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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY MEET THE ARTMAKERS

Shake hands with these unknown subjects who make Utah arts possible. Cover by Derek Carlisle & Sarah Arnoff

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SCOTT RENSHAW

Cover story, p. 13 From a dialect coach to a pyrotechnics tech, unsung arts heroes take centerstage this issue. “In 20 years covering Utah’s arts community, I’ve met so many people who do amazing things,” Renshaw says. “This story just reminds me that there are still so many more to discover.”

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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Cover story, Nov. 23, “Give!”

Love fighting the good fight, my friends.

@MICHAELKMCHENRY Via Instagram

News, Nov. 23, “Blank Canvas: Downtown street is once again bustling, but key component is missing”

So, nets are designed to capture stuff, right? What happens when there’s a dead bird or garbage trapped in the net? It seems like an ongoing maintenance issue to me. Especially for a permanent installation.

BILLY PILGRIM Via cityweekly.net Define “bustling.”

MICHAEL HILTON MENDENHALL Via Facebook

Blog post, Dec. 2, “Big Fight Ahead: Thousands gather ahead of Monday’s expected Bears Ears announcement”

[It’s] sad you need a big fight with government to get the right outcome for citizens.

DAVE CALDWELL Via Facebook

Too bad it won’t matter. The Republicans in this state aren’t capable of listening to reason. Hopefully we can change the makeup of the legislature to bring some semblance of balance to our state.

@GOODIECHET Via Twitter

How many of those even know where it is or will ever see it? This was a demonstration against Trump, of course.

@JTHURM2 Via Twitter

Blog post, Dec. 4, “Trump in Utah: ‘A Very Historic Action’”

So now that y’all have seen such bountiful beauty, get the fuck outta the way cause here come the drillin’ rigs!

PAX RASMUSSEN Via Facebook

Someone obviously wrote that [speech] for him. If it was vintage Trumpf he would have said that we marvel at him.

DENNIS MARCUS Via Facebook

Natural wonders are only natural wonders until drilling and mining equipment invade and scar the land.

@AIRTISTICUSA Via Twitter

Hey, why all the crying? In four or seven years you can push for a new proclamation or executive order. Land’s been there for millions of years; surely we Utah citizens can’t fuck it up in seven.

JIM FISH SVENDSEN Via Facebook

Look, Obama never should have done what he did with Bears Ears anyway. And the state should do more to protect the land. Simple: Give power to the states.

ANDREW FALETTO Via Facebook

You are a total fool if you think the goal was to protect anything. Greed. That was the goal.

G. BILLINGSLEY Via Facebook

So the carny-in-chief stopped by and you know what they say, “If you can’t dazzle them with brilliance, then baffle them with bullshit!”

CRAIG PERRY Via Facebook

Insanity run amok.

MELODIE THOMAS JACOBSEN Via Facebook In other news Trump gets sued … again.

@VIRGILGLASS Via Twitter

Blog post, Dec. 4, “Anti-Trump Protests: President’s visit, national monument reduction spurs Utahns to make a statement” Grrrrr!

JADE JD LeBLANC Via Facebook No one cares anymore—especially our president. Smh.

@JUSTJ_EVERYHTING Via Instagram

Trump supporters think “the people” are mostly rednecks who claim a birthright to pillage nature.

GEORGE T. Via cityweekly.net

More than 3 million of us made a better choice …

NATASHA DeSMET Via Facebook Fight back!

MICHAEL JAMES Via Facebook

Remembering Santa Ed

Regarding the article you ran last year on Dec. 8 about Santa Ed, I am sorry to impart the sad news that he died suddenly and unexpectedly two weeks after it was published. He was an amazing man and very much loved. You can visit his Facebook page which is Santa Ed if you would like to read his obituary. Thank you,

DEB SCOTT Salt Lake City

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OPINION Quitter’s Reflections “I like to quit things. It is a very satisfying thing, quitting.” That’s how Larry David explained the decision to pull the plug on his popular comedy show Curb Your Enthusiasm. But is quitting really satisfying? It doesn’t seem so. In fact, there is a cultural bias for Vince Lombardi’s contrary viewpoint: “Winners never quit and quitters never win.” Americans celebrate those who persevere; those who overcome obstacles by dint of blood, sweat and tears; those who succeed where others have failed. The Protestant work ethic is in our bones and in our institutions. I learned in the Army that quitting could have unpleasant consequences. In academia, a Ph.D. ABD (All But Dissertation) can be as stigmatizing as quitting a Mormon mission. During the Battle of the Bulge in World War II, German troops surrounded the 101st Airborne Division. The Germans delivered an ultimatum—either surrender or die. The American general responded in a single word: “Nuts!” Stories like that populate America’s cultural narrative like stars in the night sky. Sifting my own history, however, I find a surprising number of quits— enough of them to conclude that quitting is a lot more complicated than David lets on. Quitting is taxonomic: That is to say, it is a category

BY JOHN RASMUSON comprising a number of subdivisions in the same way that “political,” “humanitarian” and “economic” are subsets of “immigration.” The taxonomy of quitting includes good quits and bad quits. Voluntary and involuntary quits. Quits imposed by aging, and quits born of self-disgust. Some take the shape of resolutions, blooming in late December like forced hyacinths, only to shrivel within a few weeks. Some instances of quitting are satisfying and principled. Some aren’t. One subcategory is the “pending quits” of tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow. Kick the Twitter habit, give up glazed donuts, forswear swearing— everyone has a few quits pending. In my experience, good quits outnumber bad quits. That is probably because the good ones are vetted while the bad ones are the half-baked issue of impulse or neglect. Donald Trump’s obsession with all things Obama is punctuated with such illconsidered quits. My good quits include a romance that had run its course and a packa-day Marlboro habit. I quit jogging for my knees’ sake, stopped buying neckties, and bailed out of a nascent accounting degree at the University of Utah. In my teens, I took leave of church and I quit the NRA, neither in protest. America would be a kinder, gentler place if everyone did the same. When it comes to bad quits, I consider abandoning a book to be a personal failure. I gave up on David Foster Wallace’s Infinite

Jest after 300 pages. I am a fan of Wallace’s nonfiction, but his big novel was a slog for me. Nevertheless, I should have seen it through to the end. I feel the same about lapsed friendships. I have a number of them caused by moves to new places. Sustaining a long-distance friendship takes work. I hate to say it but I have given up on too many. Another bad quit has a musical connection. My parents paid for piano lessons when I was in junior high school. I didn’t like practicing every day, so I gave it up after a couple of years. I’m sorry I did. I envy those who can play the instrument. I shouldn’t have quit the piano—or the friendships. You could spend hours compiling a list of “should-quits”—some for yourself, some for everybody else. Bottling water in plastic, texting while driving, burning fossil fuel, fighting unwinnable wars, stockpiling assault rifles—quitting these would benefit the commonweal. It’s easy to think of quits for others: Quitting newspapers is unpatriotic; abandoning a pre-diabetic diet is foolish; suspending contributions to an IRA is a self-inflected wound. My wife has a dog-eared, should-quit list just for me. “Quit drinking from the milk carton” has been on it for a long time. So has “Quit eating crap.” On my list are a bunch of elected officials, mostly Republican. I was elated when Jason Chaffetz choose the Sarah Palin career path. I hope Orrin Hatch takes the polls to heart and retires. I wish that Mike Noel would quit his tired polemics, that Mike Pence would

quit fawning and that Trump would quit lying. To be fair, the president’s disregard for the truth is not unprecedented. Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s riveting PBS series The Vietnam War, documented the self-serving lies told by Presidents Nixon and Johnson. Trump’s lying is pathological; Nixon’s and Johnson’s duplicity caused the deaths of thousands of people in Southeast Asia. My friends Mike Hughes and Lee Richardson were among the 361 Utahns killed in that misbegotten war. I hope Trump watched the troubling film. I find that the older you get the more involuntary quits are thrust upon you. With old age comes an instinct to avoid the high, the slippery and the heavy. It doesn’t take a doctor’s advice to give up ice-skating, moving pianos and climbing a ladder, but it does take an endorsement by a doctor to get a sexagenarian’s driver’s license renewed. When it comes to involuntary quits, doctors might prod, but technology is ruthless. The boxes of 35mm slides, floppy discs and cassette tapes stored in my basement are proof. A quit might be satisfying for David because it is either a remediation or a course correction. The take-away for our bombastic president is grounded in efficiency: If you always tell the truth, there is no need to quit lying. CW Send feedback to: comments@cityweekly.net


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UTA Makeover

From the years of angst over the Utah Transit Aut­hority’s ineptitude and corruption, it’s clear that something needed to be done. And finally, the Legislature is moving ever so slowly to something. Frontpage stories in the Deseret News and The Salt Lake Tribune heralded the task force recommending a small appointed commission, which would remove the highly paid chief and the smarmy 16-member board. The proposal recommends bonding and gives UTA access to transportation money, but stops short of a state takeover. Why? Because the state doesn’t want to assume $2 billion of debt. If you think the proposal is a zero-sum answer, you’re wrong. Commissions need staff support and pay, and Robert Gehrke thinks a bigger commission is the answer. Frankly, a good accountant would help.

House & Home

The headline writers at The Salt Lake Tribune tell us what they think with “Not in my (neighbor’s) backyard: Salt Lake City leaders give in to east-side opponents on ‘mother-in-law’ apartments.” Yes, we know the population tsunami is coming and the city needs affordable housing. Still, the city has never been much of a friend of historic neighborhoods, instead filling developers’ pockets through teardowns and construction. And there’s no affordable housing requirement in new developments. The capital city needs density, affordable housing, homeless shelters and, yes, diversity in neighborhoods. When the council approved mother-in-law apartments for many areas, it excluded much of the east side. Because something of history should be preserved—even in a tsunami.

Point of the Mess

The suggestion that the state rebuild the prison onsite was shot down because of the appetite for development around Point of the Mountain. The Trib reports that the state is bound to spend billions of dollars to develop the area and highways surrounding it. POM “could be the epicenter of growth in Utah,” according to Natalie Gochnour, director of the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute at the University of Utah. The story was giddy with the possibilities of high-paying jobs, lots of housing and business and … business. But it did note that there’s much at stake. You can’t force people to use public transit, for instance. And will they be able to “encourage higher-density housing that puts more people closer to jobs” and wise water use? Transportation facilities could cost up to $11.4 billion. There’s a lot of hope and imagination. Reality might be something else.

TORRIE NORRIS

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For some armed service members, the transition back into civilian life can be difficult. In 2007, Ph.D. in psycology Laurie Sakaeda created a program called A Helping Hoof to help ease that process. Based in Grantsville, the program uses horses as therapy animals and primarily helped veterans with anxiety and depression issues. It’s now expanded to assist people of all backgrounds.

What inspired you to create the program?

Knowing there would be a lot of men and women returning from the Middle East with PTSD and other service/combat related issues. The folks that come to work with the horses have different backgrounds, but when they work with the horses there’s a commonality, and it is very satisfying to see them develop skills or overcome obstacles. I have worked with many people who were afraid of horses for different reasons, but after a few weeks in the program, their confidence has grown and they almost forget they were afraid.

Can you explain Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy?

EFP varies from facility to facility. The work I do includes the horse in different processes for the client. Sometimes we do structured exercises with the horses that may involve the use of props and a lot of metaphors. Other times, I kind of see where the client is and what they need. These are more horsemanship exercises, but often the client will be acting out their behavior patterns—and then we can work directly with those. Then other times, the person may actually ride the horse either bareback or with a saddle.

What are the benefits of EFP?

In the time I’ve been involved in EFP, I’ve seen people gain confidence and the ability to trust, improve their communication, work on self-respect and increase their self-esteem. The horses are generally pretty accepting, so the client enjoys being in a non-judgmental relationship. The acceptance of the horse can also challenge the client’s belief that no one likes them or they are unworthy. A lot of the work is helping people get out of their comfort zone in a way they can tolerate but still know they accomplished something.

How is it funded?

The program is funded through fee-for-service individual payments from the VA. Since I donate many services to the veterans, I engage in fundraising activities—such as Western shows, competitive trail rides and movies. I [also] work with the James P. Huber Foundation which is a nonprofit corporation. If someone wants to donate funds and have it be tax deductible, they can donate through the foundation with a note that it is for A Helping Hoof, and I will get it.

—BENJAMIN BENALLY comments@cityweekly.net


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How did Minnesota diverge linguistically from “duck duck goose” to “duck duck gray duck”? This mystifies me. My wife, a native Minnesotan, told me about this years ago, much to my puzzlement. —SlackerInc, via the Straight Dope Message Board As great mysteries go, it’s not quite up there with the lost colony of Roanoke, I’ve gotta say. You might have heard it mentioned, by your wife or Garrison Keillor or someone, that a bunch of Scandinavian settlers put down stakes in Minnesota over the years. Well, they and their progeny called the familiar kids’ game duck-duckgray-duck because that’s what people called it back in the old country—in Swedish, it’s anka-anka-grå-anka. It’s just one of those immigrant contributions that stick to the culture. The Irish and Scots brought fiddle music; Hungarians brought goulash; Swedes brought duck-duck-gray-duck, which endures in the upper Midwest. There is, it happens, a Swedish variant exactly equivalent to the standard American name, called anka-anka-gås. But gray duck’s the one that made it across the ocean. In departing from duck-duck orthodoxy, the Swedes are hardly alone. Worldwide, this game and its close relatives enjoy a diverse roster of appellations. In the Indian rumaal chor, for instance, one player, the “thief,” runs around a seated circle of fellow participants, who extend their arms behind them; when the thief drops a handkerchief somewhere along the way, whoever grabs it becomes the thief’s pursuer. The South African game of vroteier (“rotten egg”) is similar.  When we talk about duck-duck-goose, really we’re talking about a glorified version of tag—a word from the Middle English tek, meaning “touch” or “tap,” having perhaps made its way to modern usage via the Scottish tig. In some parts of the British Isles the game is still called “tig,” in others “tag,” though it’s “tip” in North Wales, “tuggy” in Newcastle, and “dobby” in Nottingham. See where I’m going? It’s not that upper Midwesterners have their own occult version of a popular American game; it’s that children everywhere use different names for some variation on the very same thing, an activity entailing one person— “it”—pursuing some other or others. Kids have been doing this since antiquity, too, and over the centuries they’ve found ways to put their own whimsical little spins on it, as the Encyclopaedia Britannica notes: “In some variants the children pretend that the touch carries some form of contagion—e.g., plague (Italy), leprosy (Madagascar), fleas (Spain), or ‘lurgy fever’ (Great Britain).” That last ailment’s fictitious, at least, but still, a grim kind of game.  I suspect it’d make sense, though, to the German philosopher Karl Groos, who back around the turn of the 20th century wondered what it was that made young mammals—including young human

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE You’re It

mammals—engage in play. Play doesn’t quite make sense, after all, from an evolutionary perspective: You’re expending energy that’s not going toward some big-ticket goal like finding food, defending your young or procreating. And burning energy needlessly is the best case; in the worst, you’re exposing yourself to physical harm, from broken bones to concussions, for what would appear to be no good reason. Groos’s answer was that play is common in young mammals because it’s a form of practice for behaviors that will be important throughout an animal’s life. Escaping someone in a game of tag? That’ll get you into shape to outrun some future reallife predator who wants to have you for a meal—or, I suppose, help you evade those bubonic pathogens. In a significantly more recent article, the evolutionary psychologist Peter Gray tries to make the case that all formal team sports are variations of tag—a three-yearold playing tag and an NFL wide receiver are both outrunning a pursuer, Gray points out, though admittedly one’s got better endorsement opportunities. Gray thinks that where an animal sits on the food chain might influence whether it has more fun chasing or being chased: for monkeys or squirrels, he writes, “the animal being chased shows the greatest pleasure in the game”—they need the practice outrunning predators; he places humans in this category, too—whereas dogs like to chase cars because they’re more evolutionarily inclined to be the predators. (You’ll be forgiven for thinking it’s because they’re idiots. Researchers are only beginning to come to terms with how widespread play is in the animal kingdom. It was once thought that only certain mammals and birds wanna have fun, but we’ve more recently observed playlike behavior in fish, reptiles and even invertebrates like wasps and octopuses. Accordingly, we’re diversifying our understanding of why animals play. Simple survival instinct may be the beginning, but it may also be, for instance, that animals play in order to learn boundaries in their communities—how hard they can bite, for instance, without pissing their pals off. What with the torrent of discouraging stories that’ve come pouring out since the Harvey Weinstein news broke, one might argue there’s a lot of male humans out there who could stand to play another million rounds of Simon Says. CW

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It seems like after every mass shooting, the solution is “thoughts and prayers.” You can participate in a prayerful candlelight 2017 Vigil to #EndGunViolence that also seeks concrete actions to stem the bloody tide of deaths. The gathering remembers the half million Americans killed or injured by guns in the five years since the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre. And it should send a message to the politicians and gun lobbyists who fight against reasonable gun control. All Saints Episcopal Church, 1710 Foothill Drive, 801-581-0380, Sunday, Dec. 10, 7 p.m., free, bit. ly/2zDIDLU

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“If there ever was a time to support immigrants and immigrant justice in Utah, that time is now.” That’s the message from the Enriching Utah Coalition, raising money for an emergency fund and hotline for immigrants being squeezed by the system and the politics around it. At Keep Families Together: Celebrate & Fundraise for Immigrant Lives, tapas, music and dancing add to an atmosphere of support. Funds collected aid families in extreme need of food, shelter, clothing and more, as well as provide financial assistance for legal representation, and support hotline services to assess their needs and connect them with appropriate resources. Frida Bistro, 545 W. 700 South, Friday, Dec. 8, 5-7 p.m., $20-$50, bit.ly/2j69pqe


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DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 13


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14 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

Clovis Lark, Symphony Librarian

Sarah Shippobotham, Dialect/Accent Coach

Jared Steffensen, Curator + Kevin Lucey, Preparator

Jennifer Freed, Stage Manager

Before every Utah Symphony performance, Clovis Lark places the score on the conductor’s podium. The more fascinating part of his job is the process of determining specifically which score ends up on that podium. In an Abravanel Hall office stacked floor-toceiling with accordion folders full of scores, Lark talks about his role as librarian for the symphony. Growing up mostly in St. Louis and Manhattan, Kansas, Lark was interested in music, but like many people interested in the arts, he found himself initially studying a subject in college—in his case, mathematics and political economy—that seemed more practical, before switching to music. A potential graduate degree in musicology was sidelined by the loss of research funding, leading him to change direction again to culinary school and five years working in restaurants. In 1992, however, he saw a job posting in Bloomington, Ind., for a librarian at the Indiana University Conservatory. “I looked at the requirements and thought, ‘Well, I can do this,’” he says. “That’s probably how almost every orchestra librarian gets their job: There may be a myriad of reasons behind such a decision as simple as supplementing their instrumental income (I was unemployed), or helping out in their orchestra library, but once we get into what’s going on behind the scenes, we find a rewarding world that we make into our own” The job involves multiple steps as the symphony plans performances several months down the road. Generally, the artistic director provides the basic program, and Lark begins the process of finding the needed scores for each scheduled piece. But the exact steps required can vary greatly. Is the composer contemporary enough that the work is still under copyright, requiring payment of royalties? For pieces that are in the public domain, which of the many existing versions is best? If the symphony library does have a copy of a specific piece, is it even the version that the conductor wants to work from? Once the desired version is obtained, Lark works with the conductor and concertmaster on specific notations for the performance of each part. “Just like a player getting their technique, intonation, everything spot-on,” Lark says, “I’m doing this from the paper end before it even hits the stage, including collaboration with the lead players and conductors.” Lark is content with his off-stage role, since he self-deprecatingly describes his own playing ability—”I stopped [violin] at a certain point because one thing I do have is a very, very good ear, and my proficiency was nowhere near the amazing level, personal dedication and drive of my colleagues on stage.”—in addition to having terrible stage fright. “I knew somehow in the back of my head, someone had to do the work to get things on stage, but you never knew exactly what it was,” he says. “I discovered there was an area of this job which I cared a great deal about: Making a piece absolutely understandable and correct, which is a critical component of a great performance.” “The simplest part of my job is wearing a suit, going out and putting the score out for the conductor,” he says. “People will see me doing that. But who is that, and what does he really do for a living? It’s the end of a detailed process that may have begun a year earlier.”

If you’ve attended a theatrical production in the Salt Lake Valley in the past 20 years that included an accent, you’ve probably heard Shippobotham’s work. Since relocating to Utah for a position with the University of Utah drama department in 1998, and subsequently spending 15 years as head of the Actor Training Program there, she has worked with actors on the finer points of convincing an audience through the way they speak that they’re from somewhere else. A native of Cardiff, Wales, Shippobotham traces her interest in theater and voices back to childhood, but she became particularly attuned to variations in regional speech after moving to England at the age of 11, then returning to visit Wales. “I have this vivid memory of going back to Cardiff after we left, and suddenly hearing everybody speaking differently,” she says. “My ears just went, ‘What?’” Her interest in acting took her back to Wales for collegiate drama school, and eventually to a specialized program at the Central School of Speech and Drama. “I wanted to be an accent coach for film,” Shippobotham says. “In 1997, [Central] was pretty much the only school in the world to have a program for accent coaching.” For Shippobotham, teaching an accent begins with learning it herself. Although she says she can “fudge around in about 30 or so accents,” she’ll begin a project of coaching for a production by attempting to find authentic speakers of that accent, often via online clips, to observe how faces look when they speak and to learn what she calls the “mathematical changes”—variations on pronouncing specific vowels or consonants that might take the word “like” into the Cockney “loik” or Irish “lake.” But as an actor herself, Shippobotham also finds it important to teach not just a formula, but a way to make the accent a natural part of an actor’s performance. “The intangible part of dialect coaching is the tune and the rhythm,” she says. “It becomes too paintby-numbers if I say, ‘You have to go up here and down here.’ … Does it feel authentic? Does it sound like you spoke like that before you hit the stage? Do you feel free to create in the accent, as opposed to I-have-to-getit-right?” Despite her initial interest in teaching for film, Shippobotham only has one movie credit, although it was a high-profile one: Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit trilogy. In addition to her work annually with the Shaw Theater Festival in Ontario, she continues coaching actors locally, most recently in Pioneer Theater Co.’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. And it’s fascinating having her teach me the intricacies of an Australian accent by having me recite a single sentence: “There was once a young rat named Arthur, who would never take the trouble to make up his mind.” “I love sound,” she says. “I think language and text is really important. And it should be as good as it can be, and if somebody’s willing to put in the time, I really enjoy helping people to expand. In a way, the joy is the game: How do I unlock you? How do I push you further than you think you can go?”

As part of Utah Museum of Contemporary Art’s exhibition Cities of Conviction, a mixed-media work hangs from the ceiling, the pieces including sections from a gasoline pump. The story behind how it ended up ready for the installation’s opening night explains a lot about the roles of the museum’s curator and preparator. “This piece came from Saudi Arabia at 10 a.m. on the day we were supposed to open the exhibition at 7,” museum curator Jared Steffensen says. “It was thrown into a bag of bubble wrap, thrown into a crate and sent here. There were labels, but they were written on masking tape in pencil, and that has a tendency to rub off. And also they were in Arabic. So, you have three people in Utah looking at Arabic symbols, trying to figure something out.” Steffensen and Kevin Lucey—the museum’s preparator, who does much of the physical work of installing exhibitions—don’t always encounter quite so much drama while readying an exhibition for the public. Yet they play a role that almost makes them co-creators of works of art. Lucey started in his position in summer of this year, taking a role that he only discovered existed after an internship at UMOCA. “I started as a photography major, but before that I was painting houses and doing electrical work,” Lucey says. “I wanted to continue in the art world, but I didn’t see being the individual that was producing the work.” The internship, however, opened his eyes to “Oh wow, this exists in the art world: a job that is labor/ maintenance-based, but for a museum.” The role of the preparator might be described fairly simply—Lucey says it’s “to make sure that nothing is falling apart from an art sense”—but there’s considerably more to the job, and to the collaboration between Lucey and Steffensen. As an exhibit is being planned, Steffensen— who held the preparator job himself circa 2009—begins envisioning the placement of works within a gallery space, often employing modeling software. “Then,” Steffensen says, “I’ll have Kevin look at it, then we discuss certain things—there’s not enough space here, we think this is too tight an area. Because I think [the preparator] knows the area a bit more intimately. We’re the ones on the computer.” The details of an installation might involve everything from the transition from one work to the next, to the lighting, to the physical height at which a work is hung on the wall. Even within UMOCA, different spaces present different moods—”the Main Gallery with a huge hardwood floor,” as Lucey says, “then up here [on the main floor] with concrete and white”—that can affect a viewer’s experience. Lucey also notes that the installation process brings those who work at the museum closer to the works. “I’ll just walk by and be like, ‘This was someone’s idea, but at the same time, [we] were able to execute it.’ … Everything changes once you lift the case off the crate. Everything’s a little different than you thought it would be: There’s a hook in this place, but you really need it in this place.” “The thing that keeps bringing me down into the room,” Steffensen adds, “is the creative problem-solving. There’s something incredibly fulfilling about that, when you stand in front of a work and think, ‘Now how the hell are we going to get this on the wall?’”

In a rehearsal for Eric Samuelsen’s play The Ice Front, one of the main characters—a theater company stage manager—explains her role. “I’m invisible,” the character says; “I’m essential.” Beside the theater’s seating structure, behind the sound and lighting board, Jennifer Freed takes on that role for Plan-B Theatre Co. as she has for 20 years. She describes her role in a way similar to Samuelsen’s protagonist: “The person who keeps it all together, maybe,” Freed says. “Because I have to know everything: the costume each character wears, all the props, all the lights, all the sound. I have to know if an actor is sick. Even getting here early enough to make sure everything is set up for the actors when they get here. You really have to be on top of it. You have to know all your troops.” Freed grew up in a family of theater people in Utah, so she was immersed in it from an early age. But it still wasn’t an obvious career track for her, especially because, as she puts it, “I had no desire to act.” It was her sister who encouraged her to look into the behind-the-scenes side, and she began the theater program at the University of Utah. “I thought I was going to go into lighting design or set design,” she recalls. “I was working on my first production backstage, talking to the stage manager, and she said, ‘You should look at stage management.’ So I did, and I fell in love with it.” Her professional career took her to New York for several years, but she returned to Utah, initially to call shows for Utah Opera for five years. “I could do what I wanted to do here,” Freed says, “and I could buy a house for less than I was paying for an apartment in New York.” That still doesn’t mean it’s possible for theater to be a full-time occupation for Freed. She works a day job in the purchasing department at Lagoon, “which supports my theater habit,” she jokes. While she says she’d work in the theater full-time if it were possible, the logistics of such a career don’t really work unless you’re willing to give up the rest of your life. “Those who do make it, they’re on the road all the time. For me it came down to, I’m really truly proud of what we do here. It equals everything I did in New York, or at the opera, and I’m allowed to have a life, and another job, and that’s fine.” For now, that life includes being the person who keeps the show running without ever being on the stage. “I was never in acting classes, never comfortable with that,” Freed says. “But give me pen, a paper, a script, and tell me that I need to follow blocking and help people, I’m there for them. … . If [the audience is] noticing me, then I’ve screwed up somewhere, and that horrifies me.” She’s OK with being invisible. Everyone else in the show is more than OK with her being essential.


Sarah Shippobotham Clovis Lark

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DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 15

Jared Steffensen + Kevin Lucey


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16 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

Chris DuVal, Fight Choreographer

Kevin Alberts, Costume Designer

If you believe that the key to stage combat is aggression, Chris DuVal would like to disabuse you of that notion. “This is an art form about creating an illusion,” he says in his office on the University of Utah campus, where he currently heads the Actor Training Program. “How do we create moments that look explosively dangerous, like two people out to kill each other, but are actually about people who are deeply connected, taking care of the other person?” DuVal’s specialization in fight choreography is only part of a long career in theater that began with growing up in a family of performers—both his father and grandfather acted professionally—in Southern California. The graduate of a performing arts high school, he was encouraged by his father to study theater in college rather than biology, “which is really bizarre for a parent,” he says with a laugh. He was only 18, in a production of Cyrano de Bergerac with California Youth Theatre, when he first became interested in stage combat while working with renowned fight choreographer B.H. Barry. It was not, however, a skill that came naturally to him. “I was actually not very good at it, at all,” he says. “but I knew that I wanted to be better. And I just kept working at it.” That work involved around eight years of training toward certifications from the Society of American Fight Directors, Dueling Arts International and the Academy of Theatrical Combat. Subsequently, he has worked for 18 seasons as fight director for the renowned Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland. For DuVal, the process of working on a theatrical production is always focused on protecting performers. “The director may say, ‘We want this physical moment,’” DuVal notes. “So it’s all going to be contingent, for me, on actor safety. Is the floor safe? Is the lighting adequate for the physical activity they’re being asked to do? Actors tend to be either scared of getting hurt themselves, or hurting someone else, or fearful of looking dumb. So a lot of my work is providing solutions to some of those fears. What are the choreographic opportunities that will make the actor feel safe, feel like they’re protecting their partner, and also makes them feel confident in what they’re doing?” Like many behind-the-scenes people, DuVal believes he’s doing his job best when you don’t even realize that it’s being done. “I don’t want people to see a play happen, then see a choreographic interlude, then see the rest of the play happen,” he says. “I want the fight to be an integral part of the story. So sometimes we affectionately call our choreography more appropriately ‘storyography.’ The actual moves are less important than the story, and how the story gets furthered. “As a young choreographer, my fights were always very long, and used as many of the flashiest moves as I could possibly get in them,” he says. “Now I’m much more interested in making the fight as long as it needs to be, and to get down to the essentials of what that conflict needs to communicate.”

The racks of clothes—organized by era, and by men’s or women’s garments—fill a space large enough that Kevin Alberts doesn’t even know how big it is. It’s a visual representation of 30 years spent designing the costumes that actors have worn on some of Utah’s biggest stages. A native of suburban Detroit, Alberts—a fulltime employee of the University of Utah’s costume shop—recalls participating in the drama club in high school, but “I didn’t know that being a costume designer was a job. I don’t think I knew where costumes came from.” It was only when he began working with a community theater that he started learning firsthand. “They needed someone to do costumes, and I went, ‘Well, how hard can it be?’” Alberts says. “It was a little harder than I thought.” College study in theater led him to the University of Utah for grad school, where he eventually returned after stints working in Chicago and New York. In addition to working for Pioneer Theatre Co. and other Salt Lake City-based companies, he has designed for Utah Shakespeare Festival since 2002. The process of designing a show begins with meetings with a director, but the specifics of that process can differ greatly depending on the collaborator. “Some directors are very straightforward; they know in their mind they have a picture of what they want their show to look like,” Alberts says. “Some directors are open to anything—we could do this or we could do that—and it’s your job to funnel it all together. Some directors are more ethereal or talk in metaphors, and you have to funnel that in.” Every production is its own unique thing, with its own unique dynamics. Sometimes the logistical challenges involve working on two different shows—one for PTC, one for the university theater department—at the same time. There’s the challenge of keeping your own ideas fresh when you’re working on a well-known show where there might have been hundreds of previous productions, or even a movie version. Then there are the particular quirks of working on shows for Utah Shakespeare in a smaller town like Cedar City: “If you don’t come prepared, you’re stuck,” he says. “There used to be a Kmart, and that was it. Now there’s a Walmart and a Kmart.” But for Alberts, there remains the appeal of working directly with the actors, something other people on the technical side of theater production, like lighting and set design, don’t always have. And after 30 years, there’s the experience of knowing what pieces from that massive stockroom of costumes might work for an upcoming show, and which shows are the real tests of his skill. “People ask ‘what’s the hardest show, and what’s the biggest show,’ and they’re not necessarily the same thing,” Alberts says. “Les Misérables is probably the biggest thing we’ve ever done, but looking at it, it’s a whole bunch of dirty rags, so you’re not overwhelmed by the size of it. Beauty and the Beast was the hardest thing we’ve ever done, because you have to make somebody be a teapot, and a clock, and a candlestick. It’s all stuff we had never done, so the learning curve on that was tremendous. “We save everything,” he says. “It could end up being rags for Les Miz, if nothing else.”

Heidi Belka, Pyrotechnician/Stage Hand/General Behind-the-Scenes Firing a cannon inside a theater for a production like The Nutcracker requires a very specific kind of training. For those who know how to do it right—like Ballet West’s Heidi Belka—there are ways to test your level of expertise. “Ideally, I get a smoke ring,” Belka says. “That’s my goal each show.” Unlike many behind-the-scenes theater professionals, Belka didn’t grow up thinking she would be in showbiz. After working mostly in retail, she became interested in the work her husband was doing as a theater technician. “He was telling me what he was doing, and I was like, ‘I don’t understand,’” Belka says. “So he said, ‘Come down and try it out.’ I did one show with him and just loved it. I loved the activity: unloading the truck, bringing it in, building the show.” A three-year apprenticeship program followed, which involved preparation for a wide variety of backstage jobs. As a member of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees union (IATSE), Belka might work everything from the lighting rigging for a rock show at Vivint SmartHome Arena, to working in the costume shop of a theatrical production, to running the remote control for the flying carpet in Ballet West’s production of Aladdin. Additionally, she works frequently on movie and television production in Utah, applying her skills to scenic painting, lighting and more. “Some people would say that it’s not wise to do what I’ve done, and to specialize in one thing,” Belka says, “but it’s worked for me for 10 years now. From day to day, one day I’m a carpenter, the next day I’m an electrician.” She does acknowledge, however, that “pyro” is the job she loves most, and wishes she could to more. When Ballet West’s long-time pyrotechnician retired, the company’s stage manager, Michael McCulloch, approached Belka about learning the craft. The process involved some unique preparation—”I needed to pass a background check with [the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms],” Belka says—so that she could receive a possessor letter of clearance to work under McCulloch’s license. “He taught me how to take an electrical match and wire it into whatever the gadget is,” Belka says, “how to mix the chemicals, different ratios for whatever effect we want.” While the exciting side of the job might involve firing cannons and creating flash effects, there’s also an important safety component to the role. She might be called in to serve as “fire watch” for a touring theater production, which means someone to ensure nothing goes wrong any time a live flame is on stage—whether it’s a torch in Wicked or just a cigarette lighter in An American in Paris. “Pyro can be stressful, making sure no one is in its path before I go,” Belka says. “In fact, no matter the gig, I always have a healthy amount of nerves going. I just want to keep people safe and do a great job.”

Mike Leavitt, Musical Director The journey of a classically trained pianist to working on Salt Lake Acting Co.’s satirical, often raunchy Saturday’s Voyeur might seem like an aesthetic leap. For Mike Leavitt, it’s the perfect way to combine what he loves about music and theater. The Las Vegas native performed in state and regional competitions as a classical pianist, but landed his first professional theater gig at the age of 15, as a keyboard accompanist for a national tour of Brigadoon. “I enjoy the collaborative effort of theater,” Leavitt says, “working with other musicians in the pit, and on the music director side, working with actors, the director, the production team. Whereas as a classical pianist, I’m stuck in a room by myself practicing eight hours a day.” The role of musical director is just one of many hats Leavitt wears, as he makes a living also composing and arranging music and producing for studio recordings. But the musical director job itself is one that requires a wide range of different skills. At times he’s working with actors so that they learn their individual singing parts correctly, including pronunciation tricks so that lyrics can be most easily understood by an audience. Then there’s the technical side, says Leavitt: “We need this kind of staging, this kind of set design so this song will come across. We need this many musicians, and how to get them mic’ed properly. How am I going to make sure my singers are heard, whether it’s a large theater or a small theater. The amount of work that goes into the title is more than what many people might initially conceptualize.” The process is altogether different for Saturday’s Voyeur, where Leavitt took over in 2016 after longtime Voyeur music director Kevin Mathie moved out of the state. “For me it felt really natural,” Leavitt says of the transition. “It all kind of made sense. There’s a certain lingo that I had to get used to, in the fact that Voyeur is a different beast than any other kind of production out there. But it’s still theater and still live.” That show still involves different logistical demands, in that each production is a brand-new show. “With Voyeur, I am integral to the creation of that whole project every year,” Leavitt says. “[Writers Allen Nevins and Nancy Borgenicht] might say, ‘I have this song’—’Changes,’ by David Bowie—’but I don’t know what to do with it yet,’ and I have to figure out how to work it into the show. … You never know who’s going to sing which line, so you have to base it on certain keys, to make sure that it fits everybody’s range properly. And you want not just a hodgepodge, but a flow from beginning to end.” While he brings the skills of a talented musician to the process, it’s just as important that he brings a work ethic—including 16-hour-days at times—and an enthusiasm for collaboration. “I love the creation side of it, I love the performance side, I love the rehearsal process,” Leavitt says. “That’s some of the most enjoyable parts of any theater process—when you really get to know your team.” CW


chris du val

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DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 17

kevin alberts

Heidi Belka


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18 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

Salt Lake Ballet Theater: The Night Before Christmas There are some holiday traditions that never overstay their welcome: the prized poem “The Night Before Christmas,” the Dr. Seuss’ tale of Christmas redemption How the Grinch Stole Christmas and the immensely popular ballet The Nutcracker, for example. So credit the Salt Lake Ballet Theater’s annual production of The Night Before Christmas with effectively morphing together all three, courtesy of its lavish rebranding of the first on that list. Truth be told, it bears little resemblance to that hallowed Yuletide poem first published anonymously in 1823, and later attributed to author Clement C. Moore. In this rendition, a young girl named Alexandria falls asleep after a Christmas party. When Alexandria awakens, she finds herself in the presence of the Christmas Fairy, who then takes her on a magical tour that includes Santa’s workshop, the Kingdom of the Sweets, the Christmas Fairy’s Palace and, eventually, Mother Goose’s Storybook Land. All goes well until Horrible Hateful Harry and his Grinches arrive, and declare their intent to kidnap Santa. Perhaps it’s a parable about a really scary Black Friday shopping trip. Written and directed by Neil Hess and featuring dancers of all ages, this production is a family-friendly affair. Besides, with all the actual Horrible Hateful Harrys in the world, fairies, elves and storybook characters provide a nice respite. Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night at the theater. (Lee Zimmerman) Salt Lake Ballet Theater: The Night Before Christmas @ Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Dec. 8, 7 p.m.; Dec. 9, 1 & 7 p.m., $16.50-$18.50, artsaltlake.org

SATURDAY 12/9 Susan Lehmann

In life, sometimes, our career paths choose us. That seems to be the case with Susan Lehmann, the Utah-based author of two true-crime books—Visions of Ted Bundy: The Psychic and the Chi Omega Murders and Echoes from the Mind: The Psychic and the Gainesville Student Murders. While attending Florida State University, Lehmann discovered writing and journalism, finding her greatest interest in being “a real journalist … [to] put my interview skills to work as a writer.” She refers to her trademark truecrime genre as a “gathering of events,” and describes her work as creative non-fiction. Visions of Ted Bundy is inspired by actual events in the early hours of Jan. 15, 1978, when five students were savagely attacked— two fatally—on the FSU campus. In the book, newspaper reporter Helen Baxter is approached by a music student named Joseph, who offers assistance to find the killer. With his visions, a suspect is arrested—but what is the link between Joseph and the killer? Echoes from the Mind marks the return of Helen Baxter in a case involving the murder of five college roommates in their apartment, once again employing psychics in the investigation. As the search for the killer leads down a path of frightening discovery, Baxter is certain of one thing: Some experiences defy explanation. Lehmann is currently working on two new novels. But she doesn’t need a psychic to know the ending. (Benjamin Benally) Susan Lehmann @ Weller Books Works, 665 E. 600 South, 801-328-2586, Dec. 9, 3 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

COURTESY OF DANCE MOMS

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

PETER LEHMANN

PENNIE KNAPTON

FRIDAY 12/8

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, DEC. 7-13, 2017

COURTESY MIDTOWN MEN

ESSENTIALS

the

TUESDAY 12/12

Holiday Hits with Midtown Men and Utah Symphony If this time of year has you feeling sentimental for some elusive, dreamy-filtered Golden Days of Christmas Past (and you just can’t seem to shake memories of that special December night back in ’63) then look no further than The Midtown Men and Utah Symphony’s upcoming salute to the ’60s. This theatrical rock and roll experience makes nostalgia new again thanks to a fully choreographed set-list of revisited rock classics and orchestral holiday favorites. Members of the original Broadway cast of Jersey Boys, vocalists Michael Longoria, Daniel Reichard, J. Robert Spencer and Tony Award-winner Christian Hoff shed new light on this diverse decade, and pay tribute to an incredible catalogue of music with silky-smooth Broadway panache. While they might have found their sweet spot in the sounds of the ’60s, The Midtown Men proved they can keep it contemporary, too, with the release of their first radio single— a reimagining of the bouncy 1990s pop carol “All Alone on Christmas”—produced by rock icon and friend of the band Steven Van Zandt. “Sometimes the best projects are the ones that are the most unlikely. And quite often, like this one, they turn out to be the most fun,” the erstwhile Sopranos star and E Street Band member said in a press release about his collaboration with the group. “They have conquered the recording studio the same way they took Broadway. The Midtown Men have arrived.” (Samantha Herzog) Holiday Hits with Midtown Men and Utah Symphony @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m., $29-$85, utahsymphony.org

TUESDAY 12/12

The Irreplaceables Tour Chloe Lukasiak is one of the most immediately recognizable young women in the dancing world today. She was prominently featured as an original member of the hit Lifetime series Dance Moms, and is one of the three incredible dancers performing as part of The Irreplaceables Tour. The production is a high-energy opportunity for fans to interact with three of their all-time favorite cast members in a brand new way. Not only does the tour offer performances by Lukasiak, Kendall Vertes and Kalani Hilliker, but the three Dance Moms stars lead workshops teaching fans of any skill level how to dance, sharing their talents with the communities that love them. Lukasiak is thrilled about the opportunity to interact with her fans on an educational level, saying during a phone interview that she was asked to teach a dance class before, and she “loves teaching so much.” When asked what she is looking forward to most about The Irreplaceables Tour, she says she’s “really excited to meet the fans, and to perform. It’s a really magical experience.” She loves letting fans know that “their support means the world. [We] are excited and happy, celebrating dance and being together—just talking about it makes me so excited!” The Irreplaceables Tour is a one-of-akind chance for fans to learn from the three dancers as well as to watch some breathtaking performances. “As a dancer,” Lukasiak says, “there is no better feeling than knowing that you’ve danced your heart out.” (Andrea Wall) The Irreplaceables Tour @ The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City, Dec 12, 6 p.m., theirreplaceablestour.com


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Musicals, Big and Small G BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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trictly speaking, Newsies is a musical, and a delightfully entertaining one. In another sense, it’s a dance performance so exhilarating, it’s practically an athletic competition. Of course, it’s silly to separate the components of a rousing production like this. There’s a winningly old-fashioned quality to the Disney-fied telling of the 1899 New York newsboys strike, with a fictionalized character named Jack Kelly (Jonathan Shew) leading his fellow newspaper delivery boys in an action against publishers raising rates in a way that exploits their largely underage labor force. And there’s even room for a modest exploration of women entering the work force, in the character of aspiring reporter Katherine (Nadia Vynn), which doesn’t exist in the 1992 movie version but here gives rise to the funniest single tune, “Watch What Happens.” That song and all of the others—by Disney stalwart composer Alan Menken and lyricist Jack Feldman—are effectively rousing, although there’s an awkward attempt to create a show-stopper out of Jack’s earnest “I want” number “Santa Fe” that feels out of place with the rest of the show’s tone. Its crowning glory, however, are the two centerpiece production numbers, which director/choreographer Karen Azenberg and her gifted ensemble turn into breathtaking displays of acrobatic precision. While the first act nears its close with the explosive performance of “Seize the Day,” the second act gets a pulsequickening kick-off with “King of New York,” in dance numbers that somehow weave in a musical interlude with spoons and water-filled glasses. It’s the kind of work that leaves a spectator’s mouth agape. The narrative itself is in some ways merely serviceable, mixing plucky orphans, a mismatched love story and a greedy businessman for something that might feel straight out of a 1930s Hollywood genre piece. Sure, it’s satisfying in 2017 to see a tale in which standing up to grasping corporate interests actually results in a happy ending, but Harvey Fierstein’s book isn’t exactly breaking new storytelling ground. And it doesn’t particularly matter, when you’ve got a talented cast in fine voice, giving the story their gee-whiz best. All that, plus a chance to watch the intricate moves of phenomenal dancers, bringing the kind of showmanship that’s not surprising to see has to burst into the aisles.

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Pioneer Theatre Co. Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theater 300 S. 1400 East Through Dec. 20 $42-$64 pioneertheatre.org

ive Utah Repertory Theater Co. and director Johnny Hebda credit: While stage musicals are often associated with grand theatricality, their shows have become case studies in how songs in a smaller space can create a powerful emotional connection. What was true of Utah Rep’s spring production of Kiss of the Spider Woman is true again for The Bridges of Madison County, the stage adaptation of Robert James Waller’s 1992 tearjerker by playwright Marsha Norman and composer/lyricist Jason Robert Brown. In broad strokes, the story remains the same: In 1965 Iowa, Francesca Johnson (Erin Royall Carlson)—an Italian war bride living with her husband and two children on their farm—finds herself longing for something more after 18 years of rural domesticity. And while the rest of the family is away at a fair with the prize steer, she connects with Robert Kincaid (Kevin Goertzen), a National Geographic photographer visiting to chronicle the area’s picturesque covered bridges. Initially, there are bumps in adjusting to this interpretation of the material. Norman scraps the novel’s framing structure of Francesca’s now-adult children finding her diaries, removing the context of them discovering how much she sacrificed for them. It’s also a paradigm shift for taciturn manly-man Robert to become someone who bursts into song to express his emotions. But the latter difficulty is erased entirely by Goertzen’s performance, which finds a more complex arc for a guy who could easily feel like a housewife’s improbable romance-novel fantasy. He brings a hushed quality to his line readings that is beautifully offset by his powerful voice, and he gets a tremendous partner in Carlson, whose performance is just as versatile both in silence and in song. Those Sondheim-esque compositions by Brown—ranging from the frisky humor of “State Road 21” to the heartbreaking ballads like “Falling into You”—are the story’s heartbeat, yet what makes them soar is the efficiency with which Hebda and company make use of a black-box theater space to tell this story. The moKevin Goertzen and Erin Royall bile walls of the Johnson Carlson in The Bridges of Madison County kitchen create a fittingly constricting feel for Francesca’s life, which opens out into the tender moments near the bridge (conveyed simply by a pair of ladders). The source material might be chided for its melodrama, but this version cuts to the heart of a kind of heroism in simple lives—and it all feels so personal, you could almost reach out and touch it. CW

THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY

Utah Repertory Theater Co. Regent Street Black Box 131 S. Main Through Dec. 10 $20 artsaltlake.org

BLAKE YELAVICH

Two very different emotional beats for two new musical productions.

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Award-winning Utah artist Stephanie Saint-Thomas presents examples of her mixed-media art and jewelry in Wanderlust: A Treasure Trove of Holiday Gifts at Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre Loge Gallery (300 S. 1400 East, 2nd Level, pioneertheatre.org), Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Through Dec. 20.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Aida Hale Center Theater, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Jan. 20, times vary, hit.org Annie Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, Dec. 8-23, dates and times vary, empresstheatre.com The Best Christmas Pageant Ever CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, through Dec. 16, ThursdaySaturday, 7 p.m., centerpointtheatre.com The Bodyguard, Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through Dec. 10, times vary, arttix.artsaltlake.org The Bridges of Madison County Eccles Theater Regent Street Black Box, 131 S. Main, through Dec. 10, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 20) A Christmas Carol The Musical Center Point Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, through Dec. 23, times vary, centerpointtheatre.org A Christmas Carol Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Dec. 23, dates and times vary, haletheater.org Christmas Vacation: The Polarized Express Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Dec. 30, desertstar.biz A Fairly Potter Christmas Carol The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Dec. 23, dates and times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com A Fairy Tale Christmas Carol The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Dec. 12-13, 7 p.m., theziegfeldtheater.com Forever Plaid: Plaid Tidings Covey Center for the Arts, 425 W. Center St., Provo, through Dec. 23, times vary, coveycenter.org The Little Prince The Art Factory, 211 W. 2100 South, through Dec. 23, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., sackerson.org Newsies Pioneer Memorial Theater, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through Dec. 20, FridaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Monday-Thursday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., pioneertheatre.org (see p. 20)

Odettes for the Holidays Good Company Theatre, 2404 Wall Avenue, Ogden, Dec. 8-23, goodcotheatre.com Star Ward Christmas Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Dec. 23, 7:30p.m., theobt.org The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Dec. 29, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org

DANCE

Ballet West: The Nutcracker Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, through Dec. 30, dates and times vary, balletwest.org The Irreplaceables Tour The Complex, 536 W. 100 S., Dec 12, 6 p.m., theirreplaceablestour.com (see p. 18) Salt Lake Ballet Theatre: The Night Before Christmas Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Dec. 8-9, times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Odyssey Dance Theatre: The Redux NUT-Cracker Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Dec. 13-23, times vary, tickets.utah.edu Utah Metropolitan Ballet: The Nutcracker Covey Center for the Arts, 425 W. Center St., Provo, Dec. 9-20, utahmetropolitanballet.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

West Valley Symphony of Utah Christmas Concert Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m., culturalcelebration.org Holiday Hits with The Midtown Men Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org (see p. 18)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Alex Velluto Wiseguys Jordan Landing, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Dec. 8-9, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Christian Pieper Wiseguys Jordan Landing, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, Dec. 7., 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com John Heffron Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Dec. 8-9, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Todd Johnson Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Dec. 8-9, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com


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LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Chris Ames: An American Homeless in Paris Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, Dec. 7, 7 p.m., kensandersbooks.com Erin Summerill: Ever the Brave The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Dec. 8., 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Jake Parker: The 12 Sleighs of Christmas The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Dec. 9, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Sonya Cotton & Gabe Dominguez: Tiny Home The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Dec. 10, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com Susan Lehmann Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Dec. 9, 3 p.m., wellerbookworks.com (see p. 18)

TALKS & LECTURES

Phun with Physics Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 801-581-6927, Dec. 11, 3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m., nhmu.utah.edu

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 23

14th Annual Glass Art Show Red Butte Garden 300 Wakara Way, through Dec. 17, redbuttegarden.org 34th Annual Holiday Craft Market Finch Lane

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VISUAL ART

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Breakfast With Santa Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, 801-768-2300, Dec. 9 & 16, 9 a.m.-11 a.m., thanksgivingpoint.org Brunch with Santa Sheraton Salt Lake City Hotel, 150 W. 500 South, 801-401-2000, Dec. 9 & 16, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., sheratonsaltlakecityhotel.com/brunch-with-santa Christmas in Color Provo Towne Center, 1200 Towne Center Blvd., Provo, through Dec. 30, Monday-Thursday, 5:30 p.m.-10 p.m.; FridaySaturday, 5:30 p.m.-11 p.m., christmasincolor.net Christmas in Color Salt Lake Equestrian Park, 2100 W. 11400 South, South Jordan, through Dec. 30, Monday-Thursday, 5:30 p.m.10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 5:30 p.m.-11 p.m., christmasincolor.net Christmas in the Wizarding World The Shops at South Town, 10450 S. State, Sandy, through Jan. 31, shopsatsouthtown.com Lower Lights Christmas Concert Kingsbury Hall 1395 Presidents Circle, through Dec. 9, 7 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Luminaria: Experience the Light Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, through Dec. 30, thanksgivingpoint.org University Choirs Holiday Concert Libby Gardner Hall 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m., music.utah.edu Trees of Diversity 2017 Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley, through Dec. 30., Monday-Thursday. 9-6 p.m., culturalcelebration.org ZooLights Hogle Zoo, 2600 Sunnyside Ave., Dec. 1-31, hoglezoo.org

Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Dec. 19, saltlakearts.org Annual Statewide Juried Exhibition Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Jan. 12, heritage.utah.gov Artist/Dad Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Jan. 12, heritage.utah.gov Carol Sogard: Artifacts for the 23rd Century UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Jan.13, utahmoca.org Cities of Conviction UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 6, utahmoca.org Cookie Allred: The Color of Places Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Dec. 20, slcpl.org David N. LeCheminant: Morning Walk Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 5, slcpl.org Drew Grella: I Would Rather Wear a Cape Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 5, slcpl.org Go West! Art of the American Frontier from the Buffalo Bill Center of the West Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through March 11, umfa.utah.edu Holiday Group Exhibit Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, through Dec. 15, accessart.org Holiday Group Show David Ericson Fine Art, 418 S. 200 West, through Dec. 15, davidericson-fineart.com Ilse Bing Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 31, umfa.utah.edu Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 9, utahmoca.org Jerry Hardesty: Doublespeak Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Dec. 29, slcpl.org Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective LDS Church History Museum, 45 N. West Temple, through April 15, history.lds.org Karen Horne: Ballet To Tango Exploring the Art of Dance Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, 801-533-4200, through Dec. 23, hornefineart.com Kristina Lenzi: Alien Matters Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 5., slcpl.org Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Lesly Abalos-Ambriz: 24: Is This Lesly? Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-5948623, through Dec. 27, slcpl.org Sarah Malakoff: Second Nature Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through Jan. 26, granaryartcenter.org Seeing the Sacred Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through Dec. 3, urbanartsgallery.org Stephanie Saint-Thomas: Wanderlust Pioneer Memorial Theatre Loge Gallery, 300 S. 1400 East, through Dec. 20, pioneertheatre.org (see p. 22) Virginia Johnson: Meditations on Ennui Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Jan. 11, slcpl.org Warm Up With Cool Art Show Local Colors of Utah, 1054 E. 2100 South, 801-363-3922, through Jan. 16, localcolorsart.com Winter Group Show Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through Jan. 12, phillips-gallery.com Winter Scenes and Holiday Dreams Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Dec. 30, culturalcelebration.org

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24 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

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Holiday gifts for cooks, foodies and winos BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE!

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f your holiday gift shopping is stuck in a rut, we’re here to help—especially if you’re looking for interesting and useful presents for cooks, foodie friends or wine lovers. The possibilities are endless, with great gifts ranging from inexpensive to extravagant, and from practical to frivolous. In the December issue of our sister publication, Devour, writer Merry Harrison suggests personalizing gift-giving by creating themed gift baskets. For example, if you’re giving to someone with a passion for grilling, put together a gift box or basket containing some interesting barbecue sauces and rubs, tools like instant-read thermometers or insulated cooking mitts, a useful grilling cookbook or two and the all-important grilling apron. Other ideas for themed gift baskets include ones brimming with local artisan chocolates, cheese, jellies and jams, honey and other locally made craft foods. The gift that’s made the biggest impression on me this year, is a device called Joule by ChefSteps ($179-$199). It’s a smart and sexy sous vide tool that fits into a kitchen drawer. In the past, I’ve been frustrated by huge sous vide machines that take up half my kitchen counter space. Not so with this one, which is about the size of an immersion blender. Simply place it into a pot of water, set the cooking time and temperature via Wi-Fi/Bluetooth from a smartphone, tablet, etc., place the food you’re cooking into a Ziploc bag in the temperature-controlled water, and go do something fun while Joule perfectly sous vides your food. It’s even capable of being voice-controlled. It’s an amazing kitchen device, and one that I use at least weekly.

Convenient sous vide Joule from ChefSteps If you’re shopping for a wine lover, look no further than SLC-based Ruth Lewandowski Wines. These unique, natural wines are lovingly created by Evan Lewandowski and are easily identified by their eye-catching Utah state-shaped labels. But, it’s what’s inside the bottle that counts. How about a stocking stuffer or two? I scoured a half-dozen different grocery spice aisles looking for sumac—a Middle Eastern seasoning—before I discovered Utah’s own Usimply Season sumac ($5.99) at Harmons. SLC’s “Life Boldly Flavored” company also sells berbere, piri piri, baharat, dukkah, garam masala, mitmita, zaatar, togarashi and more. At Saffron Valley locations and online (saffronvalley.com), you’ll find an array of pre-mixed Indian spice blends that cooks will love. Owner Lavanya Mahate’s creations include tandoori masala, korma masala, Punjabi masala, whole spices like star anise, cardamom and pure saffron, tea blends, flatbread mix and more. Meat lovers would appreciate finding charcuterie under the tree from Creminelli Meats and Beltex Meats. And why not throw in the best book on charcuterie that I’ve come across yet? Pure Charcuterie: The Craft & Poetry of Curing Meats at Home ($29.99) by Meredith Leigh—a former vegan—is an extremely practical, visual guide that walks readers through the processes of making charcuterie at home. Leigh’s recipe and technique for preparing buttermilk boudin blanc is worth the price of the book alone. Who wouldn’t love finding the new cookbook from the ladies of Hell’s Backbone Grill wrapped up on Christmas Day? Written by Blake Spalding and Jennifer Castle with Lavinia Spalding, plus beautiful photography from Ace Kvale, it’s titled This Immeasurable Place: Food and Farming from the Edge of Wilderness; Recipes from Hell’s Backbone Grill ($35). But maybe the best way to give this holiday season is with a charitable contribution to, or volunteering for, local organizations that help feed the hungry in our communities all year-round: Utah Food Bank, Utahns Against Hunger, Food Not Bombs, Crossroads Urban Center, Kids Eat Utah and others do just that. Happy holidays! CW


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After spending a year at its location on 300 South, The Big O Doughnuts has migrated to 248 W. 900 South, right in the middle of the up-and-coming Central Ninth area. Its proximity to Vertical Diner is quickly making this part of town a hot spot for anyone looking for some low-guilt comfort food. Expect to see tried-and-true staples of Big O’s menu— lemon lavender and orange cardamom have definitely tagged along for the relocation. Seeing as it’s still technically autumn, pumpkin aficionados can get their hands on Big O’s famous pumpkin pie in doughnut form. For a full menu, check out thebigodoughnuts.com.

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Vertical Pizza Goes Void

Speaking of Vertical Diner, its sister restaurant Vertical Pizza recently closed its doors at 2280 S. West Temple. Owner Ian Brandt’s final words on the former restaurant’s website states that the location was too “out of the way.” Brandt’s post wasn’t all melancholy, however—he did mention the possibility of some classic Vertical Pizza selections popping up on the menus at Sage’s Café or Vertical Diner. In a world that is always in need of more pizzerias, the absence of Vertical Pizza is a harsh blow to Salt Lake’s culinary community.

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Red Moose After Dark

Local chef Katie Weinner has found a temporary resting place for her nomadic culinary project SLC Pop throughout December. Every weekend, Weinner and her professional crew transform Red Moose Coffee Co. (1693 S. 900 East) into a staging area for their take on international comfort food. The evening meals feature seven-item menus served in what Weinner calls an “indoor food truck.” Anyone familiar with SLC Pop or her work on Top Chef knows that any opportunity to sample her cooking is worth checking out. No reservations are required, and all menu items cost less than $15. For more info and advance tickets, visit slcpop.com.

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Revving Their Engines Brand-new RPM Brewing’s beers are on the fast track. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

B

ack in October, I got the opportunity to hang out with the boys at RPM Brewing Co. in Salt Lake City. At that time, their beers were just churning away in the fermentors, waiting for their debuts. Now the time has come to check out what Utah’s newest brewery has on its taps. P1 Pilsner: This is a classic-looking lager, true to form and quite nice. It poured a very clear golden body with a thin cap of white head that quickly dissipated. The aromas are faint, with a bit of malt sweetness, grass and floral hops. It’s an Americanstyle Pilsner with an aroma similar to its German counterparts. The flavor begins lightly bitter, with a grainy and softly sweet malt presence balancing floral, spicy Noble hop flavors. This moves into a medium bitter middle, with notes of grassy, floral,

spicy Noble-like hops and a light sweetness from malt. The finish is medium-dry, with the hop flavors continuing alongside light grainy malt and biscuit-like malt. Overall: This is a crisp, flavorful, straightforward Pilsner. It doesn’t have a wealth of complexity, which is perfectly fine for the style. P1 Pilsner will be available for purchase in grocery and convenience stores around the beginning of the new year. It’s the first RPM beer to debut in 12-ounce cans. Corkscrew Pale Ale: This pale ale is chestnut-colored with amber hues, while the head is a finger high and an eggshell shade of white. From the aroma, I get the sense that this is more of an English-style pale ale. The hops give it a pleasant earthiness to go with its dry apricot and orange/ marmalade esters, while the malts bring a subtle caramel character. The first sip seems musty, then transitions into more caramel and orange peel. Floral notes come next, with a bit of pine bitterness. The finish for the most part is dry, with just a smidge of burnt caramel. Overall: I get the impression that this is an American pale ale that drifts into English style, the two significant differences being citrus and pine bitterness (American) versus floral and herbal (English). As American styles are all the rage right now, a little blurring of the lines is a nice change of pace on my palate.

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

Bent Piston Porter: It pours dark, as you’d expect from a porter. The colors are deep reddish brown with a single finger of dense khaki head. Upon first whiff, I don’t get much, then aromas of cocoa, coffee and herbal grass begin to emerge as my sniffer turns it up to 11. The taste takes its cues from the nose, with dark chocolate, coffee and toast. From there, a bit of caramel sweetness emerges—not enough to make it sweet, just to balance out the more charred aspects of the malt. The end delivers herbal hops to stave off any cloying sugars. The finish is very clean, almost lager-like, and the alcohol is virtually non-existent with zero warming

present, as expected of four percent beer. The bottom line: The clean, light flavors in this beer give it an almost schwarzbier (dark lager) quality, and it has all-around good robust characters. While it’s not terribly complex, it does provide all of the components to draw in macro-beer drinkers looking to expand their tastes. It’s an enjoyable offering. These are just three of the house beers RPM currently offers. During my recent visit, there were more than 10 beer styles to choose from, including an East Coast IPA, an IPL and a saison. RPM’s restaurant, The Garage, is located at 1122 E. Draper Parkway in Draper. As always, cheers! CW


Tradition... Tradition

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

coffee, crepes & a mic

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It’s a beautiful but casual space—open and airy, with wide swatches of white throughout and semi-communal tables. As a tribute to the owner’s Italian grandmother, some menu items, such as the meatballs and ravioli, carry her name, Nonna Maria. Good starters include the bruschetta alla checca (wood-oven-baked grilled filone, campari tomato, basil, garlic and Grana Padano cheese). Pizza and pasta account for much of the main menu, along with risotto and grilled items such as grilled Shetland Island Scottish salmon and grilled housemade lamb sausage. For dessert, consider the housemade gelato or caramelized peach tart. 1709 E. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-349-1480, seasaltslc.com

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“Freestyle Asian cuisine” is what Shabu restaurant owners and brothers Kevin and Bob Valaika call what they do. There’s a lively bar scene where sushi and sake are consumed by happy patrons, and in the dining room, Shabu Shabu is a popular favorite, where customers have the opportunity to play chef by dipping ingredients (meat, seafood, veggies) from a bento box into an assortment of hot, freshly made broths (Thai coconut or traditional), effectively cooking your dinner yourself at your table. If you’d prefer to have the chef cook for you, try the citrus-plum sea scallops, coconutcrusted tofu or macadamia-crusted mahi-mahi. 442 Main, Park City, 435-645-7253, shabupc.com

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STORE ★★★★★

Everything is fresh at this inexpensive, funky eatery, from the tortillas and salsas to the tamales and tacos. It’s been around longer than most local restaurants, and looks like someone transported a taco shack from a Baja beach right into Cottonwood Heights. This cool and kitschy place features cold Mexican cervezas served in glass cowboy boots, and a rockin’ house sound system. The only thing missing is sand. The mahi-mahi fish tacos with cilantro aioli are wildly popular, and the zippy jalapeño-spiked guacamole is addictive. The burritos are good, too, but it’s really all about the tacos here. Flip-flops are optional. 2265 E. Fort Union Blvd., Cottonwood Heights, 801-944-2300

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n i e r a s m e t i y Holida p o h S d n a n i come

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JUST 3 MIN from Downtown! 1659 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City

The concept here is all about fresh, regional, casual cuisine. Specialties include a small plate of sautéed chanterelles topped with crisp shoestring potatoes and a farm-fresh lightly fried egg—yolk properly quivering and ready to coat the savory flavors below. Other highlights are a perfectly balanced arugula salad with sherry vinegar, olives and Parmesan. The sautéed cod with a pale (but intensely flavored) lemon jam on kale and a side of sautéed pea shoots with golden raisins and pine nuts hits all the right notes—balance, texture and color. 111 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801355-3282, thecopperonion.com


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BEGINNING DECEMBER 1ST

REVIEW BITES A sample of our critic’s reviews

PETE SIMMONS

BREAKFAST 9AM-11AM

208 EAST 500 SOUTH (801) 428 2704 TACOTACOSLC.COM

Fried quinoa with poached egg and pork belly

Purgatory

Purgatory comes from Sapa owner Mai Nguyen, who has never shied away from cutting-edge. It’s not fancy, but its design features are all first-rate. The beer list is one of the more extensive in town, with some 17 IPAs alone and seven “beertails.” As for the menu, this is not your daddy’s bar food—unless your pop was used to eating things like pork belly nigiri ($6) or a protein salad of tomato, carrots, chickpeas, quinoa, cucumber, dill, beet hummus, herbs and yuzu vinaigrette ($7). Other standouts include the nearly-incendiary heat of the spicy chicken ssam ($6), a DIY lettuce wrap with a red chilepowered mix of chicken, leek, jicama and carrot morsels. There’s a large french fry selection, and the accoutrements are unique, ranging from versions like nacho and Buffalo to K-Pop fries, curry, enchilada and rosemary. The Baja Bowl ($9) is outstanding, literally a burger in a bowl—a housemade black-bean burger covered with pickled red onion, enchilada sauce, rice, cilantro, lettuce, tomato, scallions, shredded cheese and a fried egg. For those looking for something a bit more mainstream, try the mozzarella/Parmesan/crema cheese sandwich ($6); it’s one of the best grilled cheeses in town. Reviewed Oct. 19. 62 E. 700 South, SLC, 801-596-2294, purgatorybar.com


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FILM REVIEW

Fresh Turkey

CINEMA

The Disaster Artist does more than re-create a famously bad movie. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

A24 FILMS

T

he 2003 drama The Room has been alternately celebrated and reviled as one of the worst movies ever made— and I’ll just have to take everyone’s word for that. Unlike many who find a perverse fascination in spectacular awfulness, I’ve never carved out time for the cinematic equivalent of someone saying, “Ugh, this sour milk is disgusting—here, smell it.” And allow me to assure those of you who are similarly The Room virgins that The Disaster Artist requires no such background to be delightful. That might seem counter-intuitive, because in one sense The Disaster Artist is built on a grand act of impersonation. James Franco—who also directed—stars as Tommy Wiseau, the enigmatic writer/ director/star of The Room whose vaguely Eastern European accent, cascade of rockstar hair and apparent obliviousness to his complete lack of dramatic talent make him a fascinating figure. All it takes is watching a few clips of Wiseau on YouTube to get a sense of how Franco has embodied the sheer alienness of this guy beyond his fractured syntax and heavy-lidded self-confidence. But if you’re not so familiar with Wiseau’s rhythms that Franco’s performance seems uncanny, can the movie work? The fact that The Disaster Artist does transcend its potential simply to be a remarkable simulacrum comes down to a savvy structural decision by screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, adapting the memoir by Greg Sestero. Like Ed Wood and Bowfinger—two other comedies about determined but delusional film auteurs—The Disaster Artist is mostly a buddy movie built around a relationship between two oddballs who need each other. Dave Franco plays Sestero, who is a 19-year-old wannabe actor in San Francisco circa 1998 when he meets Wiseau in an acting class. The scene is one of the movie’s most hilarious bits—the uptight Sestero watching dumbstruck as Wiseau

shrieks his way through the “Stella!” scene from A Streetcar Named Desire while literally climbing the set—but it also sets the stage for the nature of the central relationship. Sestero admires Wiseau’s complete commitment, even to looking ridiculous; the solitary Wiseau seems happy just to know that somebody believes in him. Casting the Franco brothers could have felt like a stunt, but instead, The Disaster Artist gets a lot of mileage out of the inherent chemistry between them. Dave falls naturally into a deferential youngerbrother role, as Wiseau becomes not just Sestero’s friend, but also his patron as he finances their mutual move to Los Angeles to pursue their acting dreams. And it’s also important that Dave provides a grounded counterpoint to James’ showier performance, serving as an audience surrogate for the idea that, sure, Wiseau is weird, but maybe he’s an admirable kind of weird. It all builds, of course, to centering much of the movie’s second half around the production of The Room in 2002, and the set pieces here are truly inspired. From the seemingly endless number of takes Wiseau requires to remember a single breathless, ridiculous string of lines—that Wiseau himself wrote—to Wiseau’s insistence on making himself the centerpiece of a sex scene, The Disaster Artist serves as a wonderful chronicle of someone with an undeniable vision. The notion that this vision is jaw-droppingly misguided never even occurs to him.

Dave and James Franco in The Disaster Artist

It becomes a tricky balancing act for James Franco to maintain the deliberate mystery around Wiseau, while also making him recognizably human and sympathetic when people laugh in his face. The key scenes are effective—whether it’s an awkward attempt to meet Judd Apatow in a restaurant, or Wiseau’s reaction to the unintended laughter at The Room’s premiere— but the focus is so much on Wiseau’s bizarre behavior that it’s not always easy to see a real person underneath it all. Yet there’s still a charm to celebrating The Room as a sheer act of will, albeit one backed by Wiseau’s mysteriously bottomless bank account. When the credits roll with side-byside comparisons of scenes from The Room and James Franco’s own version of those scenes, it feels like an unnecessary sop to The Room’s cult of fans who might be impressed by the duplication. Even if you’ve never seen The Room before, it’s clear that The Disaster Artist is best not at emphasizing re-creation, but honoring a work that was like absolutely nothing else. CW

THE DISASTER ARTIST

BBB.5 James Franco Dave Franco Seth Rogen Rated R

TRY THESE Ed Wood (1994) Johnny Depp Martin Landau R

Bowfinger (1999) Steve Martin Eddie Murphy PG-13

The Room (2003) Tommy Wiseau Greg Sestero R

Spring Breakers (2012) Vanessa Hudgens James Franco R


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DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 33


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. AIDA’S SECRETS BBBB At some point, refugees escape their home countries—nations torn apart by war, famine, earthquake or some other unthinkable tragedy. The lucky few find asylum and begin new lives. The unlucky are sent home, stuck in camps, berated by their new countrymen, or die. Even the “lucky” ones find their lives altered in ways that affect generations to come. As related in Alon & Saul Schwarz’s documentary, Aida—a Polish-born World War II survivor—sends her two young sons, Isak and Shepsel, away after the war. Isak goes alone to Israel, Shepsel to Canada with his father. When the brothers find each other 60 years later, they have questions for their mother, with whom Isak has had fleeting contact, but she’s still so traumatized she deflects their inquiries

THE DISASTER ARTIST BBB.5 See review p. 32. Opens Dec. 8 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE FENCER BBB.5 It’s a familiar tale, but in a setting we haven’t seen before: Teacher inspires underdog kids to succeed in a sport where they have no prior experience—but in early 1950s Estonia, a Soviet republic suffering under Stalin’s harsh regime. Endel Nelis (Märt Avandi), in hiding from the secret police in a small town, takes a job teaching phys ed in the secondary school. Nelis is meant to be keeping his head down, but he can’t resist passing on his passion for

fencing. The kids are traumatized—many have been orphaned in the Soviet occupation—and Nelis needs to learn how to be a good teacher. Hearts will be thawed, then thoroughly warmed all around by the end—which, if it doesn’t bring a lump to your throat, might mean you’re one of the cold Soviet drones who are the villains here. Based on a true story—the real Nelis is a national hero in Estonia, where fencing is extremely popular—this joint Finnish-German-Estonian production and Golden Globe nominee in 2016 for Best Foreign Language Film is a beautiful, finely wrought production with terrific performances all around. Opens Dec. 8 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—MaryAnn Johanson

JUST GETTING STARTED [not yet reviewed] Rivalry develops when an ex-FBI agent (Tommy Lee Jones) moves into a retirement community with a witness protection program former mob informant (Morgan Freeman). Opens Dec. 8 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS VICTORIA AND ABDUL At Park City Film Series, Dec. 8-9, 8 p.m.; Dec. 10, 6 p.m. (PG-13)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THE ROAD FORWARD At Main Library, Nov. 28, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

THE BREADWINNER BBB.5 Animation can tell any kind of story—including this glorious work that is decidedly not for children. Director Nora Twomey and screenwriter Anita Doron adapt Deborah Ellis’ book, set in Taliban-era Kabul, where a young girl named Parvana (Saara Chaudry) is forced to disguise herself as a boy to earn money for the family after her father is arrested. The narrative doesn’t shy away from brutality, emphasizing the violence and misogyny behind the religious façade of the regime. Yet it also does things a live-action interpretation couldn’t do, like bringing to life a fanciful hero-quest story-within-the-story, while Twomey also allows silence to settle effectively over certain scenes. Ambitious and thoughtful right up to a climax that intercuts between multiple settings with a sense of epic consequence, The Breadwinner is the year’s finest animated feature, with nary a CGI animal. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

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34 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

with “I don’t remember.” Aida’s Secrets is so intimate it’s almost uncomfortable. Aida accepts Shepsel, but keeps him in the dark; Isak is similarly stymied. It’s sad at times, but it’s a fascinating study of making the best choices in the worst circumstances, and fallout that continues for years and years after. Opens Dec. 8 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—David Riedel

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CONCERT PREVIEW

One Night Only?

After 10 years away, The Rodeo Boys ride again— perhaps for the last time.

LIVE Music

BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

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friends under cobalt skies. In “Epic,” they revel reverently in their brew-fueled creative connection: “I guess I’ll have a tall one to help speed things on their way/ Heavenly muse/ we call upon you/ again/ tonight.” Warren explains that the mood music is exactly that. He’s been basking in TRB’s tunes, and the feeling they evoke, in preparation for the show. “I really like our music,” he says. So did a lot of us. Listening to The Rodeo Boys, and watching them onstage, experiencing their bond through their music, you feel a pang of desire to be part of the band—and then you realize your presence makes you one. Elliott and the band are excited to rekindle this connection. “We never did have a farewell; we just kind of fizzled out,” he says, referring to the band post-Flex. Although they did send CDs to a few labels, they never pushed too hard to get signed—it wasn’t about that, Scrivner says. “The vibe of the band was very organic. We played because we wanted to be with our friends and laugh.” Ludemann seconds this. “It’s just an excuse to get together with your friends, drink some beers and have some laughs.” Midgley marvels at how easy it’s been: “I’m always amazed that some members of our group can remember the entire lyrics to songs that we haven’t played for 12 years.” Warren is especially pumped. He leans over the phone, speaking directly into it. “Practicing, George, with you guys has been fantastic. When we’re down in that room… I love it so much. Our songs are so cool.” Will this become a full-fledged reunion? The older-wiser Rodeo Boys hesitate to say, beyond the possibility of issuing some unreleased material. What matters is that, for what might be one night only, they and their fans will once again commune with their heavenly muse. CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

nside keyboardist Ben Warren’s house, the set list for The Rodeo Boys’ upcoming show—their first since 2006—plays quietly, like mood music. It works, mainly because of the dulcet tones of Warren’s Fender Rhodes. The instrument complements another endearing, noteworthy TRB trait: their intertwined voices, intoning goofy lyrics like, “White-hot Bruce/ he’s a triskaidekaphobe/ and his white-hot moves/ go straight to your dome.” You’d be forgiven for missing the poetry in those words, inspired (perhaps obviously) by cold beer and bottle shots of ancient age. Superficially, they’re bereft of depth and (sometimes) sense. Their beauty is revealed only when the music, voices and words swirl together, and you realize that these guys love each other. They’re brothers. This was immediately clear 15 years ago on drummer Clayton Scrivner’s back patio, where TRB grilled steaks and guzzled beer while discussing their debut album, Same as Cash. They were all around 25 years old, a time when we’re supposed to be weaning off of parties and contemplating adult things like careers, families and graduate school. So it makes sense that The Rodeo Boys’ music dwelled in this limbo between adolescence and maturity. It’s a little different now. We’re drinking beer in Warren’s kitchen, but only he and bassist Greg Midgley (who replaced original member Brett Ludemann prior to TRB’s 2006 sophomore joint, Flex) are physically present. George Elliott, now living in St. George, joins via Warren’s smartphone speaker. Scrivner and Ludemann are busy, but we’ll connect later via telephone. Without everyone in the same room, I wonder briefly if the original magic will manifest. And then it does. Jokes and stories pepper the chat, many illustrative of the band’s enduring bond. “Greg has helped me so much,” says Warren, who suffered a traumatic brain injury in 2009. “He’s been sort of the savior, with helping me remember how to play the songs.” Warren could still recall how to play piano and read music, but relearning TRB songs by ear was tough. Ludemann, so far removed from the band, also needed help. Midgley kindly transcribed all 15 songs for them. Now that The Rodeo Boys are all 40-ish, they reflect on the music with the expected perspective. When Scrivner reached out recently about the reunion show, he joked that they’d all become “Ecstasy Dads,” referring to their popular song about former Zions Bank CFO Dale Gibbons, who in 2001 was busted for hosting drugand sex-crazed house parties. The only similarity is that some of the band members have children, and Elliott has enough to need a minivan. But Scrivner’s point is that there’s a certain irony in grown, responsible men singing about “Easy Bake Lovin’,” being Scott Baio’s best friend, and the joys of combining condom-less sex with appetizers. “Our songs were Rorschach inkblots of inside jokes,” he says, “but there was a lot of emotion in them.” The Rodeo Boys have the spunk of a smart-alecky but genuinely intelligent college-rock band like Too Much Joy. They also share Steely Dan’s affinity for antiheroes and for the Rhodes piano, with the tendency of both acts to favor detail and temper their humor with real sensitivity. You hear it in songs like “Pancakes, Pancakes,” where TRB talks about jumping on trampolines with


LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER

THURSDAY 12/7

Remember when it was a big deal that the Rolling Stones had been around for 30 years? And how we all marveled at how a 50-year-old Mick Jagger could still chicken-strut like a mofo night after night? Well, Jagger’s now 73, and next year the Supersuckers hit the big three-oh while singer-bassist-hype man Eddie Spaghetti crosses the half-century mark. He’s now the lone original member of the self-proclaimed “Greatest Rock and Roll Band in the World,” but he’s still out there kickin’ ass on tour, even after beating Stage 3 throat cancer. And while the ’Suckers ain’t the Stones, a whole lot of us feel like they are. You come by that feeling when you see them live. Eddie strides onstage in his aviators, cowboy hat and shitkickers, wielding that slick black Les Paul bass. Then, in a snarl of power chords and backbeat—with twangy acoustic interludes—he and the guys tear through a set of songs about creepy jackalope eyes, weed, birth defects, rock ’n’ roll, drinkin’, fuckin’ and fightin’. In between those, he tells stories and jokes, revealing that underneath all that semisardonic rock bombast, Spaghetti’s just a goofball—nay, meatball. Nothin’ against Mick and the boys, but that’s a real rock star. Plus, it’ll be a hoot to see him perform “Creepy Jackalope Eye” or “Pretty Fucked Up” as a geezer in 2038. So in the name of rock ’n’ roll and shits ’n’ gigs, long may Spaghetti rock. (Randy Harward)

Supersuckers

EDWARD SAENZ

Supersuckers, The BellRays, The Bombpops

The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $17 presale; $20 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY 12/7-9 Eric McFadden

People always throw around the name Jimi Hendrix when talking about Eric McFadden. Sure, he’s a black dude and a guitar hero, but you know who he sounds like more than anyone? Himself. He clearly admires Hendrix, but also Frank Zappa and classic-era Parliament-Funkadelic guitarist Eddie Hazel. And guessing from his music and the company he keeps, you can probably assume a diverse litany of influences including the likes of Chris Whitley, Gary Lucas, Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Joe Strummer, John Bigham (The Soul of John Black, Fishbone), Joey Santiago (The Pixies), King’s X, Nick Cave, Johnny

Eric McFadden Cash and a slew of others. But these references account for only fleeting moments in McFadden’s music, which is difficult to classify. It’s rock, it’s funk, it’s country, it’s jazz, it’s prog—sometimes it even sounds like proto-troll band The Frogs, and it has almost as many circus and clown references as a Luni Troupe record. It’s this relentless skill and originality that’s made the dude an in-demand session player and sideman for some pretty heavy hitters—and even landed him in Hazel’s shoes as lead guitarist on George Clinton’s mothership. If only that translated directly to commercial success. (RH) Thursday: Brewskis, 244 25th St., Ogden, 9 p.m., free, 21+, brewskisonline.net; Friday: Piper Down Pub, 1492 S. State, 9 p.m., $5, 21+, piperdownpub.com; Saturday: The Ice Haüs, 7 E. 4800 South, 9 p.m., $5, 21+, icehausbar.com

FRANK SCHWICHTENBERG VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

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SUN FUN

SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $1,350 MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

$2 MIMOSAS NEW BRUNCH MENU SMOKED PULLED PORK SAMMIES, POKER DURING THE NIGHT GAME, ALL GAMES TELEVISED

TUESDAY:

MNF WED

WEDNESDAY:

THURS

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

MAD MAX MONEY MACHINE

$1 TACOS, FOLLOWED BY KARAOKE

PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!! STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $400 POT

SUE’S HIGHLAND HAS PAID OUT OVER $3,400 IN BINGO PRIZES!

3928 HIGHLAND DR

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

STATE live music

THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

TASTING TUESDAYS Join us for a whiskey tasting with a professional. | 6pm

2013

SUN FUN

2014

MONDAYS Blues night

...

1/2 OFF TACOS 11 AM-4 PM DAILY THIS WEEKS LIVE MUSIC DECEMBER 7 DECEMBER 8 DECEMBER 9

(801) 532-2068 155 W 200 S Salt Lake City, UT, 84101 www.lakeeffectslc.com

| | | | | | | |

6-9 PM 10-1 AM 6-9 PM 10-1 AM 6-9 PM 10-1 AM 6-9 PM 10-1 AM

$2 MIMOSAS NEW BRUNCH MENU

FOOTBALL IS FOLLOWED BY KARAOKE, ALL GAMES TELEVISED

MNF WED

$1 TACOS, SQUARES BOARD, GIVE AWAYS

DEC 16

SUE FOR SANTA TOY DRIVE FOR TOYS FOR TOTS MUSIC PROVIDED BY 9021YO! RAFFLE, GIVE ALWAYS, YES WE ARE A DROP FOR TOYS FOR TOTS AND ARE ALREADY ACCEPTING DONATIONS .................................................................................................

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1,250 POT

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

8136 SO. STATE ST 801-566-3222

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 37

DECEMBER 14

MICHELLE MOONSHINE & CO. DJ CHASEONE2 SCOTT FOSTER BONANZA TOWN ERIC ANTHONY CONTROLLED BURN SCOTT FOSTER DJ CHASEONE2

THE ELDERS

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...

SUNDAY NIGHT Industry night $3 pints $3 whiskeys

20 1 7

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast!

THE SALT SHAKERS

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WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT | 6:15PM Join a professional to explore wines by the glass. December 6th Donky & Goat, Perli Vineyard Syrah, Mendocino County December 13th Quinta Do Crasto Reserva, Portugal Music at 7:30.

FRI SAT

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AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!


LIVE

38 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9TH

MICHELLE MOONSHINE

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12TH

CHERRY THOMAS

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16TH

KILT NIGHT W/ SWAGGER 1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492 PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

TUESDAY 12/12 Foo Fighters, Bob Mould

When Nirvana drummer Dave Grohl formed Foo Fighters after Kurt Cobain’s death, didn’t you wonder just how good the band would be? How many drummers have stepped out from behind the kit to front a band? Not enough to bet money on, right? But the whole time Nirvana existed, Grohl was writing songs in secret, because even he had his doubts about measuring up to Cobain. Twenty-three years later, the band has yet to drop a dud, and Grohl, the longfaced punk, is now one of rock’s greatest frontmen and songwriters, not to mention a helluva guy. Foo Fighters is a real rock band staffed with good guys like him, who enjoy the hell out of playing rock ’n’ roll for fans, who they treat like friends. They give everything, every night, even when Grohl broke his leg onstage, because he’s truly grateful that someone listens to and likes these songs of his. Then he’s out there live-trolling the Westboro Baptist Church, sending good vibes to trapped miners, directing excellent films and miniseries that educate his fans about the history of rock—kind of like he’s doing on this show, by giving 20,000 people a chance to see Bob Muthafuggin’ Mould, the guy behind Hüsker Dü and Sugar. Just when you think the world is in the toilet and there are no heroes, guys like Grohl restore your faith in humanity. He once pretended to run for president on the cover of my old haunt, Harp magazine. Don’t you wonder, sometimes, if he should do it for real? I’d bet on him winning—except we need him right where he is. (RH) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $79-$100, all ages, vivintarena.com

Lindsey Stirling, Alexander Jean

In less than half a decade, 31-year old violinist Lindsey Stirling has risen to the artistic apex of her instrument, as well as innovating her shows by combining elements

Foo Fighters

of dance, performance art and electronic music. Her eclectic musical stylings have garnered several billion YouTube views, plus a spot in Forbes’ “30 Under 30 In Music” in 2015. Touring for her fourth album, Warmer in the Winter (Universal), Stirling rounds out a discography in which no release failed to enter the Billboard Top 40. Warmer is widely varied fare, from “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy” to “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch.” Opening is folk duo Alexander Jean, comprised of Mark (middle name Alexander) Ballas and his spouse, BC Jean. The similarly multi-talented Ballas is a musician and choreographer on Dancing With the Stars, where Ballas was also Stirling’s dance partner, and they finished in second place on the season that just ended. Their tour pairing bodes for a vastly entertaining holiday show. (Brian Staker) Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 8 p.m., sold out at press time, all ages, live-at-the-eccles.com

Lindsey Stirling

RALPH ARVESEN VIA FLICKR

ERIC MCFADDEN

BRANTLEY GUITIERREZ

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8TH


Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen Next to Himalayan Kitchen

Nightly Music

The

Chakra Lounge and Bar

Thursday 12/07 - DJ Birdman Friday 12/08 - Bollywood Night Saturday 12/09 - J Godina & Caviar Club DJ’s Wednesday 12/13 - LiveJazz Friday 12/15 - DJ Bronto Call (Gonzo)

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night small plate menu

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu nfl football FRIDAY DECEMBER 8TH

jersey giveaways every sunday, monday & thursday

great food & drink specials

PHOENIX RISING

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 12/6

BLUE ON BLACK 9:00PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 12/7 Reggae at the Royal

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

4242 South State Street SLC, UT 84107 Open from 10am - 2am

something like seduction skumbudz

$

5

amfs & long islands

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BARBARY COAST SALOON

SATURDAY DECEMBER 9TH

1/2 off nachos & Free pool

featuring dj jason lowe

dance to all the best of the 80's & 90's

saturday 12/9

101.5 The Eagle royal christmas bash

jagertown

coming soon 12/16 natural roots, daverse, funk & gonzo, dj seanny boy

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open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

the wayne hoskins band sam drogin and sinners like us Tuesday 12/12

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Live Music

friDAY 12/8

12/22

12/31

supper bubble, funk & gonzo clay cleezy on the 1'S & 2'S ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 39

merry blissmas tour


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40 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

WEDNESDAY 12/13

CONCERTS & CLUBS

CARLA LOCATELLI

Samba Fogo, The Hips

Watch all College and NFL games

on our 30+ Full HD TV’s

A local nonprofit performing-arts group founded over a quartercentury ago, Samba Fogo is inspired by the passion of AfroBrazilian music and dance. They have been following a mission that’s at least as much educational as performance-based, traveling to schools and other community groups. It’s all about the rhythm, and their percussive energy is the source of their fire— quite literally, as the element is a big part of their shows. For them, dance and rhythm become a metaphor for life itself, as a pathway to joy. At this time of year, watching the group perform adds a little bit of Carnival spice into an otherwise wintry season. Salt Lake combo The Hips (pictured) opens, and they add their own percussive flair and flavor with their blend of hip-hop, funk, soul and Afro-Brazilian sounds. They’ve also shared and traded members with their good friends in Samba Fogo, and tonight is no exception. Co-lead vocalist Emerson Andrews says the band is about to release their second Live on KRCL Radio Active EP, only 14 months after the first one dropped. Andrews says they’re looking to add a second musical act to the bill as well. (Brian Staker) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $5, 21+, metromusichall.com

SPIRITS . FOOD . LOCAL BEER

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight. *Dine-In Only

Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Tuesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

call for reservations DECEMBER 7

TNF NEW ORLEANS @ ATLANTA MARMALADE CHILL 10PM

DECEMBER 9

SATURDAY BRUNCH 10-3 CHASEONE2 10PM

DECEMBER 11

MNF NEW ENGLAND @ MIAMI FOLLOWED BY MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION

DECEMBER 8

APRES SKI WITH DJ GAWEL 6-9 DJ ELLIOTT ESTES 10PM

DECEMBER 10

NFL SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-3 SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES WITH HARRY LEE AND THE BACK ALLEY BLUES BAND 9PM

DECEMBER 12

WILL BAXTER BAND 9PM

DECEMBER 13

DINNER AND ASHOW WITH ERIC ANTHONY 5:30-8:30 SOUL, FUNK AND JAZZ WITH A.M. BUMP 10-1

OPEN

365 DAYS

A YEAR 326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

•LIVE M U S IC• 12.7 MICHELLE MOONSHINE 12.8 CROOK AND THE BLUFF 12.9 YOU TOPPLE OVER 12.11 OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION 12.13 JOHN DAVIS 12.14 SIMPLY B 12.15 WILL BAXTER BAND 12.16 PIXIE & THE PARTYGRASS BOYS

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 12/7 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

FRIDAY 12/8 LIVE MUSIC

7 Day Diablo (Outlaw Saloon) Channel Z (Club 90) Classic Steve + Steve Schuffret (Park City Mountain) Cory Mon (The Ice Haüs) Courtney Spaulding (Silver Mine Taproom) Crook & The Bluff (Hog Wallow Pub) Da Shinobi (The Acoustic Space) Dead & Company Tour Closer Webcast (The State Room) Dr. Barber + Panthermilk (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Eric McFadden (Piper Down Pub) see p. 36 High Octane (The Spur) Ivouries + Mojave Nomads + Noah Ruble + Cedric Moore (Kilby Court) Mad Macks + Soul Providers + Kiddo + Rugged Method + Siaki & Brutal Ambition + Malev da Shinobi (The Acoustic Space) The Mystic + Breezeway (ABG’s) Nathan Pacheco (UCCU Center) The Piano Guys (Vivint Arena) Rail Town (The Westerner) Retro Riot w/ DJ Jason Lowe (The Royal) Robert Cray (Eccles Theatre) The Rodeo Boys + Starmy + The Rubes

Proudly serving locally produced beers & spirits — 40+ local beers available —

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Keys On Main) Dueling Pianos feat. Mike + JD (Tavernacle) Gothic + Darkwave w/ DJ Nina (Area 51) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) The New Wave 80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Angelz + Bijou + Ciszak (Sky)

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90) Karaoke Thursday’s (Prohibition)

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Cupidcome + Sulane + Electric Azathoth + Dewey Adams + Michael Morgan Mann (Metro Music Hall) Eric McFadden (Brewski’s) see p. 36 The Grouch + Del The Funky Homosapien + DJ Fresh + DJ Abilities (The Depot) The Honky Blue Tonky (O.P. Rockwell) Jazz Ensemble (Gallivan Center) The Jay Lawrence Quintet (The Acoustic Space) Law Rocks (The State Room) Michelle Moonshine (Hog Wallow Pub) Michelle Moonshine (Lake Effect) Ol Fashion Depot + The Wednesday People + The Arvos + Vintage Overdrive (Kilby Court) Paint The Woods + Sister Adolescents + Star Crossed Loners + Local Desper (Velour) Supersuckers + The Bellrays + The Bombpops (Urban Lounge) see p. 36 Victor Menegaux (Downstairs)

KARAOKE

FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

6405 s 3000 e Holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 41

BRUNCH PARTY EVERY 1ST & 3RD SUNDAY EACH MONTH 11AM - 3PM

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LOCATED AT THE BASE OF THE CANYONS


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42 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

Good Spirits

RANDY HARWARD

BAR FLY

(Urban Lounge) see p. 35 Scott Foster + Bonanza Town (Lake Effect) Seth Brown + The Sardines + Brogan Kelby + Pacificana (Velour) Tim Daniels Band (Brewskis) Truce In Blood + Incrypted + Riksha + Sugar Bone + Dipped In Whiskey (Liquid Joe’s) Will Baxter Band (O.P. Rockwell)

Friday Night Fun All-Request Dance w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

SATURDAY 12/9

All-Request Gothic, Industrial, EBM, and Dark Wave w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Jpan (Downstairs) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Mustard (Sky) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + Drew (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys On Main)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Metro Music Hall)

LIVE MUSIC

7 Day Diablo (Outlaw Saloon) 8six (The Loading Dock) Andy Frasco & The UN + DJ Velvet (Canyons Village) Bandemonium Drawing (Diabolical Records) Bonanza Town (The Spur) Channel Z (Club 90) Crook & The Bluff (Funk ’n’ Dive)

FRI 12.8• THE RODEO BOYS REUNION SHOW STARMY, THE RUBES

SAT 12.9• EKALI MEDASIN, JUDGE

SUN 12.10• HOTT MT 90S TELEVISION, LORD VOX

12/14: ONE BE LO 12/15: COLTER WALL 12/16: COCKTAIL 13 12/19: CALIFORNIA BORDER PATROL 12/20: THE WILD WAR 12/21: SLUG LOCALIZED

SUN 12.10• MATTHEW LOGAN VASQUEZ (OF DELTA SPIRIT) AT RYE DINER & DRINKS

TUES 12.12• BABY PINK

Good Spirits always looked mysterious, sandwiched between a golf course and a residential neighborhood, only a block away from the Salt Lake County Metro Jail. The parking lot seems darker and quieter than it ought to be. I venture inside for the first time, certain that I’ll find someone with volumes of tales concerning dive-bar drama with regular customers and recidivist jailbirds. Inside, I find a smiley bartender, and ask her to introduce me to somebody who’s here every night and has yarns to spin. Samantha (pictured) walks over to a guy playing poker, and returns to say he’ll meet me on the back patio during the break. Silhouetted by the patio light, he says, “No names.” He’s been burned on previous bar-centric interviews where they dared to use his real name and photograph, bringing shame upon his staunchly LDS family. He then whips out his phone to show a picture of himself with a Mormon honcho relative. He says the jail’s proximity doesn’t make things as interesting as the Section 8 housing residents who live behind the bar. Fittingly, he then swipes to pictures of him partying with Randy and Mr. Lahey from Trailer Park Boys. He tells of once owning a popular, now-defunct downtown bar and a limousine—and, unrelated, that he lost his father, best friend and other loved ones when their plane crashed into a mountainside. In between and after these show-and-tells, he reiterates: “No names.” You got it, Mr. Mystery. (Randy Harward) Good Spirits, 999 W. 3300 South, 801-263-0411, bit.ly/2zxbJwB

Ekali + Medasin + Judge (Urban Lounge) Eric McFadden (The Ice Haüs) see p. 36 Eric Anthony + Controlled Burn (Lake Effect) Gareth Emery (Park City Live) Jagertown + The Wayne Hoskins Band + Sam Drogin + Sinners Like Us (The Royal) Live Trio (The Red Door) Melody Pulsipher (Funk ’n’ Dive) Michelle Moonshine (Piper Down Pub) Mullet Hatchet (Brewskis) Pacificana + Brother. + The Acoustic Fools (Kilby Court) Rail Town (The Westerner) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Talia Keys & The Love (O.P. Rockwell) You Topple Over (Hog Wallow Pub)

Dueling Pianos feat. Drew + Jules (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys On Main) Gothic + Industrial + 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Ev (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Jon Smith (Gallivan Center) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Sky Saturdays feat. Sharps (Sky)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Aaron Gillespie + Onward + etc. + John Allred + Kyle Linder (Kilby Court) Hott MT + 90s Television + Lord Vox (Urban Lounge)

Alternative + Top 40 + EDM w/ DJ Jeremiah (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 12/10 LIVE MUSIC

FRI 12.8• LIVE BAND KARAOKE SAT 12.9• CREATORS GRID WED 12.13• SAMBA FOGO THE HIPS, MY DEAR WATSON

THU 12.14• BIRTHQUAKE PALACE OF BUDDIES, SELFMYTH

FRI 12.15• DANCE EVOLUTION BLACK PXSSY, TURTLENECK WEDDING DRESS

PEACH DREAM, NASTY NASTY

WED 12.13• THE CAT CHARITY SHOW IVY LOCAL, SERGE DU PREEZ, SALT CITY HOOP KITTIES

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

WED 12.20• GARY NUMAN PRIMITIVE PROGRAMME

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •

12/21: URSULA MAJOR 12/22: BRENTON’S B-DAY BASH 12/23: BELLAVOLENT 12/27: MOM’S NIGHT OUT 12/28: 10TH ANNUAL S&S CHRISTMAS PARTY 12/29: HIP-HOP ROOTS


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Irish Session Folk (Sugar House Coffee) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

TUESDAY 12/12

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Alicia Stockman (The Spur) Baby Pink + Peach Dream + Nasty Nasty (Urban Lounge) Cherry Thomas (Pipe Down Pub) Crazy Town (Liquid Joe’s) Foo Fighters + Bob Mould (Vivint Arena) see p. 38 In Hearts Wake + Fit For A King + Like Moths To Flames + Phinehas (The Complex) Jazz Ensemble (Westminster College) Lindsey Stirling + Alexander Jean (Eccles Theater) see p. 38 Sundressed + Nominee + Heartless Breakers + Detour (Kilby Court) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 12/11 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Michale Graves (Liquid Joe’s)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Mic (The Cabin)

LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle)

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist)

WEDNESDAY 12/13 LIVE MUSIC

Brisk (Downstairs) Divorce Court + Canopy Canvas + Bon Mambu (Kilby Court) Ivy Local + DJ Serge du Preea (Urban Lounge) Sambo Fogo + The Hips (Metro Music Hall) see p. 40 Shannon Runyon Duo (The Spur) Timmy Teaze & Friends (The Moose Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Wees (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys On Main) Open Mic (Velour) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51) Roaring Wednesdays - Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition)

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ KJ Casper (Area 51) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE (THURS) PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS

DIAMOND POOL TABLES LEAGUES AND TOURNAMENTS

DART SUPPLIES PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Tues & Fri: 3pm-1am Saturday: 11am-1am Sunday: 11am-9pm Closed Monday

CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

PHOTO

OF THE WEEK

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY ING ISSUE GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATURED IN AN UPCOM TAG YOUR PHOTOS

#CWCOMMUNITY

WE HAVE THE NFL SUNDAY TICKET

9PM

BINGO

TUESDAYS

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE

WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334

DECEMBER 7, 2017 | 43

GROOVE TUESDAYS

SATURDAY, DEC. 7

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KNEEL OR STAND @ JOHNNY’S!

MONDAYS THURS. / SUN. / MON. FREE GAME BOARDS FOR $$ PRIZES BREAKING

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

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RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

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KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)


© 2017

KELLY CLARKSON

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. ____ year (precollege experience) 2. Trump impersonator Baldwin 3. Competitor of Ivory and Coast 4. Spanish “other” 5. “Ha! I was right!” 6. First name on “The View” 7. Sir in the Ruhr 8. Dutch cheese 9. “I ____ Song Go Out of My Heart” 10. ____-à-porter 11. “Rats!” 12. “Beats me” 13. Cream of the crop

54. Climate change subj. 55. Bone below the elbow 56. Performer at 1963’s March on Washington 57. Great Lakes city 58. ____ occasion (never) 59. Things faultfinders pick 60. French 101 verb 64. Hip-hop’s ____ tha Kyd

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

21. Made dinner for 22. Kinda sorta 25. Acct. earnings 26. Part of DMV: Abbr. 27. She raised Cain 28. Part of a sly laugh 29. ____ a kind (pair) 30. Post-WWII female service member 31. Suffix with British and Bush 32. Coat and ____ 36. Have the title to 37. Harden 38. Big name in ice cream 39. Forest female 40. Hip-hop record mogul Gotti 41. ____-Lo Green, former coach on “The Voice” 42. Na+ or Cl45. Process of sorting injuries 46. Out of breath 47. Ltr. addition 48. Geographical quintet 49. Score in baseball 50. Made a smooth transition 51. Our sun’s type

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Gal who played Wonder Woman in 2017’s “Wonder Woman” 6. Young seal 11. Actress Zadora 14. 2006 U.S. Supreme Court appointee 15. “Napoleon Dynamite” star Jon 16. “Good” cholesterol, briefly 17. Shade of white 18. Give out one’s address? 19. French affirmative 20. Way in which lamebrains arrange themselves? 23. “Sure thing” 24. On its way 25. “All these interjections from Rocky ... enough!”? 33. Campbell of “House of Cards” 34. “How ____ to know?” 35. Garden tool use by the ruling family of old Florence? 43. “This Is How ____ It” (1995 #1 hit) 44. It’s 29% cream 45. Uneven trade which leaves a person with 13 less than they previously had? 51. D, in an emoticon 52. Billiard stick 53. 2005 Kelly Clarkson hit ... or this puzzle’s theme 61. Wee bit 62. Pioneering nurse Barton 63. Parts of college courses 65. Word after golden or old 66. “There’s ____ every crowd” 67. Diary part 68. Color in sunsets 69. Lollygags 70. Gave pills, e.g.

SUDOKU

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44 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) As far back as ancient Egypt, Rome and Greece, people staged ceremonies to mark the embarkation of a new ship. The intention was to bestow a blessing for the maiden voyage and ever thereafter. Good luck! Safe travels! Beginning in 18th-century Britain and America, such rituals often featured the smashing of a wine bottle on the ship’s bow. Later, a glass container of champagne became standard. In accordance with the current astrological indicators, I suggest that you come up with your own version of this celebratory gesture. It will soon be time for your launch. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You might feel quite sure that you’ve gotten as tall as you’re ever going to be. But that might not be true. If you were ever going to add another half-inch or more to your height, the near future would be the time for it. You are in the midst of what we in the consciousness industry call a “growth spurt.” The blooming and ripening could occur in other ways, as well. Your hair and fingernails might become longer faster than usual, and even your breasts or penis might undergo spontaneous augmentation. There’s no doubt that new brain cells will propagate at a higher rate, and so will the white blood cells that guard your physical health. Four weeks from now, I bet you’ll be noticeably smarter, wiser and more robust.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) The brightly colored birds known as bee-eaters are especially fond of eating bees and wasps. How do they avoid getting stung? They snatch their prey in mid-air and then knock them repeatedly against a tree branch until the stinger falls off and the venom is flushed out. In the coming weeks, Cancerian, you could perhaps draw inspiration from the bee-eaters’ determination to get what they want. How might you be able to draw nourishment from sources that aren’t entirely benign? How could you extract value from influences that you have be careful with? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) The coming months will be a ripe time to revise and rework your past—to reconfigure the consequences that emerged from what happened once upon a time. I’ll trust you to make the ultimate decisions about the best ways to do that, but here are some suggestions. 1. Revisit a memory that has haunted you, and do a ritual that resolves it and brings you peace. 2. Go back and finally do a crucial duty you left unfinished. 3. Return to a dream you wandered away from prematurely, and either re-commit yourself to it or else put it to rest for good.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The astrological omens suggest that now is a favorable time to deepen your roots and bolster your foundations and revitalize traditions that have nourished you. Oddly enough, the current PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) It’s one of those bizarre times when what feels really good is in planetary rhythms are also conducive to you and your family close alignment with what’s really good for you, and when tak- and friends playing soccer in the living room with a ball made ing the course of action that benefits you personally is probably from rolled-up socks, pretending to be fortune-telling psychics what’s best for everyone else, too. I realize the onslaught of this and giving each other past-life readings, and gathering around strange grace might be difficult to believe. But it’s real and true, the kitchen table to formulate a conspiracy to achieve world so don’t waste time questioning it. Relish and indulge in the domination. And no, the two sets of advice I just gave you are freedom it offers you. Use it to shush the meddling voice in your not contradictory. head that informs you about what you supposedly should be LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) doing instead of what you’re actually doing. In accordance with the long-term astrological omens, I invite you to make five long-term promises to yourself. They were ARIES (March 21-April 19) You might get richer quicker in 2018, Aries—especially if you formulated by the teacher Shannen Davis. Say them aloud a refuse to sell out. You might accumulate more clout—especially few times to get a feel for them. 1. “I will make myself eminently if you treat everyone as your equal and always wield your power teachable through the cultivation of openness and humility.” 2. responsibly. I bet you will also experience deeper, richer emo- “I won’t wait around hoping that people will give me what I can tions—especially if you avoid people who have low levels of give myself.” 3. “I’ll be a good sport about the consequences emotional intelligence. Finally, I predict you will get the best sex of my actions, whether they’re good, bad or misunderstood.” of your life in the next 12 months—especially if you cultivate the 4. “As I walk out of a room where there are many people who kind of peace of mind in which you’ll feel fine about yourself if know me, I won’t worry about what anyone will say about me.” you don’t get any sex at all. P.S.: You’d be wise to start working 5. “I will only pray for the things I’m willing to be the answer to.” on these projects immediately. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) To discuss a problem is not the same as doing something practiTAURUS (April 20-May 20) The members of the fungus family, like mushrooms and molds, cal to correct it. Many people don’t seem to realize this. They lack chlorophyll, so they can’t make food from sunlight, water and devote a great deal of energy to describing and analyzing their carbon dioxide. To get the energy they need, they “eat” plants. difficulties, and might even imagine possible solutions, but then That’s lucky for us. The fungi keep the earth fresh. Without them neglect to follow through. And so nothing changes. The sad or to decompose fallen leaves, piles of compost would continue to bad situation persists. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Scorpios accumulate forever. Some forests would be so choked with dead are among the least prone to this disability. You specialize in matter that they couldn’t thrive. I invite you to take your inspira- taking action to fulfill your proposed fixes. Just this once, howtion from the heroic fungi, Taurus. Expedite the decay and dissolu- ever, I urge you to engage in more inquiry and conversation than usual. Just talking about the problem could cure it. tion of the worn-out and obsolete parts of your life.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You come into a delicatessen where you have to take a numbered ticket in order to get waited on. Oops. You draw 37 and the counter clerk has just called out number 17. That means 20 more people will have their turns before you. Damn! You settle in for a tedious vigil, putting down your bag and crossing your arms across your chest. But then what’s this? Two minutes later, the clerk calls out 37. That’s you! You go up to the counter and hand in your number, and amazingly enough, the clerk writes down your order. A few minutes later, you’ve got your food. Maybe it was a mistake, but who cares? All that matters is that your opportunity came earlier than you thought it would. Now apply this vignette as a metaphor for your life in the coming days.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) I’m guessing you have been hungrier than usual. At times you might have felt voracious, even insatiable. What’s going on? I don’t think this intense yearning is simply about food, although it’s possible your body is trying to compensate for a nutritional deficiency. At the very least, you’re also experiencing a heightened desire to be understood and appreciated. You might be aching for a particular quality of love that you haven’t been able to give or get. Here’s my theory: Your soul is famished for experiences that your ego doesn’t sufficiently value or seek out. If I’m correct, you should meditate on what your soul craves but isn’t getting enough of.


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46 | DECEMBER 7, 2017

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Dirt Mall No More?

Many urban Utahns grew holiday shopping and seeing Santa at the now defunct Cottonwood Mall (4835 S. Highland Drive). It was the first shopping mall in the state and folks drove from Nevada, Idaho and even Colorado to see the wonders of the new huge ZCMI store (the LDS Church’s first branch location). You might have even had your first job at Copper Rivet or spent quarters at the Tilt Arcade, bought skis at Pedersons Sports or got a few strikes at the Cottonwood Bowling Lanes. There was La Rie’s, Anita Shops, Arthur Frank and a F.W. Woolworth—not to mention the 40,000-square-foot Paris department store and Makoff’s. Oh, the days when you wandered aimlessly through a shopping mall— when you had time to shop in a mall! The mall began its final downward spiral in the late ’90s, and by the time the place was bulldozed in 2007, it was a ghost of past Christmas memories. General Growth Properties was the last group to touch the 56-acre site. They had plans to put in an insanely dense “Old World European” clump of offices and 600-plus high-end residences in a rat warren of complex streets. Their price range at that time was $700,000 for a three-bedroom townhome, aiming at the 65-and-older age demographic. I sat in blind studies with the developer and laughed when they showed the design plans, commenting that without elevators in their three-level townhouses, they’d have a hard time selling to an older crowd. That big plan went in the toilet during the recession and General Growth Properties filed for bankruptcy. The development was placed under the management of the Howard Hughes Corp. The lonely Macy’s store sat on the huge piece of dirt until it closed earlier this year after new developers announced their plans. Ivory Homes and Woodbury Corp. have nine Planning Commission and City Council public meetings between now and Feb. 1 to get public feedback on their proposed uses of the land. Right now, they are looking at 12 percent open space, 40 acres of residences and 17 acres of mixeduse area to include restaurants, retail office and residences. Frankly, I think these local groups have a much better chance with this land’s future than the greedy boys I met with back in 2006. If you’re interested in sharing your ideas, contact them at cottonwood@ivoryhomes.com. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner SIMPLE LIFE

We - We dream until we die We - We slept right through our high We - We sometimes lose our mind We - We call it simple life We - We dress the part we play We - We would rather leave than stay We - We have it all under control We - We are the ones who sold our soul We - We have given all we can We - We think we understand We - We push all dark aside We - We call this simple life Standing on a corner watching as the World moves across the great big sky

Roger Knox Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

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News That Sounds Like a Joke White people living in Lawrenceville, Ga., had the chance of a lifetime on Nov. 16 to attend a “Come Meet a Black Person” event sponsored by Urban MediaMakers, a group for filmmakers and content creators. Cheryle Moses, who founded the group, said she read in a 2013 study that most white people don’t have any nonwhite friends. “I want to do my part to change things,” she told The Washington Post. “I have never met a black person,” one person commented on Moses’ Facebook post. “What do you recommend I bring that they would like?” Later, WXIA-TV reported that more than two dozen people showed up to share chili and cornbread, but fewer than a half-dozen were white.

WEIRD

Unclear on the Concept The Detroit Police Department got a little carried away on Nov. 9 while trying to address a persistent drug problem on the city’s east side. Two undercover special ops officers from the 12th Precinct were posing as drug dealers on a street corner when undercover officers from the 11th Precinct arrived and, not recognizing their colleagues, ordered the 12th Precinct officers to the ground. Shortly, more 12th Precinct officers showed up and the action moved to a house where, as Fox 2 News described it, a turf war broke out as officers from the two precincts engaged in fistfights with each other. An internal investigation is underway, and the police department has declined comment.

Bright Ideas Dunedin, New Zealand, police Sgt. Bryce Johnson told Stuff.nz that he’s seen people reading newspapers, putting on makeup and using their mobile phones while driving, but pulling over a driver who was playing bagpipes while driving, as he did on Nov. 15, was a first for him. “His fingers were going a million miles an hour,” Johnson said. The driver, who admitted to being a bag-

n The Hopkinton, Mass., Police Department cited an unnamed driver of a Buick Century on Nov. 12 for making their own license plate out of a pizza box and markers. The plate, which reads “MASS” at the top and sports a sloppily rendered six-digit number, prompted police to post some helpful warnings to creative citizens on its Facebook page and resulted in charges including operating an uninsured and unregistered vehicle and attaching “fake homemade” plates.

Crime Report In the wee hours of Nov. 5, before the McDonald’s in Columbia, Md., had opened, a woman reached through the drive-thru window and tried to pour herself a soda, but she couldn’t reach the dispenser. The Associated Press reports that, rather than driving down the road to a 24-hour restaurant, she can be seen on surveillance video squeezing herself through the drivethru window, pouring herself a soda and collecting a box full of unidentified items before taking off. The thief remains at large.

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Oh, Canada Montreal police might win the Funsuckers of the Year award after pulling over 38-year-old Taoufik Moalla on Sept. 27 as he drove to buy a bottle of water in Saint-Laurent. Moalla was enthusiastically singing along to C+C Music Factory’s song “Gonna Make You Sweat” when a patrol car pulled behind him with lights and sirens blaring. Officers directed him to pull over, and four officers surrounded Moalla’s car. “They asked me if I screamed,” Moalla told CTV News. “I said, ‘No, I was just singing.’” Then he was issued a $149 ticket for screaming in public, a violation of “peace and tranquility.” “I understand if they are doing their job, they are allowed to check if everything’s OK,” said a “very shocked” Moalla, “but I would never expect they would give me a ticket for that.” His wife, however, said she wasn’t surprised and would have given him a ticket for $300. Awesome! Indian computer coder Suyash Dixit braved perilous terroristinfested territory and drove six hours in early November to plant his flag and declare himself king in the last remaining unclaimed habitable place on Earth—Bir Tawil, a border area between Sudan and Egypt. “I am the king! This is no joke, I own a country now! Time to write an email to U.N.,” he told The Telegraph. King Dixit has also created a website for his new nation, where he is encouraging people to apply for citizenship. However, Anthony Arend, an international law and politics scholar, scolds that “under international law, only states can assert sovereignty over territory.” The Litigious Society The Canadian Press reports that Lorne Grabher of Nova Scotia, Canada, is suing the Transport Department to keep his vanity plate, which reads GRABHER. The retiree has sported the namesake plate for 27 years, but in January it was revoked for being “inappropriate,” and authorities denied the reason was because of its similarity to a suggestive comment by President Donald Trump revealed during his campaign. “I am increasingly dismayed by the hypersensitivity of some people who are ‘offended’ by every little thing they encounter,” Grabher wrote in his affidavit. He went on to say that he is proud of his AustrianGerman surname. Grabher’s case is scheduled to be heard in the Nova Scotia Supreme Court in September 2018. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Flying Solo Office workers at Cambridge Research Park in Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire, England, feared the worst as they rushed outside on Nov. 13 after watching a hot air balloon crash into a fence in their parking lot. Strangely, no one was in the basket of the balloon, although the gas canister was still running. Eyewitness Jack Langley told Metro News: “Either they had bailed out and jumped out before crashing or the balloon escaped from its mooring lines.” Cambridgeshire Police later discovered the balloon had taken off when the pilot got out of the basket to secure it to the ground.

pipe player, said he was only doing “air bagpipe,” and a search of the car did not turn up the instrument. He was released with a warning, but Johnson urged other drivers to keep both hands on the wheel at all times.

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The Continuing Crisis An unnamed man in Frankfurt, Germany, called police 20 years ago to report his Volkswagen Passat missing, believing it had been stolen. In November, the car was found just where the driver had left it, according to Metro News—in a parking garage that is now scheduled to be demolished. Police drove the 76-year-old to the garage to be reunited with his car, which is unfit to drive, before sending it off to the scrap heap.

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Rude Awakening A family in Vero Beach, Fla., were rudely awakened early on Nov. 11 when Jacob Johnson Futch, 31, climbed onto their roof to, as he later told authorities, meet with an agent of the Drug Enforcement Agency. WPTV reported the family didn’t know Futch and called Indian River Sheriff’s deputies to say that someone was stomping on their roof, yelling and howling. When asked, Futch admitted injecting methamphetamines earlier that morning. He was charged with trespassing and held in the Indian River County jail.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL


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