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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY A TALE OF TWO CHRIS’

Writer Chris Stewart Warned Us. But Does Congressman Chris Stewart Care? Cover illustration by Jeff Drew jeffdrewpictures.com

13

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 18 A&E 23 DINE 29 CINEMA 31 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

RYAN CUNNINGHAM Cover story, p. 13

Call it serendipity. While working at the downtown library, the author stumbled upon the holy grail—a cache of novels penned in the ’90s by future Republican Congressman Chris Stewart. “My brain reflexively recoiled against the connection,” Cunningham says. Could it be Stewart predicted today’s dystopian political climate à la Nostradamus? Read on.

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

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Guv on the proposed “Donald J. Trump” highway. facebook.com/slcweekly

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Local rappers react to questionable Fresh Prince cover.

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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T F E B R U A RY 2 2 , 2 0 1 8 | V O L . 3 4 N 0 . 3 9

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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Cover story, Feb. 22, “Feed Frenzy”

It’s been a mystery to me why several months back I started reading opinions and articles in City Weekly and found them so damned interesting and well-written. That is, until I read this. Thank you. Now I know.

AL WINKELMAN

@SLCWEEKLY As for me, I like the warming.

MICHAEL FARRELL Via Facebook

You’re way too polite.

JANET VIGIL Via Facebook

Via CW comments

GET YOUR KITTY FIX

So, did Obama and Merkel consult on controlling Facebook or is that more #fakenews?

A.G. FOSTER

Via cityweekly.net

Dine, Feb. 22, Chuck-A-Rama

Exactly.

News, Feb. 22, “Fired Up!”

Ray Ward is my representative in the UT legislator. His courage and dedication to giving voice to issues of tremendous importance like global warming’s effect on climate change and legalization of medical marijuana are unique among his Republican colleagues. As an MD, he appreciates the rigors of the scientific method in bringing factbased, peer-reviewed discoveries to the attention of the public. Thanks for your timely coverage of this development on the Hill. Bountiful The jury is still out on this one. I don’t think anyone argues that the planet is not warming. The argument is how much humans are involved in the change. I used to believe that humans were the cause of climate change and then I opened my mind. In the past, the climate has changed way more dramatically from warm to cold and back with nothing at all to do with humans. What we are experiencing might be totally natural or just a tiny fraction off natural. I almost said “normal” but stopped because that might not exist.

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A&E, Feb. 22, “Pictures Perfect”

BY BY DANIEL DANIEL WALTERS WALTERS

City Weekly telling it like it is.

@THEREALK2THEC_

F

Via Facebook

HERE'S WHY YOU SHOULD CARE.

Via Facebook He should just be grateful that a jury set him free.

Via Twitter

@WIEOBENSOUNTEN

Get / 1 t n Re REE

MIKE SCHMAUCH

COLBY MAN

Pay up, Utah. Way to go, prosecutors! I think they went to the Marcia Clark and Christopher Darden School for Prosecutors. Swallow and Shurtleff should be in jail.

Perfect article.

THE Source for Tune-Ups, Rentals & Equipment

Written from the point of view of a carpetbagging old Senator.

FACEBOOK'S LATEST ALGORITHM IS should anyone pay [Swallow’s] legal fees? ANNIHILATING SMALL PUBLISHERS.

Illustrates that 99 percent of photographers who do it for money—I hesitate to call many of them professionals—are rubbish at what they do. Utah is worse than most areas with the wedding scene the way it is.

News, Feb. 22, “Shot Down”

NEW CAFE HOURS OPEN AT 7AM TUES-SAT 302 E. 900 S. I TINKERSCATCAFE.COM

FEED FRENZY

Opinion, Feb. 22, “Dear Orrin”

DAVE CALDWELL Via Facebook

Global warming is a thing; we have been warming since the last Ice Age. Let’s look at 1 million years as opposed to only 200.

MICHAEL GATTENBY Via Facebook

They don’t admit it doesn’t exist. They just have the real science that proves the carbon tax fraud that leftists don’t want to hear.

ROBERT JAMES DOBROVNIK Via Facebook

CHRIS KETH

Gross.

JENNIFER GUEST BILLINGSLEY Via Facebook How lazy is it to give a review of Chuck-ARama? People know what they’re getting when they go to Chuck-A-Rama and 30-year-old Greek diners—all the highs and lows and expected redundancies. Only a hipster like this guy would feel the need to write some “surprising” article about it.

MATT MORRIS Via Facebook

I have a distinct recollection of [critic Alex Springer] at about 8 years old sitting down with a plate of about a dozen of those scones, popping them open, filling them with honey and polishing them all off even before Round 2.

@SPRYUTE Via Twitter

The author responds: I tried that again as a 35-year-old. Just not the same, man.

Blog post, Feb. 24, “2018 Legislative Session: Finally, the Utahraptor gets the respect it deserves”

GOP lawmakers only make laws for corporate profit and rich people.

JASON OLIVER Via Facebook

Breaking news, Feb. 27, “Swallow’s Day in Court, Redux”

When citizens are accused they have to pay out of pocket for defense and if they can’t they end up in a cage. Why in the fuck

JERRALD CONDER

DAVE KINGERY Via Facebook

An Open Letter to Orrin Hatch

Recently, Donald Trump said you called him “the greatest presidents in the history of our country.” You also told those gathered at the American Enterprise Institute that people who support the Affordable Care Act are “the stupidest, dumbass people I’ve ever met.” Such pronouncements lead me to question your language, your judgment—and your circle of acquaintances. Those include, from photographic evidence, former and present senators Jim DeMint, John Ensign, Lauch Faircloth, Jesse Helms, James Inhofe, Ron Johnson, Rick Santorum and John Thune. The cumulative IQs of these eight scintillating intellects might, with a stretch, approach 750. Yet you call me a “dumbass” for supporting Obamacare. Conversely, you admire Mr. Trump despite his utter lack of knowledge—essential to any educated adult—of how our government works; despite his overt racism, his corrupt, self-dealing nepotism, his blatant lying; despite 40 years of stiffing suppliers, 30 years of admitted tax-cheating, 20 years of lady-parts grabbing, three wives, two divorces, trysts with porn stars; despite bragging that he’d like to date his own daughter because of the size of her “rack.” This is among America’s greatest presidents? He’s the role model you hold up for your grandchildren? What planet are you living on? Sincerely,

A.D. REED

Asheville, N.C. We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


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Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, RYAN CUNNINGHAM, BABS DE LAY, HOWARD HARDEE, ASPEN PERRY, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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OPINION

#PayMe

In my early 20s, there were five movies in rotation as my go-to bedtime stories. On any given night Godfather, Godfather II, Casino, Tombstone or Goodfellas would lull me off to dreams of ruling the world—by means of legitimate business, of course. The lessons offered in these films were there for the taking, and I loved them. With the women’s movement resurrecting the topic of equal pay amid companies still behaving shadily. I find one Goodfellas line in particular ringing in my ears: “Fuck you. Pay me.” While this sentiment may seem too vulgar or, dare I say, un-ladylike, I would argue it’s appropriate since there has not been significant change in the decades women have spent asking politely and “leaning in.” At this point, it is perhaps more befitting to the tone we should be taking. The way I see it, any justification a company offers for not paying female employees on par with their male counterparts is bullshit any way. Why not just lay it all on the table? Not to mention, the concept behind the line is simple: “Oh, you have this excuse? That’s your problem. Pay me.” Gender pay equity is perhaps the least-complicated issue our nation currently faces, so why hasn’t it been fixed? To her credit, Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski is known for being ahead of the curve when it comes to supporting women in business. Especially considering her installment of six weeks’ paid family leave for both female and male SLC employees last year. On March 1, she furthered her support of women and family by signing a policy promising to end pay inequity for city employees. I commend Biskupski for not only addressing this issue

BY ASPEN PERRY head on, but also challenging other Utah cities to look at their current practices. But I fear the Beehive State having the fourth-largest wage gap in the country is telling of a more systemic problem, which will require more than policy change. Less than a month ago, the Senate Business and Labor Committee refused to discuss a bill presented by Sen. Luz Escamilla, D-Salt Lake, to study the variance of pay between men and women at the state level. Their lack of discourse speaks volumes about the committee’s awareness of the issue—as well as their refusal to solve it. In addition to committees preferring to stick their heads in the sand, it’s no secret many Utah companies discovered they could avoid set pay for a set title by simply altering the title of their female employees. I personally know more than a handful of women in careers where their tasks match their male colleagues. Unfortunately, neither their title or pay reflect the job they’re actually doing. On paper, these companies appear to be complying, as only individuals within the organization would be privy to the roles of their coworkers. In order for policy abuse to change, insiders in such companies would have to speak out. And, much like in the #MeToo movement, men will have to lend their voice as well. Herein lies my main concern. Will men step forward to help alter a broken corporate culture in support of their female colleagues? Given Utah’s complicated relationship with how they view women, I’m not so sure. Not unlike the role women play in mafia and Western films, Utah loves to preach the importance of it’s women and children—all the while offering few substantial opportunities for ladies to prosper on their own terms. Women are only as important as their role of supporting cast allows. It’s a role many Utah women know all too well, myself

included. Frustrated by a lack of pay—with concrete knowledge I had male colleagues making significantly more—after I had my second child, I decided it was time to take my chances elsewhere. At the time, I had spent a few years submitting manuscripts for publication, and after weighing the probability of being published versus being paid equally, I decided to make a real attempt to become a professional writer. Sure, the chances of becoming a successfully published author are one in a million, but I reasoned: at least I had a chance. Taking on a system that preferred me in the role of “influencer” seemed more daunting than forging my own path. Furthermore, since my salary was on the low end, creating my own way meant little financial repercussion to our family budget. Had I continued to work, damn near my entire paycheck would have gone to child care. The choice to walk away from a career almost a decade in the making appeared to have already been made for me. The decision to work or stay home is a choice women constantly question and feel guilt over. These feelings of doubt are inevitable when so many factors of the decision have been taken out of our hands. If I would have had the lady balls then to demand more—#PayMe—my choice might have been different. For women to have more power over their own destiny, we need to use changes in policy to achieve results. It’s time to stop asking nicely and know our worth. Moreover, our male counterparts need to have our backs. With that, I ask all those aware of the disfunction within their companies: Are you with us? CW

Aspen Perry is a Salt Lake City-based aspiring author and self-proclaimed “philosophical genius.” Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Memory Loss

City Weekly first wrote about the dangers ahead for Salt Lake City’s Northwest Quadrant in 2010. The official idea then was to build a beautiful, sustainable community along the likes of Daybreak and sitting right on the wetlands of the Great Salt Lake. Neither the bugs nor the birds seemed to bother those bent on development. While that idea faltered, the Legislature decided to site the state prison out there, and is now pushing for an inland port in the fragile area. What got in the way of environmental stewardship were politics and politicians’ shortterm memory. Salt Lake City still wants to build, but without the state as its overlord. Westside residents are rightly concerned about pollution, traffic and, yes, the Great Salt Lake. The Salt Lake Tribune ran an op-ed citing the problems while the Deseret News was joyful at the thought of more business. Vacant land is just too tempting to leave alone.

Kiss This Bear Behind

Could we at least wait until Donald J. Trump is dead? Not that that’s going to happen soon to the healthiest and smartest man in the entire world, but it might be a bit early to think of naming roads after him. Of course, that idea came from fellow coal-lover Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, who might as well say, “Bears Ears my ass,” to the public. That’s where he wants to put the Donald J. Trump National Parks Highway. “As long as we can put an expletive in front of the name,” says Michael Aaron, publisher of QSalt Lake. This isn’t unusual for a red state. “Consider that in Alabama, Mississippi and Virginia, ‘Jackson’ is in the Top 10, but not any other president, not even Washington,” writes Jeff Guo of The Washington Post, who reminds us that the No. 1 road name in Utah is, wait for it, “Main.”

A Win For Equity

Yea, Jackie Biskupski— finally. Last week, the Salt Lake City mayor stood up for women, and pushed back against the hateful Utah Legislature. She welcomed Women’s History Month with a Gender Pay Equity policy, something the Legislature not only refused to consider but pretty much dismissed as, you know, so much hysteria from women. Sen. Luz Escamilla, D-Salt Lake City, wanted to commission a study to look at the pay gap among the state’s 22,000 employees, but was shut down almost from the start, according to KUER 90.1 FM. That’s what happens when your state is run largely by conservative, old white males who mostly think women should stay home and bake bread.

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

What’s the capital of Kentucky? Louisville, you say. Hey, try Frankfort instead. You can pick up countless facts like this from Josh Stasinos who’s arguably the local king of pub quizzes. The genial 41-year-old Los Angeles native has been writing trivia for eight years.

CITIZEN REV LT IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

WOMEN’S RALLY

How many quizzes do you run? And at what venues?

Two weekly quizzes: Monday nights at Ice Haüs [where he’s general manager], and Wednesday nights at Ogden’s Funk ’n Dive bar. I also have a friend who uses my questions every Friday night in Maui at the Shearwater Tavern, so I guess that makes me transpacific. I also do several corporate quizzes a year.

How did you become involved in pub quizzes?

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HITS&MISSES

Simply, I was bartending a slow Monday night, and had heard about pub quizzes elsewhere. I wanted to be busier and make more money so I came up with a unique format. My first quiz took me a month to write, but was a huge success. When it was over I realized I had to do it again every week … and here we are eight years later.

What are the general categories?

Round one is done on a Bingo card and is 24 general trivia questions. Round two is namethat-tune, where they only get 20 seconds to name the artist and title. Rounds three, four and five are each themed. Over the last eight years, I have covered just about every subject you can think of—and then some.

Which category is easiest—and hardest? And which is your favorite?

Any category can be made hard or easy depending on how it’s written. The biggest hits are when I go to great lengths to be clever—like ridiculous descriptions of movie plots—but those are also exhausting to write. I love music, so that is my favorite round to put together. It also takes the most time.

How do you come up with the questions? Over the years, there must be thousands.

I always have pen and paper with me. I take notes of interesting things all week long—that I hear on the radio, read, see in film or TV … a random conversation at the bar. Anything can become a question. At this point, it’s tens of thousands. Sometimes a regular will say I’ve already asked that question, but over the years I have mostly not repeated myself.

Do you have “groupies”—regular quiz followers?

I have gotten to know a lot of people very closely over the years. They come and go. Some have been coming for many years. My friends in Maui met and married because of my trivia.

What’s the fascination of pub quizzes? What’s their origin? Maybe TV or radio quiz shows?

It’s like watching Jeopardy, but with drinking, and the possibility of winning something. There are heaps of trivia shows on the radio and TV and on the internet, but a pub quiz is much more personal and interactive … and R-rated. And it’s an excuse to drink on a Monday night and not feel bad about it. They started in the U.K. in the ’70s for the same reason I did it … to pack a pub on a slow night.

Celebrate International Women’s Day at a peaceful rally with attitude, sponsored by KRCL 90.9 FM. You can hear stories from guest speakers and look back at the achievements and political legacies of women who paved the way. The goal is to encourage more women to run for office, to vote and to support important legislation. “In honor of the vibrant and bold women throughout history who have championed equal rights, we invite women and allies throughout Utah to wear bold and bright colors, bring signs of unity and support and join us for a rally to Amplify Women’s Voices,” according to the event’s website. There will be a musical performance at noon. Utah State Capitol Rotunda, 350 N. State, 801-363-1818, Thursday, March 8, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/amplifyingwomensvoices.

PUBLIC LANDS LECTURE

You’ve heard it before: We’ve got to “take back our lands.” As part of the Wallace Stegner Center symposium on Public Lands in the Changing West, you can hear the other side from John Leshy, an expert in public lands, water and other natural resources issues as well as constitutional law. Leshy, who’s writing a political history of America’s public lands, will talk about Debunking the Creation Myths of America’s Public Lands. “We must embrace large federal landholdings as a shared patrimony— a precious heritage which binds us to our ancestors and which we, in turn, hold in trust for future generations,” he says. S.J. Quinney College of Law Moot Courtroom, Level 6, 383 S. University St., 801-585-3440, Wednesday, March 14, 12:15-1:15 p.m., free, bit.ly/2FNBnRu.

CURTIS TOWN HALL

Do you feel disenfranchised by the curious gerrymandering that has placed southern Utah and Salt Lake County in Rep. John Curtis’ district? Come to Curtis’ Sandy Town Hall where he promises to answer any and all questions. “I said I’d reinvent town halls, and I intend to! Come and experience a different approach to citizen engagement,” he says. “As always, you can ask me anything!” Sandy City Hall, 10000 S. Centennial Parkway, 801-922-5400, Saturday, March 10, 10 a.m.-noon, free, bit.ly/2tbPNZa.

You award prizes, right?

The top three teams win a prize—white-elephant style. I have given everything from Lego mini-figures, to Squatty Potties, to Ziplock bags that appear to have cockroaches in them, and everything bar- and drinking-related … except the alcohol itself.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net


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I’d say the market for studies on marijuana legalization is currently about as hot as the market for, say, late-night gas-station taquitos in the greater Denver area: i.e., torrid. Much as the public craves results, though, the fact remains that legalized recreational weed is just a few years old in the handful of states that allow it. Data’s coming in steadily, but it’s preliminary, and therefore wide open to interpretation. Your traffic-accident query is a good example of how far into the weeds one can get here. Take Colorado, where recreational marijuana has been legal the longest—since 2012, officially, though business really started booming in 2014 with the advent of licensed retail outlets. According to analysis by the Denver Post, the number of drivers there who died in car crashes with THC in their systems more than doubled between 2013 and 2016. OK, that doesn’t sound great. But in context it’s not so clear. For one, crash fatalities in Colorado (and in Washington, another legalization state) over roughly this period have remained in line with stats from control states where marijuana remains outlawed, per 2017 research in the American Journal of Public Health. And multiple earlier studies had previously found reduced traffic fatalities following the passage of state medical-marijuana laws. And two, the relationship between THC and impairment remains poorly understood, even down to establishing intoxication—as anyone who’s nervously awaited a drug test will tell you, THC metabolites linger in the bloodstream long after the high has worn off. (Chugging grapefruit juice doesn’t mask those metabolites, by the way, if anyone’s still claiming it does.) We’ve had decades to observe how alcohol degrades one’s skills behind the wheel; far less time to assess the intersection of driving and weed use. For the moment, though, what we’ve got is data to confirm anyone’s preexisting prejudices. Opposed to recreational marijuana? Legalization’s made the roads deadlier. In favor? Plenty of evidence suggests that’s not really happening. This was a provisional conclusion offered in a 2016 report by the Drug Policy Alliance, which found “stable” traffic-fatality numbers in pot-friendly states, and also that no, legalization doesn’t seem to be contributing to any increase in kids getting high. The tax angle is more straightforward: legal pot equals big bucks. As of last year, Colorado had taken in $500 million in weed taxes, with half going to K-12 education. Municipalities can impose their own levies, too, which is how Pueblo County ended up spending $420,000 (heh heh) on scholarships for 210 local students in 2017. Another place legal weed appears to be

leaving its footprint: the opioid crisis. An AJPH study from last fall found that in the first two years of recreational marijuana being legal in Colorado, opioid-related deaths declined 6.5 percent, reversing an upward trend going back more than a decade. On the one hand, these are (once again) preliminary numbers, but on the other they track with what we know about places where medical marijuana had already been legalized—a 2014 paper calculated a 25 percent reduction in opioid-related fatalities in states with medical marijuana laws on the books compared to those without. Meanwhile, in a survey of 224 patients in Michigan from 2016, respondents reported a 64 percent reduction in opioid use associated with their medical-pot habit, plus “decreased number and side effects of medications, and an improved quality of life.” What all this seems to be telling us is that, where possible, pain sufferers are substituting weed for opioids, and doing better for it. Switching to another reliable painkiller that poses neither a massive addiction problem nor an OD risk—who’d have thunk, right? Predictably, this reasoning hasn’t found a home at today’s Department of Justice, where Attorney General Jeff Sessions has adopted an unmistakably weed-hostile stance overall—in January he revoked Obama-era directives telling the feds to quit prosecuting pot offenses in states that have legalized it—and specifically scoffed at the theory that marijuana’s painkilling properties could help on the opioid front. Last winter he waved off the very idea as “almost a desperate attempt to defend the harmlessness of marijuana,” adding, “Maybe science will prove I’m wrong.” Again, early studies appear to be doing so, not that Sessions is likely to care. A first-draft scorecard, then, for legalized weed: promising on opioids, good for state budgets, and TBD on some other issues, including traffic deaths. In other words, plenty of research left for publicpolicy types in pursuit of the straight dope. Such as: At two Colorado animal hospitals, cases of marijuana poisoning in dogs went up fourfold after medical pot became legal, with edibles playing a role in at least a pair of fatalities. To win the war against leaving gummies on the coffee table, we’ll surely need more data than that. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607.


NEWS

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Long Shots

Overshadowed by Romney, Democratic hopefuls press on in a statewide Senate bid. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

MAX RUTHERFORD

T

Salt Lake County Councilwoman and Senate candidate Jenny Wilson believes Congress needs new blood. “There has to be a new generation of leaders that step up and say, ‘Enough is enough.’ The Senate is an old boys club,” she says.

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Romney, Democrat Mitch Vice’s campaign is eclipsed by both of them. Less visible than Wilson, Vice is the only Democrat as of press time registered with the lieutenant governor’s office to gather signatures. Vice’s lack of exposure seems to correlate with fewer resources. Wilson considers herself the Democratic frontrunner partly because of the steady flow of contributions she’s collected. By the end of last year, Wilson had raised more than $410,000—more than 200 times the amount Vice had reported (about $1,700) with the Federal Election Commission. “It’s not discouraging; it’s politics,” Vice says. “I have more will than money. The thing about money is it’s prohibitive to the common citizen to get involved, and the common citizen is the one being affected by money. Money isn’t always the answer.” Now in marketing and advertising, Vice grew up in Los Angeles but moved to Utah around 1993 to work and raise a family. He contends he brings a salt-of-the-earth perspective to the race. “I’m just a working-class guy that has been forgotten by the Democrat party,” he says. “I am just a working-class Joe, never been in politics before other than being a very frustrated citizen. I’m here taking a stand for the working class.” Economic and social justice are priorities, and finance reform is a centerpiece of his campaign. At a time when politics are polarizing, Vice aims to focus on constructing ideas rather than demolishing others, a tactic he believes Democrats have relied on at their own peril. “They’re not making a connection to the citizens. There’s no message. There’s no vision. No one knows what Democrats stand for other than ‘We’ve got to fight Republicans’ or ‘We’ve got to fight Trump,’” he says. “Look, can we fight for something instead of against something.” CW

state who haven’t had a voice.” Not as high-profile as Trump, Wilson has a reliable supporter in her own corner, a man who calls Romney a friend and a former three-term Salt Lake City mayor—and who also happens to be the candidate’s father, Ted Wilson. Ted Wilson noticed his daughter’s early aptitude for connecting with folks. He remembers, for instance, taking Jenny to political events when she was a teen and seeing a spark in her as she interacted with others. “I knew from then on that she would be good at politics,” Ted Wilson says. “She’s got a tough skin on her. She takes criticism seriously but doesn’t let it ruin her general disposition. She’s always had a toughness about her and a willingness to jump in and take on projects that might seem impossible.” A bid for a U.S. Senate seat against Romney, who Ted Wilson describes as “a guy who’s almost a God in Utah politics,” will be a slogging contest. Ted Wilson considers Romney a close friend and praises the former GOP presidential nominee for playing an integral role in rescuing a floundering 2002 Winter Olympics. But even he says Romney’s purchase of a local home seemed to be a calculated move. Jenny Wilson is a fifth-generation Utahn, he says, whose great-great-great-grandfather Orson Pratt descended into the valley two days before Brigham Young in 1847. As for long odds, Ted Wilson can empathize; he ran unsuccessfully for the same seat in 1982 against incumbent Hatch. He says success shouldn’t be measured merely by the election results, and he’s optimistic the race will be positive no matter the outcome. “She’s a winner either way,” he says. “If she gets the nomination, I expect she does a good job and makes Mitt respond to tough questions. She’ll keep a good spirit, and it can turn out to be a very positive experience.” That’s assuming Wilson makes it that far. If her efforts are being overshadowed by

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caucus convention versus those who support a signature-gathering method. The battle led to a rule change on Feb. 24, which critics say is illegal and could strip the Republican Party of its “qualified political party” status. A January poll conducted by The Salt Lake Tribune and the Hinckley Institute of Politics, however, indicates Wilson trails considerably behind Romney. As of press time, Romney is joined by three other Republicans who intend to gather 28,000 necessary signatures to qualify for the ballot: L’Capi Titus, Alicia Colvin and Jay Hiatt. Mitchell Vice is the lone Democrat who is considering a signature-gathering path at this time. Wilson, who opted not to gather signatures but instead take her chances at the Democratic convention in late April, currently appears to be Romney’s likely opponent. Wilson bills herself as a fiscally responsible reformer who is strong-willed yet open to compromise. On the county council, she’s backed initiatives in the mid-2000s to extend health benefits to family members of LGBTQ county employees and supported imposing strict limits on gifts to elected officials. “For me, these issues are a matter of fairness and a matter of compassion,” she says, adding federally, she’s pushing for Medicaid expansion, as well as publicly financed campaign reform. In the ’90s, Wilson worked in Washington, D.C., as chief of staff for the late Rep. Bill Orton, D-Utah, and she highlights her experience in Congress as a boon to her campaign. But she also remembers a time when Utah’s delegation had members from both parties. “What I feel is so needed in this federal delegation is a different voice. I’m not going to go in and take over as a Democrat if I’m elected to the U.S. Senate,” she says. “I’m going to bring a voice for a lot of people in this

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he buildup to Mitt Romney officially declaring his candidacy for U.S. Senate was so slow and suspenseless that by the time it finally happened, you’d be forgiven if your first thought was, “Didn’t he already announce this a while ago?” Nope. Romney waited until Feb. 16 to say publicly that he intends to fill a seat Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, has been holding for the last 41 years. For plenty of Utahns, this meant all was right in the universe. Since at least the 2012 presidential election—and, for some, long before that— Romney has remained a household name in Utah’s political circles, and to them, he stands as the poster child of an effective and honest leader. But it’s not just John Q. Public who’s got the former Massachusetts governor’s back. Romney gained early support from prominent party members—Hatch and Gov. Gary Herbert, to name a few. And the Republican with the highest national profile, President Donald J. Trump, also buried the hatchet with Romney—the two more often sneered at one another—and dispatched a congratulatory note via Twitter upon Romney’s announcement. All that’s left is the coronation. Except for one glaring detail. Romney hasn’t won the election yet, nor has he even been nominated by his party—which is in a tumultuous battle over who can run on the ticket. All the while, candidates from both camps have signed up to gather signatures to appear on the ballot. Or in the case of Salt Lake County Councilwoman Jenny Wilson, she decided to go the convention route and started campaigning before Hatch revealed he wouldn’t run for an eighth term. Stocking her quiver with political arrows specifically barbed for the incumbent senior senator, Wilson admits without hesitation that she’d rather have campaigned against Hatch. Regardless, she’s not deflated. Wilson senses a shift in the political climate that she thinks opens up the opportunity for a Democrat to have a puncher’s chance in a statewide election. “I feel that this is such a unique year and traditional rules don’t apply,” she says. Part of that might be a reaction to Trump, who’s a different brand of GOP than those who have won a majority of the vote in Utah. And locally, a faction in the Utah Republican Party recently fueled a simmering civil war that divides the GOP into those who want to nominate candidates through the


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In addition to techno-thrillers, Stewart has dabbled in spiritual self-help, autobiographical ghostwriting (he helped with Elizabeth Smart’s memoir), political history, and most recently historical fiction. Perhaps his most ambitious project was a series of novels called The Great and Terrible, a six-part, 1,387-page set that charts an epic course “from the beginning of time to the final hours of the last days.” The series sounds a bit like the Revelations-inspired Left Behind books, except reimagined with Mormon theology. When Stewart first ran for Congress in 2012, opponents suggested his lively imagination and preoccupation with the end times could inform his actual worldview. But Stewart balked at those claims. “My true worldview is just the opposite of this apocalyptic,” he told the local Fox affiliate. “Look, I know we’re going to have challenges,

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together: that Chris Stewart is the same person as Chris Stewart. A quick Google search revealed the unavoidable truth. To date, Stewart has penned a thick stack of volumes, most of which are novels. His career got rolling shortly after retiring from the Air Force in the mid-1990s, honing his chops

Chris Stewart is major in the U.S. Air Force. On June 3, 1995, Stewart led a flight of two B-1s on an around-the-world bombing mission. For 36 hours, 13 minutes, he flew nonstop, averaging 640 mph and shattered [sic] previous world records in time, distance, and speed. In August of that year, he was presented with the MacKay [sic] Trophy for the “most significant aerial achievement of the decade.” The author welcomes E-mail at stewart@micron.net.

I made this discovery through happenstance: a couple years ago, I worked parttime as a shelver at the Salt Lake City Public Library. One day, I noticed a glut of titles from an author named Chris Stewart. In the first few seconds of recognition, my brain reflexively recoiled against the connection about to snap

on military techno-thrillers in the tradition of Tom Clancy and Clive Cussler. The author bio on the jacket of Stewart’s first novel unabashedly touts his bonafides as an Air Force pilot:

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hris Stewart was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012. I found out Stewart was my congressman around the time I moved to Salt Lake City in 2013, when I learned that my house was just a block north of the new boundary line between the 2nd and 4th districts. (With a view of the Wasatch Mountains to the east, I could reasonably purport to see all four of Utah’s congressional districts from my front yard.) But it was a couple years later when I learned that Stewart held a second job every bit as ignominious as U.S. representative: he’s a writer, too.

yweekly.net

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—Rep. Chris Stewart

M. EVANS & CO., INC.

UNITED STATES CONGRESS

“There’s been times on the intelligence committee when I’m doing work, or when I’m in Russia, that I am reminded and realize, you know, this is similar to what the book laid out,”

and who knows, maybe there will be a zombie apocalypse or something like that, but I think, really, we have great reason to be hopeful, and that’s the more important message and really the message of our campaign.” I had zero interest in reading Stewart’s work until last year. As the investigation in Russian election interference began to pick up steam, I amused myself with the thought that Stewart must be kicking himself for never coming up with such a sensational premise on his own. But then I wondered, what if he did already come up with that premise? So I started digging deep into his bibliography of military dramas and quasi-religious fantasies. When I came back around to his 1997 debut novel, Shattered Bone, I hit pay dirt. Here’s the publisher’s synopsis:

U.S. and Russia. It’s so crazy that it just might work. There’s something spooky about this Russian president. In part, it’s his physical presence—he’s described by the omniscient narrator as “a wiry man, with thin brown hair atop a narrow face and pointed chin. Black eyes sat deep within his pock-marked face and his roman nose jutted out above pale, thin lips.” But it’s his sinister persona that rings every bell.

A nightmare scenario becomes terrifying reality when the Ukraine calls in an undercover agent from the old Russian regime who has lived in America nearly all his life and is now an elite bomber pilot. Drawn back to his home, the agent is pitted against a Russia ambitious to rebuild its tyrannical power. As his stolen bomber sweeps down on its target, the world braces for nuclear war, and everyone is left to wonder: Who is the renegade pilot working for?

Fedotov is characteristically thorough in his political intelligencegathering. Over the course of his previous stint as prime minister, Fedotov “had committed enormous resources to collecting such information on the power elite, the most interesting and useful of which was compiled into thick but tidy dossiers and tucked away in his safe.” We’re told that he retains such meticulous information about every member of his inner circle that he could’ve “instantly recited the most intimate personal details—from their habits of personal hygiene to their latest travels, from their political sympathies to conversations they had with their wives while lying in bed.” “The man has no moral compass,” one of Ammon’s Ukrainian co-conspirators claims. “No internal sense of right or wrong. Already he is an international pariah. By his own choosing. He has isolated himself from the West for this very purpose. He does what suits his own interest. And his interest is perfectly clear.” While Ammon prepares for his improbable B-1 heist, the war between Russia and Ukraine escalates dramatically. Russian forces invade the Crimean peninsula then follow up with a surge across the Ukrainian border into eastern Ukraine, committing myriad atrocities along the way. In desperation, Ukrainian officials initiate Ammon’s mission way ahead of schedule. Ammon and a companion named Morozov are sent to the United States, but they’re captured by the U.S. government before they ever set foot on an Air Force base. (I guess by now I should’ve warned readers about spoilers. Oops.) Still with me? Ammon, who it turns out genuinely loves Springsteen and the Cowboys, makes a secret pact with U.S. officials to carry out his caper posing as a Ukrainian spy. But instead of nuking Russia, he’s ordered to carry out a precision strike on just one high-profile target: Fedotov. Ammon and Morozov (who was drugged and has no memory of being

It was almost everything I wanted out of a Chris Stewart novel: Russian intrigue, international espionage, nuclear doomsday scenarios, elite bomber pilots. At 384 pages, the novel threatened to be a slog. But as a masochist with a penchant for novelty, I couldn’t resist: I had to read this book. The main protagonist is Richard Ammon, an all-American hotshot pilot who loves Bruce Springsteen and the Dallas Cowboys—or so we’re led to believe. We later find out that Ammon is actually a Ukrainian man named Carl Kostenko, a top-shelf Soviet spy who was planted in the United States as a teenager in an elaborate, years-long plot to infiltrate the U.S. military. Ammon held up his end of the ruse when he became an active Air Force pilot, but by that time the Soviet Union had folded, leaving the purpose of his mission unclear. When Ammon is suddenly kidnapped by his Ukrainian superiors, he’s debriefed on an escalating conflict between Ukraine and Russia. The new Russian president, Vladimir Fedotov, is hellbent on retaking Ammon’s childhood homeland and restoring Russia’s status as a world superpower. To achieve his geopolitical aims, Fedotov even approves a top-secret proposal for a nuclear strike meant to devastate Ukrainian forces into submission. To counteract the dastardly Fedotov’s plans, the Ukrainians give Ammon a new mission: use his insider status at the U.S. Air Force to steal a nuke-loaded B-1 bomber and use it to ratchet up tensions between the

To most of his subordinates, Fedotov was a mysterious man, shrouded in a veil of paranoia and fear. He was a shadowy figure, a hard and ambitious man who had risen to power with such speed and direction that he left no trail in his wake.


VIA FLICKR.COM/REPCHRISSTEWART

“Forty-five seconds, sir!”

“Captain Blenko!” Fedotov called to his guard. “Arrest this man! Get this coward out of my sight!”

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It gets better. The guard is frozen with indecision. Only one person in the room wants to start a nuclear war, but that person is also the only one with the authority to decide. The general panics and reaches for the control panel. He and Fedotov tussle, and as Fedotov orders the guard to shoot, Nahaylo’s mind flashes to all of the innocent lives that could be lost, including his grandchildren.

The book ends happily, with a nuclear crisis averted, a dangerous Russian president eradicated, and a battered Richard Ammon returned to his beloved wife and life in the United States. So was Shattered Bone a slog? I’ll say this much: The plot is mostly predictable, the characters are two-dimensional, and the writing—when it’s not describing an action sequence involving aerial combat—is unspectacular. Other readers were more enthusiastic. “Absolutely thrilling page-turner,” one Goodreads commenter said. “Exciting and well-paced without a potty-mouth vocabulary. The worst I could find was sonofa... [sic]. How refreshing!” another posted. Stewart’s strength in this book is knowing his subject matter, which is perhaps an awareness he more broadly possesses about all his writing 20 years on. When I interviewed Stewart over the phone back in June, he portrayed his current yet-to-be-published project as a hodgepodge of his interests. “I guess you’re supposed to write what you know, right?” he offered rhetorically. “And I know a little bit about intelligence and national security and military. And I know now a little bit about politics. So it’s a little bit of a combination between the two.” Even as he plugs away at a new book, it’s hard to imagine Stewart could write anything more timely than his maiden effort, given its eerie prescience. He even admitted that “maybe once or twice” it occurred to him that present-day proceedings have overlapped with certain events in his 1997 novel. “There’s been times on the intelligence committee when I’m doing work, or when I’m in Russia, that I am reminded and realize, you know, this is similar to what the book laid out,” he said. But Stewart stopped short of calling his novel prophetic. He said the Russia-returns-to-Soviet-glory scheme in Shattered Bone was just a reflection of suspicions held by some U.S. military personnel in the 1990s. “Those of us in the military were hopeful that they would be integrated into the West, but we never really—I don’t want to say we didn’t expect it, but I don’t think we were surprised to see that that didn’t work out very well.” And as for the fictional president Fedotov, Stewart maintained that the character wasn’t based on any specific, real-life figure; Fedotov

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“Thirty seconds, sir!” the sergeant cried out. Sir! What do you want me to do?” [sic]

“Kill the missile!” he cried again, while lurching for the self-destruct button.

Nahaylo grabbed Fedotov by the shoulders and pulled him around, staring him straight in the eyes. “President Fedotov, you must kill the missile!” he cried. “We must stop while we can! This isn’t some kind of game here! This is life! This is death! This is war!” Fedotov pushed him away. Nahaylo held on. Fedotov pushed him back once again, then glanced at his guards in a panic.

General Nahaylo pulled out his pistol and shot Fedotov square in the chest, blowing him back in his chair.

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“They are cowards, and I will not back down. So, General Nahaylo, don’t tell me what I must or mustn’t do. Unless you are in charge here. Don’t tell me what to—

“Ten seconds, sir!!” the sergeant cried out. “Nine … eight!”

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captured by the U.S.) manage to steal the B-1 and fly halfway around the world into Russian airspace. But when Morozov figures out what Ammon is up to, he foils the American assassination plot and launches five onboard nukes, sending them all to major Russian cities. Ammon is able to disarm all five warheads before Russian fighter jets force the B-1 into a crash landing, but not before Fedotov learns that an American bomber has aimed nuclear missiles at targets across Russia. In the spirit of mutually assured destruction, Fedotov launches his own nuclear missile directed at the Eastern Seaboard of the United States. “I will not sit here and wait to be destroyed,” Fedotov exclaims to his top general. “I will not roll over like a dog on his back and expose my jugular vein.” What follows is maybe the most affecting scene of the entire novel. When Fedotov’s general tries to explain that the American warheads have been disabled and pose no threat, the Russian president is unmoved. The general begs Fedotov to self-destruct the Russian missile, but with mere seconds remaining until the point of no return, it becomes clear that Fedotov has no intention of canceling the strike. He insists that the Americans started the fight, that he’s just “calling their bluff.”


Moreover, it’s the role of a member of the House Intelligence Committee, which includes a chairmanship over the Department of Defense Intelligence and Overhead Architecture Subcommittee, a congressional group that broadly oversees “the policies, programs, activities, and budgets of the National Reconnaissance Program, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Program, the General Defense Intelligence Program (Defense Intelligence Agency), and Department of Defense activities that are funded through the Military Intelligence Program.” In other words, Stewart is not a passive observer anymore. Instead of dreaming up fictitious Russian plots to disrupt the world order, he literally oversees our nation’s efforts to track and counteract actual Russian plots to disrupt the world order. Oh, to be Chris Stewart these days! How techno-thrilling to have the inside scoop on all these juicy, strangerthan-fiction Russian plots: The 2016 plot to sow distrust in the American electoral process, and the plot to do it again in 2018. The plot to support Donald Trump’s Putin-friendly U.S. presidential campaign while undermining the campaign of Hillary Clinton, a longtime Putin foe. The plot to propagate outrage and division over social media with Twitter bots and fake news farms. And why not: the plot Putin announced just this month to develop a nuclear ballistic missile that would render U.S. missile defense systems “absolutely pointless”—though one might blame this recent arms escalation on our president’s worldwide boast about his big and powerful Nuclear Button. It would be unfair to imply that Stewart is completely unconcerned about Russia. In August of 2016 after a trip to Moscow, Stewart did warn both The Salt Lake Tribune and the Deseret News that the Russian government was looking to stir hijinks in our election and “in nearly everything we do.” But in his address to the Utah state senate in January, Stewart drew attention to other concerns. He dismissed charges of collusion between the Trump campaign and Kremlin-tied conspirators, claiming “there just simply isn’t evidence.” He slammed the inflammatory Steele Dossier by simultaneously discrediting its origins and flatly pronouncing “there is nothing in it that is true.” Furthermore, he accused “a few individuals in very senior positions” at the FBI, the Department of Justice, and the CIA (without naming them) of working as “political operatives” (without citing evidence). So this is who Congressman Chris Stewart has become: a member of the House Intelligence Committee who publicly impugns the motives and integrity of top U.S. intelligence officials, all while casting unspecific doubt on an American investigation into a foreign adversary, one whom Stewart himself admits is acting with indiscriminate malice toward our democracy. He’s an intriguing character, this all-American hotshot pilot, so full of complexity and contradiction—maybe too good even for writer Chris Stewart to concoct. But as much as Stewart’s critics have shunned his active literary imagination in the past, I personally wish he honed its power more sharply right about now. A man in his role who can foresee the apocalypse so vividly is, perhaps, well-positioned to prevent it. CW JEFF DREW

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represented “more of a composite of just Russian mentality or Russian culture more than any one individual.” It’s also worth mentioning that Vladimir Putin didn’t come to power until 2000, three years after Bone was first published. Stewart’s book, then, is a worst-case scenario. It’s an exploration of what would happen if our worst fears were realized, if Russia returned to an authoritarian, anti-West mindset under the insidious reign of an anti-democratic megalomaniac. What’s unsettling is that it’s entirely rational to argue we’ve arrived at those conditions, but it’s the climactic scene with the paranoid, unhinged leader ready to start a nuclear war to reassure his own sense of pride—the culmination of the worst case—that really gives me pause. I wondered if Stewart felt the same way. When I asked him what has prevented a comparable nuclear crisis from happening up until now, he might have misinterpreted my question as contesting the plausibility of the crisis crafted in the novel. “I wouldn’t have any fun writing a book that wasn’t based on something that was plausible,” he posited. “It’s just so much more challenging when you stay within the realm of what’s real and try to create something entertaining within that realm. And so, not only with this book but with other books as well, I mean, they’re all plausible. They’re all based on, you know, the military world as I saw it, the relationship between political leaders and military leaders. So you know, something like that, you know, clearly hasn’t happened, but it could happen. And that’s what makes the drama kind of fun to me is to keep it within the realm of what’s actually possible.” Just as I was about to transition to a new topic, Stewart cut in: “Did that answer your question? I’m trying to figure out if that’s what you asked.” “Maybe elaborate a little bit on your concern of that situation arising and why or why not it might happen,” I replied, attempting to restate my initial question more explicitly. “Well I’m not sure what else I can say, and to be honest with you, as you described the scene, I remembered it. But if you’d asked me about it, I would’ve struggled to kind of come back to that scene, but—maybe I’ll just leave it as that’s the best I can say.” I moved on to questions about Stewart’s writing career after that. We talked about what it takes to improve as a writer, and how to measure that improvement. I feel an immediate kinship with anyone who tries to write because, well, writing is hard, and it’s difficult to appreciate how hard it is unless you’ve tried it. It was Gene Fowler who once said, “Writing is easy. You only need to stare at a piece of blank paper until a drop of blood forms on your forehead.” So I have respect for anyone, Stewart included, for trying to write. But the paths we’ve chosen as writers are much different. I see myself as more of an observer, one who stands to the side and describes what he sees. Stewart might have started out with a similar ethos in the 1990s—in fact, I see Shattered Bone as a creative expression of accumulated experience and testimony. It reflects something authentically observed. The Chris Stewart of 2018 has a different role. One that isn’t as conducive to speculative flights of fancy. It’s the position of a U.S. Representative.


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Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood Live This year marks the 50th anniversary of the launch of Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood on PBS, and that landmark—accompanied by a Sundance-premiere documentary about Fred Rogers—has the children’s television pioneer back in the popular consciousness. But despite Rogers’ passing in 2003, his legacy is ongoing, and not just in the generations of kids who grew up on his affirming messages. In 2012, PBS Kids launched Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood, a series for pre-schoolers featuring an animated version of the gentle feline who was one of Rogers’ puppet alter-egos in the original Land of Make-Believe. Familiar characters like Henrietta Pussycat, King Friday and X the Owl are represented by their offspring in a show that continues Rogers’ focus on recognizing that everyone, even young children, deal with difficult emotional situations. Those charming messages come to theaters around the country in Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood Live, a musical stage experience starring all of the familiar cast members from the ongoing series. Daniel decides he wants to do something nice for all of his neighborhood friends, inspiring a ripple effect of kindness—and this song-filled, family-friendly tale features colorful sets and costumes and an innovative lighting design to capture the attention of young audience members. It even provides opportunities for kids to dance and sing along to new musical numbers and the classic “It’s a Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood.” And if their parents or grandparents—perhaps remembering their own delightful experiences in the Land of Make-Believe—want to sing and dance along as well, nobody is going to complain. (Scott Renshaw) Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood Live @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main., 801-355-2787, March 8, 6:30 p.m., $20-$42.50, live-at-the-eccles.com

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

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JC Carter, director of Utah Repertory Theatre’s Utah-premiere production of Straight, talks about the fluid sexuality of the play’s protagonist, Ben, with a favorite line from the show. “He says, ‘When a guy does something with another guy, he automatically becomes gay, with everything attached, no going back,’” Carter says. “He doesn’t want to be just ‘gay Ben.’” The play explores the life of Ben, a 26-yearold investment banker who is romantically involved with a woman named Emily … and also romantically involved with a man named Chris. It plays around with the idea of openmindedness among millennials, who still often find the “B” in “LGBTQ” hard to process. “The way these relationships are portrayed— between Ben and Emily, and Ben and Chris—is identical,” Carter says, “so much so that it even made liberal old me rethink my concepts of sexual attraction.” Playwrights Scott Elmegreen and Drew Fornarola—who will be in attendance for opening night, and conducting a new play workshop on Saturday, March 10—craft a story that works within some of the conventional rhythms of romantic comedy; “It’s like a rom-com turned on its ear, then turned upside down,” Carter says. Yet it’s also very specifically not a “coming out” story, in the sense that it’s about someone trying to live his life without defining himself as either X or Y. “Don’t label Ben,” Carter says. “I don’t want him labeled. How often have I gotten stuck with a label I didn’t like that was just one aspect of me but not the only aspect of me?” (SR) Utah Repertory Theatre: Straight @ Sorensen Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, March 9-25, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, March 25, 3 p.m., $20, utahrep.org

Not everyone can claim the luck of the Irish, and some still search for that elusive pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. However, until one reaps those rewards, why not enjoy traditional Irish entertainment, and kick up your heels to make merry? Or better yet, avoid injury and let trained professionals do the leaping. Indeed, the Trinity Irish Dance Co. tends to please those who claim a wee bit of the Irish, whether through desire or descent. Think high-kicking dancers with lightning-fast feet. The creative input of Emmy Award-winning Hollywood dance coach, former champion step dancer and company founder Mark Howard inspires performances that are both innovative and exhilarating. Little wonder, then, that they’ve performed before sell-out crowds in Europe, Asia and North America, showing off their skills before presidents, royalty and enthusiasts alike. “Trinity Irish Dance Co. has everything we wanted for a performance celebrating Irish heritage,” says Teri Orr, executive director of the Park City Institute, presenter of the group’s performance. “Their style fuses traditional elements with Howard’s innovative choreography, pushing the boundaries of what seems possible.” These dazzling dancers arrive a week before St. Paddy’s Day with a show that will likely bring more satisfaction than a keg of green beer. Likewise, Trinity Irish Dance suggest another shade of green—specifically, that which springs from envy. “These dancers are acrobatic,” Orr adds. “Their performances are charged with high-flying energy.” A word of warning: Don’t let consumption of green beer tempt you into trying it at home. (Lee Zimmerman) Trinity Irish Dance Co. @ George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, March 10, 7:30 p.m., $29-$79, parkcityinstitute.org

When life gives you lemons, so the saying goes, make lemonade. When life gave stand-up comic and writer Maria Bamford lemons, the pug lovin’ Minnesotan created her own surreal, confessional comedy style as a cathartic release. Her authentic approach includes finding the hilarity of county-issued hospital socks, as she mentions in the Comedy Central 2016 spotlight This is Not Happening, while her recently concluded Netflix series Lady Dynamite originates from her struggles with anxiety, depression and being a newlywed at the age of 43. Named 2014 Best Club Comic by American Comedy Awards, Bamford shed some light on the inside of her brain in an interview on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. “It is a type of OCD ...” she says. “If you have unwanted violent or sexual thoughts—for example, if you were concerned about, let’s just say, chopping up your parents into chunks and bits and putting those bits on a Cobb salad—you might want to talk to somebody.” Despite such unwanted thoughts, Bamford has a close relationship with her parents. Bamford’s Special Special Special—which landed on vulture.com’s Top 10 Stand-Up Specials of 2012—was hosted in the comfort of the family home in Minnesota. And she loves performing enough that she’s willing to offer some advice for anyone looking to follow in her footsteps. For those thinking to give comedy a try, Bamford says, “Do it and do it and do it. Do it wherever you can, wherever you are.” (Rachelle Fernandez) Maria Bamford @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, March 11, 7 & 9:30 p.m., sold out, 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

Utah Repertory Theatre: Straight

Trinity Irish Dance

Maria Bamford


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Born to It

Soprano Marina CostaJackson is part of an operatic family tradition. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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here’s a way of looking at Marina Costa-Jackson’s operatic career as the most obvious development in the world. And there’s a way of looking at it as a fairly improbable destination. The soprano makes her Utah Opera debut in a joint production that finds her playing Nedda in Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci and Lauretta in Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi, but she’s no stranger to Utah. Her father is from Salt Lake City, and she studied at both Utah State University and the University of Utah. Yet her family roots also go back to Italy—specifically Palermo, where her mother was from, and where she lived for several years as a child, growing up speaking Italian while her father was in the Air Force. It was there that opera was “just a constant soundtrack to my childhood,” CostaJackson says. Her two sisters, however, were the ones who first showed an interest in operatic singing, and a facility for it. “My younger sister, Miriam, was copying [the singing on the recordings],” Costa-Jackson recalls, “and my mom turned around and went, ‘Woah.’ She got it started.” Both Miriam and Costa-Jackson’s older sister, Ginger, started performing opera, but Marina didn’t think she’d end up following in their footsteps. “As the middle child, I was the one who had the most stage fright,” she says. “When my sisters performed, I’d be nervous for them.” Costa-Jackson describes herself as “indecisive” about her own career path, and initially began studying child psychology. But at one concert listening to her sisters, at around the age of 21, she had a change of heart. “Nothing can be more thrilling than opera,” she recalls thinking. “I got in on scholarship [to study music at USU], and it was one of the first times I actually sang in public.” Thanks to financial generosity from Ginger—who was already performing professionally by that time with the Metropolitan Opera—Marina and Miriam were able to return to Palermo to study opera with a private tutor. Subsequently, Marina CostaJackson has been named the Maria Callas Debut Artist of the Year by Dallas Opera in 2017, and has performed with Seattle Opera, Washington Concert Opera and Oper Köln in Germany. Aside from the obvious family talent, Costa-Jackson believes there might be some particular connection with Italian works like the ones she’s performing with

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

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Utah Opera. “I think if you had opera critics listening to any of our voices,” she says of her and her sisters, “they’d say they’re more apt for Italian opera. You could say it was a ‘blood thing,’ but growing up with the language, it’s ingrained in who we are. If I were raised by a French mama, it might be different. I love singing in Russian, too, but the Italian language is in me.” A little bit of Utah is in her, as well. While Salt Lake City isn’t exactly Costa-Jackson’s home town, she still believes there’s going to be something special about her Utah Opera debut. “We’ve always, as a family, known about Utah Opera,” she says. “Salt Lake is predominantly where my father’s family is. My husband and I moved back here about a year and a half ago to make it our home base. And I love how much the people of Utah love the arts. It’s very clear in the way we’re building theaters here. It does feel good to be here, performing for friends and family. “Even the chorus has people I was with at Utah and USU,” she adds. “When I’m around those I love, I always care just a little bit more about their opinion.” This performance provides a unique challenge by asking lead actors like CostaJackson to play very different roles in the grand tragedy of Pagliacci and the farcical comedy of Gianni Schicchi. “I have to say, I’m really glad Pagliacci comes first,” she says with a laugh. “Better to have the farce at the end, because you get to leave the

Utah Opera soprano Marina Costa-Jackson

audience with a smile rather than tears.” And while she acknowledges that the dual role isn’t easy, she takes the true professional’s approach of finding the connection between those roles. “Lauretta [in Gianni Schicchi] is just as passionate about her ideas as Nedda [in Pagliacci] is. It’s no less passionate just because it’s a comedy.” While it might have taken her a bit longer to embrace the artistic calling that came more quickly to her sisters, she doesn’t approach this performance like a girl who had stage fright. “Nedda was a role I learned in school, because I loved the music so much,” Costa-Jackson says. “It had been on my top five ‘I hope I can do this as soon as possible.’ … When you’re offered an opportunity, you wonder, ‘Will I be able to pull this off successfully?’ I just proved it to myself.” CW

UTAH OPERA: PAGLIACCI / GIANNI SCHICCHI

Capitol Theatre 50 W. 200 South 801-355-2787 March 10, 12, 14, 16: 7:30 p.m. March 18: 2 p.m. $15-$105 utahopera.org


moreESSENTIALS

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Salt Lake City artist Todd Howelson presents new digital artwork in The Thunder, Perfect Mind at Sweet Branch Library (455 F St., 801-594-8951, slcpl.org), March 9-April 21, with an artist reception Saturday, March 10, 3-5 p.m.

PERFORMANCE

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Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Urban Flea Market The Gateway, 12 S. Rio Grande St., March 11, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., fleamarketslc.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Debunking the Creation Myths of America’s Public Lands Quinney School of Law, 383 S. University St., March 14, 12:15 p.m., law.utah.edu

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Corey & Drew Wiseguys SLC 194 S. 400 West, March 9, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Jacob Leigh Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., March 9-10, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

J. Crockett: Nostalgic Blood Barnes & Noble Jordan Landing, 7157 Plaza Center Drive, West Jordan, March 9, 11 a.m., barnesandnoble.com Jack Carr: The Terminal List Barnes & Noble Sugar House, 1104 E. 2100 South, March 9, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com James and Judith McConkie: Whom Say Ye that I Am? Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, March 9, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Jennifer Adams: I Am A Warrior Goddess The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Mar. 10, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com

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COMEDY & IMPROV

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Odyssey Dance Theatre: Shut Up and Dance: Chicago Nights Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, March 8 & 10, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Odyssey Dance Theatre: Shut Up and Dance: MJ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, March 9, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Trinity Irish Dance George S. & Dolores Dore Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435655-3114, March 10, 7:30 p.m., parkcityinstitute.org (see p. 18)

LITERATURE

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DANCE

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Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood Live: King for a Day Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, March 8, 6:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Hir Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through March 11, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org The Hunchback of Notre Dame Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through March 31, dates and time vary, hct.org Spring Awakening Westiminster College Courage Theater, 1840 S. 1300 East, through March 10, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu Straight Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, 801-535-6533, March 9-25, times and dates vary, utahrep.org (see p. 18) Up (The Man in the Flying Chair) Studio 115, 240 S. 1500 East, 801-581-6214, March 9-17, 7:30 p.m., matinee March 17, 2 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Utah Opera: Pagliacci/Gianni Schicchi Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, March 10-18., dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 20) The Weird Play Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, through March 11, times vary, artsaltlake.org

Jess Hilarious Wiseguys SLC 194 S. 400 West, March 13, 7 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Maria Bamford Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, March 11, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18) Rob Schneider Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, March 8-9, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Russ Nagel Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, March 10, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com WellRed Comedy Wiseguys SLC 194 S. 400 West, March 8 & 10, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com


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moreESSENTIALS Peter Hassrick: Bierstadt and Moran: The Battle for Yellowstone Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, March 8, 7 p.m., umfa.utah.edu Stegner Lecture: Stony Mesa Sagas Quinney School of Law, 383 S. University St., March 8, 12:15 p.m., law.utah.edu A Whole New World of Alan Menken: An Evening of Songs and Stories de Jong Concert Hall, Brigham Young University, March 8, 7:30 p.m., arts.byu.edu

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

306 Hollywood Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, through March 14, modernwestfineart.com Art of Infertility Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, through March 9, accessart.org Bill Reed: Jupiter’s Belts Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through March 10, times vary, artatthemain.com Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 26, utahmoca.org Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 13, utahmoca.org Epicenter: Our Futures Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through July 1, umfa.utah.edu Eric Overton: Monument UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through March 17, utahmoca.org Go West! Art of the American Frontier from

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the Buffalo Bill Center of the West Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through March 11, umfa.utah.edu Inner Echoes Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, through April 1, urbanartsgallery.org Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective LDS Church History Museum, 45 N. West Temple, through April 15, history.lds.org Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu Matt Flint: This Wilderness Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, through March 16, gallerymar.com Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 12, utahmoca.org Nathan Florence: Toward Home Modern West Fine Art, 177 W. 200 South, through March 10, modernwestfineart.com Peter Ruplinger: Custom Stained Glass Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through March 15, slcpl.org Sugar-Coated Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through April 14, saltlakearts.org Thomas B. Szalay: Images from Timeless Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through March 31, slcpl.org Todd Powelson: The Thunder, Perfect Mind Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801594-8651, through Arpil 21, artist reception March 10, 3-5 p.m., slcpl.org (see p. 21) Trent Alvey & Claudia Sisemore: What I Did on My Summer Vacation Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through April 13, slcpl.org


Chef Viet Pham’s Nashville hot chicken was well worth the wait.

a man named Thornton Prince back during the Great Depression. Prince was known for being a bit of a man-slut, and when his girlfriend heard that he was fooling around with other ladies, she hatched a

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Can’t miss: the fried chicken sandwich Best bet: anything served “hot behind”

MARCH 8, 2018 | 23

In an effort to save you the time of looking up what exactly sets Nashville hot chicken apart from other varieties, here’s a quick primer: Legend has it that the spicy take on fried chicken originated with

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fter weeks of social media teasing, Viet Pham’s highly anticipated new venture Pretty Bird (146 S. Regent St., prettybirdchicken.com) has finally opened its doors. Despite the fact that a line had formed outside on opening week in the bitter February cold, the vibe surrounding Regent Street was not unlike that of a rock concert. The excitement for this new eatery—along with the buttery aroma of fried chicken— charged the crowd with palpable enthusiasm.

blend of spices and aioli. The first thing I noticed was the complementary crunch that comes from the slaw, pickles and that ohso-juicy fried chicken. Each bite is a glorious ode to texture, and then the nuanced spice ensemble that Pham has created starts to kick in. With every subsequent bite, the pepper flavor starts to build until it’s kissing the back of your throat. Don’t get me wrong, the hot behind is indeed hot, but it’s that good kind of hot that doesn’t exercise unrighteous dominion over the other ingredients. The balance of flavor and texture you get in this outwardly unassuming sandwich is not just pretty—it’s damned near beautiful. Regent Street just got a little bit spicier, and that’s a motherclucking good thing. CW

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

were as crisp as their assembly-line service. The small space was never intended to host a restaurant, but the mindfulness put into its layout— with seats for only 15 or so guests— only adds to its charm. After placing my order, I found an empty spot by the counter where I could see all of the steps my bird went through before my plate came out. At the moment, the only two options on Pretty Bird’s menu are a fried chicken sandwich ($10.50) and a quarter bird ($9.50), which can both be made into combo meals for a couple bucks more. Upon ordering, you get the choice of mild, medium, hot or “hot behind”—so named for the warning that line cooks yell when they’re running behind you with something molten. I was eager to see just how spicy Pretty Bird’s willing to go, so, armed with valor, I went with the hot behind fried chicken sandwich, which comes topped with cider coleslaw, pickles and Pretty Bird Sauce—a magical

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Bird is the Word

plan to burn sweet retribution right into his gullet. She prepared a big dish of fried chicken for dinner one night, and liberally dusted his portion with a few scoops of cayenne pepper. Thinking Prince’s head would explode from the heat, she was instead surprised to see he was instantly enamored with the food. From this bit of Tennessee history, a restaurant called Prince’s—which is still in operation—was born, and Nashville hot chicken was born along with it. Having visited the Nashville favorite Hattie B’s with my wife, I felt like my palate was adequately primed for Pretty Bird. When I arrived, I already had visions of crispy, pepper-powdered fried chicken dancing in my mind, and the restaurant’s interior was absolutely resplendent with the smell of frying oil and hot sauce. I spotted chef Viet Pham along with his crew, manning their stations in fresh-pressed, white button-down shirts, which


FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

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Rolled ice cream is starting to take off in a big way, and new eateries offering the tasty spirals of frozen goodness are finding ways to present them with something unexpected. At Doki Doki (249 E. 400 South, 385-229-4339, facebook.com/dokidessert), which celebrated its grand opening at the tail end of February, they’re rolling up their ice cream inside sweet Japanese crêpes. To drink, Doki Doki serves different cream teas, along with boba tea for those who like their beverages to have a bit of texture. Beat the summer rush and get there now.

St. George Farmers Market Call for Vendors

The Downtown Farmers Market at Ancestor Square (2 W. St. George Blvd., farmersmarketdowntown. com) in St. George is seeking local vendors. The market officially kicks off May 12, and will be open every Saturday through Oct. 27. Like its sister event in downtown Salt Lake City, the St. George market is looking for any area growers, craftspeople or other vendors who create their goods with locally sourced ingredients. The market is also accepting volunteer applications—any interested parties can email info@farmersmarketdowntown.com.

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

$12 Lunch Specials at Current

Current Fish and Oyster Executive Chef Alan Brines has been busy implementing a few new specials to complement their weekday lunch menu. Brines is bringing back the popular chicken and waffle with its white cheddar and green onion waffle and jalapeño maple syrup, along with a cauliflower sandwich and a roasted pork sandwich. Be sure to pair your dozen-dollar lunch specials with one of Current’s day drinks like the Brown Derby loaded with honey, grapefruit and bourbon, or the Antoinette with vodka, elderflower, grapefruit, lime, rhubarb bitters and sparkling wine. Not a bad way to spend a lunch hour. Quote of the Week: “When I’m no longer rapping, I want to open up an ice cream parlor and call myself Scoop Dogg.” –Snoop Dogg Food Matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

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KING BUFFET

L U N C H B U F F E T • D I N N E R B U F F E T • S AT U R D AY & S U N D AY A L L D AY D I N N E R B U F F E T


A map of the ever-expanding IPA landscape. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

T

here’s no doubt that India pale ales are huge right now. In fact, they’re so popular that on any given day, you could run across more than a halfdozen variants of this single style of beer. If you’re not attuned to IPAs, they can all seem similar and even downright identical. I’ve put together a list of locally made IPAs that encompasses some of the more popular varieties; hopefully, I can help you distinguish the differences between them so you can make a more informed decision during your next beer purchase. The West Coast IPA: This style of IPA was born in the early- to mid-2000s, and is

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26 | MARCH 8, 2018

MIKE RIEDEL

Navigating India Pale Ales

found mostly in the San Diego area. Emerging from the American Northwest’s new subgroup of citrusy hops, these beers quickly developed a massive following, changing the IPA game forever. They have heavy citrus peel bitterness, with malt sweetness that hinges on the fruitier side. Look for big citrus and piney hop bitterness in the finish. An excellent local example would be Epic’s Hopulent IPA. It’s super complex, and is a true representation of the style. The New England IPA: This style is relatively new to the IPA scene. It was born in Ohio, perfected in New England and is now becoming a worldwide phenomenon. One of the things that made IPAs so huge is their bitterness, and this particular style of pale ale has managed to utilize all the flavors that shine in the citrus and tropical hop varieties, while cutting way back on the bitterness. This style also relies on a cloudy to murky orange appearance that makes it look a lot like orange juice. The result is a creamy and tropical-tasting beer that looks and tastes like fruit juice, but with no actual fruit present. One of the best examples in SLC is 2 Row’s Feelin’ Hazy IPA. It looks and tastes just like an alcohol-infused Orange Julius. The Fruited IPA: Another new trend with IPAs is the addition of fruit. I guess the thinking here is that, if the implied flavors from the hops make you happy, the actual fruits that the hops are mimicking will make you extra-happy. In some respects,

these are done successfully; the trick here is to avoid conflicting flavors between the fruit flavors and the hops. You don’t want tangerine on top of tangerine-like hops. That just muddles them both. One of the best examples that I’ve tried locally is Uinta’s Grapefruit Hop Nosh. The citrus here really works well with the IPA without becoming the whole point of the beer. The Session IPA: These IPAs encompass everything mentioned above, plus some others. This style of IPA has all of the flavors of their progenitor beers, only with the alcohol level toned down. Typically the ABV level is below 5 percent and the drinkability quotient is higher than high. Utah breweries have been doing session IPAs long before

Get hoppy with Uinta’s Grapefuit Hop Nosh IPA

they were cool, and, frankly, have perfected them. If you’d like to get to know a great local session IPA, Shades of Pale’s Grapefruit Revolution is worth getting acquainted with—it’s light in body but full on malt and hoppy citrus flavors. There are even more IPA variants out there: black IPAs, retro IPAs, English, Southern Hemisphere and even India pale lagers (IPLs). Only you know what flavor profiles work best for you. Keep this checklist handy next time you’re working your way through your favorite beer list, and remember: Fresher is always better with IPAs. As always, cheers! CW

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ALEX SPRINGER

REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

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You know you’re in a BBQ place worth its salt when the aroma of smoked meat hits you long before you can look at the menu. For lunch, you can’t go wrong with a Kaiser’s Hillbilly Hamburger ($9): a juicy pile of sliced brisket sandwiched between a hamburger bun struggling to maintain its structural integrity. The joint also offers combos that let diners mix and match ribs, brisket, pulled pork, chicken and sausage; I went with a two-meat combo plate ($15.95) with ribs and sausage. I’ve never been one to scoff at a good dry rub, but there’s something elegant about a rack of ribs that hasn’t been prepped with anything but salt and black pepper. Such a sparse seasoning strategy puts the meat’s flavor and the pitmaster’s smoking acumen front and center, and owner/Texas native Gregg Chamberlain knows what he’s doing. The smoked sausage is generously portioned—one link could cause serious blunt-force trauma—and damn, is it good, with the characteristic snap of a sausage made with authentic casing (guts), and packs a pleasant punch of black pepper and garlic. Reviewed Feb. 8. 962 S. 300 West, 801-355-0499

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FILM REVIEW

Second Glances

CINEMA

A re-watch of A Fantastic Woman yields something less than a “best of the year” candidate. SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A

Daniela Vega in A Fantastic Woman narrative packs so much hostility into its tight narrative time frame that it defines Marina too much by her victim status, rather than through the entirety of her life experience. Lelio does at times try to leaven the sting of A Fantastic Woman with fantasy sequences offering another glimpse into Marina’s state of mind, like a walk into a high wind that turns into something out of a silentera comedy, or a choreographed dance in a gay nightclub. There’s also the ever-present reminder that this is a love story, through the post-death visions Marina continues to see of Orlando, and a lovely slow dance to Alan Parsons Project’s “Time.” Yet Lelio also goes a touch overboard with the motif of mirrors; it’s clear that the physical body Marina sees doesn’t match the identity in her head the first three or four times. Vega’s performance allows the film to dodge the perception that Marina is simply an object of pity—the triumphant final scene makes that clear—but the return journey toward that ending is bumpier than it was the first time around. CW

BBB Daniela Vega Francisco Reyes R

Tangerine (2015) Kitana Kiki Rodriquez Mya Taylor R

801-363-0565 580 E 300 S SLC theartfloral.com

MARCH 8, 2018 | 29

The Danish Girl (2015) Eddie Redmayne Alicia Vikander R

Art l a r o Fl

The

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TransAmerica (2005) Felicity Huffman Kevin Zegers R

make someone ’ s day

A FANTASTIC WOMAN

TRY THESE Boys Don’t Cry (1999) Hilary Swank Chloë Sevigny R

Funerals weddings Birthdays

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nomination for The Danish Girl while Tangerine’s Kitana Kiki Rodriguez and Mya Taylor remained on the awards sidelines. Vega conveys a ferociousness built on living under perpetually judging eyes, and understanding the continuum of aggression from uncomfortable glances to overt physical assault. Lelio captures Vega’s almost imperceptible flinch when Orlando’s exwife calls Marina by her male dead-name, recognizing the sting of someone’s refusal to recognize you. And in one of the most powerful sequences, Marina—who has not had any top or bottom surgeries—visits a sauna in hopes of finding something left behind by Orlando, her ability to “pass” as male in the men’s locker room providing a reminder of her strange place in the world. All of this makes A Fantastic Woman a compelling glimpse into the life lived by a transgender woman—except that it’s such a narrow window on that life. What emerges in a second look, after the initial gut-recoil horror at the many indignities Marina faces, is what a fine line A Fantastic Woman walks between exploration and exploitation. From the physical confrontation with Orlando’s son, to a police station physical examination that requires her to strip naked, to being abducted by Orlando’s family members because she dared to show up at the memorial, Marina’s life becomes an almost relentless string of transphobic incidents. Of course it would be absurd to suggest transgender people don’t face such hostility on a daily basis; it’s just that this

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

wkward things can happen between the first viewing of a film and the second viewing. For example—and I’m just spitballing here—you could put it on your list of the year’s best films, only to discover that maybe it’s not quite that great. Such is the dilemma that faces me with regard to A Fantastic Woman, co-writer/ director Sebastián Lelio’s Oscar-winning Chilean drama. It’s the kind of story that delivers a visceral impact as its unfolding for the first time, anchored by a mesmerizing central performance. But when you know what’s coming, parts of the structure begin to crumble, and some of the filmmaking choices feel clunky rather than potent. It starts to feel less like a great movie than like a kind of movie that you want to be great. Its protagonist is certainly one that’s rarely seen on screen: Marina Vidal (Daniela Vega), a transgender woman who works as a waitress by day and sings in a hotel lounge by night. She’s in a happy relationship with an older, divorced man, Orlando (Francisco Reyes), but her world crumbles when Orlando dies suddenly from an aneurysm. And in case the grief wasn’t enough to disrupt her life, Orlando’s ex-wife and children want to erase Marina from their lives, including making it clear she’s not welcome at the memorial service. It’s a powerful thing seeing an actual transgender actor tear into a performance the way Vega does here, not fishing for the plaudits cisgender actors almost invariably get for the “brave” transformations they undergo to play trans; just look at 2015, when Eddie Redmayne scored an Oscar


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CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. BEFORE WE VANISH [not yet reviewed] Aliens take human form while scouting for a planned invasion of earth. Opens March 9 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR) A FANTASTIC WOMAN BBB See review on p. 29. Opens March 9 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) GRINGO [not yet reviewed] A straight-laced businessman (David Oyelowo) improbably— and comedically—becomes a wanted criminal. Opens March 9 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE HURRICANE HEIST [not yet reviewed] It’s a heist … in a hurricane. Whaddaya need, a road map? Opens March 9 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT [not yet reviewed] Another family is tormented by a mysterious masked trio. Opens March 9 at theaters valleywide. (R) THOROUGHBREDS BBB.5 If writer/director Cory Finley had played this same concept with a straighter face, it might have collapsed as over-earnest satire of upper-class mores; instead, it’s a pretty terrific dark comedy. The focus is the renewed friendship between Lilly (Anya Taylor-Joy), a Connecticut rich kid, and Amanda (Olivia Cooke), a self-admitted sociopath who once killed the family race horse. But Amanda’s unique personality makes her a possible accomplice when Lilly considers getting her hated stepfather (Paul Sparks) out of her life. Finley compiles an ace team of technical credits to accentuate his two strong lead performances, including Erik Friedlander’s marvelously evocative score of percussive beats and yipping, whining strings. And while perhaps it’s too obvious to build a narrative around the idea that the girl with no emotions might have a stronger inner compass

for right and wrong than her mansion-dwelling friend, Cooke finds a surprisingly poignant core in that character, while Finley keeps the action moving with bursts of sly humor. By the time Finley gets to the climactic moment—directed with bravura restraint—the touch of acidity with which he delivers his moral makes it go down easier. Opens March 9 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw A WRINKLE IN TIME BBB I went to bed thinking I’d watched something vaguely disappointing; I woke up wondering if I’m woefully underappreciating it. Director Ava DuVernay adapts Madeleine L’Engle’s novel about a troubled 13-year-old girl named Meg (Storm Reid) who undertakes an adventure to find her long-missing scientist father (Chris Pine), assisted by her younger brother (Deric McCabe), a classmate (Levi Miller) and three mysterious supernatural beings (Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling). The fantasy component of Meg’s trans-dimensional quest initially feels a bit thin, including characters soaring over a landscape of floating islands that feels a bit like DuVernay’s Ava-tar. But while a primal battle between the forces of light and darkness is the central external conflict, the script hones in on the feeling of being an unhappy outsider, with unsettling imagery that turns happy-family settings like a suburban cul-desac and a busy beach into nightmare moments. Reid brings a prickly energy to the protagonist role, emphasizing the idea that this is less a family-friendly blockbuster than a reminder that anyone, no matter what others try to convince them, has the capacity to be a hero. Opens March 9 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 306 HOLLYWOOD At Main Library, March 8, 7 p.m. (NR) BOMBSHELL: THE HEDY LAMARR STORY At Main Library, March 13, 7 p.m. (NR) THE CIRCUS At Edison Street Events, March 8-9, 7:30 p.m. (NR) DOLORES At Rose Wagner Center, March 14, 7 p.m. (NR)

PHANTOM THREAD At Park City Film Series, March 9-10, 8 p.m. & March 11, 6 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES

ANNIHILATION BBB.5 It’s fitting that a story about free-flowing DNA (Alex Garland’s adaptation of Jeff VanderMeer’s novel) combines so many genre classics into something new and fascinating. Biologist/ex-soldier Lena (Natalie Portman) joins a research team into a mysterious phenomenon called “the shimmer” that is slowly engulfing more and more of the American East Coast. The bulk of the story follows Lena on that expedition with four other women (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Gina Rodriguez, Tessa Thompson and Tuva Novotny), and it’s wonderful that the team’s demographics are so matterof-fact. Garland finds sci-fi inspiration everywhere—Solaris, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Alien, The Thing—and while some of the “inspiration” feels perilously close to theft, many images and concepts here are indelible. The character and philosophical underpinnings are perhaps too thinly developed, but that still leaves a spectacle that’s generally wondrous to behold. (R)—SR

DEATH WISH BB Just what we need now: A morally repugnant good-guy-with-agun remake directed by vessel of pure id Eli Roth. Michael Winner’s original was morally questionable, but at least central character Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson there, Bruce Willis here, sleepwalking through the part even more than Bronson did) feels somewhat conflicted about the vigilante justice he rains down upon New York City. This version is just a slam-bang, rootin’-tootin’-shootin’ fantasy about Kersey’s revenge on the scumbags who murder his wife and leave his daughter comatose, though at least screenwriter and walking hard-on Joe Carnahan doesn’t let the bad guys rape the women as in the 1974 flick. Roth takes the blunt-object screenplay and dulls the edges further, leaving a tonally deranged and shockingly violent celebration of vigilantism that escapes 1-star judgment for technical skill alone. (R)—David Riedel

RED SPARROW BB If this were meant to be nothing but a dopey cinematic airportnovel, it might actually be possible to get carried away by the popcorn logic—but when you’re making the equivalent of Trigger Warning: The Motion Picture, flippancy is not a good look. Jennifer Lawrence plays Domenika, a Russian ballerina whose career is sidelined by injury, forcing her down the road toward training as a spy with special skills in seduction (stop laughing). Lawrence is the secret weapon for making this come at all close to working, bringing her steely determination to bear on the enigmatic Dominika, but she can’t make audiences ignore the extra-extra-rapey-and-torture-y unpleasantness. While Red Sparrow clearly shares DNA with unabashedly trashy, stylish genre fare in the Luc Besson tradition, punishing intensity ain’t the vibe for a movie where the crippled ballerina instantly becomes an international super-sexy-spy. (R)—SR

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ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Meadows Massacre, Junta Deville and The Jingoes. Wey started after the latter band had run its course; “I broke up the fuckin’ band,” Spock says. He spent the ensuing summer days remodeling his basement into a practice space. At night, he’d jam on acoustic guitar, coming up with songs like “Scream About You,” which merges The Stooges and Rolling Stones. “The songs were just coming to me—almost a whole album’s worth,” he says. He called Jingoes drummer Trevor Goss and the pair refined the arrangements, then sent cassettes to potential bandmates. That’s how Morrison (Ether, Red Bennies, The Wolfs, The Moths, PurrBats) became involved. Local über-producer Mike Sasich (Sarah Anne DeGraw and the Odd Jobs, Thunderfist, The Moths) enlisted as well. While recording, Spock’s wife, Raemie, suggested that the song “Bark” sounded like it should be a duet; enter Thunderfist associate Anna Kennedy. That was 2016, and Wey’s eponymous debut album came out last Valentine’s Day. Spock attributes the delay to busy schedules, not that anyone really cares, especially after hearing it, because— órale, güey—the album is pinche awesome. Imagine Jello Biafra stepping into John Doe’s shoes, to caterwaul alongside Exene Cervenka (only it’s Kennedy and her phenomenal voice). Now imagine X’s cool intensity and the Stones’ swagger with the trebly guitar fuzz of The Stooges. Wey calls it, fittingly, “punk rock boogie.” Spock estimates the band has played a dozen shows in its existence, and they have three shows planned to support Wey. Once they’re done, Morrison intends to retire from performing live. Given how much music he’s given Salt Lake City over the past 25 years, that’s a bummer, güey. Spock says that, while he respects Morrison doing what’s best for himself, he didn’t form this band just to break up. Stopping when Morrison leaves, he says, would be “putting a period at the end of something that’s still gonna keep going. Do I wish Eli would stay with us? Of course. Do we respect his decision? Of course we do. And I think he respects our decision that we wanna share this music with as many people as possible. And the music yet to come.” CW

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ere’s your Español lesson for the week: The band Wey gets their name from the Spanish word güey, which they spell in a colloquial way. It’s kinda like how some people think “ya” spells “yeah.” But Wey’s reason for not using the formal spelling is acceptable. “You don’t want people to think it says ‘gooey,’” vocalist Spock and I say, almost simultaneously. As guitarist Eli Morrison finishes some things in the kitchen, listening to Debussy piano instrumentals on his zillion-watt stereo, Spock (real name Eric Uquillas) elucidates upon his choice of band name. He first heard the word in a scene from the Robert Rodriguez film El Mariachi. The title character orders a beer and, as the bartender begins to pour, he indicates—with contempt in his voice—that he’d prefer it in a bottle: “En botella, güey.” Needing to know the meaning of the word, Spock looked it up. “The first thing that it said in the Mexican slang, Google fuckin’ thing, was ‘punk, bro, asshole, friend.’” The precise meaning of güey/wey depends on the user’s tone. A tone of derision gives it a negative connotation. One might say to an annoying person, “Ay, güey!” (Aw, dude!), “Ya, güey!” (Enough already, dude!) or even call someone “pinche güey” (fucking loser). Friendlier tones, obviously, make it an informal term of endearment. One of the most common uses of the word is equal to saying “dude.” Spock, 52, was born in Vallejo, Calif. By 13, he was living in nearby Fairfield. It was there that he started playing in punk bands. As a high school freshman, his band Karnage landed a song (“The Few, The Proud, The Dead”) on Maximum Rocknroll magazine’s compilation, Not So Quiet on the Western Front (Alternative Tentacles, 1982). By 17, Spock was in San Francisco, where he played in the band House of Wheels. “That was our shot at the big leagues,” Spock says. “We got a music lawyer, a manager, a development deal with [A&M] Records. But we only put out one song, on a Thrasher cassette. None of the other songs ever got out, but it was a good life experience: how to be young, dumb and fuck things up but have the time of your life for the whole ride.” By 1991, Spock was in Los Angeles working as an assistant editor on television series like Walker, Texas Ranger. Eventually, he decided that world wasn’t for him and he relocated to Bend, Ore., to teach snowboarding. In 1996, he moved to Utah, teaching at local ski resorts and performing at Spanky’s with the likes of Mountain

LIVE Music

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The story of one güey and his punk-rock boogie band.

MUSIC EMILINA SZUBZDA

CONCERT PREVIEW


—LOCATIONS— Midvale • SLC • Roy

Do you like fun? They Might Be Giants does—or is it do? Because the band, led by the duo of John Flansburgh and John Linnell, holds silliness and intelligence at equal importance. So they surely appreciate good grammar. Throughout their 35-year career, TMBG has juxtaposed whimsy and information in their songs, cultivating a sense of wonder in their audience. You see it in tunes like “Particle Man,” “Istanbul (Not Constantinople)” and “Spider,” which sound silly but also plant seeds that might sprout interests in physics, history or entomology. This is amplified on their five children’s albums, like No! (Idlewild/ Rounder, 2002) and Why? (Idlewild/Lojinx, 2015), which do all of the above and emphasize curiosity. But it doesn’t stop there: The band’s biggest hit, “Birdhouse in Your Soul,” brings friendship, mental health and spirituality into the equation. The value and variety in all of that make life fun. And as TMBG say with the title of their newly minted 20th album: I Like Fun. (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $23 presale; $25 day of show, 21+, depotslc.com

FRIDAY & SATURDAY 3/9-10

Get Lucky feat. Datsik, Above & Beyond, Paul Oakenfold, Space Jesus and more Datsik

SHERVIN LAINEZ

They Might Be Giants

V2 Presents’ annual two-day EDM festival Get Lucky always offers a huge roster of DJs and producers programmed to party, including headliners Datsik and Above & Beyond. Los Angeles-based Datsik began experimenting with glitchy, oscillating electronic squeals and divebombs around 2008—prime time in the production of robotic noises. Riding the EDM wave, the laptop jockey’s danceable hip-hop and house/techno quickly made him a star. Conversely, co-headliners Above and Beyond—an English electronic group made up of Tony McGuinness, Jono Grant and Paavo Siljamäki—have more of a trance sound, and are known to incorporate surreal visual elements in their live shows. There are some gems farther down on the event poster, too. One that seems a little too far down is EDM legend Paul Oakenfold, known for the feel-good, early-2000s hit “Starry Eyed Surprise.” (Howard Hardee) The Great Saltair, 12408 W. Saltair Drive, 7 p.m., $60-$105 ($10 parking), all ages, thesaltair.com

They Might Be Giants pop artist is a student of Canadian psych-rock heavyweight King Khan, so her vocal treatments are often experimental and her use of synthesizers abstract. Stylistically, the singer-songwriter, multiinstrumentalist, poet and visual artist ranges from traditional folk to raw garage rock on People, with her two drummers (known collectively as Your Government), adding extra oomph. It might be all over the place musically, but lyrically the album is a multi-layered dissection of the sociopolitical climate. (HH) Gold Blood Collective, 1526 S. State, 8 p.m., $10, goldbloodcollective.com

Mary Ocher

TUESDAY 3/13

JAMES WINTERHALTER

Mary Ocher, Dawg Hands, Calista

Mary Ocher clearly takes cues from the politically oriented punk and indie artists of the 1980s. Her latest album, The West Against the People (Klangbad, 2017), is accompanied by an essay that elaborates on the themes she explores with the music— middle-class panic, freedom of relocation and the identity of “The West.” Given the current state of global politics, one might expect a resurgence of artists explicitly outlining how fucked up things are. But not so: Ocher stands out in this regard (and others—check out those glasses). The Russian-born, Berlin-based psychedelic

BORIS ELDAGSEN

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BY RANDY HARWARD & HOWARD HARDEE

FRIDAY 3/9

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A great theme of ’80s movies and music videos is the high-school nerd who needs to reach deep within himself to find the kickass giant robot within. The vid for Y&T’s “Don’t Stop Runnin’”—one of the great summer songs of 1984—is literally this. An otherwise handsome actor is nerded-out by wetting down his feathery mullet and combing it tight against his head (for maximum nappiness) and giving him glasses. He awkwardly asks a hot girl to the prom, gets cruelly rejected, then goes home to take refuge in his Walkman and the crunchy guitars and maximumdiaphragm vox of Dave Meniketti and his band. Of course, he fantasizes that the music brings out the best in him—a tall, shiny robot that can fly—and that he rescues her from a gang of toughs. That was me. So in 1985, when the Oakland arena rockers came through on tour with Heart,

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LIVE

Y&T

I was all about that song. When they played it, they trotted out the bot and my head exploded (it’s real)! The next summer, the band moved on to another ’80s trope: beaches and “Summertime Girls.” Naturally, as a pubescent male, I ate that shit up. And I imagine there’s gonna be a lot of us would-be kickass robots looking for a taste of past fantasies at this show. (RH) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 7 p.m., $15 presale; $20 day of show, 21+, liquidjoes.net

WEDNESDAY 3/14

Joanne Shaw Taylor, Talia Keys

Name some guitar heroes who aren’t dudes. Ignoring blues fans, for whom this should be easy, the names that come up are probably rock/metal/pop shredders Lita Ford, Orianthi, Jennifer Batten and Nita Strauss. Now, they can play, but guitar heroism in those genres is compulsory and partially blown-out by aesthetic flash. Blues musicians tend to be more like everyday people looking to connect with other everyday people, while letting their playing be the fireworks. That’s why the aforementioned guitar players, with no disrespect, don’t stand out as much as, say, Joanna Connor, Anne McCue, Samantha Fish, Ruthie Foster—or Joanne Shaw Taylor. Dave Stewart (Eurythmics) discovered the English six-stringer when she was 16, and brought her on tour as a member of his band, D.U.P. Fast-forward another 16 years, and Shaw is six albums deep into her career, and respected for jaw-dropping solos and meaty, satisfying tunes that render her gender incidental. But it’s worth a shout since this issue hits the streets on International Women’s Day. (RH) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $18 presale; $20 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com


ST. PRACTICE DAY SATURDAY, MARCH 10TH

IRISH DANCERS, IRISH FOOD & IRISH WHISKEY

FRIDAY, MARCH 16TH

SATURDAY, MARCH 17TH

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ST. PATRICK’S WEEKEND

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HEATHEN HIGHLANDERS

1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492

PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

MARCH 8, 2018 | 35

KOTTER PROJECT

MURPHY AND THE GIANT KOTTER PROJECT • RUSTED REEL RED HEADED STEP TWINS HEATHEN HIGHLANDERS

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MURPHY AND THE GIANT


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| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | MARCH 8, 2018

SATURDAY 3/10

SHERVIN LAINEZ

Umphrey’s McGee

CONCERTS & CLUBS THURSDAY 3/8 LIVE MUSIC

Alan Michael (Garage on Beck) Alterbeast + Grindmother + Inferi + Aethere + Envenom + Through Eternal Mourning (The Loading Dock) Bookends (Hog Wallow) The Coverdogs (The Corner Store) Eric Anthony (Lake Effect) Lars Yorgason Singers & Larry Jackstien Quintet (Gallivan Center) Latin Thursday, feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Lucius + Ethan Gruska (The State Room) Midnight North (O.P. Rockwell) Movements + Can’t Swim + Super Whatevr + Gleemer (Kilby Court) Not So Friendlies + Tag Along Friend + Human Toy + Jordan Jaeger (The Underground) Reggae at the Royal w/ Earthkry + Natural Roots (The Royal) Tal Haslam + James McIntyre + Sam Cooley + Evan Sharp (Velour) Talia Keys (Snowbird) The Tayler Lacey String Band + Nick Passey + Janie Jones (The Beehive)

The Ventures (Egyptian Theatre) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs) Yonder Mountain String Band + Old Salt Union (The Depot) Young Professionals Charity feat. Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Deer Valley) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) House DJ (Bourbon House) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (’80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Ganja White Night (Sky) Youth Jam Session (Music Garage)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Funk ’n’ Dive) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

SATURDAY, MAR. 17

ST PATTY’S DAY PARTY

POST - PARADE SHENANIGANS

SHEPHARDS PIE, PRIZES ALL DAY, GIVEAWAYS, LIVE MUSIC! JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

Describing Chicago musical conglomerate Umphrey’s McGee is something like blind men describing a proverbial elephant: The trunk is elongated jams; the stomping feet carry the funk rhythms; and the wispy tail is the hint of fusion jazz. They do bear many earmarks of the jam band set: They were in a sense born at Bonnaroo, playing one of their first major shows at the initial festival. They are able to noodle with the best of them, but their auditory excursions also venture into not-so-jam-friendly waters like math rock and prog. In addition to their musical innovations, the band pioneered the brilliant marketing strategy of making each night’s live performance immediately available for purchase on CD after the show. They often base improvisations on audience suggestions, and also sometimes provide audience members with wireless headphones connected to the soundboard feed. The band’s latest release, It’s Not Us (Nothing Too Fancy Music), dropped in January. After 2016’s Zonkey, consisting of mashups of everyone from Radiohead, Beck and Phil Collins to Motörhead and Ween, it’s a refreshing return to original material. (Brian Staker) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $29.50, 21+, depotslc.com

FRIDAY 3/9 LIVE MUSIC

American Hitmen + Rune + Advent Horizon (The Royal) Barisone + Regular Ass Dude + DJ Feral Williams + Stackhouse (Urban Lounge) Blind Joe (Liquid Joe’s) Blue on Black (The Barbary Coast) Bonanza Town (The Spur) David Rolos (Sky) Eighth Day (Club 90) Get Lucky w/ Datsik + Getter + Slander (The Great Saltair) see p. 32 Gia Gunn + Gia Bianca Stephens + Eva Chanel Stephens + Lilia Maughn + Kay Bye + Justin Hollister (Zion Bar) DJ Hearts of Steele (Outlaw Saloon) Hot House West (Piper Down Pub) I The Victor + Vinyl Tapestries + Nick Passey + The Rock Princess (The Loading Dock) Idaho Muscle (Brewskis) John Flanders (The Bayou) Justin Hollister (Zion Bar) Kyle May (Deer Valley)

SATURDAY, MAR. 10

PUDDLE MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS

Marmozets (Kilby Court) The Mix (Prohibition) Orjazum (Garage on Beck) Renshaw + The Wykees + Salem Swing + Hanzel (Velour) Rick Gerber & The Nightcaps (The Yes Hell) RL Grime (Park City Live) Scenic Byway + Martian Cult + The Wicked Notions (The Ice Haüs) Scott Foster (Lake Effect) Simply B + Lounge On Fire (Hog Wallow) Southbound (The Westerner) Steve Schuffert (Legends at Park City Mountain) Susan Bush + Phil Triolo (Feldman’s Deli) Take Over + Satan + In Unison + Sonnets (The Beehive) They Might Be Giants (The Depot) see p. 32 Tim Daniels Band (The Cabin) The Ventures (Egyptian Theatre) Why Don’t We (The Complex) Yak Attack & Jelly Bread (O.P. Rockwell)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51)

MONDAYS

BREAKING BINGO 9PM

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS

9PM NO COVER FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


6th annual St. Patrick’s Day Celebration at

SAT. MARCH 17

OPEN 10AM ST. PATTY’S BRUNCH FROM 10-3 UTAH’S LARGEST ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY dj godina Marmalade Hill

NO COVER

DJ Che

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

10-2am, Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

MARCH 8, 2018 | 37

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F

| CITY WEEKLY |

GIANT TENT | DRINKS | FOOD | MUSIC

Salt Lake Scots Pipe Band

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

LIVE MUSIC


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

38 | MARCH 8, 2018

LEATHERHEADS SPORTS BAR & GRILL

RANDY HARWARD

BAR FLY

Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Scotty Boy (Downstairs) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) House DJ (Bourbon House)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Metro Music Hall)

SATURDAY 3/10 LIVE MUSIC

23RD Army Band (Viridian Center)

Architects + Stick To Your Guns + Counterparts (Metro Music Hall) B.D. Howes (Deer Valley) Bonanza Town (Park City Mountain) Break on Through Doors Tribute (The Cabin) Brisk (Downstairs) Crook & The Bluff (Hog Wallow) Doug Wintch & The Wandering Stars (Feldman’s Deli) Eighth Day (Club 90) Get Lucky w/ Above & Beyond + Getter + Slander (The Great Saltair) see p. 32 Glass Eye (The Bayou) Hearts of Steele (Outlaw Saloon) The Hollering Pines + Mia Grace (O.P. Rockwell) Josh Warburton (The Harp & Hound) Lantern by Sea + Vann Moon (The Ice Haüs) Live Trio (The Red Door) Los Hellcaminos (The Yes Hell) Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect)

A sports bar in a strip mall in Draper doesn’t sound all that special. But the first thing you notice when you walk into Leatherheads is a stage as tall and wide as the ones you find at Vivint Smart Home Arena or the Maverik Center. It towers over the tables full of patrons washing down burgers with beer and booze. In the past couple of years, ’80s hard rock bands that played those giant arenas back in the day— Warrant, Winger, Slaughter, Whitesnake, Kix—performed here. You can almost see the sea of cheering fans knocking around beach balls and tossing underthings onstage. For anyone who misses the heyday of hair metal, the idea of seeing a show like that in a room holding only a few hundred fans is seductive. By chance, I meet Jay Gibb, the owner. It’s not long before we’re discovering that we saw some of those same bands in arenas 25 years ago. Not only that, but Jay used to own The Holy Cow (now The Urban Lounge) back when I was newly 21 and enamored with the music he booked. That was anything from locals (funky alt-rockers Honest Engine, grungers The Obvious) to touring bands (industrial group Cradle of Thorns, alt-rockers The Flys). Jay says the sports bar helps him offer live music without the risk of losing money on the shows. That’s pretty smart. I tell him I used to suck down the giant Long Island Iced Teas that the Cow served back then. “We have those here!” he says. I almost order one, for old times’ sake, but I reconsider. It’s a long drive home. I’ll be back, though. (Randy Harward) Leatherheads Sports Bar 12101 S. Factory Outlet Drive, 801-523-1888, bestsportsbarsaltlakecity.com

Mega Ran + None Like Joshua + RhymeTime + Siaki + Em Garcia (Kilby Court) Mitch Raymond Trio (Pat’s BBQ) Mmend + Brother + Harpers (Velour) Mooseknuckle + Never Go Back (The Barbary Coast) Motherlode Canyon Band (The Spur) The Pit + Sea One + Will Power + Cash Warner + Lyrical Assailant + 8six + Tattic + Brandon McBride (The Loading Dock) Puddle Mountain Ramblers (Johnny’s on Second) Rattle & Hum U2 Tribute Band (Brewskis) Rings Of Saturn + Nekrogoblikon + Allegaeon + Entheos + Lorna Shore + Gloom + Founders Of Ruin (In The Venue) Savage Daughter + The Co-Founder + Emma Park + Upcharm (The Underground)

The Soulistics (Canyons Village) Southbound (The Westerner) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Swagger (Piper Down Pub) Tony Holiday & The Velvetones (The Yes Hell) Twisted Axis + The Wicked Notions + Playing Ghosts (The Royal) Umphrey’s McGee (The Depot) see p. 36 The Ventures (Egyptian Theatre) Wey + Starmy + Magda-Vega (Urban Lounge) see p. 31 Winter Showcase + LyndiFest (The Beehive)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Joel (Twist) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle)


GRAB A BITE

TONIGHT

AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY THURSDAY:

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SATURDAY:

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00

DJ Soul Pause @ 9:00

SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $1,750 MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00! TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

75+ BEERS available

BLUEGRASS JAM WITH HOSTS PIXIE AND THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 7PM-10PM MARCH 7

TOURING ARTISTS LEGATO 10PM-1AM

MARCH 8

MICHELLE MOONSHINE 7PM

MARCH 9

FUNKY FRIDAY WITH DJ GODINA

MARCH 10

SATURDAY BRUNCH 10-3 CHASEONE2 10PM

MARCH 11

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-3 SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES WITH HOSTS NICK GRECO AND BLUES ON FIRST HARRY LEE AND THE BACK ALLEY BLUES BAND 10PM-1AM

MARCH 12

JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Proudly serving locally produced beers & spirits

EVERY TUESDAY

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AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

DINNER AND A SHOW. ONLY AT GRACIE’S!

*Dine-In Only

FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

BOOK YOUR NEXT PARTY OR EVENT AT ELIXIR!

BRUNCH PARTY THIS SUNDAY, MARCH 11TH 11AM - 3PM

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

MARCH 8, 2018 | 39

JOIN US FOR APRÉS SKI LOCATED AT THE BASE OF THE CANYONS

| CITY WEEKLY |

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Wednesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00


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| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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40 | MARCH 8, 2018

CONCERTS & CLUBS

NEW HIMALAYAN PUB FUSION SMALL PLATES MENU

Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) House DJ (Bourbon House) Sky Saturdays feat. DJ Matty Mo (Sky)

KARAOKE

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 3/7

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 3/8 Reggae at the Royal

earthkry daverse • dj dub wise amfs & long islands $ 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

5

friDAY 3/9

Live Music

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke Cosplay (The Union Tavern) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 3/11 LIVE MUSIC

Che Zuro (Deer Valley) Irish Session Folks (Sugar House Coffee) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Lucille Furs + Crook & The Bluff + Green River Blues (Kilby Court) No Quarter Led Zeppelin Tribute (The Depot) Scott Rogers (Snowbird) Spafford (The State Room) Trapt + EasyFriend + Nick Johnson + Young Apollo (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

MONDAY 3/12 LIVE MUSIC

saturday 3/10

Live Music

twisted axis • playing ghosts mantis jackson Tuesday 3/13

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon

ShamROCK St. Patty's Day Party w/ Royal Bliss

3/16

3/17

St. Patty's Day Green Party w/ Herban Empire • The green leefs • tribe of i 3/23

3/31

retro riot dance party with dj jason lowe prince tribute night iya terra

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports  ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

KARAOKE THAT LIVE MUSIC DOESN’T SUCK WEDNESDAYS WITH EVERY THURSDAY W/ LOCAL ARTISTS MIKEY DANGER

DANCE MUSIC ON $4 JAMESON FRIDAY & SATURDAY $5 SHOT & BEER

CHAKRALOUNGE.NET OPEN NIGHTLY 364 S STATE ST. SALT LAKE CITY 5 PM - 1 AM

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (The Spur)

KARAOKE

with ginger and the gents rune • advent horizon

TUESDAYS 9PM BREAKING BINGO

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) The Expendables + Through The Roots + Pacific Dub (Park City Live) The Lone Bellow + The Wild Reeds (The State Room) PHS Music Showcase (Velour) Red + Lacey Sturm + Righteous Vendetta (The Complex) Ryan Caraveo + Notion (Kilby Court) Slick Velveteens + Speechless Peaches + Shecock & The Rock Princess + RZRSNK (Urban Lounge) Vacui + The Mystic + Moonwave (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke (Cheers To You) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413


S P IR ITS . FO OD . LOCAL B EER

e b o t e c a l p The ! i k s s è r p A r fo

March 14th Honig Vineyards, Cabernet Sauvignon. $25/glass Music at 7:30.

Industry night - in the Rabbit Hole basement of Lake Effect

MARCH 10

TASTING TUESDAYS Join us for a whiskey tasting with a professional. | 6pm

...

ERIC ANTHONY DJ CHASEONE2 SCOTT FOSTER WHISKEY REBELLION DJ CHASEONE2 “RABBIT HOLE” MARMALADE CHILL DJ MR. RAMIREZ “RABBIT HOLE” DJ DOLPH & CO. “RABBIT HOLE” THE BLUE ZEN BAND MATT WENEGER DHCC PROJECT

| | | | | | | | | | |

6-9 PM 10-1 AM 6-9 PM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 8-12AM 7:30-10:30 PM 6-9PM 7:30-10:30 PM

(801) 532-2068 – 155 W 200 S Salt Lake City, UT, 84101 www.lakeeffectslc.com

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

MARCH 8, 2018 | 41

MARCH 11 MARCH 12 MARCH 13 MARCH 14

3.17 ST. PATRICKS’ DAY BASH W/ PIXIE & THE PARTYGRASS BOYS

MONDAYS Blues night

THIS WEEKS LIVE MUSIC MARCH 9

3.16 SCOUNDRELS

$3 pints $3 whiskeys

1/2 OFF TACOS 11 AM-4 PM DAILY MARCH 8

3.12 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

| CITY WEEKLY |

...

SUNDAY NIGHT

THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

3.10 CROOK AND THE BLUFF

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

March 7th Prisoner, Red Table Wine, California. $18/glass

3.9 SIMPLY B & LOUNGE ON FIRE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT

3.8 BOOKENDS


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | MARCH 8, 2018

CONCERTS & CLUBS

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE BEST CRIMINAL DEFENSE

TUESDAY 3/13 LIVE MUSIC

Alicia Stockman (The Spur) Cherry Thomas (Piper Down Pub) Cortege + Sympathy Pain + Hoofless + Portal to the God Damn Blood Dimension (Diabolical Records) Dusty & Moira + Rebel Rebel + CDSBS + Stop Karen (The Underground) Futuristic + IshDARR + James The Mormon (The Complex) Lucy Rose + Charlie Cunningham (Metro Music Hall) Martin Sexton + Chris Trapper (Urban Lounge) Mary Ocher + Dawg Hands + Calista (Gold Blood Collective) see p. 32 Matt Wenegar (Lake Effect) The Moves Collective (Gracie’s) Ok Ok + Skies Like Rockets + Galagher (Kilby Court) Phillip Phillips + The Ballroom Thieves (The Depot) Utah Copa (Velour) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee) Y&T (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 34

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Lifty Lounge w/ DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

BIG SHINY ROBOT! News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

Trial Litigation Criminal Defense

Advocacy Government Relations

CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

ferbrachelaw.com NEW

THURSDAY EVENT MARCH 1ST

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FRIDAY, MARCH 9TH

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COLLEGE NIGHT FREE CORN HOLE & BEER PONG-$2 COORS & BUD DRAFTS

Fridays

$3 FIREBALLS-

KARAOKE

Mondays 75¢ WINGS ALL DAY

saturdays

SCANDALOUS SATURDAY’S W/ DJ LOGIK

Tuesdays KARAOKE 9PM

Wednesdays

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exclusively on

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3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com


WEDNESDAY 3/14 LIVE MUSIC

Anderson East + JS Ondara (The State Room) Brisk (Downstairs) Hard To Hit + ImAlive + Lets Get Famous + Untamed Engine + Noise Ordinance (The Loading Dock) Harm’s Way + Ringworm + Vein + Queensway (Kilby Court) Joanne Shaw Taylor + Talia Keys (Urban Lounge) see p. 34 Michelle Moonshine (Hog Wallow) Scott Klismith (The Spur)

KARAOKE

{THURSDAY & FRIDAYS 9PM}

POOL TOURNAMENTS MONDAYS BY CRISSIE FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS BY RANDY

TEXAS HOLDEM MONDAYS & THURSDAY

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Dueling Pianos (The Cabin) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Youth Jam Session (Music Garage)

KARAOKE

Affirmative Action Karaoke (Piper Down Pub) Areaoke w/ KJ Ruby (Area 51) Karaoke (Donkey Tails Cantina) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

URBAN FLEA MARKET

MARCH 11, 2018

10:00AM - 4:00PM

AT THE GATEWAY

VARIOUS TIMES

AT THE SALT PALACE

MARCH 17, 2018

11AM - 6PM

AT MTN WST CIDER

MARCH 8, 2018 | 43

4TH WEST FEST | ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE AFTER-PARTY!

| CITY WEEKLY |

MARCH 16-18, 2018

SLC TATTOO CONVENTION

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR EVENT PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385.528.2547 open 7 days a week from 11 am to 1 am

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

PINKY’S


© 2017

CARBON FOOTPRINT

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Annual Austin, Texas music/film festival named for its loc. in the U.S. 2. Centers of activity 3. Neural conductor 4. Whom Uncle Sam wants 5. Sweater material 6. Angry with 7. Traffic problem

47. Author 48. K-12 49. “Tell me about it!” 50. Whitney Houston, to Dionne Warwick 51. Spread out 54. Driver of “Girls” 55. “My ____!” 56. Drinks at sidewalk stands 58. Baseball’s Ripken 59. Jackie’s second husband 60. A little kid might drool over it 61. Org. from which George H.W. Bush resigned his membership in 1995

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

8. Fruit Ninja, e.g. 9. Red state? 10. Part of UCLA 11. 2014 U.S. postage stamp honoree depicted with the colors of the gay pride flag 12. Kind of legend or sprawl 13. Pickler’s need 18. They precede sigmas 22. Room in an apt. big enough to accommodate a dining table, in real estate ads 23. Animal always spelled out in Scrabble? 24. Syringe, for short 25. Ned who, in 2015, became the manager with the most victories in Kansas City Royals history 26. Icky stuff 27. Diplomat’s asset 28. Actor Morales who plays Elian Gonzalez’s dad in a 2000 TV movie 29. Causes of sudden altitude drops 32. Charged particle 34. Doing the job 35. “Don’t take ____ seriously!” 37. Pizza ____ 38. Half of Mork’s goodbye 39. ____ bump 40. Authentic 45. It follows Avril in Paris 46. “For Your Eyes Only” singer Easton

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Have a great night at the comedy club 5. Attack vigorously 11. Layover locale, perhaps 14. Love letters? 15. Amateur 16. Opposite of “Dep.” on a flight board 17. Really get the grit off some fruit? 19. Slugger’s stat 20. Triumph 21. Gardener, at times 22. “Thirteen” actress ____ Rachel Wood 23. Healthy routine of some reef material? 27. Tries to rip open 30. What egg whites aren’t 31. “Four little letters, three billion little people”: Stephen Colbert 32. ____ facto 33. “Why, can you possibly mean me?!” 36. It’s been left on 17-, 23-, 49- and 58-Across 41. 18%, maybe 42. Like someone whose photographs are all selfies 43. Wallach and Whitney 44. Signs of things to come 46. Address 49. Snacker’s discarded item in ancient Peru? 52. Two-time NBA All-Star Vandeweghe 53. Cambodia’s Phnom ____ 54. “So THAT’S it!” 57. Bridal bio word 58. Like a TV lover uninterested in cutting the cord? 62. Leaf-peeping mo. 63. Grande with the 2014 hit song “Love Me Harder” 64. Atypical 65. Director Craven who said “Horror films don’t create fear. They release it” 66. Benghazi native 67. Singer with the 1988 album “Y Kant Tori Read”

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According to my assessment of the astrological omens, you’re in a favorable phase to gain more power over your fears. You can reduce your susceptibility to chronic anxieties. You can draw on the help and insight necessary to dissipate insidious doubts that are rooted in habit but not based on objective evidence. I don’t want to sound too melodramatic, my dear Pisces, but this is an amazing opportunity! You are potentially on the verge of an unprecedented breakthrough! In my opinion, nothing is more important for you to accomplish in the coming weeks than this inner conquest. ARIES (March 21-April 19): The men who work on offshore oil rigs perform demanding, dangerous tasks on a regular basis. If they make mistakes, they might get injured or befoul the sea with petroleum. As you might guess, the culture on these rigs has traditionally been macho, stoic and hard-driving. But in recent years, that has changed at one company. Shell Oil’s workers in the U.S. were trained by Holocaust survivor Claire Nuer to talk about their feelings, be willing to admit errors and soften their attitudes. As a result, the company’s safety record has improved dramatically. If macho dudes toiling on oil rigs can become more vulnerable and open and tenderly expressive, so can you, Aries. And now would be a propitious time to do it.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What’s your most frustrating flaw? During the next seven weeks, you will have enhanced power to diminish its grip on you. It’s even possible you will partially correct it or outgrow it. To take maximum advantage of this opportunity, rise above any covert tendency you might have to cling to your familiar pain. Rebel against the attitude described by novelist Stephen King: “It’s hard to let go. Even when what you’re holding onto is full of thorns, it’s hard to let go. Maybe especially then.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I suspect that in July and August you will be invited to commune with rousing opportunities and exciting escapades. But right now I’m advising you to channel your intelligence into well-contained opportunities and sensible adventures. In fact, my projections suggest that your ability to capitalize fully on the future’s rousing opportunities and exciting escapades will depend on how well you master the current crop of tamer scenarios. Making the most of today’s small pleasures will qualify you to harvest bigger pleasures later. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If you saw the animated film The Lion King, you might have been impressed with the authenticity of the lions’ roars and snarls. Did the producers place microphones in the vicinity of actual lions? No. Voice actor Frank Welker produced the sounds by growling and yelling into a metal garbage can. I propose this as a useful metaphor for you in the coming days. First, I hope it inspires you to generate a compelling and creative illusion of your own—an illusion that serves a good purpose. Second, I hope it alerts you to the possibility that other people will be offering you compelling and creative illusions—illusions that you should engage with only if they serve a good purpose. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I do a lot of self-editing before I publish what I write. My horoscopes go through at least three drafts before I unleash them on the world. While polishing the manuscript of my first novel, I threw away over 1,000 pages that I had worked on very hard. In contrast to my approach, science fiction writer Harlan Ellison dashed off one of his award-winning stories in a single night, and published it without making any changes to the first draft. As you work in your own chosen field, Aquarius, I suspect that for the next three weeks you will produce the best results by being more like me than Ellison. Beginning about three weeks from now, an Ellison-style strategy might be more warranted.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189902532, JUDGE KENT HOLMBERG. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. ANIVA TEO AND REID PULEGA, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO REID PULEGA: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $12,324.20. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

MARCH 8, 2018 | 45

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In his book Whistling in the Dark, author Frederick Buechner writes that the ancient Druids took “a special interest in in-between things like mistletoe, which is neither quite a plant nor quite a tree, and mist, which is neither quite rain nor quite air, and dreams, which are neither quite waking nor quite sleep.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, in-between phenomena will be your specialty in the coming weeks. You will also thrive in relationship to anything that lives in two worlds or that has paradoxical qualities. I hope you’ll exult in the educational delights that come from your willingness to be teased and mystified.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio mathematician Benoît Mandelbrot was a connoisseur of “the art of roughness” and “the uncontrolled element in life.” He liked to locate and study the hidden order in seemingly chaotic and messy things. “My life seemed to be a series of events and accidents,” he said. “Yet when I look back I see a pattern.” I bring his perspective to your attention, Scorpio, because you are entering a phase when the hidden order and secret meanings of your life will emerge into view. Be alert for surprising hints of coherence.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189901220, JUDGE KENT HOLMBERG. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MICHAEL BYINGTON AND TANYA MARSH, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MICHAEL BYINGTON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,791.94. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On April 23, 1516, the Germanic duchy of Bavaria issued a decree. From that day forward, all beer produced had to use just three ingredients: water, barley, and hops. Ever since then, for the last 500-plus years, this edict has had an enduring influence on how German beer is manufactured. In accordance with astrological factors, I suggest that you proclaim three equally potent and systemic directives of your own. It’s an opportune time to be clear and forceful about how you want your story to unfold in the coming years.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the 2002 film Spiderman, Mary Jane slips on a spilled drink as she carries a tray full of food through a cafeteria. Spiderman, disguised as his alter ego, Peter Parker, makes a miraculous save. He jumps up from his chair and catches Mary Jane before she falls. Meanwhile, he grabs her tray and uses it to gracefully capture her apple, sandwich, carton of milk and bowl of Jell-O before they hit the floor. The filmmakers say they didn’t use CGI to render this scene. The lead actor, Tobey Maguire, allegedly accomplished it in real life–although it took 156 takes before he finally mastered it. I hope you have that level of patient determination in the coming weeks, Libra. You, too, can perform a small miracle if you do.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189902583, JUDGE ANDREW H STONE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. DESTINY LENABURG, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO DESTINY LENABURG: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $729.75. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): How will you celebrate your upcoming climax and culmination, Taurus? With a howl of triumph, a fist pump, and three cartwheels? With a humble speech thanking everyone who helped you along the way? With a bottle of Champagne, a gourmet feast and spectacular sex? However you choose to mark this transition from one chapter of your life story to the next chapter, I suggest that you include an action that will help the next chapter get off to a rousing start. In your ritual of completion, plant seeds for the future.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The English word “velleity” refers to an empty wish that has no power behind it. If you feel a longing to make a pilgrimage to a holy site, but can’t summon the motivation to actually do so, you are under the spell of velleity. Your fantasy of communicating with more flair and candor is a velleity if you never initiate the practical steps to accomplish that goal. Most of us suffer from this weakness at one time or another. But the good news, Virgo, is that you are primed to overcome your version of it during the next six weeks. Life will conspire to assist you if you resolve to turn your wishy-washy wishes into potent action plans—and then actually carry out those plans.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 159903409, JUDGE ANDREW H STONE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. GUADALUPE SALAZAR AND PHOENIX TAGGART, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO GUADALUPE SALAZAR: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $3,427.18. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen


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46 | MARCH 8, 2018

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189901222, JUDGE AMBER METTLER. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. PAUL CRUZ, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO PAUL CRUZ: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $592.50. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915029, JUDGE ROYAL I HANSEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JARVIS NEZ, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JARVIS NEZ: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $10,153.15. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

Senior Front-End Software Engineer sought by DealerSocket, Inc. in Draper, UT. Slv cmplx sftwre engnrng tsks. Trblsht & slve cde lvl prblms qckly & effcntly. Aply @ www.jobpostingtoday.com # 78896 Sr Area/Transmission Planner sought by PacifiCorp for Salt Lake City office. Contribute to planning and implementing transmission projects to ensure that the transmission system accommodates customer needs. Utilize eng methods to comply with NERC/WECC Reliability Standards. Reqs: BS, or foreign eqv, in Electrical Eng or rltd + 5 yrs of exp in transmission modeling, transmission system eng and/or transmission system planning. MS + 3 yrs exp OK. Reply to: Job# 5541, 825 NE Multnomah, Ste 1800, Portland, OR 97232 or apply at www.pacificorp.com.

URBAN L I V I N

G

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Spring Fever Spring break at the University of Utah is March 18-25. Hopefully you’ve booked your ticket to one of U.S. News and World Report’s Top 10 best spring break destinations: Cancun, Miami Beach, South Padre Island, the Bahamas, Cabo San Lucas, Puerto Vallarta, Puerto Rico, Punta Cana, Jamaica and Panama City Beach. We just returned from our “cure the colds” early spring break and found, once again, that we love Salt Lake City International Airport. According to Reward Expert, the airport ranks second-best in the nation for on-time performance, with 88.55 percent of flights arriving and departing in a timely fashion. That record is great unless you travel on JetBlue, which has the worst airline on-time performance overall (and appears to bear the brunt of the onslaught of spring break travelers). Other budget carriers Southwest and Frontier unsurprisingly take second and third place for most delayed flights overall. Yet, according to a recent study by insuremytrip.com, only 448 out of 111,912 flights (.04 percent) at SLC International were canceled in 2017. Other good marks went to Phoenix Sky Harbor International, Minneapolis-St. Paul International and Seattle-Tacoma International. The worst rates for canceled flights are NYC’s LaGuardia, Houston’s George Bush International, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International and Newark Liberty International. If you’re not a spring breaker, you might be planning a trip for Easter (April 1) or Passover (March 30-April 7). Again, Reward Expert urges travelers to leave early. Easter Sunday and the first day of Passover (and the day before) are more likely than most to feature delays and airport hassles. There are also new road changes as you approach and leave the SLC airport, the park-and-wait lot has moved behind a new $4-million facility that includes a 24hour Touch ’n’ Go convenience store with a Chevron gas station (yup, visitors can now pay a fortune for gas when they forget to fill up the rental car on return), Burger King, Costa Vida and Beans & Brews open or opening in time for the spring travel season. Finally, if you’re going to travel with your comfort peacock, dog or hamster, there now are animal relief stations across the street from each terminal in front of the parking garage. These grassy areas have waste stations and a little room to exercise your pets. Happy travels! n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189900901, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MIREYA BARRON AND ROSABELIA NEVAREZ, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MIREYA BARRON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $9,233.29. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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WEIRD

Wait, What? Police in Mainz, Germany, responded to an apartment building after cries were heard from within one unit early on Feb. 17, The Associated Press reported. When they arrived, officers found two men, the 58-year-old tenant and a 61-year-old visitor, “hopelessly locked up” with a mannequin dressed as a knight and a large remote-controlled car. The men were too drunk to explain how they had become entangled, and one officer remarked that “the whole thing would have remained a funny episode” if the younger man had not become “more than impolite.” He now faces a charge of insulting officers.

People Different From Us Metro News reported on Feb. 20 that travelers “remained silent” for 20 minutes while a fellow passenger on a Ural Airlines flight from Antalya, Turkey, to Moscow used the air vent above her seat to dry a pair of underwear. Witnesses reported that the woman showed no shame and that “everybody was looking with interest and confusion.” Debate raged later, however, after video of the woman was posted online, with one commenter speculating that “maybe the takeoff was sort of extreme, so now she has to dry those.” Least Competent Criminals Shanghai, China, police posted a video on social media of two men trying to break into a business on Feb. 14 by using bricks to shatter the glass storefront. But as United Press International reported, when Suspect A’s brick bounced off the glass, he bent to retrieve it and ended up squarely in the path of Suspect B’s brick, which struck him in the head and apparently knocked him out. In the video, Suspect B can be seen dragging Suspect A away from the store. Police remarked: “If all burglars were like this, we wouldn’t need to work overtime.”

Awesome! Staffers at a Bangor, Maine, day care called Watch Me Shine were happy to receive Valentine’s cookies made by a parent— until those who ate them started to feel high. “Within 15 minutes, teachers were reporting they had concerns about those cookies,” Tiffany Nowicki, director of the center, told the Bangor Daily News. About 12 staff members felt the effects of the treats, which were confiscated by the police and are being tested. “If they find something that shouldn’t be in those cookies,” Nowicki said, “that’s a big problem and we’ll make sure it’s addressed.” The day care has instituted a new policy that no outside food can be brought in for the children or staff.

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The Continuing Crisis Donna Walker of Linthwaite, England, just wanted a nice night out to celebrate her 50th birthday; she wasn’t anticipating a trip to the emergency room. Walker, along with her husband, Carlton, 45, and their two sons, was waiting for takeout food at the Atlantis restaurant in Holmfirth, West Yorkshire, early on Feb. 18 when a brawl broke out. The Walkers don’t know what started the fight, but Carlton told Metro News: “When the fight spilled out of the takeaway, I said to Donna to stay inside. When I turned round my wife was at the doorway being attacked and was covered in blood. My son was being strangled.” Donna sustained a 2-inch gash on her forehead and was bitten on the arm by the young woman who attacked her, calling for a tetanus shot and antibiotics. “I wiped my eye and saw all the blood,” Donna said. “I had no idea I had been struck.” Police were still looking for the attackers at press time. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com.

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The Litigious Society Crestline, Calif., resident Claudia Ackley, 46, has teamed with “Discovering Bigfoot” filmmaker Todd Standing to sue the state of California, requesting on Jan. 18 that state agencies acknowledge the existence of a Sasquatch species. Ackley and her daughters, 11 and 14, say they were hiking a trail at Lake Arrowhead in March 2017 when they spotted a large figure braced in a pine tree. “I ran into a Sasquatch—a Bigfoot. We were face to face,” Ackley told The San Bernardino Sun. Forest rangers insisted at the time that Ackley and her daughters had seen a bear, and Ackley fears that by not acknowledging the presence of the legendary creatures, the state is putting the public at risk. “People have to be warned about these things,” she said. “They are big.”

Compelling Explanation A woman claiming to be on a mission from God led a Kentucky State Police trooper on a chase at speeds up to 120 mph on Feb. 10, stopping only when another trooper pulled in front of her car. According to the Elizabethtown (Ky.) News-Enterprise, Connie Lynn Allen, 52, of Goodlettsville, Tenn., told officers that she was Mother Mary, en route to pick up Baby Jesus, and that God had given her permission to speed. She also said that she had died six years ago. She was charged with several offenses and is being held in Hardin County.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

n A drug smuggler from Brazil apparently didn’t know he was under investigation by the National Anti-Narcotics Trafficking Unit in Portugal when he arrived on a flight Feb. 12 wearing a set of false butt cheeks, filled with 2.2 pounds of cocaine, reported United Press International. The 32-year-old unidentified man was detained at the Tax and Customs Authority and searched, where his unusual derriere aroused suspicion. An accomplice, waiting for him at a Lisbon train station, was also arrested and charged with drug trafficking.

Inexplicable Firefighter Constantinos “Danny” Filippidis, 49, from Toronto, was the subject of a weeklong search by more than 250 people using drones, dogs and helicopters starting Feb. 7, when he disappeared from Whiteface Mountain ski resort in New York’s Adirondacks. When he finally turned up in California at the Sacramento International Airport on Feb. 13, he was still dressed in his ski pants and ski boots, and he still had his helmet, along with a new iPhone and a recent haircut. But, according to the Syracuse Post-Standard, Filippidis couldn’t tell officers anything about how he had traveled across the country, other than he rode in a “big-rig-style truck” and “slept a lot.” The truck dropped him off in downtown Sacramento, but he was unable to explain how he got to the airport. He was taken to an area hospital.

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a pause hits the music like the death of a loved one. yet silence includes sound the way parents are to children. so we die, but we go on guilty to breathe or make a sound.

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City Weekly March 8, 2018  

A Tale of Two Chris'

City Weekly March 8, 2018  

A Tale of Two Chris'