Page 1

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T N O V E M B E R 2 3 , 2 0 1 7 | V O L . 3 4 N 0 . 2 6

Give BY ALEX SPRINGER

From family services to hope on two wheels, these 10 local charities fight the good fight.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY OPEN YOUR HEART (AND POCKETBOOK)

These 10 local charities are walking the talk. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

14

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 18 A&E 22 DINE 28 CINEMA 31 TRUE TV 32 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

DAVID ADAMSON

Office administrator Chances are if you swing by our downtown offices, it’s Adamson’s face that greets you. One half of our office administration team, the Newport Beach, Calif., native says the friendly people are the favorite component of his job, and adds, “the occasional free concert tickets don’t hurt, either!”

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

NEWS

Much-needed LGBTQ summit announced. facebook.com/slcweekly

CHECK OUT! Our event photos and giveaways ... at cityweekly.net/freestuff.

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

FILM

The Square scores cheap points at sophisticates’ expense.

Twitter: @cityweekly • Deals at cityweeklystore.com


CD RECEIVER

$69.99

$89.99*

CD RECEIVER

List Price: 99.99

After $70 Rebate

DVD RECEIVER

$159.99 $ List Price: 249.99

SAVE

$90

$200

$110

$30

List Price: 299.99

SAVE

SAVE

SAVE

$99.99

DVD RECEIVER

DEH-X6800BS KDC-BT368U

•CD receiver with AM/FM tuner • Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling • Built-in Android and iPhone audio control

AVH-291BT

AV6117B *After $70 mail-in rebate

•6.2” LCD Touchscreen Display • Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling •Audio Streaming

•C D receiver with AM/FM tuner • Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling

•6 .2” Touchscreen Display • Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling •Audio Streaming

SAVE

SAVE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

FREE! SiriusXM Tuner with 3 Month Subscription

$150

• DVD/CD Receiver with 6.2” Touchscreen • Built-in GPS Navigation • Built-in Bluetooth for Hands-free Calling

Similar Illustration on the Sub Box

$249

BASS POWER PACKAGE (2 E12D, EA.) ATREND BOX R500X1D, R2D4-12,

VX7021, XCAM500J

.99

NAVIGATION SYSTEM WITH FREE BACKUP CAMERA

List Price: 399.99

SPECIAL BLACK FRIDAY PURCHASES SOME QUANTITIES MAY BE LIMITED HURRY IN FOR THE BEST SELECTION

SAVE

$300

$249.99 List Price: 399.99

SAVE

$250

M.E.S.A. MONEY CREDIT CARD

AV RECEIVER APPLE CARPLAY & ANDROID AUTO

$399.99 List Price: 699.99

LEASE / PURCHASE 70% APPROVAL RATE

90

DAY PAYMENT

OPTION

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

soundwarehouse.com/financing

DVD/CD receiver with 6.2” touchscreen and AM/FM tuner. Compatible with Apple CarPlay. Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling and audio streaming.

AV NAVIGATION SYSTEM

$449.99 List Price: 699.99

W W W. S OU N D WA R E H OUS E .C O M

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

FREE LAYAWAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 11/29/17

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 3

HOURS

10AM TO 7PM MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

PROGRESSIVE

This 6.95” In-dash DVD/CD player with AM/FM tuner works with Android Auto and Apple Carplay. Built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling & music streaming.

GET THE SOUND YOU DREAM OF

DDX9903S

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

$150


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, Nov. 9, “You’re Fired!”

Look at the cover of this newspaper. I dig it! Way to be, SLC! You have my

@VALENTINEOMINE Via Twitter

Good job City Weekly! You make me proud to be a Utahn.

@BONNIEKAEG Via Instagram

Read this the other day at Even Stevens. Excellent article. There’s a real chance.

JEFF ZIVKOVIC Via Facebook

No, he shouldn’t be impeached. He needs to be catapulted into space and burn in the sun. His hair products will ensure he really burns up.

SHAWN LOWRY Via Facebook

If Trump’s egregious behavior were an impeachable offense … yes. If Trump’s lifelong pattern of unethical, immoral and shady dealings were impeachable offenses … yes. If Trump’s pathological lying were an impeachable offense … yes. If Trump’s hiring of people with conflicts of interest and inexperience for their roles were impeachable offense … yes. If Trump’s repeated demonstration of low IQ were an impeachable offense … yes. If Trump were to be evaluated by a panel of psychologists and found to violate the 25th Amendment … yes, If Trump is proven to have knowingly participated in treasonous dealings with foreign governments? To be determined.

JARED BOWDEN Via Facebook

Good thing those are all ifs and not facts.

SEAN DEVOS Via Facebook

No, he hasn’t done anything wrong. This cover is in horrible taste and shows its true colors. Left-wing, not unbiased.

PAULA GORMAN

| CITY WEEKLY |

Via Facebook Message aside, this is a beautiful piece of emotion invoking artwork. It’s just fun to look at. Might I add, thankfully we live in a country in which artwork like this doesn’t get you arrested and declared an enemy of the state.

4 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

SOAP BOX

NOVEMBER 9, 2017 | VOL. 34 N0. 24

Way to voice what we’ve all been thinking! Mad respect for you guys.

BOBBY HALL Via Facebook

@ALI.MITCHELL Via Instagram

Right, because the democrats are so honest, lol. How about doing a story about how to fix this corrupt system bought by the

rich to make themselves richer and screw the common man?

DAVE CALDWELL Via Facebook

Like the opposite of the current tax plan?

PETER MUSCARELLO Via Facebook

Alright, even bright red Utah is beginning to get it! Hope springs eternal. CAROL MCLEAN Via Facebook Yet another anti-Trump article devoid of any significant or intelligent criticism. Got anything real? Obviously not.

@XJSAUCEX Via Twitter

I have an idea: Let’s keep complaining about Trump and not consider how he got there. Trump could be gone in three years. How about talking about the real problem of the corruption of our political system and how it is bought by the highest bidder? Government for the people? Lol. For the corporate profit is more like it.

DAVE CALDWELL Via Facebook

You sure you’re not describing Hillary Clinton’s behavior over the last 40 years? When do see that article? Nice job, kids.

PAUL KARNER Via Facebook

Your comments look similar to ours

@PGHCITYPAPER Via Instagram

Trump is an asshole. He needs to be put in a giant sealable diaper and shot into space.

SHAWN LOWRY Via Facebook

Your cover story was correct in acknowledging that this effort is extremely difficult even as in the case of Nixon who history definitively proved was a crook. Mutiny has never ended well for mutineers so go ahead protest go to jail if you want, nothing will be gained 30 years from now, except that maybe you won’t get the job that you need at that time because of your criminal record. America today is a Land of Confusion (reference Genesis hit from 1986) and why? [Because] Democrats won’t accept our constitutional democracy. People who speak of tolerance rarely are and hate creates more hate. In closing, let me reference Michael Jackson: Look at the man in the mirror and asking him to change his ways.

DEREK JONES, Salt Lake City

Look, I don’t like the guy, but Kelly Kenoyer’s article about how he can and should be impeached is quite weak, and somewhat dishonest. You state a number of reasons why he’s a clown, some baseline arguments

for why he’s not a good president, but if you’re truly an investigative reporter then learn what impeachment is, what grounds need to be observed, how—if at all—that could apply to our current president, then write your article. If you know about impeachment and simply aren’t representing it justly, then that’s a totally different story. As it stands now, the article is but another “Look here!” and does absolutely nothing except confirm the Trumphating vitriol in those who already have it. You’re educating no one, and linking to a website demanding the same of what you’re suggesting (albeit highlighting some iffy holdings and whatnot) merely showcases that you’ve got biases up front, which is not very investigative at all, now is it? ... Not for a minute, does anyone believe that Trump’s issues are because of Trump Tower and the connections—people simply hate him because he’s a jerk, a loudmouth and he may not be making the best decisions. He’s not presidential either. Fair enough. But don’t paint the picture of his impeachable grounds (which are not solid on their own at this point) as though that’s what you’re really upset about. People who want to impeach Trump simply don’t like him, as your article clearly articulates, and that in itself is not worthy of impeachment. More often than not, when I talk to someone about why they hate Trump, they can’t give me a reason beyond how much of a jerk he is. Cite some policy, maybe? Refer to facts and not hearsay, unverified or unsubstantiated claims, or worse please don’t propagate information that’s already been proven false. These concepts allude a great deal of those who dislike the POTUS. Why? Because Twitter. Because orange skin. Because, because, because. Remember, each President so far has had plenty of baggage—hell, we had a full on deviant in the office in the 90s and he’s a hero to many. It’s just not politically expedient to mention those presidents unless they are either of the opposite party of your publication’s majority or it unless it fits a popular narrative; that’s what one can deduce from reading City Weekly. Have more integrity than that, and stop pushing the same rubbish as everyone else. Selling papers* (ad space, my apologies) can be done in more ethical ways. Please keep writing, keep the paper rolling, but fix some shit and be more fair. Y ​ our Libertarian (not Rep/Dem) reader,

MATT ​BROWN, Via CW comments *Editor’s note: City Weekly is a free publication.

Impeach Trump now. Ask us how!

News, Nov. 9, “Electric Slide”

Clean energy capital with the worst air quality in the United States? Sure.

MATT HANDY Via Facebook

Talk to us once you have fixed the problems with the police department and the homeless issue.

MICHAEL A. STAHLER Via Facebook

Not to mention Mayor Excuski’s patently false veteran support or civil rights narrative.

AARON JONES Via Facebook

Blog post, Nov. 15, “Twilight’s Twilight?”

Gallivan Center had way better line-ups than Pioneer [Park] has ever had. Sure, there’s a few good shows here and there but, it used to be phenomenal year in/ year-out at Gallivan. Plus, it seemed like more of an adult-themed crowd who actually pay taxes and are able to purchase the things necessary to bring in revenue. I’m all for it leaving bum park and the slummy area of Pioneer. Sign me up!

BRENNEN LYNN DAVIS Via cityweekly.net

We encourage you to join the conversation. Voice your opinion on our stories posted across our social media sites, as well as cityweekly.net, for a chance to be featured in this section.


STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN

Circulation Circulation Manager ERIC GRANATO

Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales DANIEL COWAN, MIKEY SALTAS Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866

Business/Office Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE

Sales Director of Advertising,Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives ANNE BAILEY, LISA DORELLI, PAULINA JEDLICA KNUDSON, ALEX MARKHAM, JEREMIAH SMITH

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Production Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Marketing Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZ-KINNY, MATTHEW AULDRIC BEERE, TERESA BAGDASAROVA, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, SAMMIE HERZOG, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, POLINA LYUBAVINA, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Proofreaders SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, GEOFF GRIFFIN, MARYANN JOHANSON, MIKE RIEDEL, TED SCHEFFLER, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN Editorial Interns BENJAMIN BENALLY, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ

Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

| CITY WEEKLY |

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Copperfield Publishing Inc. JOHN SALTAS City Weekly founder

Phone 801-575-7003 E-mail comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 5

All Contents © 2017


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

6 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

PRIVATE EY

Dead Chickens

Sometime about 100 years ago, my immigrant grandfather decided he wanted to try something new. He’d been working as a coal miner in Carbon County for a decade, lured by a labor agent boasting of great wealth who had visited his village of Gavalohori, Crete, where he scratched out an existence. Following a sea and land voyage of 28 days, he found himself deep inside a coal mine in Sunnyside, Utah, with “100 boys from my veeelaage.” It was good, honest work and he was a good, honest 20-year-old man. It was such good work, that despite losing dozens of his companions over the next two decades in mining accidents, he kept on digging into various mines throughout the West. After all, where else can a young man with few technical skills be paid the handsome wage of $1 a day? he must have rationalized. And he worked for that wage despite knowing that his boss literally rigged the scales against him. Immigrant miners like him were not often paid $1 a day as a wage, but $1 for each ton of coal extracted from the mine. When his coal was taken to the scales, those scales were often rigged to measure less weight than what they actually bore. A ton might show up as a half ton, for instance, earning 50 cents, not $1. So, he worked twice as hard and tried all the while not to do anything that might upset his boss—because the reward for that was to be sent to a mining section with less coal and more dirt and he wasn’t paid for dirt. He might also be assigned to a more dangerous section.

B Y J O H N S A LTA S

The mining bosses considered the life of a coal miner of less value than that of a mule. Their lives seemed a dead end. It was the coal-mining version of keeping the boys down on the farm. But over time, Greek men like my grandfather—and other immigrant coal miners—began speaking English; began talking to one another their new common tongue and realized that they were all getting screwed. That begat the modern labor movement and the onset of unionized workforces. When he died over 70 years after turning his first shovel of Utah coal, my grandfather remained a proud supporter of worker unions. But along the way, he realized that he couldn’t mine coal forever. The hard, dangerous work had already cost him friends and thanks to his proximity to loud explosions, it had cost him his hearing, too. At one point, he ended up near Vernal to discover new opportunity. As it turns out, he found three. The first was the United States Army, in which he enlisted during World War I. Though his name remains—misspelled not once, but twice—on the war memorial in Vernal, he didn’t serve long, being discharged due to emphysema, a complication of 10 years of working underground. The second opportunity came shortly after he was discharged when he entered a Vernal café and met, then soon married my handcart, Mormon Battalion and polygamy-descended grandmother, just 17 or so. He took along her young child, my uncle Lynn Woolsey, as well. Bestowed with a new family and another child on the way, my grandfather quit the coal mines. He and another Greek man decided that hauling goods was their calling. In short order, they had their biggest and most lucrative job yet, transporting a load of chickens from Vernal to Price. It was the dead of winter.

@johnsaltas

Off they went, already counting their chickens and eggs, but not counting on the storms they would encounter. I imagine their route took them into Nine Mile Canyon, a most desolate place any time of the year. Somewhere along the way, all the chickens froze to death. When they finally arrived in Price with nothing to sell and nowhere to go, my grandfather reached into his pockets for the final coins remaining of his life savings and somehow made his way back to Vernal. His days as a businessman were over. And I’m thankful for that. Had those chickens lived and had the venture grown into a thriving distribution company, my mother wouldn’t have been born. That really is the truth—the butterfly effect of it all. My grandfather might have had more children, just not the children I grew up calling my aunts, uncles and mother. He wouldn’t have moved to Bingham Canyon where my mother was born. No mother, no me. No me, no City Weekly, nor its spawns Devour, Vamoose, Winners and all the rest like Best of Utah and, yep, the Utah Beer Festival. I’d be OK with that, but I’d not be OK with no Paula, Pete, Eleni or Mikey. Nor would I be OK never knowing the great people I’ve met through City Weekly—especially the special angels who believe in our mission and recognize the value we represent to this community. There are so many, but above all I’d never have met our great employees. What a crew they are! More talent and heart than any former dirt digger like myself should deserve to know. I love them all. So, this Thanksgiving, I’m thanking my lucky stars for dead chickens. I’ve never asked much of our readers, but if you can, how about thanking dead chickens, too? CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 7


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

Remote Work

S ON U W O FOLL TAGRAM INS

Well, there’s always Twitter. That could be the answer to the question of whether to move the Bureau of Land Management to Utah. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and a couple of Colorado lawmakers figure this is a good way to drain the D.C. swamp— send the alligators out West. The timing might be suspect, what with the call to downsize national monuments, but it’s not a particularly new idea. The Salt Lake Tribune editorialized about bringing government to the people, and both George Pyle and Thomas Burr spoke on KCPW about the effort. There are only 500 BLM employees who’d have to move, but they all have moving expenses. Utah loves jobs, so there might be incentives available. Sure, the Washington lobbyists would have a harder time wining and dining bureaucrats, but they could talk to them on Twitter and Skype, for what it’s worth. And it’s not much.

We sell tickets! check us first! low or no fees upcoming shows

Louis the child

$

Pushing Boundaries

EKLY E W C @SL

THE Source for Tune-Ups, Rentals & Equipment

If you can navigate the San Juan voting dilemma, you’re doing better than District Judge Robert Shelby. As gerrymandering becomes a front-andcenter issue, Shelby is trying to work through the voting boundaries in San Juan County. He’s already found that the districts work against Navajos, but—go figure—some Navajos like it that way. They think they’ll get more from the county than the Navajo Nation, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. This isn’t the only voting dust-up in a state where a 37 percent turnout is pretty good. Rep. Jeremy Peterson, R-Ogden, is wading into the murky waters of the Electoral College, wondering how it would be if candidates didn’t campaign based on that antiquated model. Good luck with that, Representative. Utahns would do almost anything to keep Democrats from a single vote.

Build Up

50% OFF TUNE-UPS! SKI TUNE-UP $15 REG $30 SNOWBOARD TUNE-UP $20 REG $40 Expires 12/7/17

698 Park Avenue • Park City Townlift • 435-649-3020 134 West 600 South • Salt Lake • 801-355-9088 2432 East Ft. Union • South Valley • 801-942-1522

Maybe a 12-story housing development is better than a weedy hole in the ground. Or Holladay citizens might just be desperate to see something rise from the 9-year-old depression where the Cottonwood Mall once stood. Ivory Development and Woodbury Corp. have a proposal for a high-rise development, and retailers in the area are thrilled at the prospects, according to the Trib. What’s missing is any talk of affordable housing, and that might be intentional. The Republican House tax bill eliminates a type of tax-exempt bond for affordable development. The Senate bill doesn’t, but there still remains doubt about the future of those bonds. And Utah sorely needs to think about affordable housing, particularly given the homeless crisis.

$

the frights

20

$

15

tues, nov. 28 | the complex

wed, nov. 29 | kilby court

chocolate tastings!

charlie parr

30

$

16

thur, nov. 30 | the chocolate conspiracy

sat, dev. 2 | the state room

supersuckers

robert randolph and the family band

$

17

$

thur, dec. 7 | urban lounge

40 fri, deC. 29 | the state room

hir $

27 sun feb. 11, 2018 | salt lake acting company

FOR MORE SHOWS & EVENTS GO TO CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM


COMING SOON

CITY WEEKLY AUTOS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 9

www.cityweekly.net

STAY TUNED...


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

UPCOMING EVENT

BROADWAY DIVAS BRUNCH NOVEMBER 26, 2017 12:30PM-4:00PM

AT CLUB-X

CHEESE AND CHOCOLATE TASTING NOVEMBER 30, 2017 6:00PM-9:00PM

AT CHOCOLATE CONSPIRACY TICKEST AT CWSTORE.CITYWEEKLY.NET

Is there a general consensus on aspartame’s health effects? —MichaelEmouse, via the Straight Dope Message Board You’d think, wouldn’t you? It’s not like we haven’t had time to study the subject. The artificial sweeteners aspartame (marketed as NutraSweet) and sucralose (Splenda) were first synthesized in the 1960s and ’70s respectively, though they’re mere babies compared to saccharin, the ingredient in Sweet ’n Low—Teddy Roosevelt was a fan of that stuff. By now, surely, there’s settled science on all of them. No dice. As recently as 2016 Pepsi was still dithering over which fake sugar to put in its no-cal drinks. Faced with rising consumer health concerns and declining sales, in 2015 the company replaced the aspartame in Diet Pepsi with a combination of sucralose and acesulfame potassium. Unfortunately, diet soda drinkers hated the new taste; throwing up its corporate hands, last year Pepsi announced the return of aspartame cola under the mouth-watering name Diet Pepsi Classic Sweetener Blend. If industry execs feel a bit of whiplash, well, you can sympathize: aspartame and its like are the focus of MSG-levels of hysteria on the internet, where prominent articles bear headlines like “Aspartame Is, By Far, the Most Dangerous Substance on the Market That Is Added to Foods.” Still, folks want their diet soda. Some consensus wouldn’t hurt. Part of the problem is that we’re looking at a bit of a moving target. When last we addressed the topic in this column, in 1996, aspartame was being blamed for Gulf War Syndrome. (Conclusion: nope.) For a while people were worked up about aspartame’s alleged links to cancer, though studies haven’t borne those fears out, and the major health bodies, like the FDA and the European Food Safety Authority, have given it their stamp of approval. OK, so ingested in non-insane quantities it probably doesn’t cause cancer—not exactly a ringing endorsement, maybe, but good to know all the same. In recent years, however, concern has drifted to the surprisingly complicated question of: Does this stuff even work as advertised? People use it because they’re watching their weight, counting calories, minding their health. But is it paying off? Frankly, the early returns don’t look great, and not just for aspartame. We’re talking about the whole category of compounds called non-caloric artificial sweeteners, or NAS: a group of substances, sucralose and saccharin included, that have long been considered “metabolically inert”—that is, they pass through our bodies unchanged from how they went in, providing no caloric energy along the way. For about 10 years now, though, researchers have been troubled by some unexpected findings in studies conducted on human and rodent subjects: not only did NAS not seem to be contributing to better health, but in fact their consumption was persistently linked to things

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Sugar Coat It

like weight gain and attendant health issues. A 2009 study, for instance, suggested folks who drink diet soda daily are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome (a group of related conditions, including high blood pressure, linked to heart disease, stroke, etc.) than people who don’t drink soda, diet or regular. Of course, there are other factors to consider: For instance, people drinking diet might be doing so because they’re already overweight and thus more likely to run into such health troubles. So scientists turned back to mice—who, in a 2014 study out of Israel, also showed warning signs for obesity and diabetes after they suckled on water mixed with artificial sweeteners. Control groups of mice were fed natural sugars; only the NAS mice developed abnormally high blood-sugar levels. This tracked with what was already suspected, but it provided an idea about why. The theoretically inert sweeteners, the Israelis found, seemed to be having some effect on our old friend the gut microbiome. It’s increasingly thought that the state of the native bacteria in our digestive tracts—the microbiome, or microbiota—has manifold implications for our physical well-being, among these a major role in how the body converts food to energy. As described here back in March, experiments nowadays are exploring whether the gross but promising procedure known as fecal transplantation might be viable for combating obesity, though no one’s yet gotten it to work. And, according to one of the Israeli study’s leaders, these gut bacteria “are not agnostic to artificial sweeteners.” The researchers reported that the guts of mice fed with NAS contained greater populations of bacteria that are particularly good at extracting energy from food and turning it into fat.
 This line of inquiry is just getting started, but I’ll also mention a research review published earlier this year in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. The preponderance of clinical trials conducted over the years, the authors wrote, don’t “clearly support the intended benefits of nonnutritive sweeteners for weight management,” and might raise the possibility we’ve been discussing—that these substances could actually be linked to obesity and metabolic problems. So: Are sweeteners like aspartame hurting your health? Stay tuned on that, but it’s looking more and more like they ain’t helping. n Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago, Ill 60654.


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill _ frost

Eight things you just don’t want to hear from family this Thanksgiving:

8. “Mommy has to go work

her shift at Trails. Are my turkey pasties on straight?”

we need to go set up camp outside Walmart.”

How about a Bud Light Lime Cran-Brrr-Rita?”

5. “Finally, a holiday without a mass shooting … oh, wait, never mind.”

4. “Gather ’round the radio,

kids! It’s almost time for The Best of InfoWars!”

Bastion’s food allergies and enjoy the soy broth.”

1. “We checked 23andMe again this year: We’re still white!”

COAT EXCHANGE

Baby, it’s cold outside, and the homeless know it’s only going to get worse. If you have a coat or if you need a coat for what’s coming, Pioneer Park is the place for you. This Coat Exchange is a different kind of Black Friday event, taking on the flipside of consumerism. All winter clothing items are welcome. If you’re a little wary of Pioneer Park itself, check out the donation centers listed on the Coat Exchange website. Leftover clothing will be donated to Crossroads Urban Center, which advocates for lowincome and homeless people. Pioneer Park, 350 S. 300 West, 801-502-1991, Friday, Nov. 24, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., free, coatexchange.org.

LGBTQ YOUTH SUMMIT

Alienation, bullying, suicide—let’s not go there. Instead, encourage youths 1418 years old to find a place where they can affirm friendships, build community and foster creativity. Ignite is a statewide summit geared to LGBTQ youth, their friends and families, and seeks to build community and self-worth for kids who otherwise might be relegated to the fringes of Utah’s conservative society. “Affirming parents, counselors and school administrators are welcome to attend and will have breakout sessions, including a Q&A with [Encircle] executive director Stephenie Larsen,” organizers state. Ignite also includes celebrity performers, games, dinner, live music, and more. Utah Valley University Classroom Building, 815 College Drive, Orem, 951-514-9708, Saturday, Dec. 2, 12-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2j2qRer.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 11

2. “Please respect Bry’lee and

Guess who’s coming to Utah? It’s President Donald Trump, who apparently can’t wait to slash Utah’s national monuments—specifically Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante, in case you’re wondering. There might be more, but “you’ll find out,” as the president likes to say. Utah Diné Bikéyah, Kids Speak for Parks, the Mormon Environmental Stewardship Alliance and other groups sponsoring the Rally Against Trump’s Monumental Mistake say, “This action is illegal, unwarranted and dismisses the more than 2.8 million people that petitioned President Trump to keep our national monuments fully intact. It is also an affront to Native American tribes.” Bring your #SaveGrandStaircase and #StandWithBearsEars signs. T-shirts are available, too. Utah State Capitol, 350 N. State, 385-202-4954, 801-631-1384, Saturday, Dec. 2, 1-2:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2zaob9m.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Did anybody bring a garment bag?”

MONUMENT RALLY

3. “Grandma isn’t breathing.

CHANGE THE WORLD

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

6. “The wine store was closed.

In a week, you can

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

7. “Hurry up and finish eating—

CITIZEN REVOLT


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

12 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

NEWS

PUBLIC ART FUNDING

Blank Canvas Downtown street is once again bustling, but key component is missing. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

N

ow reanimated, Regent Street is modern and alluring—but something’s still missing. Take a stroll down the artery that links 100 and 200 South, running parallel to Main and State streets, and you’re bound to spot theatergoers—the area’s signature building, the Eccles Theater, raised its curtain about a year ago. Or you might be enticed by the scent of artisanal pizza wafting from the Fireside on Regent restaurant, which sits near the north end of this midblock road that feels more like a grand pedestrian walkway. But what you won’t see is a onceenvisioned dazzling and malleable fiber sculpture hanging overhead. In fact, you won’t see any piece of public art despite a redevelopment plan that specifies an installation. That’s because negotiations between the artist, Janet Echelman, who was unanimously selected by an ad hoc committee, and the city have disintegrated. City Weekly detailed the selection process and the subsequent deal collapse in an exhaustive April 2016 cover story. A year and nine months later, not a dime of the $2 million earmarked for art on Regent has been spent. Echelman is optimistic that the two sides can patch up their differences and press on. Hailing from Boston, she hadn’t discovered her trademark medium until she was on a Fulbright fellowship in southeastern India. While walking on the beach one day, panicking that her paints wouldn’t arrive in time for an exhibition, she applied her artistic eye to fishnets lining the shore. Hoisting the webs up on poles, she discovered a unique mode of expression. Now her monumental pieces hang everywhere—from Portugal to Canada, and in the U.S. from Boston to Seattle. Salt Lake City was to be the site of her next installation. “I have already been through a competitive process and been selected, so I would strongly urge the city to follow the results of that public process and correct the mistake of what happened,” she says via email. But the city is starting the process anew. It claims that Echelman asked for more money and time to complete the project before any documents were formally signed. “They tried to continue negotiations with her, but they felt like—along with her contract requirements and the current construction and timeline of the street—it

Vanilla sky: Per a September 2015 city press release, Echelman’s installation was meant to “transform the urban context of Regent Street and invite people in to discover the urban corridor.” wasn’t coming together and it wasn’t feasible to move on and so the contract negotiations were terminated,” says Amanda Holty, communications manager for the Salt Lake City Redevelopment Agency. Echelman disputes this characterization. She says her bid did not change from the time she submitted her design brief. “I was completely surprised by the cessation of my project,” she writes. The unanimously selected project, as she understood it, was put on hold because of the impending mayoral election. “I believe that now that the new mayor is in play, my project should be re-started and proceed to completion despite the delay.” Although the fallout seemed to coincide with the election, negotiations collapsed around Dec. 11, 2015, before Mayor Jackie Biskupski was sworn into office. Echelman also disagrees that her proposed contract, as well as the requested time extension, should have been insurmountable hurdles. As she saw it, the city drafted a standard contract that didn’t fit the “unique nature of this unique project,” in part because the work would drape from both private and public spaces on Regent Street. “I provided a template contract to the city to assist in developing the appropriate contract for this project, as I have invested in years of legal work that has resulted in a contract we have used to complete this type of project in multiple cities,” she says. Regarding the fuzzy due date, Echelman says the Salt Lake City Arts Council is at least partially to blame. The council, she contends, “dragged their feet and thus delayed the start of my work yet were not offering an equivalent extension of the time.” She also admits the complexity and scope of the project is unlike any the council has commissioned before. “I recommended lengthening the time allotted to allow for the proper coordination with the private and public building owners whose property the artwork would attach,” she writes. “I confirmed that I could deliver

within the original time period of the design brief from which I was selected.” Echelman has partnered with Salt Lake City-based Ore Design. She considers this a boon to the proposed installation, which she hopes will become a reality. “I believe [Ore] will be an outstanding construction partner to realize my design, and allow for the highest-quality construction of my design with a cost-effective way of providing expert local oversight to implementation of all elements,” she says. Regardless, if Salt Lake City is to hang an Echelman from its cityscape, the artist will have to bid again. Dana Hernandez, Salt Lake City’s public art program manager, says her department still has an obligation to complete an art project on Regent. “The city believes in creating a vibrant place for people to live and visit, and part of that is arts and culture. The most accessible art form there is is public art because it’s meant for everyone,” Hernandez says. “I would imagine that citizens can see and appreciate what public art does to enhance our daily lives in general.” The invitation to bid, or “request for quotation” as they’re called, is in its final stages, and Hernandez is awaiting approval from city attorneys before it is uploaded to the web. That could be as early as this month. The applicant window will be open for about a month. Afterward, it will be Hernandez’ job to weed out any of the entrants who don’t apply properly. The rest will be passed along to the recently assembled Artist Selection Committee, which comprises nine panelists, seven of whom are voting members. Of those, three are art experts, three represent nearby property owners and one is an RDA representative. The two non-voting members come from the mayor’s office and the Downtown Alliance/Cultural Core. The city must have the project funds committed by next August, when the artist should have an activated contract. Depending on its complexity, the art piece

could take another year before it’s completed. And the city has learned from some of the missteps of 2015. “In order to prevent any types of issues arising this go around, we’ve done a tremendous amount of work in terms of planning, revising the process, instituting new procedures that can help us start in a really good place,” Hernandez says. This time—contrasted with last—the arts council will draw up an explicit contract with a fixed dollar amount, so applicants will know there is no opportunity to go above the $2 million amount. The budget includes artist fees, permitting, easement costs, construction and travel if the artist is not from the state. “All of the costs that would be associated with executing the project would be encompassed in the $2 million budget, and we’re trying to make that as clear as possible so that people know they can’t expect any additional funding,” Hernandez says. In 2015, the city offered an additional $700,00 on top of the $2 million, if the piece had a technology component. At the time, the thought was a big wall on the Walker Center garage might make for a good canvas for a technological projection. The $2 million is coming out of bond funds for the Regent Street improvements, Holty says, and the extra $700,000 no longer is available. Even still, the funds are substantial enough to attract a talented artist, like Echelman, who can create something remarkable, Hernandez says. “This is a really great opportunity for Salt Lake City to showcase that they actually do value the arts and how adding a project of this scope and scale could enhance and change the landscape of our city in a good way,” she concludes. “This is our first opportunity to have the funding available to even broach that kind of a project. It shows that Salt Lake City is growing up a little bit.” CW


Serving awesome curry dishes since 1998

2020 S. State street Salt Lake City, UT, 84115 801-467-4137

2017

‘Tis the season!

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 13

In these pages you will find a variety of LOCAL businesses. When you shop local, your spending stays local. These are your neighbors and community members that rely on dollars staying in our local market. SHOP LOCAL, LIVE LOCAL! Enjoy!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

GGIF T uide

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

660 S. State street Salt Lake City, UT, 84111 801-924-9188


SARAH ARNOFF

t’s been a rough year. Instead of social media feeds being flooded with upcoming movie teasers and videos of tiny hamsters eating tiny food, we’ve watched in horror as the news cycle is dominated by living, breathing monsters—leering, bloviating, aberrations that our worst nightmares couldn’t prepare us for. It’s enough to make us believe that heroes don’t exist anymore, and that hope is little more than an illusion. Well, I’m here to tell you that we still live in a world where heroes walk among us. They might not have the benefit of nifty outfits and awe-inspiring CGI at their disposal, but spending a few weeks getting to know some of the people behind Utah’s outreach organizations has given me a much-needed dose of hope. Read on for some good news, and if you’re inspired to do so, look up each organization’s website to find out ways to help these local heroes.

Amid the many opportunities to celebrate the holidays with our families and loved ones, let’s not overlook the fact that World AIDS Day kicks off December. Thousands of people across the world are still dealing with an affliction that sadly has started to feel like old news. While we have seen medical progress in HIV prevention and treatment, those affected by it still need help, love and, perhaps most important, understanding. As Jared Hafen, Utah AIDS Foundation programming director puts it: “We are always working to fight the negative stigma that surrounds this community.” As part of his work, Hafen oversees programs to help those who are HIV-positive live normal, happy lives. “We remove barriers so our clients are able to access medication, mental health services, support groups and housing,” he says. “We also have a food bank stocked with a variety of foods that are specific for the nutritional needs of people with HIV.” In addition to resources and medication, the foundation also provides judgment-free prevention methods. “We have a test site here on Mondays and Thursdays from 5-7 p.m. where we do free HIV testing and low-cost STI testing,” Hafen says. “We also do a syringe-exchange program and provide services to help people locate a doctor who is willing to monitor them and help out with financial assistance programs.” While living with HIV has become increasingly more manageable, Hafen says around 40,000 new cases are reported annually across the nation. “We still see a lot of people not testing and ending up in the hospital with opportunistic infections, which weakens their immune system,” he says. “It does make HIV a lot more difficult to treat, and it may take years for their immune system to bounce back.” If you’re interested in lending a hand, the foundation holds volunteer orientations every other week. “There are several different volunteer opportunities,” Hafen notes. “We have the food bank, our testing site, office support and we also have our special events and projects.” The foundation is collaborating with Westminster College on Dec. 1 to commemorate World AIDS Day, and their Oscar Night Red Carpet Gala in March is not to be missed. utahaids.org

Salt Lake County Animal Services

PETE FULLER

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

Utah AIDS Foundation

PETE FULLER

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

From family services to hope on two wheels, these 10 local charities fight the good fight.

Thanks to the work of Salt Lake County Animal Services, the city has one of the largest no-kill animal shelters in the country. It’s also a place where young children can read books to shelter cats. Through a collaboration with Best Friends Utah’s NKUT Coalition, the County Animal Shelter has become a more humane place for stray animals that roam our streets. Serving around half of the cities in the valley, the shelter takes in a huge volume of animals, and helps them become healthy enough to find homes with some lucky Utahns. The shelter last year saw a 93 percent “save” rate, and “One of our major victories is all of the programs that we have created to maintain our no-kill status,” Marketing and Communications Manager Callista Pearson says. In addition to offering discounted adoption rates to match senior animals with senior citizens, the shelter recently held a mock “pet election” to raise money for their injured-animal fund. “It’s called Pawlitical Pets, and people registered their own pets to become the county’s pet mayor,” Pearson says. With a wide variety of community outreach programs, County Animal Services is constantly working to redefine what it can do for our pet communities. “A shelter is more than just holding animals,” Pearson adds. “We try to get people to keep their pets for their whole lives. Ultimately, our goal is to find homes for every pet.” Looking to get involved? County Animal Services is participating in Giving Tuesday, and is seeking donations of pet supplies, food and toys. And if you have little ones who want to help out, taking them to read a favorite book to a shelter feline as part of the Book Buddies program is a great place to start. slco.org/animal-services


DAVE PACHECO SACHIN PAVITHRAN

wheelchairs, can be really expensive,” Pavithran points out. “Wheelchairs can cost up to $20,000, and adapting vehicles and homes with assistive technology can be very expensive as well.” The foundation also offers small grants for those needing communications devices, such as iPads. “We also have small-business loans that we give to people with disabilities who want to start up or enhance their business,” Pavithran says. “They have to set up a full business plan, but we give them some seed money to start, and it’s also low-interest.” For those interested in volunteering, they operate a reutilization lab in Salt Lake City where people can help refurbish wheelchairs and other mobility devices. Those in need can purchase the refurbished wheelchairs at cost—a huge price cut compared to brand-new devices. “Once these are put together, we do an evaluation assessment to make sure it’s in working order,” Pavithran says. “The idea isn’t to make money off of this.” uatf.org

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Modern medical science has given us some spectacular breakthroughs in technology designed to help people with disabilities become more independent. But it often doesn’t come cheap. As a blind man, this is something Sachin Pavithran, director of Utah Assistive Technology Foundation, has learned firsthand. “We still need to raise awareness,” he says. “There are options out there to help people gain independence. The foundation was formed in 1989 to educate people with disabilities about available technology. “It has evolved into giving people access to assistive technology,” Pavithran says, “to get people independent and involved in the community.” The foundation does this by offering financial aid to those in need of assistive technology because of a disability. Through a partnership with Zions Bank, the agency helps provide low-interest loans. “Some of this technology, like

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Utah Assistive Technology Foundation

SACHIN PAVITHRAN

With the fulminating controversy surrounding Bears Ears National Monument reaching a peak, the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance is marshaling its forces—and is ready to start kicking some ass. “This monument is about healing,” grassroots organizer Dave Pacheco says. “It’s an opportunity for Native Americans to heal some really old wounds that this country inflicted upon them, and it’s an opportunity for all of us to rewrite the history books.” The grudge that a number of Utah legislators held against the designation of the national monument last year has been revived thanks to the Trump administration. “Utah politicians are seeing an opportunity to try and challenge the monument once more,” Pacheco warns. “They are asking this president to roll back protections on the national monument by drastically reducing [its] boundaries.” President Trump is expected to visit Utah in December to approve legislation shrinking Bears Ears by 90 percent, and Grand Staircase Escalante by 40 percent. SUWA and its affiliates are gearing up for some tough times ahead. “The biggest thing that people can do is to voice their opinion,” Pacheco says. “Pick up your pen, go to your keyboard, write your opinion and send it to any publication.” SUWA is also teaming up with the Sierra Club, Utah Diné Bikéyah and the state’s Native American tribes to organize a rally at the State Capitol on Dec. 2. “Come one, come all,” Pacheco says. “Let the world know that Utah does not stand with the Utah politicians, this president and their efforts to undermine the protections that are in place on our wild public lands.” suwa.org

SACHIN PAVITHRAN

DAVE PACHECO

Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance

Odyssey House

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 15

MELANIE APGOOD

| CITY WEEKLY |

Opioid addiction has spiraled out of control in the past decade, and Utah has had the misfortune of being one of the most impacted states in the nation. On the frontlines of the road to recovery is Odyssey House, which is the state’s largest health provider for those struggling with substance abuse. As marketing director for the nonprofit, Kali Mower works with the organization’s different programs. “We have the full continuum down,” she says. “Day treatment, intensive outpatient, general outpatient and individual therapy. People can access those services wherever they fit, and can move up or down depending on how they’re doing.” The facility also has around 95 licensed mental health therapists on staff to round out services. In its 47-year history, Odyssey House has evolved to combat whichever drug trend happens to be plaguing society. “About 10 years ago, meth was the primary drug choice,” Mower says. “Recently, our population has shifted to where prescription pills are the main drug of choice, and the age of users has shifted about 10 years.” As the patients who seek out Odyssey House get younger, it becomes more difficult to integrate them into society once they get sober. “When they are 34, they held a job or had a family, but now these guys have nothing,” Mower says. “No work experience, dropped out of school, and a lot of homelessness and criminal activity.” With the recent announcement that the federal government has approved Utah’s Medicaid waiver, Odyssey House has received a much-needed influx of funds that has kicked off plans to double its current number of residential drug treatment beds. To get involved, Odyssey House offers training programs for volunteers, and it’s currently accepting donations of basic supplies like winter clothing and shoes. “We provide Christmas for all of the people in our care, and at any given time, there are about 500 people here,” Mower says. odysseyhouse.org


Utah Youth Village

CHARITY HOTTON

Before she became Utah Youth Village’s director of therapeutic foster care, Charity Hotton spent her formative years fascinated with helping people figure out how to become better parents. Upon landing this position at Utah Youth Village, Hotton realized that she had achieved her dream. “That’s literally what I get to do,” she says. “I get to make kids’ lives better every day by helping people be amazing parents.” The village functions as one of Utah’s most expansive charities for foster parenting and family services. “We do everything from parenting to intensive, inhome services for families to foster care or group homes, and we also have a private girls’ campus out in Tooele County,” Hotton says. One of the organization’s main goals is to provide foster families. “We’re also a licensed child-placing agency,” Hotton explains. “The process consists of a home study, a two-week training and a background check.” Fostering children is always challenging, but Youth Village works as a continuing resource for those who are dedicating themselves to being a foster parent. The organization is always looking for volunteers who can provide home-maintenance services or tutor current foster families. “Foster families make huge sacrifices, and sometimes kids knock holes in walls or ruin faucets, so people who have handyman skills are really helpful to our foster parents,” Hotton says. For those who aren’t ready for the huge commitment, financial donations are a big help to Youth Village. “We generally get about 50 referrals for youth each month, and we can only serve between 11 and 14 of them,” Hotton says. “Our biggest needs are monetary.” youthvillage.org

COURTESY COMUNIDADES UNIDAS

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Comunidades Unidas

PHOTO COLLECTIVE STUDIOS

Because bikes are fun to work on and ride, Utah Bicycle Collective has built strong inroads to the world of environmental conservation, community outreach and youth mentorship. At its core, the organization exists to keep bicycles recirculating within the community. All of their locations accept bike donations and are great places to buy new wheels. “Getting as many people riding bikes as possible is good for the community,” Executive Director Clint Watson says. “Bikes are awesome forms of transportation, and riding bikes is the cornerstone of a cleaner, healthier society.” At this point, the collective has grown to five locations from St. George to Ogden. “Each of our locations runs things a little differently depending on their community needs,” Watson continues. Recently, the Provo chapter held a bike prom, which is essentially an excuse to put on some cummerbunds and corsages and enjoy a brisk bike ride through downtown. It’s a rare sight to behold hundreds of people zipping through town in tuxes and ball gowns, that’s for sure. In addition to holding volunteer shop hours where people can come help refurbish donated bikes for resale, the collective’s SLC chapter has dedicated certain nights a week as WTF (women, trans and femme) nights. “They’re designed to be a safe space for those who may be intimidated working in a shop or industry that has been historically dominated by men,” Watson says. The organization’s work with young people is also impressive. From opportunities for children to pick up their first bike at one of the collective’s giveaways to offering a certification course aimed at teens who want to work at a bike shop, UBC can keep kids of all ages active and enthusiastic about bikes. bicyclecollective.org

PHOTO COLLECTIVE STUDIOS

Utah Bicycle Collective

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

Utah is lucky enough to have cultivated a vibrant immigrant community, but the difficulty that some face when they come to America is staggering. Not only are they trying to secure work, navigate the insurance system and figure out their own health care, but they might be doing it while learning a new language. Veronica Zavala, community management coordinator at Comunidades Unidas, found herself in a similar situation when she immigrated from Mexico in 2010. “Many residents who are born here don’t know how to understand the system,” she says. “Immigrants are so lost when they come here, so Comunidades Unidas is like a bridge between the system and the community.” Comunidades Unidas’ goal is to become a resource library for those new to the country and to the state. “This organization works with Hispanic Latino communities to help them understand health care and civic engagement,” Zavala says. “If we can’t help someone who comes to us, we’ll help them get in touch with other organizations; we try to provide as many services as possible.” Many individuals come to the U.S. in order to escape oppressive governments, and one of the group’s priorities is to help these immigrants build a positive relationship with local and national governments. “We’re trying to help people realize that many organizations that help immigrants are organized by the government,” Zavala says. “In return, we know that we’re part of a society and we will contribute to that society.” Comunidades Unidas offers several programs for anyone who wants to get involved—from volunteer opportunities to internships. Those who are especially familiar with disciplines like accounting, law, medicine and education can be particularly helpful as resources. “It’s hard work that we are doing in our community,” Zavala says. “At this point, the view on immigration is very negative, but we are doing the best that we can and we are trying to give back to our communities.” cuutah.org


T

hough Utah is home to many great organizations, they wouldn’t be what they are without some truly heroic people who keep the lights on. Earlier this month, two such people, Angie Gamarra and Peeches Cederholm, were recognized by their peers and nominated as honorees for Utah Philanthropy Day. Both women embody the volunteer spirit that maintains our nonprofits and charities— and spending a few moments with them was nothing short of inspirational.

COURTNEY GLEESON

Angie Gamarra, Amigos Mentores

Arrive Utah

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 17

JENNIE DOPP

JENNIE DOPP

JENNIE DOPP

JENNIE DOPP JENNIE DOPP

Parents of children with disabilities are a special breed of amazing, but that doesn’t mean they don’t need a whole lot of help. Such was the situation with Jennie Dopp, who now works as Utah Parent Center’s development coordinator. Her son, who is now 17, was born with a rare chromosomal duplication syndrome called 7q11.23. “At the time he was diagnosed, there were not a lot of resources that fit our needs,” she recalls. “I was at therapy with my son and saw a flyer for some summer activities that were adapted for kids with special needs, and it was Utah Parent Center that was advertising those activities.” This began the long and fruitful relationship that she now has with the organization. The center’s goal is to provide training, resources and activities—such as the Halloween Carnival in Eagle Mountain— for families whose members have disabilities. Their training programs encompass topics like guardianship and managing behavioral issues and how to build an individualized education plan (IEP) within the public school system. The organization also offers transitional assistance when teens with disabilities graduate from high school. “It’s a scary situation for families when their kids are aging out of the school system,” Dopp says. “So we teach parents exactly what’s next, like how to access vocational rehab or employment programs.” Depending on the time of year, the center’s needs tend to fluctuate, though financial assistance is always appreciated. “Because we are a statewide organization, financial contributions can help extend our services throughout the state,” Dopp says. As they continue to grow, Dopp wishes Utah parents will see the center as a source of light. “Parents of children with disabilities know that the services we provide don’t change a diagnosis for an individual, but we can bring families hope,” Dopp says. It’s a hope she’s experienced first hand while raising her son. “They couldn’t change my son’s diagnosis, but they gave me the tools I needed,” she concludes. utahparentcenter.org

They say that once you’re a Girl Scout, you’re always a Girl Scout. That sentiment rings true for Peeches Cederholm, a board member with Utah’s chapter of the Girl Scouts of America. She first joined the organization when she was 9. Her time as a Girl Scout instilled a love of service and charity work that she still maintains today. “You get more than you ever give,” she says. “Especially in today’s climate. Volunteering is a unifier, and it crosses all borders.” It’s also something that has come to define her as a person. She and her late husband moved to Utah, and finding volunteer work locally was a way for them to expand their social circle while giving back to the community. “Those people ended up being our lifelong friends, and from there it was easy to just always be involved,” Cederholm reminisces. Cederholm says she has seen all aspects of her life get a positive jolt through her volunteering. “In the last three or four years, volunteering has become a way for me to cross the digital divide and think more outside the box.” Cederholm also exemplifies the type of volunteer who can empower others with her impressive efforts. “I think everybody knows that you feel good for doing it,” she says. “What makes you keep going back is the people you meet. It’s actually very selfish!” CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Utah Parent Center

Peeches Cederholm, Girl Scouts of America & Junior Achievement

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

On the socioeconomic spectrum, there is a surprisingly large number of families and individuals who are hanging on by a thread. These are people who are not homeless, but who are used to skipping their own meals in order to feed their children, or who are using candles to light their homes because they can’t afford to pay their power bills. It’s a group that can become easily overlooked, which is why Arrive Utah was organized. Not only does Arrive focus on providing for families in need, but through its use of the Circles Initiative, the organization helps families teach themselves how to solve their particular set of problems. “We work with families that are lowincome or just really struggling financially,” Director Jen Nibley says. “We bring community members and family members together and let them tell us how they want to move forward. We wrap a circle of support around them to help make that possible.” This circle of support coaches low-income families across rough patches. It’s an approach that only works with the help of committed volunteers. Sign up to volunteer or donate via the Arrive Utah website. arriveutah.org

Angie Gamarra is only 17, but she’s already set a pace for a bright future. After her family immigrated to Utah from Peru in 2004, she tried to take an interest in extra-curricular programs. But a short-sighted elementary teacher wouldn’t let her join a recess-monitoring program because of her heritage, so she didn’t get involved with the community until middle school. “I became very reserved, but my family is very academic, and that was a path for me to take to not become so absorbed by what had happened,” she says. When representatives of Amigos Mentores—an academic mentorship program focused on Latin American students— visited her school, Gamarra saw something special. “I became absorbed by service and started loving it,” she says. “I was able to grow academically and individually, and I think that targeted programs like this do have an effect.” Gamarra graduated high school early, and continued to work with Amigos while enrolled at Salt Lake Community College, where she was recognized by Professor Gordon Storrs, who had been an academic mentor with the program. “It’s not very often that you run across people who can accomplish so much in a small amount of time,” Storrs says. “This young woman is one of the most interesting, aware and bright young people I’ve ever had the chance to meet.” Gamarra’s work with Amigos Mentores is something that she’s already started to duplicate at the University of Utah, where she has been admitted to the Nursing Early Assurance Program. “The work will never be done, and it’s really nice to continue what I did here at SLCC,” she says. “I used to be a shy, introverted kid who hid behind her mom’s back, but Amigos Mentores has really prepared me in my academic endeavors.” Did I mention she’s only 17?


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

18 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

Elf: The Musical The 2003 comedy Elf introduced us all to Buddy, a human orphan who crawled into Santa’s bag as a baby and was mistakenly brought back to the North Pole, where he was raised to believe he was a (slightly taller than normal) elf, before returning to the outside world to find his family. It was a box-office hit, earning $173 million largely on the basis of Will Ferrell’s appeal as the enthusiastically naïve Buddy, and his interactions with James Caan as his irascible biological dad, Walter Hobbs. But was there anything—aside from Zooey Deschanel crooning “Baby, It’s Cold Outside”— that suggested this high-concept star vehicle was the stuff of a Broadway musical, which could be successful even without its star? Yet, here we are: A musical version of Elf premiered in 2010, with songs by Matthew Sklar and Chad Beguelin (The Wedding Singer), and mostly following the arc of its cinematic source material. There are a few noteworthy changes—Papa Elf isn’t our narrator, and Walter has been softened as a character from the movie’s neglectful meanie—but the bones of the story are there. And it all works, even without Ferrell’s distinctive charms. Sam Hartley stars as Buddy in this touring production, and he’ll get to bring audiences into tunes like “World’s Greatest Dad.” Meanwhile, you’ve got the chance to see a cadre of fake Santas in a grand production number, all on the way to a lesson about appreciating the true meaning of Christmas. (Scott Renshaw) Elf: The Musical @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, Nov. 24, 8 p.m.; Nov. 25, 3 & 8 p.m.; Nov. 26, 1 & 6:30 p.m., $30-$90, artsaltlake.org

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

SATURDAY 11/25

SATURDAY 11/25

Great things can be born of not-so-great material. That already happened once with Robert James Waller’s best-selling 1992 romance The Bridges of Madison County, as the book’s drippy melodrama gave rise to a wonderfully restrained 1995 feature film. Then, in 2014, it inspired a Broadway musical adaptation, which won a Tony Award for the songs by Jason Robert Brown (The Last Five Years). “The complexity of the music is above anything that we have tackled at Utah Rep yet,” says Johnny Hebda, co-director of Utah Repertory Theater’s production. “It has a classical base to it, but set to a very contemporary score—a very unique musical theater score that I don’t think audiences will have experienced very often.” The story remains fundamentally the same in exploring the relationship between Francesca Johnson, an Italian-born war bride in 1960s Iowa, and Robert Kincaid, the National Geographic photographer who comes to town to chronicle the local covered bridges. Unlike some of the story’s previous incarnations, however, this version expands the focus beyond just the romance between Francesca and Robert. “The Broadway version kind of expanded a few of the supporting characters,” Hebda says, creating some additional conflict. It brings a number of different perspectives to the show. I think the stage adaptation did a good job of creating the sense of how close-knit a community this is. One of the central themes is family, and making sacrifices for your family above your passions.” (SR) Utah Repertory Theater: The Bridges of Madison County @ Eccles Theater Regent Street Black Box, 131 S. Main, Nov. 25-Dec. 10, dates and times vary, $20, artsaltlake.com

In these divisive times, when it seems like so many people disagree about so many things, it’s important to focus on what we have in common. How about this: People love to sing. They love it even better when they can do it in a group large enough that it doesn’t matter how you sound; you just need to add to the volume level. The community comes together once again on Thanksgiving weekend for the Utah holiday season tradition of the Messiah Sing-In at Abravanel Hall. On Saturday and Sunday nights, anyone can show up with a score for Handel’s Messiah—the official edition for these performances will be by Bärenreiter—or even just have a free edition downloaded on their smartphone or tablet, and join with more than 1,000 like-minded singers to get into the spirit of Christmas. Participants raise their voices accompanied by the Utah Symphony, under the baton of conductor Conner Gray Covington, as well as the Messiah Chorus, singing melodies that have captivated audiences and singers alike since premiering 275 years ago in 1742. Between the choruses, everyone can sit back and enjoy solos by the professionals, including soprano Abigail Rethwisch, mezzo-soprano Melanie Ashkar, tenor Christopher Oglesby and bassbaritone Jesús Vicente Murillo. Does a group of people coming together to do something they enjoy solve all of the problems we face these days? Of course not. Is it a place to start? Yes. And hallelujah for that. (Geoff Griffin) Utah Symphony: Messiah Sing-In @ Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-355-2787, Nov. 25-26, 7:30 p.m., $14$39, utahsymphony.org

Utah Repertory Theater: The Bridges of Madison County

Utah Symphony: Messiah Sing-In

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

BLAKE YELAVICH

JEREMY DANIEL

FRIDAY 11/24

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, NOV. 23-29, 2017

COURTESY UTAH SYMPHONY

ESSENTIALS

the

WEDNESDAY 11/29 Christkindlmarkt SLC

When it comes to classic holiday experiences, one of the most famous is the German Christmas market. The combination of small outdoor shops gathered together in one area, lots of good food, music and the feel of being in Old Europe is so sought after that travel, tour and cruise companies build entire itineraries around them for people traveling to Germany in December. Thanks to Utah native Allyson Chard and Christkindlmarkt SLC, you don’t have to cross the Atlantic Ocean—just Sunnyside Avenue—to get a taste of the original at This Is the Place Heritage Park. It’s an event based on giving— inspired by the German tale of St. Martin’s kindness to a homeless stranger—and encourages families and other groups to participate in a service project. The market features local vendors, including makers of traditional Christmas crafts and ornaments as well as purveyors of German food. In addition to the market stalls, check out the activities for children, such as a treasure hunt, a “Gnome Fest” and, of course, a chance to visit St. Nicholas. Enjoy live music, a cuckoo clock with live dancers emerging to mark the time and a live Nativity featuring Roman soldiers, wise men, angels and even camels. Thursday night is highlighted by the St. Martin’s Lantern Parade celebrating those who have participated in a service project. Friday and Saturday’s St. Nicholas-themed parades praise the spirit of generosity. Feel free to join in and march while singing carols. (GG) Christkindlmarkt SLC @ This Is the Place Heritage Park, 2601 E. Sunnyside Ave., 801582-1847, Nov. 29-Dec. 2, 11 a.m.- 8 p.m., free, christkindlmarkt-slc.com


A&E

The Bulb and HOLIDAYS the Beautiful Holiday light experiences are all about creating Christmas memories. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

water, but we were overwhelmed by the response.” The zoo’s light display includes both stationary lights and animated features like animals, plus additional family-friendly attractions like a fire pit for making s’mores. Hansen says it’s important for the event to remain affordable, as part of the zoo’s “gift back to the community,” and notes that an event of this kind becomes part of memorable moments shared by families. “I really think that, in this market, it’s about time with family, creating Christmas traditions and memories,” Hansen says. “We all grew up going to see lights, and you want to share that with your kids.” That generation-to-generation connection is certainly one Holdman recognizes as well. “We hope to become a tradition for people,” he says. “That’s what it’s all about, is making memories. The reason why we have traditions is you experience all these good times, and when you re-experience it, it brings back all those memories from previous years.” CW

STORE

★★★★★

CHRISTMAS IN COLOR

Provo Towne Center 1200 Towne Center Blvd., Provo; Salt Lake County Equestrian Park 2100 W. 11400 South, South Jordan Nov. 24-Dec. 30 Monday-Thursday, 5:30-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 5:30 -11 p.m. $25-$30 christmasincolor.net

| CITY WEEKLY |

ZOOLIGHTS

Hogle Zoo 2600 Sunnyside Ave. Dec. 1-31 Sunday-Wednesday, 5:30-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 5:30-10 p.m. $5.95-$8.95 hoglezoo.org

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST

DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 19

COURTESY HOGLE ZOO

The Christmas in Color drive-thru

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

whose own professional background at the time was in IT. “What I loved about animating lights was I loved art and I loved technology, and this was a way to combine them.” Inquiries about his work after his videos hit the internet have since turned his hobby into a full-time job, including creating displays in Moscow, South Korea and South America. Now in its third year, Christmas in Color has two Utah locations—Provo and South Jordan—for visitors to tour through acres of lights, all accompanied by holiday music played on the car’s radio. “Everybody’s seen Christmas lights throughout their life,” Holdman says. “What really impresses people is a lot of Christmas lights. And when you bring an element of animation into it, they’re doing something people have never seen.” Yet Holdman also recognizes that reminding people of what they have seen is a big part of the experience, which is why he doesn’t change the display much from year to year. “One thing I found out is, people like traditions,” he says. “Christmas is a very traditional thing. I’d do new music, and people would say, ‘Oh, I really liked the music last year.’” The appeal of tradition is also clear to Erica Hansen, community outreach coordinator for Hogle Zoo. Now in its 11th year, the zoo’s annual holiday ZooLights have already become something of a tradition—although Hansen notes that part of ZooLights’ origin was the inaccessibility of another local tradition. “City Creek was under construction,” Hansen says, “so a lot of downtown holiday stuff was a little harder to get to. Attendance for us is a pretty hard and fast bell curve [focused on the summer months], so we try to get people to come other times of the year. It was time to dip our toe in the

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Hogle Zoo’s ZooLights

ANIMATED COLOR

W

ith the more-or-less-official arrival of the Christmas season after Thanksgiving, locations around the state turn into colorful, twinkling displays of lights. While Temple Square’s decorations are one of the most popular holiday destinations—a tradition dating back more than 50 years—Utah becomes home to dozens of places hoping to attract visitors with illumination. But what draws folks, as though they were moths, to these beaming displays? For Richard Holdman—creator of the Christmas in Color drive-thru light experience—the simple answer comes down to family. A Utah Valley native, Holdman recalls getting in the car and driving to see the Temple Square lights when he was a kid. But he also credits his father’s interest in home Christmas decoration with sparking his own ongoing fascination with holiday lights. “My father was always big into Christmas,” Holdman says, “[and] would do an elaborate train set. And he really loved Christmas lights. We came from a big family, and we always helped. I hated putting them up, but when they were up, they were awesome.” It wasn’t always obvious, though, that this interest would carry over into adulthood. Holdman recalls that, when he had only been recently married, his wife suggested putting up lights. “I thought, ‘Uh, I don’t know,’” he says. “When I get into doing something, I always go overboard. Either I’m going to do no lights, or a lot of lights.” The “lot of lights” concept only got bigger for Holman in 2005, when he saw a video of someone who had created an elaborate animated home Christmas lights display set to music. For much of the next year, he prepared for his own home arrangement, creating a showpiece set to “Amazing Grace” that became a viral YouTube sensation. “I come from a family of artists,” says Holdman,


moreESSENTIALS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Main, Park City, through Nov. 25, 8 p.m., parkcityshows.com The Little Prince The Art Factory, 211 W. 2100 South, Nov. 24-Dec. 23, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., sackerson.org The Nutshell and Other Poems Rose Wagner Center 138 W. 300 South, Nov. 25, 3 & 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org Star Ward Christmas Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Dec. 23, 7:30p.m., theobt.org The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Nov. 25, 11-12 p.m., kingsenglish.com White Rabbit Red Rabbit Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, through Dec. 2, times and dates vary, tickets.utah.edu

DANCE

Ballet West: The Nutcracker Val A. Browning Center, 3848 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, Nov. 24-25, 7 p.m., balletwest.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Messiah Sing-In Abravanel Hall 123 W. South Temple, Nov. 25-26, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Small Business Saturday: Gabriel Tallent and Jennifer Adams The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Nov. 25, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., kingsenglish.com

20 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Rio Grande Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 21, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Christkindlmarkt SLC This Is the Place Heritage Park, 2601 Sunnyside Ave., 801-582-1847, Nov. 29-Dec. 2, 11 a.m.-8 p.m., christkindlmarkt-slc.com (see p. 18)

SEASONAL EVENTS

The LDS Church History Museum (45 N. West Temple, history.lds.org) presents an exhibition of work by Mormon artist Joseph Paul Vorst featuring paintings, drawings, watercolors and lithographs in Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective (“Drought” is pictured), through April 15, 2018.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Aida Hale Center Theater, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Jan. 20, times vary, hit.org The Bridges of Madison County Eccles Theater Regent Street Black Box, 131 S. Main, Nov. 25-Dec. 10, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) A Bundle of Trouble Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Nov. 30, days and times vary, hct.org A Christmas Carol Heritage Theatre, 2505 S.

Highway 89, Perry, 435-723-8392, Nov 24-Dec 15, 2, 7:30p.m., heritagetheatreutah.com A Christmas Carol Center Point Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, Nov. 24-Dec. 23, times vary, centerpointtheatre.org A Christmas Carol Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, Nov. 25-Dec. 23, dates and times vary, haletheater.org Christmas Vacation: The Polarized Express Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Dec. 30, desertstar.biz Elf: The Musical Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Nov. 24-26, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Guys and Dolls Egyptian Theatre Co., 328

Christmas in Color Provo Towne Center, 1200 Towne Center Blvd., Provo, Nov. 24-Dec. 30, Monday-Thursday, 5:30 p.m.-10 p.m.; FridaySaturday, 5:30 p.m.-11 p.m., christmasincolor.net (see p. 19) Christmas in Color Salt Lake Equestrian Park, 2100 W. 11400 South, South Jordan, Nov. 24-Dec. 30, Monday-Thursday, 5:30 p.m.10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 5:30 p.m.-11 p.m., christmasincolor.net (see p. 19) Christmas in the Wizarding World The Shops at South Town, 10450 S. State, Sandy, through Jan. 31, shopsatsouthtown.com Holiday Electric Light Parade Washington Blvd., Ogden, Nov. 25, 5:30 p.m., ogdencity.com Lights On! Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Nov. 29, 4 p.m., thegallivancenter.com Luminaria: Experience the Light Thanksgiving Point, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, through Dec. 30, thanksgivingpoint.org Tree Lighting Ceremony Park City Mountain Resort, 1310 Lowell Ave., Park City, Nov. 25, 4:30-6:30 p.m., parkcitymountain.com

ZooLights Hogle Zoo, 2600 Sunnyside Ave., Dec. 1-31, hoglezoo.org (see p. 19)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

14th Annual Glass Art Show Red Butte Garden 300 Wakara Way, through Dec. 17, redbuttegarden.org Annual Statewide Juried Exhibition Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Jan. 12, heritage.utah.gov Artist/Dad Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Jan. 12, heritage.utah.gov Cities of Conviction UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 6, utahmoca.org Cookie Allred: The Color of Places Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Dec. 20, slcpl.org David N. LeCheminant: Morning Walk Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 5, slcpl.org Drew Grella: I Would Rather Wear a Cape Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 5, slcpl.org Holiday Group Exhibit Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, through Dec. 15, accessart.org Holiday Group Show David Ericson Fine Art, 418 S. 200 West, through Dec. 15, davidericson-fineart.com Ilse Bing Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 31, umfa.utah.edu Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 9, utahmoca.org Jerry Hardesty: Doublespeak Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Dec. 29, slcpl.org Jimmi Toro: Kindle a Light Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Nov. 26, kimballartcenter.org Joseph Paul Vorst: A Retrospective LDS Church History Museum, 45 N. West Temple, through April 15, history.lds.org (see left) Karen Horne: Ballet To Tango Exploring the Art of Dance Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, 801-533-4200, through Dec. 23, hornefineart.com Kristina Lenzi: Alien Matters Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Jan. 5., slcpl.org Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Lesly Abalos-Ambriz: 24: Is This Lesly? Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-5948623, through Dec. 27, slcpl.org Sarah Malakoff: Second Nature Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through Jan. 26, granaryartcenter.org Seeing the Sacred Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through Dec. 3, urbanartsgallery.org Virginia Johnson: Meditations on Ennui Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 E., 801-594-8611, Nov. 29-Jan. 11, slcpl.org Winter Group Show Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, through Jan. 12, phillips-gallery.com Winter Scenes and Holiday Dreams Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Dec. 30, culturalcelebration.org


The Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake Presents:

The 28th Annual Native American Holiday Arts Market December 2 & 3, 2017 Saturday: 10:00 am to 6:00 pm Sunday: 10:00 am to 5:00 pm

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Vendors will be offering both traditional and contemporary Native American goods including jewelry, pottery, paintings and more.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 21


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

DINE Harvest Huddle

Deer Valley chefs create memories at Montage. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

TRINA HARRIS

A

t Montage Deer Valley’s Apex restaurant, a gaggle of talented chefs from Deer Valley eateries and beyond huddled recently to create their annual Harvest Dinner. While the meal was spectacular, I don’t normally write about such events—since, you know, it already happened, and you missed it. However, you can enjoy these great chefs’ cooking at their individual restaurants, and this feast was a peek into what you might expect. One thing I can guarantee: Plan to be dazzled. The evening began with a cocktail reception and hors d’oeuvres, where guests met and mingled with chefs and the purveyors of artisan food, such as Gold Creek Farms, The Honey Jar and Strong Vertical Gardens. Montage Deer Valley Executive Chef Shawn Armstrong led off with his creative beet-root deviled egg—a hollowedout, fuchsia-colored egg white stuffed with speck and pickled mustard seeds. This wasn’t your momma’s deviled egg. Armstrong’s innovative handling of something as traditional as a deviled egg makes me want to try the scallop BLT on the regular Apex menu. Stein Eriksen Lodge Chef Zane Holmquist took the reins for the next course, an autumnal dish of roasted fall carrots with garam masala glaze, atop faro “grits” with Gold Creek Farms cheddar. The Indian flavor slant, via the garam masala glaze, made me see and taste carrots in a whole new light, providing a truly delicious interpretation of the humble root vegetable. Served on a stone plate—I wouldn’t want to be a server that night!—Ryker Brown’s Utah rainbow trout was sensational. Brown is executive chef at Promontory Ranch Club, and a chef I’ve been keeping an eye on for some time. His talents appear to be limitless, and the fall flavors of his seared trout with pork belly, braised cabbage, apples, mustard and mussels are testament to his creativity. I’m not sure I’d want to leave that diverse collection of ingredients in anyone else’s hands. To sample Chef Brown’s cooking yourself, I suggest visiting The Peak restaurant at Promontory for his blackened ahi tuna with buckwheat pasta, pea tendrils and pineapple-soy ponzu sauce. Not to be outdone, Rachel Wiener, executive sous and chef de cuisine at St. Regis Deer Valley, wowed the crowd with her Niman lamb rack—beautiful, mediumrare racks with leeks, trumpet royal

Chef Zane Holmquist’s roasted carrots . mushrooms and white asparagus. Weiner is a versatile chef whose J&G Grill menu at the St. Regis ranges from Sichuan peppercrusted yellowfin tuna and pan-roasted Arctic char Grenobloise, to shiitake-shio ramen with roasted pork pancetta, softcooked egg, pea shoots and togarashi. Throughout the evening, excellent wines were paired with each course, and the service was about as good as it gets. The professionalism of the Apex restaurant staff is nothing short of world-class. Montage Executive Pastry Chef Stephen Jones closed the evening with a stunning, scrumptious dessert composed of dried flowers from summer persimmons with honey and white-tea ice cream—a very inventive dessert, indeed. To ensure that you don’t miss the Montage’s next culinary extravaganza, I recommend contacting the folks there to be put on a list to receive info about upcoming special dinners and events. In the meantime, you can enjoy the extraordinary cooking of these fine chefs at Apex, Stein Erikson, Promontory and St. Regis. CW

MONTAGE DEER VALLEY

9100 Marsac Ave., Park City 435-604-1300 montagehotels.com/deervalley PROMONTORY

8758 N. Promontory Ranch Road, Park City 435-333-4600 promontoryclub.com ST. REGIS DEER VALLEY

2300 Deer Valley Drive East, Park City 435-940-5700 stregisdeervalley.com STEIN ERIKSEN LODGE

7700 Stein Way, Park City 435-649-3700 steinlodge.com


208 EAST 500 SOUTH (801) 428 2704 TACOTACOSLC.COM

Buy one entree

get one free! equal or lesser value w/ this ad expires 12.17.17

coffee, crepes & a mic

54 w. 1700 s. M-F 7:30am-3pm Sat/Sun 7:30am-4pm

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

sustain yourself!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

3231 S. 9 0 0 E. 8 0 1 - 466-327 3 7am-1am / 7 Days A Week OPEN MIC EVERY SUN @ 7:30 - 10:30 p.m.

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 23

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

| CITY WEEKLY |

Contemporary Japanese Dining


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

24 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW @scottrenshaw

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

DEREK CARLISLE

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

Award Winning Donuts

Nouveau Current

While wine-lovers every year anticipate the November arrival of the Nouveau Beaujolais vintage from France, Current Fish & Oyster (279 E. 300 South, 801326-3474, currentfishandoyster.com) looks to our own shores. On Wednesday, Nov. 29 at 6 p.m., Current hosts a New World Nouveau Bash, showcasing vintages from American wineries including Scribe, Broc Cellars, Martha Stoumen and Fausse Piste. Chef Alan Brines is creating special bites to pair with wine at various stations, in a casual evening of food and drink. Cost is $70 per person, and reservations are required.

Brunch With Santa

As you’re considering the different ways to take little ones to visit Santa Claus—or maybe you have a few things you’d like to ask the big guy for yourself—you might want to combine that holiday encounter with some tasty grub. Sheraton Salt Lake City (150 W. 200 South) presents its third annual Brunch With Santa buffet on three successive Saturdays— Dec. 2, Dec. 9 and Dec. 16—from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Brunch offerings include seafood and carving stations, plus a special children’s buffet area where kids can decorate sugar cookies. Then get a complimentary photo with Santa. Attendees are also encouraged to bring non-perishable, kid-friendly food as part of the event’s partnership with the nonprofit For the Kids, which provides food to elementary-age school children at risk of food insecurity. For more information, visit sheratonsaltlakecity.com.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS THE

On our website FIVEALLS.COM OR CALL USA AT

801.582.1400 HOLIDAY HOURS STARTING DEC. 1ST (CLOSED THANKSGIVING)

RESTAURANT

Thu: 6-9:30pm | Fri/Sat: 5:30-9:30 1458 South Foothill Drive

Give Dough, Get Dough

Lehi’s Rain Agency (3333 N. Digital Drive) hosts the second annual Churros for Change fundraiser, featuring live music—including former American Idol contestant Jenn Blosil—and all-youcan eat filled churros from San Diablo Artisan Churros. Learn about charitable organizations including Charity Vision, Because He First Loved Us and Startup Santa, and get in the spirit of holiday giving. Get tickets at bit.ly/2ANlzLc. Quote of the Week: “Christmas cookies can’t help but be retro. They are memory first, sugar-flour-egg-redhot-gumdropsparkle reality second.” —Dana Goodyear

Send tips to: comments@cityweekly.net

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181


Why not make beer part of your holiday feast? BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

Red Rock Secale: This is a Bockbier at its base, but has the addition of rye malt and is aged in High West Rye Whiskey barrels. Secale pours a dark ruby color with a moderate two fingers of off-white head. The nose has a dry, roasted-malt aroma along with a light rye spiciness, rounded out with a mild caramel malt and vanilla aroma. The taste starts with caramel malts and toffee. Chocolate-covered raisins come next, with a dry rye piquant. Hints of vanilla and whiskey follow through to the end, as well as a subdued hop bitterness that balances

the malty sweetness in the finish. The body is full, and the whiskey notes become a bit more pronounced as it warms. Bottom line: This seasonal favorite’s intense blend of toffee, pine, spicy rye and whiskey sweetness is wonderful with crispy caramelized turkey skin, and it pushes pecan pie into orgasmic territory. These are just suggestions. I invite you to experiment at your table. Just keep away from similar tastes, concentrate on complementary flavors, and you’ll be fine. As always, cheers! CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

f you’re like me, some foods tend to frequent your Thanksgiving dinner plate more than others. It’s easy to pick out a single beer to cover an entire meal, but it can be a bit more challenging to pair one only to the favorite morsels you hold so dear. Here are some of my fondest pairings (with great locally made beers, of course) that will enhance nearly everything in your traditional Turkey Day meal. Uinta Rise and Pine: This ale has a nice black body with two fingers of mocha-tan foam. The aromatics are somewhat tame— pine-like hops and oils pool atop dark chocolate and roasted barley. The strengths of this beer become evident, even though it lacks aromatic power. Upon first sip, resinous and oily hops lead the way with pine, adding a dank freshness with subtle earthy tones. The base of the beer is more conspicuous after your tongue recovers from the hop lashing,

BEER NERD

MIKE RIEDEL

Turkey Day Pairings

with rich roasted grains providing notes of juniper berry, raisin, dark chocolate, coffee and charred barley. Malt sweetness emerges next with caramel, toasted nuts and Nutella. At the end, the hops put the brakes on the sweetness, providing balance. Overall: It’s both hoppy and malty in appropriate amounts. I loved how Rise and Pine complements the earthier flavors on a Thanksgiving plate, particularly adding depth to sautéed mushrooms, spinach and my personal favorite: stuffing. Bohemian Dunkel: Pouring a deep yet clear copper-amber hue, it manages to stir up one finger of loose, soapy, light beige head. The nose is a tad underwhelming; it’s a blend of caramel sweetness, dark-fruitiness and some toasted-malt notes that suggest bread and biscuit. Thankfully, the flavor is less subdued. It begins malt-forward, which is not surprising for this style—lightly roasted, with notes of bready, biscuity malts, caramelized sugar and molasses. Hints of toasted nuts and dates are present, too, though less dominant than they were in the aroma. The finish is bittersweet, thanks to a healthy dose of grassy and somewhat earthy hops that help counteract the sweetness. The lively carbonation levels agitate the palate; the result is crisp and prickly. Overall: This lager is well-balanced, and quite easy-drinking. The toastier aspects of this German beer chase away any of the cloying features of your dinner. Sweet potatoes or yams, pie and cranberries are a bit tastier as this session beer reinvigorates your palate.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 25


150 South 400 East, SLC | 801-322-3733 www.freewheelerpizza.com

Alamexo’s guacamole

Alamexo Cantina

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

This new sister location to Matthew Lake’s Alamexo Mexican Kitchen offers the same top-notch cuisine, but in a more casual atmosphere. Food is served family-style—all dishes arriving simultaneously—rather than in the classic style of appetizer, salad, entrée, etc. If $11.95 seems steep for guacamole, know that you’re paying in part for performance: It’s created fresh at your tableside. By contrast, a trio of enchiladas seems like a steal at $15.95. It’s hard to choose between pork carnitas stuffed with wild mushrooms and Oaxaca cheese, or the barbecued short rib enchiladas with Poblano rajas. But if forced, I’d opt for the pollo con pipián verde enchiladas, served in a cast-iron skillet, stuffed with shredded chicken and smothered in an avocado-colored green chile and pumpkin seed salsa. Also consider the delectable flautas con papas y chorizo ($7.25)— two corn tortilla flautas stuffed with high-quality, lean housemade chorizo and potato, topped with a rich guajillo salsa, lettuce, crema and jalapeño. Finish off your meal with buñuelos—fritters drizzled with local honey—which will cement your already desperate longing to return ASAP. Reviewed Oct. 5. 1059 E. 900 South, SLC, 801-658-5859, alamexo.com/cantina

BREAKFAST and LUNCH

S ON U W FOLLO GRAM A T S IN

served

 Established 2004 

ALL DAY! KLY

WEE @SLC now serving breakfast

26 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

REVIEW BITES

ADAM FINKLE

Delivering Attitude for 40 years!

694 East Union Square, SANDY

801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm

brittonsrestaurant.com

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

MAR 25TH APR 1ST APR 8TH

timmy the teeth guy benson ojtj


FREE

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

SPRING ROLLS

MIN. $40 PURCHASE

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

MENTION THIS AD

Jersey Mike’s Subs

Since 1956, this New Jersey-based sandwich shop has been making gourmet wraps as well as hot and cold subs for its loyal customers. If you are looking for a hot and steamy type of sub, try their authentic Philly cheesesteak. As far as cold subs go, you can’t go wrong with Jersey Shore’s Favorite—provolone, ham and capocollo. Jersey Mike’s offers catering services as well. Multiple locations, jerseymikes.com

Lucky 13

New Golden Dragon

IT TAKES A

TO CURB YOUR HUNGER!

Ocean City

italianvillageslc.com

5370 S. 900 E. / 801.266.4182

M O N -T H U 11 a - 11 p / F R I - SAT 11a- 12a / S U N 3 p -10 p

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 27

NOT AGE VILL DED U L C IN

Pleiku, named after the capital of Gia Lai Province in central Vietnam, is located downtown on Main Street. The ambiance and décor are ultra-modern and chic, with molded plastic chairs and a wall-length banquet, mostly done in white and cream tones. As far as the Asian fare goes, there is a tasty tapa that made the trip from the owner’s previous restaurant, Pipa, to Pleiku: Shaken Steak Cubes—marinated and grilled crispy boneless sirloin beef served with veggie accompaniments like cucumber, greens, onions and cilantro. 264 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-359-4544

| CITY WEEKLY |

Pleiku

Ocean City is your one-stop shop for fresh seafood, Asian food products and authentic international ingredients. Everything in the market is natural and imported from far-off places. The seafood market imports spices that are necessary for Asian cooking but rarely found in SLC. They also carry a selection of imported teas and baked treats. 872 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-953-1916, freshseafoodmarketinsaltlakeut.com

20 W. 200 S. SLC

(801) 355-3891 • siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

village

Owned and operated by the renowned chef Xiao, New Golden Dragon—specializing in dim sum and Asian cuisine—has raised the bar for Chinese food in Utah. The kung pao shrimp is some of the best around, and the black pepper pork chop and chicken lo mein are out of this world. They also cater, and delivery is free on orders of $20 or more. 1716 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-487-9888, slcnewgoldendragon.com

Prost!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Ask any Salt Lake City native where the best burger in town is, and they’ll probably say Lucky 13 without batting an eye. Situated across the street from Smith’s Ballpark, the bar and grill is always bustling when the Salt Lake Bees are playing, and the open patio out front fills up quickly in the warmer months. Favorite burgers include the Bacon Stinky Cheeseburger dished up with melted Stella blue cheese, as well as the Ol’ Man Burger—a creation not for the faint of heart, as it’s loaded with roasted jalapeños. 135 W. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-487-4418, lucky13slc.com

9414 S Union Square, Sandy, UT (801) 999-4321 www.yingsthaisushi.com


FILM REVIEW

All the Rage Three Billboards dares to imagine a world in which anger isn’t righteous. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

28 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

S ON U W O FOLL TAGRAM INS

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

M

ildred Hayes (Frances McDormand) is a woman with a mission. Seven months removed from the horror of her teenage daughter, Angela, being raped and burned alive along an isolated stretch of highway near her home in Ebbing, Mo., Mildred is outraged that there has been no apparent progress in finding the perpetrator. So in an attempt to nudge local police Chief Willoughby (Woody Harrelson), she opts for the nuclear public relations option: She rents three adjacent billboards on that same stretch of highway and offers a provocative message. “RAPED WHILE DYING” “AND STILL NO ARRESTS” “HOW COME, CHIEF WILLOUGHBY?” Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri offers the set-up for a movie about a scrappy underdog’s righteous war against an uncaring system—except that’s not what the movie is about at all. Writer/ director Martin McDonagh has crafted a story built around the toxicity of anger. In a fundamental sense, it’s an idealized vision of what the world might look like if we could find an antidote for that toxin. That’s certainly not the impression you’re likely to get at the outset. McDonagh employs the same acidic dialogue that has sparked his plays and his previous features In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths as he introduces Mildred’s scorched-earth approach to getting justice for Angela. McDormand’s electrifying performance is all hard edges and caustic interactions, so deep in her own grief, that the fact that Chief Willoughby is facing a terminal cancer diagnosis does nothing to shake her determination to publicly shame him into action. When a local priest comes to visit Mildred and her son (Lucas Hedges) to encourage her to take the billboards down, she tears into him over the Catholic Church’s sexualabuse scandals, in the kind of speech that gets audiences whooping in agreement.

There’s just the small matter that McDonagh is implicating anyone in the audience who’s still fully on board with Mildred’s behavior. He provides plenty of context for Mildred’s rage over victims not getting justice—including her own history with an abusive ex-husband (John Hawkes)—as well as her guilt over the circumstances leading up to Angela’s death. What’s similarly clear is that, at least in this case, the Ebbing police haven’t actually done anything wrong. Willoughby has been investigating, and has simply run into dead ends. Mildred wants someone to blame. She needs someone to blame. Even if it’s a dying, well-intentioned, well-respected police chief. What McDonagh explores in Three Billboards is the impact of chain-reaction hate and rage on everyone in its path. He takes the riskiest approach in the creation of Officer Dixon (Sam Rockwell), a police officer who has already been implicated in the beating of a black suspect, and who lives with his openly racist mother (Sandy Martin). In 2017, it feels like an act of artistic suicide to suggest that there’s hope for redemption in those who abuse power, but McDonagh gives Dixon a messy and complicated arc—played with genuine complexity by Rockwell—that includes some brutal, seemingly unforgiveable behavior. But again, this is an idealized vision McDonagh is delivering—a sort of foul-mouthed, unsettling spin on Pay It Forward—and he’s as audacious as he can be in delivering it. Are we prepared to consider that the worst person we know

Frances McDormand in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

could be better if they just let go of their darkest emotions? McDonagh is a writer first and foremost—notwithstanding a few great visual moments like the bold design of those billboards—and there are times when his big ideas bump up against our expectations for real-world behavior. It might come off as too broad when a black supervisor is brought in to deal with the rogue elements in the Ebbing police force; the exchange of dialogue immediately preceding Angela’s never-depicted death could feel so on-thenose that the nose would be broken by the impact. But the mistake would be continuing to think of Three Billboards as a story that congratulates us for cheering along with acts motivated by fury, even when we think the circumstances warrant it. As darkly comic as McDonagh’s words might be, there’s a grace and optimism here that could leave a lump in your throat. It takes a lot of nerve in these times to suggest that anger is rarely righteous. CW

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

BBB.5 Frances McDormand Sam Rockwell Woody Harrelson Rated R

TRY THESE KLY

WEE @SLC

Fargo (1996) Frances McDormand William H. Macy R

Pay It Forward (2000) Kevin Spacey Haley Joel Osment PG-13

In Bruges (2008) Colin Farrell Brendan Gleeson R

Seven Psychopaths (2012) Colin Farrell Sam Rockwell R


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 29


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

30 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. COCO BBB It’s possible that there’s a specificity to this Pixar story that makes it harder for a white guy to connect with it emotionally—and maybe that’s just fine. In contemporary Mexico, young Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez) longs to be a musician like his idol, the late Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt), but family tradition prohibits music due to the sins of an ancestor. But on Día de los Muertos, Miguel gets a magical opportunity to visit the Land of the Dead, and unwrap his mysterious family history. A sluggish opening act built around a too-familiar “parents just don’t understand” premise gives way to lively sequences in the Land of the Dead, a colorful metropolis where Miguel finds a guide in down-on-his luck skeleton Hector (Gael García Bernal). But while the details—neon-bright creatures called alebrijes; the sugar-skull character design—elevate material that could have seemed derivative, there’s also a sense that the emotional climax is built around a primacy of family ties that’s distinctive to its cultural setting. There’s no question about the moment I’m supposed to be crying; perhaps those who actually cry grasp something that escapes me. Opens Nov. 22 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—Scott Renshaw LAST FLAG FLYING BBBB In December 2003, three former Vietnam War buddies reunite when the Marine son of one of them is killed in action in Iraq. “Doc” Shepherd (Steve Carell) just wants support as he goes to greet his son’s returning body, but a sudden disillusionment with the military causes him to change his plans: Instead of a burial at Arlington, Doc wants to bring his boy home to New Hampshire. The ensuing road trip—with Bryan Cranston’s devil-may-care bar owner and Laurence Fishburne’s man of the cloth—makes for a melancholy reunion, one that takes us on a journey that is funny and sad, bleak and inspiring. Director Richard Linklater’s

script (written with Darryl Ponicsan, upon whose novel this film is based) is full of poignant zingers about grief, duty and how one may “respect the troops” and still criticize America’s manipulation of patriotism. Mostly Linklater lets his exquisite cast do the heavy lifting, Carell and Fishburne are more subdued than we’ve seen;  Cranston is funnier, full of a bittersweet joie de vivre, as if he refuses to let the weight of their own experience in a senseless war hang heavy over them. Opens Nov. 22 at theaters valleywide. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS BBB “Invented” is a rather melodramatic overstatement, but this is nevertheless an affable and gentle holiday biopic, perfect for a matinee with visiting relatives. It covers the two months in 1843 in which Charles Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol, and the condition in which he wrote it: panic. As presented in Susan Coyne’s mostly historically faithful screenplay, the kind-hearted, charismatic Dickens (Dan Stevens) is struggling to work out the story for a novel that he desperately needs to be a success, since his last three were flops. He interacts with his imagined characters (including a fine Christopher Plummer as Scrooge), which is less precious than it could have been, though the movie does delight overmuch in showing Dickens stumbling across familiar-to-us details (e.g. a ghostly waiter named Marley). Stevens cuts loose as Dickens, a theatrical fellow who does funny voices for his adoring children, and finds depth in his flaws, notably his disdain for his embarrassing father (Jonathan Pryce). Without overselling it, director Bharat Nalluri underscores Dickens’ own Scroogelike need for redemption (albeit on a much smaller scale), and delivers a warm, hearty yuletide tale in the process. Opens Nov. 22 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—Eric D. Snider NOVITIATE BBB.5 You don’t often find movies that are as deeply respectful of religious tradition—and as understanding of the emotional upheaval caused by change—as writer/director Maggie Betts’ tale. Set in the early 1960s, it follows young Cathleen Harris (Margaret Qualley) as she follows her calling to become a nun, just as the Catholic Church is beginning the Vatican II period of reforms. Cathleen is an intriguing enough central character, as Betts explores the psychology of vocation and the challenges of living an

ascetic life devoted to nothing but God. The more fascinating story, however, surrounds the convent’s Reverend Mother (Melissa Leo), who balks at the proposed church reforms that threaten to shake the foundations of her world. While Leo maight be an actor prone to grandiose performances, she’s superb here as a unique variation on the cinematic drill sergeant trope—terrifying to her charges, and at times taking out on them fears that have nothing to do with them. Those two stories don’t always mesh neatly, and Betts perhaps packs too many subplots into her narrative. She nevertheless finds humanity in self-sacrificing devotion, and the emotional fallout of living in a changing world. Opens Nov. 24 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—SR THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI BBB.5 See review p. 28. Opens Nov. 22 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BATTLE OF THE SEXES At Park City Film Series, Nov. 24-25, 8 p.m.; Nov. 26, 6 p.m. (PG-13) THE ROAD FORWARD At Main Library, Nov. 28, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES JUSTICE LEAGUE BB.5 It feels like an attempt by the DC Cinematic Universe braintrust to learn lessons and actually make a better movie—even if they have to address every critical comment, and those responses don’t make any sense together. In the wake of Superman’s death, the villainous Steppenwolf (Ciarán Hinds) arrives to wreak havoc, forcing Batman (Ben Affleck) and Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot) to recruit Aquaman (Jason Momoa), Flash (Ezra Miller) and Cyborg (Ray Fisher) for assistance. Introducing those new characters requires a lot of shorthand, and only Miller’s enthusiastic Flash manages to make a real impression. And while the narrative tries to be less bleak and more fun, there’s just way too much stuff packed into two hours. Mostly, there’s a vibe that its failings are a result of trying too hard, rather than not trying hard enough. That’s something, anyway. (PG-13)—SR LADY BIRD BBB.5 Greta Gerwig’s debut feature as solo writer/director is an emotional feast—smart, funny and wise—about the audacity and horror of female adolescence. In 2002 Sacramento, Christine McPherson (Saoirse Ronan) endures her senior year in Catholic high school, hoping to attend college somewhere with culture, like New York, even if she’s not a very enthusiastic student. Everything here looks back at the painful process of growing up with affection and exasperation, as Ronan molds Christine into a wonderful mess

yearning to be true to herself and to sculpt her own identity— including giving herself the new name “Lady Bird”—though has no idea who she is yet. Her relationships—with friends, possible lovers and particularly her mercurial interactions with her mother (Laurie Metcalf)—provide a beautiful, bittersweet snapshot of the mysterious road to adulthood. (R)—MAJ

THE SQUARE BB Ruben Östlund’s Force Majeure employed social satire in which people genuinely wrestled with what their response to a difficult situation said about their character; his Palme d’Or-winning follow-up seems more interested in scoring cheap points at the expense of hypocritical sophisticates. Stockholm modern-art museum curator Christian (Claes Bang) prepares for the opening of new installation about social responsibility, while he himself deals with the aftermath of getting his pockets picked. Östlund crafts several terrific sequences, including a tense set piece in a hallway illuminated by the cascade effect of motion-sensor lights. Those pieces just don’t add up to a powerful statement, even as Christian realizes that his actions have unexpected ramifications. The broad swipes at art-world types fall flat, leaving an ambitious look at the disconnect between creative statements and real-world behavior that snickers at piles of gravel as art. (R)—SR

THE STAR BB.5 You thought you knew the story of the first Christmas, but an adventure-seeking donkey actually played a much larger role than the Gospel would have you believe in this timidly respectful animated story. Mary (Gina Rodriguez) is visited by an angel in “Nazareth, 9 months B.C.,” which, OK, is pretty funny. Later, wayward donkey Bo (Steven Yeun) becomes the pet of Mary and Joseph (Zachary Levi), then uses his contacts in the animal kingdom to save them from King Herod’s baby hunter and get to the stable on time. Embellishments aside, Carlos Kotkin’s screenplay is faithful to Gospel accounts, feinting at comedy while maintaining reverence and instilling positive spiritual values, but also padding the thin story with unnecessary character squabbles. Director Timothy Reckart’s animation looks as plastic as a cheap Nativity set; on the other hand, Oprah voices a camel. (PG)—EDS

WONDER BB “Be kind, for everyone is fighting a hard battle.” In case you missed this moral, it will be repeated at the film’s end. It seems churlish to complain about a movie that reminds kids to be nice to people, but Wonder is both ham-handed and so subdued it’s almost dramatically inert. Ten-year-old Auggie (Jacob Tremblay), who suffers from facial deformities, is going to school for the first time, where he remains a bullied outcast for a while. This isn’t Auggie’s story alone, however; it takes jarring detours into those of his older sister and his one new friend, to show us those other hard battles. But while the film avoids sappiness, it offers up Auggie’s distress as a path by which others might become better people. That isn’t as kind as Wonder seems to believe it is. (PG)—MAJ

more than just movies at brewvies FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: NOVEMBER 24TH - NOVEMBER 30TH

JUSTICE LEAGUE

THOR: RAGNARÖK

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Rated Xmas

TV

Screw Thanksgiving—bring on the Christmas TV!

W

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Gwen Stefani’s You Make It Feel Like Christmas (Tuesday, Dec. 12, NBC): Everybody’s favorite chipmunkvoiced ska survivor hosts her very own songs-and-sketches holiday special, with guests Chelsea Handler, Ken Jeong, Seth MacFarlane, Ne-Yo and, duh, Blake Shelton. It’s gonna be B-A-N-A-N-A-S! A Christmas Story Live! (Sunday, Dec. 17, Fox): An even better idea than A Christmas Story 2, A Christmas Story Live! puts the played-to-death holiday classic on the Broadway stage, with Matthew Broderick, Maya Rudolph and Chris Diamantopoulos. It’s live; an eye could get shot out. Doctor Who: Twice Upon a Time (Monday, Dec. 25, BBC America): It’s the end of the road for 12th Doctor Peter Capaldi and series writer/producer Steven Moffat, but also the debut of the first-ever female Doc, Jodie Whittaker. Plus, in a timey-wimey twist … the First Doctor! Breathe, nerds.

Morel Orel (Hulu) National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (all of December, Freeform): The greatest work of the late Chevy Chase (wait, he’s not dead?) is the pinnacle of holiday movies (sorry, Bad Santa). And, if ever there were a phrase to sum up the country in the dying days of 2017, it’s “Shitter’s full!” Moral Orel, “The Best Christmas Ever” (streaming, Hulu): God-fearing Orel believes his baby brother Shapey to be the second coming of Jesus—but he’s also a complete asshole. Meanwhile, his parents are divorcing, and Dad’s at the bar (“Forghetty’s Pub”) getting loaded on Christmas. Ever hopeful, Orel looks to the heavens for divine intervention. Nothing happens. Fade to black. Merry Christmas! CW Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

asn’t Turkey Day grand? Anyway: The Christmas season began in August, and you still probably don’t have a holiday viewing plan—so The Only TV Column That Matters™ has put one together for you (it’s OK that you didn’t get me anything). Here are 12 Christmas shows on the ho-ho-horizon: Trolls Holiday (Friday, Nov. 24, NBC): The most adequate kids’ movie of 2016 is now a time-filling Christmas special about the Queen of the Trolls (Anna Kendrick) forcing her holiday traditions upon the Bergens, which sounds suspiciously Christian. Besides, Bergens eat Trolls, don’t they? A Christmas Story 2 (Friday, Nov. 24, CMT): Sequels are always better than the original, and this follow-up to 1983’s A Christmas Story is no exception: A teenage Ralphie needs a sweet Mercury convertible for Christmas, otherwise he’ll never get laid. A major award, for sure. Homicide for the Holidays (Saturday, Nov. 25, Oxygen): Season 2 of the murder-rific Xmas series features truecrime stories ranging from “a botched house fire that led to the uncovering of a triple-homicide to a case that is still classified as the worst family massacre in U.S. history.” Joy! Angry Angel (Monday, Nov. 27, Freeform): A newly dead angel (Brenda Song) is somehow stuck on Earth—well, New York City—and still hung up on her ex (Ricky Mabe), all of which pisses off her boss up in Heaven (Jason Biggs). Will she ever get off … the terrestrial plane? A Very Pentatonix Christmas Special (Monday, Nov. 27, NBC): Vocal group Pentatonix return for another holiday special, with A-list guests like Jay Leno(!) and a teen ventriloquist(!!). “A cappella” is Italian for “no real musicians will stoop to work with them,” by the way. The Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show (Tuesday, Nov. 28, CBS): Not so much a “holiday” special as a primetime halfnaked jiggle-fest that makes total sense in the new age of sexual-harassment awareness. Rumored musical guests: Hologram David Bowie and Lemmy dueting on Wham’s “Last Christmas.” Drunk History Christmas Special (Tuesday, Nov. 28, Comedy Central): Comics reenact ’Merican holiday events like George Washington crossing the Delaware on Dec. 25, and Teddy Roosevelt banning Christmas trees in the White House. Bill O’Reilly was right—the War on Christmas is centuries old!

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 31


Spirit of ’77

MUSIC

Wilson and Monty 4760 S 900 E, SLC Anna Powell drive from Nashville 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu wednesday 11/22

Thanksgiving Eve Party

Danksgiving dubbest green leefs i funk & gonzo Live Music

friDAY 11/24

red, yellow & Green black friday party

herban empire newborn slaves i from the sun

Live Music

saturday 11/25

limitless rmz i the swoop carlos vitanen sunday 11/26

monday11/27

jersey giveaways every sunday, monday & thursday

great food & drink specials Tuesday 11/28

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon

wayland and October Rage with Berlin Breaks and Reloaded

12/1

12/8 12/9

w/ dj jason lowe

The Eagle Royal

Christmas Bash ft. jagertown

the wayne hoskins band ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

to Laurel Canyon in Troubadour 77. BY LEE ZIMMERMAN comments@cityweekly.net

W

ith a veritable treasure trove of writing and production credits, musicians and songwriters Anna Wilson and Monty Powell have been behind the scenes of some of the biggest country hits of the past two decades. The list includes a number of Top 5 songs for artists like Tim McGraw (“One of These Days”), Bryan White, Keith Urban (the No. 1 hits “Days Go By,” “Sweet Thing,” “Who Wouldn’t Wanna Be Me”) and Billy Ray Cyrus (“Could’ve Been Me”). The upshot of their partnership is one incredible statistic: Wilson and Powell’s work is featured on albums that have sold a combined 70 million copies worldwide. The two met in Nashville during the early ’90s. Wilson was doing publicity for the band Diamond Rio, whose albums Close to the Edge and Love a Little Stronger were being produced by Powell. They hit it off romantically and creatively, and opted to join forces. Their love of skiing and the outdoors led them to relocate to Utah, where they’ve become a proud part of the Salt Lake and Park City music scenes with a band they’ve dubbed Troubadour 77. Along with drummer Nathan Chappell and the husband-wife pair of guitarist Austin Weyand and bassist Kassie Weyand, they’re releasing their debut album, Selma Avenue (Transfer), on Dec. 1. Clearly, the pair has a knack for popular music of the charttopping variety. But they’re not purveying the Nashville sound on Selma. Wilson and Powell are serious about reinventing the breezy late ’60s/early ’70s singer-songwriter vibe of Southern California’s Laurel Canyon. This return to their roots was the impetus for initiating T77. “The music business is and has always been focused almost exclusively on young people,” Powell says in an email interview. “This formula has left behind [baby] boomers to either get down with their kids’ and grandkids’ music, or to wear ourselves out listening to ‘Free Bird’ for the thousandth time. Why can’t there be recordings that sound familiar, lyrics that you not only can understand, but speak to where we are at in life and not just to kids?” Wilson is even more emphatic. “T77 is an attempt to try and change the culture and conversation of who gets to have a seat at the table,” she says. Selma’s title pays tribute to the street where the now-shuttered Los Angeles studio Criterion Music Corp. was located and “the troubadours that walked through the doors.” It’s where Jackson Browne created his early demos, and where Linda Ronstadt, J.D. Souther and members of the Eagles used to hang out and draw inspiration. Wilson cites all of the above, as well as Carole King, Stevie Nicks, James Taylor and Tom Petty (RIP) as influences. Their presence permeates Selma’s grooves, particularly in the title track, where Wilson sings in her mellifluous, goosebumpsinducing voice: “On Selma Avenue/ There were a chosen few/ … / and when their dreams came true/ I discovered “Blue Bayou”/ so I saved my nickels/ and I saved my dimes/ yeah, I was dreamin’ / of the day I’d catch a ride/ to Selma Avenue.” “I was only five years old in 1977 when they were hitting their stride,” she says. “I’m fortunate to be here in 2017, attempting to carry their torch.”

KENN SULLIVAN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

32 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

CONCERT PREVIEW

Nathan Chappell, Kassie Weyand, Anna Wilson, Monty Powell and Austin Weyand of Troubadour 77 As for Powell, he grew up enamored with John Denver and Alice Cooper, which further diversifies T77’s sound. “It made for a real melting pot of musical inspiration to pull from,” he says. Even the band’s name reflects this music and its era. A troubadour, obviously, is a traveling singer, poet or performer, while Wilson says that the numerical component is a tribute to 1977, “one of the most watershed years in musical history, just before the dawn of disco and the ebb of classic rock bands and singer-songwriters.” To that end, T77 strives to create a sound that baby boomers can relate to, while simultaneously enticing millennials with messages about timely social issues like gun control (“I Got A Gun”) and civil rights (“Freedom Rider”). “We are trying to appeal to anyone who likes a good song with a melody and a lyric, created in a classic-sounding production,” Wilson says. “It’s less about the sonics and more about organically delivering the message.” The band succeeds wildly on all counts. Selma Avenue is a nostalgic time-warp back to the ’70s for those of us who were there. It’s also an immersive, cinematic, laser-accurate period piece that will convince younger audiences they were there, too, while reminding them what matters now. Wilson even made a playlist where she mixed T77 songs among tunes by her influences just to see if they fit, and if they had the same effect on her younger self, the dreamer. “To me, it does,” she says. It’s also more satisfying than writing for other artists in Nashville work-for-hire, where she often had to compromise her soul or her message. “Some people write their best songs in their 20s; I think I’m writing my best work now. I’m just giddy.” CW

ANNA WILSON & MONTY POWELL: STORIES AND SONGS FROM NASHVILLE

Thursday, Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m. Gallivan Center 239 S. Main 385-743-0146 Free, all ages excellenceconcerts.org

TROUBADOUR 77 CD RELEASE SHOW

Friday, Dec. 1, 8 p.m. O.P. Rockwell 628 Main, Park City 435-565-4486 $10 21+ oprockwell.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 33


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER

FRIDAY 11/24

OMG! Can you imagine going to a concert on Black Friday? Not just any concert, but one by one of today’s biggest pop stars at Salt Lake’s biggest arena? Yeah, after an early morning battling hostile Walmart Morlocks for cheap shit, or even mashing the refresh button on cyber-deals, I wouldn’t venture into another, larger crowd, where the annoying noise is louder. Just kiddin’, KP fans. Kinda. I tried to hate her, ’cause some songs—like the melodramatic, precious “Firework”—suck. But I gotta admit that I don’t throw rocks at the radio when I hear “Teenage Dream,” “California Gurls” or “Hot N Cold.” So I get it, to a point. I mean, Perry’s new joint Witness (Capitol) seems like bids to demonstrate depth, but she’s not deep. She’s best when she’s all about fun, and Witness is a total snooze. But it’s cool if you like it, or you just wanna go hear the old jams. As for me, I’ll hit the Record Store Day events and spend the night listening to better music. (Randy Harward) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7:30 p.m., $47-$148, all ages, vivintarena.com

Jarabe de Palo

Yeah, yeah, more rock en Español. But this time it’s from Spain! That’s where the language originated, and it’s spoken a bit different there. Like with a slight lisp, little phonetic differences and less machismo. That’s singer-songwriter-bandleader Pau Donés for ya: He’s Spain’s Chris Martin, fronting its Coldplay—at least on the new piano-heavy album, 50 Palos (Tronco). On other albums, like 2015’s Tour Americano, the dude and the rest of his band rock. It might be like a ’90s alternative rock

Jarabe de Palo

SLGCKGC VIA FLICKR

Katy Perry, Purity Ring

band or Springsteen-esque heartland rock or alt-country or just a solid, straightup band of rockeros. But if you browse through JdP’s discography on Spotify, you’ll hear even more variety (spaghettiWestern blues, anyone?) but also a consistent sound; a through-line that ensures, no matter the genre, a Jarabe de Palo song always sounds like Jarabe de Palo—which, by the way, means “stick (or tree) syrup.” Since Mrs. Butterworth’s doesn’t make that flavor, let’s just decide that he means the songs are sweet and tend to get stuck in your head. (RH) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 7 p.m., $35 presale; $45 day of show, 21+, liquidjoes.net

SUNDAY 11/26 Angus & Julia Stone

What do a couple of Aussies know about snow? It doesn’t actually matter, because “Snow” from Snow (Capitol) only mentions snow once, and the song sounds like it was made for basking on grainier

Katy Perry ground cover—like a beach, maybe in the fall, when it’s still sunny but also kinda cold, so you gotta snuggle up with somebody to keep warm. Then you fall asleep and traipse into A&J Stone’s soft-focus dreamworld, where their sleepy but peppy songs, which sound like Mazzy Star on meds, are the breeze in your hair. It’s not so bad there, dwelling in dreams that feel real, while Angus and Julia’s voices talk to you like anything from your conscience to ghosts. Except when you realize that these deceptively tranquil songs have only put a gauzy filter on your reality, ameliorating the hell out of your humdrum day-to-day— which suddenly seems as good as, or better than, the fantasy. (RH) Park City Live, 427 Main, Park City, 8 p.m. (doors), $30-$65, 21+, parkcitylive.net

Angus & Julia Stone

JENNIFER STENGLEIN

LIVEPICT.COM VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

34 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


ON EAS S L BAL E! FOOT IS HER DAY TICKET FL SUN S N K R O ION ETW PAC-12 N NF - BOTH LOCAT M

Proudly serving locally produced beers & spirits — 40+ local beers available —

HIGHLAND live music

HOLY SHIT SUES IS 9!!!

FRI SAT

LOCATED AT THE BASE OF THE CANYONS FRIDAY & SATURDAY LIVE MUSIC 6PM - 9PM DJ’S 9PM - CLOSE

WHISKEYFISH, BIRTHDAY CAKE, SHWAG, SHENANIGANS

UTES VS COLORADO 8:00 ROCKY MT RIVALRY FOLLOWED BY SAMEYEAM

SUN FUN

FULL DINING MENU FROM CAFE TRIO

$2 MIMOSAS NEW BRUNCH MENU SMOKED PULLED PORK SAMMIES, POKER DURING THE NIGHT GAME, ALL GAMES TELEVISED

MNF WED

BRUNCH PARTY EVERY 1ST & 3RD SUNDAY EACH MONTH 11AM - 3PM

MAD MAX MONEY MACHINE

$1 TACOS, FOLLOWED BY KARAOKE

PING PONG TOURNAMENT!!! STARTS AT 8:00, CASH PRIZE TO THE WINNER. THE MORE PEOPLE THAT PLAY THE MORE CASH TO BE HAD

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $350 POT

THURS NOV 22

BLACK WEDNESDAY PARTY

W/ SAMEYEAM, BEER PONG SHENANIGANS

6405 s 3000 e holladay | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

2PM

FRI SAT

HIGHLAND

U

LUMPY’S BUS!

ALL UTAH HOME GAMES NOV 25 Utah VS Colorado 8:00

U

2013

SUN FUN

2014

ROCKY MT RIVALRY FOLLOWED BY DJ BAD HAIR DAY

$2 MIMOSAS NEW BRUNCH MENU

FOOTBALL IS FOLLOWED BY KARAOKE, ALL GAMES TELEVISED

MNF WED

$1 TACOS, SQUARES BOARD, GIVE AWAYS

DEC 16

SUE FOR SANTA TOY DRIVE FOR TOYS FOR TOTS MUSIC PROVIDED BY 9021YO! RAFFLE, GIVE ALWAYS, YES WE ARE A DROP FOR TOYS FOR TOTS AND ARE ALREADY ACCEPTING DONATIONS .................................................................................................

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1,150 POT

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

8136 SO. STATE ST

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 35

801-566-3222

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

| CITY WEEKLY |

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

UTES VS COLORADO 8:00

WATCH ALL NFL GAMES EVERY SUNDAY, MONDAY, AND THURSDAY NIGHTS

THE RAVENS

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

STATE live music

d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SUE’S HIGHLAND HAS PAID OUT OVER $3,400 IN BINGO PRIZES!


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JED PEARSON

WEDNESDAY 11/29

Fleetwood Mac Tribute feat. The Bookends, Morgan Snow, Michelle Moonshine, Sam Smith

There are a few musical power couples in town. Rick Gerber (Badfeather, Rick Gerber & the Nightcaps, Pig Eon) and Gillian Chase (Le Voir) are one of the best, and they sound great together in their duo The Bookends. Tonight’s gonna be a little different, as Gerber’s buddies in the Nightcaps back the pair paying tribute to one of the greatest rock bands in history, Fleetwood Mac. And isn’t it interesting to picture Gerber and Chase (which would be a great name for the duo if The Bookends didn’t already imply a partnership of mutual and equal effort) as one of the two couples in that legendary band? You know, minus the infighting and melodrama. Sure, strife made Mac’s Rumours a certified classic, fueling “Go Your Own Way” and “The Chain.” But that doesn’t mean a happy couple can’t render those tunes accurately and faithfully, maybe even with a slightly new and unintended spin. But before they do, singer-songwriters Morgan Snow, Michelle Moonshine and Sam Smith take a crack at tracks from the Mac canon. In individual

The Frights

The Bookends

sets, though—they ain’t no musical power triad. (RH) The Hog Wallow, 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, 8:30 p.m., $7, 21+, thehogwallow.com

The Frights, Vundabar, Hockey Dad

A trio of surf bands from various locales, even though it’s a bit out of season for the musical genre, is always fun. Poway, Calif., trio The Frights is the closest to what you might think of as surf’s local turf, and they throw garage rock’s roughness and a punkish raw energy into their songs. The title of their latest album, You Are Going to Hate This (Dangerbird, 2016), is only half-winking. Vundabar vaults out of Boston, a city not usually noted for surf bands, but certainly as a music mecca in general. They opened last year’s Copenhagen Beer Festival, actually held in Beantown, with the likes of Yo La Tengo. Last but not least, Hockey Dad hails from Windang, New South Wales, Australia. Astride a highly surfable peninsula, they show their stateside-savvy with their moniker’s oblique Simpsons reference. It might not be summer, but tonight for a couple of hours you can pretend. (Brian Staker) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $15, all ages, kilbycourt.com

EVERETT FITZPATRICK

36 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

LIVE


WEDNESDAY 11/29

CONCERTS & CLUBS

SLGCKGC VIA FLICKR

Billy Joel

THURSDAY 11/23 LIVE MUSIC

Thanksgiving w/ Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s)

Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Gothic & Darkwave w/ DJ Nina (Area 51) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) The New Wave ‘80s Night w/ DJ Radar (Area 51)

KARAOKE

FRIDAY 11/24 LIVE MUSIC

Bad Donkey + DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

3LAU (Park City Live) Cherry Thomas (Harp & Hound) Chris Masterson (Downstairs) Choir Boy + Indigo Plateau + Fossil Arms + 20xx + DJ Mikhell (Urban Lounge) Crook & The Bluff (The Ice Haüs) Dave Brogan & Friends (Hog Wallow Pub) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) Kaleb Austin (The Westerner) Lake Effect (The Spur) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Live Trio (The Red Door) Metal Dogs (Brewskis)

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + & DarkWave w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) House DJ (Outlaw Saloon) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy + JD & Mike (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys On Main) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Wees (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second)

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 11/25 LIVE MUSIC

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

Pixie & the Partygrass Boys (Hog Wallow Pub) Scott Foster + Michelle Moonshine & Co. (Lake Effect) Steve Schuffert (Park City Mountain) Tanglewood (Brewskis) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Baker Street Blues Band + Slick Velveteens + The Arvos (The Ice Haüs) Caspa (Sky) Crook & The Bluff (Piper Down Pub) Donna Marie + Natural Roots + Teki + DJ Specialist (Metro Music Hall) Ginger & The Gents + Balls Capone (Funk ’n’ Dive) Jarabe De Palo (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 34 Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons (The State Room) Katy Perry + Purity Ring (Vivint Arena) see p. 34 Kaleb Austin (The Westerner) Lavelle Dupree (Downstairs) Lisa Frank + Shanghaii + Malev Da Shinobi + Dennis James + Ocelot + The Heretix (Urban Lounge) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Major Tom & The Pirates (Garage On Beck) Pale Waves + The Candescents (Kilby Court)

Billy Joel hasn’t performed solo in Salt Lake City in a decade; the last time he rolled his grand piano through town was with Elton John on their last Faceto-Face tour. Between bookend face-to-face sets where they dueted on each other’s songs, John came out looking like someone’s BeDazzled™ mother-inlaw and performed a bath bomb of once-powerful, now over-exfoliated songs (but, thankfully, none of that Lion King dreck). Then Joel came out and put some good ol’ rock ’n’ roll stank on the proceedings. The set was perfectly sequenced, with rockers, mid-tempo numbers and ballads forming sublime emotional peaks and valleys. He told stories of pre-tour rehearsals in SLC, and an oral sex joke that received a hilariously mixed reaction. If I’m being fair, he played his share of schmaltz (“River of Dreams,” the odious “We Didn’t Start the Fire”), but he finished strong with “It’s Still Rock and Roll to Me” and “Only the Good Die Young.” But those joint sets ruined some of Joel’s songs, where he traded verses with John on “Just the Way You Are,” “My Life,” “Uptown Girl” and “You May Be Right”—all of which need to be voiced only by Joel’s earnest New York croon. That’s what you’re getting tonight, along with songs conspicuously missing from those tours, several audience-choice numbers and random, sometimes surprising, cover snippets. (Randy Harward) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $49-$150, all ages, vivintarena.com

SHANGHAII, MALEV DA SHINOBI

SAT 11.25• CHOIR BOY

INDIGO PLATEAU, 20XX, FOSSIL ARMS

TUES 11.28• GAINS FOR IZZY’S BRAIN

HEAD PORTALS, NICK PASSEY AND THE PERPETUAL SADNESS, JACOB T. SKEEN

WES 11.29• PIXIE & THE PARTYGRASS BOYS

11.24 • DONNA MARIE, NATURAL ROOTS 12/2: THE ROLLING STONES TRIBUTE 12/5: THE HEXXERS 12/6: CVPITVLS 12/7: SUPERSUCKERS 12/8: THE RODEO BOYS 12/9: EKALI

11.25 • VIOLET TEMPERS

LORD BIRTISH

11.28 • CRAIG BROWN BAND 11.29 • ANGEL VIVALDI SCALE THE SUMMIT, ANDY JAMES

11.30 • DANCE EVOLUTION 12.1 • MARK FARINA

HOLLYWOOD HENNINGS

NATE LOWPASS, CHOICE

FRI 12.1• FREE KITTENS COMEDY FRI 12.1• DUBWISE W/ SUBSWARM

12.2 • MISS PEPPERMINT (RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE SEASON 9) TERRA FLESH, LILLIA MAUGHN, LONDON SKIES

DUBAMINE

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •

12/6: SLICK VELVETEENS 12/7: INKJAR MARKET 12/8: LIVE BAND KARAOKE 12/9: CREATORS GRID 12/13: SAMBA FOGO 12/14: BIRTHQUAKE

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 37

THE UMBRELLA BROTHERS, FUR FOXEN

TUES 11.30• GERMAN WYOMING

TEKI, DJ SPECIALIST

| CITY WEEKLY |

FRI 11.24• HIP HOP ROOTS W/ LISA FRANK


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

38 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

Roaring Wednesdays at Prohibition

JORDAN COPP

BAR FLY

Remember the late ’90s when all the cherry poppin’ daddies were rioting in zoot suits with their squirrel nut zippers? The swing era was so money, baby! Well, it originally happened close to 100 years ago, but before the turn of the 21st century, alongside the third-wave ska revival, some hepcats brought back lounge and big-band swing music. Along with that came energetic, acrobatic swing dancing. Salt Lake Swing executive director Craig Hulinsky remembers those times, and knows the importance of the flashpoint era. That’s why he—along with Murray speakeasy Prohibition and a group of local musicians—formed SLS, a nonprofit dedicated to the preservation of swing. One of the organization’s biggest events is Roaring Wednesdays where, for a reasonable $3 cover charge, you can learn to Lindy Hop from international champion Anthony Chen while house band Hot House West (or occasionally Red Rock Hot Club or King Strang & the Stranglers) adds an aural complement to Prohibition’s eraaccurate atmosphere. Hulinsky says the night got popular fast because “people who used to be into the scene when it was popular before are coming out of the woodwork.” Roaring Wednesdays adds 5-10 new regulars each week, some of whom even carpool from Ogden and Provo, or get all dolled up in vintage threads. Hulinsky is thrilled to pair his event with an actual speakeasy, where there are secret bookcases, bare lightbulbs, antiques, oddities and even a whiskey-barrel fountain. “It’s really cool,” he says. “Everyone smiles when they’re Lindy Hoppin’. It’s the funnest way to get exercise I can think of.” (Randy Harward) Roaring Wednesdays at Prohibition, 151 E. 6100 South, 7:30-11:30 p.m., $3, prohibitionutah.com, saltlakeswing.com

Watch all College and NFL games

on our 30+ Full HD TV’s

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday

SPIRITS . FOOD . LOCAL BEER

Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight. Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Tuesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

call for reservations NOVEMBER 22

GRACIE’S 8TH ANNUAL UGLY CHRISTMAS SWEATER PARTY TO BENEFIT “THE INN BETWEEN” WITH ERIC ANTHONY PLAYING DINNER AND A SHOW 6PM-9PM FOLLOWED BY CJ DRISDOM AND CHANGING LANES PLAYING 10PM-1AM. WE ARE ACCEPTING DONATIONS OF NEEDED ITEMS AT THE DOOR.

NOVEMBER 23

NOVEMBER 24

HAPPY THANKSGIVING OPEN 11AM-2PM

APRES SKI WITH DJ GAWEL 6PM-9PM FUNKY FRIDAY WITH DJ CHE 10PM

NOVEMBER 25

NOVEMBER 26

SATURDAY BRUNCH 10-3 COLLEGE FOOTBALL ALL DAY UTAH V COLORADO 8:00 CHASEONE2

NOVEMBER 27

MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ

SUNDAY NFL BRUNCH 10-3 GRACIE’S SUNDAY NIGHT BLUES FEATURING CHRISTIAN COLEMAN AND THE BLUE ZEN BAND 9PM

NOVEMBER 28

LIVE MUSIC WITH MARMALADE CHILL 10PM

OPEN

365 DAYS

A YEAR 326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

•LIVE M U S IC• 11.24 PIXIE & THE PARTYGRASS BOYS 11.25 DAVE BROGAN & FRIENDS 11.27 OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION 11.29 FLEETWOOD MAC TRIBUTE WITH THE BOOKENDS & SPECIAL GUESTS 11.30 PROPER WAY 12.1

STONEFED

12.2 UGLY SWEATER PARTY W/ STONEFED

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Michelle Moonshine & The Distillers (Johnny’s on Second) Mountain Country (Garage On Beck) The Naked Waiters (Park City Mountain) Nowdaze + Spade Ripper + Eazy Pimpin + Lyrical Assailant (In The Venue) Phoenix Rising + Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Ryan Shupe & The RubberBand Performers (Peery’s Egyptian Theatre) Silent Miles + Wicked Bears + Andrew Goldring (Kilby Court) The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) The Used + Glassjaw (The Complex) Will Baxter Band (Lake Effect) Yarn + Badfeather + Morgan Snow (The State Room)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE (THURS) PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS LEAGUES AND TOURNAMENTS

DART SUPPLIES PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Tues & Fri: 3pm-1am Saturday: 11am-1am Sunday: 11am-9pm Closed Monday

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 11/26

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24TH

Black Friday Brunch $1 Mimosas & Bloody Mary Bar

CROOK & THE BLUFF AT 9PM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25TH

LIVE MUSIC

Angus & Julia Stone (Park City Live) see p. 34

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DIAMOND POOL TABLES

9PM

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LIVE MUSIC

Alternative & Top 40 & EDM w/DJ Jeremiah (Area 51) Burlesque & The Beats feat. DJ Cat’s Pajamas (Prohibition) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Mike (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Funk ’n’ Dive) Dueling Pianos (Keys On Main) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) House DJ Outlaw Saloon) DJ John Smith (Gallivan Center) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Luva Luva + DJ Matty Mo (Moose Lounge) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Gothic & Industrial & 80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays w/ Ikon (Sky)

THANKSGIVING DAY doors open at 11am

HIGHBALL TRAIN AT 9PM

BLACK SHEEP BROTHERS BLACK SMOKE GYPSIES

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28TH MARK DEE AT 8PM

8:30PM | 21+ | $5 COVER

YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

4242 South State Street SLC, UT 84107 Open from 10am - 2am

1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492 PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 39

BARBARY COAST SALOON

BALOO’S BIRTHDAY BASH

| CITY WEEKLY |

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 25TH


NIGHT LIGHTS

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Kilby Court

st 741 S. 330 We /kilbycourtslc facebook.com

LIVE Music wednesday, november 22 trivia & karaoke

thursday, november 23

happy thanksgiving

THE PIG OPENS AT 4:00 ALL THE TURKEY DAY FIXINS

Check out sartainandsaunders.com to see more upcoming shows

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

friday, november 24

DJ MATY MO

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

saturday, november 25 UTAH GAME AT 8:00 FOLLOWED BY DJ LATU

Weeknights

Jesse and Alesha Roark, Nick Bentley

monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

wednesday

THE TRIVIA FACTORY 7PM

thursday

KARAOKE W/ DJ BEKSTER 9PM

Chad VanGallen

Amy Batchler, Miguel Peterson

The Bleach Wipes

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

| CITY WEEKLY |

40 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

@scheuerman7

Great food $

5.99 lunch special MONDAY - FRIDAY

$

12 sunday funday brunch $3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

Nathan Marabello, Lucy and Max Schoenfeld, Paris Kralik, Kitzia Rodriguez

Denis Shkuratko


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET The English Beat + The Gringos (The Complex) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Vinyl Tapestries (Garage On Beck)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

KARAOKE

David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

THIRSTY THURSDAYS $3 pints and $3 whiskeys, $5 gin, $4 vodka, $5 tequila, $4 rum.

MONDAY 11/27

Andrea & The Omedes (Prohibition) Head Portals + Nick Passey + Jacob T. Skeen (Urban Lounge) Jazz Repertory Ensemble (Fine Arts West) Jeffrey Scott Stevens (Perry’s Egyptian Theatre) Louis The Child + Louis Futon + Ashe (The Complex) Matisyahu + Common Kings (The Depot) The Muzic Clan + Phobia the Greatest + Jelani + Rugged Method + 801 Green Tree (Kilby Court) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/

...

LIVE MUSIC

THIS WEEKS LIVE MUSIC NOVEMBER 22 NOVEMBER 23 NOVEMBER 24 NOVEMBER 25 NOVEMBER 27 NOVEMBER 29 NOVEMBER 30

NELSEN CAMPBELL SEXTET CLOSED SCOTT FOSTER MICHELLE MOONSHINE & CO. WILL BAXTER BAND CHRISTIAN COLEMAN AND THE BLUE ZEN BAND THE JAY LAWRENCE QUARTET ERIC ANTHONY DJ CHASEONE2

FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

DJ ChaseOne2 @ 9:00

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00 SUNDAY:

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

DAY PAYMENT

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 11/29/17

TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY:

VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 41

CREDIT NEEDED

6-9 PM 10-1 AM 10-1 AM 7:30-10:30 7:30-10:30 6-9 PM 10-1 AM

| CITY WEEKLY |

Reg. Price: $54000

NO

| | | | | | |

$19999

FREE LAYAWAY

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

| 7:30-10:30

(801) 532-2068 155 W 200 S Salt Lake City, UT, 84101 www.lakeeffectslc.com

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 9:00 Pot $1,200 MONDAY: Micro Brew Pint Special Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

10AM TO 7PM

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

1/2 OFF TACOS 11 AM-4 PM DAILY

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

TWO 12" SUB-WOOFERS

• 300 WATTS RMS • 600 PEAK POWER • TIGHT AND ACCURATE BASS

Se Habla Español

...

EVERY THURSDAY:

W W W. S O U N DWA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

TASTING TUESDAYS Join us for a whiskey tasting with a professional. | 6pm

Closed for the holiday

save $340 • CLASS D 1 CHANNEL • POWER AMPLIFIER • 300 WATTS RMS

MONDAYS Blues night

AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY

BASS PACKAGE POWER AMPLIFIER

SUNDAY NIGHT Industry night $3 pints $3 whiskeys

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

TUESDAY 11/28

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Christian Coleman & The Blue Zen Band (Lake Effect) Lark & Spur (Covey Center) The Spill Canvas + Wild + Super Whatevr (In The Venue)

Codoulet Rouge, Cotes du Rhone, France

November 29th Carne Humana Red Table Wine, Napa Valley Music at 7:30.

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

LIVE MUSIC

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS Enjoy craft cocktails and live music. Get here early as it fills up fast!

WINE WEDNESDAY & JAZZ NIGHT | 6:15PM Join a professional to explore wines by the glass. November 22nd Beaucastel


CONCERTS & CLUBS RANDY'S RECORD SHOP LISTINGS ONLINE AT VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED COMPLETE CITYWEEKLY.NET CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

We sell tickets! check us first! low or no fees upcoming shows

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen

Nightly Music

The

Chakra Lounge

Thursday 11/23 - DJ Birdman Friday 11/24 - Bollywood Night Saturday 11/25 - J Godina & Caviar Club DJ’s Wednesday 11/29 - Jazz Man Friday 12/01 - DJ Bronto Call (Gonzo)

and Bar

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night small plate menu

FOLLOW US ON

TWITTER @CITYWEEKLY

MONDAYS

FREE GAME BOARD FOR NFL

BREAKING BINGO 9PM $800

ALL SUNDAY GAMES KNEEL OR STAND @ JOHNNY’S! TUESDAYS

GROOVE TUESDAYS JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

the frights

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

$

LIVE MUSIC

Billy Joel (Vivint Arena) see p. 37 Crosstalk (Dumke Recital Hall) Fleetwood Mac Tribute feat. The Bookends + Morgan Snow + Michelle Moonshine + Sam Smith (Hog Wallow Pub) see p. 36 The Frights + Vundabar + Hockey Dad (Kilby Court) see p. 36 The Jay Lawrence Quartet (Lake Effect) Michelle Moonshine (The Spur) Pixie & the Partygrass Boys + The Umbrella Brothers + Fur Foxen (Urban Lounge) Scale The Summit + Angel Vivaldi + Andy James (Metro Music Hall) The Wood Brothers (The State Room)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Brisk (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos feat. JD & Dave (Tavernacle) Dueling Pianos (Keys On Main) Open Mic (Velour) Open Mic (Sugar House Coffee) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51) Roaring Wednesdays: Swing Dance Lessons (Prohibition) see p. 38 DJ Wees (Area 51)

SUNDAYS & MONDAYS

Louis the child

WEDNESDAY 11/29

Next to Himalayan Kitchen

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

Set To Stun + Northern Ghost + Away At Lakeside + Below Fiction + Chronic Trigger (The Loading Dock)

SATURDAY, NOV. 25

WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE

THANKSGIVING

OPEN @ 6:00 BRING YOUR FAMILY FOR A TURKEY DAY NIGHTCAP

$

20

$

15

tues, nov. 28 | the complex

wed, nov. 29 | kilby court

chocolate tastings!

charlie parr

30

$

16

thur, nov. 30 | the chocolate conspiracy

sat, dev. 2 | the state room

supersuckers

robert randolph and the family band

$

17

$

thur, dec. 7 | urban lounge

40 fri, deC. 29 | the state room

hir $

27 sun feb. 11, 2018 | salt lake acting company

FOR MORE SHOWS & EVENTS GO TO CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM WASATCH POKER TOUR

SUN. & THUR. & 8PM SAT. @ 2PM FRIDAYS

FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

DJ RUDE BOY WITH BAD BOY BRIAN

165 E 200 S SLC | 801.746.3334


VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

News from the geeks.

| CITY WEEKLY |

T! O B O R Y N I H S BI G

what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

exclusively on cityweekly.net

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 43

LUMPY’S ON HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, live music & DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, poker Tuesday; DJs Friday & Saturday METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, live music ThursdaySaturday, all ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, poker Monday, acoustic Tuesday, trivia Wednesday, bingo Thursday POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, live music Thursday-Saturday THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Friday, live jazz Saturday THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, live music SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, live music, All ages SUGAR HOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, dueling pianos WednesdaySaturday; karaoke Sunday-Tuesday TIN ANGEL CAFÉ 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, live music URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, live music TWIST 32 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-322-3200, live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, live music, all ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thursday-Saturday THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, trivia Wednesday; karaoke Friday-Sunday; live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, karaoke Thursday FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, trivia Tuesday; live music Friday & Saturday FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, karaoke & live music FUNK ’N’ DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music & karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, live music & DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, live music ThursdaySaturday HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-268-2228, poker Monday; ladies night Tuesday; ’80s night Wednesday; karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, karaoke Thursday; DJs & live music Friday & Saturday HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, karaoke HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, reggae Tuesday, DJs Friday & Saturday ICE HAÜS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. Panther Way, SLC, 801-3828567, karaoke Tuesday, Wednesday & Sunday; DJs Thursday-Saturday JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tuesday & Friday; karaoke Wednesday; live music Saturday KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-363-3638, karaoke Tuesday & Wednesday; dueling pianos Thursday-Saturday KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, live music Tuesday-Saturday THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, trivia Wednesday LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, trivia Tuesday, DJ Wednesday, karaoke Thursday A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, karaoke Tuesday ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, karaoke Wednesday, ‘80s Thursday, DJs Friday & Saturday BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-463-4996, karaoke Tuesday, live music Saturday THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, live music Friday & Saturday BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, local jazz jam Tuesday, karaoke Thursday, live music Saturday, funk & soul night Sunday BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400, karaoke Friday-Sunday CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871, karaoke Saturday CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, live music & DJs; karaoke Thursday CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-566-3254, trivia Monday, poker Thursday, live music Friday-Sunday CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, live music & DJs THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, free pool Wednesday & Thursday; karaoke Friday & Saturday DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-261-2337, live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134, karaoke Wednesday; live music Tuesday, Thursday & Friday; DJ Saturday DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, live music & DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-953-6374, live music


© 2017

HEAD

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Frisbees and such 2. About 45 miles of it touch Canada 3. 6x Pro Bowl QB Donovan 4. Baghdad’s ____ City 5. Asian territory in the game Risk 6. Roman 1551 7. Company that makes Scrabble 8. Make much of 9. Snow blower brand

54. Something lent or bent, in a phrase 56. First name in country 57. What’s lost in “Paradise Lost” 58. “____ is whatever distracts”: Kafka 59. “Paris, Je T’____” (2006 film) 60. Potential hurdles for coll. students 61. It’s usually not erasable 62. Charge 63. Roll-call call

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

10. Hearty entree 11. Chesapeake ____ 12. Cheer with an accent 13. “Got that right!” 19. One practicing the “E” of STEM subjects: Abbr. 21. ____ James, 2008 Beyoncé role 25. Adderall target, briefly 26. “____ we forget ...” 27. A.D. part 29. “Mangia!” 30. “You ____ Sunshine” 31. Prefix with comic 32. Kicked off 33. Empty, as an apartment 37. Ally (with) 38. Ill-gotten goods 39. Petunia Dursley, to Harry Potter 41. Branch 44. Nightmare cause 45. “Cold, hard” money 47. London Underground, with “the” 48. Tends, as plants 49. Alternative to texts 53. Piñata part

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Chinatown offering 7. Abbr. in some city names 11. Lad 14. Security checkpoint item 15. Loads 16. Oktoberfest offering 17. Beach footwear 18. What a welcome sight relieves 20. 1959 Coasters hit that’s always stuck in your head? 22. Have a bawl 23. Prefix with lateral 24. Black-tie affair 28. 1978 Rolling Stones hit that’s always stuck in your head? 34. Roughly 3.8 million square miles, for the United States 35. Tokyo currency 36. QVC competitor 37. Actor Christian of “Mr. Robot” 40. “I’d be delighted!” 42. Note to a creditor 43. 1997 Will Smith/Tommy Lee Jones blockbuster, for short 45. One in a prompt box 46. 1982 Human League hit that’s always stuck in your head? 50. “____, Brute!” 51. Bloviation 52. Letters on NYC trains 55. 1994 Toni Braxton hit that’s always stuck in your head? 61. In case it’s called for 64. Studly 65. Org. with a campaign called “Degrees Not Debt” 66. “To ____ not to ...” 67. Marcos of the Philippines 68. Caps Lock, e.g. 69. Parts of décadas 70. ____ Antilles

SUDOKU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

44 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Journalist James A. Fussell defined “thrashing” as “the act of tapping helter-skelter over a computer keyboard in an attempt to find ‘hidden’ keys that trigger previously undiscovered actions in a computer program.” I suggest we use this as a metaphor for your life in the next two weeks. Without becoming rude or irresponsible, thrash around to see what interesting surprises you can drum up. Play with various possibilities in a lighthearted effort to stimulate options you have not been able to discover through logic and reason. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Let’s observe a moment of silence for the illusion that is in the process of disintegrating. It has been a pretty illusion, hasn’t it? Filled with hope and gusto, it has fueled you with motivation. But then again—on second thought—its prettiness was more the result of clever packaging than inner beauty. The hope was somewhat misleading, the gusto contained more than a little bluster, and the fuel was an inefficient source of motivation. Still, let’s observe a moment of silence anyway. Even dysfunctional mirages deserve to be mourned. Besides, its demise will fertilize a truer, healthier and prettier dream that will contain a far smaller portion of illusion. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Judging from the astrological omens, I conclude that the upcoming weeks will be a favorable time for you to engage in experiments befitting a mad scientist. You can achieve interesting results as you commune with powerful forces that are usually beyond your ability to command. You could have fun and maybe also attract good luck as you dream and scheme to override the rules. What pleasures have you considered to be beyond your capacity to enjoy? It wouldn’t be crazy for you to flirt with them. You have license to be saucy, sassy and extra sly.

annual traditions was to buy a small Christmas tree and hang it upside-down from the ceiling. She decorated it with ornamental dildos she had made out of clay. While I understood her drive for revenge and appreciated the entertaining way she did it, I felt pity for the enduring ferocity of her rage. Rather than mocking the old ways, wouldn’t her energy have been much better spent inventing new ways? If there is any comparable situation in your own life, Gemini, now would be a perfect time to heed my tip. Give up your attachment to the negative emotions that arose in response to past frustrations and failures. Focus on the future. CANCER (June 21-July 22): So begins the “I Love To Worry” season for you Cancerians. Even now, bewildering self-doubts are working their way up toward your conscious awareness from your unconscious depths. You may already be overreacting in anticipation of the anxiety-provoking fantasies that are coalescing. But wait! It doesn’t have to be that way. I’m here to tell you that the bewildering self-doubts and anxiety-provoking fantasies are at most 10 percent accurate. They’re not even close to being half-true! Here’s my advice: Do not go with the flow, because the flow will drag you down into ignominious habit. Resist all tendencies towards superstition, moodiness and melodramatic descents into hell. One thing you can do to help accomplish this brave uprising is to sing beloved songs with maximum feeling.

THE STATE OF UTAH TO the Defendant Alexia Whiting. You have been named as a Defendant in a Complaint filed by the Plaintiffs in the Second District Court, Davis County State of Utah, Civil Number 170701040. You are hereby summoned and required to file an answer in writing to said Complaint with the Clerk of the Second District Court, at P. O. Box 769, Farmington, UT 84025, and to serve upon or mail to Tamara J. Hauge, 4424 S. Century Drive, Murray, UT 84123 a copy of said answer within twenty one days after publication/Facebook Message/Cell phone text of this summons. If you fail to do so, the Plaintiffs will be granted the relief prayed for in their complaint by default as set forth in said Complaint.

Apothecary & Knowledge Center

Select Teas

Herbal-Black-Green-PuerhCustom Blended RAW

Kombucha Jun-Traditional-Herbal Huge Selection

Bulk Herbs

Old Medicine for the New Age!

Tinctures

Small Batch Crafted

Breath Easier This Winter

DOWNTOWN’S ONLY FLOAT SPA

1 hour Only $30

Natures Pharmacy and Knowledge Center

txt or call (801) 613.2128 619south. 600west NaturalLawApothecary.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| COMMUNITY |

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 45

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your lucky numbers are 55 and 88. By tapping into the uncanny powers of 55 and 88, you can escape the temptation of a hexed fiction and break the spell of a mediocre addiction. These catalytic codes could wake you up to a useful secret you’ve been blind to. They might help you catch the attention of familiar strangers or shrink one of your dangerous angers. When you call on 55 PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A snail can slowly crawl over the edge of a razor blade without or 88 for inspiration, you may be motivated to seek a more hurting itself. A few highly trained experts, specialists in the dynamic accomplishment beyond your comfortable success. You art of mind over matter, are able to walk barefoot over beds of could reactivate an important desire that has been dormant. hot coals without getting burned. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Pisces, you now have the metaphorical VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): equivalent of powers like these. To ensure they’ll operate at peak What exactly is the epic, overarching goal that you live for? efficiency, you must believe in yourself more than you ever have What is the higher purpose that lies beneath every one of your daily activities? What is the heroic identity you were born to before. Luckily, life is now conspiring to help you do just that. create but have not yet fully embodied? You may not be close to knowing the answers to those questions right now, Virgo. ARIES (March 21-April 19): In alignment with the current astrological omens, I have prepared In fact, I’m guessing your fear of meaninglessness might be at your horoscope using five hand-plucked aphorisms by Aries poet a peak. Luckily, a big bolt of meaningfulness is right around Charles Bernstein. 1. “You never know what invention will look the corner. Be alert for it. In a metaphorical sense, it will arrive like or else it wouldn’t be invention.” 2. “So much depends on from the depths. It will strengthen your center of gravity as it what you are expecting.” 3. “What’s missing from the bird’s reveals lucid answers to the questions I posed in the beginning eye view is plain to see on the ground.” 4. “The questioning of of this horoscope. the beautiful is always at least as important as the establishment of the beautiful.” 5. “Show me a man with two feet planted LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): firmly on the ground and I’ll show you a man who can’t get his We all need teachers. We all need guides and instructors and sources of inspiration from the day we’re born until the day we pants on.” die. In a perfect world, each of us would always have a personal mentor who’d help us fill the gaps in our learning and keep us TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It may seem absurd for a dreamy oracle like me to give economic focused on the potentials that are crying out to be nurtured in advice to Tauruses, who are renowned as being among the us. But since most of us don’t have that personal mentor, we zodiac’s top cash attractors. Is there anything I can reveal to have to fend for ourselves. We’ve got to be proactive as we push you that you don’t already know? Well, maybe you’re not aware on to the next educational frontier. The next four weeks will be that the next four weeks will be prime time to revise and refine an excellent time for you to do just that, Libra. your long-term financial plans. It’s possible you haven’t guessed the time is right to plant seeds that will produce lucrative yields SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): by 2019. And maybe you don’t realize that you can now lay the This is your last warning! If you don’t stop fending off the foundation for bringing more wealth into your life by raising happiness and freedom that are trying to worm their way into your life, I’m going to lose my cool. Damn it! Why can’t you just your generosity levels. accept good luck and sweet strokes of fate at face value?! Why do you have to be so suspicious and mistrustful?! Listen to me: GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I used to have a girlfriend whose mother hated Christmas. The abundance that’s lurking in your vicinity is not the set up The poor woman had been raised in a fanatical fundamental- for a cruel cosmic joke. It’s not some wicked game designed to ist Christian sect, and she drew profound solace and pleasure raise your expectations and then dash them to pieces. Please, from rebelling against that religion’s main holiday. One of her Scorpio, give in and let the good times wash over you.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION IN THE SALT LAKE CITY DEPT. OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, SALT LAKE COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. CASE NO. 179912314, JUDGE MARK KOURIS. CASCADE COLLECTIONS LLC, PLAINTIFF V. RICHARD VICARS, DEFENDANT. THE STATE OF UTAH TO RICHARD VICARS: You are summoned and required to answer the complaint that is on file with the court. Within 21 days after the last date of publication of this summons, you must file your written answer with the clerk of the court at the following address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, UT 84111, and you must mail or deliver a copy to plaintiff ’s attorney Chad C. Rasmussen at 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, UT 84604. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This lawsuit is an attempt to collect a debt of $7,023.65. /s/ Chad C. Rasmussen


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

46 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

Summons By Publication In The Salt Lake City Dept. Of The Third Judicial District Court, Salt Lake County, State Of Utah. Case No. 179911639, Judge Barry Lawrence. Cascade Collections Llc, Plaintiff V. Samantha Olsen, Defendant. The State Of Utah To Samantha Olsen: You Are Summoned And Required To Answer The Complaint That Is On File With The Court. Within 21 Days After The Last Date Of Publication Of This Summons, You Must File Your Written Answer With The Clerk Of The Court At The Following Address: 450 S State St., Salt Lake City, Ut 84111, And You Must Mail Or Deliver A Copy To Plaintiff's Attorney Chad C. Rasmussen At 2230 N University Pkwy., Ste. 7E, Provo, Ut 84604. If You Fail To Do So, Judgment By Default Will Be Taken Against You For The Relief Demanded In The Complaint. This Lawsuit Is An Attempt To Collect A Debt Of $6,269.98. /S/ Chad C. Rasmussen

Notice by Publication Thomas S. Cornett is petitioning for a divorce from Laura Virginia Hernandez Morales and is seeking notification from Laura Virginia Hernandez Morales if she contest the divorce or not. Contact Thomas S. Cornett, inmate number 24548-081 is located a FCI Coleman Medium, 846 NE 54th Terrace, Sumterville, FL 33521.

URBAN

FANTASTIC MASSAGE L I V I N G Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

801-577-4944 3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

Intermountain Healthcare and SelectHealth Inc. seeks the following positions:

• Senior Quality Analyst Engineer (Job ID 207250) • Staff Business Systems Analyst (Job ID 207245) • Data Architect (Job ID 207246) • Software Engineer-Staff (Job ID 207252) • Genetic Health Disease Counselor (Job ID 207251) Apply online at: https://jobs.intermountainhealthcare.org and search for job code listed. Upon hire, all applicants will be subject to drug testing/screening and background checks.

Popular downtown Ogden Bar for Sale • $995,000 Asking Price. • $350,000 /yr in profits. $440,000 in equipment • Fully licensed & staffed! Turn-key operation. Call or text George Metos at 801-440-3176

www.ubcutah.com

Your dog’s home away from home -overnight dog boarding-cageless dog daycare-dog washing stations-

801-683-3647 • www.utahdogpark.com Woods Cross: 596 W 1500 S (Woods Cross) | Airport Location: 1977 W. North Temple

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Downtown Taxes

The president and Congress are attempting to cobble together a huge tax-reform package before the end of the year. Locally, if you’re a homeowner, your property taxes are due now. If you’re a business and/ or property owner in downtown Salt Lake City, you get to pay an extra “special assessment” tax that goes to fund the Downtown Alliance (DA). What is the Downtown Alliance? Oh, come on, you’ve heard of it! Have you ever gotten a great deal on a meal during the annual Dine-O-Round? Ever ridden a GreenBike? Taken the free Jingle Bus during the holidays? I could go on, but trust me, if you’ve been downtown in the past two decades, you’ve been affected by the alliance. The nonprofit DA is a partner of the Salt Lake Chamber. Their annual budget is about $2.5 million, which comes from specialassessment funds (40 percent) and advertising and attendance fees, partnerships and sponsors (60 percent). Businesses in the Central Business District are automatic DA members, and the goal is to help build a “dynamic and diverse community that is the regional center for culture, commerce and entertainment.” Basically, the organization wants to draw more people to spend time and money downtown. Despite a big mirror ball, New Year’s “Eve” didn’t work out. Creating a multilocation festival around downtown cost a fortune and was too dependent on weather. It’s now going to be replaced with the onenight Last Hurrah event at The Gateway on Dec. 31. The outdoor mall’s street will be open to pedestrians only, and will host family friendly activities, live music and DJs, as well as a pop-up bar for adults to party away the last night of the year. The DA’s most massive ongoing success is the Downtown Farmers Market. The freshfood fest started back in 1992 to “introduce positive activities to Pioneer Park … a space notorious for criminal activities.” The market attendance blossomed but so has the area’s crime rate. During the colder months, the food-and-craft vendors are open every Saturday indoors at the Rio Grande Depot through April. How we city folk found 100plus farms and ranches to cart in their goods is a history lesson that began in the 1800s. So get this: Every time you come downtown, into the heart of our capital city, know that property owners and businesses like me and City Weekly have paid an extra tax to woo you—and to make us all look good. You’re welcome! n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner BREAK AWAY

I’ll try and save you I’ll dive right in Side by side You’re worthy my friend There are several Today you’re the one A quest to rescue you Begun Hands wide open Arms outstretched Kung Fu moves My very best For you, to you Because you Are the best My friend Ken Corbet

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

FEELING STUFFED IN? TRY A LARGER SIZE!

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED PARTLOW RENTALS:

BOUNTIFUL

WVC/MAGNA

Beautiful 2 bdrm. six-plex! Central A/C, Hook-ups, Covered parking, storage. PRICE DROP! $845

Must Have 2 bdrm! Tons of storage, private balcony, hook-ups! Don’t miss this price! $745

DOWNTOWN

DOWNTOWN

Deluxe 1 bdrm. Industrial Loft! Cement floors, exposed piping, stainless steel appliances! PRICE DROP! $995

Delightful 1 bdrm vintage charmer! Hardwood floors, alcoved walkways, built ins! PRICE DROP! $725

AVENUES

LIBERTY PARK

Amazing 1+ bdrm. duplex with full basement (guest area or storage)! Hardwood floors, double paned windows, fireplace! ! PRICE DROP! $1095

Perfect 1 bdrm. w/ counter bar dining, on-site laundry, dishwasher, track lighting! PRICE DROP! $725

VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT PARTLOWRENTS.COM VISIT OUR OFFICE LOCATION AT 440 S. 700 E. STE 203 801-484-4446


S NEofW the

Walk of Shame A presumably humiliated opossum “ran off” in late October after three Pennsylvania men posted photos on social media of themselves giving it beer and kissing it. The Pennsylvania State Game Commission was unamused by the antics of Michael Robert Tice, 18, of Newport; David Mason Snook, 19, of Reedsville; and Morgan Scot Ehrenzeller, 20, of McAlisterville, and charged them on Nov. 2 with unlawful possession of wildlife and disturbing wildlife. According to TribLive, Tice kissed and held the animal while Snook poured beer on its head and into its mouth. The men couldn’t be reached for comment.

WEIRD

Be Kind to Animals Donna Byrne, 53, of Polk County, Fla., was charged with driving under the influence on Nov. 2, but it was her mode of transportation that earned her an animal-neglect charge. Byrne was riding her horse, Boduke, down a busy road in Lakeland in the middle of the afternoon. When officers reached Byrne, she was staggering and had red, watery eyes—explained by her breath alcohol level, which was more than twice the legal limit, Polk County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Brian Bruchey told the Orlando Sentinel. Boduke got a ride to the sheriff’s Animal Control livestock facility, but Bruchey said he’d most likely be returned to Byrne, whose rap sheet includes cruelty to animals and drug possession. n In Darmstadt, Germany, police detained a 19-year-old man on Nov. 7 after they noticed “a significant bulge in his trousers” and discovered he was carrying a baby python in his pants. The unnamed man was carrying on a loud, drunken argument with another man when police were called, reported The Guardian. Officers took the man and the snake to the police station, where the snake was put in a box, and authorities considered whether the “non-species-appropriate transport” could be a violation of animal-protection laws.

Compelling Explanation The Stardust Ranch in Rainbow Valley, Ariz., has a lot to offer potential buyers: Just an hour west of Phoenix, the property boasts a 3,500-square-foot home with a pool, 10 acres, barns, a gated entry ... and two portals to another dimension: one at the back of the property, and one in the fireplace. Owner John Edmonds and his wife bought the property, now listed at $5 million, 20 years ago to run a horse rescue, but he says he’s killed more than a dozen extraterrestrials on the property (using a samurai sword) and has suffered many injuries in his encounters with them. Edmonds told KPNX TV in October that aliens tried to abduct his wife: “They actually levitated her out of the bed in the master chamber and carried her into the parking lot and tried to draw her up into the craft.” (She won’t enter the room anymore.) Listing agent Kimberly Gero notes: “This isn’t the type of property that you can just place in the MLS and wait for a buyer to come along.”

HAIRDRESSERS Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Julie “Bella” Hall

Selling homes for 33 years in the Land of Zion

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 4 years

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

Who Knew? Poland has one of the lowest birth rates in Europe, so the Polish Health Ministry is using the example of rabbits to encourage its citizens to multiply. The ministry produced a short video with a rabbit “narrator” who explains that members of the Leporidae family enjoy exercise, a healthy diet and little stress. “If you ever want to be a parent, follow the example of rabbits,” the video suggests. The ministry said in a statement to the Associated Press in early November that it was looking for a way to increase public awareness about the low birth rate that “did not offend anyone and was not vulgar.” Inexplicable Boriska Kipriyanovich, 21, of Volgograd, Russia, claims that he lived on Mars until a long-ago war wiped out all life on that planet and he has now been reborn on Earth. As a Martian, he visited Earth, where his people had close ties to ancient Egyptians; that’s how he knows there is a mechanism behind the ear of the Great Sphinx of Giza that can unlock it, which will “significantly change” life on Earth. His mother told Metro News in November that Kipriyanovich could read by the age of 1, draw by 2 and has talked about ancient civilizations since he was a small boy, despite not having been taught about them. Among his revelations about Martians: They stop aging at age 35 and are immortal; they grow to about 7 feet tall and breathe carbon dioxide; and they still live on Mars, but underground. No further word about what changes an “unlocked” Sphinx will bring. Unusual Hobbies Kung fu master Li Weijun used his bare hands to smash 302 walnuts in 55 seconds on Nov. 1, breaking a Guinness World Record. The previous record, held by a man in India, was 212 walnuts in one minute, according to United Press International. Weijun accomplished the feat in Foshan City, Guangdong Province, China, with video cameras rolling to capture the proof, which has been submitted to Guinness for official recognition. Wait, What? In case simply eating fried chicken isn’t enough for KFC fans in Japan, Twitter users there have an opportunity to luxuriate in the essence of one of 100 KFC “bath bombs”—bath salts infused with the fast food giant’s signature “11 herbs and spices.” KFC tells United Press International that the limited-edition bath bombs won’t be sold in stores, but people who retweet the chain’s promotional post will be entered to win one.

HOME LOANS MADE BRIZZÉE Julie Bri-ZAY, makes home buying ea-ZAY Loan officer I NMLS#243253

Julie Brizzee Citywide Home Loans NMLS#67180

801-747-1206

Providing All Mortgage Loan Services Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

NOVEMBER 23, 2017 | 47

Ow Ow Ow! A Chicago wiener stand was the scene of a crime gone south on Oct. 31 when Terrion Pouncy, 19, accidentally discharged his gun, which he was trying to conceal in his pants, and shot himself in a most sensitive location. The Chicago Tribune reported police were called to the Original Maxwell Street Polish at about 6 a.m., after a hooded man threatened employees with a smallcaliber pistol. One of the employees gave him money from the cash register, according to the complaint against Pouncy, after which the robber stole the man’s cellphone and wallet, and ran outside, stuffing the gun in his pants, but it went off twice, striking his “groin” and thigh. Pouncy kept running and eventually

called 911 to report that he’d been shot. He was charged with two counts of armed robbery with a firearm, but couldn’t appear for his bond hearing, as he was recovering at a local hospital.

| COMMUNITY |

Smooth Reactions Tempers flared in Minot, N.D., before 33-year-old Cornelius Marcel Young was charged with terrorizing after attacking his fiancee’s brother at a trailer park on Nov. 3. The Minot Daily News reported that Young yelled at the brother, punched him in the face and knocked him into a wall after he had turned up the thermostat in the trailer, according to a Minot Municipal Court affidavit. When the brother threatened to call police, Young brandished a knife, as his fiancee jumped on his back and bit his ear “to distract him.” Two children were in the trailer during the fight but were uninjured.

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Nakedly Weird A family of three were taken from their home and forced into a car on Nov. 7 in Leduc County, Alberta, Canada, by five naked people. The man, who was placed in the trunk, quickly escaped, and his wife and baby also managed to get away, according to The Canadian Press. A passing truck driver picked up the three victims, but then the naked kidnappers’ car rammed his truck from behind, sending it into a ditch. Royal Canadian Mounted Police caught up with the criminals; of the five, two were minors and were not charged. The adults faced charges of kidnapping and resisting arrest. The RCMP gave no explanation for why the five kidnappers were naked, but posited that drugs or alcohol might have been involved.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL


The

Backstop

It may be on the BACK but readers stop here to see your ad FIRST! Call for rates 801-575-7028

WORDS sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947 VOICEOVER WORKSHOP Forming in SLC, Learn to earn voicing commercials & more. www.voscott.com/workshops.html

DIVORCE ONLY $297

PHILLIP COOMBS

DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

Happy Birthday to you aka THE Plank King of Utah

FEEL BETTER TODAY!

- 2 locations to serve you

717 S 300 W #D • 801.486.5500 pridemassageslc.com

NOW HIRING - COMMISSION & BOTH RENT OPTIONS AVAILABLE

4500 s. 535 e. #D170 801-590-9521

reviveslc.com

Easy and Fast (48 hrs) www.callthedivorcefirm.com

Free Consult 801-981-4478

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

HOLIDAY MASSAGE SPECIAL $20 OFF services code 20FIX E-GIFT CARDS $20+ OFF! www.MassageFixUtah.com

DUCES WILD IS FOR SALE

CITY WEEKLY STORE

GOT WORDS?

Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

With One PhOne Call

• We Make “House Calls” • Simple and Hassle Free • Paid For or Not • Quickly Sell Your Car, Truck or Van • Have a Check About 15 Minutes After We Arrive

“It’s Worth Your Time To Call”

Call or Text 24/6

801-560-9933 WWW.CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

South Salt Lake SOB license Class D liquor license 801-918-3066 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

NEW WINDSHIELDS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

48 | NOVEMBER 23, 2017

Sell Your Car Today

Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

WE WAIVE

$100 OF YOUR

INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-414-4103

AWINDSHIELDREPLACEM ENT.COM

Certificates available in

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

OGDEN 763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

Free Press Isn’t Free

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

Support Local Journalism. Join Press Backers Today!

If truth matters, if standing up to the big fellas matter, we invite you to become a Press Backer. Support local journalism. Support local voices. Help us tell the stories no one else will tell. Truth does matter. Make a difference today.

Exclusive offers available only for Press Backers members. Check us out! www.pressbackers.com

THE WEEK PHOTO OF WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY NG ISSUE GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATURED IN AN UPCOMI TAG YOUR PHOTOS

#CWCOMMUNITY

City Weekly November 23, 2017  
City Weekly November 23, 2017  

Give