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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY LET THE SUNSHINE IN

Public records? What public records? Let the sunshine in, honey. Cover illustration by Hugh D’Andrade hughillustration.com

13

CONTRIBUTOR

6 LETTERS 8 OPINION 11 NEWS 18 A&E 23 DINE 29 CINEMA 31 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

DAVE MAASS

Cover story, p. 13 “While many reporters need to remain laser-focused on dispassionately reporting stories, I really enjoy helping by calling out those in power who stand in their way,” Maass says. When not holding offcials’ feet to the fire, the sci-fi enthusiast approaches strangers at journalism conventions and tries to get them to partake in Doctor Who cosplay.

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Saturday May 26, 2018

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Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, HOWARD HARDEE, MARYANN JOHANSON, JOHN RASMUSON, MIKE RIEDEL, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, March 1, “Local Music Issue” Great cover!

@PHILLYTOSLC Via Instagram Love it! Steven Vargo: Maybe you should be in front of the camera more often.

@BUBERTY

Via Instagram Oh man, that looks painful.

@ROBA_FETT Via Instagram

Opinion, March 1, “On Trump’s Parade”

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Let’s face it, if Trump pulls off his parade charade it will be to feed his insatiable ego, verified as the guard marches by saluting him—This was my idea, This is my army, I’m in control. I would add “Trump could improve their circumstances,”i.e. learn to correctly salute the Marine Sergeant at Marine Helicopter One. Trump’s hand and fingers are cupped and separated, and never touch his forehead. Make visual contact with the Sergeant, not the ground! Salute the Sergeant crisply prior or abreast of the Marine, not after passing by. McMaster, Mattis and Kelly should drill Trump on the basics of military respectfulness. Bush and Obama had crisp, sharp and timely salutes down. How sad and disrespectful.

JAN ZIMMERMANN Via CW comments

Straight Dope, March 1, “The Road Salt Conundrum”

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Interesting article about “road salt,” but it doesn’t apply here in the northern tier of Utah counties. Salt taken from the evap ponds around the Great Salt Lake goes on our roads, washes off into the storm drains (what the vegetation and animals don’t slurp up), storm drains empty into the northern creeks and rivers which flow into the GSL, closing the cycle. No problem!

TOD YOUNG

Via cityweekly.net

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News, March 1, “Hare Apparent”

[Rabbits] can’t be a staple of a diet, though: not enough fat to live on. (Rabbit and squirrel share these issues) but occasionally in conjunction with other foods/meats? Sure.

AMANDA GREEN Via Facebook

You know what else is naturally cholesterol free, low in fat, high in calcium and phosphorus? Plants. Fruits and vegetables and legumes and grains. Plants are what you’re looking for, not God damn bunnies.

JORI SCHMALZ Via Facebook

What kind of asshole eats rabbits? If you truly care about sustainability, you wouldn’t be eating animals.

JOE SNOW

Via Facebook People have weird arbitrary hang ups about what they eat. I’m a vegetarian, so I’m no exception. But if you’re going to eat meat, it’s strange that you would eat some animals and scoff at eating others when there isn’t a rational reason behind it.

ANDREW LATTA Via Facebook

Sad and gross. Did City Weekly turn into the bankrupt Venezuelan government that they are going to start telling people to eat rabbits? “Hey, ducks and geese are delicious and free at parks everywhere, so why not?”

BRANDON EBERHARD Via Facebook Swan tastes a bit off.

CASEY REID Via Facebook

Movie review, Red Sparrow

Didn’t feel like I was punched in the mouth, but got awfully bored.

@MUGGER1955

Blog post, March 5, “Local rappers break down Utah Legislature’s rap video”

They rap better than they legislate.

BRYAN STENQUIST Via Facebook Fascist hip-hop.

RYAN NORTHROP Via Facebook

Blog post, March 7, “Guv shares thoughts on the proposed Donald J. Trump Utah National Parks Hwy.”

So my question for Mr. Herbert … Once he gets impeached, would we rename it? Or just keep the embarrassing brown nosing out there for a little history?

KIMM LOFTHOUSE Via Facebook

It will be the road that never gets completed and files for bankruptcy.

CODY EARNSHAW Via Facebook

Are Utah lawmakers on dope?

JEFF ROSS

Via Facebook We need to show our loyalty as a state and show our true colors to the world—for better and for worse. Consequences of our premature zest be damned.

BENJAMIN NOVAK Via Facebook

Jennifer Lawrence just needs to go away.

I might be prepared to honor a deceased Donald Trump by naming a highway after him. In that case, the sooner, the better.

Via Facebook

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JENNIFER GUEST BILLINGSLEY

DUSTIN CLARK

How about “Pussy Grabbing Blvd.”? Much more deserving.

SUSAN GREEN Via Facebook

What’s up With Utah Politicians?

Dear editor: Last November, three of us, all Utah residents, visited Rep. Chris Stewart’s office to ask that he withdraw his co-sponsorship of the Israel Anti-Boycott Act. This bill criminalizes Americans who voice support for international campaigns to boycott businesses profiting from Israel’s illegal military occupation of Palestinian territories. Boycotts have been used to promote human rights for decades, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the boycott of businesses supporting the apartheid regime in South Africa. In 1982, the Supreme Court upheld boycotts as constitutionally protected political speech. Over three months after our visit and after three email reminders, Rep. Stewart has yet to respond to our concerns about his legislation’s stifling of Americans’ constitutional right to free speech. All of Utah’s congressional delegates have co-sponsored the Israel AntiBoycott Act except Sen. Lee (to his credit). What’s up with Utah politicians? Apparently their priority is supporting Israel’s military oppression of the Palestinian people over protecting our most fundamental American right—freedom of speech.

BOB BRISTER, Salt Lake City

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OPINION

One in Four and More

I have a friend who is an engineer. More than once, I have watched him scrawl an X- and Y-axis on a napkin in order to subdue an abstraction, force a process to reveal its contours, or make a problem as apprehensible as a hand-drawn graph will allow. All the while I was thinking of concrete nouns and transitional words—“first,” “next,” “finally”—to reach the same conclusion. Numbers are his forte, but I prefer words. Of course, I appreciate a trend line on a graph, but for the most part, numbers speak to me in a language I don’t grok. They are like the Latin phrases which look vaguely intelligible but require help to decipher. Keeping company with ratios and decimals makes me uneasy, and a percentage is like the marshmallows you resort to at 11 p.m. when there is no other sweet in the house. I prefer the phrase “one in four” to “25 percent.” Even though they are equivalent, I appreciate the mental picture created by the former. Were you to remark on the fact that one in four Utahns are overweight, I visualize a foursome at Chuck-a-Rama. One of them, whose girth is greater than mine, is returning to the dessert table. Google “one in four” and you find a category chockablock with interesting data points like these: n  One in four teens have received a sext. n  One in four Mormons favor same-sex marriage. n  One in four gun owners believe the NRA has too much influence. n  One in four auto accidents are caused by cellphone use. n One in four undergraduate women are sexually assaulted in college.

BY JOHN RASMUSON n  One in four young Americans are qualified to enlist in the Army. That three out of four Americans under 24 are rejected by the Army is a shock. It upends my preconceptions. As one who became a soldier by way of the Vietnam-era draft, I thought the Army would take just about anybody. Sure, medical conditions like Donald Trump’s bone spurs are disqualifiers. So are a criminal record, a history of drug use and lack of a high school diploma. But obesity? Who would have thought that out of every three people disqualified from service, body weight and lack of physical fitness would account for one? Obesity poses a weighty problem. The Trump administration is committed to adding 7,500 soldiers to the ranks this year. If the past is an indicator, almost half will come from 11 southern states. (Few will come from Utah.) The problem is that the manpower pool in the South is shrinking because the average waistline is expanding. A report from The Citadel raises concern about obesity rates that are higher in the South than elsewhere in the U.S. One in four Utahns are obese, but in the South, it is one in three. Almost half of all recruits fail the initial physical fitness test, and one in four overweight and out-of-shape soldiers are injured in basic training. It is not a problem unique to southern states. “This is a problem reflective of American society,” writes the Heritage Foundation. “One in three adults and one in five kids are obese; 91 percent of our children live on a poor diet; and one-quarter of our youth spend three or more hours per day watching TV.” “The U.S. Army faces an imminent and menacing threat of our national security—the lack of qualified young people,” writes retired Gen. William Wallace on the Mission: Readiness website. Organized in 2009 by 600-plus senior military leaders, Mission: Readiness has “championed public policy to prepare our youth to be citizen-ready and

able to serve their nation in any way they choose.” The phrase “citizen-ready” resonates because it foregrounds a rarely discussed subject—citizens’ responsibility in a republic. Our country doesn’t ask much of its citizenry: vote, serve on a jury, pay taxes—that’s about it. Defend the homeland? The requirement to serve in the military was effectively set aside in 1973 with the advent of the all-volunteer military. Nowadays, most of us are content to have others volunteer. Back in the day of the draft, when I was a soldier, everybody had a friend or relative in Vietnam. That’s not the case with Iraq and Afghanistan, even after 17 years of war. In successive combat tours, a disproportionate fraction of the population fights our country’s battles—one in 250?—for which they get mostly lip service from lapel-pin patriots in return. Have you noted that American flag pins are de rigueur on politicians’ lapels? So much so that retired Marine Gen. John Kelly’s refusal to wear one made the news. To the aide who suggested he should pin one on, Kelly said, “I am the American flag.” Kelly’s boss in the Oval Office wants to enlist thousands more into the military in the next few years, but qualified recruits will be harder and harder to find. The numbers are already trending downward from “one in four” to “two in ten.” In response, Mission: Readiness is calling for a national fitness program modeled on the anti-smoking campaign with “a range of policies, penalties, incentives and disincentives.” In the schools, that would mean nutritious food in the cafeteria and physical education in the curriculum. The country has faced an “inactivity epidemic” before. During the Cold War, President John Kennedy made physical fitness a national priority to offset the fact that “easy living is sapping the strength and vitality of our children.” Now, as then, we need more than words to make our kids citizen-ready. The numbers prove it. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

A City Disenfranchised

Way to disenfranchise an entire population, Utah Legislature! Salt Lake City might as well be imprisoned in a dungeon without light, thankful for the bread and water they are allowed to survive. We won’t even talk about how badly the city’s gerrymandered—cut up into three incongruous congressional districts. And let’s not talk about SLC’s historic water rights, which have been preserved only by an agreement to study the issue. But let’s talk Salt Lake’s government and how ineffectual it was during this session. Not even the amazingly reincarnated city lobbyist Ken Bullock, whose second-chance employment is earning him $105,500, could stop the train. Three Utah senators, according to The Salt Lake Tribune and Deseret News, came out swinging against the city for its noninclusive lobbying. There’s plenty of blame to go around. While the Legislature is elitist and power-hungry, the city needs to be more open and aggressive.

The Pig’s Lipstick

Remember the old saw about lipstick on a pig? That’s what we’re doing with the Utah Transit Authority, soon to be known as the Transit District of Utah (TRADUT?) The good news is that the 16-member board would be hacked down to three. Oh, but boo-hoo, UTA “warned” that repainting logos could cost $50 million, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. And they’ll have to get rid of their own lawyers and use the governor’s. They don’t like that because ostensibly, transit is a very complicated animal. But wait. Board members’ salaries are “limited” to $150,000 a year plus benefits. Maybe they all have Ph.D.s or something. And UTA is drowning in debt, beholden to developers and still one of those murky quasi-public organizations.

It’s Veto Time

You have less than two weeks to urge Gov. Gary Herbert to veto a resolution to eviscerate the Antiquities Act. The Utah Navajo Commission, and several Navajo Nation Chapters are deeply concerned about recent saber rattling over Bears Ears and the looming threat of erasing monument designation. “HJR 1 should not be used as a weapon against Tribes whose rich heritage in Utah is often dismissed as less important than mineral extraction, grazing, or recreation by Utah elected officials,” they said in a statement. The resolution would leave it to Congress to pass laws protecting any “objects of historic and scientific interest.” That these Native Americans were pretty much shut out during the bill’s creation should be enough reason to oppose the legislation. Instead of calling the last legislative session a “win-win,” Herbert should recognize it for what it was—an unprecedented power grab.

STRAIGHT DOPE Going Viral

CITIZEN REV LT

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

HITS&MISSES

Disappointed in your answer regarding infectious diseases. Ten million annual deaths by 2050—not! Bacteriophages to the rescue. Maybe you should answer the question: What are bacteriophages? —Jerry Novoryta

That’s an optimistic take, Jerry, and it might yet prove right. But optimism doesn’t typically get everyone off their asses and into problem-solving mode, which was the point of that U.K. governmental report I cited in the December column you’re referring to. Worldwide, we’re already losing 700,000 people a year to infections that won’t respond to antibiotics; in 30 years, the Brits concluded, that could be 10 million if we don’t buckle down now. The report didn’t mention bacteriophages, probably because research still hasn’t gotten to where we can really think of them as a silver bullet. In general, though, phages (as they’re known) tend to get less coverage than you’d figure they deserve, if only in that they outnumber all other organisms on earth put together—there’s 10 million trillion trillion of them out there. So what are they? They’re viruses that infect bacteria, sometimes modifying their activity, sometimes killing them outright. Phages are crucial in maintaining the world’s microbial equilibrium; every day, they kill off 40 percent of all bacterial cells in the ocean. What with their proven know-how at offing microbes, you can understand why we might want to try aiming them at the infectious ones. And, in fact, phages have been admired for their antibacterial potential since their discovery just over a century ago. After showing some initial promise, research on phage therapy to treat bacterial infection lost steam once antibiotics came along in the ’40s and took over the bug-fighting game, at least in the West. Behind the Iron Curtain, where doctors lacked broad access to our antibiotics buffet, phage therapy remained a subject of hotter scientific pursuit, notably at a facility in Tbilisi, Georgia. Phages are back on everyone’s radar now, though here in the U.S. we still aren’t at full speed on testing—not much thus far in the kind of double-blind controlled clinical trials, for instance, that the FDA likes to see before it greenlights a treatment for widespread use. What we have instead are largely case studies—anecdotal, but certainly intriguing. Consider Tom Patterson, a 69-year-old psych professor at the University of California, San Diego, who picked up an antibioticresistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii while on vacation in Egypt in 2015. When the infection spread from his pancreas and through his system at large, he went into septic shock and fell into a coma. Luckily for Patterson, his wife, Steffanie Strathdee, happens to be an infectious-disease epidemiologist who heard from a colleague about a patient who’d sought phage treatment in Tbilisi. With Patterson having basically reached the end of the line optionswise,

Strathdee was able to persuade the UCSD medical team to acquire some phages and pump them into his bloodstream, to great effect: out of the coma within three days, bacteria all gone within three months. With stories like this turning up, and with the antibiotics situation looking ever bleaker, the West is coming around to the phage way of thinking. Right now, clinical trials in Europe are examining phages’ effectiveness on burn-related infection, and two small-scale trials are getting underway in the U.S. in 2018.  Still, there are some roadblocks. As discussed here back in December, one obstacle to the development of better antibiotics is pharmaceutical companies and their eye for the bottom line; cynically but correctly, they see pouring a couple billion into developing a new antibiotic as a bad investment, since sooner or later bacteria will evolve to resist it, too. Antimicrobial phages pose similar problems and more: they’re not intended for chronic use (i.e., the lucrative kind), and since they exist in nature and the basic treatment premise was established decades ago, legally it might be tricky to patent them as intellectual property. A 2014 Nature article reported on ways biotech firms might get around this: combining multiple phages into patentable cocktails, or using gene-editing technology to engineer new ones altogether. The regulatory apparatus in the U.S. and Europe, meanwhile, isn’t really set up to deal with phages, as there’s a virtually limitless variety of them and no established courses of treatment to give approval to. One idea that’s been floated is to create pre-approved national phage libraries, from which doctors could select to match whatever infection needed zapping.   Backing up our beleaguered antibiotics would presumably be phages’ most important task, but that’s not the end of their promise: they’ve been seen to be effective on gangrene and food-borne illnesses like salmonella and E. coli, and in hand washes to prevent the spread of staph in hospitals. And unlike antibiotics, phages won’t disturb your body’s bacterial balance but in fact (boosters predict) can be targeted to improve the gut microbiome. If you think you hear people talking up probiotics all the time now, wait till they want to tell you about the new phagesmoothie bar down the street. n Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607.

IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

DEMOCRACY READING

Do you wonder what’s happening to our democracy, or even if it still exists? Yascha Mounk will read from and sign his new nonfiction book, The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger & How to Save It at this important event. The talk is co-sponsored by Better Boundaries, leading the state’s redistricting effort. In his nonfiction book, Mounk explores democracy around the world. “This is the first book to go beyond a mere description of the rise of populism,” according to the event’s website, and will help you assess the risks and find a way to preserve democracy. Signed books are available for $29.95. The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Saturday, March 17, 7 p.m., free, bit.ly/2Hk1grJ.

GRAMA TRAINING

As evidenced by this week’s cover story, it’s almost Sunshine Week—a time when we are reminded of how it used to be when government was for the people, and information flowed both ways. To that end, join GRAMAmania! for a halfday training about how to get public records through the Government Records and Management Act and the Freedom of Information Act. You will hear from the GRAMA (Government Records Access and Management Act) ombudsman and Utah’s investigative reporters, learn the how-to’s and explore databases. The answers are there—you just have to find them. Weber State University, Elizabeth Hall, 1395 Edvalson St., Ogden, free, March 17, 9 a.m.-noon, RSVP on Facebook, bit.ly/2FLAlIl.

CAUCUS NIGHT

You know that big, internal struggle the GOP is having about ballot access? Well, here’s your chance to make a difference in the party of your choice—no matter what happens. Utah’s parochial little “mass” meeting system encourages you to go to a neighborhood location and choose the delegate who will vote on the party’s candidate. It’s a one-nightonly event and has tended to bring out the fringes from each party. Go ahead, give it a try. Become a delegate. On Utah Caucus Night, your chances are better than ever of becoming an insider. If you’re a delegate, you might be able to change the direction of your party. Your ’hood, Tuesday, March 20, 7-9 p.m., free, (GOP) bit.ly/2tsMyNb, (Dems) utahdemocrats.org, (other registered parties) bit.ly/2tt9aNF.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net


NEWS

GOVERNMENT

Pointed Discussion

City, residents feel lost in the shuffle of inland port authority debate. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

DW HARRIS

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“The disenfranchisement of our residents will profoundly affect our community,” Westpointe Community Council Chair Dorothy Owen says.

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restrictions including outside Salt Lake City,” the mayor’s stated in part. “The board’s complete lack of accountability significantly undermines the ability of duly elected Salt Lake City officials to represent residents on critical land use issues. The City will no longer be able to make decisions on nearly one-third of Salt Lake City land. Yet the bill still leaves the City with the obligation to provide municipal services to the area, such as public safety and street maintenance, without a revenue source to pay for these additional services.” City officials are now urging Gov. Gary Herbert to veto the bill. Two days after Biskupski testified against SB 234, members of the Westpointe Community Council, environmentalists and other activists gathered in the Capitol rotunda. Other than a couple TV cameras, a dozen or so supporters and a few gown-donning brides-to-be, the entire rotunda was dead. It was the last Sunday before the legislative session and not a senator or representative was in sight. Westpointe found allies in conservation groups that are trying to ensure fragile wetlands near the Great Salt Lake come out intact after the development dust has settled. City Weekly wrote about the unique bird habitat in a recent cover story [“For the Birds,” Feb.15]. In addition to environmental groups, grassroots political organizations are also supporting Westpointe’s cause. Ann O’Connell with the League of Women Voters of Utah noted that locals come out losers in the end. “Nobody has contributed to the discussion about this inland seaport—just very important people who will probably make a great deal of money, but nonprofits and the citizens of the city have had absolutely nothing to say and really didn’t know it was coming,” she says. CW

Erin Mendenhall took the stand during a Senate Economic Development and Workforce Services committee meeting to say that the city was poised to approve an inland port whether or not the state hopped aboard. She emphasized that the city wasn’t relying on the state’s help. With that said, the city wasn’t eschewing some form of partnership, Mendenhall added, as long lawmakers didn’t throw in “dangerous components” that take away the city’s taxing and land-use authority. “As drafted, this bill would be an unprecedented encroachment on the core municipal functions,” she said. Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski warned that land and zoning appeals would be decided by the authority’s board members who lacked the institutional knowledge of city planners. The board could also usurp and supersede city ordinances, she declared. “Instead, an unelected and unaccountable board would have the right to override the city’s administrative landuse decisions—not based on fair and equitable standards but instead based on the board’s opinion that the city’s landuse decision does not achieve the board’s goals for developing the inland port,” Biskupski testified. By the end of the legislative session, the bill’s final version left city leaders scratching their heads. It didn’t alleviate any of their concerns. Biskupski’s office said the mayor was declining interviews until she has a chance to strategize the city’s next move, but she released a statement: “In a matter of a mere 30 minutes, the Senate and House passed a bill that eliminated the City’s land-use authority, compromised environmental protections, and took all tax increment. This allows the proposed board to spend it without

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with SB 234,” Owen says. “The disenfranchisement of our residents will profoundly affect our community.” It’s a familiar refrain: people are protective of their backyards and like to have a say about what goes in them. That’s consistent. What changes, some residents point out, is the attitude of lawmakers who side with locals in some instances but not in others. Case in point is the 2017 debate over the Bears Ears region of Southern Utah, when some of the same lawmakers who support the inland port authority resolutely called for more local control. The mantra reiterated by state officials over and over was that the government should listen to those closest to the land when it comes to policy decisions. The San Juan County Commission, and Monticello and Blanding city councils, were afforded profound deference when a controversial national monument was declared in their neck of the state. The state’s insistence on creating an inland port authority has not only rankled residents, but city leaders as well. Nevertheless, Gibson made his final plea on the House floor on March 7, asking that his colleagues pass the bill while acknowledging the city’s disapproval. “Does the great Salt Lake City agree this is a good plan for them? Probably not,” he said. “But I would argue that the State of Utah feels like we could do more.” To call the tension between the city and state a battle, though, is to gloss over the subtleties of the dispute and mischaracterizes the issue: Both sides are in favor of developing the northwest quadrant. That’s not the rub. The fight is over who’s in charge. Plus the city, which has been negotiating with landowners on zoning changes for at least two years, doesn’t want to give up its taxing authority. On March 2, City Council Chairwoman

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ry as you might, it’s hard to believe residents in Layton or Mapleton phoned their elected leaders to demand they establish an inland port authority and charge it with overseeing business in Salt Lake City’s sprawling, 3,000-acre northwest quadrant. But, in essence, that’s what Senate Bill 234—sponsored by Sen. Jerry Stevenson, R-Layton, and Rep. Francis Gibson, R-Mapleton—did. Even folks living in the city seem to be only marginally interested in developing that corner of town. But ground is breaking at full-steam, and the lack of enthusiasm of residents in, say, Sugar House, is more than made up for by city and state leaders. In other words, officials see northwest quadrant development as economically important, but unless you stand to gain somehow, you’re probably reserving your cognitive bandwidth for other things. Zooming down Interstate 80 on your way to West Wendover’s roomie, privately run liquor store, it’s possible that you’ve spent a little time in Salt Lake City’s northwestern-most neighborhood—a place (likely also unknown to you) called Westpointe—but not much. Unless, that is, you live in Westpointe. Dorothy Owen is a resident and chairwoman of the neighborhood community council. Like most people, she takes pride in her town and is wary of the decisions outside politicians make that have the potential to change its face. “It’s our home—to people who are blacksmiths, who are entrepreneurs, who run restaurants,” she says. The ultimate goal of SB 234 is to ensure the creation of an inland port—a hub where freight from the West Coast will be processed and sent on its way to other destinations. If all goes as expected, open space in the northwest quadrant will fill in with light industrial businesses. As that becomes a reality, Owen and her neighbors want to make sure their voices aren’t lost. “We’re very concerned that our rights are being taken away and decisions being made about land-use planning are being usurped by the state government


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By the Electronic Frontier Foundation |

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and global level to defend and advance civil liberties as technology develops. As part of this work, we file scores of public records requests and take agencies like the U.S. Department of Justice, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Los Angeles Police Department to court to liberate information that belongs to the public. Because shining a spotlight is sometimes the best litigation strategy, we are pleased to announce the 2018 winners of The Foilies.

Since assuming the presidency, Donald Trump has skipped town more than 55 days to visit his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, according to NBC and sites like trumpgolfcount.com. He calls it his “Winter White House,” where he wines and dines and openly strategizes how to respond to North Korean ballistic missile tests with the Japanese prime minister for all his paid guests to see and post on Facebook. The fact that Trump’s properties have become secondary offices and remain a source of income for his family raises significant questions about transparency, particularly if club membership comes with special access to the president. To hold the administration accountable, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington filed a FOIA request for the visitor logs, but received little in response. CREW sued and, after taking another look, the Secret Service provided details about the Japanese leader’s entourage. As Politico and others reported, the Secret Service ultimately admitted they’re not actually keeping track. The same can’t be said about Trump’s golf score.

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In its fourth year, The Foilies recognizes the worst responses to records requests, outrageous efforts to stymie transparency and the most absurd redactions. These tongue-in-cheek pseudo-awards are hand-chosen by EFF’s team based on nominations from fellow transparency advocates, participants in #FOIAFriday on Twitter, and, in some cases, our own personal experience. The San Francisco-based EFF is a nonprofit that works on the local, national

The Mulligan Award: President Donald J. Trump

overnment transparency laws like the Freedom of Information Act exist to enforce the public’s right to inspect records so we can all figure out what the heck is being done in our name and with our tax dollars. But when a public agency ignores, breaks or twists the law, your recourse varies by jurisdiction. In some states, when an official improperly responds to your public records request, you can appeal to a higher bureaucratic authority or seek help from an ombudsperson. In most states, you can take the dispute to court. Public shaming and sarcasm, however, are tactics that can be applied anywhere. The California-based news organization Reveal tweets photos of chickpeas or coffee beans to represent each day a FOIA response is overdue, and asks followers to guess how many there are. The alt-weekly DigBoston has sent multiple birthday cakes and edible arrangements to local agencies on the one-year anniversary of delayed public records requests. And here, at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, we give out The Foilies during Sunshine Week, an annual celebration of open-government advocacy.

@EFF | Illustrations by Hugh D’Andrade

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Recognizing the year’s worst in government transparency.

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THE FOILIES 2018


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FOIA Fee of the Year: Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Sexual assault in prison is notoriously difficult to measure due to stigma, intimidation and apathetic bureaucracy. Nevertheless, MuckRock reporter Nathanael King made a valiant effort to find out whatever he could about these investigations in Texas, a state once described by the Dallas Voice as the “Prison Rape Capital of the U.S.” However, the numbers that the Texas Department of Criminal Justice came back with weren’t quite what he was expecting. TDCJ demanded he fork over a whopping $1,132,024.30 before the agency would release 260,000 pages of records that it said would take 61,000 hours of staff time to process. That in itself might be an indicator of the scope of the problem. However, to the agency’s credit, they pointed the reporter in the direction of other statistical records compiled to comply with the federal Prison Rape Elimination Act, which TDCJ provided for free.

Best Set Design in a Transparency Theater Production: Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed

“Transparency theater” is the term we use to describe an empty gesture meant to look like an agency is embracing open government, when really it’s meant to obfuscate. For example, an agency might dump an overwhelming number of documents and put them on display for cameras. But because there are so many records, the practice actually subverts transparency by making it extremely difficult to find the most relevant records in the haystack. Such was the case with Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed, who released 1.476 million documents about a corruption probe to show his office was supporting public accountability.

“The documents filled hundreds of white cardboard boxes, many stacked up waist high against walls and spread out over rows of tables in the cavernous old City Council chamber,” Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Leon Stafford wrote. “Reed used some of the boxes as the backdrop for his remarks, creating a six-foot wall behind him.” Journalists began to dig through the documents and quickly discovered that many were blank pages or fully redacted, and in some cases the type was too small for anyone to read. AJC reporter J. Scott Trubey’s hands became covered in papercut gore. Ultimately, the whole spectacle was a waste of trees: The records already existed in a digital format. It’s just that a couple of hard drives on a desk don’t make for a great photo op.

Special Achievement for Analog Conversion: Former Seattle Mayor Ed Murray

In the increasingly digital age, more and more routine office communication is occurring over mobile devices. With that in mind, transparency activist Phil Mocek filed a request for text messages (and other app communications) sent or received by now-former Seattle Mayor Ed Murray and many of his aides. The good news is the city at least partially complied. The weird news is that rather than seek the help of an IT professional to export the text messages, some staff simply plopped a cell phone onto a photocopier. Mocek tells EFF he’s frustrated that the mayor’s office refused to search their personal devices for relevant text messages. They argued that city policy forbids using personal phones for city business—and of course, no one would violate those rules. However, we’ll concede that thwarting transparency is probably the least of the allegations against Murray, who resigned in September 2017 amid a child sex-abuse scandal.

The Winger Award for FOIA Feet Dragging: FBI

Thirty years ago, the hair-rock band Winger released “Seventeen”—a song about young love that really hasn’t withstood the test of time. Similarly, the FBI’s claim that it would take 17 years to produce a series of records about civil rights-era surveillance also didn’t withstand the judicial test of time. As Politico reported, George Washington University professor and documentary filmmaker Nina Seavey asked for records about how the FBI spied on antiwar and civil rights activists in the 1960s and 1970s. The FBI claimed they would only process 500 pages a month, which would mean the full set of 110,000 pages wouldn’t be complete until 2034. Just as Winger’s girlfriend’s dad disapproved in the song, so did a federal judge, writing in her opinion: “The agency’s desire for administrative convenience is simply not a valid justification for telling Professor Seavey that she must wait decades for the documents she needs to complete her work.”

The Prime Example Award: Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority

When Amazon announced last year it was seeking a home for its second headquarters, municipalities around the country rushed to put together proposals to lure the tech giant to their region. Knowing that in Seattle, Amazon left a substantial footprint on the community (particularly around housing), transparency organizations like MuckRock and the Lucy Parsons Labs followed up with records requests for these cities’ sales pitches. More than 20 cities, such as Chula Vista, Calif., and Toledo, Ohio, produced the records—but other agencies, including

Albuquerque, N.M., and Jacksonville, Fla., refused to turn over the documents. Thel excuses varied, but perhaps the worst re-h sponse came from Maine’s Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority. The agency didl provide the records, but claimed that byp opening an email containing 37 pages of doc-o uments, MuckRock had automatically agreedw to pay an exorbitant $750 in “administrativef and legal fees.” Remind us to disable one-O a click ordering. f U El Premio del Desayuno p Más Redactado: CIA i BuzzFeed reporter Jason Leopold has filedt thousands of records requests over hisK career, but one redaction has become his all-o time favorite. Leopold was curious whetherw CIA staff is assailed by the same streams of office announcements as every other workplace. So, he filed a FOIA request—andm holy Hillenkoetter, do they. Deep in thep document set was an announcement thatt “the breakfast burritos are back by populara demand,” with a gigantic redaction coverings half the page citing a personal privacyc exemption. What are they hiding? Is Anthonyi Bourdain secretly a covert agent? Did David Petraeus demand extra guac? This could beT the CIA’s greatest Latin American mystery since Nicaraguan Contra drug-trafficking. A

B

I i o a As director of the privacy advocacy groupA We See You Watching Lexington, Michaels Maharrey filed a public records request toC find out how his city was spending money onp

The Courthouse Bully Award: Every Agency Suing a Requester

surveillance cameras. After the Lexington Police Department denied the request,t he appealed to the Kentucky Attorneyu i General’s Office—and won.


The CIA’s aversion to FOIA is legendary, but this year the agency doubled down on its mission of thwarting transparency. As MuckRock’s Emma Best detailed, the intelligence agency had compiled a 20-page report that laid out at least 126 reasons why it could deny FOIA requests that officials believed would disclose the agency’s “sources and methods.” But that report? Yeah, it’s totally classified. So not only do you not get to know what the CIA’s up to, but its reasons for rejecting your FOIA request are also a state secret.

Special Recognition for Congressional Overreach: U.S. House of Representatives

The Data Disappearance Award: Trump Administration

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Last year, we gave the “Make America Opaque Again Award” award to newly inaugurated President Trump for failing to follow tradition and release his tax returns during the campaign. His talent for refusing to make information available to the public has snowballed into an administration that deletes public records from government websites. From the National Park Service’s climate action plans, to the U.S.D.A. animal welfare datasets, to nonpartisan research on the corporate income tax, the Trump administration has decided to make facts that don’t support its positions disappear. The best example of this vanishing game is the Environmental Protection Agency’s removal of the climate change website in April 2017, which only went back online after being scrubbed of climate change references, studies and information to educate the public.

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Because Congress wrote the Freedom of Information Act, it had the awesome and notat-all-a-conflict-of-interest power to determine which parts of the federal government must obey it. That’s why it might not shock you that since passing FOIA more than 50 years ago, Congress has never made itself subject to the law. So far, requesters have been able to fill in the gaps by requesting records from federal agencies that correspond with Congress. For example, maybe a lawmaker writes to the U.S. Department of Puppies asking for statistics on labradoodles. That adorable email chain wouldn’t be available through Congress, but you could get it from the Puppies Department’s FOIA office. (Just to be clear: This isn’t a real federal agency. We just wish it were.) In 2017 it’s become increasingly clear that some members of Congress believe that FOIA can never reach anything they do, even

when they or their staffs share documents or correspond with federal agencies. The House Committee on Financial Services sent a threatening letter to the Treasury Department telling them to not comply with FOIA. After the Department of Health and Human Services and the Office of Management and Budget released records that came from the House Ways and Means Committee, the House intervened in litigation to argue that their records cannot be obtained under FOIA. In many cases, congressional correspondence with agencies is automatically covered by FOIA, and the fact that a document originated with Congress isn’t by itself enough to shield it from disclosure. The Constitution says Congress gets to write laws; it’s just too bad it doesn’t require Congress to actually read them.

In the chaos of President Trump’s immigration ban in early 2017, the actions of U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents and higher-ups verged on unlawful. And if CBP officials already had their mind set on violating all sorts of laws and the Constitution, flouting FOIA seems like small potatoes. Yet that’s precisely what CBP did when the ACLU filed a series of FOIA requests to understand local CBP agents’ actions as they implemented Trump’s immigration order.

The Franz Kafka Award for Most Secrets About Secretive Secrecy: CIA

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The Lawless Agency Award: U.S. Customs and Border Protection

ACLU affiliates throughout the country filed 18 separate FOIA requests with CBP, each of which targeted records documenting how specific field offices, often located at airports or at physical border crossings, were managing and implementing the ban. The requests made clear that they were not seeking agency-wide documents but rather wanted information about each specific location’s activities. CBP ignored the requests and, when several ACLU affiliates filed 13 different lawsuits, CBP sought to further delay responding by asking a federal court panel to consolidate all the cases into a single lawsuit. To use this procedure—which is usually reserved for class actions or other complex national cases—CBP essentially misled courts about each of the FOIA requests and claimed each was seeking the exact same set of records. The court panel saw through CBP’s shenanigans and refused to consolidate the cases. But CBP basically ignored the panel’s decision, acting as though it had won. First, it behaved as though all the requests came from a single lawsuit by processing and batching all the documents from the various requests into a single production given to the ACLU. Second, it selectively released records to particular ACLU attorneys, even when those records weren’t related to their lawsuits about activities at local CBP offices. Laughably, CBP blames the ACLU for its self-created mess, calling their requests and lawsuits “haphazard” and arguing that the ACLU and other FOIA requesters have strained the agency’s resources in seeking records about the immigration ban. None of that would be a problem if CBP had responded to the FOIA requests in the first place. Of course, the whole mess could also have been avoided if CBP never implemented an unconstitutional immigration order.

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Rather than listen to the state’s top law enforcement official, Lexington Police hauled Maharrey into court. As the Associated Press reported last year, lawsuits like these are reaching epidemic proportions. The Louisiana Department of Education sued a retired educator who was seeking school enrollment data for his blog. Portland Public Schools in Oregon sued a parent who was curious about employees paid while on leave for alleged misconduct. Michigan State University sued ESPN after it requested police reports on football players allegedly involved in a sexual assault. Meanwhile, the University of Kentucky and Western Kentucky University have each sued their own student newspapers whose reporters were investigating sexual misconduct by school staff. These lawsuits are despicable. At their most charitable, they expose huge gaps in public records laws that put requesters on the hook for defending lawsuits they never anticipated. At their worst, they are part of a systematic effort to discourage reporters and concerned citizens from even thinking of filing a public records request in the first place.


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The Danger in the Dark Award: The Army Corps of Engineers

When reporters researching the Dakota Access Pipeline on contested tribal lands asked for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ environmental impact statement, they were told nope, you can’t have it. Officials cited public safety concerns as reason to deny the request: “The referenced document contains information related to sensitive infrastructure that if misused could endanger peoples’ lives and property.” Funny thing is, the Army Corps had already published the same document on its website a year earlier. What changed in that year? Politics. The Standing Rock Sioux, other tribal leaders and “Water Protector” allies had since staged a multi-month peaceful protest and sit-in to halt construction of the pipeline. The need for public scrutiny of the document became clear in June when a U.S. federal judge found that the environmental impact statement omitted key considerations, such as the impact of an oil spill on the Standing Rock Sioux’s hunting and fishing rights as well as the impact on environmental justice.

The Business Protection Agency Award: The Food and Drug Administration

The FDA’s mission is to protect the public from harmful pharmaceuticals, but they’ve recently fallen into the habit of protecting powerful drug companies rather than informing people about potential drug risks. This past year, Charles Seife at the Scientific American requested documents about the drug approval process for a controversial drug to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The agency cited business exemptions and obscured

listed side effects as well as testing methodology for the drug, despite claims that the drug company manipulated results during product trials and pressured the FDA to push an ineffective drug onto the market. The agency even redacted portions of a Bloomberg Businessweek article about the drug because the story provided names and pictures of teenagers living with DMD.

The Exhausted Mailman Award: Bureau of Indian Affairs

Requesting information that has already been made public should be quick and fairly simple—but not when you’re dealing with the Bureau of Indian Affairs. A nomination sent into EFF requested all logs of previously released FOIA information by the BIA. The requester even stated that he’d prefer links to the information, which agencies typically provide for records they have already put on their website. Instead, BIA printed 1,390 pages of those logs, stuffed them into 10 separate envelopes, and sent them via registered mail for a grand total cost to taxpayers of $179.

Crime & Punishment Award: Martin County Commissioners, Florida

Generally, The Foilies skew cynical, because in many states, open records laws are toothless and treated as recommendations rather than mandates. One major exception to the rule is Florida, where violations of its “Sunshine Law” can result in criminal prosecution. That brings us to Martin County Commissioners Ed Fielding and Sarah Heard and former Commissioner Anne Scott, each of whom were booked into jail in November on multiple charges related to violations of

the state’s public records law. As Jose Lambiet of GossipExtra and the Miami Herald reported, the case emerges from a dispute between the county and a mining company that already resulted in taxpayers footing a $500,000 settlement in a public records lawsuit. Among the allegations, the officials were accused of destroying, delaying and altering records. The cases are set to go to trial in December 2018, Lambiet told EFF. Of course, people are innocent until proven guilty, but that doesn’t make public officials immune to The Foilies.

The Square Footage Award: Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office

When a government mistake results in a death, it’s important for the community to get all the facts. In the case of 63-yearold Blane Land, who was fatally hit by a Jacksonville Sheriff patrol car, those facts include dozens of internal investigations against the officer behind the wheel. The officer, Tim James, has since been arrested on allegations that he beat a handcuffed youth, raising the question of why he was still on duty after the vehicular fatality. Land’s family hired an attorney, and the attorney filed a request for records. Rather than having a complete airing of the cop’s alleged misdeeds, the sheriff came back with a demand for $314,687.91 to produce the records, almost all of which was for processing and searching by the internal affairs division. Amid public outcry over the prohibitive fee, the sheriff took to social media to complain about how much work it would take to go through all the records in the 1,600-foot cubic storage room filled with old-school filing cabinets. The family is not responsible for the sheriff’s filing system or feng shui, nor is it

the family’s fault that the sheriff kept an officer on the force as the complaints—and the accompanying disciplinary records— stacked up.

These Aren’t the Records You’re Looking For Award: San Diego City Councilmember Chris Cate

Shortly after last year’s San Diego ComicCon and shortly before the release of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, the city of San Diego held a ceremony to name a street after former resident and actor Mark Hamill. A private citizen (whose day job involves writing The Foilies) wanted to know: How does a Hollywood star get his own roadway? The city produced hundreds of pages related to his request that showed how an effort to change the name of Chargers Boulevard after the football team abandoned the city led to the creation of Mark Hamill Drive. The document set even included Twitter direct messages between City Councilmember Chris Cate and the actor. However, Cate used an ineffective black marker to redact, accidentally releasing Hamill’s cell phone number and other personal contact details. As tempting as it was to put Luke Skywalker (and the voice of the Joker) on speed dial, the requester did not want to be responsible for doxxing one of the world’s most beloved actors. He alerted Cate’s office of the error, which then re-uploaded properly redacted documents. CW

The Foilies were compiled by Electronic Frontier Foundation Senior Investigative Researcher Dave Maass, Staff Attorney Aaron Mackey, and Frank Stanton Fellow Camille Fischer. For more, visit eff.org.


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The life of any creative person is so full of challenges and disappointment that it’s easy to imagine how the prospect of public accolades keeps you going: “Just wait until I win that big award.” So it’s interesting that author Colson Whitehead has a fairly pithy response to what it’s like now to be introduced as “Pulitzer Prize winner Colson Whitehead” after his novel The Underground Railroad won that honor in 2017: “It’s certainly better than ‘Garbage Person Colson Whitehead,’” he says. Self-deprecation notwithstanding, Whitehead crafted a fascinating story for his acclaimed 2016 novel. It follows Cora, a slave on a Georgia cotton plantation who learns from a man named Caesar about the escape network known as The Underground Railroad. But in Whitehead’s alternate history, the terminology isn’t just a figure of speech: A literal subway system carries runaway slaves to freedom in the north, and sets Cora on a dangerous adventure. The Underground Railroad garnered plenty of high-profile support on its road to the Pulitzer, including a spot in Oprah Winfrey’s revived book club, and a shout-out from thenPresident Obama in summer 2016. Yet despite all of the recognition for his latest novel—which Whitehead discusses in Salt Lake City this week, along with stories of his failures on his way to becoming a successful writer—he’s proudest of something a reader said about one of his earlier novels. “A young woman came up to me and told me that Sag Harbor got her through chemotherapy,” he says. “I’m sticking with that one.” (Scott Renshaw) Colson Whitehead: The Underground Railroad @ Main Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, March 15, 7 p.m., slcpl.org

It isn’t often that a local dance company produces a piece that was staged in the prior season. But according to Repertory Dance Theatre Artistic Director Linda Smith, the circumstances were right for a reprise of choreographer Zvi Gotheiner’s Dabke—this time in the more intimate space of the Rose Wagner Black Box Theatre—just one year after its 2017 premiere. “‘Back by popular demand’ is the best way to describe our motivation,” Smith says. “We were overwhelmed with positive feedback, and questions about when we were going to perform the work again. This was a concert that our audience wanted to recommend to their friends. It was also a concert that they wanted to experience again.” The evening-length work was inspired by the Israeli-American Gotheiner’s familiarity with the Arab folk dance form known generally as dabke from his time growing up in Israel. Commonly performed at occasions like weddings, dabke is a social dance in which those participating form a line that slowly progresses in a circle. Gotheiner’s work takes that basic structure, and folds it into a piece incorporating Middle Eastern music and contemporary dance styles. Thematically, it touches on conflict within the region from which it originates, gender roles and connection to the land. “I remember witnessing it as a child,” Gotheiner says of dabke dance in a 2017 RDT video interview, “and being fascinated by the kind of ecstasy, and people oozing into one another. It’s a togetherness that we don’t have in our culture anymore.” (SR) Repertory Dance Theatre: Dabke @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-3552787, March 16-17, 7:30 p.m.; March 18, 2 p.m., $15-$20, rdtutah.org

If you aren’t one of the lucky few to score tickets to Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton, you still have a chance to see his other great all-American story. In a two-night concert run at the Pioneer Theatre Co., musical-lovers can experience In the Heights, which tells the interconnecting stories of 12 neighbors living in a tight-knit community in Washington Heights, Manhattan. The bonds formed over decades are tested after neighborhood matriarch Abuela Claudia wins the lottery, and neighbors contemplate moving away. Diego Klock-Perez, who plays the character Usnavi de la Vega, has performed in previous productions of In the Heights, and has been familiar with the story since he was in high school. He says the play means a lot to him, not only because it bridged his love of rap and theater, but also because it offers a chance for a young Latino man to play the lead. “It’s really freeing and liberating to express myself in this musical-, hip-hop-style-, R&B-, salsa-, Spanish-culture that is represented,” KlockPerez says. “I was almost losing my Latino identity by submerging myself in the musical theater world.” All songs will be performed on stage, and the actors will have scripts in hand. Without the physicality of a full-blown production, viewers have a chance to really focus on the sounds and lyrics of the play. “This play is meant to be shared with your family, and people are supposed to bring those that are close to them to come see this show,” Klock-Perez says. (Kylee Ehmann) In the Heights – Concert Version @ Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, March 16, 7:30 p.m.; March 17, 2 & 7:30 p.m., $40, pioneertheatre.org

Wanda Sykes is one sassy individual. Unafraid to speak her mind, she’s been an advocate for LGBTQ issues, a spokesperson for PETA’s anticruelty campaign and a wry pontificator about political issues and today’s racial divide. She’s also outrageously funny, a fact that became obvious to most Americans when she served as an award-winning writer on The Chris Rock Show and subsequently starred in the CBS series The New Adventures of Old Christine, Curb Your Enthusiasm and, more recently, ABC’s Black-ish. Her film career is illustrious as well, thanks to roles in Monster-In-Law, My Super Ex-Girlfriend, Evan Almighty and various animated voiceovers. Yet, with all her awards and accolades— she’s been nominated for seven Emmys, garnered an American Comedy Award, a Comedy Central Award, recognition by GLAAD foe Activism in the Arts and kudos from Entertainment Weekly as one of the 25 funniest people in America—she remains fearless in her commitment to call things as she sees them. When she was chosen as the first AfricanAmerican openly gay entertainer to host the White House Correspondents’ Dinner in 2009, she couldn’t resist the opportunity to strike back at radio blowhard Rush Limbaugh. Referring to Limbaugh’s previously stated desire to see newly elected President Barak Obama’s agenda fail, she replied succinctly: “I hope his kidneys fail, how ’bout that? Needs a little waterboarding, that’s what he needs.” Given that pronouncement, we’re psyched to hear what Sykes has to say about our current political calamities. (Lee Zimmerman) Wanda Sykes @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, March 16-17, 7 & 9:30 p.m.; March 18, 6 & 8:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

Colson Whitehead: The Underground Railroad

Repertory Dance Theatre: Dabke

Pioneer Theatre Co.: In the Heights – Concert Version

Wanda Sykes


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A roundup of St. Patrick’s Day activities for the Irish in all of us. BY SCOTT RENSHAW AND LEE ZIMMERMAN comments@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

D

on’t you love it when a festive occasion falls on a weekend? Not an early or late observation of the event, but the honest-to-goodness real deal? This year, St. Patrick’s Day is on a Saturday, meaning that there are going to be plenty of ways for revelers—whether they’re Irish by blood or just in spirit—to have fun with the occasion. Here are just some of the places in Utah where you can wear your green, go bragh with Erin and let your shamrock flag fly.

Salt Lake St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Siamsa

St. Paddy’s Day gives those whose ancestors hailed from the Emerald Isle, as well as those who refer to themselves as being of honorary Irish descent, an excuse to celebrate a timeless tradition. That’s especially true in our fair city, which has enjoyed its own gathering of the green, the popular annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Dubbed “The Irish Are Coming: 40 Years of Shamrocks and Shenanigans,” the parade still finds one of its four founders, John Welsh, taking an active role as its announcer. His daughter, Meghan Welsh-Gibson—vicepresident of the Hibernian Society of Utah, the parade’s primary sponsor—follows in her father’s footsteps as the parade entry coordinator. “This was a parade that was started by four friends who had a dream of making St. Patrick’s Day more than just a day on the calendar,” Welsh-Gibson says. “Their love of their Irish heritage is what has sustained this

Salt Lake City tradition for 40 years. What started out as a parade with roughly a few hundred people lining the streets to watch, has turned into thousands of people that have come to love and anticipate this grand event every year.” A “siamsa” (a Gaelic word meaning “entertainment of the land”) featuring music, dance, food and refreshments takes place at the Gallivan Center following the parade’s conclusion. In addition, a portion of the parade proceeds go to the local Shriners Hospitals for Children. And that makes Irish eyes smile indeed. (Lee Zimmerman) Parade begins at 200 South & 500 East and concludes on State Street, March 17, 10 a.m., irishinutah.org

Celtic Celebration

There’s no reason to limit St. Paddy’s Day festivities to the Irish alone. Their Scottish kinfolk also boast mirth and merriment of their own. That’s one reason why the annual Celtic Celebration promises to provide such grand Gaelic entertainment. “The Peery’s Egyptian Theater is truly the heart of local and regional entertainment for the Ogden/Weber area,” says Ross Reeder, the theater’s director of sales and marketing. “In partnering with LaRae Thackeray and her Celtic Beat Dancers, we have added to the many great bands that have performed over the years.” Granted, the denizens and descendants of each nation would likely insist that each boasts a distinct heritage and history all their own. Nevertheless, the festival makes no distinction between brogues or bagpipes, jigs and reels, step dancers, mournful ballads, pipes and drums transcend geography and bridge the divide between Ireland’s rolling green meadows and Scotland’s craggy cliffs and desolate moors. Leaping Lulu, Wasatch & District Pipe Band, the aforementioned Celtic Beat and others of a similar pedigree are out to ensure that everyone gets into a common Gaelic groove. (LZ) Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, March 17, 7:30 p.m., $10-$15, egyptiantheaterogden.com

SLC’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade

4th West Fest St. Patrick’s Day After-Party

Mountain West Cider—teaming up with Red Rock Brewery and Tullamore Dew—continues to help turn its particular corner of Salt Lake City’s west side into a place for revelry, with this free admission post-parade extravaganza. Jump on the Tullamore Dew Party Trolley at the end of the parade route, which will bring you directly to the site of the event. Live music is on the agenda, including headliners The Dunmore Lasses and the John Flanders Trio, plus plenty of food trucks, games and booths with local vendors (including City Weekly). And of course it’s a chance to try the beer and hard cider from the event’s organizers, should St. Paddy move you in that direction. (Scott Renshaw) 425 N. 400 West, March 17, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., free, mountainwestcider.com

St. Patrick’s Day Ceili

The Gaelic word “ceilidh” (pronounced “KAY’-lee”) refers to a social gathering of dancing music and storytelling; Legacy School of Dance turns it into a day of live Irish dance performance. You can enjoy as a spectator or even join into the group dance yourself, plus enjoy refreshments and participate in a silent auction to help raise funds for local dancers hoping to attend a national competition. (SR) 100 W. 2675 North, Layton, March 17, 6-8 p.m., $5 at the door, legacy-dance.com

St. Patrick’s Day at Discovery Gateway

Grown-ups and their grown-up-drink celebrations aren’t the only way to get your Irish up; young folks can still get leprechaun-vivial. Regular admission at Discovery Gateway will get you into a day of special programming for kids that includes information about the science of rainbows that lead you to the pot of gold, arts and crafts projects with shamrocks and much more. (SR) CW Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, March 17, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., discoverygateway.org


moreESSENTIALS

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Utah artist Emily Fox King explores notions of femininity with floral paintings (“Parmelie” is pictured) in Florescentia at Alice Gallery (617 E. South Temple, visualarts.utah.gov), through May 4.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Illiza Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, March 15, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Shayne Smith Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., March 16-17, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Tom Green Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, March 16-17, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Wanda Sykes Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, March 16-17, 7 & 9:30 p.m.; March 18, 6 & 8:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18)

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Michalyn Steele: The Native American Moral Voice Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, March 15, 5:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

MARCH 15, 2018 | 21

TALKS & LECTURES

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Brandon Mull, James Riley and Kevin Sands West Jordan Library, 1790 W. 7800 South, March 19, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Camron Wright: The Other Side of the Bridge Sandy Library, 10100 S. Petunia Way, Sandy, March 20, 7 p.m., slcolibrary.org Colson Whitehead: The Underground Railroad Main Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, March 15, 7 p.m., slcpl.org (see p. 18) Kenneth Wright & Sarah Jane Wright: Lola Dutch The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, March 17, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Shannon Hale & Dean Hale: The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl: 2 Fuzzy 2 Furious The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, March 16, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Tahereh Mafi: Restore Me The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, March 15, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

Dabke Rose Wagner Center Black Box Theater, 138 W. 300 South, March 16-17, 7:30 p.m.; March 18, 2 p.m., rdtutah.org (see p. 18) School of Dance Gala Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, March 16-17, 7:30 p.m., dance.utah.edu Shen Yun Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-3552787, March 16-17, 7:30 p.m.; March 17, 2 p.m.; March 18, 1 p.m., live-at-the-eccles.com

COMEDY & IMPROV

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Chamber Music Society of Salt Lake City: Horzowski Quartet Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, March 15, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Utah Symphony: Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, March 17, 11 a.m., artsaltlake.org

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Cash on Delivery Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through March 17, dates and times vary, hct.org Footloose Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through March 17, dates and times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com The Hunchback of Notre Dame Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through March 31, dates and time vary, hct.org In The Heights: Concert Version Pioneer Theater Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, March 16, 7:30 p.m.; March 17, 2 & 7:30 p.m., pioneertheatre.org (see p. 18) Disney’s The Little Mermaid CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through March 24, Monday-Saturday, times vary, centerpointtheatre.com The Little Mermaid Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 500 North, Orem, through April 14, dates and times vary, halecenter.org Straight Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, 801-535-6533, through March 25, times and dates vary, utahrep.org Tamales and Roses Noorda Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, March 16-17, 6:30 p.m., uvu.edu/theater Up (The Man in the Flying Chair) Studio 115, 240 S. 1500 East, 801-581-6214, through March 17, 7:30 p.m., matinee March 17, 2 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Utah Opera: Pagliacci/Gianni Schicchi Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, through March 18, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY


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moreESSENTIALS Pet Psychic Patty Rayman Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, March 17, 2-4 p.m., pattypetpsychic.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

CONVENTIONS

Salt Lake City Tattoo Convention Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, March 16, 11 a.m., slctattoo.com

ST. PATRICK’S

Celtic Celebration Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, March 17, 7:30 p.m., egyptiantheaterogden.com (see p. 20) 4th West Fest St. Patrick’s Day Parade After Party Mountain West Cider, 425 N. 400 West, March 17, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., mountainwestcider.com (see p. 20) St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Siamsa The Gateway, 90 S. 400 West, March 17, 10 a.m., irishinutah.org (see p. 20)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Bob Hope: An American Treasure Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through April 28, culturalcelebration.org Cory Dumont: Artwork Chapman Branch Library, 577 S. 900 West, through April 26, times vary, slcpl.org Curtis Olson J GO Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, Feb. 23-March 29, jgogallery.com David LeCheminant: Cubist & Abstract Expressionist Wooden Constructions Fringe Gallery, 345 W. Pierpont Ave., March 16, 6-9 p.m., thefringegallery.com Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 26, utahmoca.org Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201,

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through May 13, utahmoca.org Elizabeth M. Claffey: Matrilinear Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through May 11, granaryartcenter.org Epicenter: Our Futures Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through July 1, umfa.utah.edu Eric Overton: Monument UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through March 17, utahmoca.org Fahamu Pecou: DO or DIE: Affect, Ritual, Resistance Shaw Gallery, Weber State University, 3964 W. Campus Drive, Ogden, through April 7, weber.edu/shawgallery Florescentia: Works by Emily Fox King Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through May 4, visualarts.utah.gov (see p. 21) Inner Echoes Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, through April 1, urbanartsgallery.org In/Out: Artwork by Clayton Middle School Students Main Library, 210 E. 400 S., 801-5248200, through May 18, times vary. slcpl.org Jake Gilson: Ripening “A” Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through April 7, agalleryonline.com Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective LDS Church History Museum, 45 N. West Temple, through April 15, history.lds.org Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu LEGO City Blocks The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, March 17-Aug. 31, theleonardo.org Matt Flint: This Wilderness Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, through March 16, gallerymar.com Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 12, utahmoca.org Nicole Pietrantoni: Alas, Alack Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, through April 15, kimballartcenter.org Peter Ruplinger: Custom Stained Glass Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through March 15, slcpl.org Randy Laub and Stephanie Swift Salt Lake Culinary Center, 2233 S. 300 East, through March 30, saltlakeculinarycenter.com Sugar-Coated Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through April 14, saltlakearts.org

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BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

Q

The Sovereigns of Shapes

Nestled in Lehi’s cozy main street area, the Lehi Bakery (172 W. Main, 801-768-9544) took a look at round doughnuts and promptly said, “Nah, bro.” Their trademark is the square doughnut, which proudly defies the status quo. Outside of their shape, the square doughnut’s flavors remain traditional, but this one works a little bit better for sand-

The Imperators of Innovation

With the exception of Big O, the other monarchs on this list have had at least a few decades to perfect their craft. West Valley upstart Donut Boy (2194 W. 3500 South, 385528-0782) has only been around for two years, but they’re already making some serious waves in W VC. Their menu rotates regularly, but in my few visits, a pie-doughnut fusion appears to be a pronounced theme. Their interpretations of banana cream pie and apple pie are amazing, but they’ve reached the pinnacle of doughnut technology with their strawberry shortcake—a raised doughnut, filled with fresh strawberries and pastry cream, topped with strawberry icing, more berries and whipped cream. Here, worlds collide in the best possible way. CW Monday-Saturday, 6 a.m.-1 p.m.; Sunday, 7 a.m.-1 p.m.

MARCH 15, 2018 | 23

The pictured Banbury Cross (705 S. 700 East, 801-537-1433) has been making doughnuts for hungry Utahns for more than 30 years, and it’s the foundation of local doughnut culture. They’ve perfected the crisp-to-chewy ratio—their doughnuts manage to retain a

fluffy, but not too fluffy, inner texture which is contained by a paper-thin outer layer of crispness. Rumor around the newsroom has it that their maple bars have healing powers. For serious doughnut reflection, all roads lead to Banbury Cross. Monday-Saturday, 5 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 6 a.m.-1 p.m.

There are cake doughnuts, and then there are Dunford Bakers cake doughnuts. It’s not too difficult to find prepackaged pastries at grocery stores from this West Jordan bakery (8556 S. 2940 West, 801-3040400), but they’re best sampled fresh from the source itself. Their chocolate and white cake doughnuts are beautifully rich and dense, and typically come robed in a thick shell of icing. Somehow Dunford Bakers has managed to create a perfect hybrid of doughnut, cake and

Utah is slowly becoming home to a wide variety of plant-based comfort foods, and Central Ninth’s The Big O Doughnuts (248 W. 900 South, 385-770-7024) has vegan doughnut lovers covered. My go-to at Big O is their strawberry glazed—not only is it flaky and sweet, but the icing is filled with crumbled freeze-dried strawberries, which cuts through the sweetness with a katana of tart—a ka-tart-na, if you will. Their menu is huge, so expect to be a repeat visitor once they’ve got you hooked. Wednesday-Friday, 7 a.m.-2 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m.- midnight.

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The Tycoons of Tradition

The Kaisers of Cake

The Viscounts of Vegan

wich purposes if you’re so inclined. They also offer foot-shaped doughnuts with whipped cream toes, and buttermilk bars that look like miniature loaves of pound cake. With their flavors on point, Lehi Bakery remains a bastion for the structural rebels and outlaws of the doughnut scene. Tuesday-Friday 7 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m.-4 p.m.

uick confession: Doughnuts never ranked very high on my list of baked goods. I’d never say no to a free doughnut, but I’d never wake up in the middle of the night with a craving for one, either. As two of my pop-cultural spirit animals—Homer Simpson and Dale Cooper—seem to enjoy these fried rings of pastry on a transcendental level, I decided to dedicate some serious time to doughnut studies. After plotting our course, my wife and daughter—wearing her “Donut worry, be happy” T-shirt, obvs—visited bakeries from Lehi to West Valley to learn from Utah’s finest doughnut designers.

brownie, making this an economical three-treats-in-one dessert that actually eats like three desserts. Monday-Friday, 6 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m.-3 p.m..

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Behold the lords and ladies of Utah’s doughnut scene.

If you gave me a box of assorted doughnuts, I’d choose regular glazed over a fritter any day of the week. That was until I tried the apple fritter at Fresh Donut & Deli (2699 S. State, 801-467-8322). From bite one, my taste buds swelled with unanticipated depth of flavor—this monster tastes like it came from the ovens of a French boulangerie. There’s a mouth-hugging flavor of slightly burnt caramel that comes from the many nooks and crannies within the fritter’s landscape, and it’s perfectly complemented by the baked apples inside. It’s forever changed the way I think about fritters. Monday-Saturday, 5 a.m.-5 p.m.

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Holey Doughnut Empire

The Pharaohs of Fritter


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FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

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Caffe Molise on the Move

The owners of downtown’s Caffe Molise (55 W. 100 South) and BTG Wine Bar (63 W. 100 South) have announced plans to relocate their businesses to the Eagle Building, at 404 S. West Temple. The move is currently scheduled to take place this May in order to accommodate renovation plans for the building, which was built in 1915. Clubbers circa 1995 likely knew this space as The Bay and later as Vortex and Club Bliss, but it has been vacant since the club closed more than five years ago. Once the relocation is complete, both businesses will enjoy a bit more space as well as a great location for tourist traffic. Caffe Molise and BTG Wine Bar will maintain regular business hours while preparations commence.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Texas de Brazil Easter Menu

What’s a national holiday that originally commemorated pagan fertility rituals without some good food? Texas de Brazil Churrascaria (50 S. Main, Ste. 168, 385-232-8070, texasdebrazil.com) is kicking off springtime with sweet and sour Brazilian limeade, which is available to diners from March 19 to April 15. On Easter Sunday (April 1), the location is serving its Brazilian steakhouse dinner menu all day, starting at 11 a.m. Diners can expect a supplemental brunch bar— scrambled eggs, bacon, muffins, croissants—that lasts until 3 p.m. Easter Sunday? More like Feaster Sunday.

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

National Ravioli Day

Hark, ye fans of food festivities! March 20 is National Ravioli Day, so you better damn well find a place to chow down on this most delectable of Italian dishes. Brio Tuscan Grille (multiple locations, brioitalian.com) is one such eatery that will be paying obeisance to the gods of stuffed pasta. Diners who choose to celebrate National Ravioli Day at Brio can choose from lobster and shrimp ravioli or mushroom ravioli di bello, with the option to buy one dish and get a free one to take home. Regardless of where you dine for NRD, make sure to get ravioli somewhere. The stuffed pasta gods are the most cruel and unforgiving of all pasta deities—and they have long memories. Quote of the Week: “My doctor told me I had to stop throwing intimate dinners for four unless there are three other people.” –Orson Welles Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

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801-982-7499 4950 W. 6200 S.

MARCH 15, 2018 | 25

West Valley


These two local beers require your attention. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

love talking beer, whether it’s here at City Weekly or in a random pub. I especially enjoy helping people find the beer styles that jibe best with their palate and personality. For some reason, I prefer to avoid talking about what beer is in my glass. When you’re a beer nerd of the Nth degree, people tend to think your every beer is a $40 Beaujolais barrel-aged Dutch Melomel on cherries. Although those are fine every once in a while, I do also enjoy the occaisional PBR. So, though it’s rare that I shout about what’s in my glass, it’s not unheard of. Today is one of those days. I had a couple of exceptional beers this week that I don’t mind sharing with you, and these personal selections need to be on your radar.

I’m not sure why Polygamy Porter has less cred in Utah than it does outside of our borders. Is it its availability or notoriety? All I know is that original Polygamy Porter is a top-notch beer, and its recent barrel-aged treatment is brilliant to boot. It looks like you’d expect—an opaque deep brown color with a pleasant foamy head featuring copper highlights. The nose is chocolatey and malty as hell, with aromas of rich brownies coated in a syrupy mocha glaze. Vanilla is also present, with some mellow medicinal booziness hanging on to the edges like perfume. Upon first sip, you get pleasant chocolate-covered vanilla ice cream with a dash of leafy hop and barrel char. Bourbon notes come in next—nothing really heavy, more like the memories you have of whiskey from the night before. It’s pleasant and inviting, yet it adds richness. The end is rich and roasty and somewhat espresso-like, with a mellow wood dryness. Overall: Even though this beer has an ABV of 9.5 percent, its bourbon-barrel component doesn’t seem to add to the heat. Wasatch has birthed an enjoyable variation on the Polygamy Porter theme that hits all the right marks.

Desert Edge Rye Pale Ale

If you haven’t had a beer for a few days, you know how important that first sip breaking your beer fast can be. If it’s underwhelm-

MIKE RIEDEL

Under the Radar

Barrel Aged Polygamy Porter

ing, it can set the tone for the night. If it’s brilliant, it’s like watching Star Wars for the first time. My experience with Desert Edge’s rye pale ale was definitely the latter. It’s a flavor explosion that hits all the right notes, and you need to be aware of it. Its clear amber/orange color has light golden edges, with a single finger of white head leaving a subtle lace as I swill it down. The aroma has wonderful orange and lime scents right off the bat with some dry grassy rye on the back end, as well. The flavor starts with citrus with some sweet fruits—maybe pineapple—along with some flowery hops. This flavor profile is not really what I was expecting at the beginning; this

almost tastes like a great IPA, without any bitterness later because of the hops. It ends with a nice dose of spicy rye malt. The finish is pleasantly dry. Overall: Although this beer might play to the IPA crowd, it’s an all-American Pale Ale. The malt bill is more than the typical caramelized malt, and the hop selection plays very well off the spiciness of the rye. You probably didn’t know about this beer yesterday, but now you do. What are you going to do about it? There you have it: A glimpse into my tiny mind. What do you think of these selections? I’d love your feedback. As always, cheers! CW

26 | MARCH 15, 2018

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Apollo Burger The local chain opened its first location on Salt Lake City’s North Temple back in 1984. Since then, the company has grown to include a dozen locations around the state, as far away as St. George. Of course, the classic Apollo burger is the main draw here. But there’s much more to the experience than just the burgers, like the Philly cheesesteak, barbecue beef, Reuben, Greek gyro, chicken souvlaki, corn dog, tuna melt and more. Or, if you’re on a health kick, get one of their hearty salads. Oh, and you’ll definitely want to order the baklava for dessert. Multiple locations, apolloburgers.com

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Pie Hole With ovens firing until 2 a.m. on weeknights and 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, there’s little surprise that the downtown Pie Hole is busiest after midnight—what sounds better than a hot, cheesy pizza after a long night out? Order it by the slice or get a whole pie (there’s even a vegan option), and satisfy those late-night hunger pangs with quality cuisine. 344 S. State, 801-359-4653, pieholeutah.com Coffee Garden Coffee Garden treats their regulars like family, and both Salt Lake City locations have become irreplaceable in their respective communities by providing high-quality coffee with great customer service. Each has a distinct personality: Downtown’s (inside Eborn Books) is literary and intimate; 9th & 9th (next to Tower Theatre) is cinematic and expansive. 878 E. 900 South, 801355-3425; 254 S. Main, 801-364-0768

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Brewvies When you combine beer and movies in one convenient downtown SLC location, you get Brewvies Cinema Pub. What’s not to love about kicking back with a flick, a frothy pint and some hearty bar grub? The theater offers showings of the latest blockbusters and independent films, plus a separate bar area lined with pool tables, video games and TVs. 677 S. 200 West, 801-322-3891, brewvies.com

coffee, crepes & a mic


A sample of our critic’s reviews

MAR 16TH

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Whether you’re bouncing back from a recent breakup or lamenting your lack of progress in finding a soul mate, it’s nice to have a supportive venting session. When you’re in need of something warm and uplifting like a hug—but aren’t above a little bad-mouthing—a slice of David’s Luscious Lemon Cake ($4) from Canyon Rim’s The Baking Hive is what you’re after. The soft, yielding texture of the cake embraces your taste buds, while the tart flechette of lemon flavor talks shit on every scrub that did you wrong. If your tastes run more toward chocolate, get a load of the Dirty Jonny bar ($3.50), which layers a fudge brownie on top of a chocolate chip cookie base, then tops the whole extravagant delight off with chocolate butter cream. If the kids just can’t get enough of the dessert deliciousness, you can have them learn how to make their own: The Baking Hive offers eight-week baking classes for ages 4-12, giving them the skills to make wonderful (and not too messy) treats. Reviewed Feb. 15. 3362 S. 2300 East, 801-419-0187, Millcreek, thebakinghive.com

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

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Old Friends BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

exclusively on NATHAN MEIER

cityweekly.net

Artist Logan Madsen in a still from Logan’s Syndrome

| CITY WEEKLY |

and how difficult these things are for him: ‘See, this is what I go through.’” While it might seem like a challenge for someone to make such an intimate documentary about a personal friend, Meier sees his relationship with Madsen as one that provided a unique and perhaps even necessary dimension to the project. “I had enough of a distance in the fact that I now live physically hundreds of miles away from Logan,” Meier says. “I’m not always there, and we hadn’t been around each other much in the years leading up to this. But I think even Logan has a way of stepping back and looking at his history and his physical self from an objective point of view. When you have this type of situation where you have two very rare human beings, they have spent their whole lives documented, studied, probed and prodded. And I think they’ve been able to emotionally disconnect from that level of scrutiny or exposure.” Meier also says that he found himself learning things that he never knew before, particularly about what it was like for Madsen’s parents. “I didn’t really know very much about his family history, so I was discovering all this as we went along,” he says. “The ‘a-ha’ moment for me was when I interviewed his parents. They had these really intense interviews [which] shaped the film in a major way … You often have friends where you don’t really know their parents.” It was all part of an artist discovering that the most fascinating story might be just around the corner. CW

LOGAN’S SYNDROME

Utah Museum of Fine Arts 410 Campus Center Drive Wednesday, March 21 6-9 p.m. Free Logan Madsen art exhibition before film screening utahfilmcenter.org

MARCH 15, 2018 | 29

Meier and Madsen began discussing a filmmaking component to accompany that planned next exhibition, and they shot approximately four hours of initial footage of their conversations. As is the case for many documentaries, however, logistics and the need to raise money turned the project into a longer process. Meier didn’t begin filming in earnest until 2011, and shooting and editing took six years before Logan’s Syndrome premiered at the Carmel International Film Festival in October 2017. Filming a documentary about a person’s life can be intrusive and challenging, but Meier came at it from a perspective atypical for many documentary filmmakers: having been the subject of a documentary himself. In 2001, KUED Channel 7 aired Nathan’s Story, which chronicled then-17-year-old Meier’s experience as a new teen father. “I was thinking a lot about that experience,” Meier says, “having been the subject of a film that was intimate and involved friends and family. It caused problems for me with some of my personal relationships. It’s a big responsibility when you decide to say you’re attempting to capture somebody’s life on film, capture someone’s experiences.” Aware of those potential challenges, Meier entered into the process being clear with Madsen that he and his family would have final say in what material could and could not be included in the final product. “I felt that it had to serve Logan and his family, not serve me and my goals,” Meier says. “Part of that is knowing when something is appropriate to be part of a film, and what things are off limits. I was sensitive to what this might do to them publicly, rather than, ‘This is drama, this is good stuff,’ and supersede their wishes.” Nevertheless, Logan’s Syndrome provides an intimate portrait of Madsen’s life with Miller Syndrome, partly the result of footage Madsen shot himself with a GoPro camera. “He was really creative with the way he would film things,” Meier says. “He would mount the camera to the ceiling, or to his wrist while he’s painting, or in the shower. He wants you to understand, by watching, how he does things we do all the time,

-cityweekly.net/bigshinyrobot-

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F

ilmmakers can find themselves on long journeys to finally make their first feature. For Nathan Meier, it turns out he only had to look down the street where he grew up. The documentary Logan’s Syndrome is Meier’s profile of Logan Madsen, a local visual artist who lives with Miller Syndrome, a congenital disorder that caused him to be born with malformed limbs and facial differences, in addition to autism. Logan and his older sister, Heather, are believed to be among fewer than 30 people in the world who are affected by Miller Syndrome. The Madsens also grew up in Holladay, in the same neighborhood where Meier’s family lived. “I didn’t become friends with him until high school,” Meier says. “We were in art class together, but then I went to California [to attend California Institute for the Arts], and we lost touch for nine years.” That friendship was renewed in 2008, as Meier happened to be visiting Utah at a time when Madsen was having his first solo show at Art Access Gallery. “The paintings he showed were … just pretty florals, not particularly challenging work,” Meier says. “He told me that his next show would be paintings of himself and his physical deformities, really putting his body out there. When we were in high school, we never talked about his disabilities. It was kind of something he was in denial about, even though it was so obvious.”

BIG SHINY ROBOT!

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Logan’s Syndrome finds a filmmaker discovering a fascinating story in his own childhood neighborhood.

CINEMA


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30 | MARCH 15, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. 7 DAYS IN ENTEBBE BB.5 A well-intentioned effort at both-sides-ing a pivotal battle in the Israeli/Palestinian conflict bites off more than it can chew, and winds up with something that’s more rote procedural than risky political thinker. The subject is the summer 1976 hijacking of an Air France flight by the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, with the hostages held at Entebbe Airfield in Uganda in an attempt to secure the release of Palestinian prisoners. The focus alternates between two German radicals (Daniel Brühl and Rosamund Pike) participating in the hijacking, and the debates by Israeli leaders including prime minister Yitzhak Rabin (Lior Ashkenazi) and defense minister Shimon Peres (Eddie Marsan) over whether to send the Israeli Defense Forces in for a rescue. Director José Padilha makes a few bold filmmaking choices, including juxtaposing military action with a dance performance choreographed by Ohad Naharin. But as much as Gregory Burke’s screenplay tries to humanize everyone involved, this is too fraught a subject for the baseline moral quandaries they face. The result is a sporadically intense drama that spends too much time on scenes of people looking pensive while smoking. Opens March 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw A CIAMBRA [not yet reviwed] Coming-of-age drama about a Romani teenager trying to navigate between the cultures of his native Calabria. Opens March 23 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR) I CAN ONLY IMAGINE [not yet reviewed] Inspiring true story behind the inspiring hit song by the inspiring band MercyMe. Opens March 23 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

LOVE, SIMON BBB It says something about a changing world when a coming-outof-age story can be so relatively light and frivolous. Director Greg Berlanti takes on this adaptation of Becky Albertalli’s novel Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda, about a closeted gay highschool student named Simon (Nick Robinson) who worries that he’s about to be outed when a classmate (Logan Miller) sees his email correspondence with an anonymous guy. Screenwriters Elizabeth Berger and Isaac Aptaker offer a considerably more comedic take on the source material, aiming for the high school social-satire snark reminiscent of Mean Girls or Easy A. And it’s generally funny stuff—including a fantasy sequence in which Simon imagines the easier life ahead at “Liberal University”— even as it undercuts some of the genuine existential terror of a kid wondering how his friends and family might see him with a new label attached. There’s also less effective buildup in the mystery of “who is Simon’s online secret admirer,” so it’s a bit thin as a teen romance. It’ll have to suffice that an entertaining, upbeat gay spin on mainstream theatrical teen romance now gets a chance to exist at all. Opens March 23 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—SR THE PARTY BBB.5 Politician Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) is hosting a gathering of close friends to celebrate her new job in Parliament. It doesn’t go well. Writer-director Sally Potter’s brisk, brutally snappy take on the British drawing-room comedy is a cutting takedown of the anxieties and hypocrisies of highly educated, well-off, left-wing Londoners, one that takes advantage of the dual meaning of “party,” with the evening’s acrimonious chaos echoing current political omnishambles on both sides of the Atlantic. The remarkable ensemble—also featuring Emily Mortimer, Cherry Jones, Timothy Spall, Cillian Murphy, Bruno Ganz and a movie-stealing Patricia Clarkson—never descends into caricature, even if that would have underscored the savage skewering. Instead, they (and Potter) imbue their characters with deep humanity ... which only serves to make that skewering all the more pointed. (This

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET is a laugh-until-you-cry sort of black comedy.) Their arguments about guilt and ambition, class and privilege, spirituality and reason are never as black-and-white as Aleksei Rodionov’s beautiful cinematography, and they get at some of the authentic contradictions of trying to be progressive in a world that doesn’t make that stance easy. Opens March 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson TOMB RAIDER [not yet reviewed] Lara Croft (Alicia Vikander) is tested when she visits the island where her adventuring father disappeared. Opens March 23 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE INSULT At Park City Film Series, March 16-17, 8 p.m. & March 18, 6 p.m. (R) LOGAN’S SYNDROME See p. 29. At Utah Museum of Fine Arts, March 21, 6 p.m. (NR) WHAT HAPPENED, MISS SIMONE? At Main Library, March 20, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES A FANTASTIC WOMAN BBB What if you put a movie on a “Best of 2017” list, only to discover that maybe it’s not quite that great? Sebastián Lelio’s Oscarwinning Chilean drama follows transgender woman Marina (Daniela Vega), as she faces the sudden death of her older partner Orlando (Francisco Reyes) and conflict with Orlando’s family. It’s a powerful thing seeing an actual transgender actor tear into a performance the way Vega does here, allowing the film to dodge the perception that Marina is simply an object of pity. But Lelio also provides a too-narrow window onto Marina’s life, focusing on the indignities she endures and walking a thin line between exploration and exploitation. While he leavens the sting with fantasy sequences and the ever-present reminder that this is a love story, a return journey toward the triumphant final scene is a bit bumpier. (R)—SR GRINGO BB.5 Director Nash Edgerton brings his pitch-black sensibility to the story of pharmaceutical company middle manager Harold Soyinka (David Oyelowo) getting caught up in his company’s

entanglements with a dangerous drug cartel. The screenplay is dense with subplots—a possible corporate merger, someone trying to steal the company’s formula for a key product, a reformed mercenary (Sharlto Copley) sent in to rescue Harold—with Oyelowo doing his best to fill in the blanks of a character thinly drawn as a good-hearted dupe. But while you can sometimes feel the strain in the efforts to be quirky-violent—it’s a homicidal drug lord who digs The Beatles!—Charlize Theron is phenomenal as an ice-queen boss who actually allows a moment for the insecurities to peek through. Wackiness may ensue, but a performance like that is too good to get lost in the shuffle. (R)—SR

THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT BB The Strangers was one of the better (and more profitable) of the home-invasion-thriller sub-genre, so it’s surprising that it took a decade to conjure a sequel. Less surprising is this randomly titled follow-up which features a new director, writer and cast, and is a step down in quality, though not without its slasher-y pleasures. Our victims this time are a family of four headed for daughter Kinsey’s (Bailee Madison) new boarding school, but stopping for the night at Uncle Marv’s lakeside trailer park, which is abandoned and a little foggy (i.e., a murder factory). The trio of masked youths who beset them are menacing— though the masks do most of the work—and director Johannes Roberts gets the jump on us a few times. But the killers have no motive here—and, as it turns out, neither does the movie. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

A WRINKLE IN TIME BBB Ava DuVernay adapts Madeleine L’Engle’s novel about a troubled 13-year-old girl named Meg (Storm Reid) who undertakes an adventure to find her long-missing scientist father (Chris Pine), assisted by her younger brother, a classmate and three mysterious supernatural beings (Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling). The fantasy component of Meg’s transdimensional quest initially feels a bit thin, and the alien landscapes too familiar. But while a primal battle between light and darkness is the central external conflict, the script hones in on feelings of being an unhappy outsider, with unsettling imagery turning happy-family settings like a suburban cul-de-sac and a busy beach into nightmare moments. Reid’s prickly energy in the protagonist role emphasizes the idea that this is less a familyfriendly blockbuster than a reminder that anyone, no matter what others try to convince them, can be heroic. (PG-13)—SR

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CONCERT PREVIEW

You Come About

MUSIC

John Hiatt’s Bring the Family and Slow Turning inspire self-reflection. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

John Hiatt

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That blew my mind; I thought I’d had it all figured out. In the ensuing years, I listened to Hiatt with new ears. I took his songs as he intended them to be taken. I empathized or sympathized accordingly with him and his characters. And I explored my reactions to the songs, gleaning some self-knowledge in the process. Today, I know Slow Turning as a collection of scenes that reflect on personal growth, and how decisions alter the arc of our lives. Some songs are escape fantasies (“Trudy and Dave,” “Tennessee Plates”). Others extol the virtues of living in the moment (“Drive South”) or where you could wind up if you live idly (“Ride Along”). Still others explore loneliness (“Icy Blue Heart,” “Is Anybody There?”), dread the encroaching past (“It’ll Come to You”) and reckon with character flaws (“Paper Thin”). But it’s the title track that sums everything up. “Slow Turning” is about seeking and achieving perspective. We’re born knowing nothing, then we vacillate between thinking we know everything and realizing we don’t know shit, before finally accepting that life is constant learning. As Hiatt sings so ebulliently, “It’s been a slow turnin’/ from the inside out/ a slow turnin’, baby/ but you come about.” To mark their 30th anniversaries, Bring the Family and Slow Turning are being reissued on vinyl (A&M/UMe). Not only that, but Hiatt has re-formed The Goners, the band that backed him up on the latter platter, and they’re going on tour to play the entire album from front-to-back. I expect that watching the man perform his magnum opus, peppering the set with stories, will evolve my relationship to Slow Turning even further. And I welcome it. CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

MICHAEL WILSON

I

JOHN HIATT & THE GONERS

Wednesday, March 21, 7:30 p.m. Delta Hall at The Eccles Theater 131 S. Main 801-355-2787 $35-$65 All ages live-at-the-eccles.com

MARCH 15, 2018 | 31

f I’d heard John Hiatt’s Slow Turning when it came out in 1988, I’m not sure I’d still be a fan. Sure, you get your driver’s license at 16, but most teenage boys aren’t ready to explore much of the emotional territory this album covers. It’s an album about growing up, written by a man who’s lived hard and might’ve died if he hadn’t changed. I was just getting started. Luckily, I didn’t hear Hiatt’s music until I was 21—biologically, chronologically and legally an adult, but with miles to go en route to maturity. In the film Benny & Joon (1993), the tender ballad “Have a Little Faith in Me” plays when Johnny Depp and Mary Stuart Masterson first kiss. The song gave me chills. But upon leaving the theater, I promptly forgot about the song by who I thought was an old black dude with an amazing voice. Two years later, I finally picked up Hiatt’s Bring the Family (A&M, 1987). His sobriety album (alluded to in the songs and by the backcover photo of him sipping coffee) runs the emotional gamut. The first side alone hits invigorating escapism (“Memphis in the Meantime”), raw lust (“Alone in the Dark,” famous for soundtracking Jamie Lee Curtis’ bump-and-grind in True Lies), manic love (“Thing Called Love”)—all perfectly relatable to a baby adult. It then veers abruptly into a stark rumination on being a habitual heartbreaker (“Lipstick Sunset”) before swerving in the other direction, pledging to be the light in someone’s darkness (“Have a Little Faith in Me”). It was deeper, taller and older than me—but the tears in my eyes meant I was catching up. I resolved to buy everything Hiatt had ever put out. I started with his two most recent releases, Perfectly Good Guitar (1993) and the live Hiatt Comes Alive at Budokan (1994). The next one I brought home was Slow Turning. I’d read online that it and Family are regarded as Hiatt’s breakthrough albums, and that they established him as an artist and performer in his own right. Until then, he’d been a critically acclaimed “songwriter’s songwriter,” with people like Bob Dylan, Steve Earle and Iggy Pop covering his work. By then, I was five years older, married and a father, with experience in some of the emotional trials that Hiatt sang about. I was ready. At least I felt that way. I came to know Slow Turning as a collection of stunning tunes populated with perfectly drawn characters acting out stories that must’ve been pretty rough for their author. You see, at the time, I’d bought into the John Hiatt mythology. It goes like this: A young kid from Indiana hits the road, finds a $25-a-day job writing songs in Nashville, earns a reputation as a songwriting savant, begins making his own records, parties too hard, gets sober, rallies to do some of his best work, and ultimately becomes an internationally respected artist. Every one of his songs, I and many other fans surmised, had to be personal. Ten or 12 years ago, in an interview, Hiatt set me straight. He said that, while his songs might start out autobiographical, he fictionalizes them. That way, he can keep some things to himself while also making the songs relatable for others.


BY RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER & HOWARD HARDEE

—LOCATIONS— 677 S. 200th W. Salt Lake City 801-746-1417

6885 State St. Midvale 801-561-5390

5654 S. 1900 W. Roy 801-773-2953

(No disrespect to Coin, but we’ve covered them before.) I’ll admit to some concern that hometown girls The Aces signing to a bigger label (Red Bull Records) would see the already slick pop-rock group’s considerable charms spit-polished to death. That would’ve been such a pisser, because they already had their shit together. Their songs are youthful, but written by older souls. They’re Mormon girls from Provo, but they’re not uptight—they’ll drop an S-bomb and not give a fuck, which gives them an irresistible mystery. And onstage, they’re just so right: four confident young women with distinct presences who play their individual roles well, but in service of a stronger, stunning whole. The idea that this could’ve somehow been corrupted by music biz bullshit—heavy-handed production and other such meddling—was nauseating. But their big-time debut album When My Heart Felt Volcanic finds The Aces sounding like themselves, which will make your heart erupt. And make the band, perhaps before the summer is over, deservedly huge. (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $20 presale; $22 day of show, all ages, depotslc.com

SATURDAY 3/17

Cut Chemist, El Dusty, Chaseone2

Lucas McFadden goes by a descriptive and fitting stage name—what else does the DJ/producer do if not practice musical

Cut Chemist

ALEXANDER BORTZ

Coin, The Aces

chemistry? He puts cuts on a 33-1/3 rpm centrifuge, separates what he needs, then mixes everything up until the pH is phat and the resulting solution is poppin’. He came to fame doing this in groups like Jurassic 5 and Ozomatli until 2006, when he dropped his first solo release, The Audience’s Listening (Warner Bros.). Although he toured behind that and a 2007 collab with DJ Shadow, and continued to make DJ mixes and issue singles, his productivity slowed to a trickle between 2008 and 2012. According to his publicist, McFadden felt “isolated from the world and artistically uninspired.” Fortunately for us, he found a way to keep going, discovering inspiration in working with live musicians. These sessions yielded his long-awaited second set, Die Cut, featuring contributions from the likes of his J5 homie Chali 2na, The Mars Volta drummer Deantoni Parks, Farmer Dave Scher and even the esteemed emcee Biz Markie. It’s a long way from working only with samples, but the resulting solution pops like a sodium block in duck pond. (RH) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $25, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

The Aces out this tour. Replacing him is celebrated pianist Chick Corea. In a sense, the piano is the quintessential jazz instrument, as it combines a capacity for adept melodic improvisation with dense chordal harmonies and syncopated rhythms. Corea’s genius has been that he can play in a wide variety of styles, and his own style of playing helped forge the jazz fusion genre. He has endeavored, in a medium sometimes seen as cool, to communicate warmth and expressiveness to his audiences. It might be interesting to hear how the JLO interprets Corea’s compositions, many of which are considered jazz standards, alongside its own repertoire. (Brian Staker) de Jong Concert Hall at BYU, Provo, 7:30 p.m., $45-$85, arts.byu.edu

Chick Corea

TUESDAY 3/20

JASON ARMORIO

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Chick Corea

The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra presents an unparalleled opportunity to witness an extraordinarily accomplished level of artistic creation. The band reprises a large swath of the history of jazz music, with their interpretations of works by Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk and other standardbearers of this great American art form. This is a somewhat different JLO performance, as their regular bandleader—trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis—is sitting

DAN MUSE

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32 | MARCH 15, 2018

CITYWEEKLY.NET

FRIDAY 3/16

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LIVE

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT


6th annual St. Patrick’s Day Celebration at

SAT. MARCH 17

OPEN 10AM ST. PATTY’S BRUNCH FROM 10-3 UTAH’S LARGEST ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY dj godina Marmalade Hill

NO COVER

DJ Che

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10-2am, Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

MARCH 15, 2018 | 33

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F

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GIANT TENT | DRINKS | FOOD | MUSIC

Salt Lake Scots Pipe Band

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LIVE MUSIC


FROM SUE’S STATE LOCATION

NEXT HOME GAME - MARCH 10, 1:30 VS. LOS ANGELES WATCH ALL RSL AWAY GAMES AT A BAR NAMED SUE

HIGHLAND live music

FRI SAT SAT MAR 17

ST PATRICKS DAY

DJ SAMEYEAM CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE, GREEN BEER IRISH WHISKEY, BAG PIPERS.

KARAOKE

HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!!

WED

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SLOW RIDE

MON & THURS

STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

THURS

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1050 POT

SUN & THURS

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT STARTS @ 7PM

THE SUES COMBINED HAVE PAID OUT MORE THAN ANY VENUE IN BREAKING BINGO. CLOSE TO 9K!!!!! REBECCA WNUK

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

20 1 7

2013

2014

STATE live music

FRI SAT SAT MAR 17

ST PATRICKS DAY

WED

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $550 POT

SUN &

KARAOKE

MON &

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

TUES

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34 | MARCH 15, 2018

LIVE

FREE SHUTTLE TO ALL R S L HOME GAMES

WED

BONANZA TOWN DJ BAD HAIR DAY BAG PIPERS, GREEN BEER, IRISH WHISKEY, GUINNESS CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE.

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

STARTS @ 7PM

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

8136 SO. STATE ST 801-566-3222

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

Vundabar

WEDNESDAY 3/21

Vundabar, Current Joys, Ratboys

Boston band Vundabar is getting to be kind of a big deal, garnering attention in the indie world. Singer/multi-instrumentalist Brandon Hagen wrote most of the songs on their third, self-released album, Smell Smoke (Gawk). Many of them detail the travails of caring for a sick relative—not exactly common lyrical fodder for a young upstart rock band. But that kind of dark insight is the best kind of introspection: Against a bouncy, noisy backdrop, they lay out anxieties and fears in place of a detached coolness. While the band is still small enough that Hagen himself is listed as PR contact, that might not last too much longer. As the solo project of Nicholas Rattigan, Current Joys is part of the post-MTV generation’s experimentation with video, with emotional vicissitudes illustrated through visual imagery as much as soundwaves. Chicago post-country band Ratboys is in the early days of their career, ambling down a dusty, rock-strewn road on their second album, GN (Topshelf, 2017). (BS) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10 presale; $12 day of show, all ages, kilbycourt.com

OMD, Ggoolldd

At the peak of their success, the classic new wave band Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (OMD) had a string of hits in the U.K., but they’re perhaps best known in the U.S. for their 1986 hit “If You Leave.” Despite becoming something of a forgotten band since their heyday in the mid-1980s, co-founders Andy McCluskey (vocals, bass) and Paul Humphreys (keyboards, vocals) are recognized as innovators of electronic music circles and are often labeled the “Lennon–McCartney of synth-pop.” That might be a bit hyperbolic, but OMD was indeed ahead of its time. And the band is not without its charms: It’s hard not to smile at lyrics as literal as those of “Electricity” (“Our one source of energy/ The ultimate discovery”) or one of their campy music videos (seriously, check out the one for “Enola Gay”). OMD is celebrating their 40th anniversary this year, and they’re accompanied by Ggoolldd, an up-and-coming dream-pop/electronic band out of Milwaukee, Wis., fronted by the dynamic and delightfully weird Margaret Butler. (Howard Hardee) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m. (doors), $30 presale; $35 day of show, all ages, thecomplexslc.com


S P IR ITS . FO OD . LOCAL B EER AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY THURSDAY:

Gonzo @ 10:00 FRIDAY:

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00 SUNDAY: Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!!

Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $1,800

SATURDAY:

St Patty’s Day Party Corned Beef & Cabbage Tons of Giveaways DJ Soul Pause @ 9:00 No Cover!

MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

e b o t e c a l p The ! i k s s è r p A r fo

TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

3.17 ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY W/ PIXIE & THE PARTYGRASS BOYS

3.19 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

3.21 BEN BRINTON

3.23 & 24 STONEFED

3.16 SCOUNDRELS

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3.15 MEANDER CAT

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AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

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MARCH 15, 2018 | 35

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM


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36 | MARCH 15, 2018

FRIDAY 3/16

CONCERTS & CLUBS

NORMAN JEAN ROY

Bon Jovi

ver All Night L i l e D ong We Find additional coupons on page 25

ENTER TO WIN a 26” Full Suspension BMX Bike at cityweekly.net/ freestuff Expires 03/25/2018

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In 1984, I first heard a tinny version of the night-drive anthem “Runaway” coming from a transistor radio on an elementary school softball field. Everyone, boys as well as girls, was diggin’ it. By 1986, even my synthpop-focused best friend was blasting Slippery When Wet. The New Jersey band had successfully merged the working-class Asbury Park sound (see Springsteen, Southside Johnny) with glam rock, and everybody loved it. But after New Jersey (1988), the band got infected with the dreaded cheese virus. Each subsequent album was more sanitized and sappy until Bon Jovi finally just issued a Nashville country album (red state music from a Jersey liberal, go figure). The move toward a more marketable pop sound was a smart career move; unlike some of their ’80s peers, BJ can headline without a comparable support act. But now the new dreck outnumbers the classics in sets where you have to endure bland, boring lulls to get to the lightning. The band even looks more like Maroon 5 than the ragtag bunch of Jersey dudes that initially captured our attention. One unexpectedly bright point, however, is guitarist Phil X, who replaced longtime lead guitarist and co-face of Bon Jovi, Richie Sambora. The dude plays like a mofo, and his solo stuff ranges from badass, bluesy arena rock to power pop—none of it aimed at the vanilla people. (Randy Harward) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $66.50-$546, all ages, vivintarena.com

THURSDAY 3/15 LIVE MUSIC

Cars & Trains + Conquer Monster + Bikini Shark (Diabolical Records) Cody Robbins + Caleb Gray + Al Deans + Amara Doxey (Velour) Herman’s Hermits w/ Peter Noone (Egyptian Theatre) Jake J & The Killjoys (The Spur) Kevyn Dern (Snowbird Resort) Latin Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) The Lil Smokies (Urban Lounge) Lo Ca$h Ninjas + Show Me Island (The Beehive) Meander Cat (Hog Wallow Pub) QUINN XCII + Chelsea Cutler (The Complex) Reggae at The Royal w/ Funk & Gonzo + Simply B (The Royal) Rylee McDonald (Lake Effect)

Sorority Noise + Remo Drive + Foxx Bodies (Kilby Court) Tad Calcara & New Deal Swing (Gallivan Center) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ/DC (Metro Music Hall) Dueling Pianos (Deer Valley) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Gothic + Darkwave w/ DJ Nina (Area 51) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave ’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Spag Heddy (Sky) Youth Jam Session (Music Garage)


PROUDLY

GRAB A BITE

serving locally produced beers & spirits

TONIGHT

75+ BEERS AVAILABLE

DINNER AND A SHOW. ONLY AT GRACIE’S! EVERY TUESDAY

CRAFT COCKTAILS - WINE - BEER

80’S NEW WAVE NIGHT EVERY THURSDAY 7PM-11PM W/ DJ BIRDMAN (RAFFLE PRIZES & GIVEAWAYS) FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

BOOK YOUR NEXT PARTY OR EVENT AT ELIXIR!

FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

MARCH 14

THE NATE ROBINSON TRIO 10PM1AM

MARCH 15

LOS HELLCAMINOS 7 OR 10 W/P

WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT March 14th Honig Vineyards, Cabernet Sauvignon. March 21st Savestriin Vineyards, Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley Music at 7:30. THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

SUNDAY NIGHT Industry night - in the Rabbit Hole basement of Lake Effect

$3 pints $3 whiskeys

TASTING TUESDAYS Join us for a whiskey tasting with a professional. | 6pm

...

MARCH 16 MARCH 17

*Dine-In Only

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Wednesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00 | | | | | | | | | | | | |

7:30-10:30 PM 6-9PM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 6-9PM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 8, 9:30, 11, 12:30 8-12AM 7:30-10:30 PM 6-9PM 7:30-10:30 PM

(801) 532-2068 – 155 W 200 S Salt Lake City, UT, 84101 www.lakeeffectslc.com

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

MARCH 15, 2018 | 37

MARCH 18 MARCH 19 MARCH 20 MARCH 21

Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight.

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1/2 OFF TACOS 11 AM-4 PM DAILY

DHCC PROJECT RYLEE MCDONALD DJ CHASEONE2 WILL BAXTER BAND DJ CHASEONE2 “RABBIT HOLE” WILL BAXTER BAND BONANZA TOWN DJ MR. RAMIREZ “RABBIT HOLE” HEATHEN HIGHLANDERS “LIVE BAGPIPE SETS” DJ DOLPH & CO. “RABBIT HOLE” THE ANDY T BAND SYDNIE KEDDINGTON JAY LAWRENCE TRIO

MARCH 19

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday

MONDAYS Blues night

THIS WEEKS LIVE MUSIC MARCH 14 MARCH 15

MARCH 17

ST. PATRICKS DAY CELEBRATION WITH DJ GODINA, MARMALADE HILL, DJ CHE, THE SALT LAKE SCOTS PIPE BAND AND MORE

...

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast!

MARCH 18

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-3 SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES WITH HOSTS NICK GRECO AND BLUES ON FIRST JAKE DREIER BLUES BAND 10-1AM

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MARCH 16

CHANGING LANES EXPERIENCE

OPEN 10AM-1AM SERVING BRUNCH FROM 10AM-3PM NO COVER ALL DAY

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JOIN US FOR APRÉS SKI LOCATED AT THE BASE OF THE CANYONS

BLUEGRASS JAM WITH HOSTS PIXIE AND THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 7PM-10PM


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38 | MARCH 15, 2018

CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ KJ Kevan (Area 51) Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (The Barbary Coast) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

KARAOKE

{THURSDAY & FRIDAYS 9PM}

POOL TOURNAMENTS MONDAYS BY CRISSIE FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS BY RANDY

TEXAS HOLDEM

FRIDAY 3/16

PINKY’S CABARET

CHECK OUT OUR NEW

MENU

MONDAYS & THURSDAY

FREE FASHION SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY NOON TILL 2PM

BEST

GARLIC BURGER

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385.528.2547 open 7 days a week from 11 am to 1 am

FEATURED IN CITY WEEKLY'S BURGER WEEK\ \RIBEYE SPECIAL $8 ON FRIDAY'S

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

SATURDAY, MAR. 17

ST PATTY’S DAY PARTY

LIVE MUSIC

AM Bump (The Bayou) Basement Walls (Pat’s BBQ) Bon Jovi (Vivint Arena) see p. 36 Coin + The Aces (The Depot) see p. 32 Coral Creek (O.P. Rockwell) For King & Country + Matthew West + Natalie Grant + Bethel Music + Zach Williams + more (Maverik Center) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) He Is We + Vendetta Red + Taylor Garner (Kilby Court) Herman’s Hermits w/ Peter Noone (Egyptian Theatre) Highland Bagpipe Experience (Gallivan Center) Hot House West (Avant Groove) The Johnny Utahs (The Yes Hell) Kyle May (Deer Valley) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Masquerade Project X Party w/ Phaya (The Complex) Murphy & The Giant + The Kotter Project (Piper Down Pub) Pinguin Mofex + Noble Bodies + Star Crossed Loners (Velour) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) The Rebel Celts w/ Pennyland + Annie’s Romance (The Ice Haüs) Royal Bliss St. Patty’s Party w/ Folk Hogan + Cory Mon (The Royal) Scoundrels (Hog Wallow Pub) Shannon Runyon (Legends at Park City Mountain)

BROTHERS BRIMM

POST - PARADE SHENANIGANS

SHEPHARDS PIE, PRIZES ALL DAY, GIVEAWAYS, LIVE MUSIC! JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

9PM- NO COVER

Sharon Needles + Sonnei + Chelsea Siren + Terra Flesh + Mercury Adams + Lisa Dank + Kay Bye + DJ Shutter + DJ Justin Hollister (Metro Music Hall) Urban Pulse (Club 90) UTA Trax + Nate Holland + Thoroughbred (Urban Lounge) Wey + Magda Vega (Brewskis) Whiskey Fish (The Barbary Coast) Widowmaker + Face Your Maker + Second Death + Sky Burial + Cries of The Captive + False Witness (The Loading Dock) The Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) All Request Top 40 w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Jarvicious (Alleged) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Matty Mo (Downstairs) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ KJ Kevan (Area 51) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 3/17 LIVE MUSIC

Adventure Club (Park City Live) AJR + Hundred Handed (The Complex) Alan Michael (The Bayou) Alicia Stockman (Deer Valley) Billy Currington & Locash (The Union Event Center)

MONDAYS

BREAKING BINGO 9PM

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


ST. PATRICK’S

WEEKEND FRIDAY, MARCH 16TH

$5 R E

COV

KOTTER PROJECT

LIVE MUSIC

AMP & SUB ENCLOSURE PACKAGE

SAVE

NOON - MIDNIGHT $20 AT THE DOOR | 1/2 OFF BEFORE 6PM

$100

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SATURDAY, MARCH 17TH

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MURPHY AND THE GIANT

∙ 10" SUB WITH (SEXY) BASS ENCLOSURE

.99

List Price: 400.00

10AM TO 7PM

FREE LAYAWAY

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

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NO

CREDIT NEEDED

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• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

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90 OPTION

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

DAY PAYMENT

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MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 3/22/18

1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492 PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

MARCH 15, 2018 | 39

W W W. S O U N DWA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS

MURPHY AND THE GIANT KOTTER PROJECT • RUSTED REEL RED HEADED STEP TWINS HEATHEN HIGHLANDERS

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$299

∙ 500 WATT MONO AMP


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40 | MARCH 15, 2018

DELTON LANES

RANDY HARWARD

BAR FLY

Blarney Bash w/ Big Red Band (The Depot) Bucky Cash & The Low Point (Pat’s BBQ) Celtic Celebration (Peery’s Egyptian Theatre) Cut Chemist + El Dusty + Chaseone2 (Urban Lounge) see p. 32 Detour + Dweller + Droopy Tights + In Unison (The Underground) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) The Green Party w/ Los YaYaz + Martian Cult + 90s Television (Metro Music Hall) Herman’s Hermits w/ Peter Noone (Egyptian Theatre) Jasper K. Groff (The Yes Hell) Jyrki 69 + MGT + Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) The Kotter Project + Mark Dee (The Harp & Hound) Live Trio (The Red Door) Mirah + La Louma (Kilby Court) One Punch Opie (The Union Tavern) Otter Creek (Feldman’s Deli) Pixie & The Partygrass

Boys (Hog Wallow Pub) Rage Against The Supremes (The Spur) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Sister Adolescent + The Poppies (Velour) St. Paddy’s Day w/ Crespo (Sky) St. Patty’s Day Green Party w/ Herban Empire + The Green Leefs + Tribe of I (The Royal) St. Patty’s Day Party w/ Urban Pulse (Club 90) St. Patty’s Reggae Bash w/ Zion Riot (Brewskis) St. Patrick’s Day w/ Murphy & The Giant + The Dunmore Lasses (The Ice Haüs) St. Patrick’s Day w/ The Wicked Tinkers + Murphy & The Giant (Piper Down Pub) Temples + Moray + John-Ross Boyce (ABG’s) Tomb Of Belial + DiseNgaged + Delusions of Godhood

“Shit, it’s league night.” It’s 9:15 on a Monday night. During the day, Delton Lanes is darker. I like to roll here—in this dimly lit, sparsely populated hole-inthe-wall. But the lights are so bright tonight that the place feels like a hospital. As I approach, the kid at the counter says he won’t have an open lane for a while, but I’m welcome to hang out. No problem. I wander over to the lounge for a beer. But as I cross the threshold, I realize I have to work late and get up early, so beer is a bad idea. On the other hand, a quick 10 frames should still make for an invigorating break. I cop a squat away from the bar, watching the bowlers through a tinted window. I worry that the bartender will come inquire as to my poison, and that I will say beer, and that I will drink said beer. Lucky for me, an old barfly is busy reading the Utah Jazz schedule. “They play Indiana, they play Memphis...” When they turn up the TV, focusing on a Jazz postgame interview, I figure it’s safe to keep people-watching. After a while, the people start putting on street shoes, bagging up balls, picking up purses, putting on coats. Behind me, the counter kid says, “Alright, man. I should have a lane for you if you want to follow me.” I rise from my barstool, ready to see if I can top my best game. En route to the counter, I reach for my wallet. My hand finds nothin’ but butt. Shit. I turn on my heel and sneak out. I’ll come back—probably in the afternoon. (Randy Harward) Delton Lanes, 3544 W. 3500 South, 801-968-4821, deltonbowling.com

(The Loading Dock) Tony Holiday & The Velvetones (Canyons Village) Tony Holiday & The Velvetones (Barbary Coast) The Will Baxter Band + Bonanza Town (Lake Effect)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Alternative + Top 40 + EDM w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Cat’s Pajamas (Prohibition) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Joel (Twist) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Filippo Rippe Weirdo! Drag Show

(The Beehive) Gothic + Industrial + 80s w/ Courtney (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ KJ Kevan (Area 51) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 3/18 LIVE MUSIC

Henry Wade Music (Snowbird Resort) Herman’s Hermits w/ Peter Noone (Egyptian Theatre) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Motherhood + Failure Machine + Rejoin The Team (Kilby Court) Purification by Fire + Dethrone The Sovereign + Screaming By Design + Kusama (Urban Lounge) Ravenmind + Noise Ordinance + Delphic Quorum (The Loading Dock)


CONCERTS & CLUBS Rob $tone + Ant Beale (The Complex) Steve Schuffert (Deer Valley)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

Après Ski (The Cabin) Dueling Pianos (The Spur)

KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo MONDAY 3/19 karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30

wednesday 3/14

Thursday 3/15

Reggae

at the Royal

$

funk & Gonzo simply b

5

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 3/16

LIVE MUSIC

Almost Amateur + Runaway Brother + Kelley Nash + Picnics At Soap Rock (The Underground) Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Changing Lanes Experience (Covey Center For The Arts) Dead Country Gentlemen + Breezeway + Hard Times + Queenadilla (Urban Lounge) Dick Stusso + Jo Passed (Kilby Court) Eden + Vérité (The Complex) Tommy Traina + 8Six + Keep It Lit + Deevomax (The Loading Dock)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

foLk hogan • lhaw dealin' in dirt saturday 3/17

Live Music

Tuesday 3/20

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon

retro riot dance party prince tribute night

3/31

iya terra

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

IRISH DRIFTERS - 12PM

KARAOKE

MATHIEU “ROOSTER” ROBINETTE - 2PM

TUESDAY 3/20

MATTHEW AND THE HOPE 4:30PM

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke (Cheers To You) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

LIVE MUSIC

Bodysnatcher + So This Is Suffering + Awaken The Catalyst (The Loading Dock) The Bookends (Piper Down Pub) Caleb Gray (The Spur) Cones + Totem City (Kilby Court) Dallin Hunt + Mia Hicken + Austin AStrike (Velour) Dante Elephante + The Boys Ranch + Cool Banana (Metro Music Hall) Deep Romance (The Beehive) G. Love & Special Sauce + Ron Artis II & The Truth (The State Room) Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Chick Corea (deJong Concert Hall) see p. 32 The Oh Hellos + Wildermiss (The Complex)

DJ LATU - 8PM HEATHEN HIGHLANDERS EVERY 4 HOURS! SUNDAY HANGOVER BRUNCH: OPEN AT 10AM 31 east 400 SOuth • SLC 801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

MARCH 15, 2018 | 41

3/23

SATURDAY, MARCH 17, OPEN 10AM

| CITY WEEKLY |

great irish food & drink specials

DUNMORE LASSES 10:30PM

St. Patty's Day Green Party w/ Herban Empire • The green leefs • tribe of i open at noon

IRISH DRIFTERS 9PM

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Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam & More Jam (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

FRIDAY, MARCH 16

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GREEN PIG’S ST. PATRICK’S WEEKEND


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CONCERTS & CLUBS Sydnie Keddington (Lake Effect) Titus Andronicus + Rick Maguire (Urban Lounge) Turkuaz (O.P. Rockwell)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Lifty Lounge w/ DJ Marty Paws + Chris Shields (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (The Barbary Coast) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 3/21 LIVE MUSIC

Ben Brinton (Hog Wallow Pub) Brisk (Downstairs) Eldren + Close Encounter + Beachmen (Rye) G. Love & Special Sauce + Ron Artis II & The Truth (The State Room) John Hiatt & The Goners feat. Sonny Landreth (Eccles Theatre) see p. 31 OMD + Ggoolldd (The Complex) see p. 34 Sage Francis + B. Dolan + Zac Ivie (Urban Lounge) Shannon Runyon (The Spur) Upcharm + Push + Slow No (The Underground) Vundabar + Current Joys + Ratboys (Kilby Court) see p. 34 Wyclef Jean + DJ Juggy (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Wees (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos feat. Rick Gerber & Mike Rogers (The Cabin) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Temple Gothic & Industrial (Area 51) Youth Jam Session (Music Garage)

KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Areaoke w/ KJ Ruby (Area 51) Karaoke (The Wall at BYU) Krazy Karaoke (Donkey Tails Cantina) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)


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MARCH 15, 2018 | 43


© 2017

KITCHEN

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. 2009 Best Picture nominee set in the 22nd century 2. Sacco of Sacco and Vanzetti 3. Wicked 4. “You’re looking at the wrong guy” 5. ____ even keel 6. Quite

44. Like some noisy cats 45. Pack in a ship’s hold 46. Itch (for) 48. Longs (for) 50. Plot elements? 52. Café au ____ 53. Gung-ho 54. Escapes injury 57. Soft & ____ (Gillette brand)

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

7. Actress Longoria 8. Rub the wrong way 9. Combed, as hair 10. #1 best-selling author Greg ____ 11. Jet fuel component 12. One asked to RSVP 16. 53-Across component 21. “That’s ____!” (parent’s admonition) 23. Paddle 25. “Law & Order: ____” 29. “Mighty ____ a Rose” 30. Hypotheticals 31. Homer Simpson outbursts 32. High-protein beans 34. Thermos alternatives 35. -y pluralized 36. Org. concerned with Common Core 37. Plot point in many a soap opera 38. 53-Across component 39. Siren luring sailors to shipwreck 40. “I want to be kept informed,” in textspeak 42. Moscow’s land: Abbr. 43. Outbursts that provoke blessings

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Faulkner’s “Requiem for ____” 5. 53-Across component 9. Duettist with Elton on 1976’s “Don’t Go Breaking My Heart” 13. Ristorante bottle 14. Campbell of “Party of Five” 15. 1985 John Malkovich film 17. Eight, to Dieter 18. “I smell ____!” 19. TV’s Griffin and others 20. With 34-, 35- and 53-Across, idiom that applies to this puzzle’s grid? 22. Bulb cover 24. 11-time NBA All-Star Iverson 25. Part of a crib 26. Greyhound stop: Abbr. 27. Celebrity chef Rachael 28. Celebrity chef Jamie 31. Celebrity chef Paula 32. Big mistake 33. Lacking width and depth, for short 34. See 20-Across 35. See 20-Across 38. Celebrity chef Bobby 40. Lascivious looks 41. Hollywood’s Howard and Perlman 42. Celebrity chef Gordon 44. “More or less” 47. “Just Another Girl on the ____” (1993 movie) 48. Celebrity chef Wolfgang 49. Preceder of Barbara or Clara 51. “Yum-m-my!” 53. See 20-Across 55. Gather a bit at a time 56. Poems whose titles often start “To a ...” 58. Need a bath badly 59. Start of an elimination process 60. Nabisco’s answer to Hydrox 61. Icicle’s place 62. Followers: Suffix 63. 53-Across component 64. Suffix with hip or hoop

SUDOKU

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44 | MARCH 15, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Although her work is among the best Russian literature of the 20th century, poet Marina Tsvetayeva lived in poverty. When fellow poet Rainer Maria Rilke asked her to describe the kingdom of heaven, she said, “Never again to sweep floors.” I can relate. To earn a living in my early adulthood, I washed tens of thousands of dishes in restaurant kitchens. Now that I’m grown up, one of my great joys is to avoid washing dishes. I invite you to think along these lines, Pisces. What seemingly minor improvements in your life are actually huge triumphs that evoke profound satisfaction? Take inventory of small pleasures that are really quite miraculous. ARIES (March 21-April 19): The British science fiction TV show Dr. Who has appeared on BBC in 40 of the last 54 years. Over that span, the titular character has been played by 13 different actors. From 2005 until 2010, Aries actor David Tennant was the magic, immortal, time-traveling Dr. Who. His ascendance to the role fulfilled a hopeful prophecy he had made about himself when he was 13 years old. Now is an excellent time for you, too, to predict a glorious, satisfying or successful occurrence in your own future. Think big and beautiful! TAURUS (April 20-May 20): New York City is the most densely populated city in North America. Its land is among the most expensive on earth; one estimate says the average price per acre is $16 million. Yet there are two uninhabited islands less than a mile off shore in the East River: North Brother Island and South Brother Island. Their combined 16 acres are theoretically worth $256 million. But no one goes there or enjoys it; it’s not even parkland. I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I suspect it’s an apt metaphor for a certain situation in your life: a potentially rich resource or influence that you’re not using. Now is a good time to update your relationship with it.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1970, a biologist was hiking through a Brazilian forest when a small monkey jumped from a tree branch and landed on his head. Adelmar Coimbra-Filho was ecstatic. He realized that his visitor was a member of the species known as the golden-rumped lion tamarin, which had been regarded as extinct for 65 years. His lucky accident led to a renewed search for the elusive creatures, and soon more were discovered. I foresee a metaphorically comparable experience coming your way, Sagittarius. A resource or influence or marvel you assumed was gone will reappear. How will you respond? With alacrity, I hope! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The Velcro fastener is a handy invention that came into the world thanks to a Swiss engineer named George de Mestral. While wandering around the Alps with his dog, he got curious about the bristly seeds of the burdock plants that adhered to his pants and his dog. After examining them under a microscope, he got the idea to create a clothing fastener that imitated their sticking mechanism. In accordance with the astrological omens, Capricorn, I invite you to be alert for comparable breakthroughs. Be receptive to help that comes in unexpected ways. Study your environment for potentially useful clues and tips. Turn the whole world into your classroom and laboratory. It’s impossible to predict where and when you may receive a solution to a long-running dilemma! AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): On May 29, 1953, Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay climbed to the top of Mount Everest. They were celebrated as intrepid heroes. But they couldn’t have done it without massive support. Their expedition was powered by 20 Sherpa guides, 13 other mountaineers and 362 porters who lugged 10,000 pounds of baggage. I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, in the hope that it will inspire you. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to gather more of the human resources and raw materials you will need for your rousing expedition later this year.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): How adept are you at playing along the boundaries between the dark and the light, between confounding dreams and liberated joy, between “Is it real?” and “Do I need it?” You now have an excellent opportunity to find out more about your capacity to thrive on delightful complexity. But I should warn you. The temptation to prematurely simplify things might be hard to resist. There may be cautious pressure coming from a timid voice in your head that’s not fierce enough to want you to grow into your best and biggest self. But here’s what I predict: You will bravely explore the possibilities for self-transformation that are available outside the predictable niches.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the Sikh religion, devotees are urged to attack weakness and sin with five “spiritual weapons”: contentment, charity, kindness, positive energy and humility. Even if you’re not a Sikh, I think you’ll be wise to employ this strategy in the next two weeks. Why? Because your instinctual nature will be overflowing with martial force, and you’ll have to work hard to channel it constructively rather than destructively. The best way to do that is to be a vehement perpetrator of benevolence and healing.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): If all goes well in the coming weeks, you will hone your wisdom about how and when and why to give your abundant gifts to deserving recipients—as well as how and when and why to not give your abundant gifts to deserving recipients. If my hopes come to pass, you will refine your ability to share your tender depths with worthy allies—and you will refine your understanding of when to not share your tender depths with worthy allies. Finally, Cancerian, if you are as smart as I think you are, you will have a sixth sense about how to receive as many blessings as you disseminate.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I suggest you gaze at exquisitely wrought Japanese woodcuts . . . and listen to jazz trumpeter Miles Davis collaborating with saxophonist John Coltrane . . . and inhale the aroma of the earth as you stroll through groves of very old trees. Catch my drift, Libra? Surround yourself with soulful beauty—or else! Or else what? Or else I’ll be sad. Or else you might be susceptible to buying into the demoralizing thoughts that people around you are propagating. Or else you might become blind to the subtle miracles that are unfolding, and fail to love them well enough to coax them into their fullest ripening. Now get out there and hunt for soulful beauty that awakens your deepest reverence for life. Feeling awe is a necessity for you right now, not a luxury.

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The iconic 1942 movie Casablanca won three Academy Awards and has often appeared on critics’ lists of the greatest films ever made. That’s amazing considering the fact that the production was so hectic. When shooting started, the script was incomplete. The writing team frequently presented the finished version of each new scene on the day it was to be filmed. Neither the director nor the actors knew how the plot would resolve until the end of production. I bring this to your attention, Gemini, because it reminds me of a project you have been working on. I suggest you start improvising less and planning more. How do you want this phase of your life to climax?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Cultivating a robust sense of humor makes you more attractive to people you want to be attractive to. An inclination to be fun-loving is another endearing quality that’s worthy of being part of your intimate repertoire. There’s a third virtue related to these two: playfulness. Many humans of all genders are drawn to those who display joking, lighthearted behavior. I hope you will make maximum use of these qualities during the coming weeks, Virgo. You have a cosmic mandate to be as alluring and inviting as you dare.

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46 | MARCH 15, 2018

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 159903409, JUDGE ANDREW H STONE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. GUADALUPE SALAZAR AND PHOENIX TAGGART, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO GUADALUPE SALAZAR: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $3,427.18. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189901222, JUDGE AMBER METTLER. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. PAUL CRUZ, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO PAUL CRUZ: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $592.50. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189900901, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MIREYA BARRON AND ROSABELIA NEVAREZ, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MIREYA BARRON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,233.29. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189902583, JUDGE ANDREW H STONE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. DESTINY LENABURG, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO DESTINY LENABURG: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $729.75. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189902532, JUDGE KENT HOLMBERG. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. ANIVA TEO AND REID PULEGA, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO REID PULEGA: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $12,324.20. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

URBAN L I V I N

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WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Developing Incentives

Let’s talk about some affordable housing realities. I know I’ve pointed out during the past year that affordable housing is rare and getting harder to find. This isn’t just a Salt Lake City problem; it’s a big city problem throughout the U.S., especially in areas with booming tech and other profitable industries. Seattle is a great example of what could be coming our way. They’ve had a massive population influx in the past two decades, and The Seattle Times declared, “Amazon so dominates Seattle that it has as much office space as the city’s next 40 biggest employers combined.” With that much office space comes thousands of employees who need a Google’s worth of housing. GeekWire noted last October that Seattle was indeed the nation’s top real estate market thanks to tech giants like Amazon (and, oddly to me, local breweries—there’s one microbrewery per every 19,000 people). They add, “12 percent of workers are employed in a STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering, Math] job.” Seattle city officials have been desperately trying to work with developers to deal with the housing crunch and massive rents. They came up with what they call the “grand bargain,” which would allow builders/ developers put in taller and denser buildings in core areas of Seattle if they include housing units that blue collar folk could afford. Honolulu, San Francisco, New York and Washington, D.C., have laws in place requiring developers to include affordable units in their construction plans. Salt Lake City is trying to do the same. Here’s the rub, though: When you require a developer to put, say, 20 percent of its new-construction inventory as low-income housing, the developer has to pass on their rent loss to the other 80 percent of tenants. If rents in a new building were planned at $1,500 for each two-bedroom apartment, and a law mandates that 20 percent of the units could only rent for $800 per month, then $700 would have to be added onto the other rentals. Thus: Rents are going up. Bringing this all home, Utah County is marketing a $200-million “Mountain Tech” commercial and industrial development right off the Pleasant Grove Boulevard freeway exit, with 10 buildings expected to mar the landscape. The Silicon Slopes might be great for our economy, but its terrifying for renters in both Utah and Salt Lake counties. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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While You Were Sleeping As the medal ceremony for the men’s 1,000-meter speedskating competition concluded on Feb. 23 at the Gangneung Oval in Pyeongchang, South Korea, “serial streaker” Mark Roberts, 55, of Liverpool, England, jumped the wall and took to the ice. Roberts peeled off his tracksuit to reveal a pink tutu, a “penis pouch” with a monkey face on it, and “Peace + Love” scrawled on his torso. Although he might have lost points for an initial fall, he jumped up and continued performing a dance routine. Metro News recounts that Roberts has streaked at Wimbledon, the French Open and soccer matches, along with dog shows and other large events. He “retired” in 2013, saying “gravity’s against me,” but apparently he couldn’t resist the global exposure of the Olympics.

WEIRD

Ironies As the 2018 Winter Olympics got underway, and athletes from Russia were forced to compete under the Olympic flag and be designated as “Olympic Athletes from Russia” (OAR) as punishment for systemic doping at the 2014 Games in Sochi, Russian bobsledder Nadezhda Sergeeva proudly wore a T-shirt that read “I Don’t Do Doping.” But on Feb. 23, Sergeeva became the second Russian athlete to fail a doping test. (Russian curler Alexander Krushelnitsky also failed a drug test earlier in the Games.) Sergeeva was a vocal critic of the Olympic policy toward Russian athletes, telling Yahoo Sports, “If we are here, and we are clean, we should be able to walk under our flag.”

Special Delivery At the beginning of February, several residents along a block in Marina, Calif., were hit by mail thieves. But the criminals probably didn’t know what hit them when they stole Rosalinda Vizina’s

Awesome! The mining town of Kurri Kurri, Australia, cut loose on Feb. 24 with a new festival to draw visitors: Mullet Fest, a celebration of the infamous hairstyle and those who wear it. Local hairdresser Laura Johnson came up with the idea, which included contests (Junior Mullet and Ladies’ Mullet categories, and so forth) and bands (the Stunned Mullets from Karuah). Winner of the junior division prize, Alex Keavy, 12, told The Guardian: “It’s not a hairstyle, it’s a lifestyle.” He pledged to use his $50 prize to buy his girlfriend a pie. More than 180 contestants competed for Best Mullet of Them All. Meryl Swanson, the local Labor MP and a contest judge, said she was “looking for pride, people embracing the mullet, finding self-worth in it.”

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Can’t Possibly Be True A designer pop-up store in Seattle made news on Feb. 22 for one particular item: a clear plastic, drawstring shopping bag that sells for—wait for it—$590. United Press International reported the bag was first seen on Paris runways in January and sports the Celine Paris label along with warnings in several languages about the suffocation risk posed to babies. Close Call Flemington, N.J., cemetery worker Peter Ferencze, 59, was digging a grave at Hanover Cemetery on Feb. 20 when the 800pound lid of a concrete burial vault fell on top of him, pinning him in the grave. Ferencze was treated and released from Morristown Medical Center after police and other first responders managed to lift the cover with straps, giving Ferencze enough space to squeeze out, the Morristown Daily Record reported. Bright Ideas Christina C. Ochoa of Wichita, Kan., and her mom, Christy L. Ochoa, explained to The Wichita Eagle that more than 50 $5 withdrawals Christina made from a Central National Bank ATM during a five-day period in mid-January were for a “money cake” she was making as a gift for someone. But the bank says the faulty ATM was dispensing $100 bills instead of $5 bills, and that Christina received $14,120 instead of $1,485. In a Jan. 22 lawsuit, the bank seeks $11,607.36, plus interest, it says is owed by Christina. The bank is also trying to seize two cars the Ochoas bought during the same period, claiming that the $3,000 down payment for one of them was made up entirely of $100 bills. n In Boston, trolley driver Thomas Lucey, 46, of Saugus, Mass., was indicted Feb. 21 for paying a man $2,000 to attack him while he was on the job on Oct. 30, 2016, so that Lucey could collect workers’ compensation and disability insurance. The “attacker” wore a Halloween mask and carried a plastic pumpkin, from which police obtained fingerprints used to identify him and unravel the scheme, according to The Boston Globe. A grand jury in Suffolk County brought charges of insurance fraud, workers’ compensation fraud, misleading a police investigation and perjury.

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Compelling Explanations On Feb. 9, the Texas 3rd Court of Appeals upheld the four-year prison sentence Ralph Alfred Friesenhahn, 65, of San Antonio received after his fourth DWI conviction in 2016, rejecting arguments from his lawyer, Gina Jones of New Braunfels, that the state’s legal limit for alcohol concentration discriminates against alcoholics, who have a higher tolerance for liquor. “You’re not being punished for being an alcoholic,” Sammy McCrary, chief of the felony division for the Comal County criminal district attorney’s office told the Austin American-Statesman. “It’s the driving that’s the problem.”

TMI? On Feb. 20, little Jameson Proctor was born in St. Louis and a radio audience listened in as he came into the world. Cassiday Proctor, co-host of the “Spencer’s Neighborhood” show on The Arch in St. Louis, scheduled her C-section right in the middle of drive time and then invited listeners to share the moment when Jameson was born, at 7:45 a.m., through a broadcast phone call. “Our radio show is all about sharing our personal lives,” Proctor, 33, told The Telegraph. She also solicited ideas for names from her fans and received more than 400 submissions. “It was not something I wanted to keep private,” Proctor said.

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Unclear on the Concept Washington State University senior Logan Tago, a football linebacker, received WSU’s Center for Civic Engagement Fall 2017 Community Involvement award on Feb. 1 for 240 hours of service to the local community, the WSU Daily Evergreen reported—service he was ordered to give as a stipulation of his sentencing in January 2017 for third-degree assault. In June 2016, The Seattle Times reported Tago allegedly hit a man with a six-pack of beer and later agreed to a plea deal that called for 30 days in the Whitman County Jail, $800 in fines—and exactly 240 hours of community service. Tago managed to play the final two games of the 2016 season and in all of 2017’s 13 games, despite a WSU athletic department policy that prohibits players who are facing a felony charge from playing.

package. Sfgate.com reported that Vizina, an entomologist, had ordered 500 live cockroaches for a study she’s working on. “I feel a little bad for the roaches in case they got smushed or tossed or something like that,” Vizina told KSBW. “For the thieves, I hope they went everywhere,” she added.

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Suspicions Confirmed District Judge Joseph Boeckmann, 72, took a personal interest in the young men who came through his courtrooms in Cross and St. Francis counties (Ark.) from 2009-2015 with traffic citations or misdemeanor criminal charges. The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported that Judge Boeckmann routinely dismissed those charges pending “community service,” which Boeckmann would set up through private phone calls with the men, assigning them to provide sexual favors or allow Judge Boeckmann to take pictures of them in “embarrassing positions; positions that he found sexually gratifying,” a court document revealed. Boeckmann, of Wynne, Ark., admitted to the charges in October and was sentenced Feb. 21 to five years in prison. Prosecutors had agreed to a lesser sentence in light of Boeckmann’s age, but U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker ordered the maximum sentence, saying, “he acted corruptly while serving as a judge. That sets his crime apart.”

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL


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City Weekly March 15, 2018  

The Foiles 2018

City Weekly March 15, 2018  

The Foiles 2018