Page 1

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

Welcome to

J A N U A RY 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 | VO L . 3 4

THE NO-FUN ZONE!

N0. 34

Our Annual Legislative Preview


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | JANUARY 18, 2018

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY BILLS, BILLS, BILLS!

Rejoice! Our annual look at the upcoming Legislative session is here. Cover illustration by Trent Call, trentcall.com

13

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 21 A&E 25 DINE 35 CINEMA 38 MUSIC 53 COMMUNITY

RAY HOWZE

Cover package, p. 14 Legislators, they’re just like us—kind of. The 2018 Legislative session kicks off Jan. 22 and all eyes will be on them. “This is my first year helping our readers navigate Utah government,” the SLC native says. “I hope I can learn as much as possible, to inform them and me on what makes the state tick.”

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

NEWS

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

MORE NEWS!

Russell M. Nelson named LDS Local advocates want plastic church’s 17th president. bags to be a thing of the past. facebook.com/slcweekly

Twitter: @cityweekly • Deals at cityweeklystore.com

Check out our four-page pullout guide to the 2018 Slamdance Film Festival on pgs. 27-30. Then, get your discounted locals only pass at cityweeklystore.com!


SAVE

SAVE

$80

$80

10” POWER SUB SYSTEM

12” POWER SUB SYSTEM

BUILT-IN AMPLIFIER & SUBWOOFER

BUILT-IN AMPLIFIER & SUBWOOFER

M.E.S.A. MONEY GET THE SOUND YOU DREAM OF CREDIT CARD PROGRESSIVE

NO

LEASE / PURCHASE 70% APPROVAL RATE

$199.99

List Price: 299.99

CREDIT NEEDED

OPTION

soundwarehouse.com/ financing

APP RADIO SAVE

SAVE

SAVE

$175

$370

$200

NO DVD OR CD 7” touchscreen display Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling • Rear View Camera Ready • Steering Remote Ready • •

$399.99

$324.99

$349.99

List Price: 500.00

List Price: 720.00

LICENSE PLATE BACK UP CAMERA W/ NIGHT VISION

AFTER $50 INSTANT REBATE

List Price: 600.00

SAVE

SAVE

$350

$500

IP 67 WATER/DEBRIS RESISTANT

HURRY INTO 1 0F OUR 3 STORES

DDX9903S

Available in Black and Chrome

NOW

This 6.95” In-dash DVD/CD player with AM/FM tuner works with Android Auto and Apple Carplay. Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling & music streaming.

DVD/CD receiver with 6.2” touchscreen and AM/FM tuner. Compatible with Apple CarPlay. Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling and audio streaming.

RECEIVER $499 $499 AV NAVIGATION SYSTEM $239.99 AV APPLE CARPLAY & ANDROID AUTO W W W. S OU N D WA R E H OUS E .C O M .99

List Price: 1,000.00

.99

List Price: 850.00

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

FREE LAYAWAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 1/25/18

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 3

HOURS

10AM TO 7PM MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

SOUND DAMPING

MAKE YOUR SPEAKERS SOUND BETTER

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

AFTER $50 INSTANT REBATE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

$219.99

List Price: 279.99

90

DAY PAYMENT


Serving local coffee & Pastries

NEW

cafe hours open at 7am tues-sat

@SLCWEEKLY @CITYWEEKLY

cat lounge

11-7 tues-thur 11-8 fri-sun 302 E. 900 S. I TINKERSCATCAFE.COM

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, Jan. 4, “Team Wolf”

Controlling the population of voracious predatory animals is a good thing. Killing them all off for fun is not. Huge difference.

SEAN DEVOS Via Facebook

Nobody does sunset better than wolves.

@SARDIRE Via Twitter

Tell that to sheep owners, cattle owners and flock owners. The depredation of stock to small ranchers can be devastating.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

4 | JANUARY 18, 2018

SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

RAY MENASCO Via Facebook

THE Source for Tune-Ups, Rentals & Equipment

True, but there’s a happy medium.

STEVE TRAGESER Via Facebook Wonderful piece!

@OURREVOLUTIONAZ Via Twitter

Private Eye, Jan. 4, “Started Over”

/ Get 1 t n e R REE F

Expires 2/9/18

50% OFF TUNE-UPS! SKI TUNE-UP $15 REG $30 SNOWBOARD TUNE-UP $20 REG $40 Expires 2/9/18

698 Park Avenue • Park City Townlift • 435-649-3020 134 West 600 South • Salt Lake • 801-355-9088 2432 East Ft. Union • South Valley • 801-942-1522

Dear John: Having “been there” as it were re. John and Yoko, I took pleasure in reading your candid: “I was never a fan of Yoko.” Whew, glad somebody finally said it. So just to add weight to my “Whew!” I was there when she did her dumb piece at St. Martin’s School of Art, B.J. (Before John) with her first husband. The Bag Piece where they cavorted about inside a black bag for about 30 minutes on the drawing studio floor with the students crammed in raked seats in the form of a mini coliseum as per the drawing studio of the period. I was there too when she miscarried in St. Charlotte’s Hospital. Me on the floor above with my newborn daughter, Liberty, and she downstairs driving the hospital crazy. Sad, but it too, became a show. Then again at Robert Fraser’s gallery for

John and Yoko’s “white on white” show with kitsch charity collecting boxes. Sum total? Pretty vacuous. I would like to heartily raise a glass to CW’s past, present and future and hope that you all think more of new trails than good ‘ol days.

JANN HAWORTH, Salt Lake City

Dining review, Jan. 4, Sweet Lake Biscuits & Limeade Wowzers!

@HEATHERHEATHERSWORLD Via Instagram Looks amazing.

CRISTIN BISHOP Via Facebook Drooling. Sweet Lake Biscuits & Limeade is my fave.

@BEAUTY_BY_THEBARBIEGIRL Via Instagram

Film review, Jan. 4, I, Tonya

I am sad that they did not use the new Sufjan song. Anyone intrigued by Tonya’s story needs to also listen to it. Apparently he has wanted to write a song for years and the film encouraged him to do it sooner than later. It is amazingly well done.

ANGELA ELMORE

Blog post, Jan. 11, “Bag the Bag advocates hope to build momentum in 2018”

Salt Lake let’s get with the times. I moved from a city where plastic bags are no longer available and haven’t been for a few years now. Reusable or paper are the only way to go.

ANNETTE DEL CASTELLO Via Facebook Plastic bags are such trash. I liked what L.A. did. You have to pay a few cents, and the bags are more durable. And still recyclable. Best to “incentivize” good behavior.

Is it really “acting” if you’re telling your own life story? Either way, it was a fascinating show. I loved it.

@GOPTODD Via Twitter

@MEGANJULI Via Twitter At least charge for them.

MICAH BANKS Via Facebook

Haven’t used plastic bags in years and never want to again.

ERIN WINWARD CHATTERTON Via Facebook

Via Instagram

Let’s do it and and recycle the ones we have to pave the roads.

Via Facebook

I’m so in!

Via Instagram

Blog post, Jan. 11, “Dabakis the Thespian”

NIKA JONES

Via Facebook

@HARVEYTHEMINIPIN

Via Facebook

Yep, not the best actor.

TONA FOSTER

I’m in Europe a couple of times a year, and I take my reusable bags because they mostly do not have plastic. If Trump can force non-morality down our throats, the rest of us can fight for this.

TYLER C.

Via Facebook

Acting must be a prerequisite. Donna K. Bradshaw Via Facebook

have to have a ban. People will usually do what is easiest.

(OR HIS MOM, WE GUESS)

Plastic bags are too much of a nuisance for only having one use before being tossed. Get rid of them and buy your own reusable bag to take with you. Richard Humberg Via Facebook I bring my reusable bags 90 percent of the time. If everyone was doing it, then we wouldn’t

@WILLIAMCRAIGLOWE

I like the ones that say THANK YOU on them.

MATT HANDY Via Facebook

We encourage you to join the conversation. Voice your thoughts on stories posted across our social media platforms, as well as cityweekly.net, for a chance to be featured in this section.


BIG SHINY ROBOT! News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th

Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th

OXOXOXOXO Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th XOXOXOXOX

OXOXOXOXO Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th XOXOXOXOX

exclusively on

cityweekly.net -cityweekly.net/bigshinyrobot-

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS

Production Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN Circulation Circulation Manager ERIC GRANATO

Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales MIKEY SALTAS Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Business/Office Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

Sales Director of Advertising,Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives ANNE BAILEY, LISA DORELLI, PAULINA JEDLICA KNUDSON, ALEX MARKHAM, JEREMIAH SMITH

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Editorial Interns BENJAMIN BENALLY, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, HOWARD HARDEE, MARYANN JOHANSON, MIKE RIEDEL, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Editorial Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Editorial Assistant RAY HOWZE Proofreaders SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Marketing Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZ-KINNY, MATTHEW AULDRIC BEERE, TERESA BAGDASAROVA, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, SAMMIE HERZOG, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, POLINA LYUBAVINA, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS

®

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Copperfield Publishing Inc. JOHN SALTAS City Weekly founder

Phone 801-575-7003 E-mail comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 5

All Contents © 2017


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

6 | JANUARY 18, 2018

PRIVATE EY

Skatacracy

The uproar caused by President Donald Trump when he asked a group of Senators why we should allow people from “shithole countries” in Africa to take residence in the United States remains unabated. In a one-two punch, he also disparaged Haitian nationals, asking why we would ever want more of them as neighbors. That caused Rep. Mia Love, born of Haitian immigrant parents, to take umbrage and sort of ask for an apology from the one person on the globe who has never apologized for anything. Sorry, Mia, but that was soft. There’s a reason for that. Love is ensconced in congress due to her multitudes of fine neighbors in Utah County, mostly Republican and mostly LDS. They’re in a quandary because of all religious faiths in the country, the most supportive of Trump is LDS. That means they have a choice. Either recall the beliefs of their religion and rally behind Sister Love and stand against an obvious ratchet of Trump’s blatant racism, or stick with the crazy uncle living in the White House, accept his beliefs and validate that they comprise the easily lied-to base that Trump is so fond of playing to. On one hand, they want to embrace all that is good about their religion, because that’s what religious people do. On the other, they want to be good Republicans because that means they are not socialist, baby-killing, drug-crazed, queer Democrats. That’s a tough call down in Utah County. Should we do the right thing and stand by Love? Should we denounce racism and march on the Capitol steps? Or should we let our true colors speak in their silence? Throughout Utah’s history, silence has been the great microphone of state politics.

B Y J O H N S A LTA S @johnsaltas

There’s written histories of Carbon County and Bingham Canyon where Klan crosses burned on hillsides and in immigrants’ yards in the early 20th century. Greeks, Italians, Slavs, Mexicans—it’s always the Mexicans—were regarded as trash. Prior to that, a pre-Trumpian, Francis A. Walker, was authoring screeds against immigration, often referring to my peeps, Southern and Eastern Europeans as “beaten men from beaten races, representing the worst failures in the struggle for existence.” Ask Utahns today about that period, and it’s like it never happened. But it did, and it shaped my own bearing on equality. And now look who’s writing and editing. It’s also a funny thing these days that defying racism is both met with amazement on one side (What, me racist? I’m the least racist person alive!) while being measured on the other side (You don’t know what racism is! You’re white!). Everyone has a personal relationship with racism and everyone is more right about it than the next person. What seems to be lacking is universal understanding. Thank Twitter and other social media for that. Call me what you want—and since our president has lowered the bar on name-calling, forcing family papers like this one to adopt new publication standards of word usage—go ahead and call me a shithole. But we are worse off as a nation these days than we were pre-Twitter where everyone with 50 followers has an opinion and no one with 50,000 has any influence. We just scream at each other. When the president debased the entire African continent and basically all of the Caribbean and Latin America as well—oh, plus rapist Mexico— nothing happened other that we all screamed at the rapid pace of 280 characters per minute. Yes, there were protests, but they were quickly replaced by Twitter snark, Facebook cats and Instagram soufflés. It’s not enough to make one want to quit, but something has to give.

I say, take Trump up on his word that the U.S. would be better off with lots more Norwegians. Last year, some 512 Norwegians moved to the U.S. Perhaps they were some lost Vikings, but it’s a great place to start a seismic change from brown-chain migration to white. Make that lily-white. Let’s take five million of them. My bet is that doing so, even with all their whiteness, won’t improve your lives or mine even a whit. All they’ll do is complain about the high crime rate, poor health care, lack of stellar schools, quality jobs and how far they now live from the Greek islands. They’d soon be called ingrates by our Boy-Wonder-inchief, same as he disparages a Haitian, Nigerian, Mexican or—well, anyone who breathes not named Trump. What needs to change is not immigration law, but election law. Since the 1960s when the great social experiments of our country began, the single constant has been the utter lack of decent people filling Congress’ seats. I’m no longer of the mind to even credit people for serving in politics; they’ve been no friend. They get in, they mess with people and get out. They’re also often well-to-do. You tell me: Has Orrin Hatch been on both sides of every issue or not? He’s a scoundrel of the worst order. Nary a thing makes him a great Utahn. People that have been around as long as I have can tell you nothing changes, except the words used in the increasing level of nasty rhetoric. There’s likely not a swear word I haven’t embraced. But even I wonder how it came that now everyone’s talking about dick pics, pussy grabbing, and shitholes. Our public leaders (our skatacracy, if you will) moved that needle when Trump hit the trifecta on the three above—and you, yeah, you—let it happen. We all did. Let’s change the channel. Read. Embrace and thank all those around you. Exchange word umbrage for action. Or, just share another selfie and be done with it. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 7


RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | JANUARY 18, 2018

FIVE SPOT

Growing up, Virginia native Zach Harvey always appreciated art. Although he wasn’t as skilled with a paintbrush as his older brother, this didn’t stop him from promoting his brother’s paintings. After joining the Air National Guard, Harvey ended up in Las Vegas. There, he met Dana Anderson and Phillip Limon, founders of the art agency, Industry Supporting Industry (ISI). Together, they opened up an ISI chapter in Salt Lake City, giving Harvey a chance to shine a much-needed light on the area’s alternative art scene.

What kind of art does ISI showcase?

We have all sorts of artists. We have sculptors, bone carvers, wood burners, aerosol artists ... we have Heather Olsen [who] does oil paintings, the fine-arts type of art. We’re trying to pull in everybody that just wants to show off what they can do. A lot of artists have galleries and stuff like that, but they’re not really in the public eye.

Who does ISI appeal to?

There’s always going to be an underground vibe to what we do. It’s going to be grungy— more edgy—we don’t want to cater to snobs. We would rather cater to people who appreciate it, than to people who don’t. The art scene can be so pretentious, but I never looked at it in that way. There’s no room for that. Like, if you look at a punk rock show and a symphony, we’re the punk rock show.

What kind of charity work has ISI done?

We’ve worked with Huntsman Cancer Institute and the Rape Recovery Center. We had live paintings, and they auctioned the work off. Charities are super important, because you can go on Instagram and buy as many followers as you want, but if you’re not doing anything for the community, you might as well just stop.

What do artists really love about your shows?

They’re all themes that we choose. Like this next show, [Jan. 18] is going to be a Tim Burton theme. We have artists who would never paint anything Tim Burton-related, but what they love about it is, it pushes them to go outside of their comfort zone. They appreciate the art that gets made that would’ve never got made in the first place.

What do you hope ISI does for Salt Lake City?

This city is so cool. It just needs to have more art. People just need to change their view on it. Let’s make the city beautiful. What I really want to do is get a contract with Gateway, and then we could have artists paint all the walls seasonally. So every season, you’re looking at a different piece. That’s the kind of stuff I want to do to this city.

—RACHELLE FERNANDEZ comments@cityweekly.net


HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Money for Nothing

Sen. Orrin Hatch is out raising money. He has a lot of it, and, you know, he needs more. Not that he’s running for re-election or anything. Just because he can, and well, there’s a yet-to-be-built library to commemorate him. Here’s the problem, and it’s not about Hatch. It’s about the influence of money in politics. Yes, money has long played a big part in electing politicians, but ever since Citizens United, that part has grown exponentially. Corporations are now people. Just so you know how insidious this can be, politicians can raise money for their re-election campaigns at the same time as their foundations raise money for other things. Hatch held backto-back fundraisers like this last year, according to Politico, with donations from $3,000 to $100,000 a pop. Opensecrets. org notes that politicians who leave office can keep their campaign organizations running forever. Politics is just very green.

Let There Be Six

Activism is activism, right? Maybe there’s more to it ... maybe there’s a creative aspect to it. At ARTivism: Mobilizing the Climate Movement, you can discover that energy within you. Local climate-justice groups kick off the day with a panel of artists, writers, musicians and dancers who, they say, “embody diverse forms of art activism.” The afternoon will be devoted to making “powerful banners and puppets in an art build.” There will also be an introductory workshop on storytelling to help you hone your own activist voice. University of Utah Department of Art and Art History, 375 S. 1530 East, 801-916-7044, Saturday, Jan. 20, 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m., free/registration: bit.ly/2DmsBsJ.

RESISTANCE CONTINUED

The world didn’t come to an end with the 2016 election. It just began a new era of the good fight, and it is a time to renew and sustain that effort. If you care about the struggle of undocumented immigrants living under the threat of deportation, if you care about indigenous people who are fighting to keep their native lands, if you care about the abuses of power by the Salt Lake City police, and if you care about the United States’ role in destroying foreign relations—then you should join J20: A Year of Resistance, Continue the Fight to celebrate the struggle and its victories. Wallace Bennett Federal Building, 125 S. State, Saturday, Jan. 20, noon3 p.m., free, bit.ly/2DgGHM5.

CLEAR AIR FAIR

For the fifth year in a row, the Utah Clean Air Solutions Fair will bring together organizations, individuals and ideas to craft a viable path to livable air. It’s about creating a communal effort from which you will leave with “pollution solutions” and a sense of empowerment. There will be music, art and booths as well as scientists, politicians and environmental groups ready to answer questions and move you forward. Trolley Square, 367 Trolley Square, Saturday, Jan. 20, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., free, bit.ly/2mtCMV0.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 9

Yes, it continues. Join women from throughout the nation as they don their pussy hats and march forward in protest of the Trump administration’s cruel and elitist agenda. The 2018 Women’s March: Power to the Polls will aim at the mid-term elections and the issues facing women in our nation today, from gun violence to politicians accused of sexual assault. Check out the website. Besides Las Vegas, there will be sister marches around Utah. Sunday, Jan. 21, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., free, powertothepolls.com.

| CITY WEEKLY |

WOMEN’S MARCH

We get it. The man was a prophet—at least to about 16 million people worldwide. But, still, Thomas S. Monson lived in the world, and during a time of some conflict as well as success within the LDS Church. So it’s a little stunning to have 192,000 followers sign an online petition to The New York Times complaining that his obituary chose to “attack and disparage” him. They somehow compared his obit to Fidel Castro’s, thinking the NYT was more “neutral” to the Cuban dictator. Maybe we should recommend the documentary Obit, which details how the NYT decides to cover the death of newsworthy people. It’s not about how kind they were. It’s about how they navigated the times in which they lived. It’s about the news—not a eulogy. But Mormons need to get over it. No doubt, Monson will be perfect in heaven.

CLIMATE ARTIVISM

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

It’s About the News

IN A WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

And now there are six. Count them—six ballot initiatives. The latest one is what we call the anti-vote petition. It’s actually called Keep My Voice, which means political insiders really want to be the ones deciding who gets on a ballot. Utah Policy clarified the name as “Freedom of Association,” meaning that insiders would have the freedom to associate with the people they want on the ballot. KMV is coming up late in the game against the Count My Vote (CMV) initiative, aka “Direct Primary Election Act.” It’s late because each of the six initiatives must achieve 113,000 signatures in 26 of the 29 Senate districts by April 15. Besides those two, there are petitions for medical cannabis, Medicaid Expansion, fair redistricting and school funding. The plethora of initiatives might send a message to the Legislature that their constituents aren’t being heard.

CITIZEN REV LT


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | JANUARY 18, 2018

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Pressured Recently it was announced that medical experts had lowered the numbers of what acceptable blood pressures are, so now nearly half of all adults are considered to have high blood pressure. Is this a drug-company ploy to get even more people on medications? —Pressured in Michigan Funny, isn’t it? What with the fast food, the sedentary lifestyles, and the increasingly hair-raising national politics, we Americans shouldn’t really need help getting diagnosed with high blood pressure—doing just fine, thanks. Yet along come these goalpostmoving guidelines: where previously hypertension meant 140 over 90 and up, the new threshold is 130/80—meaning that, yep, quite literally overnight, a full 46 percent of Americans now have HBP. The change came via a report in November from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, part of a regular, federally sanctioned process to guide medical practices across the country. Redefining a worrisome medical condition to include 14 percent more patients sounds drastic, but how big a deal is it really? I’d submit to you that what we’re looking at is a little more nuanced than the breathless news coverage would suggest—though you’re certainly not wrong, Pressured, to cast a skeptical eye. The shady stuff we’ll get to in a minute, but first the official line on the matter—why, in theory at least, the new guidelines aren’t simply a big drug-company ploy. According to defenders, the idea isn’t to get more folks on medication but to keep more folks off it, by motivating them into blood-pressurelowering lifestyle changes before meds become necessary. Anyway, hypertension drugs work best on those with systolic blood pressures of 140 and above, so the newly designated HBP sufferers, the 130-to-139 crowd, aren’t even the target market; according to one estimate, the new numbers will mean only a 1.9 percent increase nationwide in the prescription of blood-pressure meds. (Which admittedly shakes out to about 4 million people—not nothing.) So the half-thecountry’s-got-HBP framing is maybe a little hyperbolic—one could reasonably argue the AHA et al just want to get you to quit smoking, while it’s the headline writers who are trying to give you a heart attack. If the guidelines are broadly unobjectionable, you honestly can’t say the same about the medico-corporate milieu whence they emerged, which has taken deserved heat. The last time blood-pressure guidelines underwent major revision, back in 2003, the change prompted a Seattle Times investigation focusing on the links between the new rules and the pharmaceutical companies uncomfortably close to their creation. The 2003 report created a new condition called “prehypertension” (eliminated in the 2017 update), it recommended the wider use of hypertension drugs—and nine of the 11 authors of the report, the Times found, had ties to Big Pharma. That’s a conflict of interest basically baked into this particular system. Groups

like the American Heart Organization and the American Cancer Society are what’s called patient advocacy organizations, or PAOs, and over time have come to be heavy hitters on the American medical scene: authoring guidelines, influencing policy and regulatory decisions, sponsoring research, etc. Who can disagree with patient advocacy? Unfortunately, that kind of work ain’t cheap, and many PAOs receive substantial funding from for-profit companies, including pharma manufacturers and medical-device makers. A 2017 sample of PAOs found that 67 percent received at least some cash from forprofit companies, and 12 percent got more than half their budget that way. This study was part of a series of JAMA Internal Medicine articles on the growing problem of industry influence on things like medical guidelines; it was noted elsewhere, for instance, that the industry-funded National Osteoporosis Foundation “continues to promote the idea of a widespread ‘disease’” while “others point to concern about the condition’s overdiagnosis and overtreatment.” The problem was described a bit more heatedly in a 2009 article in the New York Review of Books by Marcia Angell—longtime editor at a little pamphlet out of the northeast called the New England Journal of Medicine—about the infiltration of industry money into things like “expert panels” on health issues. Angell cited as an example the National Cholesterol Education Panel, which in 2004 recommended lowering acceptable levels of “bad” cholesterol, and eight of whose nine members proved to have financial ties to cholesterol-drug makers. Angell’s conclusion? “It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgment of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines.” So there you have it. The specific guidelines you’re asking about seem harmless enough, Pressured—most of us, anyway, could stand to exercise a little more. (We’ll note that one big doctors’ organization, the American Academy of Family Physicians, decided not to endorse the new hypertension guidelines— citing, among other issues, potential conflicts of interest on the authors’ part.) But going forward, you’d be wise to take this sort of medical-pronouncement-from-on-high with a grain of salt—or, depending on your dietary restrictions, the low-sodium flavor enhancer of your choice. n Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607


NEWS

HISTORY

Sousa Mendes’ List

Holocaust rescuer’s legacy lives on in Utah. BY RAY HOWZE rhowze@cityweekly.net @rayhowze1

Daniel Mattis, 85, escaped the Nazi’s march on Western Europe when he was a young boy thanks to Portuguese consul Aristides de Sousa Mendes (pictured below) who signed thousands of visas for fleeing Jews.

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 11

WHAT: Circular 14: The Apotheosis of Aristide WHEN: Saturday, Jan. 27, 7 p.m WHERE: The Tabernacle at Temple Square ADMISSION: Free; tickets required bit.ly/2D55162

SOUSA MENDES LEGACY IN UTAH Years after Mattis first learned of Sousa Mendes, he turned on the TV at his home, which also had a French satellite. A French movie had already begun, but Mattis soon knew what it was about. “The movie has started, I don’t know the title of the movie, there’s nothing,” Mattis says. “But the context is so clear—it’s the story of Sousa Mendes.” Mattis recorded the film, which he later learned was titled in English as Disobedience, and found out how to get in touch with the producers. There, he learned there was a Sousa Mendes Foundation in France. That started the wheels moving stateside. Mattis’ daughter, Olivia, was working in academic administration at Stony Brook University in New York. He had to share the exciting news with his daughter, who heard of the story while growing up, but says she never understood its magnitude. “I realized this is about the man who saved my life,” Olivia Mattis says. “[Dad] forwarded this exchange to me and it was

like a ton of bricks—I just started looking around Facebook if there were any [Sousa Mendes] groups, I probably Googled as well to educate myself and pretty soon, I was in touch with all of these grandchildren of Sousa Mendes who were looking for families like mine that had been rescued by him.” Sure enough, Olivia Mattis knew it was time to switch careers. In 2010, she founded the Sousa Mendes Foundation out of New York and started compiling the thousands of descendants who were saved by the consul. Of course, she knew her father living in Utah was one of them, but she didn’t know one of Sousa Mendes’ grandsons by the same name also lived in the state. Aristides Mendes, who grew up in New York City, moved to Utah in the 2000s and even met Daniel Mattis with help from Olivia. KSL Channel 5 covered their meeting in 2010. Eight years later, Olivia Mattis is bringing the foundation back to Utah on Saturday, Jan. 27, International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The foundation will host its world premiere oratorio, Circular 14: The Apotheosis of Aristide, about Sousa Mendes with a children’s choir and full orchestra at the Salt Lake Tabernacle. The performance is free, but tickets must be reserved through the LDS church. Now her life’s work, Olivia Mattis says starting the foundation has been more than worth it and hopes people take something positive from the performance. “One person can make a difference,” she says, “a pretty universal difference. [Mendes] had a very small, limited amount of power and he saw he had it and could use it for good. “Every one of us has the power to make a difference in somebody’s life.” CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

dilemma. His orders from António de Oliveira Salazar, ruler of Portugal during the war, were to deny visas to fleeing Jews. The country was trying to straddle the neutral line and didn’t want to upset Hitler. But Sousa Mendes could see the thousands of refugees that needed help. He mulled it over for days. Then, on June 17, 1940, Sousa Mendes announced he would issue the visas to everyone and created an assembly line to sign the documents. Mattis’ father, who had built the family’s wealth as a leather wholesaler, was able to secure the family visas to Brazil through Portugal. As a result, Mattis was able to eventually get to the United States and Salt Lake City where he lives today and spent his career as a professor at the University of Utah. The number of people Sousa Mendes helped is undetermined, Paldiel says, but is in the thousands with some estimates ranging from 10,000 to as many as 30,000. Sousa Mendes’ decision, though, was immeasurable. “We are told laws have to be obeyed,” Paldiel told City Weekly by phone. “You have to obey instructions—if everyone was to make a personal decision on what is right and wrong, you would have chaos. “But then there are times when you realize when a certain order, a certain instruction, is so inhumane, one is obligated not to follow that instruction because it goes against rules of civilization and humanity.” However, it didn’t turn out well for Sousa Mendes’ family. For years, he was disowned by Portugal and ended up dying in poverty. It created a significant burden on his children, some who came to the US. “He never regretted what he did,” Paldiel says, who himself was rescued by a Catholic priest. “He felt simply he had to do it as a human being—this is what makes his case different than so many others who also helped Jewish people to escape.”

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SOUSA MENDES’ BEGINNINGS In 1940, Mattis, who was just 7 years old at the time, was led by his savvy father in his family’s escape from Europe. “The Germans bombed Belgium that morning and by noon we were on the train to Paris,” Mattis says. His father had an idea of what they were up against and had already been making plans how they would flee. The family, who then went by the last name Matuzewitz, made their way to Bordeaux, France, where they awaited their next move. At the same time, Sousa Mendes, a consul with Portugal, was also stationed in Bordeaux and crossed paths with a rabbi named Chaim Kruger. He offered the rabbi a visa to cross Spain and get to Portugal. However, the rabbi wouldn’t accept the visa unless all of his “brothers and sisters”— those stranded in the streets of Bordeaux— could also secure safe passage, according to Mordecai Paldiel’s book The Righteous Among the Nations: Rescuers of Jews During the Holocaust. This put Sousa Mendes in a moral

RAY HOWZE

D

aniel Mattis knew why he and his family were fleeing Europe. Adolf Hitler and his Nazi regime were on their tail. For decades, though, he didn’t quite know exactly how they escaped. It wasn’t until Mattis attended a Holocaust remembrance event at the Salt Palace in the late 1990s that he finally heard the man’s name who gave his family a new chance at life: Aristides de Sousa Mendes. “[My wife] says to me, ‘Now you have to identify yourself,’” Mattis recalls, tearing up slightly. “But I couldn’t. I lost my voice.” Mattis, now 85, and his wife, Noemi, 81, were at an event for international consuls who helped rescue Jews during the Holocaust. One, Chiune Sugihara, was a Japanese government official who served as vice consul for the Japanese Empire in Lithuania. Sugihara issued thousands of transit visas to help fleeing Jews during World War II. Then, Mattis heard the story behind Sousa Mendes, piquing his interest. Sousa Mendes’ story—for Mattis—was only just getting started.


12 | JANUARY 18, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 13

—Dylan Woolf Harris, Staff writer

| CITY WEEKLY |

Our Annual Legislative Preview

THE NO-FUN ZONE!

Each winter, the Utah State Capitol buzzes to life when 29 senators and 75 representatives, the governor and his administration, countless staffers, advocates, security officers, journalists, spectators and more embark on a frenzied 45-day journey that we call “the session.” With a definitive start date, it can feel like the state’s business is starting anew—a fresh slate to improve (or sour) the lives of Utahns. This year, there is expected to be well over 1,000 bills introduced. Some of them might even pass. New bills. New laws. New conversations. But that’s deceiving; the 2018 session is not a dewy dawn. State code, of course, is built on the laws that were passed or ironed out in yesteryears. And for this reason, it’s useful to examine what happened in the past. Because lawmakers who ignore past sessions are doomed to repeat them, as the saying goes. So whether a lawmaker’s personal history is marred with a careless vote he or she made, or it’s notable that the legislative body wasn’t able to pass a widely supported bill, that’s worth examining.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Welcome to


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | JANUARY 18, 2018

Step right up to some of this session’s pressing issues. By Dylan Woolf Harris dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

By Ray Howze rhowze@cityweekly.net @rayhowze1

ho can you turn to to pass laws when the lawmakers won’t? The answer: Why don’t you just do it yourself? As we head into the session, it’s possible there will be bills— even some with widespread public support—that lawmakers will fail to pass. With a 45-day window, legislators can’t conceivably pass everything introduced as they rush to beat the ticking clock—nor should they. But some of the bills are resuscitated annually, kicked around, worked and reworked only to die once again when the lawmakers cheer sine die. Eventually, when groups are fed up with lawmakers’ inability to pass laws themselves, they’ve been known to map out another route and go directly to the voters. This year, as voters watch what’s happening on the Hill, they should also consider whether they’ll support a range of ballot initiatives that have been stewing for quite some time and could end up on the ballot come election time. At least two of the initiatives would raise taxes. In conservative Utah, it’s conceivable that lawmakers are afraid of staining themselves with a tax increase (albeit minimally, campaign smears don’t usually get into the weeds). A few more initiatives deal with elections and election districts. And the final one focuses on weed. For an initiative to appear on the ballot, it has to first be supported by 10 percent of the voters who participated in the most recent presidential election. That amounts to a little more than 100,000 residents from this election cycle. Additionally, signatures need to be collected from 26 of 29 senate districts.

When Congress passed the Affordable Care Act in 2010, Utah responded by suing to block a mandated expansion of Medicaid. The outcome was that the state didn’t have to accept dollars for Medicaid expansion, but it continued to pay into the federal system. An expected front to federal overreach, perhaps, but a stance that, nevertheless, left about 100,000 people in what’s been referred to as the “coverage gap”—a demographic that makes too much money to qualify for one set of programs but not enough to qualify for others. Two-thirds of whom are working one or more jobs, according to Utah Decides Healthcare, which launched a ballot initiative to expand Medicaid. “They’re typically low-wage income earners,” campaign manager Rylee Curtis says, as well as non-working caretakers and students. In order to collect, Utah would be on the hook for 10 percent of the funds. Still, supporters say, the federal match is an enormous incentive. “It triggers about $900 million that would come back to the state,” Curtis says. Part of the group’s message focuses on the economic argument—that a 10 percent investment is a hell of a deal. To pay for Utah’s portion, Utah Decides Healthcare is proposing nudging up the state’s non-food item sales tax from 4.7 percent to 4.85 percent. For the average Utahn, the campaign estimates, that increase equals about 3 cents extra for every $20 spent on non-food items. In 2016, the state passed House Bill 437, a health care bill that, among other things, provided Medicaid to the state’s vulnerable homeless population. Curtis notes that while she supports the effort, Utah carried 30 percent of the costs and it didn’t diversify the risk pool. “It was a great first step,” she says. “Seeing some movement forward was really inspiring. However, it did not cover the entire expansion population and really. it left out working Utahns.” (DWH)

The Count My Vote ballot initiative started out bold. Organizers wanted to blow up the entire caucus selection system for state candidates and get candidates on the ballot through signatures. Since November, though, and after public hearings, they scaled back that initiative and, instead, want to simplify the 2014 law, Senate Bill 54, they helped create that allows for candidates to get on the ballot through signatures or by the caucus. That’s exactly what happened in last year’s race for the Third Congressional District between Chris Herrod and John Curtis. Herrod was selected through the caucus, but Curtis, sensing strong voter support, got on the ballot via signature collection. “It justified itself,” says Rich McKeown, County My Vote’s executive chairman, about the signature-gathering process. “But the fact of the matter is, there’s been a group of people who believe there’s only one legitimate way to get on the ballot and they have been consistently attempting to litigate, agitate, go through the [political] parties to modify or ameliorate the effects of SB54.” Those attempts don’t appear to be stopping, either. Just last week, proponents of the caucus system filed paperwork for a new ballot initiative that would restore the caucus system and eliminate SB54. McKeown says their initiative plans to lower the threshold for signatures necessary to get on a ballot. The initiative would require only 1 percent of party members in a jurisdiction. Curtis submitted more than 15,000 signatures while only 7,000 were required, according to a Salt Lake Tribune article. If the ballot initiative were to pass, that threshold would be even lower. “We didn’t think there would be a way to possibly do that through the Legislature and to decide it for us,” McKeown says. “There are contrary forces that believe there is only one way to do it, that is the caucus convention system.” (RH)

P A G the


The Better Boundaries Initiative is backed by members from both political parties, including co-chairs Jeff Wright, a Republican, and Ralph Becker, a Democrat, who spoke to City Weekly. The aim is to establish an independent commission that will be delegated with the task of redrawing political districts. “In a sense, it is to combat gerrymandering,” Wright says. The initiative has two key components. First, it would set up a commission comprising Democrats and Republicans, and a chairperson appointed by the governor. The board’s task would be to map out legislative districts and U.S. House of Representative districts. The commission would submit its maps to the Legislature for final approval. The second aspect is establishing a set of standards that would guide the commission as it figures out fair boundaries. The standards ask that communities and neighborhoods stay together, for example. “Currently, the process is very broken,” Becker says. “We have a system where legislators are picking their voters. They’re deciding where the boundaries are. Incumbents are deciding how to protect their districts.” A byproduct of the system as it stands, is that many elections in the state aren’t competitive, the Better Boundaries Initiative argues. When the district is drawn to favor a candidate from one political party over another, it deters challengers from running. “We don’t have boundaries that reflect the natural boundaries of communities,” Becker adds. “There’s a need for that. It’s recognized all over the country. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a Democratic or Republican state, where the legislature—as is true in Utah—makes these decisions unilaterally and doesn’t have any standards or transparent processes. And you get bad results.” The duo is optimistic about the prospect of getting the initiative on the ballot and getting voted into law. Polling shows a majority of the state supports the idea. (DWH)

WHERE WILL THE LINES BE DRAWN

showing

th e

wi ll

results the

cuts

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 15

Our Schools Now is on a mission to put more money into the education system by imposing a small tax across a wide base. In essence, the initiative calls for a .45 percent tax increase on both income and sales tax to raise about $700 million earmarked for education. Importantly, says campaign manager Austin Cox, the initiative is led by some of the state’s most-respected business leaders. Cochairing the movement are Gail Miller with the Larry H. Miller Group of Companies, Zions Bank CEO Scott Anderson, and Ron Jibson, who recently retired as CEO of Questar (now Dominion Energy). “Three of Utah’s premier business leaders are really coming to the side and aid of Utah teachers,” Cox says. “Recognizing, one, that we’re not doing enough to put [teachers] in positions to be successful; and, two, that education is really the foundation for economic success.” The proposal aims to increase per-pupil spending by $1,000. “Utah is the lowestfunded state in the nation per student so this would take us up just a couple of spots,” Cox says. Based on the group’s calculations, it would cost the median household about a

dollar a day. “Are you willing to invest a dollar a day in our local schools so that we can provide our teachers the resources they need to be successful?” he asks. Cox rattles off a list of ways the money could be spent: upping teacher salaries, cutting classroom sizes, offering teacher mentorships and professional development, investing in early childhood education and purchasing technology. “There are so many things that are absent in our schools because of lack of funding that would give teachers the resources they need to reach our students to provide more individual learning opportunities, to make sure our students are coming to school and ready to learn when they are there,” he says. For years, school funding advocates had convened with lawmakers, hoping that they could get a bill passed through the statehouse. But that funding uptick never happened to the degree the members had hoped, even after sitting on committees and drafting plans. “We’ve done just about everything, and they have said, ‘We’re not able to do this,’” Cox says. “The only way we feel we can get this done is to go to voters with a citizens’ petition.” (DWH)

The Legislature debated a medical marijuana bill last year. But, not to many people’s surprise, it didn’t pass. For months now, the Utah Patients Coalition along with others have been collecting signatures to get medical marijuana on the ballot in 2018. DJ Schanz, who heads the Patients Coalition, told City Weekly last week they’ve already collected about three-fourths of the required signatures and expect to reach the goal by April. Carl Wimmer, a former state representative, co-sponsors the ballot initiative. Even though he says he’s not a “huge supporter of ballot initiatives, and it takes a lot for me to sign a ballot initiative,” he believes in the process and public representation—one area he thinks the Legislature has failed when it comes to medical marijuana. “In this particular case, the Legislature just appears to not have the will to move forward with the vast majority of something the people support and something that will help some of the most vulnerable people in society,” Wimmer says. “It appears they just keep kicking the can down the road and pay lip service to appease people when they

really do nothing.” Gov. Gary Herbert, in response to a student’s question at a middle school in Riverton in early January, said, “I think it’s going to happen,” according to a Salt Lake Tribune article. The governor’s office later clarified he wasn’t speaking about any specific initiative. However, it’s clear this year’s ballot initiative has a lot of support, albeit absent from Capitol Hill. Wimmer, now an ex-Mormon, has criticized the LDS church and Legislature for being too intertwined since he left the political world in 2012. He says that’s a major reason legislators haven’t passed anything regarding medical marijuana. “I think the majority are doing what the LDS church wants done regardless of their constituency and I believe a majority of voters support [medical marijuana],” Wimmer says. “The fact is, by supporting this, they would be doing the will of their constituency—every indication is the church is not supportive and as long as they’re not supportive, the Legislature will not support it.” (RH)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

B U RN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

R E N SI N

DISTRICTS &BOUNDARIES


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | JANUARY 18, 2018

Notable politicos talk about lessons learned from past mistakes. By Dylan Woolf Harris dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

o often politicians’ moves are intensely scrutinized, politicized and weaponized during their next campaign, that it seems easier for officeholders to strike the word “mistake” from their vocabulary rather than admit that they’ve made one. The electorate, after all, want leaders who are decisive, smart and who pass measures that improve our lives. But voters also value bravery, humility and realistic outcomes. Nothing is less realistic than a perfect voting record, or impeccable political prowess out of the gate, or an unblemished career when it’s all said and done. Getting politicians to cop to their errors is challenging, especially in an age when some regard apologizing as

spineless capitulation rather than the gracious way one acknowledges his or her errors in polite society. So kudos to the lawmakers who responded to City Weekly’s inquiry asking for them to own up to a past blemish (and sorry if this information is bandied around in a future attack ad paid for by your political opponent.) Explaining why a mistake occurred can reveal the cognitive workings of an elected leader, and according to legislators, mistakes made early in their careers refined their convictions in subsequent sessions. Interestingly, several members admitted a time when peer pressure—not necessarily applied explicitly—caused them to cave and vote for or against a measure when their heart screamed the opposite. Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, has emerged as a reckonable force and at times a contrarian. A conservative anti-porn crusader, unlike some in his party, Weiler didn’t vote for Trump. As a rookie legislator, Weiler found space between his convictions and those held by the party’s fiery extremes that fixate on sexual purity. That year, Weiler cast a vote he now considers a mistake. “During my first session in 2012, I voted in favor of abstinence-only sex ed for public schools,” Weiler says. “My gut instinct was to vote against it, but I succumbed to pressure from a very far-right vocal element of my party. I hoped the governor would veto it, and he did. So the bill I voted for never became law. I learned a valuable lesson to trust my instincts and not be easily persuaded by the vocal minority.” Rep. Elizabeth Weight, one of a few Democrats to vote for a law last session to lower the DUI threshold to a .05 blood-alcohol level, says she can get behind lowering the blood-alcohol level for safety, but a state that is already tarnished with infamously backwater alcohol laws shouldn’t take the lead. “Utah has established itself as such a goofy place around alcohol,” she says. “We have a reputation for being so silly and childish around alcohol.” Weight sits on the transportation committee, and last year when she heard testimony from people who argued the stricter DUI limit would improve road safety, she was on board. But the potential blowback felt in the tourism industry has been worrisome. She

shares another concern voiced by opponents of the bill that a provision barring “novice drivers” from having any alcohol in their system would unfairly capture immigrants who have been skilled drivers for years but had just recently obtained a license in the U.S. Weight expects to see an amendment introduced this year to address that problem. She also voted for a bill last year that mandated the Salt Lake County mayor select a site for a new homeless shelter. She feels, however, that the bill was rushed through the Legislature. And the outpouring of emails she received from people who were opposed to the proposed locations had Weight secondguessing her vote. “As much as those are good ideas and I know that there’s kind of a plan in place, there had not been enough discussion,” she says. A legislator for more than two decades in the House and now Senate, Margaret Dayton, R-Orem, adheres to two guiding principles: support the U.S. Constitution and maintain the family as the fundamental unit of society. She feels her support for legislation that made voting easier and more convenient went against her commitment to the former. “Initially, I agreed with the idea of extending election time from a day to two weeks of early voting. And I also voted in favor of some of the vote-by-mail legislation,” she says. “In retrospect, however, I have some serious concerns with those changes, and I am reminded that the right to vote was bought for us at a serious cost. “Voting is a blood-bought freedom, and the changes I have supported have decreased the significance of an election day when people needed to make some effort and sacrifice to go to the polls. [The] inconvenience does not match the cost paid to vote, and there seems to be an increased opportunity for voter fraud and abuse of the system,” she continues. “It is also disappointing the changes have not generated an increase in voter preparation and participation.” Rep. Timothy Hawkes, R-Centerville, also muses on a time when he wanted to vote one way but ended up voicing the opposite.


CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

01.14 @ URBAN FLEA MARKET

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

“I had trusted the other council members to help with the gaps in the discussion. I have regretted this vote more than any other to date. After visiting the site, I saw that there was a sidewalk on the other side of the road and the side of the road which was being discussed had a high steep bank. Excavating the bank would make the bank unstable. To stabilize the bank would require a large excavation of the surrounding ground and would cost to the developer a large sum of money. “The sidewalk was installed and to my knowledge has never been used. The playground equipment offered by the developer would have added much to the community instead. I have learned that community prejudice can persuade votes and to research every argument on both sides of the discussion, with an open mind before voting,” he said. “It is hard to live with a bad decision after the fact.” For some, legislative logistics, such as where you need to be and when, are a part of the learning curve. Newcomer Karen Kwan, first seated in 2017, says the labyrinthine layout of the various buildings recently landed her in an embarrassing situation. “Just the other day, I went into a meeting that I had called. I was surprised that all the other people were already in the room and that they had a presentation up on the screen,” she says. “I’m thinking, ‘That’s great. They have initiative to get everything set up for me.’” It wasn’t until Kwan made her way to the front and recognized Reps. Ken Ivory and Brian Greene that she figured she was in the wrong room and had interrupted their meeting. “They were very gracious,” she says. “But me, beet red in the face, had to ask for directions to my meeting.” For at least one legislator, the only mistake she was willing to admit was her poor choice in footwear, considering the amount of dashing around she’d be required to do. “Not wearing so many high-heeled shoes,” says Rep. Karen Mayne, D-West Valley City. “Having to remove my shoes to run in the tunnel from Senate to House is a pain and puts holes in your hose!”

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

“The substance isn’t all that important, but a colleague made an eminently reasonable motion in a committee hearing, one I thought most members of the committee would support,” he remembers. But when it came time to vote, Hawkes watched as several committee members cast no votes. “When it came to me on a roll call vote—and after a series of ‘no’ votes—my head thought ‘yes,’ but my mouth said ‘no,’” he says. “I knew it was the wrong call the moment the words came out of my mouth. I felt awful, and at the time didn’t realize I could’ve corrected it before the vote went final.” He chalks it up to a rookie mistake and points out that his vote didn’t affect the outcome, but it stuck with him nonetheless and highlighted the real power of institutional forces and social pressures between legislators. Hawkes figures these forces aren’t all bad. They can forge compromise and “knock the rough edges off” bills that need workshopping. “But in that instance, it highlighted a personal failing,” he says. “I didn’t have quite the political courage or backbone I thought I had.” He says the experience has also shaped him to be a better public servant. “I made a commitment to vote my conscience over expediency when the choice is clear,” he says. “That commitment has been tested in the years since, and I’m happy to report that I’ve lived up to it. Lesson learned.” Several lawmakers held public office before their foray into the Legislature and the choices they made in other realms have informed their behavior in the statehouse. Logan Wilde regrets supporting a sidewalk to nowhere when he served on the Morgan County Council. At the time, that jurisdiction was in the middle of a development approval. “The agreement required the developer to put a sidewalk in which connected to nothing and went nowhere,” Wilde says. “The developer wanted to take the money to construct the sidewalk and put it into local park equipment for the community instead.” The council was reticent to amend the agreement, though it was getting flak from some in the community who said the area would eventually be developed and a sidewalk was important for school children who walked to a bus stop. The council wanted to avoid the appearance that it sided with the developer. “It wasn’t until later I visited the property to see what the developer’s concerns were,” he says.

Cupid’s Club Crawl FEBRUARY 10, 2018 SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH CRAWL: 5PM - 10PM AFTER PARTY: 10PM - CLOSE

CRAWL: 5PM - 10PM AFTER PARTY: 10PM - CLOSE @ CHAKRA LOUNGE

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 17

CUPIDS CLUB CRAWL

| CITY WEEKLY |

UPCOMING EVENTS


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

18 | JANUARY 18, 2018

the great

Behold the progressive advocate, the un-retirable woman, the taxcutter and the bottom feeder! By Ray Howze rhowze@cityweekly.net @rayhowze1 he state’s legislative session is right around the corner. Legislators will do their usual thing—propose bills, pass new ones and stall others—and you will likely hear about it if you’re following along in the news or on social media. For 45 days, you can find out a lot of what your elected leaders are doing day-to-day. That’s the easy part. But what about others roaming the Capitol for those 45 days? Yes, those people who don’t have a paneled office, who have to wear name tags and who file around talking to a representative here and a senator there. Lobbyists. Sometimes regarded as the elephant in the room, they’re the ones who have the ears of legislators and, sometimes, influence their decision making. Heck, with 104 elected legislators, the more than 400 registered lobbyists outnumber them by more than 4 to 1. So who’s really running the show up there? City Weekly spoke with a few lobbyists, past and present, about what they’re up to.

Claire Geddes’ name likely still brings chills to some legislators. Geddes, a longtime citizen lobbyist throughout the 1990s and 2000s, was usually seen at the Capitol during the regular session pestering legislators about whatever latest form of “bad government” (a bad bill), in her words, was working its way through the halls. While still involved in some bills here and there today, such as the debate over rooftop solar subsidies, Geddes, who says she’s retired “at least four times,” says what she did day in and day out during the session can still be done today. You just have to be strong in what you’re saying, she says, and don’t let power intimidate you. Geddes would usually spend her mornings appearing on radio shows telling the public about what was going on at the Capitol. Then she’d spend the rest of the day talking to legislators and speaking at hearings. All on her own dime. “Half the time they wouldn’t let you talk in a meeting,” Geddes says. “The whole secret is holding [legislator’s] feet to the fire because you’re so disadvantaged being a citizen lobbyist, you don’t have gifts to give them. That’s where [legislators] get the money to run—from all these corporate lobbyists.” Geddes, who formerly chaired United We Stand and Common Cause, says she remembers times legislators wouldn’t listen to her about a bill or what needed to be changed in a bill. She and others would then hold news conferences and talk to news media and, sure enough, she says, legislators would start to come around. While she wasn’t your typical corporate-backed lobbyist, Geddes says she did it to hold those in power accountable and to inform the public. “It’s important you be concise,” Geddes says about lobbying. “It’s a sick system up at the Legislature. They come up with like 1,000 bills and pass 700-800 of them, maybe. And they do that in 33 [working] days? There’s no way. That’s why they depend on these corporate lobbyists. The one constant is always lobbyists.”

A ER UTAH B ETT

Chase Thomas’ name might emerge in a number of causes throughout the year. Thomas works as policy and advocacy counsel for Alliance for a Better Utah, which recently, delivered a petition to the Utah County Commission calling on embattled Commissioner Greg Graves to resign. Unlike some lobbyists, Thomas and others with Alliance for a Better Utah aren’t on Capitol Hill telling legislators to vote one way or another, but are there to “advocate for balance in government and transparency,” he says. “We primarily try to communicate with the public about good policy and making sure the public knows what the balanced positions are and what they can do to help …” Thomas says. “We’re not going to legislators and telling them to vote for this bill or that bill. “We’re just really going to them and getting their positions on those bills and then communicating that to the public.” So don’t call Alliance for a Better Utah a lobbying group, Thomas cautions. The alliance prefers the term “progressive advocacy group.” One reason is the alliance’s work is not done during 45 days a year. They’re involved in things year-round, such as the Graves petition. When the session does start, though, Thomas will be up there throughout. As for this session, Thomas says the alliance is looking to support any bills that increase “shared prosperity for all Utahns— anything that increases access to affordable health care” as well as any bill that raises the minimum wage (which was tabled last year), to name a few.

Snake Charmer the


FROM THE

Depths

IT COULD HAPPEN

till with us? As you follow along this session, the drama will undoubtedly revolve around questions like, What group of Utahns is pushing for this measure? And, Who elected that guy? But mostly, you’ll want to know, Is that bill going to pass? City Weekly will do its damnedest to provide online dispatches from the Capitol, as well as full coverage for some of the more pressing issues. To pique your interest, here is a one-line preview of a sampling of bills that will be introduced this year.

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 19

• Acknowledge that humans are contributing to global warming and asks the government to commit to making energy decisions based on the best available science. • Encourage the use of shielded light fixtures on outdoor lights to cut down on light pollution. • Ask Congress to exempt Utah from the Antiquities Act (the law former President Barack Obama used to create Bears Ears National Monument).

• Eliminate a position in the attorney general’s office that was specifically delegated to root out complaints about obscenity and pornography. • Ban flying drones within a quarter mile of a prison. • Ban talking on the phone while driving unless using a hands-free device. • Clarify the definition of manslaughter to including one who aids in another’s suicide by providing the “physical means.” • Bump up the minimum wage to $10.25 per hour and then increase it again in 2022 to $12 per hour. • Protect someone from a civil suit if he or she tries to save a child from a locked vehicle so long as the rescue is done in good faith and authorities have been contacted prior. • Change the state fossil from the Allosaurus to the Utahraptor. • Require that when shelters euthanize animals, it is done by injecting them with sodium pentobarbital.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Royce Van Tassell doesn’t shy away from his label as a lobbyist. “…I’m a scum-sucking bottom-feeder lobbyist,” Van Tassell even wrote in a Salt Lake Tribune column last year in response to a piece from the newspaper’s Robert Gehrke. But that was his point, he told City Weekly ahead of this year’s session. Van Tassell says he wants to get his lobbying label out there in the public and for them to know who he is instead of hiding it. “In the public’s mind, a lot of people do regard lobbyists as scumsucking bottom-feeders,” he says. “That was the point of calling it out— public perception and the reality have nothing to do with each other.” Van Tassell, who once was a lobbyist for the Utah Taxpayers Association, now is executive director of the Utah Association of Public Charter Schools. He’s also registered with the Red Acre Center for Food and Agriculture, and Farm to Consumer Legal Defense Fund. “Lobbyists end up playing a vital role for everyone that’s involved in the political process,” Van Tassell says. “For example, in the Legislature, you have 104 people plus the governor that are going to weigh in on votes and sign hundreds of bills. “[They] are not and can’t be expected to be experts in all of the policy they’re going to be involved in.” The lobbyist says he hopes to see legislation to “create some different flavors of authorizers” for charter schools. An authorizer can be the Legislature, a local school board or the State Board of Education, for example, who permit charter schools to open and hold them accountable to state and federal education requirements. Van Tassell says he hopes the Legislature will consider adjusting how authorizers are treated so “you don’t have to play, ‘Mother, may I?’ other places.” Before the Legislature considers charter schools, it likely will discuss the passage of a revised education code early on in the session so other education bills can be drafted and work their way through committees. Until that happens, people such as Van Tassell will be in a holding pattern.

What to expect during the 2018 session.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Sen. Howard Stephenson, R-Draper, has been in the lobbying and legislating business for decades. He was first elected to the Legislature in 1993. Stephenson, though, had his start in lobbying and still works in that business simultaneously. He’s currently president of the Utah Taxpayers Association, one of the state’s prominent conservative lobbying groups, and has been with the association since 1977. You might even see his name in newspaper articles about cutting taxes. Despite wearing two hats, Stephenson says he’s been up front about his conflicts of interest. He said he also hasn’t supported everything the taxpayers association has backed in previous sessions. “What I told my delegates and voters first time I ran was, ‘First of all, I do have a conflict and you have to decide if that conflict is appropriate or not,’” Stephenson says. He, of course, hasn’t been the only lawmaker to work for business-backed lobbying groups while also serving as a state legislator, he points out. “At that time [when I was first elected], there were a couple dozen members of the Legislature that were public employees or school teachers and they were directly voting on the budgets that affected their livelihood—and there was no consequence for them,” Stephenson says. Stephenson’s major effort this session involves the tax bill that’s been discussed in committees for months. Some of those talks centered on what the federal government did with its tax cut and how it would effect Utahns. “It may just be separate bills,” Stephenson says. “We want to make sure both bodies [the Senate and House] support all the elements of the bills before we combine them into one bill. If we did that—and there’s no expectation or promise we would do that at this point—leadership has expressed they would prefer them to be in separate bills.”


We buy cars (801) 845-2423 creditrefresh.cityweekly.net

20 | JANUARY 18, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

CITY WEEKLY AUTOS

A BETTER WAY TO BUY & SELL YOUR NEXT VEHICLE! REGISTER ON WWW.CITYWEEKLYAUTOS.COM TO WIN $100 MAVERIK GAS CARD


Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

COURTESY UTAH OPERA

PAULYSHORE.COM

WILLIAM MORROW

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, JAN. 18-24, 2018

GAGE SKIDMORE VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

ESSENTIALS

the

Those who grew up in the ’90s might remember it as a simpler time—when Music Television actually played music, and when wearing plaid meant you were “cool.” An integral part of the decade’s entertainment scene was California native Pauly Shore, who took MTV and America’s youth by storm. Shore’s stand-up comedy caught the eye of the network, and by 1990 he had his own show, Totally Pauly. That led to film roles in Son in Law, Bio-Dome and the cult classic Encino Man. In 1991, his first comedy album, Future of America, was named Best Comedy Album by College Music Journalists. Although Shore has been MIA from the mainstream, his 2018 stand-up tour is making its way to Utah. But don’t call it a comeback: Shore has always had roots in stand-up. In a 1998 interview with the AV Club, he said, “The best part about stand-up is that you control everything. Period.” Last summer, Shore lampooned White House adviser Stephen Miller for Will Ferrell’s comedy website Funny or Die, then ended up producing Silverlake Vice Squad for the same outlet. Although we might know Shore for his stoner entertainment, there’s a serious side to the lovable party animal. Over the past decade, he has focused more on his stand-up and his podcast, the Pauly Shore Podcast Show, where he interviews everyone from Nick Kroll to Montel Williams. Don your plaid shirts, folks, and have a night of epic-ness with The Weasel. (Rachelle Fernandez) Pauly Shore @ Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., $25, sold out at press time, 18+; Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, 801-463-2909, Jan. 19-20, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $25, wiseguyscomedy.com

Granted, Kevin Smith has never aspired to be the originator of highbrow entertainment. And yet, in his own way, he’s become an undisputed cultural phenomenon. His 1995 low-budget movie debut Clerks—which he wrote, directed, co-produced and starred in—spawned the ongoing success of the odd and unlikely stoner duo Jay & Silent Bob, cult favorites whose popularity soared over a series of succeeding films. Smith later created the AMC series Comic Book Men, authored several popular books, and went on to produce a daily podcast, which, in turn, led to “ViewAskewniverse,” a virtual realm that his rabid fans quickly embraced as their own. So, it ought to be a treat to hear Smith share the insights, inspiration and eccentricities that make up his oft-askew universe, as he makes one of his fairly regular Sundance Film Festival-adjacent visits to Utah for live shows. However, the most pointed—and poignant—presentations revolve around a live performance of the popular podcast Jay & Silent Bob Get Old. A surprisingly touching look at the idea of maturity from an otherwise immature perspective, it’s an ideal blend of humor and humility. The next night, Jay—aka Jason Mewes— takes over. Here’s further opportunity to give Jay & Silent Bob the voice they deserve. (Lee Zimmerman) Kevin Smith @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Jan. 17-18, 7 p.m., $35 Jay & Silent Bob Get Old @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Jan. 17-18, 9:30 p.m., $35 Jason Mewes @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Jan. 20, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $20, wiseguyscomedy.com

For generations of high school students, Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick has been one of those agonizing academic rites of passage—a book everyone is expected to read and admire, despite being hard to digest at the young age most of us are required to read it. Yet at the center of all the dense material about knottying and setting sails, there’s one of the most iconic narratives ever written, perhaps the definitive American story of the destructive nature of obsession. The power of that emotional core emerges through a new operatic version of Moby-Dick by composer Jake Heggie and librettist Gene Scheer (who have collaborated previously on Three Decembers and It’s a Wonderful Life, among others). Set in 1820, it’s the familiar story of Captain Ahab (tenor Roger Honeywell), who has lost one of his legs to the great white whale Moby Dick, and is determined to have his revenge on the illusive creature. Along on the dangerous journey of the whaling boat Pequod are the harpooner Queequeg (bassbaritone Musa Ngqungwana) and first mate Starbuck (baritone David Adam Moore). The production pushes the Utah Opera behind-the-scenes crew to adapting the massive show to the Capitol Theatre stage, offering an impressive technical achievement. But even more than spectacle, it’s a reminder of the human part of this classic tale. “At its core, Moby-Dick is the story of a friendship,” the production’s director Kristine McIntyre, says in a press release. “It’s about how connection with another human being can literally save your life—and maybe your soul.” (SR) Utah Opera: Moby-Dick @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Jan. 20, 22, 24 & 26, 7:30 p.m.; Jan. 28, 2 p.m., $15-$100, usuo.org

Utah Opera: Moby-Dick

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 21

Few things last in the American consciousness. Yet, somehow, Nikki Giovanni has remained a vital figure in social and political life for more than 50 years, as poet, teacher, scholar and activist. From her emergence during the civil rights movement with works like “Nikki-Rosa” to her most recent poetry collection—2017’s A Good Cry: What We Learn from Tears and Laughter—Giovanni has mined her life to explore not just the African-American experience in some general sense, but deeply personal truths. Her voice has also been powerful in times of crisis, perhaps most memorably in April 2007, when a student at Virginia Tech University— where Giovanni is a faculty member—killed 32 people. At the memorial service for victims, Giovanni presented the convocation, and her closing poem became a kind of healing invocation for those grieving on that day: “We know we did nothing to deserve it. But neither does a child in Africa dying of AIDS. Neither do the invisible children walking the night awake to avoid being captured by a rogue army. Neither does the baby elephant watching his community being devastated for ivory. Neither does the Mexican child looking for fresh water ... We are Virginia Tech ... We will prevail.” Giovanni visits Salt Lake City to deliver the keynote lecture for a week of events commemorating the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. The event—which includes a 40-minute presentation, Q&A moderated by Lisa Bickmore and a book signing—is free to the public, but tickets are required and can be reserved online. (Scott Renshaw) Nikki Giovanni @ Salt Lake Community College Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3300, Jan. 18, 7 p.m., grandtheatrecompany.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

SATURDAY 1/20

Kevin Smith/Jason Mewes

FRIDAY 1/19

Pauly Shore

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FRIDAY 1/19

Nikki Giovanni

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THURSDAY 1/18


Together We sell tickets! Alone Mike Birbiglia talks about

check us first! low or no fees

upcoming shows slam dance

C

150 Jan 19 - jan 29 | treasure mtn. inn

sleep

$

28

fri, January 19 | metro music hall

krs-one

$

20 sun, January 21 | urban lounge

suzanne santo

$

BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

16

wed, January 24 | the state room

FOR MORE SHOWS & EVENTS GO TO

CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM

City Weekly: You’ve directed a couple of movies in recent years, which is obviously a highly collaborative process. What are the up-sides and down-sides of returning to a one-man show after being immersed in that kind of collaboration? Mike Birbiglia: “The first creative work I ever did was collaborative. In high school, I was in plays, and I would write and perform sketch comedy. In college, I was cast in the improv troupe. Like you’re saying, I’ve made these movies which are wildly collaborative and involved about 100 people each. With the solo shows, it’s still a collaboration, but with a much smaller group of people: my director Seth Barrish, my brother Joe and my wife Jen. So it still is collaborative, but it’s just a smaller collaboration. To be honest with you, there’s something about performing live on stage that can’t be replicated. There’s something about a single person on stage speaking to a large group of strangers that to me is so special, because it’s almost like an ageold art form. … There’s just something about it that’s so raw, unfiltered, uncensored and personal. Movies are immortal. Like, someone could watch these movies in 10, 15, 20, even 50 years from now. Live performance happens in the moment and then it disappears. The bond that is created between you and the audience is intangible, but it’s forever.”  How do you think the process of making movies has changed the way you think about doing live performances? “I think particularly the editing process of movies has made my brain more malleable to the possibilities of how plot could unfold in the context of a live show. I’ve worked with the same editor, Jeffrey Richmond, for both of my movies. He taught me so much about editing and storytelling, that I feel like that’s the thing I’ve brought most into my storytelling from my movies.”

EVAN SUNG

$

collaboration, performing live and his wide-ranging creative work.

omedian/filmmaker Mike Birbiglia visits Salt Lake City this week with his new one-man show, The New One. Ahead of his appearance, he responded to our questions via email.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | JANUARY 18, 2018

A&E

COMEDY

You’ll be in Salt Lake City during the Sundance Film Festival week, where you premiered Sleepwalk With Me in 2012. What do you remember most about that experience? “I think the thing I remember most is that almost half of the cast and crew of the movie showed up to the premiere and they actually came on stage after the movie. … It was this really beautiful culmination of this long arduous process, in a place where I feel like all of us on stage had dreamed of having a movie premiere. When you’re starting off as a fan of independent film, and you’re thinking about the idea that you might make an independent film one day, Sundance is sort of the dream place where you’d want it to premiere, so when you’re actually living it, it’s a very surreal thing.” You’ve mentioned in other interviews how much a tour of one of these shows is a process of revising and refining from night to night. Does that perfectionist streak make it harder to look at your movies or specials, where once they’re out in the world, that’s the final version? “I don’t really watch the old ones too often for that reason. I recently did a podcast called  The Old Ones where I listened to my old albums and talked about them with an old friend. My observation about the experience is that you look at the old albums almost like you look at a mosquito in amber. That was a moment in time, and that was a document of how you felt in that moment, and the story you wanted to tell in that moment and, of course, you never want to tell that same story in that same

Mike Birbiglia

way again, because as people we’re always changing. … Our aesthetic is always evolving.”

Is it fair to say that the title of The New One might be at least in part an oblique reference to the new addition to your family [his daughter, Oona, born in 2015]? “I think it’s safe to say that ‘the new one’ is a quadruple entendre, or even a sextuple entendre. I don’t even know if that’s a word.”

If you think back on whatever dreams you had for a comedy career nearly 20 years ago when you started, how close is where you are now to what that looked like? “I think when you start out in anything, you have a sense of what you think is good, and how you could go about making that thing. At a certain point, you get 10, 15, 20 years into it, and you realize that what you thought was good wasn’t as good as you thought, and that what you created early on wasn’t nearly as good as you thought. It just forces you to try harder, and strive for more.” CW

MIKE BIRBIGLIA: THE NEW ONE

Kingsbury Hall 1375 Presidents Circle 801-581-7100 Jan. 20, 7 p.m. $25-$40 tickets.utah.edu


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 23


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

24 | JANUARY 18, 2018

more

ESSENTIALS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Artist Maura Allen presents multimedia works juxtaposing iconic silhouettes with screen-printed layers to provide insight into the legend of the America West (“Rio Grande” is pictured) as part of Parallel, a joint exhibition with Nina Tichava, at Gallery MAR (436 Main, Park City, 435-649-3001), Friday, Jan. 19, 6-9 p.m., including artist reception.

Join us for Gallery Stroll January 19 6-9pm at Michael Berry Custom Framing 163 E Broadway, SLC

PERFORMANCE

Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

THEATER

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Aida Hale Center Theater, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Jan. 20, times vary, hct.org Bright Star Pioneer Theater Co., 300 S. 1400 East, through Jan. 27, times vary, pioneertheatre.org Cash on Delivery Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through March 17, dates and times vary, hct.org Dear Ruth Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Feb. 3, haletheater.org Moby-Dick Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Jan. 20-Jan. 28, times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 21) The Real Thing Westminster College Dumke Black Box, 1840 S. 1300 East, through Jan. 21, dates and times vary, pinnacleactingcompany.org Romeo & Juliet Scera Center for the Arts, 745 S. State, Orem, through Jan. 20, scera.org Romeo et Juliette Loveland Performing Arts Center at Heritage School, 5600 Heritage School Drive, Provo, Jan. 18-22, 7:30 p.m., uvu.edu Stag’s Leap Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Jan. 29, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, Jan. 19-Feb. 3, 2 & 7:30 p.m., empresstheatre.com

DANCE

In Accord Sorensen Art & Education Complex, 1721 Campus Center Drive, Jan. 19-20, 5:30 & 7:30 p.m., tannerdance.utah.edu

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Aspen Winds Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., excellenceconcerts.org NOVA Chamber Music Series Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Jan. 21, 3 p.m., novaslc.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Jay and Silent Bob Wiseguys Ogden, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 18-19, 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 21) Kevin Smith Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 18-19, 7 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 21) Mike Birbiglia: The New One Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Jan. 20., 7 p.m., tickets.utah.edu (see p. 22) Pauly Shore Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., 21+; Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Jan 19-20, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 21) Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Jan. 19-20, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Jim Herrington: The Climbers The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Jan. 18., 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Melissa Hartwig: The Whole 30 Day by Day The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Jan. 19, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com A Conversation with Jacqueline Woodson Marriott Library, South Campus Drive, Jan. 23, noon, kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande

Sundance Film Festival 2018 Park City Main Street, Jan 18-28, sundance.org

TALKS & LECTURES

Nikki Giovanni Grand Theatre 1575 S. State, Jan. 18, 7 p.m., grandtheatrecompany.com (see p. 21) Photojournalism: Ethics, Imagery, and Understanding Our World Gore School of Business Auditorium, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, 801-832-3270, Jan. 23, 7 p.m., utahdiplomacy.org Title IX: What You Should Know Salt Lake Community College, 4600 S. Redwood Road, 801-957-7522, Jan. 23, 3 p.m.-4 p.m., slcc.edu

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Jan. 27, utahmoca.org Andrew Alba: Spring and All Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Chauncey Secrist: Icons: Assemblages Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through March 6, slcpl.org Christine Kende Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Feb. 10, slcpl.org Heydar Rasoulpour Art Access Gallery II, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, Jan. 19-Feb. 9, accessart.org Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through March 11, umfa.utah.edu Katie Paterson: salt 13 Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through May 20, umfa.utah.edu Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Lawrence Magana: Our Native Color DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-5948632, through Feb. 17, slcpl.org Leslie Randolph: Fire Paintings and MacroGalleries Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Feb. 16, slcpl.org Lizzie Määtälä and Jared Steffensen: Woula Coulda Shoulda Nox Contemporary Gallery, 440 S. 400 West, Ste. H, through Feb. 9, facebook.com/nox-contemporary Lucy Peterson Watkins: Fiber Art Exhibit Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Feb. 25, redbuttegarden.org Miroslava K. Vomela: Vivid Image-ination Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801594-8651, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org Maura Allen and Nina Tichava: Parallel Gallery MAR, 436 Main, Park City, Jan. 19, 6-9 p.m., gallerymar.com (see above left) Simon Blundell: Fragmentation and Language Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801524-8200, through Feb. 23, slcpl.org Square One: Helper Artists of Utah Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Feb. 23, saltlakearts.org Tim Peterson: A Risk Taker Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 18, slcpl.org Truth and Consequences Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, Jan. 19-Feb. 9, accessart.org The Video Game Show Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through Feb. 4, urbanartsgallery.org


Lake Effect quenches downtown Salt Lake’s thirst for hip style. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Sunday 11 a.m.-1 a.m. Best bet: Half-price tacos for lunch Can’t miss: Sipping absinthe while lounging in a velvet chair

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 25

buffs will note that Lake Effect occupies the onetime Hotel Victor saloon built in 1910. Bar veteran Nick Chachas of Gracie’s fame has breathed new, dark life into the space, cultivating a level of style

| CITY WEEKLY |

From a historical and aesthetic standpoint, Lake Effect is the restaurant version of a vampire straight out of an Anne Rice novel—a reborn, revitalized and dangerously sexy version of its past self. Local history

it’s a hell of a deal. I kicked off my lunchtime visit with a combination of a puerco and a squash taco, both of which arrived overflowing with yummy goodness. The pork belly was a bit charred, making it flounder. But it made its veggie companion shine with winter squash and black beans playing epicurean hopscotch, highlighting each other’s natural sweetness. While the tomatillolime salsa brought me to my knees, I missed the acidity of the pickled melon, which seemed to be MIA despite the menu’s description. The bottom line: Despite a few minor inconsistencies, Lake Effect is the type of establishment that considerably elevates downtown Salt Lake’s hip quotient. Come for the drinks, the fantastic service and the luscious atmosphere. Be warned, however—it’s a place that can easily seduce you to the dark side. CW

I

t’s ironic that when most people go out to eat, physical nourishment is rarely their top priority. Eating in a restaurant is one of the few experiences that engages every one of our senses, and it has made atmosphere junkies out of all of us. This socio-cultural phenomenon urges us to scour online menus and Instagram feeds for promising destinations and is gleefully embraced by Lake Effect (155 W. 200 South, 801-532-2068, lakeeffectslc.com), the hybridization of an über-hip watering hole and an upscale Latinfusion eatery.

fusion can be measured, so that’s where I started. It arrives beautifully plated with two bedsheet-sized housemade tortillas and a cheerful pop of red from some mindfully placed cherry tomatoes, but the portion size was surprisingly small considering the tortillas’ sheer surface area. The pork was cooked to perfection, but the dish’s flavor profile was a bit underdeveloped—maybe it was the sizable dollop of crema fresca that drowned everything else out. I was intrigued to try the nopales and Jack skillet ($10) because I had yet to try cooked cactus pads, which are near-mythical in Latin American cuisine. As a whole, this appetizer is a nice evolution of the ubiquitous chips and queso—the inclusion of a thick layer of Oaxaca cheese on top of the gooey pile of Jack and chopped nopales offered up some textural complexity that you don’t often get in a starter dish. If you’re craving tacos, you shouldn’t overlook the lunch specials, which offer half-off any taco on the menu. Considering you get two tacos and a side for $12,

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ENRIQUELIMÓN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Special Effect

that transcends the abilities of mere mortals. Every square inch of Lake Effect is positively dripping with frontier-goth style—exposed brick, black velvet wallpaper, chandeliers made from motorcycle chains and an aristocratic abundance of highbacked chairs. To complete its air of effortless chic, the space comes equipped with a stage where diners can enjoy live blues on Monday nights. It’s a design arsenal that would cause most places to buckle and implode, but Lake Effect wields it with all the confidence of a jetsetting countess. In the mood to wet your whistle? The kilometer-long cocktail list will do the trick. On it, is everything from in-house creations to classics such as a crème de violette-infused Arsenic & Old Lace ($11) and killer caipirinhas ($10), to non-ironic takes on the gin-tastic Bee’s Knees ($8) and the Don Q rum, Jäger and pineapple-infused Huntsman ($12). Since much of the focus here is on swanky drinks and live music, the food menu is not without a few hiccups. Chile verde ($18) is the yardstick by which most Latin-American


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

26 | JANUARY 18, 2018

FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER

TIFFANY GLEESON

@captainspringer

Award Winning Donuts

Baking Hive Classes

Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

Anyone who has visited Millcreek’s Baking Hive (3362 S. 2300 East, bakinghive.com) knows that the only thing owner/operator Elisa Barber loves more than baking, is teaching others. The cozy bakery has been showing aspiring bakers the ropes since it opened in 2014, and Barber recently announced the winter schedule for the Hive’s adult baking classes. Sessions start Jan. 25 and range from basic baking to fondant-making. Each class is $60. As someone with a longtime affection for the Baking Hive’s Irish chocolate cake, I can personally vouch for the instructors’ tasty talents.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

32nd Annual Hof Germanfest

For those looking for an all-ages version of Oktoberfest, the Sneddon Hof Germanfest, happening on Jan. 20, is here to tickle your nonalcoholic fancy. The festival celebrates Ogden’s relationship to Hof, its sister city in Bavaria, and polkas its way through the Golden Spike Event Center (1000 N. 1200 West, Ogden, goldenspikeeventcenter. com), where attendees can browse German craft booths and take yodeling lessons. Food will be available from local vendors like Siegfried’s Deli, Vosen’s Bread Paradise and Nutcracker Sweets. Consider taking a yodeling class while swallowing a bratwurst. Who needs beer to make bad decisions?

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

Under Current Liqueur Class

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

The secret to mixing a unique drink comes from a keenly curated library of liqueurs. So says the bar-management duo of Amy Eldredge and Ryan Manning from Under Current Bar (279 E. 300 South, undercurrentbar.com). They’ve scheduled an educational event to teach attendees about liqueurs like Skip Rock raspberry, Luxardo Maraschino and Pierre Ferrand dry Curacao as well as how they can be used to add fancy flourishes to cocktails. The class is on Jan. 27 from 2-4 p.m., and spots can be reserved for $55. Call 801-574-2556 or email info@undercurrentbar.com to RSVP. Quote of the Week: “Techniques are not the most difficult to teach. The attitudes chefs take are much more important.” —Alain Ducasse

Food matters tips: comments@cityweekly.net

On our website FIVEALLS.COM

THE

OR CALL US AT

801.582.1400 RESTAURANT

HOURS

Thursday 6:00pm Friday- Saturday 5:30pm

1458 South Foothill Drive


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 27


| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

28 | JANUARY 18, 2018

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 29


30 | JANUARY 18, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |


Magic in Ogden

Talisman keeps things interesting up north. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

F

that’s on the drier side. If it were any sweeter, I think it would be less like a session. Luckily, the blend here is good—and it’s available at most grocery stores. Uplifted: Ladies, if the label’s image doesn’t draw you in, you’re probably serving your mission. This big bottle pours reddish brown with a tightly foamed, tan, short-lived head that leaves some lacing. The nose has dark roasted malts, nuts, molasses and some bitter chocolate. The taste starts with roasted malts, chocolate and toffee, but once the yeast gets into the mix, doses of faint dark fruits and thin coffee begin to emerge. At the end, you’re greeted

with just a hint of smoke that is sweet from the chewy toffee remaining from the first sip. It finishes slightly malty and fruity. Overall: For a 4 percent ABV beer, this has more body than I would have thought. The texture is silky and just creamy enough to convince you it’s much bolder. Uplifted is a pleasant drinking experience that brings you back to the time of simple Scottish ales. Also available at most grocery stores. Talisman’s lineup is far from usual. Check these out if you’re looking to get out of your rut. Hell, they’re just a trip to your local beer aisle away. As always, cheers! CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

or well over a decade, if you wanted an Ogden-made craft beer, you had only one option: Roosters Brewing Co. Now, northern Utah has an alternative brewery called Talisman. Head brewer and owner Dusty Williams strives to carry on Old World traditions, while mixing in today’s edgier beer-nerd attitudes. Please don’t drool on the pages as you read this summary of some of their offerings. Udder Chaos: Man, I love milk stout. It’s right behind the tried-and-true vanilla porter in my magical beer playbook. These get me to my happy place tout-suite. This relatively new brew from Talisman pours an almost black color, with a solid finger of fluffy, dark tan head. From about six inches away, I’m already starting to get notes of

chocolate, some dark roasted malt and hints of coffee. Initially, the flavors show a nice, almost-burnt roasted malt character, with some chocolate and a familiar Saturday morning cartoon sweetness. However, as the beer warms, the flavors become much more integrated, and any sense of harsh char disappears. The finish is long; it begins mid palate as the roasted malt recedes, allowing the sweetness and chocolate to emerge. Overall: This is a nicely drinkable milk stout that I’ll be happy to have again. I also think that this beer would pair nicely with a high-end blue veined cheese, like a Stilton or some Gorgonzola. You can find Udder Chaos at most grocery stores. Killer Glove Blood Orange: This beer looks like an unfiltered hefeweizen, full of yellowish amber hues. The nose is rich with perfumey blood orange, with a good showing of toasted wheat. Along with these aromas come some background notes with strong lemon and a bit of grapefruit. The taste begins rather dry, with a wheat bread flavor accompanying a little bit of an orange sweetness. The orange increases ever so slightly, but remains quite light overall to the middle of the taste. Along with these flavors comes some yeast and light pepper, plus a bit of herb. The orange increases slightly toward the very end and leaves you with a dry orange wheat taste that lingers on the tongue. Overall: A decent orange wheat brew

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 31


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

32 | JANUARY 18, 2018

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

A sample of our critic’s reviews

JAN 20TH

better off with the blues

JAN 26TH

tony holiday

JAN 27TH

red desert ramblers

Makanmakan

Mon.-Fri. 5pm-10pm Sat.-Sun. 11am-10pm

9460 S Union Square #106, Sandy 801-432-8736

This new Sandy restaurant celebrates Asian street food by preparing a cultural mixtape of dishes from all over the continent. A heaping bowl of laksa ($10.55)—a curry-based soup, playing with a heartier, almost stew-like texture—is a great place to start; the rice noodles soak up every ounce of the savory coconut flavor, which also pairs nicely with the roast chicken and shrimp. Perhaps the most intriguing item on the menu is gulai kambing ($11.25), which consists of yellow curry served with bone-in chunks of goat meat. The goat’s rich, slightly gamey flavor works well with curry, though I was hoping for a little more heat. While the entrées are solid, the starter items transport the diner to a Singaporean market. The pictured roti canai ($4.75) is a plate of folded, flat-top fired flatbread accompanied by a small bowl of luxurious curried chicken. It’s in the same vein as naan, but its crispy exterior texture sets it apart. With a clever design strategy and a thoughtfully crafted menu, Makanmakan is a welcome addition to Sandy’s gastronomic ecosystem, where hardcore foodies and casual diners can bond over well-cooked goat meat. Reviewed Dec. 21. 33 E. 11400 South, Sandy, 801-251-0967, makanmakansandy.com

FAST CASUAL DINING STORE 2110 w. No. Temple

★★★★★

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

REVIEW BITES

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

nomad-eatery.com

801.938.9629

Stay warm with your friends at 20 W. 200 S. SLC | (801) 355-3891


coffee, crepes & a mic

sustain yourself!

3231 S. 9 0 0 E. 8 0 1 - 466-327 3 7am-1am / 7 Days A Week OPEN MIC EVERY SUN @ 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

get one monday - friday only

equal or lesser value w/ this ad expires 02.28.18

54 w. 1700 s. M-F 7:30am-3pm Sat/Sun 7:30am-4pm

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 33

free!

| CITY WEEKLY |

Buy one entree


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

34 | JANUARY 18, 2018

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

Breakfast

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Lunch & Dinner

Copper Kitchen

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

The newest venture from Ryan Lowder (owner/chef of downtown’s Copper Onion and Copper Common) is in the shiny new Holladay Village Plaza alongside new iterations of other locally owned restaurants and retail shops. Copper Kitchen in Salt Lake City has a boisterous brasserie feel to it—a big, bustling eatery featuring the type of cuisine that has garnered so many fans of Lowder’s other restaurants: steak frites, braised lamb shank, duck confit croquettes, beef bourguignon and noodles and lots more. 4640 S. 2300 East, 385-237-3159, copperkitchenslc.com

OMELETTES | PANCAKES GREEK SPECIALTIES

HOMEMADE SOUP GREEK SPECIALS GREEK SALADS HOT OR COLD SANDWICHES | KABOBS PASTA | FISH STEAKS | CHOPS GREEK PLATTERS & GREEK DESSERTS

Beer & Wine EAT MORE

LAMB

Rugged Grounds

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

Not only is this small, hip coffee shop located in Provo, it’s also open on Sundays—a rarity in Utah County. Relax among its reclaimed-wood setting with a fresh cup of coffee, tea or local kombucha or take your refreshment to the outside counter and scope out Provo’s upand-coming industrial district. The train yard nearby might be booming away, but the atmosphere at Rugged Grounds is quiet and comfortable. You might even catch some live music in the afternoons. If you feel a bit peckish, you can tuck into some avocado toast or, true to this college town’s nature, a bowl of cereal or instant noodles. 156 W. 500 South, Provo, 385-3093003, ruggedgrounds.com

THE OTHER PLACE

RESTAURANT

Open 7 days a week

MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH | 521-6567

From Scratch

Offering authentic Italian cuisine in a modern, downtown atmosphere, all of this restaurant’s pies and pastas are made—you guessed it—from scratch. Start your meal off with the braised short rib, which comes with horseradish and a honey au jus. As for pizza, try the fennel sausage, with green and red onions, or go with the Whiteout, which has three types of cheese and roasted garlic. If you’re not in the mood for pizza, the tasty signature burger is topped with shoestring onions and melted smoked cheddar cheese. You can wash it all down with an Italian soda. 62 E. Gallivan Ave., Salt Lake City, 801-961-9000, fromscratchslc.com SALT LAKE'S AWARD WINNING INDIAN CUISINE since 1990

RESERVE OUR BANQUET HALL FOR YOUR EVENT!

JOIN US FOR DINNER!!! 7 DayS a wEEk LUNch BUFFEt mON-Sat JUST 3 MIN from Downtown! 1659 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City (inside the RAMADA INN) PLENTY OF FREE PARKING

801-363-7555 - We Deliver!

Starofindiaonline.com

A

U TA H

ORIGINAL

SINCE

1968

ita l ia n v il l a ge sl c . c o m

5370 S. 900 E. 8 0 1 . 2 6 6 . 4 1 8 2

M O N - T H U 1 1 a - 1 1 p F R I - S AT 1 1 a - 1 2 a S U N 3 p- 1 0 p


FILM REVIEW

Abdication of Power

CINEMA

Phantom Thread makes a great actor’s farewell a tale of relationship control. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

FOCUS FEATURES

I

Vicky Krieps and Daniel Day-Lewis in Phantom Thread. and body language, as Alma gradually begins to assert herself and finally understand what it is she might be able to give Reynolds that nobody else has. It’s a tale of people not simply battling for the upper hand, but coming to understand when and why they might not want the upper hand. Anderson certainly gives everything he has as a filmmaker to Phantom Thread, including gathering collaborators like composer Jonny Greenwood and costume designer Mark Bridges to fill out this world with lush sonic and visual textures. But the greatest gift he offers here is understanding that he has written a story where the focus needs to be on these two central performances—always equal partners in the story, even when dynamic between the characters is far from equal. Phantom Thread doesn’t send Daniel Day-Lewis out by giving him A Daniel Day-Lewis Movie. It offers us a chance to see how much talent it requires to play a moment when someone’s voluntary bite of food turns into a surrender. CW

O B O R Y N I H S G BI

T!

News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

PHANTOM THREAD

| CITY WEEKLY |

BBBB Daniel Day-Lewis Vicky Krieps Lesley Manville R

PAIRS WITH Another Year (2010) Jim Broadbent Lesley Manville PG-13

Lincoln (2012) Daniel Day-Lewis Sally Field PG-13

Yves Saint Laurent (2014) Pierre Niney Guillaume Gallienne R

exclusively on cityweekly.net

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 35

There Will Be Blood (2007) Daniel Day-Lewis Paul Dano R

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Day-Lewis, for his part, does exactly what is demanded of the role in these early scenes, capturing Reynolds’ obvious sophistication and charm along with the dismissive way he treats every woman in his life except Cyril (played by Manville with a steely sense of her own importance to her brother). Like all of the greatest actors, he does more with a gesture—or with a frustrated exhale—than other actors can do with a monologue, building the sense of Reynolds as a petty tyrant who happens also to be talented. If this is indeed Day-Lewis’ farewell performance, it’s another masterwork. And it seems perhaps even more masterful once the true nature of his relationship with Alma fully unfolds. Anderson drops plenty of hints regarding what Reynolds is really looking for in a wife and a partner, to the point that, in hindsight, Phantom Thread might seem to reduce the character to one big “issue” in need of resolution. But the interaction between Reynolds and Alma keeps getting more and more complicated, until it becomes clear that the Reynolds Woodcock we see at the beginning of the movie isn’t really the Reynolds Woodcock he wants to be. What Anderson constructs, then, isn’t simply a showpiece for the greatest actor of his generation to stand astride a mountain and let us gaze upon his majesty. Phantom Thread is about power within a relationship, and as such it absolutely demands a performance that can stand up to Day-Lewis. Krieps does phenomenal work with her eyes

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

t was probably inevitable that the news of Daniel Day-Lewis’ retirement from acting—making Phantom Thread possibly his last screen performance— would dominate the pre-release conversation about the movie. The threetime Oscar-winner’s reunion with writer/ director Paul Thomas Anderson, who oversaw Day-Lewis’ towering work in There Will Be Blood, might add even more baggage to the assumptions a viewer could have coming in. The commanding presence of Day-Lewis would surely be part of another tale of a powerful man who manipulates everyone around him to get what he wants. At the outset of Phantom Thread, that preconception seems to be justified. Day-Lewis plays Reynolds Woodcock, a successful fashion designer in 1950s London who does the creative work while leaving the business side to his sister, Cyril (Lesley Manville). A fastidious serial monogamist, Reynolds has just moved on from his last live-in muse when he meets Alma (Vicky Krieps), a diner waitress. The two soon become lovers, whereupon Alma discovers just how particular Reynolds is about the way he wants his world organized. Thus begins what superficially appears to be the latest in film history’s long tradition of Portraits of the Artist as a Complete Asshole. Krieps plays Alma with an initial passivity and uncertainty about how to please the seemingly impossible-to-please Reynolds, and Anderson employs a wonderful sound design to emphasize every scrape of a breakfast plate that irritates Reynolds’ desire for a silent start to his day. He exercises his power over her by having her strip to her slip at the very beginning of their relationship, adding to the sense that she’s simply a paper doll there to help inspire Reynolds in his work.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | JANUARY 18, 2018

CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. 12 STRONG BBB At a time when every action seems to be painted in moral shades of gray, here’s a pretty unabashed tale of military hero-worship, executed about as effectively as one could hope. This fact-based story relates the mission of Task Force Dagger, an Army Special Ops team of a dozen men—led by Capt. Mitch Nelson (Chris Hemsworth)—assigned to embed with anti-Taliban Afghan militia to help take down Al Qaeda in the weeks after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The script introduces several bits of character drama—Nelson’s inexperience in the field; promises to the family that they’ll return home safe—and finds a reasonably solid anchor in the uneasy relationship between Nelson and the Afghan warlord (Navid Negahban) guiding American troops. But it’s really all about the battlefield material, captured by first-time feature director Nicolai Fuglsig with crisp efficiency, even when trying to maintain the geography of multiple venues during the same battle. Most of the soldiers remain anonymous grunts— even Michael Peña is woefully underutilized—yet there’s still something undeniably stirring about watching outmanned Americans charge against missile fire while they’re on horseback. Opens Jan. 19 at theaters valleywide. (R)—Scott Renshaw DEN OF THIEVES [not yet reviewed] A law enforcement team tries to stop a successful bank-robbery crew from pulling off its biggest heist ever. Opens Jan. 19 at theaters valleywide. (R) FOREVER MY GIRL [not yet reviewed] A country music star (Alex Roe) returns to his hometown and the first love he left behind. Opens Jan. 19 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

HAPPY END BB If you didn’t know this was a Michael Haneke film, you might suspect it was the art-house equivalent of a genre parody of Michael Haneke films—and that’s not a compliment. The director fixes his chilly gaze on the upper-class Laurent family: Anne (Isabelle Huppert), who runs the family construction business; patriarch Georges (Jean-Louis Trintignant), who’s experiencing symptoms of dementia; Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz), Anne’s brother, who takes in Eve (Fantine Harduin), his 12-year-old daughter from his first marriage, after her mother overdoses; and Pierre (Franz Rogowski), Anne’s black-sheep son. They’re all unhappy for various reasons, and Haneke rarely makes an attempt to pull the stories together for a larger point more profound than “these people are terrible.” Worse still, while he can make individual moments unsettling, here they feel like familiar spins on bits he’s used to better effect in earlier movies: sociopathic young people; observing violence from a distance; exploring dehumanizing technology. Those who dismissed most of his other movies as virtuosity mired in misanthropy don’t need to rewrite their theses for this one. Opens Jan. 19 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR HOSTILES B.5 There’s almost no way to salvage a movie that feels doomed by its bluntly ironic title: Who are the real hostiles, after all? In 1892 New Mexico, U.S. Cavalry Capt. Joe Blocker (Christian Bale) is assigned a task that disgusts him: escorting terminally ill Cheyenne chief Yellow Hawk (Wes Studi) and his family to ancestral land in Montana as a PR stunt, though Blocker has a dark history with Yellow Hawk. The journey is further complicated when Blocker’s party finds a homesteader (Rosamund Pike) whose family has been slaughtered by Comanche, then adds the task of transporting a convicted murderer (Ben Foster), so the narrative is busy with hair-trigger antagonisms. While Scott Foster directs some the more violent scenes with an effective kinetic urgency, every Very Important Lesson and eventual rapprochement is telegraphed from the outset, with loyalties shifting on a dime, and Bale doing most of his acting with his mustache. Revisionist

Westerns are all well and good, but this one needed a lot more revision. Opens Jan. 19 at theaters valleywide. (R)—SR PHANTOM THREAD BBBB See review on p. 35. Opens Jan. 19 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL At various venues in Park City, Salt Lake City and Sundance Resort, Jan. 18-28. (NR) SLAMDANCE FILM FESTIVAL At Treasure Mountain Inn, Park City, Jan. 19-26. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME BBBB The concept of “ripeness” permeates this gorgeous adaptation of André Aciman’s novel. In summer 1983 in Northern Italy, 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet), the precocious son of a classics scholar (Michael Stuhlbarg), develops a relationship with Oliver (Armie Hammer), the 20-something summer research assistant to Elio’s father. In many ways there’s a familiar comingof-age structure to the story, but the narrative complicates matters not just because it’s a gay romance, but by layering the characters’ outsider sensibility by having them be Jews in Italy, and by giving Elio’s family openly gay friends and a tolerant approach to their son’s explorations. Director Luca Guadagnino emphasizes the fruit trees and buzzing insects of his setting, creating an entire fertile world into which Elio—stunningly portrayed by Chalamet—begins to emerge as an adult, where everything, including emotion, is exploding into bloom. (R)—SR

PADDINGTON 2 BBBB There’s such kindness and humanity here, though that seems too small a word for the small, furry ursine who has such a positive effect on everyone merely by expecting the best from them. Returning writer-director Paul King achieves this stunning sweetness while again avoiding the syrupy sanctimony that drags down so many kid-friendly movies. This time, the young bear (Ben Whishaw) is framed for a theft, and his adopted human mother (Sally Hawkins) leads the investigation to clear his name; washedup actor Phoenix Buchanan (Hugh Grant) is a prime suspect. Meanwhile, Paddington spreads marmalade-fueled exuberance behind bars, though grumpy prison chef Knuckles McGinty (Brendan Gleeson) proves challenging. Adventure! Daring escapes! Rescues! A treasure hunt! A train chase! Afternoon tea! Not a moment here isn’t an enrapturing bear hug of snuggly, heartwarming delight. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson

more than just movies at brewvies FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: JANUARY 19TH - JANUARY 25TH

JUMANJI

12 STRONG

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 37


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

38 | JANUARY 18, 2018

CONCERT PREVIEW

Movie Music

MUSIC

to get your groove on at 4760 S 900 E, SLC How Sundance-affiliated events. 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 1/17

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 1/18 Reggae at the Royal

$

jungle man sam newborn slaves

5

amfs & long islands

1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 1/19

Live Music

neal middleton and friends

featuring members of royal bliss spencer nielson & Rust saturday 1/20

Live Music

Citizen hypocrisy Wicked notions • citizen soldier Carlos vitanen sunday

jersey giveaways conference championshps

great food & drink specials Tuesday 1/16

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

retro riot dance party featuring dj jason lowe

coming soon 1/26 2/3

W/ the wayne hoskins band huge superbowl party jersey giveaways, food & drink specials & prizes!

2/4

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

Y

ou might think that the Sundance Film Festival is a film festival—but there’s always plenty of music events happening each year. That’s because, while sitting in a darkened theater and losing yourself in a well-made film is positively sublime, the people in the seats next to you get super pissed if you try to party during the movie. There needs to be someplace to raise hell, especially during a chilly January in Park City. And, of course, somebody needs to point out the importance of music in celluloid—namely, how it provides essential emotional cues. Here are City Weekly’s picks for Sundance music events, musically inclined screenings, plus some other stuff.

The King

Forty years after the death of Elvis Presley, the new film from two-time Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Prize winner Eugene Jarecki takes the King’s 1963 Rolls-Royce on a musical road trip across the country. From the deep South to New York, Las Vegas and beyond, a tapestry of luminaries and unknown Americans join the journey, expressing themselves in words and song. With his singular cinematic brilliance, Jarecki paints a penetrating portrait of a nation in crisis and a metaphoric connection between Elvis and America. For just as a country boy lost his authenticity and became a king, so, too, his country lost her democracy and became an empire. One died on the toilet; the other now faces an uncertain future under the closest thing she’s ever had to an emperor. The Sundance Film Festival presents The King’s North American premiere; an earlier version of the film premiered internationally at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival. Following the screening, executive producer Steven Soderbergh will join Jarecki to discuss innovative strategies for the film’s 2018 release. MARC Theater, 1200 Little Kate Road, Park City, Thursday, Jan. 25, 5:30 p.m.

Music Publisher Events

Do you love a good film score? How about a hot soundtrack? You have music supervisors and composers to thank for both. And, you know, the music publishers that license the music to the productions. ASCAP and BMI are the two largest of these organizations and each is hosting events this year. The Sundance ASCAP Music Café (ascap.com/sundance) is a perennial favorite, staging daily concerts at the Rich Haines Gallery (751 Main) Jan. 19-25. This year marks its 20th anniversary, and performers include Madison Cunningham, Dark Rooms, Brett Dennen, Elliot Root, Michael Franti, Ethan Gruska, Mr. Hudson, Ruelle, Ben Dickey & Charlie Sextion, Siedah Garrett and many more. BMI has two events: The BMI Snowball (bmi.com/sundance) happens at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 23 at The Shop (1167 Woodside Ave.) and features performances by actress/producer/singer/writer Rita Wilson, pop singer-songwriter Morgan Saint, composer/singersongwriter Craig Wedren (of post-rockers Shudder to Think) who’s promoting director David Wain’s National Lampoon documentary, A Futile and Stupid Gesture. BMI also has a 20th anniversary event with the composer/director roundtable “Music & Film: The Creative Process” on Sunday, Jan. 21 at The Shop (1167 Woodside Ave.) from 2-4 p.m. Doreen Ringer-Ross, BMI’s vice president of film, TV and visual media relations, moderates a panel including Wedren, Director of the Sundance Institute Film

COURTESY BMI

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

Craig Wedren Music Program Peter Golub, director Lauren Greenfield (Generation Wealth), composer Sam Bisbee and more. All ASCAP and BMI events are open to festival credential holders. The BMI Snowball is a 21-and-older event.

(NOT) LOCALS (ONLY)

This Machine Kills Fascists feat. Crook and The Bluff, The Arvos and Green River Blues: While not related to Sundance or even film, this event warrants a mention because it demonstrates to our out-of-town guests that Salt Lake City is both woke and possessed of great talent. The brainchild of local psychedelic western blues band Crook and The Bluff, the “non-political, nonpartisan” event is emceed by Alex Cragun, executive director of the Utah Democratic Party, and all proceeds benefit four charities: The Sierra Club-Utah Chapter, Alliance for a Better Utah, The Wounded Warrior Project and The League of Women Voters. Attendees get to choose whom their entry fee benefits. Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, Saturday, Jan. 20, 8 p.m., $10, theurbanlounge.com Sundance Café at Copper Common: This free concert series curated by Bad Brad Wheeler in conjunction with Sundance and Visit Salt Lake features Two Parts Honey, Mary Tebbs (Jan. 19), Desk Set, Josaleigh Pollett (Jan. 20), Bloodhound Heart & the Kentucky Cannibal, Jacob Skeen (Jan. 21), The Wandering Stars, Kelly Bellerose (Jan. 22), Vincent Draper & the Culls, Tom Bennett (Jan. 23), Michelle Moonshine & Co., Morgan Snow (Jan. 24), Mañanero, Space Jockey Medicine Bag (Jan. 25), Sarah Anne DeGraw & the Odd Jobs, Andrew Shaw (Jan. 26), Will Baxter Trio, Leraine Horstmanshoff (Jan. 27). Copper Common, 111 E. 300 South, Jan. 19-27, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m., bit.ly/2Doz0nb Park City Live Snow Fest: Each year, Park City Live books a full week of shows. This year focuses more on EDM than previous years, but includes some hip-hop and reggae. Kaskade (Jan. 19), Post Malone (Jan. 20), Marshmello (Jan. 21), Big Boi, The Cool Kids (Jan. 23), Tribal Seeds (Jan. 24), Steve Angello (Jan. 25) and Nelly (Jan. 27). 427 Main, Park City, Jan. 19-27, parkcitylive.net The Cabin: Another strong PC-based series featuring Break on Through: Doors Tribute (Jan. 18), RATS (Jan. 19), Changing Lanes Experience (Jan. 20), Nikhi Korula (Jan. 21), Talia Keys, Sarah Anne DeGraw & the Odd Jobs (Jan. 23), An Acoustic Evening with Chris Robinson (Jan. 24), Badfeather (Jan. 25), Chali 2na and House of Vibe (Jan. 26), Project Logic (Jan. 27). 825 Main, Park City, Jan. 1827, thecabinparkcity.com 3rd Annual DoneDance with The Crystal Method: Everybody loves an after-party. For tourists, it’s one last blowout before returning to real life. It’s that for locals, too—but our return to normalcy is also a respite until next year. O.P. Rockwell, 268 Main, Park City, Saturday, Jan. 27, 9 p.m., $28-$50, shows.oprockwell.com CW


HIGHLAND live music

THURSDAY:

Gonzo @ 10:00 FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

DJ ChaseOne2 @ 9:00

ISI X SLC “TIM BURTON” THEMED ART AUCTION

FRI SAT

AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00 SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $1,450 MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00! TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

MUSIC BY SAMEYEAM. 8:00

ULTIMATE FIGHTING 220 STARTS 8PM | SAT JAN. 20 | BOTH LOCATIONS

MIOCIC VS. NGANNOU

FOLLOWED BY STREET JESUS

MON & THURS

KARAOKE

WED

PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!!

HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

THURS

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $650 POT

SUN & THURS

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT STARTS @ 7PM

SUE’S HIGHLAND HAS PAID OUT OVER $3,400 IN BINGO PRIZES!

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

2PM

HIGHLAND

20 1 7

2013

Thursdays

Fridays

$3 FIREBALLS-

Sundays

Mondays

NFL ACTION AFC & NFC CHAMPIONSHIP

KARAOKE 75¢ WINGS ALL DAY

saturdays

STARTS 8PM | SAT JAN. 20 | BOTH LOCATIONS

MIOCIC VS. NGANNOU

FOLLOWED BY DJ BAD HAIR DAY

WED SUN &

KARAOKE

MON &

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

STARTS @ 7PM

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

8136 SO. STATE ST

9PM

801-566-3222

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 39

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

ULTIMATE FIGHTING 220

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1550 POT

WED

Tuesdays KARAOKE

Wednesdays

SLOW RIDE

TUES

UFC 220: MIOCIC VS. NGANNOU

BREAKING BINGO $3000 POT-8PM

FRI SAT

| CITY WEEKLY |

COLLEGE NIGHT FREE CORN HOLE & BEER PONG-$2 COORS & BUD DRAFTS

2014

STATE live music

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

CABARET

CHECK OUT OUR NEW

MENU BEST

GARLIC BURGER

FEATURED IN CITY WEEKLY'S BURGER WEEK

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

FRIDAY 1/19

Marilyn Manson, Alice Glass

First things first: City Weekly sends its condolences to Marilyn Manson on the passing of his great-great-great-greatgreat grandfather, the LDS prophet Thomas Slayer Monson. But seriously, condolences to Elder Monson’s family— which does not, as far as we know, include America’s second-favorite shock-rocker. Even if the two were related, they’d have certainly been estranged. While Monson wasn’t the prophet at the time, Mormon influence was certainly behind the Delta Center management robbing Manson of his First Amendment rights by preventing him from performing as the support act for Nine Inch Nails in 1994. That, of course, prompted the usual tit-for-tat non-familial spat where Manson went, justifiably, full-Sinead on the Book of Mormon during NIN’s set. Well, someone on the ostensible “good side” must’ve swept away the protective circle of shredded Wonder bread and non-fluoridated tap water, ’cause Manson’s been back to play Salt Lake City several times in the past decade. Not that he’s cleaned up his act at all: Manson’s latest album is called Heaven Upside Down (Loma Vista) and features songs like “We Know Where You Fucking Live” and “KILL4ME”—both of which would’ve really alarmed the DC staff back in the day. (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m. (doors), $46.50 presale (plus fees), all ages, thecomplexslc.com

Anti-Flag

ANDREAS LAWEN, FOTANDI VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

PINKY’S

LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & HOWARD HARDEE

SUNDAY 1/21

Anti-Flag, Stray from the Path, The White Noise, Sharptooth

The imagery used in the music video for Anti-Flag’s single “American Attraction” is telling. Between shots of the band playing in front of an American flag, the video cuts to military operations overseas, automatic rifles firing and explosions; cows on factory farms and hamburgers; workingclass people and unemployed people; and faces of all colors. In case you didn’t get the idea from the band name, Anti-Flag likes to make political statements against war, imperialism and social injustice. The punks are touring in support of their 10th(!) album, last year’s American Fall (Spinefarm), which is chock-full of protest music made amidst turbulent times, including standout track “Racists,” a

Marilyn Manson response to the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va. In it, frontman Justin Sane sings, “Just ’cause you don’t know you’re racist/ You don’t get a pass for your ignorance.” Anti-Flag is joined by supporting hardcore acts Stray from the Path, The White Noise and Sharptooth. (Howard Hardee) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 6 p.m., $25, all ages, metromusichall.com

MONDAY 1/22

Victor Wooten Trio, feat. Dennis Chambers & Bob Franceschini

In his TED talk “Music as a Language,” Victor

Victor Wooten Trio: Bob Franceschini, Victor Wooten, Dennis Chambers

STEVE PARKE

JAKE STARK

40 | JANUARY 18, 2018

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


GRAB A BITE WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT January 17th Frank Family Zinfandel, Napa Valley January 24th Jeff Cohn Sweetwater Zinfandel, Sanoma County Music at 7:30. THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

...

SUNDAY NIGHT Industry night - in the Rabbit Hole basement of Lake Effect

$3 pints $3 whiskeys MONDAYS Blues night

TASTING TUESDAYS Join us for a whiskey tasting with a professional. | 6pm

...

1/2 OFF TACOS 11 AM-4 PM DAILY THIS WEEKS LIVE MUSIC JANUARY 17 JANUARY 18 JANUARY 19 JANUARY 20 JANUARY 24 JANUARY 25

TONIGHT

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast!

| | | | | | | |

7:30 PM 6-9PM 10-1 PM 10-1PM 10-1 PM 10-1 PM 6-9PM 10-1 PM

(801) 532-2068 – 155 W 200 S Salt Lake City, UT, 84101 www.lakeeffectslc.com

JANUARY 17

CHRISTIAN COLEMAN AND THE BLUE ZEN BAND 9PM-12AM

JANUARY 18

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ 7PM

MATT WENNERGREN 5:30-8:30 NATE ROBINSON TRIO 10PM-1AM LOUNGE40 10PM

JANUARY 22

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THE STEVE LYMAN TRIO ERIC ANTHONY DJ CHASEONE2 - IN THE RABBIT HOLE WILL BAXTER BAND MARMALADE CHILL MAQ QUINTET TALIA KEYS DJ CHASEONE2 - IN THE RABBIT HOLE

DINNER AND A SHOW. ONLY AT GRACIE’S!

JANUARY 19

RICK GERBER AND THE NIGHTCAPS 10PM

JANUARY 20

JANUARY 21

SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-3 NFL CONFERENCE PLAYOFFS SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES FEATURING

JANUARY 23

MATT WENNERGREN 9PM

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight. *Dine-In Only

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

SATURDAY BRUNCH 10-3 NFL CONFERENCE PLAYOFFS CHASEONE2 10PM

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Tuesday at 6:30

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 41

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

| CITY WEEKLY |

Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | JANUARY 18, 2018

SPIR ITS . FO O D . LO CA L BEER

LIVE

BRIAN ZIFF

e b o t e c a l p The ! i k s s è r p A r fo

1.18 MICHAEL DALLIN

1.19 STONEFED

1.20 STONEFED

1.22 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

1.24 DYLAN ROE

1.25 CLUSTER PLUCK

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

Wooten reveals he was born into his family’s band. They needed a bass player, so that’s how he started on the path—at age 2—to becoming one of the instrument’s foremost virtuosos, with more than a half-century of experience. He goes on to posit music as tantamount and paramount to spoken languages. In music, theory is grammar, technique is usage and immersive practice is the key to fluency. Unlike spoken languages, music is universal. It has accents and dialects, but where words sometimes fail us, chords or notes imbued with pure emotion can be a purer and more reliable form of communication. And the learning curve isn’t as steep as some folks—who feel they can’t access this sonic language for lack of innate ability—might think. Babies learn language by listening to fluent speakers, so Wooten reasons that musical neophytes shouldn’t fear playing with more experienced players. There’s more to the talk than that, and it’s well worth watching (see YouTube), much like Wooten himself. His imaginative and mindful approach to music speaks volumes, whether it’s with his hip-hop/funk/R&B famband (The Wootens), a far-out spacegrass group (Béla Fleck & the Flecktones), a threeheaded bass-hero hydra (SMV with Stanley Clarke and Marcus Miller) or his trio with drummer Dennis Chambers (Parliament/ Funkadelic, Steely Dan) and saxophonist Bob Franceschini (Willie Colón, Paul Simon). The music-as-a-language concept gets even deeper on their new platter Tripnotyx (Vix), a trippy-hypnotic prog-jazz joint featuring a cameo by actor/comedian Michael Winslow, the guy who makes the funny noises the in Police Academy films. Alas, he’s not on the tour. (RH) The State Room, 638 S.

Big Boi

State, 8 p.m., sold out (check lyte.com for tickets), 21+, thestateroomslc.com

TUESDAY 1/23 Big Boi, The Cool Kids

Best known as one-half of the extremely dope hip-hop duo Outkast, Big Boi has a hitand-miss history outside of working with Andre 3000. He’s always been perceived as less lyrically nimble than the flamboyantly creative Andre, or a solid anchor for a visionary space cadet. His debut solo record Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty (2010), however, reinforced that he’s got a musical vision all his own and is a master of subtle, syncopated flows. But his follow-up record Vicious Lies and Dangerous Rumors (2012) was a misfire, despite (or because of?) its extensive list of name-brand guests like Phantogram and Wavves. He’s not quite in top form on last year’s Boomiverse (Epic), but remains refreshingly indifferent to the trends of modern commercial rap. Big Boi is rolling through town on his Daddy Fat Saxxx Tour (subtitled “Sack 2!”) and you can expect classic Outkast hits as well as solo gems. His special guests on the tour are reunited alternative hip-hop/hipster-hop duo The Cool Kids, who broke up after their 2011 LP When Fish Ride Bicycles. They insisted only two years ago that they would reunite when swine flew, but their new album Special Edition Grandmaster Deluxe (Propelr/Cake) dropped last year. (HH) Park City Live, 427 Main, 8 p.m. (doors), $35$60, 21+, parkcitylive.net


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 1/18 4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 1/17

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 1/18 Reggae at the Royal

$

jungle man sam newborn slaves

5

amfs & long islands

1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 1/19

Live Music

Live Music

Citizen hypocrisy Wicked notions • citizen soldier Carlos vitanen sunday

jersey giveaways conference championshps

great food & drink specials Tuesday 1/16

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

2/3

huge superbowl party jersey giveaways, food & drink specials & prizes!

2/4

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

DJ Gray (Snowbird) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (Deer Valley Resort) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Gothic & Darkwave w/ DJ Nina (Area 51) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave ‘80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Karaoke (Prohibition) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 1/19 LIVE MUSIC

Afterhand + Dawnlit + Riding Gravity + Black Flak & The Nightmare Fighters + Guilty Scapegoat + Glaciers In Pangea + Ravenmind (The Loading Dock) Alternator + Dead Country Gentlemen (The Ice Haüs) The Bookends (Deer Valley Resort) Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) Dark Rooms (Alleged) Jocelyn & Chris Arndt + Slick Velveteens (Urban Lounge) Kaleb Austin (The Westerner) Kaskade (Park City Live) L.A. Guns (Liquid Joe’s) Marilyn Manson, Alice Glass (The Complex) see p. 40 Mi Cielo (Sky)

HEATHEN HIGHLANDERS BAGPIPES, IRISH FOOD, WHISKEY AND DANCERS. FRIDAY, JANUARY 19TH TELLURIDE MELTDOWN TUESDAY, JANUARY 23RD YOU KNEW ME WHEN FRIDAY, JANUARY 26TH THE RHYTHM COMBO W/ BUCKY CASH

1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492 PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 43

W/ the wayne hoskins band

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

| CITY WEEKLY |

retro riot 1/26 dance party featuring dj jason lowe coming soon

WEAR A KILT FOR NO COVER

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

saturday 1/20

Alan Michael (Garage on Beck) Aspen Winds (Gallivan Center) Badfeather (Johnny’s on Second) Break On Through + Jordan Matthew Young (The Cabin) Changing Lanes Experience (Prohibition) Dirtball (Liquid Joe’s) Eric Anthony (Lake Effect) Kiki Coquette + Madazon Can-Can (Metro Music Hall) Mod Sun + Call Me Karizma + Austin Cain + Angela White + Forget Brennan + DJ Daghe (Kilby Court) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow) Rage Against The Supremes (The Spur) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Triggers & Slips (O.P. Rockwell) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s)

KILT NIGHT

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

neal middleton and friends

featuring members of royal bliss spencer nielson & Rust

LIVE MUSIC

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20TH


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

44 | JANUARY 18, 2018

FRIDAY 1/19

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Sleep, SubRosa

It was 25 years ago that the Bay Area doom band Sleep debuted with Sleep’s Holy Mountain (Earache, 1992). Their somnambulant barbaric yawp was loud enough to bring London Records calling and, in 1995, the band presented their new boss-partners with Dopesmoker, consisting of a single 63:36 track all about green cheer. Like its trichome-speckled subject matter, it confused the shit out of the major-label execs. You almost can’t blame them. What self-respecting terrestrial radio station would play an hour-plus song, even with payola in full effect? I mean, they couldn’t get a scripted commercial in edgewise. So Sleep capitulated—a little—rewriting some lyrics, scalping the run time by 20 percent and retitling it Jerusalem to appease the crucial Jeebus-belt demo. London still wasn’t having it, so Sleep went dormant. Guitarist Matt Pike formed the mighty High on Fire while singer/bass player Al Cisneros and drummer Chris Haikus emerged as Om. Both bands developed respectable followings, but Sleep continued to stir, with Jerusalem finally released by The Music Cartel in 1998 and Dopesmoker issued by Tee Pee Records in 2003. Reunion gigs for festivals started happening in 2009, leading to Sleep (with Jason Roeder replacing Haikus) commencing a full-on wake-and-bake. The only new music so far has been the single “Clarity” (Southern Lord), but they teased a new album in November, which is the music news equivalent of awakening to the smell of coffee and bacon and … stuff. With support from local music point-of-pride SubRosa, this show is a must-see. (Randy Harward) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $28 presale; $30 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com

Proudly serving locally produced beers & spirits — 40+ local beers available — FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

JOIN US FOR APRÉS SKI LOCATED AT THE BASE OF THE CANYONS

FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

BRUNCH PARTY JANUARY 21ST 11AM - 3PM

6405 s. 3000 e. Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

1.18• SLUG LOCALIZED COMEDY NIGHT 1.19• JOCELYN & CHRIS ARNDT SLICK VELVETEENS

1.19• R&B DANCE PARTY FLASH & FLARE, CONCISE KILGORE, DJ GERONIMO

1.20• CROOK & THE BLUFF GREEN RIVER BLUES, THE ARVOS

Mike Rogers (Park City Mountain) N-U-endo (Barbary Coast) New Hollywood + Social Conduct + Saylo (Kilby Court) Pixie & the Partygrass Boys (Garage on Beck) Rise Against The Supremes + DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Sleep + SubRosa (Metro Music Hall) see above Stonefed (Hog Wallow) Telluride Meltdown (Piper Down Pub) Timeless (Club 90) Two Parts Honey + Mary Tebbs (Copper Common) Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect)

Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Mad Max (Brewskis) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

SATURDAY 1/20

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

BYUSA Karaoke Thing (The Wall at BYU) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC

Changing Lanes + Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Ché Zuro (Deer Valley Resort)

1.18• CLUSTERPHOQUE BURLESQUE 1/25: MR. HUDSON 1/26: SOULACYBIN 1/27: THE COOL DOWN W/ GERMAN WYOMING 1/28: THAT 1 GUY 1/29: J-RAD COOLEY 1/30: UNCLE RENO

GYPSY MOONSHINE, MAGIC SUCKERPUNCH, HARPY L’AMOUR, AND MORE

1.19• SLEEP SUBROSA

1.20• JOHN MAUS LUKDLX

1.21• ANTI-FLAG STRAY FROM THE PATH, THE WHITE NOISE

1.21• KRS-ONE OCELOT, ZAC IVIE, ENEEONE, DJ INIMIN8

1.22• THE OCTOPUS PROJECT NEW FUMES, INDIGO PLATEAU

1.22• AUDIO PUSH ZAC IVIE, AZA

1.24• GOOD RIDDANCE HI FI MURDER, DTA

1.24• BANDITOS

1.25• MOME WRATH

TIMMY THE TEETH

SALDURO, GREENMON, JARIN EASTMAN

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •

1/26: HIP HOP ROOTS 1/27: BLOOD OF THE YOUNG 1/30: TURNPIKE TROUBADORS 2/1: DEMUN JONES 2/2: SKETCH CABARET 2/8: THE BEE


RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen Next to Himalayan Kitchen

The

Chakra Lounge and Bar

Nightly Music Tuesday through Saturday

ChakraLounge.net

Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night small plate menu

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

364 S State St. Salt Lake City

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 45


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

46 | JANUARY 18, 2018

THE TWILITE LOUNGE

RANDY HARWARD

BAR FLY

Colt .46 (Outlaw Saloon) The Copper Children (The Ice Haüs) Dee-1 + Micah Willis (Kilby Court) Desk Set + Josaleigh Pollett (Copper Common) Joe Rock Show (The Complex) John Maus + Lukdlx (Metro Music Hall) Jordan Young (Garage on Beck) Kaleb Austin (The Westerner) Marmalade Chill (Lake Effect) Post Malone (Park City Live) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Hog Wallow) Stone Tony’s (Barbary Coast) Swagger (Piper Down Pub) This Machine Kills Fascists, feat. Crook & The Bluff + Green River Blues + The Arvos (Urban Lounge) see p. 38 Timeless (Club 90) Triggers & Slips (Canyons Village) Zion Riot (Brewskis)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Alternative + Top 40 + EDM w/ DJ Jeremiah (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) Burlesque & The Beats (Prohibition) DJ Dance Party (Club 90)

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21

GO VIKINGS!

DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Gothic + Industrial + 80s w/ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays w/ Sharps (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 1/21 LIVE MUSIC

BREAKING BINGO 9PM

TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

Marshmello (Park City Live) Nikhi Korula + Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Truett + The Dirt Nappers + Justine Sane + Isaac David (The Loading Dock)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Après Ski (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 1/22

Anti-Flag + Stray From The Path + The White Noise + Sharptooth (Metro Music Hall) see p. 40 Bloodhound Heart & the Kentucky Cannibal + Jacob Skeen (Copper Common) Everyone Leaves + Safe Face + The Last Lost Continent (Kilby Court) Kelly Bellarose (Garage on Beck) KRS-One + Ocelot + IVIE + MC Eneeone + DJ Intimin8 (Urban Lounge) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Mark McKay (The Spur)

MONDAYS

Among charming neighborhood bars loved for their lack of refinement, the Twilite Lounge—aka “the Twi”—is a star. It attracts more a diverse clientele than you’d think: college kids, musicians, occasional preppie/yuppie types, LGBTQ people. And barflies, the kinds of people more comfortable perched in places with dark walls, dim lighting, cold beer and a blend of friends and strangers with whom to trade stories. One overhears me request a receipt for a PBR. “Business expense?” she asks. Yeah. Pretty good one, right? She has a better one. Once upon a time, her job required travel, and therefore offered a meals per diem. “But I don’t eat,” she says. When her employer’s payroll person asked why she never turned in receipts, she told them she only drank. The person advised my ephemeral friend to turn in non-itemized receipts. “I drank $48 of alcohol every day!” she proclaims. I take my beer toward an old-school CD juke that still feels new-ish to me, and see mostly mid-tolate-aughts dad rock—The White Stripes, Interpol, Neko Case—but also newer local stuff like local puppet-rock band Cool Banana. Sweet. Beyond the juke, the booths near the back fireplace are all empty. One has a tabletop Pac-Man machine with exotic variations on the game. Despite it having one unused credit, I retrace my steps, dodging barflies like ghosts and request more quarters. I believe I’ve found my perch. (Randy Harward) Twilite Lounge, 347 E. 200 South, 801-532-9400, twilitelounge.com

LIVE MUSIC

Audio Push + Zac Ivie + AZA + Adub (Metro Music Hall) Booyah Moon + Dinosaur Kisses + Leaping Gnome (The Loading Dock) Bonanza Town (The Spur) Dark Rooms + Totem City + SeasOnSaphire (Kilby Court) G. Love + SImply B (The Cabin) The Octopus Project + New Fumes + Indigo Plateau (Urban Lounge) The Wandering Stars + Kelly Bellerose (Copper Common)

SATURDAY, JAN. 20

9PM - NO COVER

Victor Wooten Trio feat. Dennis Chambers + Bob Franceschini (The State Room) see p. 40

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

TUESDAY 1/23 LIVE MUSIC Big Boi, The Cool Kids (Park City Live) see p. 42 Passion Pit (The Depot) Talia Keys + Sarah Anne DeGraw & The Odd Jobs (The Cabin) Vincent Draper & the Culls + Tom Bennett (Copper Common)

WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE AT 8PM

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET The Wombats + Feature Feats (The Complex) You Knew Me When (Piper Down Pub)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Access Music Program (The Spur) Lifty Lounge w/ DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 1/24 LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 47

Karaoke (The Wall at BYU) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke w/ DJ Casper (Area 51) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal)

| CITY WEEKLY |

DJ Wees (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (The Cabin) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Banditos + Timmy The Teeth (Urban Lounge) Chris Robinson + Morgan Snow (The Cabin) Dylan Roe (Hog Wallow) Good Riddance + Hi-Fi Murder + DTA (Metro Music Hall) Michelle Moonshine & Co. + Morgan Snow (Copper Common) Suzanne Santo + Mapache (The State Room) Sweet Ascent + Anson + Honor Me This + Black Jupiter (The Loading Dock) Tribal Seeds (Park City Live) The Veer Union + Xaon + Late Night Savior + Riddled + Escher Case (Liquid Joe’s)


NIGHT LIGHTS

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN

LIVE Music thursday, january 18

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

friday, january 19

DJ MATTY MO

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

saturday, january 20

DJ LATU thursday, january 25 COMEDY SHOWCASE 8PM HOSTED BY JAY WHITTAKER A BENEFIT FOR THE ROAD HOME

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

48 | JANUARY 18, 2018

@scheuerman7

Weeknights

Tara Palacios, Alex Mateus, Ian Smith, Ri Hansen

monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

thursday

KARAOKE W/ DJ BEKSTER 9PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Great food $

5.99 lunch special MONDAY - FRIDAY

$

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

Danial Galzviz, Von, Walker Brenik, Texas Ranger

Jennifer Teague, Cynthia West, Symmer Andrews


Molly Green’s

ton Loop Road 8302 S. Brigh .com brightonresort

Cupid’s Club Crawl SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH CRAWL: 5PM - 10PM

Napo Kusitor

Ben Burwell

Limo transportation Rafe Pascale, Chelsey Noel, Kyle Cheson, Eric Dorsey, Julian Amaral, Jenna Hoy, Rob Dorsey

Cupid costume contest Hide & seek roses

AFTER PARTY: 10PM - CLOSE

| CITY WEEKLY |

BUY TICKETS NOW AT CITYWEEKLYSTORE.COM

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Stop light glow sticks

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Dating Games

Sponsored by:

VODKA

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 49

Riley Gale, Zach Lilly


KARAOKE

{THURSDAY & FRIDAYS 9PM}

POOL TOURNAMENTS MONDAYS BY CRISSIE FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS BY RANDY

TEXAS HOLDEM MONDAYS & THURSDAY

FREE FASHION SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY NOON TILL 2PM

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385.528.2547 open 7 days a week from 11 am to 1 am

BREAKFAST and LUNCH  Established 2004 

ALL DAY!

KLY

WEE C L S @

FRIDAY JANUARY 19TH

N-U-ENDO

served

SATURDAY JANUARY 20TH

BARBARY COAST SALOON YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

STONE TONY’S 9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

4242 South State Street SLC, UT 84107 Open from 10am - 2am

FOLLOW US ON

| CITY WEEKLY |

50 | JANUARY 18, 2018

S ON U W O FOLL TAGRAM INS

TWITTER @CITYWEEKLY

694 East Union Square, SANDY

801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm

brittonsrestaurant.com


VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

| CITY WEEKLY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 51

357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, poker Tuesday; DJs Friday & Saturday METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, live music ThursdaySaturday, all ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, poker Monday, acoustic Tuesday, trivia Wednesday, bingo Thursday POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, live music Thursday-Saturday PROHIBITION 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, everything from live music to karaoke to burlesque THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Friday, live jazz Saturday THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, live music SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, live music, All ages SUGAR HOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 SWITCH 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-5132955, house and techno events TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, dueling pianos WednesdaySaturday; karaoke Sunday-Tuesday TIN ANGEL CAFÉ 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, live music URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, live music TWIST 32 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-322-3200, live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, live music, all ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thursday-Saturday THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, trivia Wednesday; karaoke Friday-Sunday; live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, karaoke Thursday FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, trivia Tuesday; live music Friday & Saturday FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, karaoke & live music FUNK ’N’ DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music & karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, live music & DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, live music ThursdaySaturday THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, karaoke Thursday; DJs & live music Friday & Saturday HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, karaoke HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, live music ICE HAÜS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. Panther Way, SLC, 801-3828567, karaoke Tuesday, Wednesday & Sunday; DJs Thursday-Saturday JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tuesday & Friday; karaoke Wednesday; live music Saturday KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-363-3638, karaoke Tuesday & Wednesday; dueling pianos Thursday-Saturday KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, live music Tuesday-Saturday THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, trivia Wednesday LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714 LUMPY’S ON HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, live music & DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, trivia Tuesday, DJ Wednesday, karaoke Thursday A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, karaoke Tuesday ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, karaoke Wednesday, ‘80s Thursday, DJs Friday & Saturday BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-463-4996, karaoke Tuesday, live music Saturday THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, live music Friday & Saturday BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, local jazz jam Tuesday, karaoke Thursday, live music Saturday, funk & soul night Sunday BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400, karaoke Friday-Sunday CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871, karaoke Saturday CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, live music & DJs; karaoke Thursday CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-566-3254, trivia Monday, poker Thursday, live music Friday-Sunday CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, live music & DJs THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, free pool Wednesday & Thursday; karaoke Friday & Saturday DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-261-2337, live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134, karaoke Wednesday; live music Tuesday, Thursday & Friday; DJ Saturday DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, live music & DJs ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801478-4310, DJs


© 2017

JOBS

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Was in the lineup, but didn’t play the field 2. On 1/1/2014, Latvia became the 18th country to adopt it 3. Key with five sharps: Abbr. 4. ____ facto 5. 1958 film that featured a gelatinous mass

47. “Am I the crazy one?” 48. Vietnam Veterans Memorial designer 52. In need of a massage 53. SpongeBob, e.g. 54. 1998 Literature Nobelist Saramago 55. “Chestnuts roasting ____ open fire ...” 56. In 2007, Johannesburg’s Apartheid Museum put up an exhibition commemorating the 30th anniversary of his death 57. Plastic surgeon’s concern 58. Lead-ins to many YouTube videos 59. Droid 60. “You’re blind, ump! Blind!”

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

and Steve McQueen in his first starring role 6. #41, in relation to #43 7. ____ Day vitamins 8. “Ray Donovan” star Schreiber 9. Kept from 10. City-state involved in the Peloponnesian War 11. Airline which, in 1924, made its first intercontinental flight from Amsterdam to Batavia 12. “Fer sure!” 13. Thanksgiving staple 21. Withdraw 22. Like Advil or Benadryl: Abbr. 25. Place where rubbish goes 26. Having a lot of alcohol 27. Pakistan’s ____ Pass 28. Where some fights are fought 29. ____ American 30. In 2014, Sir Mix-a-Lot admitted she inspired his 1992 hit “Baby Got Back” 31. Buckeye State sch. 32. Order between “ready” and “fire” 33. Gets rid of 38. Million Man March and Million Mom March, for two 39. One in a cage 40. It’s a wrap in Kurosawa films 43. Slow movements 45. How some kids spend the summer 46. Mason ____

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. ____ card 6. Fearless 10. Vodka brand whose bottles are, aptly, blue 14. “Whatever ... see if I care!” 15. Together, in Toulouse 16. Self-defense, e.g. 17. Clear the slate 18. Examined by the doctor 19. Clock radio toggle 20. Chopping, kicking, bowing to a sensei, etc.? 23. Abbr. on a baby announcement 24. “At Last” singer James and others 27. Radio shows hosted by Earl Scruggs and Steve Martin? 34. Brand that tweeted “Retweet if you floss everyday. It’s so important!” 35. Google result 36. Letters often appearing in front of Queen Elizabeth II’s name 37. 2013 Oscar winner Jared 38. Tops 40. Woodwind whose name is from the French for “high” and “wood” 41. Young Darth Vader’s nickname 42. 2016 Olympics city 43. Bad thing to be caught in 44. Projects for adobe-loving architects? 49. Switched to, as on a thermostat 50. Singer-songwriter with the 2014 #1 album “1000 Forms of Fear” 51. Economist’s concern ... or what you’re doing by solving 20-, 27- and 44-Across 58. Group named for its members Anni-Frid, Benny, Bjorn and Agnetha 61. Sean Connery, e.g. 62. Kind of column, in architecture 63. Gloom’s partner 64. Radiohead head Yorke 65. City known as the “Venice of Japan” because of its many canals and rivers 66. “Enough already!” 67. Word often sung in the first moments of a new year 68. Hombre’s title

SUDOKU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

52 | JANUARY 18, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “When one door closes, another opens,” inventor Alexander Graham Bell said. “But we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened.” Heed his advice, Aquarius. Take the time you need to mourn the lost opportunity. But don’t take more than the time you need. The replacement or alternative to what’s gone will show up sooner than you think.

tive identity that best suits its special chemistry. Therefore, it’s a mistake to compare any of your alliances to some supposedly perfect ideal. Luckily, you’re in an astrological period when you have extra savvy about cultivating unique models of togetherness. So I recommend that you devote the coming weeks to deepening and refining your most important bonds.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179914987, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. LETICIA JAVIER AND MICHAEL QUINTANA, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO LETICIA JAVIER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $15,308.35. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

Apothecary & Knowledge Center

Select Teas

Herbal-Black-Green-PuerhCustom Blended RAW

Kombucha Jun-Traditional-Herbal Huge Selection

Bulk Herbs

Old Medicine for the New Age!

Tinctures

Small Batch Crafted

Breath Easier This Winter

Weekly Tea Party

Every Saturday 6 pm- 8 pm Natures Pharmacy and Knowledge Center

txt or call (801) 613.2128 619south. 600west NaturalLawApothecary.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| COMMUNITY |

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 53

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During recent weeks, your main tasks have centered around themes often associated with strain and struggle: repair, CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Bubble gum is more elastic and less sticky than regular chewing workaround, reassessment, jury-rigging, adjustment, gum. That’s why you can blow bubbles with it. A Capricorn accoun- compromise. Amazingly, Leo, you have kept your suffering tant named Walter Diemer invented it in 1928 while working for to a minimum as you have smartly done your hard work. In the Fleer Chewing Gum Co. At the time he finally perfected the some cases you have even thrived. Congratulations on being recipe, the only food dye he had on hand was pink. His early batch- so industrious and steadfast! Beginning soon, you will glide es were all that color, and a tradition was born. That’s why even into a smoother stage of your cycle. Be alert for the inviting today, most bubble gum is pink. I suspect a similar theme might signs. Don’t assume you’ve got to keep grunting and grinding. unfold soon in your life. The conditions present at the beginning of a new project may deeply imprint the future evolution of VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): the project. So try to make sure those are conditions you like! Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863-1944) created four versions of his iconic artwork The Scream. Each depicts a person who seems terribly upset, holding his head in his hands and opening his PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Gilbert Stuart painted the most famous portrait of America’s first mouth wide as if unleashing a loud shriek. In 2012, one of these president, George Washington. It’s the image on the U.S. $1 bill. images of despair was sold for almost $120 million. The money went And yet Stuart never finished the masterpiece. Begun in 1796, it to the son of a man who had been Munch’s friend and patron. Can was still a work-in-progress when Stuart died in 1828. Leonardo you think of a way that you and yours might also be able to extract da Vinci had a similar type of success. His incomplete painting The value or get benefits from a negative emotion or a difficult experiVirgin and Child with St. Anne hangs in the Louvre in Paris, and his ence? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to do just that. unfinished The Adoration of the Magi has been in Florence’s Uffizi Gallery since 1671. I propose that Stuart and da Vinci serve as your LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): role models in the coming weeks. Maybe it’s not merely OK if a “I think I like my brain best in a bar fight with my heart,” poet certain project of yours remains unfinished; maybe that’s actually Clementine von Radics says. While I appreciate that perspective, I advise you to do the opposite in the coming weeks. This will be a the preferred outcome. phase of your astrological cycle when you should definitely support your heart over your brain in bar fights, wrestling matches, ARIES (March 21-April 19): Many American women did not have the right to vote until shadow boxing contests, tugs of war, battles of wits, and messy Aug. 18, 1920. On that day, the Tennessee General Assembly arguments. Here’s one of the most important reasons why I say became the 36th state legislature to approve the Nineteenth this: Your brain would be inclined to keep the conflict going until Amendment, thus sealing the legal requirements to change the one party or the other suffers ignominious defeat, whereas your U.S. Constitution and ensure women’s suffrage. The ballot in heart is much more likely to work toward a win-win conclusion. Tennessee was close. At the last minute, 24-year-old legislator Harry T. Burns changed his mind from no to yes, thanks to a SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): letter from his mother, who asked him to “be a good boy” and When he was 24 years old, Scorpio-born Zhu Yuanzhang (1328vote in favor. I suspect that in the coming weeks, Aries, you will 1398) was a novice monk with little money who had just learned be in a pivotal position not unlike Burns’. Your decision could to read and write. He had spent years as a wandering beggar. By affect more people than you know. Be a good boy or good girl. the time he was 40 years old, he was the emperor of China and founder of the Ming Dynasty, which ruled for 276 years. What happened in between? That’s a long story. Zhu’s adventurousTAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the coming weeks, Destiny will be calling you and calling ness was a key asset, and so was his ability as an audacious and you and calling you, inviting you to answer its summons. If you crafty tactician. His masterful devotion to detailed practical do indeed answer, it will provide you with clear instructions matters was also indispensable. If you are ever in your life going about what you will need to do expedite your ass in the direc- to begin an ascent even remotely comparable to Zhu’s, Scorpio, tion of the future. If on the other hand you refuse to listen to it will be in the coming 10 months. Being brave and enterprising Destiny’s call, or hear it and refuse to respond, then Destiny won’t be enough. You must be disciplined and dogged, as well. will take a different tack. It won’t provide any instructions, but will simply yank your ass in the direction of the future. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1892, the influential Atlantic Monthly magazine criticized Sagittarian poet Emily Dickinson, saying she “possessed an GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Looks like the Season of a Thousand and One Emotions hasn’t extremely unconventional and grotesque fancy.” It dismissed drained and frazzled you. Yes, there may be a pool of tears next to her poetry as incoherent, and declared that an “eccentric, your bed. Your altar might be filled with heaps of ashes, marking dreamy, half-educated recluse” like her “cannot with impuyour burnt offerings. But you have somehow managed to extract nity set at defiance the laws of gravitation and grammar.” This a host of useful lessons from your tests and trials. You have sur- dire diss turned out to be laughably wrong. Dickinson is now prised yourself with the resilience and resourcefulness you’ve regarded as one of the most original American poets. I offer this been able to summon. And so the energy you’ve gained through story up as a pep talk for you, Sagittarius. In the coming months, these gritty triumphs is well worth the price you’ve had to pay. I suspect you’ll be reinventing yourself. You’ll be researching new approaches to living your life. In the course of these experiments, others may see you as being in the grip of unconventional CANCER (June 21-July 22): Every relationship is unique. The way you connect with another or grotesque fantasy. They may consider you dreamy and eccenperson—whether it’s through friendship, romance, family, tric.  I hope you won’t allow their misunderstandings to interfere or collaborative projects—should be free to find the distinc- with your playful yet serious work.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915020, JUDGE RICHARD MCKELVIE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. CHANNEL BUTLER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO CHANNEL BUTLER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $5,449.57. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen


Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

801-577-4944 3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

Marketing Manager

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE FARMINGTON DEPT. OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, DAVIS COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179705646, JUDGE ROBERT J DALE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. MARION KING, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO MARION KING: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 800 W State St., Farmington, UT 84025, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $5,294.38. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

(Taylorsville, UT) Identify, develop/evaluate marketing strategy, based on knowledge of establishment objectives, market characteristics, and cost & markup factors. Formulate, direct/coordinate marketing activities to promote products & services. Develop pricing strategies, balancing firm objectives & customer satisfaction. 40hrs/ wk, Bachelor’s in Marketing Management or related req’d. Resume to Cupbop Co, Attn. Yeiri Kim, 3269 W 5400 S, #C, Taylorsville, UT 84129

Your dog’s home away from home -overnight dog boarding-cageless dog daycare-dog washing stations-

801-683-3647 • www.utahdogpark.com Woods Cross: 596 W 1500 S (Woods Cross) | Airport Location: 1977 W. North Temple

54 | JANUARY 18, 2018

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

URBAN

FANTASTIC MASSAGE L I V I N G

Save a Dollar. Feed a Family. GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Money Matters

The glitterati are arriving for the Sundance Film Festival to see movies, be seen talking about movies or just be seen. The bigger names generally come for the second half of the festival and stay for the awards ceremony on the final day. There will be much talk about the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements, Harvey Weinstein and the impact money and power has on the film industry. It’s a great event for Utah’s economy—the Daily Herald reported this past June that the festival brings in $151.5 million into our private and public coffers. Hundreds of members of the press cover its 10 days, drawing many eyes to our state. The value of these small- and big-name visitors impacts all of us, but especially Park City. The U.S. Census Bureau released its American Community Survey in December 2017, showing Park City as the secondmost wealthy “micropolitan” area (towns 10,000-50,000 in population) in America. The No. 1 spot was, oddly, Los Alamos, N.M., which has a high amount of millionaires per capita because of its tech centers and laboratories. The third slot went to Williston, N.D. (another place I wouldn’t think of as a bastion for rich people). But an energy boom there created a median income is $90,080. Park City beat them with a median income of $91,470. I don’t know who the richest person living in Park City is, but according to list25.com, the celebrities with the highest net worth as of September 2017 are Steven Spielberg ($3.7 billion), Oprah Winfrey ($3.2 billion), Paul McCartney ($1.2 billion), J.K. Rowling ($1 billion) and Jay-Z ($900 million). Will any of them show up to Sundance this year? One could hope. I do know that none of them bought the most expensive home sold in Park City last year listed at $11.4 million ($1,176 per square foot). The ski-in/out home in Deer Valley with 9,693 square feet, 8 bedrooms, 10 bathrooms and 6 fireplaces was on the market for 581 days. They could drop a few dimes on the 22,000-square-foot home and land originally owned by Edgar Stern, the founder of Deer Valley. The asking price is $24.9 million for its 12 bedrooms, 16 bathrooms and 22-car garage, all sitting on about 64 acres. If you were to put 20 percent down and got a mortgage at 5.5 percent for 30 years, your principal and interest per month would be $113,331. Folks in that price range usually pay cash, though. If you have that many Hamiltons in your pocket, call me! I’d love to sell that beauty to you—any day, any time. n

Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner JACKALOPE LONELY the majority live 5 steps ahead in spite of only having 2 feet. they drink their beer in loss to their meaning. they never smile at the sign that says, “Free Drinks Tomorrow” while i’m close to tears about it.

Devin Sams Send your poem (max15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net. Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

Resolve to find a better landlord! Friends refer friends to Partlow!

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED PARTLOW RENTALS:

AVENUES

9TH & 9TH

Amazing 1+ bdrm. duplex with full basement (guest area or storage)! Hardwood floors, double paned windows, fireplace! ! PRICE DROP! $1095

Lovely 1 bdrm. PLUS office in charming divided Victorian five-plex! Tall ceilings, bay windows, SOO cute! $845

AVENUES Amazing 1 bdrm PLUS office in divided Victorian Duplex! European Washer/Dryer Hookup! Stunning interior finish! $995

VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT PARTLOWRENTS.COM VISIT OUR OFFICE LOCATION AT 440 S. 700 E. STE 203 801-484-4446


But He Started It!

S NEofW the

WEIRD

Tennis instructor Osmailer Torres, 30, of Miami, was arrested in July 2016 after hitting a 5-year-old with the child’s pint-sized tennis racket and causing a bruise on the boy’s arm and a lump on his eyebrow, reports the Miami Herald. But now, Torres believes he has a grand-slam defense: Florida’s Stand Your Ground self-defense law. Defense lawyer Eduardo Pereira told the Herald the child was the “initial aggressor” who had participated in “various violent altercations” against other children, and Torres had acted “reasonably in trying to prevent harm” to others. Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Oscar Rodriguez-Fonts will consider the claim in an upcoming hearing. Family Values

Mazen Dayem, 36, of Staten Island, N.Y., obtained a restraining order against his father-in-law, Yunes Doleh, 62, in September after Doleh repeatedly tormented him by waving his hairpiece at Dayem, provoking Dayem’s greatest phobia—the Tasmanian Devil of Loony Tunes fame. Not easily detered, Doleh was arrested on Nov. 5 for violating the order after he “removed his wig (and) made hand gestures” at a funeral the two attended, Dayem explained to the New York Post. “It’s just a very large fear of mine, his damn wig. ... I have nightmares.” Court papers say Doleh “proceeded to grimace, snarl, gurn and gesticulate.” He was charged with criminal mischief in Staten Island County court, and then sued his son-in-law for defamation after photos from the arrest appeared on social media.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

It was just another early December day at the Horsetooth Store, Gas and RV Park outside Fort Collins, Colo., as employee Lori Jones conducted inventory and restocked shelves. Suddenly, she looked up to see “Mama,” a doe deer, inside the store, “looking at the sunglasses. Then she looked at the ice cream and over at the chips,” Jones told CBS Denver. “I kind of did a double take.” When shooing the deer away didn’t work, she broke out a peanut bar and lured the doe into a nearby field. Jones then returned to work, but soon looked up to find Mama was back, this time with her three fawns in tow. It took another peanut bar to draw the family away from the store, and Jones said she has learned her lesson. “You should never feed the deer because they’re going to keep coming back.”

Selling homes for 34 years in the Land of Zion

Julie “Bella” Hall

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 5 years

Your home could be sold here. Call me for a free market analysis today.

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

New World Order

Great Art!

Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

Julie Bri-ZAY, makes home buying ea-ZAY NMLS#243253 Loan officer

I

Julie Brizzee Citywide Home Loans NMLS#67180 9785 S. Monroe St. #200 Sandy, UT 84070

801-747-1206 Providing All Mortgage Loan Services

JANUARY 18, 2018 | 55

At the courthouse in the Belgian port city of Ostend, performance artist Mikes Poppe, 34, was hoping to make a statement on the weight of history when he chained his leg to a 3-ton block of Carrara marble on Nov. 10 and began slowly chipping himself free. The Straits Times reports that for 19 days, Poppe ate, slept and worked on the marble until curator Joanna De Vos ordered the chain cut “for practical reasons.” “I don’t see the fact that I was freed as a failure,” Poppe told the Flemish-language Het Laatste Nieuws. “The act of getting free in itself was not the main goal,” he added, although he admitted that doing so had been more difficult than he thought. “I really underestimated that block of marble.”

HOME LOANS MADE BRIZZÉE

| COMMUNITY |

Paul Jacobs, 42, of South Hampshire, England, ordered a roll of bubble wrap from Amazon in November to protect his plants during a coming cold snap. Soon the box of bubble wrap arrived, protected by 100 feet of brown packing paper— enough to cover his whole backyard, he told the Daily Mail. “At first I thought they’d sent me the wrong order because the box was so heavy,” Jacobs said. He expects it will take two recycling collections to get rid of all the paper packaging.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Ironies

Malcolm Whitfield of Rochester, N.Y., was only trying to help when he ordered a Lyft car to deliver a drunk woman home from a bar in November. But when the woman vomited in the car, Whitfield was hit with a $150 fine to cover the damage. “For a second, I was like, ‘Never do anything nice again!’” Whitfield told 13WHAM. Lyft’s terms and conditions include damage fees, which most people don’t see in the fine print. Update: Lyft later refunded Whitfield’s fine and added $100 to his Lyft account for future rides. “Mr. Whitfield absolutely did the right thing by helping someone get home safely,” said Scott Coriell, a Lyft spokesperson.

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

A mom in Hillsboro, Ore., came up with the perfect retaliation for a porch pirate who nabbed her baby son’s Christmas pajamas package off the front porch. Angie Boliek told KATU she wanted to get her own “passive-aggressive revenge,” so she taped up a box full of 10 to 15 dirty diapers with a note reading “Enjoy this you thief!” Boliek left the box on her porch on Dec. 3, and by the evening of Dec. 4 it was gone. Boliek alerted Hillsboro police, but they don’t have any leads in the investigation. “It was fun to come home and see that it was gone,” Boliek said.

Hiding in Plain Sight

Good Deed, Punished

Babs De Lay

Sweet Revenge

Teller County (Colo.) Sheriff Jason Mikesell listed his SUV for sale on Craigslist in November, and he was a little perplexed when he received a response from Shawn Langley, 39, of Vail, offering to trade the SUV for four pounds of marijuana. Langley even provided photos of his black market booty and boasted about its quality, reported The Colorado Springs Gazette. “I saw that text, and I started giggling,” Mikesell said. Detectives set up a meeting and arrested both Langley and Jane Cravens, 41, after finding the promised four pounds of marijuana in their car. Sheriff Mikesell has removed his SUV from Craigslist. On Nov. 27, 27-year-old Corey Hughes, who was due to be released from prison in February after serving most of a weapons charge, walked away from a San Joaquin County sheriff’s work crew in Stockton, Calif., according to The Fresno Bee. It took police almost a month to track him to a home in Stockton, where they surrounded the dwelling and apprehended him without incident—which might not be so remarkable were it not for the distinctive, whole-face tattoo Hughes sports, which makes his face look like a human skull. He was booked into the San Joaquin County Jail.

Film Goers

Oh, Deer

Taisei Corp., a construction company based in Tokyo, announced in December that it will use autonomous drones, taking flight in April, to combat karoshi, or overwork death, reported The Independent. The drones will hover over desks of employees who have stayed at work too long and blast “Auld Lang Syne,” a tune commonly used in Japanese shops getting ready to close. A company statement said: “It will encourage employees who are present at the drone patrol time to leave, not only to promote employee health but also to conduct internal security management.” Experts are skeptical: Scott North, professor of sociology at Osaka University, told the BBC that “to cut overtime hours, it is necessary to reduce workloads.”

Least Competent Criminals

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &


The

Backstop

It may be on the BACK but readers stop here to see your ad FIRST! Call for rates 801-575-7028

VOICEOVER WORKSHOP Forming in SLC, Learn to earn voicing commercials & more. www.voscott.com/workshops.html

DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

CITY WEEKLY STORE

DUCES WILD IS FOR SALE

Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

PLUMBER - SILVER SUMMIT SERVICES Plumbing ∙ Home Repair ∙ Home Remodel

Licensed/Insured - 801-518-2325 silversummitservices@gmail.com

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

South Salt Lake SOB license Class D liquor license

NEW WINDSHIELDS Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

WE WAIVE

$100 OF YOUR

INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-414-4103

AWINDSHIELDREPLACEM ENT.COM

Certificates available in

801-918-3066 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

Toothache? Wisdom teeth? PULLMYTOOTH.

www.

com

Save time and money

Main Street Dental 801.467.2255 3195 S. Main St #225 Salt Lake

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

56 | JANUARY 18, 2018

WORDS sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

THE WEEK PHOTO OF WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY NG ISSUE GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATURED IN AN UPCOMI TAG YOUR PHOTOS

#CWCOMMUNITY SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

OGDEN 763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

Sell Your Car Today With One PhOne Call

• We Make “House Calls” • Simple and Hassle Free • Paid For or Not • Quickly Sell Your Car, Truck or Van • Have a Check About 15 Minutes After We Arrive

“It’s Worth Your Time To Call”

Call or Text 24/6

801-560-9933 WWW.CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

Profile for Copperfield Publishing

City Weekly January 18, 2018  

The No-Fun Zone!

City Weekly January 18, 2018  

The No-Fun Zone!