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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY

... AND ACTION!

Recent headlines infuse the Sundance Film Festival with a fresh sense of self-awareness. Cover photo illustration by Derek Carlisle

13 CONTRIBUTOR 4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 11 NEWS 19 A&E 23 DINE 30 CINEMA 33 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

ALEX SPRINGER

Behold the moment when the self-proclaimed “gastronaut” meets his first heaping serving of tripe. Our newly minted restaurant reviewer’s verdict? “It’s not as terrifying as one might think.” Read Springer’s full take, including his musings on lomo saltado, on p. 23.

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

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LDS Church President Thomas Group gathers to show supS. Monson dies at 90. port for national monuments. facebook.com/slcweekly

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Cover story, Dec. 28, “The Year in Photo Review”

Memories, Orrin!”

@BRIANNAMARIESLC Via Instagram

News, Dec. 28, “Free Friday Face-Off” The only thing I pulled that, is our mayor has er used his own cities lic transport—and that something.

from nevpubsays

JOSH GARLAND

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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T D E C E M B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 | V O L . 3 4 N 0 . 3 1

Loved the photo highlights in this one.

Love this place, amazing vegan food.

JONNY VASIC

Via cityweekly.net Seasons is one of my favorite vegan spots in the Valley. Glad to see they are getting the positive attention that they have earned.

JEREMY BECKHAM

★★★★★

Vegan Italian and French cuisine? I need to try this.

CAMERON JORGENSEN

is

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If he ever steps foot in Oregon, they will shoot him.

MICHAEL JAMES STONE

DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

“Thanks for the

Via Facebook He may have started out with good intentions, but once he got sucked into the Washington way, it became a moneygrab. Fortunately for him, we still get to pay him (and his benefits) for the rest of his life, so the money train has no end in sight.

THE YEAR IN

PHOTO REVIEW

Thomas Monson. May his soul rest in peace.

BISHOP MUNIR KAMARA London, UK Via cityweekly.net

Too bad we can’t lower the flag for all the LGBT people who took their own lives because of this man and his followers.

ATHERLEE RAMIREZ Via Facebook

Godspeed, Brother Monson.

COBIE PLACENCIA Via Facebook

Let the Hunger Games of the First Presidency commence!

My sympathy.

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

He did what all the rest of them do: absolutely nothing.

While I am saddened for his family, his platform while leading the church directly led to so many troubles for the LGBTQAI+ community. I hope the leaders of the church will come to their senses with the next leader.

This fool was no prophet. You don’t become one based off your donations or length of time in church.

KIM KRAUSE

Via Facebook

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST

NETTE JENSEN

Now, if we could just get Trump to retire.

LYNN BAKER

Blog post, Jan. 3,

Forty-plus years of stroking his ego. He’s an embarrassment to Utah.

Via Facebook

Cover story, Nov. 30, “The Rise and Rise of Cliven Bundy”

Via Facebook

Follow the money and you’ll know where his true values reside. He’s sold out every citizen of the state, as well as the nation. He is only interested in lining his own pockets. He will be remembered as one of the oiliest, greasiest, dirtiest, most duplicitous and least honest of all senators.

KARIN KUGEL

Via cityweekly.net

terrorism

Via Facebook

MIKE BROWN

Via cityweekly.net

Mormon legal.

PAX RASMUSSEN

Via Facebook

Dining review, Dec. 28, Seasons Plant-Based Bistro STORE

Hatch died decades ago. The GOP keeps him animated with eldritch rituals and the blood of virgins.

DANA DAHL

Via Facebook

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET

Via Facebook

Blog post, Jan. 3, “LDS Church President Thomas S. Monson Dead at 90”

I’m Bishop Kamara of the Crystal Palace Ward. On behalf of the Ward members, we are sending our condolences to the family and closest friends of our dear and beloved President

LEANA COPPERFIELD

RACHEL GILCHRIST HEARD Via Facebook

He did good, but he also did ill. The later will be neglected to be talked about. I do feel that part and parcel of the issues, however, stem from him being ordained as a bishop at 22. Far too young to even know himself.

JG BILLINGSLEY Via Facebook

CORBAN ANDERSON

RICHARD HUMBERG Via Facebook

Listen friends, [I’m] not Mormon, but I know it’s wrong to disrespect the dead, period. Behave. This is a man with a large family, and [who] has lead a successful life amongst his family. Your disrespect has zero effect on your cause. Evaluate your approach

KELLY HATCHER Via Facebook

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OPINION Plane Dogs

I’ve seen a look in dogs’ eyes, a quickly vanishing look of amazed contempt, and I am convinced that basically dogs think humans are nuts. —John Steinbeck What does an abused dog in Connecticut have in common with Donald Trump, Mike Pence and Jared Kushner? Lawyers! They are all lawyered up. Thanks to a 2016 state law, judges in Connecticut can appoint an attorney to represent a dog who has suffered cruel treatment at the hands of a human. I guess that’s OK. Indigents get court-appointed lawyers. I owned a scrappy Springer Spaniel who should have had a defense attorney on retainer. Connecticut is the only state with such a law, but certain other dogs can get legal help when their rights under the Air Carrier Access Act are threatened. Attorneys at U.S. Support Animals are just a phone call away if a registered Emotional Support Animal (ESA) is hassled. A friend’s daughter-in-law has a registered ESA. It wears a vest as proof. As such, the dog is entitled to a place at her feet on the airplane when she travels. Truth be told, her ESA is a fraud. The young woman requires no more emotional support than the rest of us, and the dog radiates none from its place under the seat. It rides in the cabin because it flies there for free, she concedes privately. Without ESA certification, she would pay about $250 for the privilege. She is not the only one to have made the cost-avoidance calculation. If you have been in an airport recently, you will have seen a lot of dogs trotting up and down the concourses

BY JOHN RASMUSON looking for a place to pee. There are so many dogs, that airports have installed patches of green Astroturf to accommodate them. I saw one such “relief station” in Philadelphia equipped with a fake fire hydrant for leg-lifters. In another airport, a silver-haired grandmother pushed a caged cat around in a wheelchair. She skirted two middle-aged women, each with a snub-nosed dog in her lap, posing selfies merrily as they waited to board a Southwest flight. I found myself speaking for the animals: This is nuts! “Any animal can be an ESA. Federal law does not require these animals to have any specific training, and you do not have to be physically disabled to have an ESA,” according to the U.S. Support Animals website. No doubt someone on the fringe is already scheming to bring a snake on a plane. In order to do that, they must present a letter signed by a “licensed mental health provider.” Not surprisingly, “clinical psychologists” are advertising documents for $99 on the internet. I don’t know where my friend’s daughter-in-law got hers. That she lives in California may be explanation enough. When medical cannabis was legalized there in 1996, I recall critics saying that doctors were way too accommodating. Telling a doctor “I’m not feeling like myself” would get you a prescription for marijuana, critics complained. A couple of tokes might take the jagged edge off the unpleasantness of airplane travel. People arrive at the airport expecting the worst. It is easy to find fault, to take offense, to object to an Astroturf urine absorber. I am no exception. I don’t want to sit next to a cell phone blabbermouth. I don’t want kids kicking the back of my seat. I don’t want a barking dog within earshot. Sharing space with a cat is out. I have witnessed the asthmatic reaction that cats trigger in my wife’s lungs. It is almost as bad as getting bit in the face by an ESA—as a guy was on a Delta

airliner in June. In short, I take a dim view of animals on airplanes, and I am skeptical of the motives of the therapy critter crowd. A few years ago, my mother was confined in a rehabilitation wing of a Salt Lake City hospital. It was a pretty bleak place. Rooms of pale, elderly patients, attached to machines, biding time morosely until physical therapists roused them from their beds. One afternoon, a man, a woman and a Golden Retriever waltzed in. The dog wore a red bandana around its neck, and its attendants were dressed in matching red shirts. Their chipper voices reached all the way to the nurses’ station as the big dog worked the bed-bound with a nuzzle and a snuffle. When they got to my mother’s room, they announced that it was the dog’s last day on the job. Retirement was ending a grand career of in-patient therapy. I playfully steered the conversation to a successor for the Golden Retriever. “How about a therapy Rottweiler?” I suggested, smiling. They looked as if they’d glimpsed Cujo, Stephen King’s murderous dog, lurking under the bed. I persisted: “These bedridden folks might respond more to a growl from Spike the Rottweiler than a nuzzle from Goldie the Retriever.” The threesome turned on their heels and made for the door. It wasn’t my lame humor that drove them out. It was bruised egos related to the fact that the red-shirted couple, not the patients, were the principal beneficiary of the dog’s hospital visits. Egoism underlies the ESA airplane dodge, too. A growing number of self-absorbed people are exploiting a loophole in the law to save a few dollars. The Air Carrier Access Act of 1986 was intended to benefit persons with disabilities. It was not intended to benefit the parsimonious. To allow this sleeping dog to lie is nuts. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

@kathybiele

Read Carefully

Mike Noel is at it again, though it’s difficult to know just what he’s at. The Kanab representative’s “Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Amendments,” House Bill 135, appears to be an effort to get the “rock lickers” of Salt Lake City out of the watershed-protection business. But once you get past that part of the bill, you may need to ask about this: “A city of the first class shall provide a highway in and through the city’s corporate limits, and so far as the city’s jurisdiction extends, that may not be closed to cattle, horses, sheep, or hogs driven through the city of the first class,” the proposed bill reads. It adds that the legislative body can place “under police regulation the manner” of driving the animals around. It looks like this could just add to the city’s pollution problem, forcing cars to idle—and bringing in a lot of methane gas.

No Death or Dignity

The case of Jchandra Brown is unfortunate because, as Utah County district court Judge James Brady wrote in the ruling, she was “an impressionable minor who could have benefited from support, counseling or therapy.” That, however, doesn’t call for a law against assisted suicide, such as the one proposed by Rep. Mike McKell, R-Spanish Fork. One of the comments on a Deseret News story expresses the concern: “As someone who has a non-curable cancer, I will likely face the choice of death with dignity or being a vegetable. While I’m not sure what I will [choose] at that time, the choice should be mine, and my family, and not some attorney politician.” Utah, specifically Rep. Rebecca Chavez-Houck, D-Salt Lake City, has tried unsuccessfully three times to pass a law on “Death with Dignity.” Lawmakers must distinguish between compassion and callousness.

IN ONE WEEK, YOU CAN CHANGE THE WORLD

POLITICAL TRAININGS

It’s that time of year, just before the Legislature gets rolling with more than 1,000 bills waiting to take wing. As citizen activists, you’ll be coming up against some of the best and highestpaid professional lobbyists, so you’d better be ready when the session convenes on Monday, Jan. 22. Following are some options to bring you up to speed:

Y2U

Yellowstone to Uintas Connection is a nonprofit based in Cache Valley, trying to protect the 350-mile wildlife corridor connecting the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem with the Uinta Mountains. Y2U’s training includes experts on lobbying, communications and upcoming environmental and social justice issues. Squatters Pub, 147 W. 300 South, 435-363-6159, Saturday, Jan. 13, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., $5 students, $10 others, bit.ly/2E8mUOe.

A Red-Taped Blessing

Speaking of water, just say goodbye to a lot of it. The proposed $1 billion Lake Powell Pipeline would “suck 77 million gallons a day out of Lake Powell, threatening the Colorado River,” according to calculations from the Utah Rivers Council. It’s all about providing water to the desert areas in Southern Utah—with no thought of conservation. The good news, however, is that Utah is now asking federal regulators to hold up on their decision to fast-track the project. That’s mainly because they just realized that other federal agencies might have a say in the pipeline. You know, red tape. So while we step back and take a breath, perhaps officials can start to talk conservation and why the area will need six hydroelectric turbines.

CITIZEN REV LT

LEGISLATIVE BOOTCAMP FOR MILLENNIALS

When it comes to health care, DJ Schanz (pictured above, center) believes in the right to choose. Although he’s not a cannabis user himself, that doesn’t stop this returned LDS missionary, graduate student and, now, campaign director of the Utah Patients Coalition, to fight for legalization of medical marijuana in Utah. With the legislative session starting soon, Schanz remains hopeful that the fate of medical cannabis will make it onto the ballot.

This is an opportunity to ensure the voices of Utah’s young people are heard on Capitol Hill. You’ll learn the legislative process, how to track bills and the important difference between educating and advocating. Utah Capitol, 350 N. State, Hall of Governors, Wednesday, Jan. 17, 6:30-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2CugP1l.

CELEBRATING THE POLITICAL KALEIDOSCOPE

There was a child with epilepsy, really bad. The family had to move to Colorado and leave their support system, and everything that was here in Utah. Certain [cannabis] strains took his seizures down from 30 a day to almost none. Families like that—this is what we are working for. We have thousands of medical refugees across the state that’ve had to move when they are literally in the most vulnerable positions of their lives.

Come hear a “conversation about the challenges and opportunities that women of color, LGBTQ and other marginalized communities face both in office and as candidates.” Maryann Martindale, former Alliance For a Better Utah director and current policy advisor with Salt Lake County, leads a discussion with Silvia Catten, Millcreek City Council; Bev Uipi, Millcreek City Council; and Marcia White, Ogden City Council. Y WCA Utah, 322 S. 300 South, Friday, Jan. 12, at 5:30-7:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2AH232m.

Can you explain what a medical refugee is?

REAL WOMEN RUN

What would you tell those who say, “Cannabis is a gateway drug?”

We look at it more as a gateway out of the more-harmful, more-addictive fatal drugs, like prescription painkillers and opiates. When you have patients with epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, cancer or chronic pain, you have this lineup of folks in some of the most stressful and dire situations you can imagine. If you can look at those people and ask the question, ‘Are these people criminals?’ and answer, ‘Yes,’ then you must have ice water running through your veins.

What has been the hardest case you’ve seen with UPC?

In this case, a medical refugee is somebody that has to pack up all their belongs in an extremely vulnerable position in their life—where they have cancer or epilepsy—and move to a neighboring state where medical cannabis is legal. There are thousands and thousands of cases like this where people have had to do that. It’s heart wrenching.

What do you hope to see happen with cannabis legislation this year?

We are going to keep an eye on [legislators], but we are very close to getting this on the ballot. We have about three-quarters of the signatures necessary. So the New Year brings both great amount of skepticism, with the Legislature coming into session, and a great amount of enthusiasm as we’re rounding the turn on completion for the ballot initiative.

—RACHELLE FERNANDEZ comments@cityweekly.net

Each year, there are opportunities to participate in the growing movement called Real Women Run. This year’s Real Women Run features a keynote address by Salt Lake Tribune editor Jennifer Napier-Pearce. Salt Lake Community College, 9750 S. 300 West, Sandy, Saturday, Jan. 13, 8 a.m.3:30 p.m., $15 students, $35 others, bit.ly/2CoHLR3.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net


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I recently adopted a black lab puppy. A neighbor who’s studying to be a vet and volunteers at a shelter gave me kudos, as it’s known in shelters that black dogs are by far the least popular color and are hard to find homes for. Could racism really extend itself in a crossspecies manner? —Robert McCarroll

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Well, your vet-student pal’s certainly right about one thing: it’s an accepted truth among animal-shelter staff that people just don’t want to take black dogs home. Articles and message-board commentary from shelter workers attest to this sad injustice; pounds across the country (and in some cases dedicated black-dog rescue groups) host special adoption events to try to get the poor creatures out the door. Guess what, though? All the concern notwithstanding, this phenomenon—known as black dog syndrome—doesn’t seem to actually exist, at least as far as research has been able to demonstrate. And there’s a fair amount of research, BDS having long been a hot topic in the shelter world. Among the more recent findings: n A 2013 analysis of 1,200 dogs and puppies at two no-kill shelters in New York State saw no significant variation in length of availability for adoption (LOA, in the lingo) related to coat color. The study did find that LOA increased about a day per year of age for adult dogs, and that mediumsized dogs could expect to wait longest; adopters gravitated toward the smallest dogs and the biggest, and (understandably) to the puppies. n Writing in 2015 in the journal Animal Welfare, researchers crunched the numbers from two Pacific Northwest shelters over a four-year period, taking into account the fates of more than 16,000 dogs. Here, they left the puppies out of it and limited the data set to the tougher sells, dogs between 1-13 years old. This time the black dogs actually got adopted faster than dogs overall, beating the average wait time by half a day or more; it was the brindles that had to hang around longer. Older dogs experienced a higher LOA, as did so-called bully breeds; both groups were euthanized more often, too. n In an online article from 2016, the ASPCA looked at shelter records for nearly 300,000 dogs and cats in 14 communities. Again, the black dogs did better than the general dog population: in 2013, for example, they accounted for 30 percent of canine intake but 32 percent of adoptions. Brown or white dogs weren’t in the same kind of demand. For what it’s worth, black cat syndrome might be a thing. Several scholarly papers have reported longer adoption waits for black cats, though the ASPCA data showed them doing OK—tabbies of all colors tended to be adopted less readily.

As far as any supposed black-dog problem is concerned, though, I think we can pretty much put this one to sleep—an image that brings me to my next point. Euthanasia is where the BDS illusion may take its real toll. Say you’re a shelter worker who believes black dogs are less likely to be adopted out. And say your shelter is full to bursting, and you’ve got to select a few unlucky animals to meet their maker. Who you gonna pick? The really weird phenomenon here, I’d say, is the durability of the BDS canard, despite all the studies debunking it. What gives? The best explanation is pet demographics. According to the ASPCA, there are simply more black-coated animals out there—it’s a dominant genetic trait in both dogs and cats—so naturally they’d appear to be overrepresented at the pound. Not to get too Freudian, but I’d suggest that given how much attention the specter of BDS continues to garner, it could be saying a little something about our own cultural anxieties—not unlike the recurring worry over whether dogs themselves can be racist, discussed here in 2010. (Inconclusive due to spotty data, but certainly it’s possible that a dog living in a homogeneously white-peopled enclave, say, might bark at the racially unfamiliar.) BDS may seem to offer another bit of evidence about the perniciousness of racism in American society—and in a venue where the apparent solution (host another black-dog adoption day!) is a bit simpler than anywhere else. Meanwhile, less-damning theories still flourish to explain black dogs’ alleged unpopularity. One you’ll see is that it’s tougher to read the facial expressions of dark-colored animals, and thus harder to forge an emotional connection with them in the unforgiving light of the pound. Far from being dispelled by actual adoption stats, this rationale for a nonexistent trend has evolved with technology: now the story’s about how selfies are an important part of bonding with our pets, and nobody wants to adopt a dog whose face won’t show well on Instagram. Clearly there’s something going on that keeps us coming back to this zombie black-dog myth. Anyway, I don’t mean to be harsh, Bob— I’m sure there are plenty of reasons for the neighbors to think you’re a good guy. Adopting a black dog just doesn’t happen to be one of them. n Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 30 N. Racine, Ste. 300, Chicago, Ill., 60607.


NEWS

CIT Y GOVERNMENT

New Kids on the Block Freshly sworn-in council members are energetic, optimistic. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

DW HARRIS

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Chris Wharton, left, and Amy Fowler were sworn-in as the newest Salt Lake City Council members in early January.

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When the public scrutinizes Wharton’s and Fowler’s decisions, it will likely relate to whether the elected leaders help improve city business: fighting crime, responsible development, affordable housing and road maintenance. Fowler lists correcting the city’s dearth of affordable housing as a No. 1 priority. Most of her indigent clients are in a population that has struggled to secure housing—a factor that compounds their other troubles. “We’re going to be looking a lot at how we’re going to structure our affordable housing,” she says. “The inclusionary zoning, if we’re going to do that, how is that going to look? What is the best model?” Wharton concurs. As a long-term goal, he’s focused on sustainability, which includes cleaning up the air. He applauds the city’s ongoing commitment to upgrade its facilities to be carbon neutral by 2032 and its vehicles to cut its carbon output by 80 percent by 2040. Wharton suggests building a coalition with other municipalities for air quality concerns. “We want people to feel like they can move here, or move their company here, or establish their family here and they’re not going to be breathing toxic air,” he says. Their first turn sitting on the dais was Jan. 2, and both members were eager for the next. “I’m really excited to do this,” Fowler says. “I’m excited to sit every Tuesday until 10 o’clock and listen to our community members—even the ones who are angry at us. It’s our closest form and access to government and to really make a change.” CW

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Undoubtedly, many will watch the interplay between the new council and Biskupski. In the past, council members have described the relationship as strained. But the two newest members are optimistic. Wharton interned for Biskupski during her days in the Legislature, and he’s familiar with her professional style. He also thinks the city council dynamic has already shifted since the time

Goals

Mayor

Biskupski was elected two years ago. “A lot of the challenges are the same, but I think ultimately residents want us to find a way to work together in spite of our disagreements,” he says. “That doesn’t mean the mayor and the council are going to agree on everything but the government is designed to have split authority between the mayor and the council; it’s also designed to be functional and work for the people of Salt Lake.” Fowler challenges the idea that the divide between the mayor’s office and the council is as wide a chasm as it’s been portrayed, though she concedes there have been disagreements. “Our form of government is set up to have a little bit of tension here and there. That’s kind of the point—to have a system of checks and balances,” she explains, adding that the public has overlooked many instances when the two branches have worked in harmony. “I kind of want to show everyone that there is a working relationship together and remember to get the message out into the city that we really do work well together, but at times we aren’t going to agree.” Recently, a piece in the Huffington Post heralded Salt Lake City for electing the “queerest city council ever.” It noted that Fowler and Wharton, along with Councilman Derek Kitchen—a plaintiff in the 2014 lawsuit challenging Utah’s same-sex marriage ban—and Biskupski identify as LGBTQ. Wharton sees these types of articles from outside media as a boon to the region, a way to appeal to younger, more progressive professionals. “Anything that broadens or in some ways challenges the typical viewpoint of Salt Lake City is healthy,” he says.

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Biskupski heard from throngs of distraught residents, a few of whom sent nasty or threatening messages. Former Councilwoman Lisa Adams said it dampered her Christmas that year. The two new faces aren’t immune. But, as attorneys, Wharton and Fowler have developed thick skins in their professional lives. “I feel like I’m more than prepared to address those. As an attorney you deal with a lot of scrutiny from your peers,” Wharton says. “Of course, it’s less personal, but you learn how to accept different viewpoints and you learn how to respond to them in a way that’s civil.” Fowler, who spoke to City Weekly in her pirate-flag decorated office, works as a public defender. She’s used to agitated clients, and she’s prepared to hear from vexed constituents, too. “It’s part of the job. I get it,” she says. “And I think that people get to voice their frustration. That’s part of our government, part of our access to government.” Not only that, they both encountered vitriol on the campaign trail, the worst of which was a death threat sent to Fowler via Facebook. “I don’t know if it was related to this job or my campaign,” she says.

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idday, Chris Wharton sits in a coffee shop near his downtown law firm and sips a green tea matcha as pedestrians parade up and down Main Street. Through the window pane, one of the passersby extends a pleasant wave after recognizing Wharton, who along with Amy Fowler was sworn-in as new Salt Lake City Council members a few days earlier. “That was a resident on the Avenues Community Council,” Wharton explains after waving back. Neither Wharton nor Fowler have held office before, nor held an analogous high-profile position, but the prospect of spending the next four years in a fishbowl doesn’t intimidate them. For Wharton, he counts many familiar friends and neighbors among his constituents. Wharton wants to remain the approachable guy on the street. “I hope that people will always feel like they can contact me and get a hold of me directly and regardless of whether we agree or disagree,” he says. “I always want people to feel like they were heard and that they got a response back from me. I know people will find me accessible and approachable.” Fowler’s initial experience of being recognized by a voter was positive. On a recent Sunday morning, she dined alone at Purgatory for brunch to read over the city’s voluminous budget proposal. Overhearing a bartender ask what she was studying, a man a couple of seats away leaned forward and inquired: “Are you Amy Fowler? … ‘Hey, I voted for you,’” she recalls. The two chatted for a bit about some of his concerns. “I realize that that is going to happen throughout the next four years, but that is why I’m doing this,” she says. “I’m excited by it.” However, the interactions between the public and elected leaders can become contentious. Wharton acknowledges as much; he’s been paying attention for a while. When the city announced the addresses of four new homeless shelter sites in December 2016, for instance, council members and Mayor Jackie


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#ItToo

JANUARY 11, 2018 | 13

—Scott Renshaw, Arts & Entertainment Editor

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or more than 30 years, the Sundance Film Festival has positioned itself on the leading edge of change in the cinematic universe. From offering exposure to traditionally marginalized voices to recognizing the rise of low-budget DIY digital filmmaking, the annual Utah showcase demonstrates how the conversation about movies is ever-changing—and ever in need of changing. In 2018, the art and business of movies finds itself facing more crucial transitions, and City Weekly’s festival preview offers a look at a couple of them. In the wake of 2017’s wave of explosive stories exposing sexual misconduct in the entertainment industry, a Sundance panel explores who gets to tell their stories in the media, and how those stories can effect change. We also dig into the way the 21st-cenury streamingplatform revolution and envelope-pushing TV series have complicated a question as seemingly simple as, “What is a movie, anyway?” Add our annual preview of festival features based on a look at the books that inspired them, and a handy guide to surviving the festival as an attendee, and you’ll be ready to dive into the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. As the world of movies keeps changing, just let us help show you where it’s headed.

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In a post-Weinstein movie industry, a Sundance panel investigates how storytellers can change the world. By Scott Renshaw scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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fficially, the Sundance Film Festival panel that journalist Sarah Ellison will be moderating on Friday, Jan. 19 isn’t about sexual harassment in the entertainment industry. Unofficially, it’s hard not to see that subject infusing every conversation about whose stories get told in the media, and how those stories can change the cultural conversation. That panel—titled “The Power of Story: Culture Shift,” with guests still not finalized at press time— will likely explore, per the festival catalog description, “gender, race and the complex nature of systemic change.” But considering the seismic impact on the movie and television industry since the October publication of sexual assault and harassment allegations against Harvey Weinstein—a film producer and distributor whose often-controversial presence loomed large at Sundance for most of the festival’s history— the need for a particular kind of systemic change has dominated headlines. “You can’t look at what’s happening right now in the culture at large or in the entertainment industry, and not see that something is happening,” Ellison says. “Every social change feels revolutionary at the time, but it’s such a long trudge toward a better future. I think people feel like this is a moment that needs to be seized upon, because it’s hard to get people’s attention about anything, and post-Harvey Weinstein, there’s a real awareness of sexual harassment.” Local producer and director Diana Whitten agrees. The active documentarian and head of the Utah chapter of Film Fatales, an international consortium of women filmmakers, told City Weekly last month the Weinstein case is “the stuff of movies. A ruinous unraveling of blackmail, non-disclosures, gaslighting and Mossad spies all betraying the lengths to which a mogul and his minions were willing—and financially able to—go to silence his victims. “More compelling to me is that a choir of women’s stories was ultimately more powerful than all of it,” she continued. That sentiment rings true for Ellison, a former Vanity Fair special correspondent set to join the staff of the Washington Post later this month. She recently covered the story of Matt Lauer’s dismissal from NBC

happen there that don’t happen as naturally in, say, the insurance industry.” At the same time, the high-profile nature of the entertainment and political arenas has made it more possible for accusers to come forward and have a journalist listen and investigate. “One of the things that’s obvious and clear, is that people who are really suffering the most from these dynamics are those working in low-wage jobs, where their platform is so much smaller than the actresses that have come forward,” Ellison says. “A person running a factory in the Midwest who is sexually or otherwise abusing employees will get less attention from the media.” Because these stories have thus far focused on the entertainment industry, however, that offers show business an opportunity to get ahead of the curve in making institutional changes. The question then becomes whether the industry takes that opportunity. “The Weinstein effect has had a lot of attention on who is the next man who is going to be outed, or step down, and what is the right way to deal with those cases,” Ellison says. “There will be a solidification of the way these things play out. What I hope is that there’s a bit more attention on the cost to people who have undergone this kind of harassment, because we really haven’t grappled with that as much. It’s on everyone now to keep this on [their] top of mind, and make the type of changes that need to be made, not just removing the most egregious kind of perpetrators.” That kind of shift in the movie and television industries—including increasing the opportunities for people besides white men to be in positions of power—will also ultimately have an impact on the kind of stories that are told. While the Sundance Film Festival has offered more opportunities for female, nonwhite and queer filmmakers to tell their stories, the transition from this venue to being in front of multiplex audiences might require changes at the top of big studios and production companies. “There was a piece earlier this year about how someone had gotten plucked from an indie movie by a big producer to direct a huge blockbuster franchise,” Ellison says. “And that male director was plucked because the producer could see himself in this young indie director. If we’re going to follow that pattern, you need to have different kinds of people in that position of power, to pluck other people from the indie movie scene.” That expectation, Ellison points out, affects everything: “The budget, what people get paid, how the marketing rolls out. How many times do people need to be surprised by a hit movie that doesn’t center around a straight white guy before the expectations —Sarah Ellison change? That’s the hard part of the conversation.” There are lots of hard conversations ahead, with While the stories of Weinstein, Lauer, this panel only one among them. Yet Ellison hopes Louis C.K., Kevin Spacey, filmmaker that, despite the challenges, this moment can inspire James Toback and other alleged abusers a real movement toward change, even recognizing have suggested that the entertainment how hard that process will be. “There’s going to be a industry is disproportionately affected by lot of different small, brave movements that will push sexual misconduct, Ellison believes that forward, and it probably won’t all be steps forward,” it’s complicated to understand whether she says. “There will be steps back and mistakes. But that’s true. “People in positions of power it’s incumbent upon everyone to take this moment: for [in entertainment] would say, ‘This is a journalists to keep writing about it, politicians should societal problem. This isn’t specific to engage with it, people who work in the industry need to this industry,’” she says. “If you look indi- be vocal about it. … You can’t rely on the entire country vidually at circumstances that fuel these being woke at exactly the same time.” CW situations of sexual harassment, there are elements of the industry that are so Power of Story: Culture Shift distinct if you are shooting a movie or Friday, Jan. 19, noon working on a television set: getting your Egyptian Theatre hair and makeup done, changing your 328 Main, Park City clothes in front of other people. Things sundance.org

People who are really suffering the most from these dynamics are those working in low-wage jobs, where their platform is so much smaller than the actresses that have come forward.” in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations, and also regularly covers politics. As a result, she has been immersed in both major working worlds that have been at the center of these stories of powerful men misusing their positions to take advantage of women. Ellison notes that the response within those two arenas has not been identical. “The biggest thing that I can see,” she says, “is that, as far as who’s losing what jobs, we’re seeing much more movement on that in the entertainment industry. … Lauer was such a bombshell, because viewers had such a relationship with him. You certainly saw more of him, if you were a Today show fan, than you did of any president or politician.”


D EF I

N I NG

More than ever, the question “What is a movie?” challenges film festival programming. By David Riedel comments@cityweekly.net @daveseesmovies

Over the years, the festival has screened several pieces of episodic work, from the first two episodes of the Mark Duplass-executive produced Animals in 2015, to the Transparent  pilot, to episodes of HBO’s The Jinx. Then came  The Skinny, a six-part web series created by Jessie Kahnweiler that premiered in 2016. “That was our first experiment with short-form episodic,” Sextro says. “That got a good response. Jessie, the creator and star, was embraced and that put a light bulb in our heads. So last year was the year we opened submissions to episodic work.” Entries in 2017 played under the Special Events banner. “[Indie Episodic] was informed by what we did last year,” Sextro says. “And we wanted to focus on independently produced projects.” Slated to premiere at this year’s festival within Indie Episodic are three episodes of  This Close. The six-episode, 30-minute series—created by Shoshannah Stern and Josh Feldman—explores the lives of two best friends, both deaf and both going through significant changes in their personal lives. This Close began as The Chances, an independently produced short-form series that was submitted when Sundance first considered episodic work. It ran in January 2017. “We liked

the series, loved the creators, and it’s a clear example of what can happen with the episodic space,” Sextro says. “It’s an original new path to a series being created.” Sundance Now purchased The Chances last year, and developed it into a series. It was the first time the video-on-demand channel bought a series. To keep Indie Episodic from being swallowed by the features premiering during opening weekend, the section rolls out on Monday of festival week with the premiere of Steve James’  America to Me, a documentary about a progressive high school in the Oak Park suburb of Chicago. The other Indie Episodic programs will play on Tuesday and repeat on Wednesday.  “We had space within the schedule to carve out. We could grow this [section] so it’s not having to fight within the confines of the first weekend,” says Sextro. And a word of advice for aspiring filmmakers: “This is probably the best opportunity to get into Sundance,” Sextro says. “We’re playing 17 projects this year in Indie Episodic. I don’t know the exact number of submissions, but it’s around 400. There are more than 8,000 submissions for short films. They’re playing around 70.” CW

JANUARY 11, 2018 | 15

Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th

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Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th

OXOXOXOXO Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th XOXOXOXOX

OXOXOXOXO Valentine’s Day Wednesday, February 14th XOXOXOXOX

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year to qualify for the Academy Awards, and then ran on ABC and ESPN in June. It’s arguable most of its audience didn’t see it on the big screen. “It’s funny,” says Charlie Sextro, the Sundance Film Festival’s senior programmer. “We loved O.J.: Made in America. There was no way we knew it was going to be an Oscar winner, and it’s a clear example of how the world is changing and how creators are changing. Lines [between television and film] are getting blurred.” In that spirit, Sundance is offering for the first time a section for episodic work called— appropriately enough—Indie Episodic. That’s not necessarily because the festival has the definitive answer about what is or is not a movie (or a TV show), but because it wants to discover new storytellers—whether their work eventually lands in theaters, on television, or a streaming service.  (For its part, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences determined after O.J.: Made in America  won an Oscar that episodic documentaries would no longer be eligible to compete. In the Academy’s eyes, maybe things aren’t so blurry.) The episodic idea has been gestating at Sundance since it showed all seven episodes of Jane Campion’s  Top of the Lake  in 2013.

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W

hat is a movie? If you asked that question in 1980, you’d be mistaken for an alien unsuccessfully trying to assimilate into human culture. But now, because of streaming services such as Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime, the distinction between film and television is blurring. Depending on whom you ask, a featurelength film is between at least 40 minutes and 80 minutes long, first runs in a theater, and the audience has to watch it with a bunch of people they’d never spend time with otherwise. Plus, there’s terrible food. Joking aside, “What is a movie?” was a big question in 2017. Take  Twin Peaks: The Return. For my money, it’s episodic television, but two episodes played at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2017 after the Showtime premiere. It landed on  Sight &  Sound’s Best Films of 2017 list, and in January 2018, the Museum of Modern Art in New York will show the entire series over three days in a screening spearheaded by MoMA’s chief curator of film. Then there’s  O.J.: Made in America. The five-part (and nearly eight-hour) episodic Oscar-winning documentary about O.J. Simpson premiered at Sundance in 2016, was released in New York and L.A. theaters in May of that

This Close began as The Chances, an independently produced short-form series.

SUNDANCE NOW

YOUR TERMS


A

s a showcase for new filmmakers and independent voices, Sundance can be a mystery for those trying to choose what to see. But at least a few titles every year are based on books, allowing for some hint of what might be in store for a viewer. Here’s a preview of five 2018 Sundance features through the source material that inspired them.

PARKVILLE PICTURES

By Scott Renshaw scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

The Miseducation of Cameron Post, by Emily M. Danforth

Festival Section: U.S. Dramatic Competition Book Synopsis: In early 1990s Montana, teenager Cameron Post is just coming to terms with her identity as a lesbian, when the aunt who is her legal guardian finds out and sends her to a Christian “gay conversion” program. Book Review: Danforth’s first-person prose makes Cameron a lively, sympathetic protagonist, and the author effectively ties the character’s conflicted feelings to guilt over the death of her parents. Things get a bit more frustrating once the story shifts to Cameron’s time at the conversion program, where it feels like there’s too little

tension in her own response to carry the dramatic momentum towards the conclusion, plus the loss of the narrative’s most interesting relationship. While avoiding easy demonization of the program’s overseers, it also occasionally lacks a strong sense of tonal focus, while still providing an important hero for young-adult readers. Reasons for Movie Optimism: Writer/director Desiree Akhavan did a solid job of telling a “coming out in a conservative culture” story in 2014’s Appropriate Behavior. Reasons for Movie Concern: Story’s split structure could result in a similar loss of focus to that in the book.

: B Book Grade

Juliet, Naked, by Nick Hornby

Festival Section: Premieres Book Synopsis: Annie and Duncan, a couple who have been together for 15 comfortable but passionless years, near the end of their relationship just as Annie begins an email correspondence with Tucker Crowe, the reclusive American singer-songwriter with whom Duncan has long been obsessed. Book Review: The narrative fits in well with Hornby’s oeuvre of stories about men whose relationships are stunted by their popularculture obsessions, and he always has compassion for his flawed characters. But it’s also a perceptive look at how easy it is to idealize and romanticize anything—maybe a connection to a musician, maybe an online flirtation—as a possible way to fill in the holes in one’s unhappy life. With typical warmth and humor, Hornby delivers a tale that pokes fun at obsessive fans and those who dismiss passionate connection to art, while always remaining human in its approach to both sides. Reasons for Movie Optimism: Great casting of Rose Byrne as Annie and Ethan Hawke as Tucker; pretty solid track record of Hornby adaptations. Reasons for Movie Concern: Sanding down the rough edges of Hornby’s story to focus on a romance could end up sacrificing its most interesting components.

: B+ Book Grade

BRON STUDIOS

APATOW PRODUCTIONS

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SUND A BY THE NCE BOOK

2018

My Abandonment, by Peter Rock [for Leave No Trace]

Festival Section: Premieres Book Synopsis: 13-year-old Caroline and her father live alone as semi-homeless gleaners in a wooded park near Portland, Ore., but their off-the-grid life is upended when they’re discovered and brought into civilization. Book Review: Rock takes some structural chances, not making it a simple story of “girl raised outside of normal world has to adapt.” That decision also results in some bumpiness, as it takes a long stretch of the novel before it becomes entirely clear what it’s about, and why Rock is playing coy with certain plot points. The echoes of the laconic parent-child dynamic from Cormac McCarthy’s The Road feel deliberate, but there’s additional intrigue as it remains tantalizingly unclear what Caroline is meant to learn from her experience, and even whether certain key characters should be considered sympathetic or not. Reasons for Movie Optimism: It’s wonderful to see Debra Granik (Winter’s Bone) back in the director’s chair for a narrative feature, and telling the kind of story—about a tough, resourceful young female protagonist—at which it’s clear she excels. Reasons for Movie Concern: If Granik retains the constantlyshifting setting for the book’s events, it could easily lose an audience in its jumps.

: B Book Grade


TONIK PRODUCTIONS

HOW TO SUNDANCE

Monster, by Walter Dean Myers

The Catcher Was a Spy, by Nicholas Dawidoff

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: B Book Grade

Festival Section: Premieres Book Synopsis: Non-fiction biography of Moe Berg, a journeyman Major League Baseball catcher, Ivy League-educated lawyer, fluent speaker of multiple languages and, eventually, OSS operative who used his many skills to help determine Germany’s atomic bomb capabilities during World War II. Book Review: Berg is a fascinating character, but in an attempt to give his story a cradle-to-grave scope, Dawidoff spends more than 150 pages on Berg’s life before getting to his espionage career, then a fair amount of time on his post-war life with his brother. While that exhaustively-researched approach certainly allows for a sense of the subject’s quirky, private personality, it ends up feeling like a lot of throat-clearing and distraction from the most fascinating anecdotes. At a certain point, you just want to get to the “spy” part, and not so much the “catcher” part. Reasons for Movie Optimism: A narrower focus on Berg’s espionage activities seems essential for a feature that clocks in under 100 minutes, which would be a plus. Reasons for Movie Concern: Paul Rudd as Berg seems to work for the character’s intellect, but the actor hasn’t really had to carry a movie on his dramatic skills. CW

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ANIMUS FILMS

: c Book Grade

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uring the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, non-stop snows turned Park City into a daily Arctic adventure, and a high-profile protest complicated the logistics of getting around the already challenging location. But don’t let any of that scare you away from considering attending Sundance, even if it might be your first time. With a little help from a knowledgeable Sherpa—like your humble narrator, after 20 years of festival coverage—you, too, can be a part of Utah’s annual mixer with the movie industry. What’s New in 2018. If the festival schedule presents you with a couple of unfamiliar names, never fear. The venue formerly known as The Yarrow—inside the ballrooms of the now-renamed DoubleTree by Hilton—The Yarrow hotel—still exists, but it’s now identified as the Park Avenue Theater. And getting to the other new venue—The Ray Theater—from there doesn’t even require you get into a car or shuttle. Located in the same strip mall area as the Park Avenue Theater and the Holiday cinemas, The Ray is a converted space that was formerly home to a Sports Authority store, right next to the Fresh Market on Park Avenue. Also new in the programming: the Indie Episodic section, focusing on works created for broadcast, cable or streaming series (see p. 15 for more details). How to Get Around. Look, there’s no other way to say it: Trying to get around Park City during Sundance week is a nightmare, and that’s if the weather is good. Traffic is brutal on the main arteries of Park Avenue, Kearns Boulevard and Main Street. There is exactly one officially designated parking area—the China Bridge structure on Marsac Avenue—and it’s both ridiculously expensive ($8 per hour with a $60-per-day max) and likely to fill up early in any given day. It’s easy to understand why Salt Lake Valley daytrippers might not want to deal with it. If, however, you want to get a taste for what it’s all about—and there really is nothing quite like it—trek up the mountain as early as possible. Find one of the limited (and free) street parking spots in Prospector Square, in the general vicinity of the Park City Marriott festival headquarters. Then, leave your car and take the festival shuttle buses everywhere you need to go. Word of warning: Try to avoid heading out of town during the peak 4-7 p.m. period, no matter whether it’s a weekday or weekend. Bumper-to-bumper traffic is the norm, as locals getting off of work and day skiers combine with festival traffic to create a perfect storm of frustration. Or for an even more stress-free option, consider taking the PC-SLC Connect bus (UTA route 901), where it leaves from the 3900 South (Meadowbrook) Trax park-and-ride at least twice daily to the transit center at Kimball Junction—where you can catch festival shuttles into town—and heads back down the mountain from the same stop. Best of all? It costs a measly $4.50 per person, and someone else does the driving. (Visit rideuta.com for schedule and routing information.) If you opt to do all of your Sundancing at Salt Lake City venues, you can still take advantage of public transportation. Three of the principal valley venues—the Broadway Theater, Library Theater and Rose Wagner Center—are a 10-15 minute walk from the Gallivan Plaza Trax stop. Seeing a Movie. Yes, this is a film festival after all. Many screenings are officially sold out well before the festival begins, but, in part, that’s to allow wiggle room for the many festival passholders who might attend any one of a number of films at a given time. That means taking advantage of wait listing, which got considerably less stressful in the past few years with the addition of the eWaitlist. Download the official festival app, create an account, then select titles you want to see. You can get in the electronic “queue” for a movie two hours before its scheduled start time—on the dot, so have your trigger finger at the ready. Once you get a number for your virtual spot in line, you can decide whether you’ve got a good enough chance to make it worth your time to head over to the actual venue, where you’ll need to be present no later than 30 minutes before start time, and have $20 cash only per ticket. Your odds will always be better for getting in at the larger venues—like Park City’s Eccles Theater—as well as the earliest and latest screenings of any given day, when many festival attendees are either enjoying a party or sleeping off the previous night. Of course, locals can also consider seeing the “Best of Fest” screenings on the Monday after the festival officially ends (Jan. 29, this year). Titles aren’t announced until Sunday, Jan. 28, but they’re all winners of festival awards, which certainly increases the odds that you’ll see something great. Tickets are free, distributed at the main festival box offices (including Trolley Square) on Saturday, Jan. 13 beginning at 8 a.m. Limit is two tickets per person, and you must have a valid Utah identification. (SR) CW

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Festival Section: U.S. Dramatic Competition Book Synopsis: In contemporary Harlem, African-American teenager Steve Harmon stands trial for murder for his role in a drug store holdup gone wrong. Book Review: Myers attempts a unique structure for his story, alternating between Steve’s journal entries and a format that presents the events of his trial—including flashbacks—in the form of a screenplay. It’s a thematically interesting choice—showing Steve’s attempt to distance himself from a possible life sentence in prison by thinking of the events as a movie—but the use of screenwriting jargon proves distracting, and the legal minutiae of the proceedings are included in a parade of objections and motions which, while likely authentic, are a long slog. The central idea of Steve as a possibly innocent kid viewed by society as less than human gets lost in a bunch of gimmickry. Reasons for Movie Optimism: The problems of a book trying to position itself as a movie might be avoided in a movie that’s actually, you know, a movie. Reasons for Movie Concern: Director Anthony Mandler—a music video veteran making his first feature—needs to show he can sustain the emotional weight for 90 minutes.

It’s not too late to be part of the festival with these tips and tricks.


18 | JANUARY 11, 2018

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ELLEN ALLEN

Grassroots Shakespeare Co.: Romeo & Juliet “O Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?” That simple question has become one of the most quoted lines in the English language. It originated, of course, with William Shakespeare’s classic Romeo and Juliet, a tragic tale about two ill-fated lovers whose bond defied the arch animosity that divided their two feuding families. Even those who have never seen the play—or any of the many film adaptations, for that matter— likely know that phrase well. After all, it’s been part of the premise for many a romantic tryst, most famously, Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim’s modern adaption, West Side Story. Still, there’s nothing quite like the original rendition, especially as presented by the Grassroots Shakespeare Co., a homegrown theater troupe that’s taken its vibrant productions of the Bard’s work from Utah to the U.K. for the better part of the past nine years. Staged with modern audiences in mind, Grassroots Shakespeare sets out to create an immersive, easily accessible experience that allows viewers to pivot from passive observers to active participants, while the actors involved react and respond accordingly. It’s a collaborative effort of sorts, and while the full beauty of Shakespeare’s storytelling remains intact, the opportunity to gain added appreciation finds its full potential. The company’s productions have most often taken advantage of outdoor settings, but Grassroots Shakespeare heads indoors—thankfully, given the season—for R&J. But would not their shows in any other venue smell as sweet? (Lee Zimmerman) Grassroot Shakespeare Co.: Romeo and Juliet @ Scera Center for the Arts, 745 S. State, Orem, 801-255-2787, Jan. 17-20, 7:30 p.m., $10-$12, scera.org

JANUARY 11, 2018 | 19

In 1978, in a little town called Dawson City in Canada’s Yukon Territory, a construction crew unearthed a curious find on the site of what was once a recreation hall: hundreds of cans of nitrate film, containing silent features from the early 1900s. The highly combustible film stock had long since been discontinued, and the majority of all movies from this era lost to fire or degradation. Sealed beneath the Arctic permafrost, the “Dawson City find” marks one of the greatest treasure troves ever of a portion of cinema history once thought lost to time. Director Bill Morrison’s documentary Dawson City: Frozen Time is in part the story of that discovery, showing scenes from movies that hadn’t been seen for decades. Yet he also constructs a tale of Dawson City itself, a boom town born out of the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush, where some men died in the treacherous quest for riches and others—like a brothel owner named Friedrich Trump—built fortunes out of that quest. Employing archival photos and creative use of the movies discovered in Dawson City, Morrison marks more than 60 years in the history of both a piece of geography and the motion picture industry itself. Most fascinating, Dawson City: Frozen Time is a chronicle of the things we only get to know because of the historical record left behind, and how easy it is for pieces of that history to vanish. Join the director for a post-film discussion with moderator Doug Fabrizio, in a celebration of keeping history alive. (SR) Dawson City: Frozen Time @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Jan. 16, 7 p.m., free, post-film discussion with director Bill Morrison, utahfilmcenter.org

WEDNESDAY 1/17

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McHale has become something of a jack-of-alltrades when it comes to entertainment, from creating cartoon voices for Bojack Horseman and Rick and Morty, to leading hilarious liveaction comedy series like The Great Indoors and Community, and even appearing in the recent revival of the legendary sci-fi series The X-Files. Despite his many roles, many of us still remember McHale best as the host of E!’s The Soup, the late-night satirical show where he roasted reality television and sarcastically commented on pop culture for 12 seasons. There’s not much this producer/writer/actor can’t do, and that’s what keeps drawing us to his biting personality and humor. McHale has always managed to balance respect and pushing the envelope in delivering humor to his viewers, thus crafting his own unique style of stand-up. Less than one year after releasing his memoir, Thanks For the Money, McHale is hitting the road, and Salt Lake City is his first stop of 2018. Even though his on-screen career has brought him to greater fame, he’s still a stand-up comic at heart. “I feel like [stand-up] keeps me one day away from death’s door, it’s so exciting and exhilarating,” McHale said in a 2017 interview with AXS. “It really keeps me young. … Live performance truly is the purest art form.” Folks can’t seem to get enough of McHale, so don’t miss your chance. Start the new year off right, by LOL’ing at stories of crazy Hollywood encounters, and what it’s like to party at the White House. (Rachelle Fernandez) Joel McHale @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Jan. 12-13, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $35, 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

Dawson City: Frozen Time

TUESDAY 1/16

Joel McHale

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Attendees of Pioneer Theatre Co. productions are accustomed to high-quality professional theater. They’re less accustomed, however, to seeing a show starring a member of its original Broadway cast. Bright Star—a musical created by Steve Martin and Edie Brickell—comes to PTC as part of a national tour, including Carmen Cusack in her Tony Award-nominated lead role of journalist Alice Murphy. The story moves between two time periods: 1946, as Alice works at a North Carolina newspaper with an aspiring writer; and 1923, when a young love affair changes Alice’s life. Actor Jeff Austin—who plays the villainous mayor Josiah Dobbs, and comes from the Los Angeles and San Francisco productions of the show—finds the Americana music style employed by Martin and Brickell ideal not just for its setting, but to capture the audience’s energy. “The end of first act is less than uplifting, really jarring to the audience,” Austin says. “Part of the brilliance of the show is to start [the second act] with loud, raucous hootenanny music, and they get the audience back in the palm of the show’s hand.” While Cusack is scheduled to leave the tour after Salt Lake City, this show provides a unique opportunity to experience a production with an actor who helped create the character. And Austin emphasizes that even for a touring cast, there’s no taking the show for granted. “I have to remember,” he says, “I’m doing that show for an audience that’s never seen it before. So every time I’m on stage, it’s like opening night for me.” (Scott Renshaw) Bright Star @ Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, Jan. 12-27, Monday-Saturday, times vary, $42-$64, pioneertheatre.org

FRIDAY 1/12

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Pioneer Theatre Co.: Bright Star

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Performance artist DeLesslin George-Warren reframes stories we think we know. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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hen DeLesslin George-Warren offered guided tours of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery hall of presidential portraits in 2016, it wasn’t to provide the comforting stories of American heroes that one might have expected. His goal was to offer a perspective on our country’s history from a point of view rarely considered: that of this land’s indigenous peoples. “People never think about interactions between indigenous people and presidents, other than ‘Andrew Jackson was bad,’” George-Warren says. “They were all terrible [to Native Americans] in their own specific ways.” A member of the Catawba nation of South Carolina, George-Warren has poured much of his energy as a creative artist into making sure that Native voices aren’t silenced. Last year, he received a grant to work on a project to revive the Catawba language, the last fluent speaker of which passed away in the 1960s. In addition to helping code a mobile app to facilitate learning the language, he has worked on creating clothing and posters featuring messages in Catawba, trying to, as he puts it, “turn a dictionary back into a living language.” When he visits the Utah Museum of Natural History this week, however, it will be to provide the same kind of unique perspective on mythologized American history that he brought to Smithsonian visitors in Washington, D.C.

As a supplement to the ongoing Now West! exhibition of art showcasing the history of the American West, George-Warren will present a series of his “Indigenous Corps of Discovery” tours, framing the narrative of westward expansion through stories of indigenous dispossession. “I grew up, really, in our museum on the reservation,” says George-Warren, whose aunts ran the cultural center, “so I have a deep love of museums. But I saw how completely absent Native Americans were from the storytelling. There would be images, but nothing really about our stories.” George-Warren’s own story is a unique one, in part informed by his queer identity. He describes growing up on Catawba land, and attending school outside the reservation. “I knew I wasn’t straight from an early age, but I knew it wasn’t super-acceptable,” he says. “I came out during my sophomore year of college [at Vanderbilt University], so I was away from my community when I was going through this journey. Then I also discovered that I had to come out as Catawba, and it was often more fraught and annoying than coming out as queer: ‘You don’t look it, how much are you.’ They were both, in their way, stressful processes.” He found a unique perspective on his identity as a queer Native American during the protests at Standing Rock in 2016, where George-Warren went to deliver a letter of support from the Catawba community. There he stayed in what was called the “Two-Spirit Camp,” drawing from the tradition in many indigenous cultures that revered individuals with a non-binary gender identity. “It was the first time I felt fully seen as both [queer and Native American],” he says. “Those things aren’t separable from each other. You can’t ask me to check just one box.” George-Warren himself isn’t easy to pin down—a student of operatic performance and musical composition who has become a performance artist, linguist, historian and activist. He brings that distinctive crosssection of talents to presentation like this week’s scheduled event Histories, which

DeLesslin George-Warren presents an “Indigenous Corps of Discovery” tour at the National Portrait Gallery in 2016.

explores ideas of whose stories are told, and why. And while the presentation takes the superficial form of a lecture—interspersed with songs and personal storytelling—that structure is part of the performance. “I was really curious about, who do we trust when they say things,” George-Warren says. “What I was finding amazing is, if it’s just a person in street clothes, or a person of color, there’s a lot of doubt. But a person in professional clothes on stage behind a lectern, automatically a lot more trust is given to that person.” George-Warren realizes that the alternative histories he presents can make some people uncomfortable, even as he emphasizes that his presentations are informed by his own background and point of view. The stories that people are familiar with are deeply ingrained, and even for a self-selecting audience of people interested in a tour of this kind, there can be resistance to hearing about the darker side of legends like George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. He even finds that some people are surprised by the fact that he isn’t angrier as he relates tales of the way indigenous peoples have been treated throughout American history. Yet that, too, is some way part of his talent as a performer. “I try to put on this very positive ‘tour guide’ air,” he says. “Being charming and welcoming to people is part of it. That disconnect was actually unsettling for a lot of people.” CW

DELESSLIN GEORGE-WARREN

Utah Museum of Fine Arts 410 Campus Center Drive Histories lecture/performance Jan. 11, 7 p.m. Tours and presentations Jan. 10-13 umfa.utah.edu


moreESSENTIALS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Aida Hale Center Theater, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Jan. 20, times vary, hct.org Bright Star Pioneer Theater Co., 300 S. 1400 East, Jan. 12-27, times vary, pioneertheatre.org (see p. 20) Cash on Delivery Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, Jan. 12-March 17, dates and times vary, hct.org Dear Ruth Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Feb. 3, haletheater.org Romeo & Juliet Scera Center for the Arts, 745 S. State, Orem, Jan. 17-20, scera.org (see p. 20) Something Rotten! Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through Jan. 14, times vary, artsaltlake.org To Kill a Mockingbird CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Feb. 3, centerpointtheatre.org The Real Thing Westminster College Dumke Black Box, 1840 S. 1300 East, Jan. 4-21, dates and times vary, pinnacleactingcompany.org

DANCE

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

COMEDY & IMPROV

J.F. Harris Wiseguys SLC 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 11., 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Joel McHale Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Jan. 12-13, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, (see p. 20) wiseguyscomedy.com Mike E. Winfield Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park, Jan. 12-13, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Nemr Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Jan. 12-13, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Urban Flea Market The Gateway, 100 S. 400 West, Jan. 14, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., fleamarketslc.com Be Great with Becca Clausen Southern Utah University Museum of Art, 13 S. 300 West, Cedar City, Jan. 11, 7 p.m., suu.edu Good Trouble: Children’s Story Time and Social Dance Presentation Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-5817332, Jan. 11 & 13, times vary, umfa.utah.edu

JANUARY 11, 2018 | 21

TALKS & LECTURES

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SPECIAL EVENTS

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Salt Lake Symphony Family Fun Concert: Read, Listen, Play! Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Jan. 13, 2 p.m., saltlakesymphony.org Fischer Conducts Rachmaninoff & Stravinsky Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 385-4681010, Jan. 12-13, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

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Lark & Spur: An Evening in Paris The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, Jan. 12-13, 7:30 p.m., slcc.edu (see p. 34) Myriad Dance Company: Perspective UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, Jan. 13, 7:30 p.m., myriaddancecompany.com


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VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Mixed-media artist Miroslava K. Vomela combines cut-outs from magazines and catalogs with layers of color and images in Vivid Image-ination: Reimagining and Recontextualizing Found Images at Sweet Library (455 F St., 801-594-8651) through Feb. 24, with an artist reception Saturday, Jan. 13, 3 p.m. Histories: Artist Lecture and Performance Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, Jan. 11, 7 p.m., umfa.utah.edu Indigenous Corps of Discovery: The Don’t Go West Expedition Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Jan. 13, times vary, umfa.utah.edu (see p. 21) Wasatch Speaker Series Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, through March 29., 385-468-1010,

7:30 p.m., dates vary, artsaltlake.org Leslie Anderson: The Most Frightful Nightmare: American Artists on Westward Expeditions Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, Jan. 17, 7 p.m., umfa.utah.edu

SEASONAL EVENTS

Christmas in the Wizarding World The Shops at South Town, 10450 S. State, Sandy, through Jan. 31, shopsatsouthtown.com

Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Jan. 27, utahmoca.org All Those Who Wander: Exploring the World by Lens Bountiful Davis Art Center, 90 N. Main St., Bountiful, Jan. 12-Feb. 28, bdac.org Andrew Alba: Spring and All Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Anna Betbeze: Dark Sun UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Jan. 14, utahmoca.org Annual Statewide Juried Exhibition Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Jan. 12, heritage.utah.gov Artist/Dad Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Jan. 12, heritage.utah.gov Carol Sogard: Artifacts for the 23rd Century UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Jan. 13, utahmoca.org Chauncey Secrist: Icons: Assemblages Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through March 6, slcpl.org Christine Kende Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, Jan. 15-Feb. 10, slcpl.org Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through March 11, umfa.utah.edu Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective LDS Church History Museum, 45 N. West Temple,

through April 15, history.lds.org Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Lawrence Magana: Our Native Color DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-5948632, through Feb. 17, slcpl.org Leslie Randolph: Fire Paintings and MacroGalleries Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Feb. 16, slcpl.org Lizzie Määtälä and Jared Steffensen: Woula Coulda Shoulda Nox Contemporary Gallery, 440 S. 400 West, Ste. H, through Feb. 9, facebook.com/nox-contemporary Lucy Peterson Watkins: Fiber Art Exhibit Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Feb. 25, redbuttegarden.org Miroslava K. Vomela: Vivid Image-ination Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org (see above left) Simon Blundell: Fragmentation and Language Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801524-8200, Jan. 13-Feb. 23, slcpl.org Tim Peterson: A Risk Taker Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, Jan. 17-Feb. 18, slcpl.org The Video Game Show Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through Feb. 4, urbanartsgallery.org Virginia Johnson: Meditations on Ennui Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Jan. 11, slcpl.org Vivid Image-ination: Reimagining and Recontextualizing Found Images Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Feb. 24, slcpl.org


Machu Picchu delivers a taste of the Andes to the Wasatch Front. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

AT A GLANCE

Open: Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m, Friday-Saturday 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Best bet: The sumptuously stocked desayuno buffet Can’t miss: The soulful lomo saltado

JANUARY 11, 2018 | 23

table and a well-trimmed Christmas tree presides over a performance space that I later learn will be used for some riotous karaoke come New Year’s Eve. Beneath this gilded layer of seasonal cheer, the walls are covered with al-

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Because I’m dining a few days before Machu Picchu’s annual New Year’s celebration, the place is positively bedecked with holiday flair. Golden tinsel centerpieces that optimistically display “2018” stand proudly on each

course in Peruvian cuisine, then cancel your plans for Saturday morning and check out the desayuno buffet ($11.99) from 10 a.m.noon. Some standouts include a wide variety of tamales along with fried plantains, pan con chicharrón and the tripe-y goodness of patasca. It’s a must for someone who is either extremely hungry or wants to take a deep dive into Peruvian cuisine—or both. There are many reasons why Peruvian cuisine should be welcomed with open arms, and Machu Picchu’s dedication to beautifully presenting traditional food with some truly great service makes it an ideal entry point. CW

L

ike the Incan ruins from which this South Salt Lake gem takes its name, Café Machu Picchu (3018 S. State, 801466-4908) is a treasure trove of mystery that begs to be explored. It’s not the only Peruvian joint in town—Andean cuisine is starting to make a splash nationwide—but it just might be the most inviting. The menu holds fast to traditional Peruvian dishes, which borrow heavily from the cultural toolbox that European, Asian and African immigrants brought with them to Peru over the years. In short, Peruvian cuisine was experimenting with culinary fusion long before anyone on Top Chef.

Peruvian cuisine’s penchant for food piles. It’s a mammoth portion of rice tossed with a mixture of shrimp and calamari along with a generous helping of spicy heat. It’s an unexpectedly satisfying meal to start off the day—nothing like fresh seafood and hot rice to jumpstart the ol’ taste buds. For those seeking a little adventure, make sure to check out the patasca ($11.99). Some places that offer tripe tend to downplay the rubbery bovine stomach lining, but tripe is the star of this Peruvian stew. It’s accompanied by boiled potatoes and hominy, all of which is served piping hot in a broth supercharged with beef flavor. As this was my first time trying tripe, I have to say that it’s not as terrifying as one might think. Chewing and cutting through the gristly mass presents a bit of a challenge, but tripe functions as a concentrated flavor sponge that imparts a surprising amount of character to this meaty dish. Wash it all down with a fruity Inca Kola for the full experience. If you’re looking for a crash

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ENRIQUE LIMON

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The Tripe Stuff

paca-fur blankets, traditional musical instruments and an array of paintings depicting stories from the New Testament—which are for sale if anyone needs to round out their collection. Taken altogether, it’s a space that celebrates its cultural roots while remaining accessible to those who are visiting for the first time. Depending on what newbies are looking for in a restaurant destination, Machu Picchu has something for just about everyone—whether or not you’re a fan of beef tripe. For those on the tripe-less end of that spectrum, the lomo saltado ($13.50 or $9.99 as a lunch special) or arroz de mariscos ($12.99, also available as a lunch special) are great places to start. The lomo is a harmonious mixture of steak strips that have been marinated and grilled to perfection, sautéed onions, peppers and tomatoes. It’s all served atop a starchy bed of thick-cut french fries and accompanied by a softball-sized helping of white rice. The arroz de mariscos is yet another reason to fall in love with


FOOD MATTERS BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

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Stanza Goes Slovenian

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Culinary geeks are invited to attend a wine and food pairing hosted by Stanza (454 E. 300 South, 801-746-4441, stanzaslc.com) on Jan. 11 at 6:30 p.m. Chef Jonathan LeBlanc is set to conjure up a five-course tasting menu that includes Pacific oyster veloute, prosciutto crudo, sausage orecchiette and herb-roasted lamb loin, each paired with a specially curated roster of Slovenian wines courtesy of Dolfo and Zampato vineyards. Spots are $100 per person, and those preferring not to imbibe can purchase the tasting menu sans wine. Sounds tailor-made for those of us who have already abandoned their New Year’s resolutions.

Alamexo Weekend Warmers

Throughout the month of January, Alamexo Cantina (1059 E. 900 South, 801-658-5859, alamexocantina.com) spices up those winter weekends with a new series of specialty margaritas and a rotating menu of $1 tacos. On Saturdays and Sundays from noon-2 p.m., chef/owner Matt Lake lets his creativity run amok in an effort to liven up those palates and clear those sinuses. If you can’t make it during lunchtime hours, Alamexo also offers an “all day, your way” menu where diners can mix and match signature dishes to best match their individual style. Alamexo, you had me at $1 tacos.

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1458 South Foothill Drive

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Brio Risotto Celebration

Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

In addition to its newly expanded series of bar bites, Brio Tuscan Grille (brioitalian.com) is gearing up for its Risotto Celebration Jan. 9-March 25. As risotto is a staple of Italian cuisine, Brio’s culinary director Alison Peters is looking forward to tempting diners with interpretations that feature everything from sea scallops to sweet potato. To complement the risotto fest, Brio also has a new line of smashes such as maple bourbon, grapefruit gin and the Bulleit Rosa. Blankets and space heaters are nice, but risotto and bourbon are the real MVPs when it comes to staying warm during winter. Quote of the Week: “In Italy, they add work and life onto food and wine.” —Robin Leach Tips: comments@cityweekly.net

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181


Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

FAST CASUAL DINING

nomad-eatery.com

801.938.9629

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2110 w. No. Temple

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JANUARY 11, 2018 | 25


Beer Blending 101

Personalize your craft beers with a little mix and match. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

T

here’s nothing worse than sitting your ass on a barstool, looking at the beer menu and finding nothing that you like. Even in some of Salt Lake City’s best beer pubs, where you have hundreds of options, that damned hamster wheel in your mind just keeps on spinning with little satisfaction. When I find myself in that funk of indecision, I often look to blending. Beer blending is a bit of a rarity for most people; I guess folks just assume that the beers listed are the only options and leave it at that. That couldn’t be further from the truth. No matter if the beer is draft, canned or bottled, your perfect slump-busting beer could be a mad scientist’s concoction away.

There are some basic rules that you’ll want to follow. First, look for beers with complementary flavors; don’t just go all drunken master and see what sticks. Remember: You still have to drink that swill. Let’s say you’ve got a pumpkin beer that you’re really not too jazzed about. Combining that with a robust porter (in the ratio of your choosing) can likely create a much more complex and enjoyable beer that’s better as a whole than its individual parts. Next: Pay attention to presentation. It might taste OK, but a beer blend that looks like canal water is going to be less than appetizing. I’ve thrown together a few examples to help get you started. The Moose Knuckle: This is one of my favorite blends. Co-concocted with my pal Wendy Hurd, this blend came out of necessity due to our cravings for a Flemish oud bruin (sour brown ale) when none could be had. It’s the marriage of a Lindemans Cuvée René and a Moose Drool Brown Ale. We were trying to re-create a beer that has perceived fruitiness plus that wild Belgian tartness. We absolutely succeeded, creating a perfect replica of the style. Our best ratio was two parts Moose, one part Cuvée. The Blondeberry: I love berries that are just on the edge of being ripe. Golden raspberries are particularly tasty. There aren’t many beers with this variety of berry floating around, so this is my best attempt

at creating a specific tart ale. For this blend, I went to Kiitos Brewing Co. and used two of their house beers: the blackberry sour ale and the cream ale. The ratio here is lopsided, mixing 85 percent cream ale and only 15 percent blackberry. This way, you balance out the big tartness with a little sweetness. It’s the best of both worlds. The Chocolate Tart: This is a dessert beer disguised as a spring ale. Chocolatelike stouts suffer from being difficult to enjoy in quantity. No matter how much you might love them, you’re likely only good for one or two pints. For this dose of bliss, I chose Epic’s Brainless Raspberry and got it all funky with Red Rock’s nitro oatmeal stout. Not to be outdone there, I stacked them. If you’re not sure what stacking is, look to the classic Black and Tan: dark Guinness on top with light ale beneath, completely separated in one glass. This blend is a solid 50/50, taking the perceived chocolate notes from the stout and combining them with tart fruit to create a raspberry cordial clone. It’s damned tasty. These are just a few examples of what you can do with beer blends. Keep good notes, and don’t be afraid to experiment with beer styles that might not be in your wheelhouse. As always, cheers! CW

MIKE RIEDEL

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BEER NERD

Kiitos blackberry sour and creme ales as one.


Breakfast

OMELETTES | PANCAKES GREEK SPECIALTIES

Lunch & Dinner HOMEMADE SOUP GREEK SPECIALS GREEK SALADS HOT OR COLD SANDWICHES | KABOBS PASTA | FISH STEAKS | CHOPS GREEK PLATTERS & GREEK DESSERTS

Beer & Wine EAT MORE

LAMB

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our critic’s faves.

coffee, crepes & a mic

sustain yourself!

Proper Burger Co.

At this Avenues Proper spin-off, burgers and brews are in abundance. The basic Plain Jane—the starting point of most burgers here—has perfect flavor and texture, with brisket incorporated into the quarterpound beef patty blend. Variations are plentiful, including the Rising Sun (with kimchi, miso aioli, cilantro, fried egg, Sriracha and pickled cucumber) and the Hipster (featuring kale pesto, red onion jam, fresh herb cheese spread, garlic aioli and spinach). 865 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-906-8604, properburgerslc.com

3231 S. 9 0 0 E. 801-466-3273 7am-1am / 7 Days A Week OPEN MIC EVERY SUN @ 7:30 - 10:30 p.m.

Shawarma King

THE OTHER PLACE

RESTAURANT

Open 7 days a week

469 EAST 300 SOUTH | 521-6567

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MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM SUN 8AM - 10PM

Owner Ehsan Suhail makes his shawarma—often a combination of beef and lamb, cooked on a rotating vertical spit—from scratch, and the chicken shawarma in particular is tender, rich and juicy, served with housemade garlic-lemon sauce, tomato, lettuce and pickle slices. A favorite is the lamb koozi, a house specialty with chunks of lamb braised until almost falling off the bone, and served on basmati rice seasoned with raisins, toasted almonds and onions. 725 E. 3300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-8039434; 2223 S. Highland Drive, Salt Lake City, 385-415-2100, slcshawarmaking.com

Guru’s Café

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Whether stopping in for breakfast, lunch or dinner, fresh is something you can always expect at this bright Provo café. Indulge in a breakfast quesadilla or the cream-cheese-stuffed Philly French toast, or try the cinnamon mango oatmeal for a lighter start. Cold or hot sandwiches, soups, tacos, pizzas and pastas are not to be missed later in the day, and there are plenty of vegetarian options for the meat-averse. Guru’s “to each their own” philosophy is focused on enlightenment, and it’s easy to achieve with their plentiful menu items. 45 East Center St., Provo, 801-375-4878, guruscafe.com

Ruth’s Diner

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JANUARY 11, 2018 | 27

ORIGINAL

Buy one entree

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U TA H

A

One of the oldest restaurants in Salt Lake City, Ruth’s opened in 1949 in a downtown trolley car that Ruth herself moved up Emigration Canyon. Erik and Tracy Nelson now run the place, and you’ll find contemporary dishes like Erik’s raspberry chicken alongside classics such as liver and onions or tender, braised pot roast. Breakfast is served into late afternoon, so you can order the famous Mile-High biscuits with country gravy for a late lunch. In warm weather, the sprawling patio is the place to be, as the restaurant also offers live music from local artists. 4160 E. Emigration Canyon Road, Salt Lake City, 801-582-5807, ruthsdiner.com


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DAVID MILLER

A sample of our previously published reviews

Stay warm with your friends at 20 W. 200 S. SLC | (801) 355-3891

Nomad Eatery’s fried mortadella sandwich

Nomad Eatery

Chef/owner Justin Soelberg calls his airport-convenient eatery a “fast-casual diner,” but banish any preconceived notions you have about fast food. The once-dark space that previous housed Basilico is now airy and inviting, with lots of reclaimed wood and a contemporary, but comfortable, look and feel. The “fast” aspect is that customers order and pay in advance at the counter, with food delivered to their tables; all dishes are cooked to order. Sandwiches and pizzas are the mainstays of the menu, and they’re uniformly excellent. The simple Margherita ($10) features a very good, rustic dough base, light tomato sauce, fresh mozzarella, basil, extra-virgin olive oil and Grana Padano cheese. It took a bit of arm-twisting to get me to try the fried mortadella sandwich ($10), but it turned out to be astonishingly satisfying: fried mortadella on a Kaiser-style bun with American cheese, French dressing, shredded lettuce, zucchini pickle and a side of tasty salt-andvinegar chips. The french fries—double-fried, perfectly cooked, thin-cut fries—are also remarkable here. Enjoy them with the excellent smoked turkey sandwich ($10), which also includes zippy black bean hummus, Fritos, Monterey Jack cheese, pickled red onion and bacon aioli on a wheat roll. Reviewed Dec. 14. 2110 W. North Temple, 801-938-9629, nomad-eatery.com

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

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28 | JANUARY 11, 2018

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REVIEW BITES

Buy One Kobe Beef (8oz /10oz) Get One Ginza Beef Or Chicken Or Pork Free (Same Size) Mon.-Fri. 5pm-10pm Sat.-Sun. 11am-10pm

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served

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ALL DAY! AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

-CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm 4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

JANUARY 11, 2018 | 29

694 East Union Square, SANDY brittonsrestaurant.com

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“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

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BREAKFAST and LUNCH


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FILM REVIEW

Civic CAREER! Engagement Copperfield Media is seeking an energetic and self-motivated individual looking for a career in media sales. As part of the Copperfield team, you can build a career in an exciting industry, make money, have fun, and be a part of a company that makes a difference in our community.

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CINEMA

The Post once again finds Steven Spielberg teaching entertaining lessons in American democracy. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

20TH CENTURY FOX FILMS

Start the year with a new

I

f America was going to get a cinematic civics teacher, it certainly could have done a hell of a lot worse than Steven Spielberg. It’s not as though the most successful entertainer in the history of movies has given up on frivolity, with recent features like The BFG and the upcoming Ready Player One. But in recent years, the 71-yearold director has grown more contemplative, using his gifts behind the camera to tell stories about how America can be the best possible America, from the complex legislative sausage-making of Lincoln to the defense of civil liberties in Bridge of Spies. The Post seems like part of an unofficial trilogy with those two previous films—a spirited, engaging exploration of freedom of the press that is bound to feel even more pointed in the age of another president openly hostile toward the Fourth Estate. This story, however, takes us back more than 40 years, to whistle-blower Daniel Ellsberg (Matthew Rhys) turning over to The New York Times in 1971 documents from a Department of Defense-commissioned report chronicling American involvement in—and public deception about—Vietnam going back to the Truman administration. The Nixon administration sought an injunction against the publication of the Pentagon Papers as a threat to national security, yet as the title of The Post suggests, the focus here isn’t on the Times, but on the Washington paper dealing with complex issues at the same time. While publisher Katharine Graham (Meryl Streep) prepares to take the cash-poor paper public, editor Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks) tries to play catch-up with the Times’ reporting. And both of them ultimately face a hard decision

about whether to risk publishing their own stories about the Pentagon Papers in the face of legal, political and financial pressure. Much of the time, The Post feels like two different movies pasted together, which makes it a bit less effective as either one. On the one hand, there’s the procedural story of reporters uncovering a far-reaching scandal, which is right in the wheelhouse of co-screenwriter and Spotlight Oscar-winner Josh Singer. The story emphasizes the lowtech leg-work of reporting in the pre-internet era, particularly as reporter Ben Bagdikian (Bob Odenkirk) tries to verify his suspicion that Ellsberg is the source of the Pentagon Papers leak. The script includes plenty of pointed, on-the-nose dialogue about the importance of journalism—“We have to be the check on their power,” etc.—but The Post is considerably more entertaining simply observing as Bradlee and his staff fumble through the disorganized stack of documents, or when Bradlee sends an intern to spy on the Times to figure out what they’ve got, or even respecting the hard work of everyone from typesetters to workers on the loading docks who get the paper out into the world. This is also, however, the story of Graham’s crucible moment as publisher, built on the back-story of her unexpected ascendance to heading the family business after her husband’s suicide. Streep’s performance is predictably sensational at capturing a woman full of self-doubt in a society still skeptical of women in positions of authority,

Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep and the newsroom staff of The Post

and Spielberg employs all of his skills in shots that emphasize her insecurity: peering down at her over Bradlee’s shoulder in a way that pins her in a corner, or circling her at a party like she’s prey just ready to be eaten. Here, too, there are moments that are a bit overwrought—Graham descends the steps of the Supreme Court through a sea of women gazing at her in unabashed hero-worship— but it’s a fascinating piece of character study, even if it’s one that’s more parallel to the central narrative than integrated into it. Yet it’s also a wonderfully efficient piece of filmmaking, opting not to focus on the arguments before the Supreme Court despite the fact that the case was a First Amendment landmark. Spielberg is slick enough in his directing choices—and savvy enough to put together a killer cast of supporting players like Tracy Letts, Bradley Whitford, Sarah Paulson and Alison Brie—that it rarely feels like you’re getting a lecture about the importance of an adversarial free press. And even when it is what you’re getting, it’s nice to have a lecturer with some style. CW

THE POST

BBB Meryl Streep Tom Hanks Bob Odenkirk PG-13

PAIRS WELL WITH All the President’s Men (1976) Robert Redford Dustin Hoffman PG

Lincoln (2012) Daniel Day-Lewis Sally Field PG-13

Spotlight (2015) Mark Ruffalo Michael Keaton R

Bridge of Spies (2015) Tom Hanks Mark Rylance PG-13


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JANUARY 11, 2018 | 31


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CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. CALL ME BY YOUR NAME BBBB The whole concept of “ripeness” permeates this gorgeous adaptation of André Aciman’s novel by screenwriter James Ivory and director Luca Guadagnino. Set in the summer of 1983 in Northern Italy, it follows the relationship between 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet), the son of a classics scholar (Michael Stuhlbarg), and Oliver (Armie Hammer), the 20-something doctoral student working for the summer as a research assistant to Elio’s father. In many ways there’s a familiar coming-of-age structure to the story, as Elio eyes Oliver from afar, not quite sure yet about his own feelings. But the narrative complicates matters not just because it’s a gay romance, but by layering the characters’ outsider sensibility by having them be Jews in Italy, and by giving Elio’s family openly gay friends and a tolerant approach to their son’s explorations (including a heartbreaking monologue by Stuhlbarg). Guadagnino emphasizes the fruit trees and buzzing insects of his setting, creating an entire fertile world into which Elio—stunningly portrayed by Chalamet—begins to emerge as an adult. It’s a world of first love where everything, including emotion, is exploding into bloom. Opens Jan. 12 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw THE COMMUTER [not yet reviewed] A businessman (Liam Neeson) is caught up in a criminal conspiracy while on a train ride home from work. Opens Jan. 12 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) MY FRIEND DAHMER BB.5 A potentially exploitative subject turns out to be surprisingly intriguing, for equally surprising reasons. Director Marc Meyers adapts the graphic novel memoir by cartoonist John “Derf” Backderf (played by Alex Wolff) about his acquaintance with future infamous cannibalistic serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer (Ross Lynch) when they were classmates at the same Ohio high school. Meyers spends a lot of time on scenes that feel like an attempt

to diagnose the origins of Dahmer’s pathology—his mother’s (Anne Heche) mental illness; the separation of his mom and dad (Dallas Roberts); fear of his latent homosexuality—and snippets of dialogue that walk the line between insightful and too uncomfortably nudging (“New rule in this house: We eat our mistakes,” mom says after a badly made dinner). Lynch’s performance, however, is compellingly nuanced, from Dahmer’s slouch-shouldered trudge, to his awkward smiles when he tries to engage with his peers. It’s clear that a lot of material was added to supplement the story from Derf’s point of view; all of that stuff tends to distract from a disturbing look at a kid who has no idea how to be normal. Opens Jan. 12 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR PADDINGTON 2 BBBB There is such kindness here, and such humanity, though that seems too small a word for the small, furry ursine who has such a positive effect on everyone merely by expecting the best from them. Returning writer-director Paul King achieves this stunning sweetness and charm while avoiding (once more) all the syrupy sanctimony that unfortunately drags down so many movies deemed suitable for kids. This time, the young bear—in vivid, authentic CGI, voiced by Ben Whishaw again—is framed for a heinous theft, and his adopted human mother (Sally Hawkins) leads the investigation to clear his name; washed-up actor Phoenix Buchanan (a hilarious Hugh Grant), a fellow denizen of storybook London street Windsor Gardens, is a prime suspect. Meanwhile, Paddington is spreading marmalade-fueled exuberance behind bars, though grumpy prison chef Knuckles McGinty (Brendan Gleeson) is proving a challenge. Adventure! Intrigue! Daring escapes and rescues! A treasure hunt! A train chase! Afternoon tea! This is a fantasy of unique scope and astonishing emotional depth beneath the silliness. There isn’t single moment here that isn’t an absolutely enrapturing bear hug of snuggly, heartwarming delight. Opens Jan. 12 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson THE POST BBB See review on p. 30. Opens Jan. 12 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

PROUD MARY [not yet reviewed] An organized crime hit-woman (Taraji P. Henson) faces a personal crossroads. Opens Jan. 12 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS THE CAMERAMAN At Edison Street Events, Jan. 11-12, 7:30 p.m. (NR) DAWSON CITY: FROZEN TIME See p. 19. At Rose Wagner Center, Jan. 16, 7 p.m. (NR) LADY BIRD At Park City Film Series, Jan. 12-13, 8 p.m.; Jan. 14, 6 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES

I, TONYA BBB.5 This cheeky, hilarious biopic of infamous skating champion Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie) seeks to redeem an unfairly maligned woman, exploring her life before and after the Nancy Kerrigan “incident” from multiple perspectives: her own, her mother LaVona (Allison Janney) and ex-husband Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan). Robbie’s career-best, warts-and-all performance convincingly plays Tonya at ages ranging from 15 to 40, earning compassion without pleading for it; Janney is masterful as LaVona, who’s trickier to play because she seemingly has no positive qualities. Though it’s irresistibly funny and filled with insane (but true) details, this is ultimately a sad story about a mistreated woman who overcame obstacles to achieve brief glory, then lost the one thing that brought her happiness. Those who have hated her for almost 24 years might have to re-examine their feelings, but the guilt trip is an entertaining one. (R)—Eric D. Snider

INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY BBB James Wan and Leigh Whannell—who, for better or (arguably) worse, created the supremely gory Saw franchise—have become more interested in giving audiences goose bumps than covering them with blood. Sure, this fourth Insidious installment is a sequel to a prequel, but it’s easy to follow and full of both unearned jump-scares and earned terrifying moments. In one scare-your-pants-off scene, a demon spider-walks slowly toward a character as the character is fully aware that she’s about to be lunch or whatever the demon has planned. The Last Key brings back spiritual medium Elise (Lin Shaye) and her colleagues (comic relief players Whannell and Angus Sampson), as she exorcises demons from her family home. As with all Insidious films, this one subverts a few horror expectations while also relying on cliché. But when it works, it really works. (PG-13)—David Riedel

more than just movies at brewvies FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: JANUARY 12TH - JANUARY 18TH

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CONCERT PREVIEW

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www.theroyalslc.com

Joe Satriani’s G3 tour finds magic in strange places.

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

wednesday 1/10

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

J

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 1/11 Reggae at the Royal

culture crews

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5

swells • vaea

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

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JOSEPH CULTICE

friDAY 1/12

Joe Satriani

saturday 1/13

Live Music

BIG FOOT AND THE DOGMEN vann moon • the swinging lights abuncha bang saturday and sunday

jersey giveaways nfl division playoffs

great food & drink specials Tuesday 1/16

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon 1/26

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featuring dj jason lowe 2/3

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(and his bandmate Vivian Campbell) can play. “There are great, great shredders—fabulous musicians—that are in bands that either feel uncomfortable stepping out of the bands or don’t really have a solo show,” Satch says. Collen’s involvement started earlier this year when Satriani invited him to participate in a G4 Experience, a multi-day fullimmersion clinic and offshoot of G3. Although Satch hadn’t met Collen, he knew from Def Leppard’s records that he “held a fantastic musical ability.” But he says Collen’s real test was getting onstage in the first place. “Anybody that joins G3 has got to be very confident, because you’re gonna be standing next to players that are the best players in the world, and there’s no room for delicate flowers.” Collen, despite his British tendency toward holding back, blew everyone away: “He lights up a room, lights up a stage,” Satch enthuses. The confluence of three unique styles always makes G3 interesting. But Collen’s inclusion on G3 2018 makes a thrilling combo, with Petrucci’s more exotic and mysterious prog vibe between Satriani’s beaches-in-space sound and Collen’s balance of English reservation and Cali sun. “When I look at players, I look for similarities and differences,” Satriani says. The similarities are what help things go smoothly, they assure that individuals feel comfortable with each other and the working situation. “But it’s the differences that really add that special mojo every night.” CW

mooseknuckle • 4TH RYTE

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G3 2018, FEAT. JOE SATRIANI, JOHN PETRUCCI AND PHIL COLLEN

Tuesday, Jan. 16, 7 p.m. Delta Hall at the Eccles Theater 131 S. Main 801-355-2787 $50-$495 live-at-the-eccles.com

W/ the wayne hoskins band huge superbowl party jersey giveaway food & drink specials all day

2/4

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

JANUARY 11, 2018 | 33

oe Satriani is known for his extraterrestrial guitar playing—not necessarily his pre-fame power-pop trio, The Squares. The band still occasionally comes up in interviews, even when he’s promoting his G3 2018 tour, giving us three times the reasons to keep it about guitar. But that doesn’t mean the tour can’t reveal interesting layers to “Satch” and his tour mates John Petrucci and Phil Collen. I learned of The Squares from Satriani himself several years ago in an interview for Guitar World. Nothing came of the band’s 1979-1984 run, not even a full album. “We were extremely unsuccessful,” Satch says in a recent phone interview. “But they were exciting times.” Another little known Satch fact is that, after The Squares fell apart, he joined another power-pop outfit, the Greg Kihn Band (“The Breakup Song,” “Jeopardy”). Both groups focused on short, punchy tunes, so most of the world didn’t experience Satriani’s otherworldly six-string shredding abilities until his self-titled solo EP in 1984. By the time Not of this Earth (1986) and Surfing with the Alien (1987, both on Relativity) came out, his playing relegated The Squares to a trivia answer. The songs still exist on YouTube, and Satriani and his friend/soundman/producer/archivist John Cuniberti painstakingly slow-baked the tapes and digitized them for release someday. Satch feels that releasing them for their own sake is a career non-sequitur—he’s a guitar player now. Not that he isn’t open to showing fans that side of himself. He just doesn’t want to confuse the shred fans who have supported him throughout the past 33 years—especially when he’s still fully stocked with shred juice. “[The Squares’ recordings] may wait for a time when there’s some larger musical biopic of what I’ve done—I guess I’m just too prolific,” he says. The guitar virtuoso now has 16 solo albums to his credit, including What Happens Next (Sony). It comes out four days before the fifth stop—Salt Lake City—on G3 2018, the 17th iteration of the tour that debuted in 1996 with Satriani, Steve Vai and Eric Johnson as the original axe-god trinity. Immensely popular among fans of instrumental guitar music, G3 celebrates musicianship with a night of mind-scrambling fretboard firepower featuring solo sets by each headliner and a finale that inserts all three players onstage at once. This version finds Satch joined by one alumnus and one new guy. Petrucci, familiar to fans of progressive rock juggernaut Dream Theater, is making his fifth appearance. Collen is on his first run with the tour. His story is the flipside of Satriani’s, given that Collen has spent most of his career in a song-oriented band (Def Leppard) and has never done a shred album. Consequently, he might seem like an odd fit. G3, however, hasn’t always been an on-the-nose production with obvious heavy metal shred kings as headliners. Past tours have seen bluesman Kenny Wayne Shepherd, acoustic/electric fingerstylist Adrian Legg and prog/jazz/ambient/art rock legend Robert Fripp. But anyone who’s seen Lep live knows that Collen


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FEATURED IN CITY WEEKLY'S BURGER WEEK

4141 So. State Street 801.261.3463

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 1/12-13

Anders Osborne, Smooth Hound Smith

Singer-songwriter Anders Osborne makes regular rounds through Salt Lake City, cruising through as recently as last summer with N.M.O., a side project with some of the dudes from the southern rock/blues group North Mississippi Allstars. What’s so special about the New Orleans blues hound’s upcoming twonight stand at The State Room, then? Well, he’s playing completely solo this time, which might seem like a departure for the fiery guitar player, but stands to highlight the vivid imagery, storytelling and dark humor often coloring his songs. Take, for instance, “Blame It On a Few,” a standout track off Osborne’s Which Way To Here (Okeh, 1995), on which he sings: “Sweet Annie put on too much makeup/ She put lipstick all over her face/ She yells, ‘Frankie play me a happy song’/ and starts dancin’ all over the place.” It’s pure rootsrock made distinct through Osborne’s signature sound and songwriting. His guitar, tuned to open D, sounds unusually rich and powerful, and his lyrics explore themes of addiction, loss, redemption and facing hard truths. All in all, Osborne is a soulful, passionate performer who has a way of moving listeners. Rounding out the bill is Smooth Hound Smith, a bootstompin’ roots-rock duo out of Nashville. (Howard Hardee) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $30-$50, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

Lark & Spur

DWIGHT MARSHALL

PINKY’S

LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & HOWARD HARDEE

Lark & Spur: An Evening in Paris

Last July saw a rare occurrence: two shows by the SLC acoustic sextet Lark & Spur. The scarcity of their performances, L&S cofounder Jeff Whiteley said, is due to his busy schedule booking and promoting his Excellence in the Community concert series, which shines a spotlight on local musicians working in jazz, blues and world music. Interestingly, L&S formed when Whiteley and singer Lori Decker were street musicians in Paris, an experience that Whiteley says directly inspired the free weekly series. Nearly 500 shows later, Excellence is a local music institution, and Whiteley is still working hard for his fellow artists—but finding more time to showcase Lark & Spur’s music. On Friday and Saturday, the group—accompanied by dancers Casey and Kayci Treu—reprises their July performances, which recreated those magical nights performing in Paris with a set of French folk and gypsy swing songs, Musette dance tunes, Edith Piaf songs, cabaret tunes and stories. “A big part of

Anders Osborne the show [is] stories about our adventures in France woven into the intros for each tune,” Whiteley says. “We also translate the lyrics, and we have fabulous dancers interpreting the songs.” These are the first indoor performances of An Evening in Paris, and the Grand Theatre at Salt Lake Community College’s South City Campus is a fittingly elegant setting. Whiteley is excited about performing in the Grand, but says his experiences in France taught him that the music is what matters most. “In France, the people paid attention when the quality of the music was high,” Whiteley says. “The setting did not matter.” (Randy Harward) SLCC Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 7:30 p.m., $10-$20 (free with valid junior high or high school ID), 5+, grandtheatrecompany.com

Krizz Kaliko

LIQUID 9

LEX B. ANDERSON

34 | JANUARY 11, 2018

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

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HIGHLAND live music

FRI SAT

QUINN BROWN PROJECT GINGER AND THE GENTS

MON & THURS

KARAOKE

WED

PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!!

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $650 POT

SUN & THURS

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT STARTS @ 7PM

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2013

2014

STATE live music

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BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1500 POT

SUN &

KARAOKE

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OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

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TUES

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THURS

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STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

3928 HIGHLAND DR

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36 | JANUARY 11, 2018

HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

SUE’S HIGHLAND HAS PAID OUT OVER $3,400 IN BINGO PRIZES!

20 1 7

LIVE

MONDAY 1/15

Krizz Kaliko, Slo Pain, Izzy Dunfore, Chez, Fatt G, Dr. Grimm & Mista Ice Pick, Sin Hiddensound

Rappers like to pump themselves up, to mythologize their backstories, call themselves geniuses or warriors or whatever. It’s trite, it’s pointless and, worst of all, it breeds and empowers too many barrelchested, dead-eyed idiots who think a meritless proclamation of greatness equals legit cred and demand for their Soundcloud mixtapes. Although Krizz Kaliko called his second album Genius (Strange Music, 2009), he didn’t belabor the point on the title track. When he rhymed about getting rich on “Getcha Life Right,” he prioritized the titular advice. And then there’s “Bipolar,” where Kaliko discusses his mental illness—which nearly caused him to murder his girlfriend and kill himself at 25. How many rappers do you know who eschew self-aggrandizement for intimacy and substance? They’re out there, of course, but they’re harder to hear in a genre where boisterous, unwarranted chest-beating is expected and applauded. Yet Kaliko has kept it real on each of his albums, from his 2008 debut Vitiligo (named after the skin condition that caused him so much emotional pain as a child) through 2016’s G.O., with songs that let his listeners know they’re not alone and encourage them to be better people. This, while not getting too preachy or forgetting to have fun (see “Ti**ies” from 2013’s Son of Sam and “Butt Naked Fun” from Genius). Great artists bleed for their art and Kaliko paints in detail with the emotional equivalent of arterial spurt. (RH) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $18 presale; $20 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com

Brett Dennen

WEDNESDAY 1/17 Brett Dennen

Pretty much everything about Brett Dennen is youthful. He’s bespectacled, baby-faced and appears to be about 13 years old (somehow, he’s 39). One of his most successful singles, “Wild Child,” is an ode to running free, good vibes and sunshine. And, heck, his music is perhaps most recognizable from being featuring on soundtracks from shows such as NBC’s Parenthood and About a Boy. But make no mistake: The slightly twangy pop-folk artist out of California’s Sierra Nevada mountains displays deep maturity and sharp self-awareness in his songwriting. On the country-tinged “When We Were Young” off Smoke and Mirrors (Elektra, 2013), Dennen shows listeners his fear of being stifled by adulthood’s responsibilities: “Whenever I reminisce/ I know that the greatest risk/ Is giving up the fun for pay/ I don’t want to live that way.” His songs tend to celebrate the outdoors, the open road and the general sense of freedom, and as a result they make great road music. By no coincidence, Dennen has acknowledged that Paul Simon’s Graceland (Warner Bros., 1986) was his favorite album growing up. He’s coming through Park City as part of the second annual Lift Series, a tour promoting music, skiing, community and environmental activism. (HH) O.P. Rockwell, 628 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $35-$50, 21+, oprockwell.com


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Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 19TH

Tuesdays

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JANUARY 11, 2018 | 37

Wednesdays

BREAKING BINGO - 8PM

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FT. CHOW TRUCK

NFL PLAYOFFS SCANDALOUS SATURDAY WITH DJ LOGIK AT 10

PAGE MCGINNIS & BRIAN THURBER

INTRODUCING FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY

saturdays

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2PM


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SATURDAY 1/13

CONCERTS & CLUBS

KATE PATTEN VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

FireHouse, Penrose

North Carolina hair farmers FireHouse are technically ineligible for the tag, “’80s hard rock/glam band” because their self-titled debut didn’t come out until 1990. Also, the fact that the album went double platinum and included one of the biggest power ballads of all time (“Love of a Lifetime”) means we also can’t really call them a casualty of the grunge era. It’s as though they happened too late but just in time, in some loophole universe between dying and nascent musical movements that was just large enough to accommodate a sophomore album (Reach for the Sky, 1992) that included another hit prom song (“When I Look Into Your Eyes”) and went gold. They had a minor hit with another schmaltz fest (“I Live My Life for You”) in 1995 and while it wasn’t, as the band sings on FireHouse, “All She Wrote,” it was all we read about them for a while. They’ve continued to tour and release new music, and even new recordings of old songs, but they don’t quite measure up to the band’s early work. And FireHouse is tough to beat, packed with fist-pumping anthems where chunky riffs play against candy-coated sing-along choruses and lyrics about forever-love and/or fucking. Alongside albums like Warrant’s Cherry Pie, it helped temporarily stave off the genre’s Ice Age, so it shouldn’t surprise anyone that the band’s set list includes almost the entire thing. But expect a few tracks from Hold Your Fire, one from 2003’s Prime Time and a Kiss cover so obvious that it need not be named. (Randy Harward) Leatherheads Sports Bar 12101 S. Factory Outlet Drive, Draper, 8 p.m., $25 presale; $29 day of show, 21+, facebook.com/leatherheadssportsbar

Proudly serving locally produced beers & spirits — 40+ local beers available —

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1.11• ZAC WILKERSON TONY HOLIDAY, MICHELLE MOONSHINE

1.12• MOUNTAINS OF MIRRORS MACHINES OF MAN, VISITORS

1.13• DESERT DWELLERS DEKAI, YOKO

1.14• LORD BRITISH

1/19: R&B DANCE PARTY 1/20: CROOK & THE BLUFF 1/21: KRS-ONE 1/22: THE OCTOPUS PROJECT 1/24: BANDITOS 1/25: MR HUDSON

DURIAN DURIAN, COOL BANANA, MARK DAGO

1.16• NOBLE BODIES

1.11• THE BEE: LOCAL STORYTELLING 1.12• MAD HURT SHOW NOCKZONE JAROM, AMONI KUFI FAASU, RUDEBOY, GEORGE LOTUBAI, SOLO FAAMAUSILI

1.13• WILLAM WILLARD MOLLY MORMON, APHRODEITY, DJ SHUTTER

1.15• KRIZZ KALIKO SLO PAIN, IZZY DUNFORE, CHEZ, FATT G, DR. GRIMM, MISTA ICE PICK, SIN HIDDENSOUND

1.17• IRON PRIEST

THE SOLARISTS, WIDOW CASE

THE ULTIMATE IRON MAIDEN / JUDAS PRIEST TRIBUTE BAND

1.17• LOS YAYAZ MIAMI FACE EATERS, WEIRD STEW

1.18• SLUG LOCALIZED COMEDY NIGHT

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1.18• CLUSTERPHOQUE BURLSEQUE NIGHT 1.19• SLEEP SUBROSA

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1/20: JOHN MAUS 1/21: ANTI-FLAG 1/22: AUDIO PUSH 1/24: GOOD RIDDANCE 1/25: MOME WRATH 1/26: HIP HOP ROOTS


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 1/11 LIVE MUSIC

The Anchorage + The Makeways (Kilby Court) The Bee (Metro Music Hall) Brett Stakelin (Deer Valley Resort) Brother Chunky (Hog Wallow Pub) David Bromberg Quintet (Egyptian Theatre) Hookers & Blow (Liquid Joe’s) Night Star Jazz Orchestra (Gallivan Center) Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Lake Effect) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Zac Wilkerson + Tony Holiday + Michelle Moonshine (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

{THURSDAY & FRIDAYS 9PM}

POOL TOURNAMENTS

TEXAS HOLDEM MONDAYS & THURSDAY

FREE FASHION SHOW EVERY WEDNESDAY NOON TILL 2PM

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385.528.2547 open 7 days a week from 11 am to 1 am

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Funk ’n’ Dive) Karaoke w/ DJ Bekster (The Green Pig) Karaoke (The Hideout Pub) Karaoke Thursdays (Prohibition) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

Shannon Runyon Legends at Park City Mountain FREE SHOW Show at 3:30 PM

Friday January 12th

Shannon Runyon Legends at Park City Mountain FREE SHOW Show at 3:30 PM

Saturday January 13th

The Fab Folk

PayDay Deck at Park City Mountain FREE SHOW Show at 2:30 PM

Saturday January 13th

Cory Mon

Umbrella Bar at Canyons Village FREE SHOW Show at 2:30 PM Sunday January 14th

Classic Steve Steve Schuffert

Legends at Park City Mountain FREE SHOW Show at 2:30 PM Monday January 15th

Rogers & Buffington

Umbrella Bar at Canyons Village FREE SHOW Show at 2:30 PM

FRIDAY 1/12

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MONDAYS BY CRISSIE FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS BY RANDY

Friday January 12th

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KARAOKE

DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Guitar Army (Feldman’s Deli) Gothic & Darkwave w/ DJ Nina (Area 51) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (’80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Therapy Thursdays feat.Borgeous (Sky)

DON’T HIBERNATE, GET OUT AND LISTEN TO LIVE MUSIC!

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Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen Next to Himalayan Kitchen

The

Chakra Lounge and Bar

Nightly Music ChakraLounge.net

364 S State St. Salt Lake City

Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night small plate menu

M O U N TA I N T O W N M U S I C . O R G

JANUARY 11, 2018 | 39

Tuesday through Saturday


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40 | JANUARY 11, 2018

FISHER BREWING CO.

MIKE RIEDEL

BAR FLY

LIVE MUSIC

Anders Osborne + Smooth Hound Smith (The State Room) see p. 34 Badfeather (Funk ’n’ Dive) Crazy Woolf (Feldman’s Deli) David Bromberg Quintet (Egyptian Theatre) Fox Brother’s Band (Outlaw Saloon) Glow, A Blacklight Experience feat. Wat Music + The Cvptvin + Ill Deff (Sky) Hectic Hobo + Tom Bennett (Piper Down Pub) Hotel Le Motel (Brewskis) J-Zach + Stockton & Tooilla + OBR + Pharrow (Kilby Court) Joshua James w/ Harpers (Velour) Kyle May (Deer Valley Resort) Lark & Spur: An Evening in Paris (Grand Theatre) see p. 34 L.O.L (Club 90) Lavelle Dupree (Downstairs) Lounge 40 (Lake Effect) Lowdown Brass Band (O.P. Rockwell) Machines Of Man + Mountains of Mirrors + Visitors + GhostPulse (Urban Lounge) Mad Hurt w/ DJ Leemont (Metro Music Hall) Motherlode Canyon (The Spur)

SATURDAY/SUNDAY

Penrose + Opal Hill Drive (Barbary Coast) Rest, Repose + The Home Team + Memories Lost + Noise Ordinance + Sheep In The Foxhole (The Loading Dock) Shannon Runyon (Park City Mountain) Southbound (The Westerner) Stray Cats Tribute Night (Area 51) Swans Of Never + Seasonsapphire + Ghost Of A Giant + Paul Godbout (The Ice Haüs ) Tony Holiday & the Velvetones (Hog Wallow Pub) USOCO + Solo23 & StrainJ + Queen Dub + Ika Williams + Sayloo + Big Siss + Looce + Zeek (Liquid Joe’s)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle)

MONDAYS

BINGO PLAYOFFS AND BREAKING 9PM

When City Weekly staff writer Colby Frazier left the paper in 2016 to help reboot Fisher Brewing Co., he might as well have said he’d taken a job in Fantasia. But while he says “Brewing is 99.75 percent cleaning,” he can’t move a mop with magic. It still sounds like a great gig, but why switch careers? He didn’t, really. After graduating from the University of Utah, Frazier supplemented part-time writing gigs by working in wineries and breweries in Santa Barbara, Calif. When he returned to SLC, there were even fewer journo jobs available, so he worked at Desert Edge Brewery and then Uinta. It was at Uinta that he met his future partners and they started planning for Fisher while working the graveyard shift. But by the time Fisher started to move forward in earnest, Frazier had already been working at CW for a few years. The last 18-24 months at the paper consisted of long days where he wrote during the day, then did construction on the brewery at night. He likens that time to a vacation before the real work began, because he and his partners are “workin’ just as hard as we ever have.” But is he happier? “I think being a newspaper reporter is probably the highest calling that a human can have,” Frazier says. But while he hopes to return to freelancing someday, he’s caught a nice buzz at Fisher: “Making beer and having your own business is a very, very special thing.” Whether he’s writing stories or brewing beer, it’s immensely satisfying to create something and see people enjoy it. “That’s something that not too many people get to experience in their profession.” (Randy Harward) Fisher Brewing Co., 320 W. 800 South, 801-487-2337, fisherbeer.com Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/DJ Wees (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (The Hideout Pub) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 1/13 LIVE MUSIC

Alexa Hill (Barbary Coast) Anders Osborne + Smooth Hound Smith (The State Room) see p. 34 B.D. Howes (Deer Valley Resort) Cardinal Bloom + Punchbuggee + The Mystic + Black Jupiter + Carlos Viitanen (The Loading Dock) Chicago Mike (The Spur) Cory Mon (Canyons Village) David Bromberg Quintet (Egyptian Theatre) Desert Dwellers + DEKAI + YOKO (Urban Lounge) Eric Anthony + Shuffle (Lake Effect) Fiddlers 3 + Beecher + Kate MacLeod +

SATURDAY, JAN. 13

PRIZES! TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

NO COVER

Mary Danzig (Acoustic Space) FireHouse + Penrose (Leatherheads) see p. 38 Fox Brother’s Band (Outlaw Saloon) Green River Blues + Jordan Matthew Young (O.P. Rockwell) L.O.L (Club 90) Lowdown Brass Band + Cory Mon (Piper Down Pub) MMEND + Marny Lion Proudfit + My Dear Watson + Johnny Paglino (Kilby Court) Outside Of Society (Barbary Coast) Party Favor (Park City Live) Pink Martini (Eccles Theater) Riding Gravity + Veronica Blue + Iridia + Embrace The Struggle (The Ice Haüs) Salt Lake City 7 (Viridian Center) Scalafrea + Transcend The Realm + Fields Of Elysium + Chronic Trigger + Envenom (The Loading Dock) Southbound (The Westerner) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Willam + Willard + Molly Mormon + Aphrodeity + Kay Bye + DJ Shutter + DJ Justin + Hollister (Metro Music Hall) You Topple Over (Hog Wallow Pub)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO

WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE AT 8PM

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


LOUNGE

Alternative + Top 40 + EDM w/ DJ Jeremiah (Area 51) Après Ski (The Cabin) Burlesque & The Beats (Prohibition) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Fingaz (Downstairs) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Gothic + Industrial + 80s w/ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays feat. Jerzey (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 1/14 LIVE MUSIC

Alicia Stockman (Deer Valley Resort) Esham (Liquid Joe’s) Irish Session Folks (Sugar House Coffee) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Lord British + Durian Durian + Cool Banana + Mark Dago (Urban Lounge) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Steve Schuffert (Park City Mountain)

Après Ski (The Cabin)

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

S P IR ITS . FO OD . LOCAL B EER

MONDAY 1/15 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Krizz Kaliko + Slo Pain + Izzy Dunfore + Chez + Fatt G + Dr.Grimm & Mista Ice Pick + Sin HiddenSound (Metro Music Hall) see p. 36

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & The JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Mic Blues Jam (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

e b o t e c a l p The ! i k s s è r p A r fo

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

TUESDAY 1/16 LIVE MUSIC

Corey Adam (The Spur) Noble Bodies + The Solarists + Widow Case (Urban Lounge)

1.12 TONY HOLIDAY & THE VELVETONES

1.13 YOU TOPPLE OVER

1.15 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

1.17 JOHN DAVIS

1.11 BROTHER CHUNKY

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1.10 MEANDER CAT

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

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JANUARY 11, 2018 | 41

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Lifty Lounge w/ DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

thursday, january 11

Karaoke (Keys on Main) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

$5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY 1/17

LIVE Music

karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

friday, january 12

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OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

42 | JANUARY 11, 2018

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saturday, january 13

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DJ MATTY MO DJ LATU

Weeknights monday

wednesday

THE TRIVIA FACTORY 7PM

thursday

KARAOKE W/ DJ BEKSTER 9PM

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Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) Temple Gothic and Industrial w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke w/ DJ Casper (Area 51) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal)

LIVE MUSIC

Brett Dennen (O.P. Rockwell) see p. 36 Iron Priest (Metro Music Hall) John Davis (Hog Wallow Pub) Los YaYaz + Miami Face Eaters + Weird Stew (Urban Lounge) Patrick Ryan Duo (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Cabin) Dueling Pianos (Keys on Main)

ON W US M O L L FO GRA INSTA

KLY

WEE @SLC


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ACROSS

43. Jokester 44. Cleaned the dishes? 46. “Santa Claus Is ____ to Town” (1970 TV Christmas special) 47. Car repair chain near the start of telephone book listings 48. Meeting on the DL 50. Message on an Election Day sticker 54. Get some sun 56. El ____, Texas 57. “Get the Party Started” singer 58. Drawback 59. “Veep” airer 60. Frontiersman Carson 61. Wonderment 62. Something confessed in a confessional

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

2. Pep rally cries 3. Her Twitter bio reads “IMAGINE PEACE” 4. Disco ____ of “The Simpsons” 5. Military address 6. Where to find Java 7. Peak sacred to the Shinto goddess Sengen-Sama 8. Young girl in Glasgow 9. Hairy primate 10. Haute couture inits. 13. Easter activities 14. “You ____ Beautiful” (1975 Joe Cocker hit) 15. TV actresses Gilbert and Ramirez 16. How some Pride Parade participants dress 17. Letters before xis 20. Stone Age cutting tool 22. High-level, as a farm team 23. Hallucination producer 24. Like a handyman’s projects, for short 26. ____-equipped 27. Writer Tolstoy 29. “If I may ...” 30. Not feel 100% 35. “Kung Fu” actor Philip 37. Build up, as a river’s edge 38. Barn ____ 39. ____ chi ch’uan 40. Poet who said “Genuine poetry can communicate before it is understood” 42. “Funny because it’s ____” (cable network slogan)

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. What one can be forgiven for thinking the spelling of 67-Across is given the descriptions offered by 13-, 29-, 49- and 60-Across 2. Diana or Bob 6. Direct-selling company since 1959 11. Against 12. Hitchcock’s “The 39 ____” 13. Bad description of the first letter of 67-Across 18. Words repeated before “like a morning star” in “Shoo, Fly, Don’t Bother Me!” 19. First planet to be discovered with the aid of a telescope 20. Schlep 21. They’re billed as the “tiny, tangy, crunchy candy” 22. Alan with 34 Emmy nominations (and six wins) 25. One corner of a Monopoly board 28. “God Save the ____!” (Russia anthem from 1833-1917) 29. Bad description of the second letter of 67-Across 31. Slugger nicknamed “Slammin’ Sammy” 32. In 1997, she died five days before Mother Teresa did 33. ____-mo 34. Gadot of “Wonder Woman” 36. Audrey Hopburn or Honey Boo Brew, e.g. 38. Mel who returns as a ghost in “Field of Dreams” 41. Hair removal stuff 45. Exam for a future suturer 49. Bad description of the third letter of 67-Across 51. Wild pig 52. Schreiber of “Ray Donovan” 53. Remote control button 54. U.S. senator Duckworth 55. Easy gait 57. Freaks out 58. Rivera who was the first Latin American to get a Kennedy Center honor 60. Bad description of the fourth letter of 67-Across 63. Slender woodwinds 64. “Victory is mine!” 65. Abstain from 66. Many a charity run 67. A bird

SUDOKU

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Three centuries ago, Capricorn genius Isaac Newton formulated principles that have ever since been fundamental to scientists’ understanding of the physical universe. He was also a pioneer in mathematics, optics and astronomy. And yet he also expended huge amounts of time and energy on the fruitless attempt to employ alchemy to transform base metals into solid gold. Those efforts might have been interesting to him, but they yielded no lasting benefits. You Capricorns face a comparable split. In 2018, you could bless us with extraordinary gifts or you could get consumed in projects that aren’t the most productive use of your energy. The coming weeks might be crucial in determining which way you’ll go.

searching for their phone or car keys in a panic. Before you say yes to a deeper bond, make sure you see them angry, stressed or scared.” I recommend that you take this advice in the coming weeks. It’ll be a good time to deepen your commitment to people who express their challenging emotions in non-abusive, non-psychotic ways.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22): My high school history teacher Marjorie Margolies is now Chelsea Clinton’s mother-in law. She shares two grandchildren with Hillary Clinton. Is that something I should brag about? Does it add to my cachet or my happiness? Will it influence you to love me more? No, nah and nope. In the big scheme of things, it’s mildly interesting but utterly irrelevant. The coming weeks will be a good time for Cancerians like you and me to renounce any desire we might have to capitalize on fake ego points like this. We Crabs should be AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A rite of passage lies ahead. It could and should usher you honing our identity and self-image so they’re free of superficial into a more soulful way of living. I’m pleased to report that measures of worth. What’s authentically valuable about you? this transition won’t require you to endure torment, confusion or passive-aggressive manipulation. In fact, I suspect it LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): could turn out to be among the most graceful ordeals you’ve If I were your mentor or your guide, I’d declare this the Leo Makeover ever experienced—and a prototype for the type of break- Season. First, I’d hire a masseuse to knead you firmly and tenderly. through that I hope will become standard in the months and I’d send you to the nutritionist, stylist, dream interpreter, trainer years to come. Imagine being able to learn valuable lessons and and life coach. I’d brainstorm with the people who know you best make crucial transitions without the prod of woe and gloom. to come up with suggestions for how to help free you from your Imagine being able to say, as musician P.J. Harvey said about illusions and infuse your daily rhythm with 20 percent more hapherself, “When I’m contented, I’m more open to receiving piness. I’d try to talk you out of continuing your association with inspiration. I’m most creative when I feel safe and happy.” anyone or anything that’s no damn good for you. In conclusion, I’d be thorough as I worked to get you unlocked, debugged and retooled. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The Kalevala is a 19th-century book of poetry that conveys VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): the important mythology and folklore of the Finnish people. “It takes an extraordinary person to carry themselves as if they It was a wellspring of inspiration for English writer J.R.R. do not live in hell,” writer D. Bunyavong says. In accordance with Tolkien as he composed his epic fantasy novel The Lord of the the astrological omens, I nominate you Virgos to fit that descripRings. To enhance his ability to steal ideas from The Kalevala, tion in the coming weeks. You are, in my estimation, as far away Tolkien even studied the Finnish language. He said it was from hell as you’ve been in a long time. If anyone can seduce, like “entering a complete wine-cellar filled with bottles of coax, or compel heaven to come all the way down to earth for an amazing wine of a kind and flavor never tasted before.” a while, it’s you. Here’s a good way to get the party started: According to my reading of the astrological omens, Pisces, in Gaze into the mirror until you spy the eternal part of yourself. 2018 you will have the potential of discovering a source that’s as rich for you as Finnish and The Kalevala were for Tolkien. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to move the furniture around. If you feel inspired, you ARIES (March 21-April 19): I’m happy to inform you that life is giving you permission to might even want to move some of that old stuff right out the be extra demanding in the coming weeks—as long as you’re door and haul it to the dump or the thrift store. Hopefully, not petty, brusque or unreasonable. Here are a few exam- this will get you in the mood to launch a sweeping purge of ples that will pass the test: “I demand that you join me in anything else that lowers the morale and élan around the getting drunk on the truth;” “I demand to receive rewards house: dusty mementoes, unflattering mirrors, threadcommensurate with my contributions;” “I demand that we bare rugs, chipped dishes and numbing symbols. The time collaborate to outsmart and escape the karmic conundrums is ripe, my dear homies, to free your home of deadweight. we’ve gotten ourselves mixed up in.” On the other hand, Aries, ultimatums like these are not admissible: “I demand treasure SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): and tribute, you fools;” “I demand the right to cheat in order When he was 16 years old and living in New York, Ralph Lifshitz to get my way;” “I demand that the river flow backwards.” changed his name to Ralph Lauren. That was probably an important factor in his success. Would he have eventually become a famous fashion designer worth $5.8 billion dollars if he had TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Are you familiar with the phrase “Open Sesame”? In the old retained a name with “shitz” in it? The rebranding made it easfolk tale, “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” it’s a magical com- ier for clients and customers to take him seriously. With Ralph’s mand that the hero uses to open a blocked cave where treasure foresight as your inspiration, Scorpio, consider making a change is hidden. I invite you to try it out. It just may work to give you in yourself that will enhance your ability to get what you want. entrance to an off-limits or previously inaccessible place where you want and need to go. At the very least, speaking those SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): words will put you in a playful, experimental frame of mind as In 1956, the prolific Spanish poet Juan Ramón Jiménez was you contemplate the strategies you could use to gain entrance. awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. The award committee And that alone may provide just the leverage you need. praised his “high spirit and artistic purity.” The honor was based on his last 13 books, however, and not on his first two. Waterlilies and Souls of Violet were works he wrote while young and still ripGEMINI (May 21-June 20): While thumping around the internet, I came across pointed counsel ening. As he aged, he grew so embarrassed by their sentimentality from an anonymous source. “Don’t enter into a long-term connection that he ultimately tried to track down and eradicate every copy. with someone until you’ve seen them stuck in traffic,” it declared. I bring this to your attention, Sagittarius, because I think it’s a “Don’t get too deeply involved with them until you’ve witnessed favorable time for you to purge or renounce or atone for anything them drunk, waiting for food in a restaurant for entirely too long, or from your past that you no longer want to be defined by.

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SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179914105, JUDGE ROYAL I HANSEN. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. ZACHARY HILL, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO ZACHARY HILL: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $4,115.72. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179915020, JUDGE RICHARD MCKELVIE. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. CHANNEL BUTLER, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO CHANNEL BUTLER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $5,449.57. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179914987, JUDGE ROBERT FAUST. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. LETICIA JAVIER AND MICHAEL QUINTANA, DEFENDANTS. THE STATE OF UTAH TO LETICIA JAVIER: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $15,308.35. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179907740, JUDGE KEITH KELLY. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. WENDY HEMMERT, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO WENDY HEMMERT: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $1,590.36. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen

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“Remember when atmospheric contaminants were romantically called stardust?” —Author Lane Olinghouse Welcome Sun (cough) dance visitors to (hack) Utah! That’s right, tens of thousands of people will soon land at the Salt Lake City International Airport for the famous film fest. But if the inversion is still around, ticket holders might think they’ve landed in New Delhi, where the smog this past fall put everything at a standstill. They’ll Uber their way up the canyon to blue skies and maybe complain that their driver ran red lights along the way—except the driver knows the smog is so thick that the police can’t read his license plate. Locals along the Wasatch Front expect inversions during January. Sadly, the upside-down air showed up in December and just stayed and stayed because storms aren’t coming through to clean out our big geographical cereal bowl. According to Intermountain Healthcare about 230,000 Utahns suffer from asthma and some 500,000 have cardiovascular disease—and all of them are in trouble the thicker the air gets. You know it’s bad, I know it’s bad and we know we can do things to reduce the inversion, but few people are actively trying. Even though the Salt Lake City Council, Salt Lake County and UTA recently sponsored a free day of public transportation to get people riding, the majority of citizens still drove their cars to work, shop or school. I’m seeing a trend for homeowners wanting to leave the valley and move to rural areas, and home buyers wanting to purchase something “above the inversion level.” I recently had one couple plot out the GPS location and altitude of where they wanted to live on the Salt Lake benches. I would take them from listing to listing in the Avenues and Olympus Cove and they would start up their measuring aps and tell me yea or nay depending on if the home was above or below the smog level. There’s no way to search the MLS for “homes above the smog level” and, indeed, our dirty air levels go up and down. One developer I work with has a hatred of SLC’s bad air and offers an extra interior air filter to potential buyers, since we spend many hours inside sleeping and eating. At least some of our air could be clean before we walk outside, right? Working air filters are becoming something buyers look for in homes and home owners are installing. Once again, welcome Sun (cough, hack) dance visitors. Maybe we’ll get some storms to suck out the muck and you’ll think we’re beautiful from airport to Park City. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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Awwwwwwww When 5-year-old TyLon Pittman of Byram, Miss., saw the Grinch stealing Christmas on Dec. 16 on TV, he did what any civic-minded citizen would do. He called 911. TyLon told Byram police officer Lauren Develle, who answered the call, that he did not want the Grinch to come steal his Christmas, reported the Clarion Ledger. Develle made TyLon an honorary junior officer and had him come down to the station on Dec. 18 to help her lock away the Grinch, who hung his head as TyLon asked him, “Why are you stealing Christmas?” Although the green fiend apologized, TyLon wouldn’t release him from the holding cell. Police chief Luke Thompson told TyLon to come back when he’s 21, “and I’m going to give you a job application, OK?”

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

Unintended Consequences Stephen Allen of Tukwila, Wash., moved in with his grandmother years ago to help care for her. When she died last year, he invited his brother, a convicted drug dealer, to move in, but along with him came drug activity, squatters, stolen property and debris. Allen eventually asked police to raid the home, but when they did on Dec. 15, they evicted Allen as well, leaving him homeless. “It’s all legal, but it’s wrong,” Allen told KIRO-7 News. “I can’t do anything about it.”

WEIRD

Wrong Place, Wrong Time In Gilgandra, New South Wales, Australia, on Nov. 29, sheep shearer Casey Barnes was tramping down wool, and her father and boyfriend were working nearby, when her long, curly hair became caught in a belt-driven motor. Horrifically, the motor ripped her scalp off from the back of her head to above her eyes and ears. Barnes was flown to Sydney, where doctors performed an emergency 20-hour surgery to save her scalp, but were ultimately unsuccessful. Barnes will have artificial skin attached to her head instead, reports The Sun. A GoFundMe page has been established to help with her medical bills.

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Alarming Animal North Fort Myers, Fla., homeowner Joanie Mathews was terrorized for hours on Nov. 14 by a large pig that wandered into her yard overnight and spent the day destroying the lawn and biting Mathews three times before trapping her in the cab of her truck. “She would circle the truck ... and I would jump in the back seat and I was like ‘Go away, pig!” Mathews told NBC-2 TV. Mathews finally called law enforcement, and it took three Lee County sheriff’s officers to wrangle the testy porker. “It was just hilarious because the pig fought them every which way,” Mathews said. No one, at press time, had stepped forward to claim the pig.

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The Sunshine State Workers at Captain Hiram’s Sandbar in Sebastian, Fla., resorted to calling police on Nov. 17 when customer William Antonio Olivieri, 63, refused to leave the bar after a night of drinking. Olivieri told Sebastian police he had arrived by boat, but when a quick walk down a nearby dock failed to uncover the boat, he said perhaps he had driven himself to the bar in a black Hyundai. Throughout the interview with police, reported the Sebastian Daily, Olivieri also maintained that he was in downtown Melbourne, Fla., where he lives. Finally, he was arrested on a charge of disorderly intoxication and taken to the Indian River County Jail. n Sumter County, Fla., sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to The Villages on Nov. 19 where resident Lori Jo Matthews, 60, reportedly barked at her neighbor’s dogs, then entered her neighbor’s yard, yelling at the neighbor and finally slapping the neighbor after being told to leave. Deputies caught up with Matthews as she attempted to enter her own home, where she was handcuffed and arrested on charges of battery and resisting arrest. Alcohol, reported villages-news.com, might have been involved.

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Unclear on the Concept Melissa Allen, 32, was arrested on Dec. 19 after attempting to shoplift more than $1,000 in merchandise from a Framingham, Mass., Target store, reported the Boston Globe. On hand to help in the arrest were more than 50 police officers who were at the store to participate in the annual “Shop With a Cop” holiday charity event.

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An Engaged Citizenry Pam Bisanti, a 31-year resident of Mount Dora, Fla., has approached the city council more than once about the speeding traffic along Clayton Street, where she lives. On Nov. 27, Bisanti made good on her threat to take matters into her own hands if the council didn’t by wielding a handmade sign reading “Slow Down” as she stood next to the roadway during rush hour wearing her pajamas and robe. “The mothers up the street who send their kids down to the bus stop should have every expectation that those kids will be able to cross Clayton without being killed,” Bisanti told the Daily Commercial, saying she plans to continue her protest until the city takes action. “I am frustrated, angry and fed up. There needs to be a solution sooner than later. Remember that vision of me in my pajamas,” she added.

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Self-Absorbent The Tea Terrace in London is offering a new way for customers to enjoy themselves—literally. On Dec. 16, the shop began selling the “Selfieccino,” an image of the customer’s face in the frothy topping of either a cappuccino or a hot chocolate. Patrons send an photo to the shop via an online messaging app, and the “Cino” machine takes it from there, reproducing the picture with flavorless food coloring in about four minutes. “Due to social media,” shop owner Ehab Salem Shouly told Reuters, “the dining experience has completely shifted. It’s not enough anymore to just deliver great food and great service—it’s got to be Instagram-worthy.”

The Call of Nature Tracy Hollingsworth Stephens, 50, of Alachua, Fla., answered nature’s call on Nov. 25 by stopping her car in the middle of County Road 232 and stepping outside. An officer of the Florida Highway Patrol soon took notice as he had been searching for Stephens following her involvement in a two-car collision in the parking lot of a nearby T.J. Maxx store earlier that day. Stephens subsequently underperformed on a field sobriety test, according to The Independent Florida Alligator, and was arrested for driving under the influence and leaving the scene of an accident.

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City Weekly January 11, 2018  
City Weekly January 11, 2018  

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