Page 1

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

F E B RUA RY 1 , 2 0 1 8 | VO L . 3 4

What Global Warming? Unmasking a proxy war strategy by online climate change denialists. By Paul Rosenberg

N0. 36


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY A POLARIZING ISSUE

Unmasking a proxy war strategy by online climate change denialists.

Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

13

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 18 A&E 23 DINE 29 CINEMA 32 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

SYDNEY PHILLIPS

Street Team A vet on our Street Team since 2011, the murder podcast enthusiast enjoys her role’s community feel. “I love being a part of a team that cares deeply about community,” she says. “City Weekly doesn’t just say it, they do it. Being a part of the family is something that has shaped me personally and professionally, and I couldn’t be any more grateful.”

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

NEWS

Downtown Sears permanently closes its doors. facebook.com/slcweekly

FILM

Sundance is now a memory, but our film reviews live on.

Twitter: @cityweekly • Deals at cityweeklystore.com

ENTER TO WIN Screening Passes to 15:17 to Paris. More info on p. 29 and at cityweekly.net/freestuff.


M.E.S.A. MONEY GET THE SOUND YOU DREAM OF

• • • •

1000 WATT MONO 300 WATT MONO 300 WATT 4 CHANNEL 600 WATT 5 CHANNEL Starting at:

CREDIT CARD

$9999

6.5" COMPONENT SPEAKER SET

MSRP $180 NOW

MSRP $40000 NOW

00

• 80 WATTS RMS POWER • 160 WATTS PEAK POWER • SEPARATE CROSS OVER

$15999 SYSTEM

• 100 WATTS RMS POWER • 200 WATTS PEAK POWER • SEPARATE CROSS OVER

MADE IN ITALY

4 CHANNEL

1000 WATTS RMS 2000 PEAK POWER

$34999

5 CHANNEL

950 WATTS RMS 2000 PEAK POWER

• FULL DIGITAL AMPLIFIERS • BOTH CLASS D BRIDGEABLE

SYSTEM

Starting at:

$49999

THESE PROCESSORS INTEGRATE WITH YOUR OEM FACTORY SYSTEMS GIVING YOU A FACTORY SYSTEM UPGRADE THAT GIVES YOU BETTER SOUND & AUDIO CONTROL

$39999

MSRP 35999

$29999

$18999

MSRP 22999

TWO CHANNEL LINE OUTPUT CONVERTER WITH ACCUBASSTM

$9999

MSRP 12999

W W W. S OU N D WA R E H OUS E .C O M

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

FREE LAYAWAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 2/8/18

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 3

HOURS

10AM TO 7PM MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

MSRP 479

99

SIX CHANNEL EQUALIZER & LINE OUTPUT CONVERTER WITH ACCUBASETM AND LEVEL CONTROL INPUT

SIX CHANNEL EQUALIZER, LINE OUTPUT CONVERTER WITH ACCUBASETM LEVEL CONTROL & SIGNAL DELAY

SIX CHANNEL EQUALIZER & LINE OUTPUT CONVERTER WITH ACCUBASETM AND LEVEL CONTROL INPUT AND INTERNAL SUMMING

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

6.5" COMPONENT SPEAKER SET

POWER AMP

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DESIGNED & ENGINEERED IN ITALY NEW LINE

DESIGNED & ENGINEERED IN ITALY NEW LINE


GET YOUR KITTY FIX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

NEW CAFE HOURS OPEN AT 7AM TUES-SAT 302 E. 900 S. I TINKERSCATCAFE.COM

@CITYWEEKLY

Cover story, Jan. 18, “The No-Fun Zone”

I wonder what they are going to do to screw up our lives this year?

AHREN YOUNG Via Facebook

Thanks for the in-depth article. Certain things you brought up reminded me of elementary school playground tactics. Maybe a better description: bullying. We can’t blame anyone but ourselves. We’ve allowed it to get this way and now we need to change it. People getting out to vote would be a good place to start.

TODD RASMUSSEN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

4 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

SOAP BOX

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T J A N U A RY 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 | V O L . 3 4 N 0 . 3 4

Via cityweekly.net

Private Eye, Jan. 18, “Skatacracy”

THE Source for Tune-Ups, Rentals & Equipment

Thank you John Saltas, well said!

@IRISBREEZE Via Twitter

John, I always enjoy your writing, but last week’s piece was exceptional. One of the things I really like about you, is your ready knowledge of parts of Utah history for which I have a huge blind spot. I am mystified by the LDS support for Trump, and you nailed the Mormon quandary.

DAVE IRVINE, Bountiful

/ Get 1 t n e R REE F

Expires 3/1/18

50% OFF TUNE-UPS! SKI TUNE-UP $15 REG $30 SNOWBOARD TUNE-UP $20 REG $40 Expires 3/1/18

698 Park Avenue • Park City Townlift • 435-649-3020 134 West 600 South • Salt Lake • 801-355-9088 2432 East Ft. Union • South Valley • 801-942-1522

In your desire to Trump-bash, you missed what he was saying and you did not answer why we should or have to import anyone. Trump’s point [was] what is going to help the country, educated people or those that do not have college degrees? It was not about race; you blew it again with your hate. Trump is still an a-hole.

KEN KEOWN

Via CW comments Just thinking about Trump usually brings me to a rage. But John, you are better than to let your rage spill out into your opinion piece. There is no excuse for lousy facts and hate.

@SLCWEEKLY

You went on a rant about how Mia Love’s congressional district is full of Utah County hypocritical Mormons for Trump. Love’s district is mostly Salt Lake County—85 percent of the district’s population to be exact. It mostly lies west of the Jordan River and Utah Lake, with a peninsula containing South Salt Lake and Millcreek, and almost no Salt Lake City residents. Trump garnered 39 percent of the vote there, while Utah’s other three districts had Trump at 46-50 percent. Mitt Romney garnered 67 percent in 2012, while the other districts had 68-78 percent. Utah hasn’t voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since 1960. A slim majority of Mormons did not vote for Trump. Hopefully, Trump Mormons will see the devil draped in Republican clothing is not better than the “evil” Democratic candidate. If they are like my in-laws, we are in good shape. If they are like my father’s family, who receive Fox News via osmosis, shun their noses toward anyone not making six figures and wouldn’t vote for a Democrat even if he were Jesus, we’re in trouble.

BRYAN WHITE, South Jordan

I’m pretty sure Trump could just drop the n-word right now on live TV and three things would happen. He’d deny saying it, his supporters would defend him and absolutely nothing would happen to him.

CORBAN ANDERSON Via Facebook

Blog post, Jan. 22, “Guv. Unveils $22.5M Tourism Plan”

An acre is a unit of area. “Square acre” is redundant. Sorry, I just don’t like him, so I’m being petty.

ROB TENNANT Via Facebook

When I first visited Zion National Park in 1980, they were already getting more than 1 million visitors a year. Now

Welcome to

THE NO-FUN ZONE! it’s well over 4 million. That’s insane. The main argument against Bears Ears National Monument came from people who want all the tourists to go away. That’s not a realistic hope, but let’s at least provide adequate funding to our national parks, national forests and public land management.

RICHARD WARNICK Via cityweekly.net

Totally makes up for $40 million we lost with Outdoor Retailer.

DYLAN MCDONNELL Via Facebook

Not to mention, the hoards of people in puffy coats wearing socks with sandals. I’m going to miss them, too.

MATT HANDY Via Facebook Pornsmog.

BRANDON EBERHARD Via Facebook I don’t know what this means, but I laughed.

TIFFANY YOUNG Via Facebook

Blog post Jan. 23, “Rep. Chris Stewart Has Wings”

Wow. Let’s normalize bad characters in juvenile movies. That is the kind of maturity level I think all our representatives should have. That was a movie script. Not real life. And Rodney Dangerfield admitted that while making [Caddyshack], it took a lot of cocaine to keep him lit up

Our Annual Legislative Preview

enough to perform it. These Republicans and their cult of Trump are frightening. They say they love the country with one hand, and strangle it with the other. Sad.

CHAS HOLMAN

Via cityweekly.net That Rep. Chris Stewart would try to equate reviled Trump with beloved Dangerfield frosts me to no small extent. Dangerfield had wit and humility, and made fun of all his flaws. Don’t friggin’ insult my childhood icons, Chris.

@RAS_BERET Via Twitter

What a waste of space. He should put liar at the top of his résumé come November.

ERIN BAIN

Via Facebook Dear Rep. Stewart: I just read what you said at the Utah Relegislature. Makes me wonder about your power of discernment you claim your priesthood gives you, as it appears you aren’t worthy of that Temple recommend you carry.

TOM PARKER

Via cityweekly.net When he called Trump “our Mussolini,” I didn’t realize it was meant as a compliment.

SETH DUNLOP Via Facebook

We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.


A weekly video : PRESENTS

series highlighting

the BEST things

to do in SLC. ............................... Sponsored by:

Save a Dollar. Feed a Family. Find us on Facebook @WTFSLC

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Editorial Interns RACHELLE FERNANDEZ, SAMANTHA HERZOG

Production Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN Circulation Circulation Manager ERIC GRANATO

Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales MIKEY SALTAS Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Business/Office Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE

Sales Director of Advertising,Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives ANNE BAILEY, LISA DORELLI, ALEX MARKHAM, MIEKA SAWATZKI, JEREMIAH SMITH

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, HOWARD HARDEE, DAVID RIEDEL, MIKE RIEDEL, PAUL ROSENBERG, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, BAYNARD WOODS, ANDREW WRIGHT, LEE ZIMMERMAN

Marketing Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZ-KINNY, MATTHEW AULDRIC BEERE, TERESA BAGDASAROVA, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, SAMANTHA HERZOG, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, POLINA LYUBAVINA, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Editorial Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Editorial Assistant RAY HOWZE Proofreaders SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

®

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Copperfield Publishing Inc. JOHN SALTAS City Weekly founder

Phone 801-575-7003 E-mail comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 5

All Contents © 2017


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

6 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

PRIVATE EY Body Slams

This past September, I spent 17 days in Greece as host of the third City Weekly Greece tour (watch for info on our 2018 tour coming soon, he parenthetically adds in shameless plug). While there, my combined time consuming television was no more than 90 seconds total. All of those seconds by accident, never once turning on a hotel television, catching only glimpses of the endless soccer game loop broadcast into Greek taverns and on ferries all day, every day. As for Greek soccer, I am solidly with the red team. Here and there, I also caught snippets of Greek news broadcasts. I’m not a complete stranger to Greek news, having once subscribed here to a couple Greek cable channels in an effort to learn how to speak Greek. I can now engage in light conversation (“I have lost Jennifer Aniston. Have you seen her?”), but the real benefit of Greek TV was that I learned to cook. Listening to Greek chefs tell viewers to add a spoon of this into a bowl of that and to stir was a much easier pathway to speaking Greek than watching news. Greek news is barely different than our own. There’s lots of screaming, shouting, finger-pointing and talking over each other at such a pace that it often doesn’t matter which language is spoken—I end up understanding neither—so when I tune in at all, I’m in for the entertainment factor. When it’s all over, I only understand there’s an animated fake good guy and a grotesque fake bad guy and both are getting worked up over damn near nothing. That story can be told in any language. Back home, I’ve been tuning into cable news once again. I hadn’t watched Fox News since the 2008 elections. Is

B Y J O H N S A LT A S @johnsaltas

Laura Ingraham the new Greta Van Susteren? What’s with this Tucker Carlson guy? So dour looking, so incredibly smarmy. Who is “I can’t believe I’m getting away with this shtick” Jesse Watters? How is it that Tucker and Jesse never got punched in high school? Only Sean Hannity (aka the Lizzie Lape of broadcast news thanks to his questionable relationship with Donald Trump) remains in his bedwetting, hyperventilating night slot. Although I’m certain Rachel Maddow is the smartest of the lot of nightly cable news personalities, I’ve never warmed up to MSNBC’s lineup. That leaves me with CNN, which therefore lies between MSNBC on the left and Fox on the right as the voice of reason. Trouble is, reason often translates into boring, and nighttime cable cannot survive if it is boring. Boring just lays there. Boring doesn’t fight back hard when it is labeled Fake News. The best fighter on CNN is Ana Navarro. It sure isn’t Anderson Cooper or Don Lemon. They both appear to be good, honest guys and dedicated journalists. But, be real—in a street fight, who do you want on your side? Them, or the karate kid, Hannity? If I’ve learned anything since watching nightly cable news again, it’s that it is indeed a street fight. It isn’t about news at all, it’s performance TV where truth and lies don’t matter, only ratings do. And if it takes outrageous acts of treachery to get there, so be it. That’s where it becomes as it is today—dangerous. No matter how far you might think Hannity will sink or climb, it’s never enough because that only sets a new bar. Over the years, a body slam and a choke hold weren’t enough to hold the attention of WWE fans, so wrestlers began falling on shards of glass, throwing chairs at each other, throwing themselves from high ladders, fighting women and little people, with each new ‘wow’ factor designed to bring fans back into the arena.

Like pro wrestling, nightly news has enough truth to it to beguile one into thinking that all the extraneous acting is also true. Despite what our president says, it’s not the news that’s fake, it’s the actors, the hosts, the stars of the show, are. When a story breaks that our president doesn’t like (Russian interference) or doesn’t understand (global warming) all he needs to do is make the claim of it being fake. That sets up the stars of cable nightly news to unleash their individual staffs into the ether to find supporting evidence on either side of the Fake News claim. Then the shouting and wrestling match begins. Soon, viewers are left not watching a discussion about the issue, but the stars of cable news go at it—“Kill her, Sean! Grab a bigger stick, Anderson! Nice move, Rachel!” Like we are supposed to, like we were raised, we go to where we find comfort. Simplistically, intellectuals—jazz music fans, opera fans—go to MSNBC. The NASCAR crowd along with MMA bleeders love the screaming action on Fox. CNN? They try hard, they get a trophy, but no matter how well they perform, they’ll always be considered a lesser game than football. When we accidentally hit Fox instead of MSNBC, it’s like hearing everything in a foreign language. That’s not good for anyone. It drives us to mostly stay tuned to our familiar stations of passion, each fed by a backdrop of leakers, insiders and snitches who trust hosts will do the dirty deed of throwing a chair in order to distract from the razor pulled from the shoe. The cheating is OK if you don’t get caught. Our political scripting is no different than a WWE event— it’s just heels versus heroes. It’s not the dialogue; it’s the action. Ric Flair knows that. So does Trump. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 7


BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Open Anxiety

‘Political Pornography’

Let’s talk public lands again since the Outdoor Retailers are whooping it up in Denver. U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop has started Twitterbashing Patagonia, which is suing the president over Bears Ears, for not testifying at a hearing, while polls like one from Conservation of the West still show most westerners oppose the administration’s attack on public lands. A New York Times opinion writer called it “the political pornography of our time: revealing but distorting, exciting but dulling, debasing to its users, and, well, ejaculatory.” And Rob, it’s actually against House rules to disparage someone on Twitter. But hey, the president does it. It may not look good for the “public” in public lands, and environmentalists know it. They’ve developed a mobile app for people to report damage to public lands, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. It’s not Twitter, but it flies.

IN A WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

Whoa! Do you remember when the Great Salt Lake was a dumping ground for human waste? On track now is something that could be as tragic and dangerous. “The Lake is under threat by a company that seeks to place a landfill on Promontory Point, 1,000 feet from this irreplaceable natural resource,” say the organizers of this Promontory Point Landfill Public Meeting. Don’t just think of the lake. Think of the ecosystem—the migratory birds and the $1.3 billion in revenue the lake generates for the state. Promontory Point Resources is seeking a Class V permit to accept hazardous waste from out of state. If you don’t want Utah to enhance its reputation as a waste destination, then join environmentalists for a presentation by Allan Moore, Solid Waste Program Manager, Utah Department of Environmental Quality. Westminster College, Gore Auditorium, 1840 S. 1300 East, Monday, Feb. 5, or Weber State University, Elizabeth Hall, Room 229, Tuesday, Feb. 6, both 6:30-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2BuL83x.

A Costly Fix

Wait, what? Utah’s going to need how many more prison beds by 2022? This, even after the Justice Reinvestment Initiative? Even after the determination to rehabilitate prisoners? Well, that was a lot of hot air blowing from a Legislature bent on clearing out Point of the Mountain for the gold ring of development. A legislative hearing detailed in a Salt Lake Tribune story showed the sorry state of affairs that inevitably led to cost overruns. Oh, but don’t forget that the first number thrown out was $550 million (not $860 million), roundly dismissed by the eagerness to get it done. Meanwhile, the recidivism rate is about 70 percent and there appears to be no will to address anything but bricks and mortar. Just watch. The Legislature will OK more prisonbuilding money while refusing to expand Medicaid because it’s too expensive.

CITIZEN REV LT BURY THE LANDFILL MEETING

Anxiety. That is what we want our public officials to avoid— at all costs, even the cost of public discourse. Just imagine, says Rep. Brian Greene, R-Pleasant Grove, that you’re walking down the hall and want to drop in on a colleague. Damn. You can’t talk business, or at least the people’s business. “It causes confusion, inefficiency and a lot of anxiety,” Greene told a legislative committee. In fact, he used the word anxiety over and over, being relatively anxious himself. Greene was proposing a change to the Open and Public Meetings Act to exempt three-person commissions from talking privately because, you know, two of them constitute a quorum. One problem: They could exclude that third commissioner— and of course, the public. Oh, and who’s been complaining about these inevitable and unavoidable secret meetings? Not the public. The very anxious commissioners. The committee saw fit to pass on this one.

RUN FOR AIR

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

HITS&MISSES

Utah native Jason Harvey (right) is the mind behind Free Kittens—a free, regular stand-up comedy show that has been packing in crowds as of late. Want to know what it’s all about? The series’ next feline incarnation takes over Urban Lounge on Feb. 2.

How did the show originate?

I wanted to not have just a typical stand-up show. I wanted to have improv elements in it; I wanted sketch elements. I kinda wanted to take all the things I love about comedy, and put it in there and I love stand-up a lot. So, I’m glad that I have some amazing comedian friends, actually. That’s kind of what Free Kittens is to me—it’s just taking all of those elements and throwing them in and mixing it up.

How did your co-host Greg Orme [pictured left] change Free Kittens’ style?

Before Greg came, there was very little in-between stuff. It was pretty much: bring the comics up, [and] they would draw a card or two. And then they’d take those suggestions and try to run them in the set, but I wanted it to be bigger. Since then, we’ve just kind of taken each show and tried to write and make it better, bigger, just unpredictable. It’s not just a normal comedy show.

How has the stand-up scene responded to the show?

With Free Kittens, honestly, people have been pretty good; the crowd there is really awesome. It seems like there’s always a different crowd. The comedy scene loves it. We had over 80 people at the last show. It was awesome.

In this stay-at-home culture, how do you manage to get people coming back?

I try to book a solid show so that every month it gets better. So people talk about it, like, ‘Hey, I went out to Free Kittens and I had a blast. They’re doing it again. Let’s go.’ Word of mouth is still the best advertisement—for people just to say, ‘Hey, I actually left my house and went somewhere and did something, and it was awesome.’

—RACHELLE FERNANDEZ comments@cityweekly.net

Patagonia. You know them. They’re the outfit that dissed the whole idea of reducing national monuments and opening public lands to corporate interests. The company is sponsoring Running Up for Air, an endurance challenge up Grandeur Peak to raise money in the fight for clean air along the Wasatch Front. The event is for runners and of course, clean air advocates, and offers a brochure on Air Quality 101. While the run itself is on Saturday, Feb. 10, a prerun party is scheduled with a short film, presentation, food, fun and a silent auction. Patagonia Outlet, 2292 S. Highland Drive, 801-466-2226, Friday, Feb. 2, 6-9 p.m., free for registrants and volunteers, bit.ly/2DBN8c0.

ABORTION STORIES

What’s up at the Legislature? Of course, it’s abortion with all the heartfelt personal stories and angst from a deeply committed pro-life cabal. There are two sides to this story, and if you’re at all tired of talking fetuses, you may want to participate in Remarkably Normal, Abortion Stories from the 1 in 3 Campaign, a play that “gives its audience the chance to rise above the political fray and to focus on the personal, putting voices to a powerful number,” the Texas Observer says. In celebration of the 45th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, proceeds go to support Planned Parenthood of Utah. Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, Jeanné Wagner Theatre, 138 W. Broadway, 801-322-5571, Friday, Feb. 2, 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. performance, $40-$100, bit.ly/2DHysMM.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 9


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

STRAIGHT DOPE The Blob

BY CECIL ADAMS

There seems to be an alarming increase in news stories about enormous fatbergs—blobs of fat and grease accumulating in the sewers of major cities in the U.S. and Europe. Is it the Western diet, more fast-food restaurants, what? Are we facing a fatberg apocalypse? —FtG

As the Western diet continues to wreak havoc on the world’s health, you can certainly see some rich metaphorical possibilities here—hard, plaque-y, whitish deposits plugging not just our bodies’ arteries but also the ones underground that sustain our cities. The British press loves to wail about sewers stopped up by wads of grease the size of buses, football fields, the Tower Bridge, but for once they’re not exaggerating the problem. This past fall, London saw its largest yet: the Whitechapel fatberg, 140 tons heavy and 270 yards in length. A leviathan glob of solid fat, human waste, and trash is more than gross enough on its face, but consider, too, where all the sewage it’s blocking will subsequently bubble up. A recent paper in the Journal of Oleo Science (what? You don’t subscribe?) reported that buildups of this kind account for 47 percent of sanitary sewer overflows in the U.S., and fully half in the UK. London attracts a good share of the attention because it’s a particularly extreme example of a common urban situation: antiquated infrastructures not designed to handle the loads they’re currently servicing. I mean that both in terms of population and what the population’s disposing of. There’s the expected verboten items—diapers, condoms, tampons—but these solids are bobbing along in a much larger waste stream that’s the ultimate source of the fatberg problem: cooking grease. We have the Brits to thank for the evocative term “fatberg,” which was added to the OED in 2015 (the same year as “Brexit,” incidentally). The phenomenon is otherwise known in the sewage trade as a FOG deposit—fat, oil, and grease—and it’s the reason you don’t dump your turkey drippings down the sink after Thanksgiving dinner. That’s not just harmless effluent: it joins a river of other solidifying fats down there. Home-scale waste isn’t the chief driver here, though: it’s restaurant waste. In research attempting to determine the source of the Whitechapel fatberg, London utility Thames Water found that not one restaurant on the street above (that’d be Whitechapel Road) used a functional grease trap—the device connected, ideally, to a commercial sink or dishwasher to screen oil content out of the waste water. A sampling of 700-plus London restaurants revealed that nine out of ten weren’t doing anything to filter out the fat headed down their drains; homes within 50 meters of a fast-food restaurant were eight times likelier to flood with sewage. Fatberg apocalypse may be overstating it, but this is a genuinely massive problem for big-city sanitation authorities, not

SLUG SIGNORINO

to mention a major physical challenge— under the streets of east London last fall, heat-fatigued crews were working in shifts to hack away at the Whitechapel berg with shovels. The BBC described fatbergs as “a form of artificial geology,” made up of “a pale, tough substance with the strength of rock.” Or, somewhat more accurately, the strength of a mighty bar of soap. As you may recall from high-school chem class, saponification is the process wherein a fatty acid, as found in animal fat or vegetable oil, encounters some high-pH substance and turns into soap—the classic pairing is tallow and lye. What we’re seeing in FOG situations is the fatty acids released during the deep-frying of food reacting with the calcium in the concrete sewer walls to form a monstrous, fetid cake that’s pure misery to dislodge. As I say, there’s other stuff clogging up the works, too. Solid trash in the sewers seems to play a role in fatberg formation, providing an anchor point for grease to congeal around. The notable culprit here, now widely used by adults on themselves as well as on babies, is wet wipes; they’re typically advertised as “flushable” by their manufacturers, but sewer operators beg to differ. A 2015 New York Times story sets out the debate: On one side you’ve got New York City, spending $18 million over five years on “wipe-related equipment problems.” On the other there’s the powerful nonwovenfabric industry, which pins the problem, to quote a trade rep, on “nonflushable wipes inappropriately flushed”—in other words, don’t blame the wipe, blame the wiper. Still, the wipes issue, while serious, is just the tip of the fatberg. What to do about all the grease? Getting people to give up their French fries would reduce clogging in both our vascular and sewage systems, but color me bearish on that prospect. An alternative is to use FOG as biofuel—to power city buses, for instance—and that’s what outfits like Thames Water have been looking into. On that front, the good news is that spent cooking oil can burn 80 percent cleaner than traditional fossil fuels. The bad news? Somebody still has to go down there and get it. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader,  30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607


NEWS

P U B L I C H E A LT H

One Man’s Drug Checks Help Save Lives

With an inept drug czar and vindictive DOJ, citizens are left to address opioid crisis on their own.

Tino Fuentes, left, checks for fentanyl contamination in heroin in a Baltimore warehouse apartment as William Miller looks on.

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 11

it. Everything I bought was fentanyl,” Fuentes says. And it’s not only heroin. Fuentes has found fentanyl in cocaine, crystal meth, and even Xanax. “I’ve tested 11 Xanax pills that look just like a bar, like it came from a pharmacy. They were pressed illegally and they were positive for fentanyl. I tested MDMA, positive for fentanyl. In Atlanta, crystal meth, positive for fentanyl,” he says. “Always test every batch,” Fuentes says. “Don’t assume because [of] the last batch.” He calls it the “chocolate chip” effect when the drugs aren’t cut well and the fentanyl is not well distributed. William Miller started using heroin in the 1960s and he has seen it all. But he hasn’t seen anything like fentanyl. He can’t even begin to count the number of people he’s known who have died because of the drug. As a result, he’s gotten clean and is now working in his Baltimore community to spread the word. “Doing it like this, it spreads out among communities,” Fuentes says. “I’ll leave some strips, do what you do on your own. Figure it out, go into your neighborhoods or wherever you think it’s deemed necessary and see how it works for you.” “No matter how you feel about people that use, people are gonna get high and this fentanyl thing, man, it is killing people,” Miller says. CW

hat, and a pair of glasses perched on his nose like Ben Franklin doesn’t give a fuck. That’s why, though he consults with some cities, he doesn’t operate as a 501(c)(3) or any other legal entity. Sometimes, ethics—saving lives—is more important than the law. But there are places that recognize the need for these harm-reduction strategies. “I’m not going to sit back and wait for the law to change or the government to help, because they ain’t never helped me and the law ain’t either,” he says to the group. “That’s why I do what I do.” “We take it and dip it in there for 15 seconds, right,” he says to a group of five harm-reduction advocates from the community as he dips the strip into a small tin votive candle holder that some people use to cook their opiates. “Then you put it up like that, as you see it start getting pink, that’s sucking up the water.” In a few seconds, lines start to stand out on the strip. If there’s one line, then your dope has fentanyl in it. And if there are two lines, it probably doesn’t. The test only covers 12 fentanyl analogues, including the even stronger carfentanil—but new varieties are developed nearly every day. And the tests can’t check the strength of a drug, only its presence. So even if it tests positive, it may not kill you. It’s more difficult to mix fentanyl in the black tar heroin that comes up from Mexico, but in many places, heroin is powder and almost all of it has fentanyl. Some of what is sold as heroin is nothing but fentanyl. “When I went to Ohio, I didn’t find anything, anything at all with heroin in

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

he says to a number of users or former users who are still involved in Baltimore’s opiate community. “You don’t have to waste the drugs at all. Just the residue.” Insite, a safe-injection facility in Vancouver, first developed the technique of using drug testing strips to test for fentanyl. “It was just trying to find a solution because there are other drug checking methods that are used—primarily in night-life and festival communities—but the kind of tests used in that community are not sensitive enough to pick up fentanyl, which is really active in small doses,” Stefanie Jones of the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) says. “That’s why using those test strips came about. It was a process of trial and error of how to get it to work most effectively.” A recent study in Vancouver showed that 86 percent of the drugs and 90 percent of the heroin they checked had fentanyl in it. Users who knew fentanyl was in their dope changed their behavior—they were more than 10 times likelier to reduce their dose. Washington, D.C.’s City Council has adopted emergency legislation that would allow organizations to distribute the strips and allow individuals to use them without fear of legal consequences. But it’s technically illegal for Fuentes to check the drugs in Baltimore—when he is testing he is legally in possession of the drugs; in some places the strips themselves are considered paraphernalia—but the weathered and grizzled old New York Puerto Rican with the leather jacket, the flat old-man golf

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

A

lthough many in Utah were aware of the trend, last October, President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency, saying that more than 64,000 Americans had died from opioid overdoses the previous year. Fentanyl is responsible for a large part of that number. But aside from his attorney general’s attempts to ramp back up a tough-on-crime drug war that will re-criminalize weed, the administration hasn’t done much. Trump hired a 24-year-old MAGA frat boy as drug czar. Taylor Weyeneth, the recent college graduate who has never really worked any where except the Trump campaign, recently resigned amid questions about his résumé. Meanwhile, local jurisdictions are passing “drug-induced homicide” laws in order to incarcerate more people for longer periods of time for drug offenses. So, around the country, advocates of a harm-reduction approach to the drug overdose crisis are taking matters into their own hands. That’s why Tino Fuentes is in a Baltimore warehouse apartment with a bunch of drug-testing strips. Fuentes, a former heroin user and dealer from New York, might not be the most obvious advocate for drug testing. Single-use Rapid Response drugtesting strips are supposed to be used to test people’s urine for the presence of drugs, but Fuentes puts them to a different use—one that may save lives. Instead of using the strip to monitor the activities of employees or parolees, Fuentes and others use the strips to test street drugs for fentanyl. Drug checking rather than drug testing. “After you suck it dry, put your shot to the side, add water to the cooker. All you’re looking for is the residue,”

BAYNARD WOODS

BY BAYNARD WOODS comments@cityweekly.net @baynardwoods


BIG SHINY ROBOT! News from the geeks. CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

1.28 @ BROADWAY DIVA BRUNCH

exclusively on

cityweekly.net -cityweekly.net/bigshinyrobot-

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

12 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

UPCOMING EVENTS MUSIC CON

FEBRUARY 2-3

10:00AM - 7:00PM SALT PALACE CONVENTION CENTER

VIVA LA DIVA

FEBRUARY 3, 2018

7:00PM - 11:00PM

AT CLUB-X


WILDLIFE CONSERVATION NETWORK

By Paul Rosenberg | comments@cityweekly.net |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 13

this bear’s condition, this heartwrenching footage provides us with a warning about the future.” Just days before the video went viral, a paper Amstrup co-authored presented the polar bear as something else as well: a “keystone domino,” a proxy used to attack global warming. The paper states that: “Because this evidence [for global warming] is so overwhelming, it

| CITY WEEKLY |

That’s true, but also a bit beside the point. “The problem is that an everwarmer future means polar bears will have less and less access to their seal prey, so the rate at which bears die from malnutrition/starvation will increase,” says Dr. Steven Amstrup, chief scientist for the nonprofit Polar Bears International. “So, regardless of the proximate cause of

would be virtually impossible to debunk; the main strategy of denier blogs is therefore to focus on topics that are showy and in which it is therefore easy to generate public interest. These topics are used as “proxies” for [anthropogenic global warming] in general; in other words, they represent keystone dominoes that are strategically placed in front of many hun­d reds of others, each representing a separate line of evidence for anthropogenic global warming. By appearing to knock over the keystone domino, audiences targeted by the communication may assume all other dominoes are toppled in a form of “dismissal by association.” The paper, Internet Blogs, Polar Bears, and Climate-Change Denial by Proxy, by Jeffrey Harvey, a senior scientist at the Netherlands Institute of Ecology, and 13 co-authors, looked at 90 blogs and 92 peer-reviewed papers. They analyzed them in terms of what they said about sea ice (declining rapidly or not, or varying unpredictably over the long run) and polar bears (threatened with extinction or not, or capable of adapting to threats). Another co-author, Bart Verheggen, a climate scientist at Amsterdam University College, starkly describes their findings: “There is a clear separation amongst blogs, where approximately half of the 90 blogs investigated agree with the majority of the scientific literature, whereas other blogs took a position that is diametrically opposed to the scientific conclusions. Most of the blogs in the latter group [about 80 percent]

I

n early December, a video of a dying, emaciated polar bear, foraging for food on an iceless land, went viral on social media. The video garnered millions of views on Facebook and YouTube. For most, it was a vivid signal of the future in store for us all due to human-caused (anthropogenic) global warming—rising temperatures due to increased carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases. For those who deny or minimize the existence of anthropogenic global warming, it wasn’t a polar bear, but a red herring (“Propaganda,” one YouTube viewer called it)—no one knows why it was dying, much less if it can be connected to global warming.

@randomlenghts

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Unmasking a proxy war strategy by online climate change denialists.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

What Global Warming?


—Jeffrey Harvey

VIA YOUTUBE.COM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

“They have tried to discredit the paper by criticizing the statistical analyses.”

based their opinions on one and the same source: Susan Crockford.” Crockford is an unpaid adjunct professor at the University of Victoria in British Columbia. There were a few contested papers—ones that drew critical comments after publication—that fell outside the consensus, but they all fell between the two groups of blogs. “Our paper was clearly a direct hit because the response from the denial blogs was immediate,” Harvey says. “As is their modus operandi, they studiously avoid the core messages, which are that they use a tiny set of topics (proxies) to dismiss anthropogenic global warming … in attacking the evidence that [anthropogenic global warming] is driving a rapid reduction in seasonal arctic ice extent, [which] threatens polar bears, they almost completely avoid the published scientific literature.” It’s worth noting that two of Harvey’s co-authors, Amstrup and Ian Stirling, both coauthored more than 20 of the 92 papers in that literature, an indication of their depth of knowledge that denialists actually held against them. The paper also concluded with an unusual call to action: “We believe that it is imperative for more scientists to venture beyond the confines of their labs and lecture halls to directly engage with the public and policymakers, as well as more strongly confronting and resisting the well-funded and organized network of [anthropogenic global warming] denial.” But global warming denialism is so pervasive, it can now be considered a contributing factor to global warming itself—something to be studied and mitigated. This paper is just the latest in the growing field of scientific studies of global warming science and denialist response that’s increasingly causing denialists to squirm.

Studying Climate Denialism: A Growing Subfield

This began in 2004, when science historian Naomi Oreskes, a professor of the history of science and affiliated professor of earth and planetary sciences at Harvard, produced the first of several studies establishing the existence of a solid 97 percent consensus of scientists that humans are responsible for ongoing global warming. It’s also been shown that increasing awareness of this consensus increases public acceptance. In 2015, Norwegian climate scientist Rasmus Benestad pioneered the study of patterns of mistakes across dissenting papers in the remaining 3 percent. These were discovered by trying to replicate their results. In 2012, Stephan Lewandowsky, a cognitive scientist at the University of Bristol, in the United Kingdom, another of Harvey’s co-authors, initiated another line of research. He explored patterns of reasoning in the public at large. He first discovered that belief in a cluster of conspiracy theories was associated with global warming denial. Then he studied the online response of denialists to that study in a paper called “Recursive Fury,” in which he reported that many denialists exhibited at least one of six previously identified characteristics of conspiracist ideation. The denialists reacted furiously again and the journal that published the paper

withdrew it, not because there was anything scientifically wrong with it, but for fear of being sued. This was widely condemned for encouraging scientifically unfounded attacks. Crockford also tried to get Harvey’s paper withdrawn and others tried to get Harvey condemned by his employer, but both were firmly rebuffed. Finally, in 2016, Yale sociologist Justin Farrell conducted more research, using network science and text analysis to investigate the overall structure and organizational power of the contrarian network, including the role of elite corporate benefactors. Thus, the first two lines of research establish why there’s no credible scientific support for rejecting global warming, while the second two broadly explain the consensus gap between scientists and the public in terms of a combination of individual psychology and socio-political influence, with a strong financial component. Harvey’s paper provides a much sharper focus for that broad explanation, leaving little wiggle room for a denialist response short of throwing up their hands in surrender. “They clearly did not want to respond through the peer reviewed literature, but instead resorted to three main tactics,” Harvey says. “The first was to accuse us of ganging up on Susan Crockford, even though she does not appear until page three of the article and is not the primary focus.” Indeed, Crockford is not even indirectly mentioned in the paper’s abstract. “They also launched all out attacks on the two most prominent authors, Mike Mann and Stephan Lewandowsky, finally coming around to me after some days,” Harvey says. Mann was principally responsible for the “hockey stick” graph, the first widely-accepted reconstruction of the past 1,000 years of northern hemisphere temperatures, showing dramatic temperature increases in the past few decades, which has made him a prime target for denialist attacks. “Recursive Fury” in particular made Lewandowsky a prime target. Finally, “They have tried to discredit the paper by criticizing the statistical analyses,” Harvey concludes. This was an effort spearheaded by economist Richard Tol, who floundered badly in a similar 2014 attempt to discredit the existence of the 97 percent consensus on global warming. On the last point, Lewandowsky highlights what he called, The “Monty Pythonesque” angle of them trying frantically to invalidate their data. “The only way to achieve that would be if their blogs didn’t make the claims they clearly insist on making—namely that the Arctic isn’t melting and polar bears are just fine,” Lewandowsky says.

A New Proxy Fight: Crockford Cries ‘Rape!’

But what they lacked in substance, they made up for in sound and fury, with Crockford leading the way. After pointing out the denier blogs’ heavy reliance on her, the paper reads: “Notably, as of this writing, Crockford has neither conducted any original research nor published any articles in the peer-reviewed literature on polar bears.”


COURTESY POLAR BEARS INTERNATIONAL

COURTESY POLAR BEARS INTERNATIONAL

A Peek Into Peer Review Confusions

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 15

“Amstrup is pissed off because I criticized his work,” Crockford wrote in a comment at WUWT. “He and Stirling are not used to being challenged.” She touted her theory of the paper’s origins and purpose, based on a paper she published online at PeerJ, which is not in a peer-reviewed journal. Ignoring that fact, she wrote, “Colleagues have read my paper and found it to be fully acceptable as a piece of academic scientific work,” adding, “If that were not true, this desperately ridiculous Bioscience paper would never have been published.” But that’s not how science works. A paper generally has to be peer reviewed and published, before other scientists feel a need to respond. “It was peer-reviewed by several well-qualified colleagues before publication (and revised accordingly) [which is not what ‘peer-reviewed’ means] but was not peer-reviewed again by the PeerJ organization, as is their policy,” Crockford wrote elsewhere. So, she knows full well it wasn’t peer reviewed, but wants to confuse her non-scientist readers. That was from the blog post containing her “letter to the editors of the journal Bioscience requesting retraction of the shoddy and malicious paper by Harvey, et al.” The editors surely saw through this amateurish deception. Just like Donald Trump, she was playing to her base. That’s hardly her only deception. Elsewhere on her blog, Crockford let her real feelings about Bioscience show—feelings so strong they seemed to impair her basic math: “BioScience is an interesting choice for this ‘Forum’ paper: I counted only 4 polar bear research papers in this journal since 2004 but 11 papers on ‘climate change denial’ since 2010 (not including this one). In other words, few polar bear scientists would usually read this journal but many people interested in the ‘problem’ of ‘climate change denial’ would seek it out.” Yet, it only takes a moment, clicking on the links Crockford provides in the text, to discover she’s totally wrong. There are actually 88 journal articles listed on polar bears, 72 classified as research articles. For ‘climate change denial,’ the numbers are 19 and 16, respectively. So, she’s wrong about the journal’s content, as well as what people read it for. It is not, as she pretends, a comfy conspiratorial den for her enemies, but a well-respected journal of bioscience! “This kind of harassment, intimidation and threats are typical in my opinion of climate change deniers when they are criticized,” Harvey concludes. “They rarely pursue the normal professional response of writing a rebuttal to a journal until all other options have been exhausted.”

There’s a second element in Crockford’s persecution narrative: Her entry into the halfbaked conspiracy theories about the origins of Harvey’s story. “It’s interesting to see the different conspiracy theories being touted about our paper [on different denialist blogs],” Verheggen says. He says that all of them are wildly wrong. The following are a few of the claims he refutes: n Mann and Lewandowsky are behind it all, and they dragged others in with them (WUWT [a blog], others) n Amstrup and Stirling wanted to get back at Crockford who criticized them and got others to help them (Tom Fuller at cliscep and elsewhere) n A clique around Bart Verheggen and Amsterdam Academia got others to join them in their crusade against “skeptics,” (the Dutch deniosphere at climategate.nl) WUWT—What’s Up With That?—is the most viewed denialist website worldwide. It actually promoted both of the first two conspiracies. Conspiracy theorists often embrace multiple, different and even contradictory conspiracy narratives. This is one of the six characteristics of conspiracist thought mentioned above, known as “must be wrong,” a pervasive belief that a conspiracy exists despite specific disproofs. Another corollary of this conspiracy thought characteristic is the belief in mutually-contradictory theories. The conspiracies listed above aren’t mutually

exclusive, but they do illustrate another characteristic of conspiracist thought, “persecution-victimization,” the tendency to see themselves as persecuted victims of the conspiracy, as well as potential heroes. Thus, Crockford and her fans prefer the conspiracy theory revolving around her, and the Dutch denialists prefer the conspiracy centered on Dutch soil.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Competing Conspiracy Theories

Internet Blogs, Polar Bears, and ClimateChange Denial by Proxy co-author Bart Verheggen, a climate scientists at Amsterdam University College.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Crockford, a zoologist who’s been secretly paid by the denialist Heartland Institute, seemingly proved their point by responding with a series of heated blog posts, rather than a comment letter to the journal. One post claimed the paper was a conspiratorial response getting back at her for a non-peer-reviewed paper she’d published on the internet. On one of the blog posts, she states that the “Bioscience article is academic rape: an assertion of power and intimidation ... Characterizing a professional, respected scientist as an unqualified vengeful opinion writer is the same kind of power attack as rape. It’s meant to humiliate and intimidate.” Other denialist blogs echoed her theme, characterizing the paper’s authors as “climate bullies” and harassers. “Crockford’s claim of academic rape is, in my opinion, really appalling,” Harvey says. “Four of my co-authors are women, including two in their 20s.” So, was Crockford accusing them of rape, too? Or simply erasing their existence? “Our team has no agenda against a specific blogger,” said Meena Balgopal, associate professor of biology at Colorado State University—another co-author. “We simply found that the majority (80 percent) of the blogs that were identified as ‘climate denying’ referenced Crockford’s blog. Our goal was to use objective methods to better understand how blogs that describe climate change and polar bears present and frame information. Discussions of ‘#MeToo’ or ‘rape’ are, therefore, irrelevant to our study.”

Ian Stirling, co-author of 32 papers in the 92-paper database, removing satellite radio from female with cub.

COURTESY POLAR BEARS INTERNATIONAL

Steven Amstrup, co-author of 21 papers in the 92-paper database, with three ridiculously cute polar bear cubs.


Susan Crockford

Back to the Science

If the point of such proxy controversies is to distract, it’s good to refocus on what it’s being distracted from. “In addition to the badgering and nitpicking, we’ve been getting more conflation of the present and the future, more about how it has been warm in the past, and more suggestions polar bears will be fine on land,” Amstrup says. These are all topics well-settled in the scientific literature that are ripe for confusion in the context of a heated proxy fight. The paper explains these confusions, but denier blogs don’t pay attention to scientific literature. That’s the study’s main finding, remember? So Amstrup ticked off what was being obscured. “Deniers have criticized polar bear scientists because things we projected for later this century have not yet happened,” he says. That’s the main point of Crockford’s nonpeer-reviewed paper. So, “there are no future threats.” This ignores the known long-term trends and the point Amstrup made about the dying bear video. “Lowered polar bear survival means more bears are starving to death, so regardless of what happened to cause this particular bear’s problems, we know a future with less ice means higher rates of this kind of event in the future—a future we can avoid by mitigating greenhouse gas rise,” Amstrup says. He also commented on past warm periods. “The best evidence suggests we will be far warmer by mid-century than any time in the polar bear’s evolutionary history,” Amstrup says. “The current warming occurring over the top of gradually declining insolation is caused by humans and is not at all analogous to past warming events.” As for polar bears surviving on land, studies show there just isn’t enough nutritious food for them to survive on without access to sea ice where they can hunt seals. Sure, bears have been known to catch geese, for example, but, “there simply are not enough geese to feed all the polar bears if we ultimately let the ice disappear,” Amstrup says. Of course, the point of the paper is that all the above is well-known to scientists and is deliberately obscured on the denier blogs. The response to the paper helps to prove its point.

A Last Hurrah—Or Harrumph

One last response deserves special attention: that of economist Richard Tol, who has made slipshod scientific-sounding arguments before. In a 2014 paper he criticized one of several studies showing a 97 percent consensus on global warming, arguing it was “only” 91 percent instead. His paper was rejected twice by one journal for flawed methodology, before it was published by another, still with some of the problems reviewers had flagged. A debunking of his claims, 24 Critical Errors in Tol (2014), written by 10 co-authors was published at skepticalscience.com, which notes that in his most glaring mistake, “Tol effectively

JAMES GIBSON

—Recursive Fury, Stephan Lewandowsky, et al.

TBD

VIA YOUTUBE.COM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

“Notably, as of this writing, Crockford has neither conducted any original research nor published any articles in the peerreviewed literature on polar bears.”

conjured approximately 300 papers rejecting or minimizing human-caused global warming out of thin air, with no evidence that those papers exist in reality.” This time, the outlook is strikingly similar. The data issues, once again, are illusory. “Simply put, there are no issues with the data and Tol doesn’t report any,” Lewandowsky says. “What Tol is doing instead is to throw various innuendos at our particular form of the data and listing the limitations of it. This is a never-ending game of ‘gotcha’ because every type of data has specific limitations, which are taken into account by the appropriate statistical analysis.” His conclusions are chimeral, too. “Harvey et al. (2017) thus really show that there are people who worry about sea-ice and polar bears, and those who do not and cite Dr. Crockford,” Tol writes. But the paper’s co-authors disagree. “We do not only show there are people who worry and people that do not,” says Peter Roessingh, another co-author, an ecologist at the University of Amsterdam. “We show that all scientists are in one camp, with half of the blogs, and all other blogs are in the other camp. It is not a random mixture. By omitting the science position, he distorts our conclusion.” Tol also complains that some of the paper’s authors had co-authored a good number of the papers on sea ice and polar bears, which made them biased. He layered multiple misleading arguments to make it seem quite underhanded and nefarious—questioning why only a small subset of papers on polar bears (in the Scopus database) were used, for example. “There may well be 278 papers on polar bears in Scopus,” Lewandowsky responds. “In fact, there are probably 10,000 papers in Scopus on bears. And a million on mammals. Holy cow, does this mean we ignored nearly a million relevant papers? Of course not! ... He’d get the same number of papers [we did] if he actually used our search terms ... Tol is complaining that the Bioscience paper is co-authored by scientists with a high level of relevant expertise. I would call that a strong asset of our paper!” In short, Tol’s response comes off as the final flourish in a flood of responses, all of which add up to a resounding underscoring of Harvey’s results. As Lewandowsky says, it’s Monty Python-esque. “Our paper is hardly surprising, but deniers are angry simply because they have been formally exposed,” Harvey sums up. “It is patently obvious that denier blogs are master cherry pickers of quite dubious sources. They know it too, but they just don’t want to admit it.” Which is why the paper’s call for scientists to become more engaged on social media is so crucial. The more of them there are, the harder it will be for the cherry pickers to win when the next viral video comes around. CW Paul Rosenberg is the senior editor for Random Lengths News in Los Angeles and a contributing columnist for salon.com.


We buy cars (801) 845-2423 creditrefresh.cityweekly.net

CITY WEEKLY AUTOS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 17

A BETTER WAY TO BUY & SELL YOUR NEXT VEHICLE! REGISTER ON WWW.CITYWEEKLYAUTOS.COM TO WIN $100 MAVERIK GAS CARD


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

18 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

ESSENTIALS

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, FEB. 1-7, 2018

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

VH1

EMILY NELSON

ROBERT HOLMAN

STUART RUCKMAN

the

FRIDAY 2/2

FRIDAY 2/2

SATURDAY 2/3

SATURDAY 2/3

When director Teresa Sanderson first got a look at the script for I and You, she almost couldn’t believe that it was by Lauren Gunderson, the same author of a play in which she had just performed, Silent Sky. I and You is a contemporary story about two high school students, with a boy named Anthony meeting with a housebound classmate named Caroline to work on an English class assignment; Silent Sky is the true story of a 19th-century female astronomer. “I was so amazed by her ability to write such rich stuff across all time periods,” Sanderson says. The story of I and You deals with Caroline’s status as a girl awaiting an organ transplant, providing subject matter that easily could have turned into something overly sentimental. But according to Sanderson, the way Gunderson writes Caroline keeps that problem at bay. “Caroline’s a complete smart-ass,” Sanderson says. “Like any kid who’s faced with grown-up things like mortality, you probably do grow up a lot faster.” A narrative about high-school students means working with younger, relatively inexperienced cast members, which Sanderson acknowledges requires a bit more work from her, and a rigidly structured rehearsal process. In this particular case, there’s also the unique dynamic of Sanderson working with Cora Fossen, whose parents—local actors April Fossen and Mark Fossen—Sanderson knows well. “I’m sure just by living with them, there are things you pick up,” Sanderson says of any similarities as a performer between Cora and her parents. “But she’s definitely her own person.” (Scott Renshaw) Pygmalion Theatre Co.: I and You @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Feb. 2-17, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m., $15-$20, artsaltlake.org

The rising interest in modern dance owes something to today’s pop stars, who increasingly share the spotlight with troupes of acrobatic dancers in tow. Indeed, concerts have become multimedia performances that accentuate the sights as well as the sounds. It’s little wonder, then, that so many modern dance companies—from the Dance Theatre of Harlem to Cirque du Soleil—are attracting new and younger audiences drawn to creative choreography and finding a theatrical connection between music and motion. It’s that spirit of artistic expression that compelled the Nikolais Dance Theatre and Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. to create Strata, a celebration of Alwin Nikolais, one of the most influential American choreographers of the 20th century. A recipient of the National Medal of Arts and a member of France’s Legion of Honor, Nikolais’ groundbreaking efforts form the basis of a unique and exhilarating four-part performance. “He was the first choreographer to fuse dance with a variety of innovative multi-media elements as a means of creating a unique theatrical experience about contemporary life,” Ririe-Woodbury Artistic Director Daniel Charon says. “Nikolais remains an inspiration whose sense of exploration and curiosity continually reminds us of the power of imagination and its ability to innovate.” The weekend also includes Elements/ Elementos, a family-friendly matinee performance designed to educate and entertain audiences of all ages, in both English and Spanish. “We stand firm in our motto ‘Dance is for everybody,’” outreach director Juan Carlos Claudio adds emphatically. (Lee Zimmerman) Strata @ Janet Quinney Lawson Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Feb. 2-3, 7:30 p.m.; Elements/Elementos @ Capitol Theatre, Feb. 3, 1 p.m., $15-$35, artsaltlake.org

No one can dispute the cultural contributions the French have made throughout history. That’s not even including vintage wine, tasty crêpes, fashionable berets, fancy language or haute couture. The more culturally astute might point to French painters like Monet, Chagall, Cezanne or Matisse, but hey, at least we’re not citing french fries as an example. For their part, Utopia Early Music spotlights French medieval music, with a pair of performances tracing it through three centuries of evolution, from the traveling troubadours of the 12th century to more complex musical styles spawned 200 years later. Notably, many of the same themes that fascinate us today— from the ribald to the romantic—inspired those musicians as well, allowing for entertainment that’s festive, intriguing and unfailingly alluring. “I love this kind of music because it sparks the imagination,” Emily Nelson, Utopia Early Music’s co-founder and executive director (as well one of the performers in the production) says. “You can close your eyes, and it takes you on an adventure. We are passionately fond of it.” With an instrumental ensemble that includes recorders, bagpipes and harp, accompanied by a trio of vocalists, Utopia’s well regarded reputation for recreating the music of the past reflects a time when courtly manners and evocative artistry found common ground. Can you say, “très magnifique?”(LZ) Utopia Early Music: The Siren and the Nightingale: Music of Medieval France @ Cathedral Church of St. Mark, 231 E. 100 South, Feb.3, 8 p.m.; Feb. 4, 5 p.m., suggested donation $10-$15, utopiaearlymusic.org

She’s perfect. She’s beautiful. She looks like Linda Evangelista. And during Season 9 of pop-culture phenom RuPaul’s Drag Race, she was at the center of the gay gasp heard ’round the world: In a defiant move, Valentina asked to keep a bejeweled mask on, which was covering her mouth and thus invalidating her lip-sync in front of the panel of judges. A gripping four-second stare down between mentor and ingenue followed, and after flubbing the lyrics to Ariana Grande’s “Greedy,” the ultimate fan favorite sashayed away. In the postseason reunion special, RuPaul called the moment, “The shocking elimination to end all shocking eliminations.” Still, the star in the making—real name James Leyva—has since managed to build a rabid fan base, inspire fashion designers near and far and land features in Vogue’s U.S. and Mexico editions (but not City Weekly, as our request for an interview was denied.) This Saturday, Valentina takes the Metro Music Hall stage courtesy of JRC Events and follows the likes of other drag superstars who have left their mark in SLC during recents months, such as Trinity “the Tuck” Taylor, Willam and the queen of snakes herself, Alaska Thunderfuck. The L.A.-native is joined by local queens Xaina, Eva Chanel Stephens, Lilia Maughn and Provo’s Feral Ann Wilde. A $15 ticket gets you in the show, with an extra $25 granting you access to a meet-andgreet with the diva-in-the-making herself. Expect flowers, Virgin of Guadalupe votives and perhaps the answer to the age-old question: Did you stone those tights? (Enrique Limón) Valentina @ Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 385-528-0952, Feb. 3, $15-$40, 9 p.m., 21+, metromusichall.com

Pygmalion Theatre Co.: I and You

Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Strata

Utopia Early Music: The Siren and the Nightingale: Music of Medieval France

Masc 4 Mask Ball feat. Valentina


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

| FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 19


Real accounts of abortion choice form the foundation for Remarkably Normal. BY KYLEE EHMANN comments@cityweekly.net @ehmannky

XOXOXO Valentine’s Day XOXOXO

! h a u M ah! u M ah! u M

XOXO Wed, February 14th XOXO

here are a million and one reasons why a person might get an abortion. Maybe they were assaulted and the pregnancy is deeply unwanted. Maybe they have a medical condition making pregnancy extremely dangerous. Or maybe they just don’t want to be pregnant. Despite more than four post-Roe v. Wade decades and millions of people taking advantage of legal abortion services for myriad reasons, Americans have a hard time shaking away the miasma of shame surrounding the procedure. This lingering stigma is exactly what inspired Remarkably Normal, produced by the Salt Lake Acting Co. in partnership with Planned Parenthood Association of Utah. Written in 2016 by playwright Jessi Blue Gormezano, the performance features real-life stories shared through the 1 in 3 Campaign (1in3campaign.org), a grassroots movement dedicated to talking about people’s abortion experiences. The campaign is inspired by the oft-repeated statistic that one in three women will have an abortion during their lifetime (according to the American Journal of Public Health, as of 2017, the statistic is now 1 in 4). The production represents part of Planned Parenthood’s annual fundraiser, and also marks the 45th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. All proceeds from the performance go directly to Utah’s Planned Parenthood. Some of these stories are remarkably matter-of-fact: a college sophomore speaks frankly about her abortion freeing her to pursue an athletic career; a young career woman gushes gratitude over not being pregnant. Others are incredibly raw and painful: A mother talks about the severe physical trauma of her first pregnancy, while teenagers write about being pushed into sexual situations they weren’t ready for. All share the larger goal of breaking the silence around abortion. Katrina Barker, communications and marketing coordinator for Planned Parenthood, says hearing these stories gives a human face to dry statistics and abstract morality arguments. “I believe strongly that the arts can touch hearts and minds in ways that a lecture can’t. This play is able to bring together a wide variety of stories and perspectives in a concise and compelling way,” she says. “I think anyone who sees it will walk away with a greater appreciation for the complexity and diversity of circumstances that bring women to the choice to terminate a pregnancy.”

NICK FLEMING

T

XOXOXOXOXO Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th XOXOXOXOXO

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

Life Stories

XOXOXOXOXO Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th XOXOXOXOXO

20 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

A&E

THEATER

Remarkably Normal tells true experiences through a lightly staged reading, complete with music and transitions. But for Cynthia Fleming, SLAC executive artistic director, one of the most interesting parts of the show comes in the setup: Each character is being interviewed, and the audience is the interviewer. “As an audience member, you’re not going to actively be asked to do or be something,” Fleming says. “But I think it creates a little more of an intimate conversation between the audience and the actor and the character.” The show’s 11 roles are portrayed by a mix of professional actors and high-profile Utah women like Rep. Angela Romero, D-Salt Lake City; Mindy Young, development director for Equality Utah; and Theresa Martinez, sociology professor at the University of Utah. Olivia Custodio, development director for SLAC, says while it’s always the actor’s responsibility to inhabit a character and make it their truth, there’s something more powerful going on here. “You can really feel that connection much more when you know that it is a real person,” Custodio says. “And to be honest, I think that’s a big responsibility, because these people gave their permission for their stories to be used, and it makes it really special when you know you’re doing this on behalf someone else for everyone else who may not have had the opportunity or courage to speak their truth yet.” Producing Director Janice Jenson considers documentary-style theater an

Ashley Ramos, Yolanda Stange and Janice Jenson rehearse Remarkably Normal.

important experience for the audience as well. “I think as an audience member and as a community member to know that this is someone’s actual story, there’s power in that, and I think that it empowers you to tell your own story,” she says. Fleming, Custodio and Jenson all acknowledge the importance of Planned Parenthood and the comforting presence it’s had in their lives. While it’s likely most attendees of Remarkably Normal don’t need to be convinced of Planned Parenthood’s value and are similarly committed to the organization’s community presence, Barker says the night will still provide a valuable experience in allowing people to speak their truth. “I feel confident the audience will leave feeling uplifted, and with a greater appreciation for the importance of comprehensive reproductive health care and access to abortion services,” Barker says. “I hope they will be more willing to speak up for those rights with their friends and family and get more involved in the political process to protect those rights.” CW

REMARKABLY NORMAL

Rose Wagner Center 138 W. 300 South, 801-363-7522 Feb. 2, 7 p.m. $40-$100 artsaltlake.org


moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

COMEDY & IMPROV

Christina P. Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Feb. 2-3, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Kellen Erskine Wiseguys West Jordan 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Feb. 1-3, times vary, 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Marcus and Guy Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Dec. 2-3, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Michael Quu Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Feb. 6-8, 7 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Valentina Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 385-528-0952, Feb. 3, 9 p.m., 21+, metromusichall.com (see p. 18)

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Breeana Shields: Poison’s Cage The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Feb. 2, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Lisa McMann: Dragon Bones The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Feb. 7, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

Heirloom quilts all produced before 1940—including one by a survivor of the infamous Donner Party—are on display in the Vintage Quilt Exhibition at Brigham City Museum Gallery (24 N. 300 West, Brigham City, brighamcitymuseum.org), through April 3.

THEATER

DANCE Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Elements/ Elementos Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Feb. 3, 1 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co.: Strata Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Feb. 2-3, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

SEASONAL EVENTS

Ice Rink Station Park 140 N. Union Ave., Farmington, 801-923-9111, through Feb. 25, shopstationpark.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

| FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 21

All Those Who Wander: Exploring the World by Lens Bountiful Davis Art Center, 90 N. Main, Bountiful, through Feb. 28, bdac.org Andrew Alba: Spring and All Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Annual Faculty Show Southern Utah Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, through Feb. 24, suu.edu/pva Bob Hope: An American Treasure Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through April 28, culturalcelebration.org Catherine Darling Hostetter & Jeff Clay: The Art of Portraiture Local Colors of Utah Art Gallery, 1054 E. 2100 South, 801-898-0639, through Feb. 13, localcolorsart.com Chauncey Secrist: Icons: Assemblages Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through March 6, slcpl.org Christine Kende Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 10, slcpl.org Desire Lines UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 26, utahmoca.org

| CITY WEEKLY |

Wind Ensemble: From Darkness to Light Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Feb. 6, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu The Siren & the Nightingale: Music of Medieval France Cathedral Church of St. Mark, 231 E. 100 South, 801-649-8522, Feb. 3-4, times vary, utopiaearlymusic.org (see p. 18) Doric String Quartet Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Feb. 7, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu On the Threshold of Winter Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m. artsaltlake.org Utah Symphony Presents: Mozart & Haydn Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 385-4681010, Feb. 2-3, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

Wild Horses and Wolves Main Library, Conference Room A, 210 E. 400 South, Feb. 5, 7 p.m., slcpl.org

Annie Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, Feb. 2-24, dates and times vary, drapertheatre.org Busytown the Musical Utah Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State, 801-532-6000, through Feb. 17, times and dates vary, uctheatre.org Cash on Delivery Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through March 17, dates and times vary, hct.org Dear Ruth Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Feb. 3, haletheater.org Don’t Drink The Water CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Feb. 3, centerpointtheatre.org I and You Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Feb. 2-Feb. 17, times and dates vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Jumpers Noorda Theatre, 800 W. University Parkway, Orem, Feb. 2-3, 7:30 p.m., uvu.edu Make Me a Song Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, 1901 University Circle, Ogden, Feb. 1-3, 8 p.m., weber.edu Molly Sweeney University of Utah, 201 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Feb. 1-2, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Remarkably Normal: Abortion Stories from the 1in3 Campaign Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Feb. 2, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 20)

To Kill a Mockingbird CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Feb. 3, centerpointtheatre.org You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, through Feb. 3, 2 & 7:30 p.m., empresstheatre.com

TALKS & LECTURES

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

PERFORMANCE

Salt Lake County Library Mardi Gras 2018 Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, Feb. 2, 7-10 p.m., slcolibrary.org (see Food Matters, p. 24) Valentine Chocolate Festival Riverwoods Conference Center, 615 Riverwoods Parkway, Logan, Feb. 3, 6:30 p.m., thechocolatefest.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Earl Gravy: Home Bodies, Away Teams UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 13, utahmoca.org Eric Overton: Monument UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through March 17, utahmoca.org George Beard: Mormon Pioneer Artist With a Camera Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through March 2, visualarts.utah.gov Heydar Rasoulpour Art Access Gallery II, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, through Feb. 9, accessart.org Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through March 11, umfa.utah.edu Jenny Floor Photography: Animal Love Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through March 2, slcpl.org Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective LDS Church History Museum, 45 N. West Temple, through April 15, history.lds.org Justin Watson: Permadeath UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through March 3, utahmoca.org Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu Lawrence Magana: Our Native Color DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-5948632, through Feb. 17, slcpl.org Leslie Randolph: Fire Paintings and MacroGalleries Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Feb. 16, slcpl.org Lizzie Määtälä and Jared Steffensen: Woula Coulda Shoulda Nox Contemporary Gallery, 440 S. 400 West, Ste. H, through Feb. 9, facebook.com/nox-contemporary Lucy Peterson Watkins: Fiber Art Exhibit Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Feb. 25, redbuttegarden.org Merritt Johnson: Exorcising America UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 12, utahmoca.org Miroslava K. Vomela: Vivid Image-ination Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org Nathan Florence: Toward Home Modern West Fine Art, 177 W. 200 South, through March 10, modernwestfineart.com Paul Crow: On Thin Ice Weber County Building, 2380 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-810-2898, through Feb. 23, ogdenfirst.org Peter Ruplinger: Custom Stained Glass Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through March 15, slcpl.org Rebecca Pyle: Paintings, Other Artwork Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org Simon Blundell: Fragmentation and Language Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 23, slcpl.org Square One: Helper Artists of Utah Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Feb. 23, saltlakearts.org Tim Peterson: A Risk Taker Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 18, slcpl.org Truth and Consequences Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, through Feb. 9, accessart.org The Video Game Show Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through Feb. 4, urbanartsgallery.org Vintage Quilt Exhibition Brigham City Museum Gallery, 24 N. 300 West, Brigham City, brighamcitymuseum.org (see above left) World of the Wild Art Show Hogle Zoo, 2600 Sunnyside Ave., 801-584-1700, through March 3, hoglezoo.org


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

Your love deserves more than 1 day of celebration! Come Often

You know how our food makes you feel... LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE DINING 18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595


It’s Tofu is exactly what you need to jump into Korean food culture.

lack of a “Have you dined with us before?” There’s a satisfying challenge that comes from examining a tray of food and

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Best bet: The crunchy rice of a hot stone pot Can’t miss: Combo meal with silken tofu stew

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 23

Some might argue that it’s the server’s job to instruct first-time diners about how to navigate the food, but I happened to enjoy the distinct

| CITY WEEKLY |

E

ven when I venture out to get food that isn’t traditionally American, it’s hard to encounter a restaurant experience that I haven’t had before. For the most part, I can generally figure out how to eat my food in a culturally appropriate way. During my first trip to It’s Tofu (6949 S. 1300 East, Midvale, 801-566-9103, itstofu.com), however, I was met with the pleasantly unexpected task of figuring out the Korean cultural nuances surrounding each dish.

at the bottom of the bowl. Their hot stone pots are also served with banchan, making this a great entry point for those making their maiden voyage. For the full experience, order this dish with a fried egg—stirring the crisp, nearly burnt rice into a mixture of rich egg yolk, marinated beef and cooked veggies creates a flavor and texture sensation that you can feel down to your toes. Through the pleasant challenge of participating in a restaurant culture I’ve never experienced, I left It’s Tofu with a new concept of what eating out could be. Not only can experimenting with an unfamiliar food culture present new perspectives, but it can taste damned good in the process. CW

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

and the other made with thinly sliced cucumber. Arming myself with their metal—not wood!—chopsticks, I began my adventure. At first, having so many options can be a tad daunting. Do I eat the daikon with the meat or just with the rice? Can I eat a slice of marinated pork and some kimchi? Is that guy over there a cop? These neuroses are nothing more than contrivances of a brain that is used to eating food in a particular order. Ditching these hang-ups is what makes eating here fun. The most important thing I learned from my experience with Korean food is that you’re expected to try combinations of everything—including whatever your dinner guests have ordered. If you’re lucky, they’ve ordered a beef hot stone pot ($12.75 or $10.75 as a lunch special). It’s an artfully arranged mix of veggies—shiitake mushrooms, carrots, bean sprouts and spinach—cooked on top of a bed of rice that gets nice and crispy

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Hot Pot Hot Spot

making an executive decision about how you’ll proceed. For me in this case, the trick was trying to determine what is and is not culturally acceptable at a Korean restaurant. As it turns out, the only norm I needed to embrace was to have fun. When I ordered the spicy pork barbeque combo with veggie tofu stew ($13.95), I was unprepared to fully take in the sumptuous serving brought to the table. The appetizing hiss of still-cooking meat and boiling stew accompanied the arrangement, creating a culinary tableau that had me completely captivated. In addition to a bowl of rice, the dish is served with four small bowls filled with condiments called banchan, which exist for the sole purpose of letting you customize each bite. Their go-to offerings are shreds of pickled daikon, disarmingly delicious soy-sauce-marinated potatoes called gamja jorim, and two types of fresh-tasting kimchi—one made with traditional napa cabbage


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

24 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

FOOD MATTERS

coffee, crepes & a mic

BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

sustain yourself!

Mardi Gras Gala

3231 S. 9 0 0 E. 8 01-466-3 2 7 3 7am-1am / 7 Days A Week OPEN MIC EVERY SUN @ 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

For those looking to get a taste of Mardi Gras before it hits New Orleans later this month, the Salt Lake County Library has you covered. Its annual Mardi Gras Gala shakes, rattles and rolls Feb. 2 from 7-10 p.m. at the Viridian Event Center (8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan). Attendees are encouraged to dress up in their finest party attire, complete with masks and shiny beads that they can chuck at each other. The free event features traditional Southern cooking and music, along with a few contests to boot. It’s open to guests 18 and older, and tickets tend to run out fast—you can preregister at slcolibrary.org/mardigras.

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

CY Noodles Expands

With the closing of Hot Dynasty in the up-and-coming Chinatown area around 3300 South and State Street, the restaurant previously known as just CY Noodles House has expanded. Now known as CY Noodle and Chinese Restaurant (3390 S. State, Ste. 18, 801485-2777, cynoodleshouseut.com), the larger space has some serious potential. Longtime fans of the restaurant’s original menu will still be able to find their favorite Szechuan dishes and noodle bowls, but they’ve added a vast new armada of regional Chinese cuisine, including familiar favorites like kung pao chicken as well as pork blood and intestine served with veggies.

Bagels and Greens

After forging a small empire of dough and lox, the masterminds behind The Bagel Project quietly opened a sister location called Bagels and Greens (170 S. Main, 801-355-2400, bagelsandgreens.com) that’s definitely worth checking out. In addition to serving bagel sandwiches and a wide variety of tasty salads, the team has added bialy, which is like a hollowed-out bagel filled with caramelized onions and poppy seeds, to Utah’s culinary repertoire. Just like their home base, all of the bagels and greens found here are veganfriendly. You’ll also get a side of wordplay with their punny menu full of items like Lox & Loaded and the Poblano Picasso. Quote of the Week: “Pinch the tail and suck the head.” –Crawfish eating instructions Food matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS THE

On our website FIVEALLS.COM OR CALL US AT

801.582.1400 RESTAURANT

Open for Valentine’s Day

Make your reservations online at

FIVEALLS.COM

1458 South Foothill Drive


FAST CASUAL DINING

2110 w. No. Temple

nomad-eatery.com

$8.50 lunch special 2 rolls + miso soup

SLC’S newest sushi lounge

801.938.9629 488 E 100 S 801.359.2092 hamachislc.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

BREAKFAST and LUNCH served

 Established 2004 

ALL DAY!

get one monday - friday only

694 East Union Square, SANDY

801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm

brittonsrestaurant.com

equal or lesser value w/ this ad expires 02.28.18

54 w. 1700 s. M-F 7:30am-3pm Sat/Sun 7:30am-4pm

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 25

free!

| CITY WEEKLY |

Buy one entree


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

26 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

Oasis of Beer

Moab Brewery offerings are not just for the desert. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

T

he odds are pretty good that if you’ve spent any amount of time in Moab, Utah, you’ve washed the dust from your throat at the Moab Brewery. Since 1996, the brewery has aided beer drinkers as they biked, hiked and camped the Southern Utah’s beautiful landscapes. Geographic amnesia sometimes plays a part when making beer selections here in the northern part of the state. I’m here to remind you that our desert brothers and sisters in suds are faithful in their duty to keep the whole state happy and satisfied with beer. FMU Double IPA: Moab’s newest brew lets just enough amber/orange light pass through to keep it on the hazy side. Foam builds to a nice cap along the perimeter, loosely sticking to the glass. From the aroma, I can tell this isn’t about to be a citric juice bomb. I get more cognac-like alcohol, with rich malts and fruity esters

resembling fig and resiny pine clinging to it all. There’s a sticky pudding-like flavor with hints of gooey caramel sauce, plus some butterscotch and dried fruits. Faint orange-y and citrusy hops mix in, keeping the malts from becoming overly sweet. A trace of tropical character shows up, but herbal pine ultimately dominates the back end. Overall: In beer drinker parlance, FMU would stand for “Fuck Me Up.” In Moab speak, it’s simply “From Moab, Utah.” Whatever it is, it’s big for a Double IPA (9.6 percent ABV), making it practically a Triple IPA or a barleywine. The more maltforward conception of this big IPA left me wanting more hop balance, not just an uppercut of huge bitterness impacting the side of my tongue. Moab Pilsner: This lager pours a crystal-clear golden yellow color with a moderate amount of visible carbonation streaming sky ward from the bottom of the glass. The beer has a finger-tall bright white head that reduces to a film covering the entire surface. After a huge whiff, I get a little foam in my nose and sneeze. The second whiff is much more subdued, and I can finally get aromas of bready malts with hints of sweet grains that are rounded out by a light amount of earthy hops. Those bready malts, along with some graininess, start off the top of the swig, transitioning to toasted wheat. As I swallow, there’s a

light to moderate presence of grassy and slightly earthy hops that provide a perfect balance. The finish is slightly dry and prickly from the carbonation. Overall: This new addition to Moab’s 4 percent grocery line-up is a wonderful Pilsner that’s not trying to be anything other than a crushable pils in a tallboy can. Get some! Rocket Bike: This lager has an amazingly hypnotic amber/rust color that is brilliantly clear. The nose is dry with bready malts and a bit of floral hops. The combo doesn’t do the palate justice. Starting with a great balance of toasted and caramel malts, there’a an almost Spanish sweet bun notion happening. Hints of roasted malt along with drier kilned malts even out the sweetness, providing the grasses and the dull floralness from the hops a perfect

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

counterbalance. The finish is semi-dry. Overall: Moab has brought out a smidge more malt character in this steam beer, which gives the yeast and hop selection something to work with. It is without a doubt one of the finest examples of the style available anywhere, and it’s as close as your grocery store. The price point on the Moabs is one of the better deals you’ll come across, not to mention that the four-pack tall boy cans are brilliant packaging. As always, cheers! CW


Tradition... Tradition

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

Simply Delicious! -SINCE 1968-

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Cucina Deli

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC Best of Utah FELDMANSDELI.COM 2015 FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

SALT LAKE'S AWARD WINNING INDIAN CUISINE since 1990

RESERVE OUR BANQUET HALL FOR YOUR EVENT!

This quaint gourmet deli in Salt Lake City offers a wide selection of inventive pasta, fruit and veggie salads, fresh sandwiches and entrées including bourbon salmon and pepper steak. The store also carries imported chocolate, cheese and candy. Among Cucina’s specialties are Thai beef salad, chicken scaloppine, lamb burgers, linguini carbonara, crab cakes, confit duck tostada and macaroni and cheese with roasted jalapeños and smoked bacon. Cucina makes it easy to dine in or take out, with its “executive” box lunches to go. 1026 E. Second Ave., 801-322-3055, cucinadeli.com

italianvillageslc.com

5370 S. 900 E. 801. 266. 4182

MON-THU 11a-11p FRI-SAT 11a-12a SUN 3p-10p

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

Spitz JOIN US FOR DINNER!!! 7 DayS a wEEk LUNch BUFFEt mON-Sat (inside the RAMADA INN) PLENTY OF FREE PARKING

801-363-7555 - We Deliver!

Starofindiaonline.com

Breakfast

Lunch & Dinner HOMEMADE SOUP GREEK SPECIALS GREEK SALADS HOT OR COLD SANDWICHES | KABOBS PASTA | FISH STEAKS | CHOPS GREEK PLATTERS & GREEK DESSERTS

Beer & Wine EAT MORE

Open 7 days a week

MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH | 521-6567

Robin’s Nest was founded on a passion for an allAmerican favorite: the sandwich. All of the sauces and dressings are housemade, and everything is prepared fresh daily. The menu offers soups, salads and more than 25 sandwiches that are all unique to the restaurant. Try options like the Aloha Oink, with Black Forest ham, provolone and pineapple salsa on ciabatta; or the Rooster Call, with chicken salad, red onion, provolone and sweet honey Dijon. All sandwiches come with orzo pasta or housemade chips, which can be enjoyed inside or outside, right on downtown’s Main Street. 311 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-466-6378, robinsnestslc.com

9460 S Union Square #106, Sandy 801-432-8736

Stay warm with your friends at 20 W. 200 S. SLC | (801) 355-3891

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 27

RESTAURANT

Robin’s Nest

Mon.-Fri. 5pm-10pm Sat.-Sun. 11am-10pm

| CITY WEEKLY |

THE OTHER PLACE

Tucked away in Clearfield behind a car-inspection station and a barber shop is this gem specializing in home-style Argentine cuisine. Back when the restaurant first opened in 2005, they had a maximum capacity of 12, but don’t worry—they can now accommodate many more than that. Once you’ve cozied up to a table, tuck in to one of their many family recipes like milanesa and empanadas. Their chimichurri sauce is revered and not to be missed— luckily, it’s incorporated into many dishes. It might take a little time to find, but once you’ve discovered Argentine Corner, you’ll know exactly where to go for your South American fix. 442 N. Main, Clearfield, 801-773-9909, argentinecorner.com

LAMB

Argentine Corner

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

OMELETTES | PANCAKES GREEK SPECIALTIES

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JUST 3 MIN from Downtown! 1659 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City

You’d be nuts not to try Spitz’ street-cart döner, which is available as a sandwich with focaccia or as a lavash wrap, with a choice of beef and lamb, chicken, falafel, mixed meats or veggies. The restaurant’s beef and lamb shawarma-style mixture is outstanding: perfectly spiced and generously portioned. Ditto the falafel. It’s a popular destination no matter the time of day, so when you visit, order from the excellent selection of craft cocktails, sangria, wine or beer right off the bat, because you might be there a while. But the service is very friendly, and the vibe is funky and fun, with eclectic music. Multiple locations, spitzslc.com


REVIEW BITES

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

A sample of our critic’s reviews

Sweet Lake Biscuits & Limeade

28 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Hasen Cone and Teri Rosquist have placed their housemade biscuits front and center, showcasing several ways that a side dish can be worthy of the spotlight. As biscuits lend themselves nicely to sandwiches, that’s the bulk of Sweet Lake’s down-home repertoire. From imposing food piles such as the portobello-and-asparagus-topped T-Rose ($10) to the gravy-laden, fried chicken delivery system known as Hoss ($11), biscuits are the darling of each dish—the crisp outer layer is strong enough to act as the bedrock for seriously massive sandwiches, and the buttery inner fluff offers a delightful texture contrast to proteins like fried chicken or pulled pork. Every dish benefits from liquid refreshment, which is where the trademark limeades come in. They offer a few staples like mint ($4) and raspberry ($5), but check out creative versions like the habanero ($4) or honeydew cucumber ($5). Sweet Lake’s iteration of the classic Cubano sandwich ($12) is a moshpit of pulled pork, sliced ham and YeeHaw spicy pickles, served on thick, toasted sourdough from Harmons bakery. Sweet Lake cranks the traditional recipe up to 11 by adding habanero-marinated chuck, making this a lunchtime sandwich that will fuel you through dinner. Reviewed Jan. 4. 54 W. 1700 South, 801-953-1978, sweetlakeslc.com

STORE ★★★★★

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM


Sundance 2018 became a place for women to shine as storytellers and protagonists.

H

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 29

allowed female protagonists to shine. Toni Collette went gloriously over-the-top as a grief-stricken mother in the horror standout Hereditary, with first-time feature writer/director Ari Aster showing a magnificent sense for creating unease through camera placement, lighting, and even something as simple as a glottal tongue-cluck. Comedian Bo Burnham showed a compassion as writer/director evident nowhere in his standup material in the dark comedy-drama Eighth Grade, showcasing young Elsie Fisher as an awkward middle-schooler coming of age in the social-media-saturated world where your popularity is forever measured in likes and shares. And that was only when the traditionally under-represented voices were white and female. African-American filmmakers like Boots Riley (Sorry to Bother You) and Qasim Basir (A Boy. A Girl. A Dream.), as well as Chilean director Sebastián Silva (Tyrel) and Mexican-born Carlos López Estrada (Blindspotting), dug into the anxieties of black Americans at this political moment in ways that were sometimes darkly satirical, sometimes heartbreaking. Bisexual Iranian-American Desiree Akhavan explored the world of Christian “pray the gay away” programs in the Grand Jury Prize winner The Miseducation of Cameron Post, while the thriller Search—by director Aneesh Chaganty—cast the all-American family dealing with a missing child as one that happened to be Korean-American. There was also a curious theme that ran through several festival films: In Search, Eighth Grade, Leave No Trace and the crowdpleasing comedy-drama Hearts Beat Loud, the central relationship was between a single father and his teenage daughter. Given the flukes of movie production, it was of course purely coincidental. But maybe it also speaks to a world into which men are watching girls emerge, and hoping it’s one in which they won’t just survive, but thrive. CW

arvey Weinstein wasn’t at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Then again, in a manner of speaking, he was everywhere. Once a ubiquitous presence at the festival—where his tirades and wheeling and dealing were as legendary as his sexual offenses have now become infamous—the former studio executive instead was part of the long-ignored, now unavoidable conversation about how women have been held back by predatory men from opportunities for success in general, and in film in particular. The festival’s programming over the years has long been a platform for underrepresented voices, but this year, perhaps more than usual, people seemed ready to listen. In that context, it was almost inevitable that Jennifer Fox’s The Tale would become a central part of Sundance 2018. Based on the filmmaker’s own experience, it cast Laura Dern as Fox, investigating her own past after her mother discovers a story young Jennifer wrote as a middle-school student, suggesting that the youthful “relationship” she recalled as consensual took place when she was 13 years old, with a much older predator (Jason Ritter) who was her running coach. It’s almost unfair to reduce Fox’s film to its torn-from-the-headlines

Laura Dern and Isabelle Nélisse in The Tale

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

premise, since she employs fascinating storytelling devices—like recasting the “young Jennifer” from a confident teenager to a timid adolescent—that turn The Tale into a harrowing exploration of what survivors often have to do to their own memories in order to keep going. As it turns out, virtually every one of this year’s best festival films was directed by a woman, telling stories so widely varied that there was no way to pigeon-hole them. In Lynne Ramsay’s You Were Never Really Here, Joaquin Phoenix is a freelance investigator who gets in over his head after attempting to track down the runaway daughter of a politician, in a vigilante thriller that turned upside down every notion about how you’re supposed to shoot this kind of action yarn. Debra Granik somehow went eight years between making Jennifer Lawrence a movie star in Winter’s Bone and her next fiction feature, but Leave No Trace freely adapted the Peter Rock novel My Abandonment—about a widowed veteran (Ben Foster) and his teenage daughter (stellar newcomer Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie) trying to live off the grid—into an emotionally devastating story about the need for community. The experimental whirlwind of Josephine Decker’s Madeline’s Madeline explored the mind of a New York teenager struggling with mental health issues (Helena Howard), and the way art can be alternately therapeutic and exploitative when dealing with such pain. Sara Colangelo fashioned the English-language adaptation of the Israeli psychological drama The Kindergarten Teacher into something uniquely American, with Maggie Gyllenhaal superb as a woman who discovers that one of her 5-year-old students might be a poetry prodigy, and becomes determined to protect his gifts. And documentary filmmaker Crystal Moselle showed a terrific kinetic sensibility following a lonely Long Island teen (Rachelle Vinberg) as she discovers a posse of fellow female skateboarders in her fiction feature debut Skate Kitchen. Even when the creative force behind the camera wasn’t female, the onscreen stories

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Herstory in the Making

SUNDANCE INSTITUTE

SUNDANCE WRAP-UP


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

30 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. WINCHESTER [not yet reviewed] Fact-based drama about the heiress to a firearms fortune (Helen Mirren) fearing she is haunted by people killed by those weapons. Opens Feb. 2 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS DARKEST HOUR At Park City Film Series, Feb. 2-3, 8 p.m. & Feb. 4, 6 p.m. (PG-13) MR. FROG At Rose Wagner Center, Feb. 3, 11 a.m. (NR) THE RAPE OF RECY TAYLOR At Rose Wagner Center, Feb. 7, 7 p.m. (NR) TELL THEM WE ARE RISING: THE STORY OF BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES At Main Library, Feb. 6, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES 12 STRONG BBB Here’s a pretty unabashed tale of military hero-worship, pulled about as effectively as one could hope for: the fact-based story of Task Force Dagger, an Army Special Ops team led by fictionalized Capt. Mitch Nelson (Chris Hemsworth), assigned to help anti-Taliban Afghan militia take down Al Qaeda in the weeks after 9/11. The script introduces several bits of character drama, and finds a reasonably solid anchor in the uneasy relationship between Nelson and an Afghan warlord (Navid Negahban). But

it’s really all about the battlefield material, captured by first-time feature director Nicolai Fuglsig with crisp efficiency, even when trying to maintain the geography of multiple venues during the same battle. The soldiers mostly remain anonymous grunts— even Michael Peña is woefully underutilized—yet there’s still something undeniably stirring about watching outmanned Americans charge against missile fire while they’re on horseback. (R)—Scott Renshaw DEN OF THIEVES BB A boozy, boorish L.A. cop-who-gets-results (Gerald Butler) sets his sights on a methodical, heavily armed crew planning a heist and … look, you remember Heat? This is basically that. First-time director Christian Gudegast clearly has ambition to burn, and demonstrates a bruisingly kinetic touch during the film’s many scenes of driving fast and/or firing automatic weapons. Unfortunately, his script isn’t nearly as taut, revealing a shaky grasp on the nuts and bolts of police procedurals. And for a movie that runs 140 minutes, a lot of seemingly important plot details are sure left dangling. Still, your mileage will ultimately depend on your tolerance for Butler, who’s increasingly in touch with his inner hambone, and here delivers a hilariously excessive rendition of a terminally Alpha Male. Whenever he’s on screen, he manages to find a new way to scuzz things up. (R)—Andrew Wright FOREVER MY GIRL BB It’s too innocuous to be “bad,” but certainly belongs to the category of mediocre, wholesome, vaguely Christian movies with country soundtracks that they’re hoping people will watch because they like those things. Adapted from Heidi McLaughlin’s novel, it’s about young country superstar Liam Page (Alex Roe), who returns to his Louisiana hometown eight years after leaving his high school sweetheart Josie (Jessica Rothe) at the altar, and finds he has a precocious daughter he never knew about. With no one else vying for Josie’s affection, there’s little conflict beyond Liam’s internal “What if I’m a bad person who doesn’t deserve forgiveness?” struggle, so we spend most of the movie just waiting for him and Josie to patch things up, and for him to give a satisfying explanation for why he left in the first place (which he never does). (PG)—Eric D. Snider

HOSTILES B.5 It feels doomed by its bluntly ironic title—because who are the real hostiles, after all? In 1892 New Mexico, U.S. Cavalry Capt. Joe Blocker (Christian Bale) escorts terminally ill Cheyenne chief Yellow Hawk (Wes Studi) and his family to ancestral land in Montana as a P.R. stunt, even though Blocker has a dark history with Yellow Hawk. The traveling party eventually picks up a homesteader (Rosamund Pike) whose family was slaughtered by Comanche, plus a convicted murderer (Ben Foster), so the narrative is pretty busy with hair-trigger antagonisms. Director Scott Foster provides some effective kinetic urgency, but every Very Important Lesson and eventual rapprochement is telegraphed from the outset, and not helped by Bale doing most of his acting with his mustache. Revisionist Westerns are fine, but this one needed a hell of a lot more revision. (R)—SR THE MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE BB Six months after second installment The Scorch Trials ended, hero Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) and rando Vince (Barry Pepper) break into a train to rescue captured Minho (Ki Hong Lee); the rest of the surviving gang cause a distraction, and bang, crash—no Minho. That sets up the rest of the story, which is to find Minho, resolve Teresa (Kaya Scodelario) and Thomas’ limp will-theywon’t-they storyline, find a cure for the zombie virus and bloodlessly kill WICKED head doctor Ava Paige (Patricia Clarkson). The breadth of slumming adult acting talent is impressive, but easy coincidences and contrivances undermine the drama at every turn. It won’t make a lick of sense to anyone who hasn’t seen the other movies, and the 143-minute movie has nearly as many endings as The Return of the King. Young adults deserve better than this, don’t they? (PG-13)—David Riedel PHANTOM THREAD BBBB News of Daniel Day-Lewis’ retirement dominated pre-release conversation about writer/director Paul Thomas Anderson’s film, which appears at the outset to be another movie in which Day-Lewis plays a powerful man who manipulates everyone around him to get what he wants. His Reynolds Woodcock—a successful 1950s London fashion designer—isn’t just a Portrait of the Artist as a Complete Asshole, however, as the narrative focuses on Reynolds’ relationship with Alma (Vicky Krieps), his latest muse. Krieps’ performance proves crucial as the nature of that relationship unfolds into a story of relationship power— people not necessarily battling for the upper hand, but coming to understand when they might not want the upper hand. Anderson hasn’t constructed a mere monument to the greatest actor of his generation; a truly great performance can also be about surrender. (R)—SR

more than just movies at brewvies FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: FEBRUARY 2ND - FEBRUARY 8TH

DEN OF THIEVES

HOSTILES

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Cupid’s Club Crawl

VODKA

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 31

Sponsored by:

| CITY WEEKLY |

BUY TICKETS NOW AT CITYWEEKLYSTORE.COM

SINGLE? IN A RELATIONSHIP? IT’S COMPLICATED? GAMES & PRIZES FOR EVERYONE!

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH 10PM - CLOSE

Cupid costume contest

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Relationship status glow sticks


Army of Two

MUSIC

might already be part of 4760 S 900 E, SLC You the Guitar Army. 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 1/31

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 2/1 Reggae at the Royal

$

5

that captain kimo watanabe

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 2/2

Live Music

vintage overdrive bigfoot and the dogmen saturday 2/3

W/ the wayne hoskins band sunday 2/4

huge big game party jersey giveaways & prizes all day great food & drink specials

Tuesday 2/6

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon

6th annual

2/8

2/16

penrose • citizen soldier • opal hill drive 2/17

royal bliss tom petty tribute ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

T

he words “Guitar Army” in a Feldman’s Deli City Weekly listing strike a Pete Townshend power chord in my head. Only two days after seeing the G3 show, where famed guitarists Joe Satriani, Phil Collen and John Petrucci weaved vibrant aural tapestries with six strings, I’m primed for more. With an hour to kill before I have to pick up my daughter, I decide to get dinner and enjoy some tunes. Surely, it wouldn’t be another high-decibel shredfest—Feldman’s would be an odd venue for that—but I’m ready for whatever else “Guitar Army” might mean. In my mind, the most likely scenario is that Eagle Twin/ Iceburn/Smashy Smashy guitar wizard Gentry Densley revived his old Guitorchestra project. I could call him and ask, or simply feed keywords to Google and see what it spits out. I opt not to ruin the surprise—and then I do by getting on Facebook. But when searching for information on Guitar Army, the first thing I notice on the Feldman’s Facebook page is a post about a guy called Farmer John. In a high-resolution grayscale photo, his eyes are both googly and piercing from between the brim of his old prospector’s hat and a beard shaded by age, weather and smoke. I’d seen him around town, living out of his truck, enough to wonder why he held a local orbit when homelessness and a vehicle seemed more suited to itinerancy. The post, timestamped 12:19 p.m., said John had been taken to the University of Utah Hospital. He’d shot himself after police towed his house-on-wheels. The power chord gives way to a stinging, sustained blues note as I continue my Guitar Army reconnaissance. Eventually, I find guitararmy.net and its center-justified manifesto: “Musicians around the world unite. Come join the Guitar Army. Drown out the drums of war with your music of joy. … Make music, not war.” It goes on to mix metaphors, recruiting “foot soldiers” for bands that are “your family.” It posits music as a universal language, then discusses the length of days, the International Date Line and creating a “wave of joy” via the simultaneous streaming of live or prerecorded versions of Schiller’s “Ode to Joy,” popularized by Beethoven. While confusing, the overriding message of the wordcloud is world peace. The musical concept, however, remained unclear. The band-family structure appears arbitrary and more like a pyramid scheme, sans the financial element. What about guitars?, I wonder as I lock my car. I notice a woman hauling an upright bass toward Feldman’s. Following her in, I watch her walk by a keyboard on a stand and one man tuning a lone guitar. A different, smiling man asks, “Are you here for the music?” I answer affirmatively; he directs me to a table for two in the far corner. It’s an odd scene, as the growing cast of musicians—only two of them guitar players—check mics and wrangle cables and children while, weirdly, .38 Special and Ratt play overhead. Finally, about 15 minutes after the advertised start time, the smiley guy picks up a guitar and, in a gentle, dusky voice, sings. “I got the ragtime blues…” He plays for another minute or two before putting down his guitar and walking off. After another 15 minutes without movement, I approach him. He’s Michael Feldman; he owns the joint. I’m out of time, so we exchange numbers and I promise to return. Then a woman with a guitar sits down.

DAVID VOGEL

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

32 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

LIVE MUSIC

Left to right: Hod Will, Mike Feldman, Christie Stolworthy, David Buranak and Bob Dintelman Sweetly, she strums and sings, “Throw me down under a juniper tree,” accompanied by a clarinet player. I decide to stick around for a minute, taking a seat at a front table near Feldman. “That’s Susan Bush,” he says with respect. “Have you heard her before?” I hadn’t, but immediately I’m happy to have made her acquaintance. After Bush, Hod Will, the founder of Guitar Army, rises to give an abridged version of his manifesto, which is best summarized as, “Let’s just play music and take care of each other.” He introduces Feldman, who tells the audience of roughly 30 about Farmer John, lying in the ICU a few miles north of us and dedicates Ralph McTell’s “Streets of London” to him. “Have you seen the old man in the closed down market/ Picking up the papers with his wornout shoes?/ In his eyes you see no pride and hanging loosely at his side/ Yesterday’s paper, telling yesterday’s news.” As he plays, I hear Phil Triolo’s mournful clarinet from behind— he’s sitting across the table from me, content to add his voice from where he is. Suddenly, Guitar Army makes sense. The audience is rapt as Feldman continues, slightly tweaking the lyrics. “So how can you tell me you’re lonely/ And say for you that the sun don’t shine/ Let me take you by the hand and lead you through the streets of Salt Lake/ I’ll show you something to make you change your mind.” After the song, I make for the door. Walking in the cold toward my car, I think of Farmer John and hope he’s all right. And I marvel at the realization that tonight I went looking for an army of guitars, but found a louder sound coming from only two. CW

GUITAR ARMY

Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. Feldman’s Deli 2005 E. 2700 South 801-906-0369 Free All ages feldmansdeli.com


SUEPER SQUARES BOARD, SCHWAG BOWL GIVEAWAYS, $3 WHISKEYS. PARTY

J E RS E Y G I V E A W A Y / B O TH L O C A TI O N S

AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY

HIGHLAND live music

THURSDAY:

Gonzo @ 10:00 FRIDAY:

FRI SAT

SATURDAY:

DJ ChaseOne2 @ 9:00

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00 SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!!

NEW ENGLAND VS WHOEVER

SLOW RIDE LOS HELLCAMINOS

MON & THURS

Followed by Breaking Bingo @ 9:00

Pot $1,550 MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

KARAOKE

HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!!

WED

STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

THURS

WEDNESDAY:

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $750 POT

SUN & THURS

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

STARTS @ 7PM

THE SUES COMBINED HAVE PAID OUT MORE THAN ANY VENUE IN BREAKING BINGO. CLOSE TO 9K!!!!!

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

TUESDAY:

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

HIGHLAND

20 1 7

2013

2014

FRI BROTHERS BRIMM SAT DJ BAD HAIR DAY BREAKING BINGO THE SUE AT 8PM WED AT $250 POT MON &

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

TUES

WED

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

STARTS @ 7PM

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

8136 SO. STATE ST

| CITY WEEKLY |

KARAOKE

SUN &

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

STATE live music

2PM

801-566-3222

Wednesdays

BREAKING BINGO $3000 POT-8PM

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 33

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER & HOWARD HARDEE

FRIDAY 2/2

FOLLOW US ON SNAPCHAT @CITYWEEKLY

Since 1985, musical spiritual leader Jim Heath has been evangelizing pretty much without rest. Better known as Reverend Horton Heat, his proselytizing efforts have helped establish the psychobilly contingent of rockabilly music as a rock-solid musical sect, with no shortage of adherents in these parts. His moniker is an homage to early country/rockabilly singer Johnny Horton, and this style of music is a sartorial as well as a throwback to ’50s greaser/hot rod culture. The Reverend was an early denizen of the Sub Pop label, which even then was about much more than grunge. Later, he catapulted to major Interscope, then came to indie Yep Roc and, for his most recent release, REV (2014), Victory Records. The new set is a revitalization of his amped-up Americana sound, celebrating or warning against carnal pleasures in “Smell of Gasoline” and “Let Me Teach You How to Eat.” His accomplices for the Salt Lake date include the Mexican punk band Voodoo Glowskulls and the Russian surf-rock gods Igor and the Red Elvises (formerly just The Red Elvises), which is quite a treat if you’re into obscure music and films: The band was famously cast in the 1998 cult flick Six-String Samurai, among other films and TV shows. (Brian Staker) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $20 presale; $25 day of show, 21+, depotslc.com

The Dickies

ABBY GILLARDI VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Reverend Horton Heat, Voodoo Glow Skulls, Igor and the Red Elvises

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 2/2-3

Reverend Horton Heat

MusicCon SLC feat. Quiet Riot, Billy Dean, The Dickies, Bow Wow Wow and more

Well, the Salt Lake Comic Convention and Fan Fest were such a success, why not stage a music con? Initially intended to debut last November, MusicCon was postponed until February. Organizers used the time to bolster the lineup, adding workshops (“breakout sessions”) by Desi Rexx and Jonni Lightfoot of ’80s glam legends D’Molls, Neon Trees drummer Elaine Bradley and local songwriter’s songwriter Monty Powell of Troubadour 77. So now we’ve got that plus more ’80s glam from Quiet Riot—fronted by a babyfaced American Idol finalist in a

Planet What, Viet Rahm, The Poppees

AARON RUBIN VIA FLICKR

34 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

backward baseball cap—and Autograph (without their original singer). Plus some pop from the same decade with Bow Wow Wow (also without their original singer). Punk rock is repped well (but only) by The Dickies, country is present with Billy Dean and James Otto, Southern-fried nü-metal is personified by Saving Abel, while former members of Train and Sugar Ray playing their old bands’ pop-rock hits along with originals. Plus, legendary guitarist Jeff “Skunk” Baxter (Steely Dan, Doobie Brothers, U.S. Department of Defense missile consultant) will be there—and that mofo is the bomb. (Randy Harward) Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, 10 a.m.–midnight, $7.50$150 (concerts ticketed separately), musicconslc.com

SATURDAY 2/3

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

You gotta love surf rock from a landlocked state. That’s not a dig. You don’t have to live near the beach to be able to make that sweet, reverb-y racket that makes even the most mundane tasks seem cool. Even better, Planet What (great name) is fronted by two axe-slingin’ women—Kylie Slabby and Jeanette Derubeis—whose keen sense of humor is all over their Facebook page, which says their interests are “wine ’n’ weed” and describes their sound as “girl-fronted whatever surf rock ’n’ roll in a trash can.” What’s more, the litany of influences is heavy on estrogen— Nirvana, Bikini Kill, Mika Miko, Hole, Babes in Toyland, The Delmonas, Sonic Youth, Bleached, Cherry Glazerr, Vivian Girls. Those influences aren’t just talk; they’re all over Planet What’s debut EP Agnus Yarn


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 35


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2ND

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD

CERTIFIED TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6TH

KERRY MYERS

ROMA RANSOM (planetwhat.bandcamp.com). Along with the discographies of all the above-mentioned bands, it’s a reminder that women can rock like nobody’s business. Chicago’s Viet Rahm name-checks Chi-town’s superscary mayor, and they call their music “psychedelic surf thrash” or “psychedelic dirt punk from our mind trash.” Local openers The Poppees aren’t the early-70s power-pop band, and their Facebook page says precious little about them—not a single adjective—but we hear good things. (RH) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., $5 donation, all ages, facebook.com/diabolicalslc

TUESDAY 2/6

Dua Lipa, Tommy Genesis

DAVE MC CORMICK SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH

In this age of fractured media viewership, it’s quite possible for all-out cultural phenomena to pass unnoticed by a huge segment of the population. Which explains why an alt-pop star like 22-yearold Dua Lipa can put up ridiculous

Dua Lipa

Planet What

numbers on YouTube (40 million views for a single like “IDGAF”) and Spotify (which has her track “New Rules” clocking in at 690 million streams) without being a household name. Not yet, anyway. For the cynical and indie-oriented among us, it would be easy to disregard the Londonbased, Swedish-born singer-songwriter/ glamor model as an Ariana Grande cutout (really easy, what with recent MTV.com headlines such as “Why Were Ariana Grande and Dua Lipa Hanging Out? 5 Possible Scenarios.”) But give the girl a chance: Her self-titled debut studio album (Warner Bros., 2017) showcases a throaty singing voice that sets her apart from her peers, and she appears willing to take some creative risks despite the major-label backing. Anyway, you might as well give her a shot, because 730 million teenagers can’t be wrong. Rapper Tommy Genesis opens. (Howard Hardee) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $25, all ages, depotslc.com

KILT NIGHT WEAR A KILT FOR NO COVER 1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492 PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

JUSTIN HIGUCHI VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

36 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

LIVE


Proudly serving locally produced beers & spirits — 40+ local beers available —

JOIN US FOR APÉS SKI LOCATED AT THE BASE OF THE CANYONS

FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

GRAB A BITE

TONIGHT

BRUNCH PARTY FEBRUARY 11TH 11AM - 3PM

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

DINNER AND A SHOW. ONLY AT GRACIE’S! JANUARY 31

MATT WENNERGREN 10PM

FEBRUARY 1

LOS HELLCAMINOS 9PM

FEBRUARY 5

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM

FEBRUARY 2

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DINNER AND A SHOW WITH THE COSMONAUTZ 6PM DJ GODINA 10PM

FEBRUARY 3

SATURDAY BRUNCH 10-3 CHASEONE2 10PM BIG GAME PARTY SUNDAY BRUNCH SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES FEATURING SOULFUL SUNDAY WITH CJ 9PM

FEBRUARY 6

MATTHEW AND THE HOPE 7PM

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight. *Dine-In Only

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FEBRUARY 4

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Wednesday at 6:30

Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 37

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565


NIGHT

LIGHTS

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

Green Pig Pub th

31 E. 400 Sou /greenpigpub facebook.com

Sean Gale, Michelle Abbinati, Tim Bottom, Kinnison Dyett, Nirvana

38 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Thank you Green Pig Pub and all your staff for the appreciation party!

Joe, Tamara Fox, Dylan Gregson, Sheri Bigelow

Pete Saltas, Robin, Leeann

Paul Price, Alma Datcher

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

Chastity & Carson Knowley

Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen Next to Himalayan Kitchen

The

Chakra Lounge and Bar

Nightly Music Tuesday through Saturday

ChakraLounge.net

364 S State St. Salt Lake City

Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night small plate menu


YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO THE BEST DEFENSE LAWYER Trial Litigation Criminal Defense

Advocacy Government Relations

Gregory Ferbrache, P.L.L.C. 801.440.7476 I gregory@ferbrachelaw.com

ferbrachelaw.com

LIVE Music thursday, february 1

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 2ND

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 3RD

friday, february 2

AZ-IZ TRANSIT CAST TRAINWRECK

1.21 GIGAWATTS

9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

4242 South State Street SLC, UT 84107 Open from 10am - 2am

saturday, february 3

DJ LATU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BARBARY COAST SALOON

THE UNION BLUES

Sunday, feb 4 PRIZES, GIVEAWAYS EVERY QUARTER OPEN @ 10:00 BRUNCH

Weeknights monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

Every sunday

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

the big game 2018 party

ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

$

5.99 lunch special MONDAY - FRIDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

Great food

$

12 sunday funday brunch

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 39

$3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

40 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 2/2-3

CONCERTS & CLUBS

TERESA C. SANCHEZ VIA FLICKR

An Evening with Chris Robinson Brotherhood

THURSDAY 2/1 LIVE MUSIC

MONDAYS & THURSDAY

Andrew Cole (Snowbird) Dee-Dee Darby Duffin (Gallivan Center) Demun Jones (Metro Music Hall) The Drifters (Egyptian Theatre) Exmag + Bass Physics + Brodyizm (Urban Lounge) Gleewood (How Wallow) Iration + The Movement + Tyrone’s Jacket (Park City Live) Jordan Matthew Young (The Yes Hell) Latin Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Lyle Lovett & Robert Earl Keen (Eccles Theater) Michelle Moonshine (Lake Effect) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Richie Kissinger & Stephanie Mabey + Burnt Out House (Velour) Savage Daughters + First Daze + Salduro + The Rubies (Kilby Court) Victor Menegaux (Downstairs)

EVERY WEDNESDAY NOON TILL 2PM

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

{THURSDAY & FRIDAYS 9PM}

POOL TOURNAMENTS MONDAYS BY CRISSIE FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS BY RANDY

TEXAS HOLDEM

FREE FASHION SHOW 3425 S. State St. Suite D 385.528.2547 open 7 days a week from 11 am to 1 am SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4

S**** BOWL

TOM BRADY

DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Deer Valley Resort) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Dave & Mike (Tavernacle)

MONDAYS

BREAKING BINGO 9PM

Arising in the early ’90s, The Black Crowes should’ve sunk under the weight of its own probable kitsch factor: the revival of a ’70s hard rock/blues-influenced sound built by bands like Led Zeppelin, shamelessly bastardizing the bluesy source material. Well, hokey or not, depending on your opinion, Zep’s British mysticism added another dimension to their musical conjurings, and Chris Robinson and co.’s musical integrity was enough that Jimmy Page jammed with them on their 2000 Live at the Greek release without embarrassing anyone. Robinson’s new unit, Chris Robinson Brotherhood, was founded when The Black Crowes were on hiatus in 2011. The title of their fifth entry, Barefoot in the Head (Silver Arrow), sounds like a description of their more hippie-type followers, but it’s grounded in the solid elements of their sound even as it builds on that base with a little funk and psych meditations. Lest anyone think he’s abandoned the Crowes’ nest for good, Robinson’s new—and purportedly ephemeral—band As the Crow Flies, touring this spring, features members of The Black Crowes and CRB, and they will perform Black Crowes favorites. (Brian Staker) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., sold out, 21+, thestateroomslc.com Gothic + Darkwave w/ DJ Nina (Area 51) Guitar Army Thursday’s (Feldman’s Deli) see p. 32 Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ The Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) The New Wave ’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Cosmic Gate (Sky)

KARAOKE

Areaoke (Area 51) Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Funk ’n’ Dive) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90) Live Band Karaoke (Prohibition)

FRIDAY 2/2 LIVE MUSIC

Ché Zuro (Deer Valley Resort) Chris Robinson Brotherhood (The State Room) see above Cinders + Great White Shore + Indigo Waves (Velour) Draize Method + Magda-Vega (Funk ’n’ Dive) The Drifters (Egyptian Theatre) Dubwise + Roommate + Illoom + King Dubbist (Urban Lounge)

SATURDAY, FEB. 3

THE ECHO PEOPLE

Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) Gryffin + TBA (Park City Live) Hazzard County (Outlaw Saloon) The HillBenders (Peery’s Egyptian Theatre) Metal Dogs (The Spur) MusicCon SLC feat. Quiet Riot + Billy Dean + The Dickies + more (Salt Palace Convention Center) see p. 34 Nate Robinson (Park City Mountain) Reverend Horton Heat + Voodoo Glow Skulls + Igor & The Red Elvises (The Depot) see p. 34 Roma Ransom (Piper Down Pub) Scott Foster + Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect) SuperBubble (Hog Wallow) Tenkaras + The Verb Garden + Kenzie Waldon (Kilby Court) Urban Pulse (Club 90) The Wayne Hoskins Band (The Yes Hell)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE All-Request Top 40 w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Chaseone2 (Lake Effect) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos feat.Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main)

WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE AT 8PM

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM

TOM BRADY VS EAGLES TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

9PM - NO COVER

FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


S P IR ITS . FO OD . LOCAL B EER WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT January 31st Melville “Verna’s” Syrah, Santa Rita Hills February 7th Chakana Estate Malbec, Mendoza Argentina Music at 7:30. THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

...

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast! SUNDAY NIGHT Industry night - in the Rabbit Hole basement of Lake Effect

$3 pints $3 whiskeys MONDAYS Blues night

TASTING TUESDAYS Join us for a whiskey tasting with a professional. | 6pm

...

1/2 OFF TACOS 11 AM-4 PM DAILY JANUARY 31 FEBRUARY 1 FEBRUARY 2

FEBRUARY 3

| 6-9 PM | 6-9 PM | 10-1 PM | 6-9 PM | 10-1 PM | 10-1 PM | 10-1 PM | 10-1 PM | 7:30-10:30 PM | 6-9 PM | 7:30-10:30 PM

(801) 532-2068 – 155 W 200 S Salt Lake City, UT, 84101 www.lakeeffectslc.com

2.2 SUPER BUBBLE

2.3 PIXIE & THE PARTY GRASS BOYS

2.5 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

2.7 KEVIN DERN

2.1 GLEEWOOD

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

1.31 SIMPLY B

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FEBRUARY 5 FEBRUARY 6 FEBRUARY 7

THIS WEEKS LIVE MUSIC

THE TOM YOUNG QUARTET MICHELLE MOONSHINE DJ CHASEONE2 SCOTT FOSTER WILL BAXTER BAND DJ CHASEONE2 (RABBIT HOLE) NIGHTCAPS DJ MR. RAMIREZ (RABBIT HOLE) TONY HALIDAY AND THE VELVETONES MATT WENEGER DE’SEAN JONES BAND

e b o t e c a l p The ! i k s s è r p A r fo

| CITY WEEKLY |

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 41

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM


RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

A weekly video series highlighting

: PRESENTS

the BEST things

to do in SLC. ............................... Sponsored by:

42 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THE POINT AFTER

BAR FLY

The Point After resides in the Murray Sports Mall, with its windows of treadmills and rowing machines that guilt-trip me to be more active. Billiards seems as close to exercise as I’ll get here, but TPA takes good care of their pool tables and, even on the busier nights when showing a UFC fight, you’re still likely to catch an open table. Now I’m no Efren Reyes at billiards, but I appreciate a sports bar that has undamaged tables, decent 18-ounce cues and just the right mood lighting for hustling someone out of their money (jk, gambling is illegal in Utah). On this particular Saturday night, I run into a regular that I recognize. “I come here just for the fights—the fights and the pool,” Fabien says. “There’s no cover if it’s smaller fights—tonight I am going for Francis Ngannou.” A TPA regular, Fabien was born in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and is fluent in multiple languages. “The burger is good,” he says, referring to his Western Bacon Burger, “and there’s no cover tonight.” He’s a man of few words, but that all changes when the light-heavyweight title fight—Cormier vs. Oezdemir—starts. It’s hard not to get excited by Fabien and his friend Lionel, as they air-box and yell at the TV. Their chants and cheers grow louder throughout the fight, and the welcoming vibe Fabien puts out has the other patrons joining in on the excitement. I wonder how many calories that’ll burn. (Rachelle Fernandez) 900 E. 5445 South, 801-266-9552, thepointafter.biz

Jessica Lea Mayfield + Sun Seeker (The State Room) Matt Weneger (Lake Effect) Riley McDonald (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Lifty Lounge w/ DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

WEDNESDAY 2/7 LIVE MUSIC

Find us on Facebook @WTFSLC

2.1• EXMAG BASS PHYSICS, BRODYIZM

2.2• FREE KITTENS COMEDY DABIS MOSTARDA, NICHOLAS DON SMITH, KRISTAL STARR, SAM POULTER

2.2• DUBWISE W/ ROOMMATE ILLOOM, KING DUBBIST

2.3• FOLK HOGAN

2/8: ADULT SPELLING BEE 2/8: THE HAZYTONES 2/9: DAVID BOWIE TRIBUTE NIGHT 2/10: TBA 2/12: CONAN 2/14: THE DANGEROUS SUMMER

MANTIS JACKSON, COLONEL LINGUS

10 Years + From Ashes To New (The Complex) Breezeway + The Cold Year + Queenadilla (Urban Lounge) Brisk (Downstairs) Echo Muse + A World Without + Glass Creatures + Hollow Crown + Far From

(The Loading Dock) Kevyn Dern (Hog Wallow) Racist Kramer + Riva Rebels + Galagher + The Four07’s (Metro Music Hall) Toasters + Sexwax Surfers + LHAW + Gringos (Liquid Joe’s) Tony Holiday Duo (The Spur) Zoso the Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience + TBA (Park City Live)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Cabin) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) DJ Wees (Area 51) Open Mic (Velour) Temple Gothic and Industrial w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition)

2.1•DEMUN JONES 2.2•SKETCH CABARET ADVENTURE IN WINTERLAND

2.3•MASC 4 MASK W/ VALENTINA

ANN WILDE, EVA CHANEL STEPHENS, XAINA, AND MORE!

2.7•RACIST KRAMER

RIVA REBELS, GALAGHER, THE FOUR07S

2.8•THE BEE 2.9•LIVE BAND KARAOKE 2.10•LEE CAMP

2.4• THE LILLINGTONS JERK, WICKED BEARS, DETOUR

2.6• DESTROYER MEGA BOG

TIM BLACK

2.7• BREEZEWAY THE COLD YEAR, QUEENADILLA

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •

2/10: DANCE EVOLUTION 2/12: BEATLES VS. STONES 2/14: THE SCARLETT KISS MASACRE 2/15: 1000MODS 2/16: BLACK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB 2/17: LP


PINKY’S

CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Gothic + Industrial + EBM + Dark Wave w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 2/3 LIVE MUSIC

SUNDAY 2/4

FEATURED IN CITY WEEKLY'S BURGER WEEK\ \RIBEYE SPECIAL $8 ON FRIDAY'S

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

LIVE MUSIC

The Drifters (Egyptian Theatre) Jim Fish (Garage on Beck) The Lillingtons + Jerk + Wicked Bears + Detour (Urban Lounge) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin)

MONDAY 2/5 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Dave East (In The Venue) Embracer + Wheatgrass + Guilty Scapegoat + The Green Man 7 + Grafton (The Loading Dock) Flor + Handsome Ghost (Kilby Court) Michael Chipman & Melinda Kirigin Voss Ccovey Center For The Arts) Monika Jalili (Peery’s Egyptian Theatre) Of Mice & Men + BlessTheFall + Fire From The Gods + MSCW (The Complex)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

TUESDAY 2/6 LIVE MUSIC

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 43

Big Wild + Daktyl + White Cliffs (Park City Live) Dave McCormick (Piper Down Pub) Destroyer + Mega Bog (Urban Lounge) Dua Lipa + Tommy Genesis (The Depot) see p. 36 Intervention + Sunsleeper + Mojave Nomads + Pick Pocket (Kilby Court) Jacob T. Skeen (Prohibition)

| CITY WEEKLY |

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke (Cheers To You) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

Alternative + Top 40 + EDM w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Joel (Twist) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Mr. Ramirez (Lake Effect) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

BEST

GARLIC BURGER

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

MENU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Brisk (Downstairs) Callie & Zac (Deer Valley Resort) Certified (Piper Down Pub) Chris Robinson Brotherhood (The State Room) see p. 40 Colt Ford + The Wayne Hoskins Band (The Royal) Crook & The Bluff (Funk ’n’ Dive) The Drifters (Egyptian Theatre) Echo The People (Johnny’s on Second) Folk Hogan + Mantis Jackson + Colonel Lingus (Urban Lounge) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) Hazzard County (Outlaw Saloon) Jim Fish (Feldman’s Deli) LUCO (Velour) Mako + Night Lights (The Complex) Mimi Valentine & The Gentlemen’s Club (Prohibition) MusicCon SLC feat. Quiet Riot + Billy Dean + The Dickies + more (Salt Palace Convention Center) see p. 34 Mythic Valley + Friends & Fellows + Amalo + Tayler Lacey (Kilby Court) Rick Gerber & the Nightcaps (Lake Effect) The Otters + Genre Zero (The Ice Haüs) Pixie & the Partygrass Boys (Hog Wallow) Planet What + Veit Rahm + The Poppees (Diabolical) see p. 34 Silver Strike (The Spur) Snyderville Electric Band (Canyons Village) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Urban Pulse (Club 90) Valentina + Feral Ann Wilde + Eva Chanel Stephens + Xaina + Georgia Coldwater + Lilia Maughn + DJ Justin Hollister + DJ Shutter (Metro Music Hall) Wastewalker + Dethrone The Sovereign + Mister Fister & The Sexy Studs (The Loading Dock)

(Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Gothic + Industrial + 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays feat. Fashen (Sky)

CABARET

CHECK OUT OUR NEW


© 2017

BEAR

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Confused responses 2. ____ Tzu (toy dog) 3. Portend 4. Have an affair 5. Above capacity, for short 6. Slangy response to “Why?” 7. Big name in chips and pretzels

Cowboy” 51. Fires (up) 52. Lyft competitor 54. Bank charges 55. McEwan and McKellen 56. Jeff Bridges sci-fi classic 59. “Give ____ whirl!” 60. Pass on a track 61. OBs, e.g.

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

8. UPS label phrase 9. On the briny 10. Hurtful email, e.g. 11. “That’s news to me!” 12. The U.S. Army bought 1,000 of his revolvers during the Mexican-American War 13. “That makes sense” 18. ____ party 22. Children’s writer R. L. ____ 24. “10” music 25. Distort 26. CBS logo 28. ____ bar 29. “Don’t look so glum!” 30. Pyramids with four equal sides 32. He’s second to Jeter among the New York Yankees’ all-time hit leaders 33. Granny’s “Darn it!” 35. Source of some cubes 39. Not an original 40. ____ impasse 42. Home of the Cubs, for short 45. Slow to catch on 46. Country’s McEntire 50. Winger of “Urban

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Deutsche Bank rival 5. Italian apology 10. Vivaldi’s “____ Dominus” 14. “Here comes trouble!” 15. Babe and Baby 16. “I get it” cries 17. A 1950-’60s titular sitcom character seen on a present-day TV screen? 19. Equal 20. Do a shepherd’s task 21. Late, as a library book 23. Typewriter feature 27. Daly of “Cagney & Lacey” 28. When many celebs tweet baby pictures of themselves, for short 31. Asian capital’s ladies’ man? 34. “Whose woods these ____ think ...”: Frost 36. “To Kill a Mockingbird” author 37. Fortify with vitamins, e.g. 38. Retiring group? 40. Leading 41. One nodding his head 42. Midpoint: Abbr. 43. NBA star Anthony, to fans 44. Pretty obvious direction on a bottle of Prell? 47. From ____ Z 48. “____ she blows!” 49. Watched a season of “Stranger Things” in one sitting, say 51. Look through blinds, say 53. Prove suitable for 57. “The Neverending Story” author Michael 58. Evidenced by its name, what a national toy retailer offers customers a chance to do ... or what you do in 17-, 31- and 44-Across 62. Run smoothly 63. Spanish 101 verb 64. Nevada’s so-called “Biggest Little City in the World” 65. Restful resorts 66. Harvests 67. LPGA part: Abbr.

SUDOKU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

44 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When I was in my early 20s, I smoked marijuana now and then. I liked it. It made me feel good and inspired my creativity and roused spiritual visions. But I reconsidered my use after encountering pagan magician Isaac Bonewits. He didn’t have a moral objection to cannabis use, but believed it withered one’s willpower and diminished one’s determination to transform one’s life for the better. For a year, I meditated on and experimented with his hypothesis. I found it to be true, at least for me. I haven’t smoked since. My purpose in bringing this up is not to advise you about your relationship to drugs, but rather to urge you to question whether there are influences in your life that wither your willpower and diminish your determination to transform your life for the better. Now is an excellent time to examine this issue.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In March 1996, a man burst into the studio of radio station Star FM in Wanganui, New Zealand. He took the manager hostage and issued a single demand: that the DJ play a recording of the Muppet song “The Rainbow Connection,” as sung by the puppet Kermit the Frog. Fortunately, police intervened quickly, no one was hurt, and the kidnapper was jailed. In bringing this to your attention, Leo, I am certainly not suggesting that you imitate the kidnapper. Please don’t break the law or threaten anyone with harm. On the other hand, I do urge you to take dramatic, innovative action to fulfill one of your very specific desires. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Many varieties of the nettle plant will sting you if you touch the leaves and stems. Their hairs are like hypodermic needles that inject your skin with a blend of irritant chemicals. And yet nettle is also an herb with numerous medicinal properties. It can provide relief for allergies, arthritis, joint pain and urinary problems. That’s why Shakespeare invoked the nettle as a metaphor in his play Henry IV, Part 1: “Out of this nettle, danger, we pluck this flower, safety,” the character named Hotspur says. In accordance with the astrological omens, Virgo, I choose the nettle as your power metaphor for the first three weeks of February.

801-577-4944 3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

University of Utah Hospital will be destroying radiology films with dates of service prior to 01/01/2008 and medical records with dates of service prior to 03/01/1996. Moran Eye Center will be destroying records with dates of service prior to 01/01/1987. If you would like access to your films or records prior to destruction, you must contact the respective facility: 801-581-2350(Radiology) ; 801-581-2704 (University Hospital) ; 801-585-6606 (Moran) before 03/01/2018. After that time the records will no longer be available

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 45

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the 1740s, a teenage Capricorn girl named Eliza Lucas almost single-handedly introduced a new crop into American agriculture: indigo, a plant used as a dye for textiles. In South Carolina, where she managed her father’s farm, indigo ultimately became the second-most-important cash crop over the next 30 years. I have astrological reasons to believe that you are now in a phase when you could likewise make innovations that will have longrange economic repercussions. Be alert for good intuitions and promising opportunities to increase your wealth.

Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

| COMMUNITY |

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Are you more inclined right now to favor temporary involvements and short-term promises? Or would you consider making brave commitments that lead you deeper into the Great Mystery? Given the upcoming astrological omens, I vote for the latter. Here’s another pair of questions for you, Cancerian. Are you inclined to meander from commotion to commotion without any game plan? Or might you invoke the magic necessary to get involved with highquality collaborations? I’m hoping you’ll opt for the latter. (P.S. The near future will be prime time for you to swear a sacred oath or two.)

FANTASTIC MASSAGE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Would you like to shed unwieldy baggage before moving on to your next big challenge? I hope so. It will purge your soul of karmic sludge. It will prime you for a fresh start. One way to accomplish this bravery is to confess your sins and ask for forgiveness in front of a mirror. Here are data to consider: Is there anyone you know who would not give you a good character reference? Have you ever committed a seriously unethical act? Have you revealed information that was told to you in confidence? While under the influence of intoxicants or bad ideas, have you done things you’re ashamed of? I’m not saying you’re more guilty of these things than the rest LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): of us; it’s just that now is your special time to seek redemption. Knullrufs is a Swedish word that refers to what your hair looks like after sex: tousled, rumpled, disordered. If I’m ARIES (March 21-April 19): In all of history, humans have mined about 182,000 tons of reading the astrological omens correctly, you should expegold. Best estimates suggest there are still 35 billion tons of rience more knullrufs than usual in the coming weeks. gold buried in the earth, but the remaining riches will be more You’re in a phase when you need and deserve extra pleadifficult to find and collect than what we’ve already gotten. sure and delight, especially the kind that rearranges We need better technology. If I had to say who would be the your attitudes as well as your coiffure. You have license to entrepreneurs and inventors best qualified to lead the quest, exceed your normal quotas of ravenousness and rowdiness. my choice would be members of the Aries tribe. For the foreseeable future, you people will have extra skill at excavating SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): hidden treasure and gathering resources that are hard to access. In his “Crazy Lake Experiment” documented on YouTube, Harvard physicist Greg Kestin takes a raft out on a lake. He drops a tablespoon of olive oil into the water, and a TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Stories have the power to either dampen or mobilize your life few minutes later, the half-acre around his boat is still and energy. I hope that in the coming weeks, you will make heroic smooth. All the small waves have disappeared. He proceeds efforts to seek out the latter and avoid the former. Now is a to explain the science behind the calming effect produced by crucial time to treat yourself to stories that will jolt you out of a tiny amount of oil. I suspect that you will have a metaphoryour habitual responses and inspire you to take long-postponed ically comparable power in the next two weeks, Scorpio. actions and awaken the sleeping parts of your soul. And that’s just What’s your version of the olive oil? Your poise? Your grahalf of your assignment, dear Taurus. Here’s the rest: Tell sto- ciousness? Your tolerance? Your insight into human nature? ries that help you remember the totality of who you are, and that inspire your listeners to remember the totality of who they are. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1989, a man spent $4 on a painting at a flea market in Adamstown, Pa. He didn’t care much for the GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Author Anaïs Nin said, “There are two ways to reach me: by way actual image, which was a boring country scene, but he of kisses or by way of the imagination. But there is a hierarchy: thought he could use the frame. Upon returning home, the kisses alone don’t work.” For two reasons, Anaïs’s formula- he found a document concealed behind the painting. It tion is especially apropos for you right now. First, you should turned out to be a rare old copy of America’s Declaration not allow yourself to be seduced, tempted or won over by sweet of Independence, originally created in 1776. He eventugestures alone. You must insist on sweet gestures that are syn- ally sold it for $2.42 million. I doubt that you will experiergized by a sense of wonder and an appreciation of your unique ence anything quite as spectacular in the coming weeks, beauty. Second, you should adopt the same approach for those Sagittarius. But I do suspect you will find something valuyou want to seduce, tempt or win over: sweet gestures sea- able where you don’t expect it, or develop a connection with soned with wonder and an appreciation of their unique beauty. something that’s better than you imagined it would be.

Software Engineer II sought by Workfront, Inc. in Lehi, UT. Dsgn, cllbrte, & excte on sftwre features in an indstry ldng SaaS ecsystm. Aply @ www.jobpostingtoday.com # 79912


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

46 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

URBAN L I V I N

G

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Our Holladay SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE FARMINGTON DEPT. OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, DAVIS COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179705646, JUDGE ROBERT J DALE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MARION KING, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MARION KING: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 800 W State St., Farmington, UT 84025, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $5,294.38. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 189900935, JUDGE LAURA SCOTT. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MELANIE BRONAS, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MELANIE BRONAS: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,081.26. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915266, JUDGE ANDREW H STONE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. TAYLOR LANGSTON AND SHAYNA BRADFORD, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO TAYLOR LANGSTON: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $13,007.75. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915254, JUDGE ANN BOYDEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. JACE PAINTER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO JACE PAINTER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $327.75. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

While visitors and locals flocked to Sundance or to ski what snow we have, the citizens and the Planning Commission of Holladay spoke loud and clear to Ivory and Woodbury Homes about a 136-foottall commercial high-rise at the old Cottonwood Mall location. That’s about 12 stories in an area where the tallest building is no more than three stories high. I’d say the citizens felt the developers’ plan looked like a festering pimple in the middle of their smooth-skinned city. According to the city’s Wikipedia page, is the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in the state “since Salt Lake City was abandoned for a time in 1857 when Johnson’s Army occupied the city.” It’s named after John Holladay, a branch president of the LDS church. In 1846, John’s family joined a group of Mormon converts called The Mississippi Company, which was heading to Utah. Back then, they didn’t have phones or even a telegraph, and were unaware that the main migrating group led by Brigham Young had been delayed by a year. So the contingent wintered in Pueblo, Colo., and reached Salt Lake Valley in 1847. Before there were homes in Holladay, there was a stream called Spring Creek (near what is now Kentucky Avenue). The first settlers built dugouts along this stream. It was an area with great meadows, grasses and wildflowers for horses and cattle. People still have horses in Holladay because there are patches of zoning where it’s perfectly OK to have a pony in your back yard. The planning commission didn’t like Ivory or Woodbury Home’s vision for the Cottonwood Mall site, and voted 5-1 to deny them approval. But the game isn’t over yet. Now, a new planning process has begun with more open meetings to get local input. One proposal calls for 40 of the 57 acres to be set aside for homes. However, Holladay City is looking for more tax-producing commercial property to help pay for additional services future owners will want and need, including police, firefighters, streets, etc. Thus, less homes, please? Sadly, there are no rules in Holladay about including affordable housing. Only citizens and planning commissioners can ask for that to be part of the deal. Holladay is known for higher-end homes and condominiums and locals aren’t going to be pleased if low-rent apartments go in a few blocks from their million-dollar mansions and horse properties. n

Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner Her lungs will shake the very earth Screaming out injustice A tongue so very sharp and quick Blood will pour down like rain A mere whisper from her lips Will crumble an entire army She can paint you as the purest of saints Or as the devil himself My those who cross her fiery gaze Be fully aware of their fate The women with control of words Is an enemy you won’t defeat

Gillian Ruppel Send your poem (max15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

Cupid’s Gonna Getcha!

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED PARTLOW RENTALS:

AVENUES

AVENUES

Amazing 1 bdrm PLUS office in divided Victorian! Antique Fireplace, off-street parking, window A/C cooling, European W/D hookup! PRICE DROP! $945

Elegant 3 bdrm 1.75 bath duplex! Light and bright! Carport, balcony, hook-ups, dishwasher, microwave range, private yard! $1795

MARMALADE

MILLCREEK

Must Have 2 bdrm. condo w/ washer dryer included! Counter bar dining, hardwood floors, two tone paint, granite counters! Community pool, gym! $1095

Marvelous 2 bdrm. duplex! Hookups, private yard (with fruit bearing tree!), shed, large living room, built in dressers! ONLY $845!

DOWNTOWN Delightful vintage 1 bdrm. w/ hardwood floors and darling details! Free on-site laundry! Only $745

VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT PARTLOWRENTS.COM VISIT OUR OFFICE LOCATION AT 440 S. 700 E. STE 203 801-484-4446


Wait, What?

S NEofW the

Ikea has taken advertising in a whole new direction with its recent print ad for a crib. The ad, which appears in the Swedish magazine Amelia, invites women who think they might be pregnant to urinate on the paper to reveal a discounted price. “Peeing on this ad may change your life,” the ad reads at the top of the page. “If you are expecting, you will get a surprise right here in the ad.” Adweek reported that the agency behind the gimmick adapted pregnancy test technology to work on a magazine page.

WEIRD

Recurring Themes

In more extreme weather news from Australia, The Daily Telegraph reported on Jan. 8 that record high temperatures near Campbelltown had killed more than 200 bats, found on the ground or still hanging in trees. Cate Ryan, a volunteer with WIRES, an Australian wildlife rescue organization, came across the flying foxes and put the word out for volunteers to bring water to rehydrate the bats that were still alive. “I have never seen anything like it before,” Ryan said. “Ninety percent of the [dead] flying foxes were babies or juveniles.” Bright Idea

Ironies

n One of Quebec City’s iconic tourist attractions is its ice hotel,

the 45-room Hotel de Glace. But on Jan. 9, the hotel’s most dreaded disaster, a fire, broke out in one of the guest rooms, the CBC reported. Manager Jacques Desbois admitted that “when I received the phone call, they had to repeat twice that there was a fire in the ice hotel.” Predictably, the flames did not spread and caused little damage to the structure, though smoke spread throughout the hotel and residents were evacuated. “In a room made out of ice and snow there are few clues to look at,” Desbois said, though each room has candles, and the hotel is considering the possibility that one of them caused the fire. Family Values

Armed and Frustrated

Linda Jean Fahn, 69, of Goodyear, Ariz., finally succumbed to a frustration many wives suffer. On Dec. 30, as her husband sat on the toilet, she barged in and “shot two bullets at the wall above his head to make him listen to me,” she told Goodyear police when they were called to the scene. Fahn said her husband “would have had to be 10 feet tall to be hit by the bullets,” ABC15 in Phoenix reported, but officers estimated the bullets struck about 7 inches over the man’s head as he ducked. She was charged with aggravated assault. Creme de la Weird

An unnamed 41-year-old Chinese woman who had been suffering from fevers and breathing problems for six years finally went for a checkup in early January at a hospital in Tongchuan, Shaanxi Province, China. Doctors X-rayed and found an inchlong chili pepper in her right lung. Metro News reported that Dr. Luo Lifeng tried to remove the pepper using a probe but was forced to operate because it was lodged too deep to reach. He speculated that she had inhaled the pepper and then forgotten about it. Go Ahead, Take Two

An unnamed Russian man, apparently desperate for a drink, stole an armored personnel carrier from a secured facility on Jan. 10 and used it to ram a storefront in Apatity, Russia, reported United Press International. Surveillance video showed him climbing out of the tank-like carrier and into the store, where he retrieved a bottle of wine, then returning to the vehicle and ramming the storefront again as several bystanders looked on. He was arrested after leaving the scene. Employee Relations

Pesto’s Pizza Shop in Boise, Idaho, takes its pizza prep seriously. So when an employee burns a pizza, the discipline is swift and public: The worker must don an orange bag that reads “I burned a pizza,” then “walk the plank,” or the sidewalk, in front of the shop five times. Pesto’s owner, Lloyd Parrott, told KBOI TV: “You know, we gotta have some fun around here. It’s all in good fun.” Oops

An unnamed man tried an unconventional method to kill a wolf spider in his Redding, Calif., apartment on Jan. 7: He set it afire with a torch lighter. Unfortunately, the burning spider ran onto a mattress and caught it on fire. Residents were able to put out the mattress fire, but not before flames reached nearby drapes and a flag collection, then a nearby closet, reported the Redding Record Searchlight. When a garden hose failed to douse the blaze, firefighters were called and prevented it from spreading to other apartments. The blaze caused about $11,000 in damage, and all the residents were able to escape unharmed. Redneck Chronicles

Daniel Bennett, 18, of Irvington, Ala., was charged in Mobile County with bestiality after “engag[ing] in or submit[ting] to any sexual contact with an animal, to wit: a horse.” The horse’s owner, Francine Janes, and her husband became suspicious when their dogs started barking the evening of Jan. 4. They found Bennett, dressed in a trenchcoat carrying burglar’s tools, hiding in one of their barn stalls, Janes told WPMI-TV. Bennett told Janes “he wanted to pet [Polly] the horse,” but he admitted to sheriff’s investigators he molested Polly. Janes said she suspects Bennett had visited Polly “seven, maybe 10 times,” because “toilet paper had been left. ... Items had been turned over. And that’s as far as I want to go.” Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

Julie “Bella” Hall

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 5 years

Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 34 years in the Land of Zion

Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today.

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

Why We Move to Utah -stunning views of our piece of the Rocky Mountains. This 5 BR two story home sits at the TOP of Draper and looks over into Utah County. You’re 15 minutes to work at our Silicon Open SAT FEB. 3 Slopes and yet live in a neighbor11 AM to 3 PM hood of massive hiking and biking trails in the planned community of Suncrest with a seasonal pool and lazy river, community center with activities like ‘movies in the park, pancake breakfasts, ‘trunk or treat’. Main floor master with huge en suite bath, all 3 levels finished with 4700 sq. ft, 5 BR/4 BA plus walkout basement with brand new kitchen down for Mother in Law or visitors. 2126 E. Eagle Crest Drive, Draper $649,900

Estate Sale TAYLORSVILLE

5 BR, 3 BA home with downstairs rec room and bar. Two fireplaces, 2 car garage, corner lot. Just appraised $310,000 but will be offered at $299,900 2613 W. Blake Drive (5630 South) in Taylorsville. DOWNTOWN LOFT at WESTGATE Have you tried to find a downtown condo lately? This is just hitting the market at press timebare brick walls, huge kitchen and bath, small patio pet friendly above a German bakery! Appraised $258K, asking $259,900

HOME LOANS MADE BRIZZÉE Julie Bri-ZAY, makes home buying ea-ZAY NMLS#243253 Loan officer

I

Julie Brizzee Citywide Home Loans NMLS#67180 9785 S. Monroe St. #200 Sandy, UT 84070

801-747-1206 Providing All Mortgage Loan Services

FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | 47

Alyce H. Davenport, 30, and Diron Conyers, 27, of Southbridge, Mass., couldn’t make it to the funeral of Audra Johnson, Davenport’s mother, on Jan. 5 because they were busy stealing a safe from Johnson’s home. Southbridge police started searching for the pair after Johnson’s boyfriend discovered the safe was missing, reported the Worcester Telegram & Gazette. When police stopped Davenport the next day, they found the safe in the trunk of the car she was driving (also registered to Johnson) and seized it. Davenport and Conyers were arrested

Lovebirds

at a Sturbridge motel, where officers found jewelry, keys, cellphones and other documents, and the two were charged with seven counts related to the theft. “Alyce has a history of larceny, identity theft and forgery,” the police report said.

| COMMUNITY |

In Albuquerque, N.M., a church’s new electronic bells are creating a living hell for neighbor Bernadette Hall-Cuaron, who has lived next to Our Lady of Guadalupe for years. “The bells ring multiple times a day during the week, and play ‘Amazing Grace’ during the week, and then they run multiple times again during the weekend,” she told KOB-TV in January. “Because of the volume and frequency of the bells, this is not calling people to the church.” Hall-Cuaron called the church to complain, but said since her request, “they have added ‘Amazing Grace’ every day ... a full verse.” The pastor responded that he has lowered the volume but will not turn off the bells completely, as some in the neighborhood love them.

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Chris McCabe, 70, of Totnes, England, escaped a frigid death thanks to his own quick thinking on Dec. 15. McCabe owns a butcher shop, and he had entered the walk-in freezer behind the shop when the door slammed behind him. Ordinarily that wouldn’t be a problem, as a release button inside the freezer can open the door. But the button was frozen solid. So McCabe looked around the freezer and saw the shop’s last “black pudding,” or blood sausage, which he used as a battering ram to unstick the button. “They are a big, long stick that you can just about get your hand around,” McCabe told the Mirror. “I used it like the police use battering rams to break door locks in. Black pudding saved my life, without a doubt.” He believes he would have died within a half-hour in the -4-degree freezer.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

48 | FEBRUARY 1, 2018

The

Backstop

It may be on the BACK but readers stop here to see your ad FIRST! Call for rates 801-575-7028

WORDS sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947 VOICEOVER WORKSHOP Forming in SLC, Learn to earn voicing commercials & more. www.voscott.com/workshops.html

DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

CITY WEEKLY STORE

DUCES WILD IS FOR SALE

Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

PLUMBER - SILVER SUMMIT SERVICES Plumbing ∙ Home Repair ∙ Home Remodel

Licensed/Insured - 801-518-2325 silversummitservices@gmail.com

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

South Salt Lake SOB license Class D liquor license

NEW WINDSHIELDS Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

WE WAIVE

$100 OF YOUR

INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-414-4103

AWINDSHIELDREPLACEM ENT.COM

Certificates available in

801-918-3066 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

Toothache? Wisdom teeth? PULLMYTOOTH.

www.

com

Save time and money

FRIENDSHIP MANOR IS HIRING • Cook, Dishwasher

Main Street Dental

• Servers/Bussers

801.467.2255 3195 S. Main St #225 Salt Lake

Great hours. Flexible Scheduling. Conveniently located on major bus and Trax lines. Adjacent to University of Utah.

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

Health Insurance Benefits for Full Time. Retirement, Paid Leave and Complimentary Meals all Positions

Call Today! 801-582-3100

SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

Sell Your Car Today

OGDEN

With One PhOne Call

763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

Your dog’s home away from home

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

-overnight dog boarding-cageless dog daycare-dog washing stations-

OF THE WEEK TO O PH WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY NG ISSUE GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATURED IN AN UPCOMI

801-683-3647 • www.utahdogpark.com Woods Cross: 596 W 1500 S (Woods Cross) | Airport Location: 1977 W. North Temple

TAG YOUR PHOTOS

#CWCOMMUNITY

• We Make “House Calls” • Simple and Hassle Free • Paid For or Not • Quickly Sell Your Car, Truck or Van • Have a Check About 15 Minutes After We Arrive

“It’s Worth Your Time To Call”

Call or Text 24/6

801-560-9933 WWW.CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

City Weekly February 1, 2018  

What Global Warming?

City Weekly February 1, 2018  

What Global Warming?