Page 1

C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | VOL. 34

N0. 21

SATANISTS

ARE PEOPLE, TOO SHAKE HANDS WITH YOUR DEVIL-LOVING NEIGHBOR.

BY AMANDA ROCK


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY DEVIL MADE THEM DO IT

Local members of The Satanic Temple and the Church of Satan dispel the devilworshipper stereotype. Cover photo by Sarah Arnoff saraharnoff.com

14

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 18 A&E 24 DINE 29 CINEMA 31 TRUE TV 32 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

SOFIA CIFUENTES

Graphic designer Hailing from Bogotá, Colombia, Cifuentes has called Utah home for two years. “Although I am not used to the winter months yet, I love to enjoy the many mountain lakes and wild places that are in this magical state,” she says of her adoptive home.

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

NEWS

Redistricting issue lingers. facebook.com/slcweekly

ENTER TO WIN Enter to Win a Screening Pass To Thank You for Your Service at cityweekly.net/freestuff.

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

CULTURE

Movies that thrill and chill.

Twitter: @cityweekly • Deals at cityweeklystore.com


10” PRIME SERIES R1

M.E.S.A. MONEY GET THE SOUND YOU DREAM OF

save $220

150 WATTS RMS

6.2” DOUBLE DIN IN-DASH RECEIVER

PROGRESSIVE LEASE / PURCHASE 70% APPROVAL RATE

MSRP $400.

00

Reg. Price: $12000

$17999

∙ 200 Watt (50 x 4) RMS Power Rating ∙ 3 RCA, 4 Volt Pre-Outs ∙ USB ∙ DVD ∙ Back up camera ready

12” SUBWOOFER

List Price: $40000

!

10”

Reg. Price: $27900

BUILT-IN AMPLIFIER & SUBWOOFER

300 WATTS RMS TRUE POWER

$4000 OFF

$25999 Reg. Price: $29900

• • • •

4 Ohm Single Voice Coil 300 Watts Peak Stamped Steel Frame 150 Watts Rms

$4800

EACH

AM/FM/CD/USB/AUX/DVD BLUETOOTH RECEIVER 2 YEAR WARRANTY W/ DEALER INSTALLATION

save $100

FRONT

USB

Reg. Price: $10000

2 YEAR WARRANTY W/ DEALER INSTALLATION

REMOTE CONTROL INCLUDED

EXTERNAL MIC

• 200 Watts (50x4) RMS Power Rating • 3 RCA Pre Outs • Steering Wheel Control Ready • Detachable Face Plate • CD/Door Cover

$149

AFTER $40.00 INSTANT REBATE

99

List Price: $25000

∙ 200 Watt (50wattsx4) RMS Power Rating ∙ 2 Video RCA Pre-Outs ∙ Back up camera ready

$14999

List Price: $25000

W W W. S OU N D WA R E H OUS E .C O M

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

FREE LAYAWAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 10/25/17

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 3

HOURS

10AM TO 7PM MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

$7999

USB INPUT AUX INPUT

NO CD PLAYER

AM/FM/CD/MP3 WMA RECEIVER

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

$22999

save $20

∙ 200 WATTS (50wx4) RMS Power Rating ∙ App Compatibility, MIX-TRAX ∙ Built-in Bluetooth and Color Customization

PRIME SERIES

12” POWER SUB SYSTEM

10” POWER SUB SYSTEM

$5000 OFF

CREDIT NEEDED

NOW

yo

300 WATTS RMS TRUE POWER

OPTION

soundwarehouse.com/financing

ice ur cho

BUILT-IN AMPLIFIER & SUBWOOFER

NO

DAY PAYMENT

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

$6999

10” SUBWOOFER & A 10” WOOFER ENCLOSURE BOX FROM SCOSCHE

90

CREDIT CARD


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

4 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, Sept. 27, “Ghost Mall”

A mall’s a mall. They often try to replicate downtowns, but those things occur in a more organic way. Lifestyle centers are forced and planned—fake. People are looking for more authentic experiences than places like this offer. I hope they’re able to turn it around.

CHAD BANKS

and it’s the only reason I force myself to go to the “other” mall.

BENTON CLARK Via Facebook

RICHARD WARNICK

So far, everything is much uglier. They have started to paint everything white. It looks like a cement prison complex now.

RYAN BRIMHALL Via Facebook

Via Facebook All this new owner has to do is hold on a couple of years. The original plan, with all of its condos and apartments was too forced, but now natural expansion has taken place all around The Gateway. These developments, combined with the crackdown at Rio Grande has the future looking brighter now than any time previous. If it can land a handful of bars in addition to the confirmed Dave & Buster’s, it might make it. The remodel of the exterior spaces has really made the area look better.

DANIEL COCHRANE Via Facebook

If this comes to fruition, it sounds amazing! But the local gov’t needs to participate and loosen up for this to really be a success and create a new niche in the Salt Lake scene.

JAIME PIMSLER Via Facebook

ED THATCHER Via Facebook

Being able to get a drink might help.

WENDI GUERRERO Via Facebook

I hated when the Apple Store moved away. That’s the only reason I went to The Gateway,

Via cityweekly.net

Hits & Misses, Sept. 27, “No Fun Zone”

I love The Gateway. I hope its comeback brings back its glory.

Is having a happy childhood in Utah really necessary? Nope!

Via Facebook

Via Twitter

I love it a lot better than City Creek! It’s not Mormon-owned or pretentious!

Right? City Creek also has one of the worst security staff I’ve ever met.

The system is not trying to produce healthy artists—duh. They want barely educated worker drones that are easily led. Just look at the snowflakes they are producing now, SJWs and antifa. The future looks bright!

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Cover story, Oct. 5, “The Censored List”

Five Spot, Sept. 27, “Why are Utah’s rape rates higher than national ones?”

SARAHJANE ALETA MORRISON

NIC DELGADO Via Facebook

CK DARCEY

Here’s City Weekly casually reminding us of the supposedly God-fearing cowards who refuse to play fair.

@GENREZERO

I knew the first time I went there, outdoor malls would be a short-term fad. If they wanna make the mall successful, put on a roof, add A/C and heat. People don’t go outside when it’s too hot or too cold. The new City Creek mall and the homeless problem do not help, either.

cally cut the size of ten national monuments, and the report doesn’t even pretend otherwise.

Via Twitter

@ARIELELAINE89

DAVE CALDWELL

Pretty clearly because of dominated religious culture.

the

male-

@FREDASCHMAUCH Via Twitter

Via Facebook

@CARLIAL921

And a purpose of Christianity is to “save” the infidel—by whatever means necessary?

Via Twitter

It has been pointed out many times that Trump has two options if he wants to modify or revoke any of our national monuments. He can try to do it unilaterally (legally impossible due to the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976) or by asking for an act of Congress (politically impossible). I find it ironic that Secretary Zinke complains about political motivations when that describes his own report. There simply isn’t a non-political reason to drasti-

Claiming all Islam is war is the same as claiming all whites are KKK. It’s a lie ... and is the first sign of bigotry and hate. Muslims are not all jihadist, just like not all Utah is Mormon. Generalizations are false.

MICHAEL JAMES STONE

Hint: It rhymes with morons.

News, Sept. 27, “Monumental Fumble”

The Straight Dope, Sept. 27, “The Real Holy War”

Because many cults that practice here look down on women. We are not going to take it anymore.

CARRIE TEETER EWING Via Facebook

There’s no stigma for women or men who have been assaulted. We’re survivors and we can overcome this. Stand together!

KRISTAL YI BULLOCK

MAREK AF

Via Facebook

The Ocho, Oct. 5, “Eight scare-filled local Halloween attractions for the budget-minded” Just don’t ride your bike without a light on it or it will be a real horror for you.

MIKE SALES Via Facebook

Via Facebook

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns BENJAMIN BENALLY, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, DAVID MILLER, MIKE RIEDEL, AMANDA ROCK, TED SCHEFFLER, ALEX SPRINGER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

Production

Business/Office

Circulation

Marketing

Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Circulation Manager ERIC GRANATO

Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS

Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZ-KINNY, MATTHEW AULDRIC BEERE, TERESA BAGDASAROVA, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, SAMMIE HERZOG, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, POLINA LYUBAVINA, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS

Sales

Director of Advertising, Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives ANNE BAILEY, LISA DORELLI, PAULINA JEDLICA KNUDSON, ALEX MARKHAM, JEREMIAH SMITH

Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales DANIEL COWAN, MIKEY SALTAS Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866

All Contents © 2017

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

Phone 801-575-7003 Email comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Copperfield Publishing Inc. JOHN SALTAS City Weekly founder

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 5


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

6 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

PRIVATE EY Eternal Memory

Last week, I worked from home for a few days because my horoscope said to. Mostly, I slid into a lounge chair and thought about my good friend Vasilios Priskos who died on Oct. 9. Priskos was more than a friend. So much more that a major reason you’re reading this now is because he made it a point that this newspaper would not die when perhaps it should have. I would rather have the paper die and not him. His legendary generosity, coupled with his true north passion for investigative news stories and the free press, led to his making sure that when fortunes changed in the news industry, and cash flows ebbed and flowed, we were certain to cover our own behind. And he did most of that after becoming partner to a wheelchair that the cancer choking his spinal cord had bound him to. He did that when most of the media intelligentsia had forsaken print, claiming—wrongly, but believably—that we were doomed to the same fate as the whale oil industry. Priskos knew our value and he never wavered. He knew our role and he never questioned it. Now, damn the fates and the false prophets, he is not here to read it. While at home, I spent a fair amount of time flicking through the maze of mindless television. One of my mechanical flicks landed on the movie Serendipity starring John Cusack and Kate Beckinsale. I pay attention to strokes of serendipity because, thanks to scores of unexplainable events, I’ve come to believe nothing is random. Who else can claim to have hailed the same cab driver six times out of 10 rides on six random corners at six different times of the day in Mazatlán, where the drivers and

B Y J O H N S A LT A S @johnsaltas

their golf-cart taxis buzz like flies? Even the driver couldn’t believe it. On the final pick up, he turned off the meter and showed us a side of the beach town tourists never get to see. Years ago, I sat at a casino bar in Wendover at 4 a.m. with just one other customer and we began a conversation. His favorite baseball team was the New York Yankees, as was mine. He’d only been to one Yankee game ever and saw Ron Guidry win his 20th game of the 1978 season. I was also in the Yankee Stadium that day, and it was my first time, too. A month prior, he’d watched the Marshall Tucker Band during Summerfest in Milwaukee. I was there dancing to “Fire on The Mountain” at the exact same time. A couple weeks after that, we passed each other in Price, Utah, and this night we ended up on those bar stools at 4 a.m. in Wendover. We both just shook our heads. Weird. Another less weird and more mysterious incident happened in Thessaloniki, Greece. It was July 15, 2005, exactly six months after my father’s passing. My mother, along on the trip, said she was sad and didn’t want to go walking with us that day. I told her to pick out a church—there are hundreds of them—and light a candle for Dad in order to feel better. For an hour she kept asking, “Which church? Which church?” and I said, “Geez, just pick one, they’re like candy stores.” So, she pointed over there and off we went. When we came out I took her picture. I looked at the picture later and read the name of the church. It was my father’s guardian Saints name. Yeah, I know. But as I was watching Serendipity and all these little clues of randomness kept popping up in scenes or pieces of dialogue and I kept getting misty-eyed. I kept thinking the friendship between Vasilios and I was not just some random thing; there was something behind it, just like

in the movie. There was a larger meaning to our friendship. I remember him serving me burgers at Royal Burger—the diner on 400 S. Main (later Royal Eatery) where his immigrant family first realized their American Dream. Maybe that wasn’t random either. Maybe everything that came later was payback for those first french fries. It had to be something. Then, as I am literally reading his obituary, one of the Serendipity characters said to another, “You know the Greeks didn’t write obituaries, they only asked one question after a man died: ‘Did he have passion?’” Wait, what? That’s not entirely so, barely true even, but no matter, I believed it at that moment, and if anyone lived a life of passion—in spades and in every other suit—it was Vasilios Priskos, a husband, son, father, brother, raconteur, gambler, teacher, businessman, mentor and friend. Well over 1,000 fellow citizens bid him farewell last week. With mercy, none of us will see another funeral ceremony the likes of which the Salt Lake City community gave to Priskos. So big, so grand, so many people, so sad. So young to go. So brutal. We shall scurry on to fight and survive another day, issue, month, and so should you. You did not know Priskos randomly. You knew him because you were supposed to know him, if only for the lesson to never give up. He fought hard, harder than most of us ever will, against an enemy stronger than any most of us will know. And for longer, too. But people die. In one last piece of randomness, another line from the same movie or Jeopardy!, I forget: “People live as long as you keep remembering them.” In his native Greece they say, “May his memory be eternal.” That would be a very long, rewarding ending, perfect for Vasilios Priskos. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 7


BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Politics in School • DAYCARE • OVERNIGHT

• WASHES • DOG HIKING

NEW CLIENTS

RECEIVE

2626 SOUTH 300 WEST, SLC 801.618.2414 I FETCHUTAH.COM

1 FREE DAY OF DAYCARE

Oh, really, Lisa Cummins? Are you really a member of the state school board—the group dedicated to providing children with a proper education? Do you really want to promote whitewashed history lessons and teaching children only what comports with your own personal political philosophy? Right-wing politicians like Utah Sen. Margaret Dayton have long fought against the concept of critical thinking, especially the kind they disagree with. Wesleyan University researchers have identified political components to schooling—including “the assimilation of immigrants” and “the development of citizenship.” Cummins, whose side lost, voted against showing students the award-winning musical Hamilton because of its governmentenlarging message, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. Maybe she thinks kids should know about only those Founding Fathers she deems worthy. Are there any?

Isn’t It Ironic?

We get it. U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop doesn’t like Bears Ears National Monument. Neither do his rural, oil-rich constituents. Bishop introduced “The National Monument Creation and Protection Act,” which a Durango Herald opinion writer called ironic “because it is intended to hamper both creation and protection.” Utah Sen. Jim Dabakis railed against the bill in a Facebook video, where he said, “To see a man who has tremendous power in our state use it for evil just gets me over the edge.” Dabakis made a good point. The bill would let presidents designate monuments up to 640 acres without restriction, but would make anything more virtually impossible. Bears Ears is 1.3 million acres. “This is our sanity,” Dabakis continued. “Goodbye to this sacred land that we ... need to keep us sane as the state of Utah grows and multiplies and becomes a mini Los Angeles.”

Called Out

Remember when Utah’s Housing First initiative made national news? No? That’s probably because it wasn’t enough. Housing First might not work, according to Washington-based Baby Steps Ministry, which stated, “Homelessness can ultimately be boiled down to loneliness and extended isolation, combined with the great variety of hard circumstances that people face.” OrgCode CEO Iain De Jong, according to The Salt Lake Tribune, called Operation Rio Grande “an exercise in social control rather than social service.” Yes, there were arrests. Addicts and homeless people have scattered. But the problem remains. De Jong was willing to say it: Criminalizing homelessness is wrong.

CAMILLE WASHINGTON

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

HITS&MISSES

Sisters Camille and Alicia Washington are co-directors of Ogden-based Good Company Theatre (goodcotheatre.com). Their current production, Marie Antoinette, marks the company’s debut in its new location at 2402 Wall Ave. in Ogden.

What was the inspiration for launching Good Company—and why in Ogden?

​A licia: Throughout college, I attended productions outside of Utah that presented theater in a different way than I’d ever experienced. After college, I found myself looking for a space that allowed theater to be experienced in a different way than what was being offered here in Utah. So, when the spark to start something myself became a flame, Ogden was a no-brainer. Camille: Ogden is a theater town from way back. There were small-stage productions downtown in the early 20th century, and Drama Club of Ogden has been around for over 100 years. It’s fun to add to that history.

What challenges involved with running a theater company were most unexpected when you began?

C: I have a visual-arts administration background, so everything was pretty new. What took me by surprise is how much actors and technicians are expected to do for little or no money, especially at a non-equity or community level. Many actors new to GCT are surprised when we offer them modest stipends. A: I can put up a show with my eyes closed, but the administration side is shockingly time intensive. Camille and I do everything, from marketing to set design to janitorial work. The work load is immense, but immensely satisfying. ​

What was the reason for moving to the new location?

A: GCT was ready to move into a facility that was more accessible for all of us, from having a rehearsal studio to minimize the gap between productions, to storage space, to higher ceilings for a better lighting grid. The new facility will help us achieve the level of professionalism we want to reach. And more bathrooms. We needed more than one bathroom. C: Our new location is a dream. … Five years was the perfect amount of time at our old space. In 2012, we were just hoping people would show up. Growth is a gift.

—SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net


COMING SOON

CITY WEEKLY AUTOS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 9

www.cityweekly.net

STAY TUNED...


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

Can friends and family video-conference with prisoners? I know prisoners have access to phones and can have visitors, but it seems like video would also make it easier to keep in touch. —Filmore, via the Straight Dope Message Board   Heck of an idea you’ve got there, Filmore. Know who else is a fan of video visitation, as it’s called? Good old Joe Arpaio, late of the Maricopa County, Ariz., sheriff’s department, where he gained a reputation for ghastly human rights abuses before being voted out of office and convicted of contempt (and subsequently pardoned by Donald Trump). Arpaio called video visitation “a win for everyone involved,” and while we live in a complex world with few easy answers, I’d suggest you couldn’t find a more reliable rule of thumb than: If Sheriff Joe’s for it, be wary. And indeed, video visitation is far from the simple convenience it might appear to be. Let’s thumb through Screening Out Family Time, a 2015 report by the nonprofit think tank Prison Policy Initiative, which elucidates some objections to what the organization calls the “for-profit video visitation industry”: This ain’t Skype. Or FaceTime, either. If you’re picturing high-quality video service, forget it—this is “poorly designed” technology, according to the report’s authors, plagued with complaints about crappy connections. That’s particularly a problem for friends and relatives trying to connect from home: Video visitation is typically free when using dedicated visitor terminals at correctional facilities, but anyone logging on remotely is paying handsomely for the terrible service Even if the tech were to get sorted out on the provider’s end, consider the customer. PPI cites a Bureau of Justice Statistics survey of previously incarcerated people in which 86 percent of respondents reported an income of less than $25,000—in other words, folks from families unlikely to have access to the decent computers and reliable bandwidth a good video link requires. In-person visits work. Most of these video schemes have been implemented at county jails, rather than prisons, which seems exactly backward: Unlike state prisons, jails aren’t the kinds of places that generally require loved ones to travel long distances for a visit. And video visitation isn’t supplementing in-person visits, as ideally it should; it’s replacing it altogether. In 74 percent of jails, PPI found, in-person visits were no longer permitted after video visits were implemented—in at least some cases, at the request of the contractor responsible for the video technology. Why does this matter? Because “family contact,” PPI writes, “is one of the surest ways to reduce the likelihood that an individual will re-offend,” so it’s something that jails and prisons should want to facilitate, not discourage. (Unlike jails, prisons seem to recognize this: PPI found

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Prison Calls

“virtually no state prisons” that had eliminated in-person visitation.) Even a single visit to an incarcerated offender has been shown to reduce the chance of recidivism by 13 percent. And beyond any technical challenges, video makes visitation difficult because … It’s really expensive. This is the big one, and opens the door to tons of broader issues. Video visitation is administered by external contractors, who charge out the nose for the service—in some cases, up to $1.50 a minute. Again, sometimes these companies will stipulate in their contracts that in-person visits be banned—hey, they’re bad for business. This is of a piece with how all sorts of carceral services have been privatized, and at great cost to inmates and their families. It’s a tremendous racket: The companies make piles of money, the facilities get a kickback and the fees can be set at extortionate levels while the services provided are lousy— after all, the contractors have a literally captive consumer base and in many cases a near lock on the market. Sending money to an incarcerated pal? That’s another way these companies make a buck. The Center for Public Integrity found transmission fees of up to 45 percent in some states; they mention one Tennessee woman who pays a total of $70 just to send $50 to her son in the clink. And remember, that’s money inmates’ relatives don’t typically have; more than a third of families with an incarcerated loved one go into debt paying for visits and phone calls alone. As you might guess, those calls aren’t cheap either. In fact, in 2013 the Federal Communications Commission announced rules capping inmate phone fees, citing, for instance, charges up to $17 for a 15-minute call. Who would argue against sensible government regulation like that, right? Well, one commissioner did dissent from the ruling: Ajit Pai, who (you can’t make this up) now leads the agency, promoted to the chairman’s job by Donald Trump. The companies levying the sky-high fees sued, of course, and earlier this year, with Pai in charge, the FCC ceased its legal defense of the rate caps. In June, an appeals court ruled that the FCC didn’t have the authority to regulate inmate phone charges, which could go on being exorbitant. So sure, video conferencing’s a great service, just like inmate phone calls—provided you’re the one hooking up the cables. n Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill _ frost

Eight more things Rocky Anderson could apologize for besides endorsing SLC Mayor Jackie Biskupski:

8. Not vanquishing proven imbecile Sean Hannity in that idiotic debate 10 years ago.

upon the citizens of Salt Lake City.

5. His 2012 presidential cam-

paign—like just any narcissist can run to be Commander in Chief.

4. Walking back statements

comparing the LDS church to the Taliban.

2. Again, the Salt Lake City

Jazz Festival. Together, we can eradicate jazz music in our lifetime.

which led to mundane mayors Ralph Becker and Biskupski. It’s Utah; you’re supposed to cling to office until you’re dead.

GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE PANEL

Trauma from gender-based violence contributes to the mental health issues of women, as an issue paper from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research notes. In fact, Utah has the ninthhighest rate for female suicide in the nation. As part of the Women of Color Conversation Series, this panel discussion on Ending Gender-Based Violence coincides with Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and hopes to bring the problem out of the shadows. The panel includes Matapuna Levenson of the Y WCA Utah’s Salt Lake Area Family Justice Center; Carol Surveyor of PANDOS; and Stephany Murguia Vega of the Rape Recovery Center. Y WCA of Utah, 322 E. 300 South, 801-537-8604, Thursday, Oct. 19, 6:30-8:30 p.m., free, seating limited, bit.ly/2yGPozO

UNDERSTANDING POLICE VIOLENCE

If you’re wondering when police violence is appropriate, you’re asking the wrong question. Violence might be a systemic problem, often directed at oppressed peoples, Utah Against Police Brutality says. It’s more than beatings and killings. It’s more than what you see on body-cam footage and cell phone videos. UAPB is offering “Beyond the Footage: Understanding Police Violence,” a discussion on the national day of action against police brutality. Panelists will help you understand what police violence is and how to recognize it. More importantly, you’ll learn how to fight against it. The Beehive Social Club, 666 S. State, 801-555-6669, Sunday, Oct. 22, 6-7 p.m., free, bit.ly/2ykN3JA

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 11

1. Opting out of a third term,

It seems like everyone’s channeling the Founding Fathers these days. At this discussion, you can learn what the U.S. Constitution really says, what it means to us today and how we’re using it to justify government actions. University of Utah political science professor Tim Chambless will tell you “What You Should Know About the Constitution” and address First Amendment freedoms, the Electoral College, the presidential pardon power, the roles of the commander-in-chief, and what it takes to get impeached. If you’re wondering about any of this, or think you already know the answers, you might be surprised by the truth. Columbus Center of South Salt Lake, 2530 S. 500 East, 801-2728683, Thursday, Oct. 19, 6-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/lwvslconstitution1

| CITY WEEKLY |

able water bottles to Big Plastic.

CONSTITUTION DISCUSSION

3. Conceding the war on dispos-

CHANGE THE WORLD

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

6.

Not dismantling the DABC after Brewvies’ Deadpool victory.

In a week, you can

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

7. Continually inflicting jazz

CITIZEN REVOLT


ARTS FUNDING

Fight or Flight

The Leonardo emerges from rocky financial start, prepares for next phase. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

O

n its website, The Leonardo Museum in Library Square describes itself as a “communitypowered” nonprofit. Meaning this: The museum, inside a five-floor building with 30,000 squarefeet of exhibit space, is driven to inspire and educate the people who visit. But a more literal reading of the phrase “community-powered” applies, too, because taxpayers are paying the museum’s power bill—and have been for at least two years. A records request to the city showed that The Leonardo has amassed almost $200,000 in unpaid invoices for electricity, gas, boilerplant and water costs. The building is city-owned, and leased to the museum for $1 per month, a contract Salt Lake City spokesman Matthew Rojas says is unique. The Leonardo is on the hook for its utilities, but stopped paying them around August 2015. Monthly bills range from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars. The most expensive line item is from June 2016 when the electricity alone topped $6,800. Consistently, the monthly invoices have been left unpaid and total $197,637.79 through August this year, when the document was compiled. So why the delinquency? Katie Smith, director of development, says the unpaid utility invoices are one item in a complicated lease renegotiation between the city and the museum that is moving slowly, yet amicably. “We’re just trying to figure out in the end if it gets folded into the lease negotiation [or] if it gets forgiven—that’s an option,” she says. “If we decide that it’s our responsibility, then we’ll pay those and get caught up.” The Leonardo opened in 2011. Smith likens the museum’s early years to that of a startup company—beginnings marked with uncertainty amid enthusiasm. The unpaid utility invoices represent rocky financial times, she says. “We opened in the red, actually,” she continues. Construction costs compounded with other exigent fixes— the escalators have had problems, for

DW HARRIS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

12 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

NEWS

“If we decide that it’s our responsibility, then we’ll pay those and get caught up,” The Leonardo’s Katie Smith says of the delinquent accounts. example—required The Leonardo to scrape the bottom of its reserves. The first five years, Smith explains, were foundational. The museum invested in traveling exhibits like Body Worlds and Mummies that are expensive but showcased the niche the museum occupies in the community, while reinforcing its mission statement. Like its namesake, Leonardo da Vinci, the museum’s goal is to fuse science, technology and art experiences while inspiring creativity and innovation. “There were years when it was lean, especially when you add depreciation in,” Smith says of a time she describes as “will we or won’t we make it?” But that was then. The first quarter of the museum’s annual $3.5 million budget currently is on track, she says. “We understand what our expenses and revenues look like.” About 1.2 million visitors have come through its doors since opening, and “earned revenue”—which includes tickets, memberships, catering, retail and bistro sales—accounts for around 40 to 60 percent of the overall budget, she says. With six years’ worth of data, The Leonardo and the city decided to revisit the lease agreement, which is for 20 years with options for 10-year extensions. Hashing out a new accord has taken longer than expected, Smith says, but it comes at a time when The Leonardo is pushing ahead.

Now that the museum has turned the corner and made it through precarious financial beginnings, it’s looking to enter a new phase. The in-house exhibit Flight has become a cornerstone. This winter, the museum will debut Alive, another three- to five-year exhibit, which will convey “the spirit of what it means to be alive,” Smith says. “There’s going to be some exploration into AI and where does that go [and] some virtual reality simulations, but we really want to capture the wonder of life.” In another area, The Leonardo aims to establish a “makerspace” complete with a CNC (computer numeric control) machine, photography lab and other DIY nooks where users can nourish their innovative ideas. The museum would like to jazz up its exterior as a way of projecting what’s going on inside the building. Still in the planning stages, ideas include a glass entry point, striping the wall in neon lights, spelling out the name in giant, climbable letters or illuminating the sides with digital screens. “But it takes a lot of money to do a cool treatment on the outside,” Smith says. Therein lies the challenge. Any exterior revamp is too early in the planning stages to pin down a dollar amount. But Smith envisions it would be paid for—as many cultural institutions are—with a mixture of public and private funding. “Anything

would be paired with private funding from foundations, individual donors, corporate sponsors plus public funding from some sort, whether it’s state, city or county. It would be a mixture of those,” she says. Securing public money can be competitive. Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts and Parks (ZAP) Director Kirsten Darrington says The Leonardo has applied for Tier I ZAP funding, but so far hasn’t been approved. Tier I ZAP funding is limited to 22 entities that must reapply each year. So if a new museum or garden is granted Tier I funding, that means one from the previous year will be dropped. The funding is for nonprofits that operate in the county and are large enough to handle the influx of funds. In addition, the money is meant to go to entities that provide cultural or educational experiences. “We want to see that they have a clearly botanical or cultural or artistic purpose and that they are providing access to Salt Lake County residents,” Darrington says. “That is really at the heart of what we want to do with ZAP funds. We want to see these organizations providing access to these.” The Leonardo is hopeful that it will be a future recipient. “When we get funded, someone else will then go back to Tier II,” Smith says. “It’s a long process because there’s implications for the community.” CW


MAKE-UP

MEN’S

WOMEN’S

WIGS

1147 EAST ASHTON AVE, SLC • 801.484.7996 • MON- SAT 11-9PM • SUN 1-5PM • PIBSEXCHANGE.COM

YOUR COSTUME CONNECTION COSTUMES BY DREAMGIRL & LEG AVENUE

801-363-0565 | 580 E 300 S w w w. t h e a r t f l o r a l . c o m

Fall Is A Great Time To glovernursery.com

Mon-Sat 8-6 I Closed Sundays

801-562-5496 — 9275 S 1300 W

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Plant

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 13


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

SATANISTS

ARE PEOPLE, TOO SHAKE HANDS WITH YOUR DEVIL-LOVING NEIGHBOR.

F

BY AMANDA ROCK |

@SLC_VGN | COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET PHOTOS BY SARAH ARNOFF | ARNOFFOTO

ire! Brimstone! Router connectivity issues? If you’re thinking satanists are greasy haired, black-clad juvenile delinquents, you’re way off. The bunch interviewed here at least are more likely to work in your IT department or attend city council meetings than to waste their Saturday nights sacrificing cats and summoning demons. A witch and warlock from the Church of Satan (“the first above-ground organization in history openly dedicated to the acceptance of Man’s true nature”), along with five members of The Satanic Temple explain their religious beliefs in the following pages. What they both have in common is that neither group actually believes in Satan—or God for that matter. What they don’t have in common is anything else. The Satanic Temple is basically a political activist group hell-bent on protecting civil liberties. According to its website, their mission is “to encourage benevolence and empathy among all people, reject tyrannical authority, advocate practical common sense and justice and be directed by the human conscience to undertake noble pursuits guided by the individual will.” Founded in 2012, the organization has 20 chapters throughout the country. Members’ beliefs follow seven basic tenets, which outline principles on justice, compassion, scientific understanding, respect and personal freedom. The now disbanded Utah chapter was behind the After School Satan Club, which challenged the use of public schools by Christian groups. The Church of Satan was founded in 1966 by San Francisco-based musician, author and occultist Anton Szandor LaVey. The organization sees Satan as representing pride, individualism and enlightenment. They accept humans’ true nature, and encourage self-indulgence and carnality. Members worship themselves rather than God. Along with The Satanic Bible and Eleven Satanic Rules of the Earth, the church abides by nine sins—the cardinal one being “stupidity.”

MEGAN KENNEDY

“There is usually a lot of surprise, amusement and sometimes disgust when you share with people that you’re either atheist or satanist,” says Kennedy, a published writer, event photographer, artist and self-described workaholic. Her photography and digital art is beautiful and dark. The Cottonwood Heights resident spends her free time playing video games, exploring graveyards, reading, camping and dispelling misconceptions. “Our culture is severely lacking on religious education and respect for the concept of pluralism. Even people who don’t ‘believe in the devil’ will be visibly uncomfortable that I’ve chosen to align myself with symbols and mythology that has historically been labeled as ‘evil’ or ‘immoral,’” she says. “Most of the time, though, people are curious and kind even if they don’t agree with the choice, and this is especially true once you introduce them to the realities of The Satanic Temple and the work they’ve done thus far to protect civil liberties.” Fascinated by the work of The Satanic Temple, Kennedy reached out to the head of the now-disbanded Utah chapter with her idea of a free lecture series. “The Satanic Temple’s Seven Tenets coincide beautifully with the goals of the Religious Education Series,” she says. “I knew we could work together to help affect cultural change, and luckily they agreed.” The series of free lectures explores everything from demon possession to deconstructing religion’s role in extremism. “I’ve studied religion and myth most of my life, and there is a major failure in our culture regarding understanding things like historical context

and the ways religion truly affects us,” she says. “I’m doing my best to combat that by introducing the public to research that often doesn’t reach them thanks to the gatekeeping of academia.” Her explanation of satanism is simple: “For me and The Satanic Temple, a satanist is someone who doesn’t recognize divine authority,” she points out. “We embrace rationality, personal sovereignty, critical thinking, compassion and reason. We align with the mythological symbol of Satan or Lucifer in order to defy the status quo of state-sponsored Christianity and its cultural influence. Satan represents the Other, the outsider. As outsiders, we’ve simply taken this weapon formed against us and repurposed it into a tool to fight oppression.” For Kennedy, The Satanic Temple also represents a community. One that doesn’t “sit back and critique religion just to feel superior, but actually rolled their sleeves up and did the hard work of digging out room for atheists—and everyone else—to access their rights every day,” she says. One of the temple’s campaigns, for example, is the Protect Children Project, an initiative aimed to protect public school students from corporal punishment, solitary confinement, bathroom deprivation and other, similar abusive practices. “If you’re uncomfortable by the notion of satanists or atheists or The Satanic Temple, I implore you to do your research, come to a Religious Education talk, and actually learn what we’re about,” Kennedy says. “We are real people suffering real cultural oppression who have chosen to employ the mythology of our oppressors to get the work done. And we aren’t just fighting for ourselves—we’re fighting to make sure you have room to live your life, too.”


JASON STOCK

Stock is the brewmaster at one of Utah’s popular breweries. He’s a family man who loves to cook. His Instagram feed is filled with pictures of dishes he’s made along with images of his family and pets. “I’m passionate about compassion and empathy,” he says. “I’d like to see more people focus on being nice to each other … I’m driven by trying to take care of my loved ones.” He’s also a card-carrying member of The Satanic Temple. “Obviously most people are going to associate it with a worship of a literal guy named Satan. Personally, I’m an atheist,” he asserts. “I don’t believe in any god … including the supposed character, Satan. To me, a satanist is somebody who rebels against the negative aspects of our dominant culture, and who opposes religious oppression.” He says he was hesitant to to join The Satanic Temple at first, saying their “imagery was offputting to some.” But after reading their guiding tenets, he changed his mind. “I’d never found an organization whose guiding principles so closely aligned with my own personal principles. I like knowing that I’m part of an organization that works to keep the wall separating church and state strong. I believe very strongly in the separation of church and state.” He now calls himself a satanist to confront hypocrisy in other religious beliefs. “I believe we, as a country, have a long way to go and I wanted to support an organization that helps point out how ridiculous the encroachment of religion into public life is. I think, and hope, that when The Satanic Temple asks for the same privileges that majority religions enjoy in our country, that it sheds a light on how inappropriate it is to mix religion with government.” When asked how being a satanist affects his daily life, he says, “The Seven Tenets of The Satanic Temple are basically a reflection of how I already feel and try to live. But to be honest, I don’t think about it much day to day.”

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 15

“Satanism is probably not what you think it is,” Steenblik says. “It is not evil, dark or cruel. I’ve found it to be freeing and filled with loving acceptance.” The Atheists of Utah vice-president is swift to point out that satanism is not one-size-fits-all. “There are about as many different kinds of satanist as there are Christians,” the Kaysville resident says, “but there are two basic categories: theistic satanism and atheistic satanism. I am an atheistic satanist. I align with the tenants of The Satanic Temple, which emphasizes personal accountability and empathy.” Steenblik was raised Mormon, but acknowledges he’s always been an Atheist deep down. He says his “firebrand activism” with Atheists of Utah is a driving force in his life, and that he strongly believes that standing up to inequality and injustice will make the world a better place for his children. So, when he discovered his personal beliefs aligned with those of The Satanic Temple, he didn’t hesitate to call himself a satanist. Steenblik admits that mentioning his affiliation has “started conversations or ended them. Where it has abruptly ended, I’ve found it is usually [with] someone whom I’d never agree, so in that respect it saves time.” Otherwise, he says, the conversations have been mostly positive and constructive. “It’s a terrific conversation starter.” Living in Davis County with his wife of 12 years and two children, Steenblik works in IT for the Department of Defense. Along with his full-time job, carving out time to spend with his family and his work with Atheists of Utah, he’s a podcaster and film critic. He’s also writing a series of children’s books based on bedtime stories he’s told his own kids. “I’m pretty passionate about art, the natural world, science and discovery, social justice, atheism and activism and comedy,” he says. “These passions drive me to do what I can to make things better—it’s a drive that has gotten stronger as my children age. If I can make any impact for them, my hope is that it will be for the better. Whether that is through standing up to inequality, injustice or by adding a little laughter or a good story.”

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

KYLE STEENBLIK


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

The Satanic Temple’s Seven Tenets

1. One should strive to act with compassion and empathy toward all creatures in accordance with reason. 2. The struggle for justice is an ongoing and necessary pursuit that should prevail over laws and institutions.

DOLORES AHMET

“If you want to truly think for yourself, you have to listen more than you talk,” fellow Satanic Temple member Ahmet says. “If your knee-jerk reaction to the term ‘satanism’ is fear and revulsion, maybe you could use some of our values. Listen to us, and you’ll learn that we aren’t that scary.” Ahmet works as a professional software developer and musician. She’s an avid reader, devouring books on science and philosophy in her spare time. “Satanism has its schisms like any religion, but in concept, it’s an ideology that places the highest value on questioning authority and thinking for yourself,” she explains. “According to literature and mythology, Satan was the one who was willing to question God—and if being literally God doesn’t exempt you from having to explain yourself, why let any earthly authority get away with ‘because I said so?’” She believes harmonious rebellion is a societal building block, and that you can come to the same conclusion as society, “but you should do so because you’ve interrogated your own values and decided you agree,” she says. “I agree that murder, theft and rape should not be allowed, that children should go to school, and that we shouldn’t have lead in our water supplies, among many other things.” That intentionality, Ahmet says, is what drew her to The Satanic Temple. “Satanism, especially the Seven Tenets of The Satanic Temple, influences a lot of my day-to-day behavior. I look for new information to try and understand the world better; I read constantly and try to get others’ perspectives; I donate to charity … I’m a vegetarian. I’m not trolling,” she says. “Satanism is my sincere, deeply held religion and it helps me become a better person according to my own standards of compassion and evidence-based activism.”

3. One’s body is inviolable, subject to one’s own will alone. 4. The freedoms of others should be respected, including the freedom to offend. To willfully and unjustly encroach upon the freedoms of another is to forgo your own. 5. Beliefs should conform to our best scientific understanding of the world. We should take care never to distort scientific facts to fit our beliefs. 6. People are fallible. If we make a mistake, we should do our best to rectify it and resolve any harm that may have been caused. 7. Every tenet is a guiding principle designed to inspire nobility in action and thought. The spirit of compassion, wisdom and justice should always prevail over the written or spoken word. Source: thesatanictemple.com

DAN ELLIS

Murray-based Ellis loves living in Utah. “How many other places on the globe exist where you can go golfing in the morning and skiing in the afternoon?” he muses. Ellis describes himself as the “problem child” in Sunday school who asked too many questions. Like Steenblik, he was raised LDS and was wary of its doctrine. “God told a man who was already hundreds of years old to build a boat and gather animals from across the globe so God could flood the planet and kill everything else?” he asks. “God killed all the women and babies by torturously drowning them? Seriously? And this is supposed to be a good thing? Also, what happened to the dinosaurs? Mormonism just piles layers of crazy on top of all of the other ridiculous claims found in more mainstream Christianity.” Working as an IT specialist for the IRS, his free time is spent golfing and “arguing with people on the internet.” An avid reader, Ellis strives to better understand his place in the world, and figure out how he can help others. He also co-hosts the podcast Godless Rebelution, is the secretary for Atheists of Utah and regional director for the American Atheists. “For me, the concept of Satan and satanism is a rejection of arbitrary authority in that I am free to do that which aligns with our best, most accurate and most current reasoning,” he says. “I am not a slave who is told that I must believe in nonsense like talking snakes, talking donkeys, dragons, talking and burning bushes and a universe that is only around 10,000 years old or face eternal torture.” Ellis aligns himself with the tenets and activism of The Satanic Temple, but insists that his thoughts on satanism as a philosophy are his own. “The Satanic Temple does not want mindless automatons carrying out their bidding. They encourage freedom of thought and independence. Try finding that in any other religion,” he says. “The beauty and attraction of satanism, for me anyway, is that there is no single way to define what it is or what it means for its adherents, though my personal beliefs, attitudes and opinions very much align with those of The Satanic Temple.”


RENEE AND A.W. “STORM” ANDERSON

The Church of Satan’s Nine Satanic Statements

1. Satan represents indulgence instead of abstinence! 2. Satan represents vital existence instead of spiritual pipe dreams! 3. Satan represents undefiled wisdom instead of hypocritical self-deceit!

5. Satan represents vengeance instead of turning the other cheek! 6. Satan represents responsibility to the responsible instead of concern for psychic vampires!

Source: churchofsatan.com

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 17

9. Satan has been the best friend the church has ever had, as he has kept it in business all these years!

| CITY WEEKLY |

8. Satan represents all of the so-called sins, as they all lead to physical, mental, or emotional gratification!

7. Satan represents man as just another animal, sometimes better, more often worse than those that walk on all fours, who, because of his “divine spiritual and intellectual development,” has become the most vicious animal of all!

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

4. Satan represents kindness to those who deserve it instead of love wasted on ingrates!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

The Andersons are proud members of the Church of Satan, and have earned the title of witch and warlock, respectively, within the church. The married couple owns a Magna tattoo shop, Art on You Studios, and has also organized the popular Halloween in Summer Festival—a celebration of all things spooky. Renee is currently the president of Magna Town Council, and Storm is the president of the Magna Chamber of Commerce. Together they have three daughters and one granddaughter. Renee loves spending time with her family, especially her granddaughter. Storm describes himself as a “born artist and satanist.” He’s passionate about spending time with his “queen” and loves art, horror, books, swimming and Halloween. “I also enjoy carnal indulgences,” he says. “What drives me is the pursuit of my goals,” which include customizing the couple’s ultimate dream home, sound long-term financial planning and regular traveling. When it comes to satanism, the Andersons are not shy. “We are open satanists,” Renee says. “We opened our tattoo shop while being very open about who we are. I was elected president of the Magna Town Council while being very open about the philosophies that we follow.” While he says he doesn’t “announce it from the mountain tops,” Storm says he’s open about his affiliation. “Most are aware of it. I do believe that by living the philosophy in my day-to-day life, I’m happier and more fulfilled than the average person,” he says. As upstanding members of their community, the couple rarely comes across someone who is offended by their religion. “There are a few out there who shy away from us, but it has never adversely affected who we are and how we handle our business,” Renee says, adding, “Satanists are certainly not normal people—far from it. We fight for what we want out of life and don’t ever give up.” The couple, it turns out, pursued satanism together a little over a decade ago after reading the collected works of Anton LaVey, founder of the Church of Satan. “Since that time, my queen and I have both become ac-

tive members and have been elevated to witch and warlock,” Storm says. Organized religion never made sense to Renee, who has always thought of herself as a satanist. When she first read LaVey’s The Satanic Bible, she had an epiphany. “I was reading a book that had said everything I already thought,” she recalls. “I had grown up believing that there certainly must have been something wrong with me to think outside the box, especially since I live in Utah.” Renee defines her beliefs succinctly, “A Church of Satan satanist is someone who is alien elite, someone who constantly pushes his or herself to reach their maximum potential, someone who will indulge instead of abstain. We are responsible members of society. We live by the philosophy of ‘if it is to be, it is up to me.’” “Alien elite,” Storm says, “means we have utilized our elite attributes and risen above the common, consumer culture, and are now alien to it.” He further underscores their beliefs by clarifying they “don’t acknowledge an afterlife, the supernatural, and find the idea of a ‘creator’ to be highly unlikely.” “We believe in carnal indulgences, as responsible adults, of course— from fine wines to fleshy pleasures,” he continues. The Church of Satan does not require its members to call themselves satanists, and, Storm says, “I personally don’t recognize other so-called ‘satanists.’” At the end of the day, Storm stresses, satanists are people, too. “We don’t seek acceptance. We’re not out to recruit or engage in socio-political activity to garner unwarranted and undeserved media attention. Members of The Church of Satan strive to meet their greatest potential in all they do and frequently succeed at it. We are movers and shakers, and our membership includes community leaders, Emmy award winners, executives, accomplished authors, musicians and artists.” “The one thing I want people to take away from this interview is we do live among you,” Renee adds. “We are the neighbors that keep our lawns mowed. We are the business next door to you that pays our taxes and gives back to the community. We are the parents of the honor roll students. We are the people that hold our heads high and are proud of who we are.” CW


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

18 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

PAUL JOYNER

TOUR DESIGN

BEAU PEARSON

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, OCT. 19-25, 2017

STEPHEN SIMMONS

ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 10/19

FRIDAY 10/20

FRIDAY 10/20

WEDNESDAY 10/25

Aladdin might be an age-old story, but it’s still a perfect introduction for anyone new to ballet or theater. Adam Sklute, CEO and artistic director of Ballet West, selected this classic for the Family Series. It’s designed to deliver a full ballet narrative in just one hour with clear narration, making it incredibly accessible for all ages. Follow our destitute yet daring protagonist Aladdin as he explores moonlit sand dunes, treasure-filled caves and colorful markets. With the help of a troublesome monkey, an endearing camel and, of course, a magical carpet, the hero tries to win the heart of a courageous princess and save the land from an evil sorcerer. Sklute describes the production via email as “magical, dramatic, beautiful and very funny. This is a perfect opportunity for you and your family to take time, slow down—not for too long—and experience theater, art, music and togetherness.” Choreographed by the company’s Principal Ballet Mistress Pamela Robinson-Harris and former soloist Peggy Dolkas, the show unites members of the Academy Professional Training Division and the students of Ballet West Academy and Ballet West II—of which Dolkas is associate director. With coruscating costumes by David Heuvel, vivid sets by Michael Andrew Currey and a beautiful score, the story will truly come to life at the Capitol Theatre. When it’s all put together, the final product is as accessible as the Disney film, and as classic as the Arabian Nights story. (David Miller) Ballet West: Aladdin @ Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 19, 20 & 21, 7 p.m.; Oct. 21 & 22, 2 p.m. matinees; $15-$35, balletwest.org

Actor, author and comedian Tim Allen is a funny guy. Cynicism and sarcasm often inform his delivery—which is one reason why his award-winning role as Tim “The Toolman” Taylor on the popular comedy Home Improvement and as Mike Baxter on Last Man Standing made him a successful sitcom star. Of course, voicing the character of Buzz Lightyear for the ever-loveable Toy Story franchise and playing Santa in The Santa Clause trilogy upped the ante on lovability for families, as well. That said, he hasn’t avoided potentially alienating part of his audience. Last Man Standing often became a platform for his weekly repasts against former President Obama, social activists and liberals in general, and it soon became clear that Allen’s views helped script the show. Republicans are a rarity in Hollywood, and when the sitcom was canceled, despite its respectable ratings, ABC blamed a scheduling snafu. Others suggested liberal bias. Allen himself agreed with the latter, and as one of the few high-profile actors in Hollywood to voice support for Donald Trump, he sparked further controversy by telling latenight host Jimmy Kimmel, “You gotta be real careful around here. You get beat up if you don’t believe what everybody believes. It’s like ’30s Germany.” Though scolded by some, Allen refused to bow to political correctness. Four years ago, he grabbed headlines for insisting that using the “N-word” is worse than the epithet it represents. Luckily for audience members at the Eccles this week, his stand-up act tends to be more unifying in its observational anecdotes. (Lee Zimmerman) Tim Allen @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, Oct. 20, 8 p.m., $40-$125, live-at-the-eccles.com

Twelve years ago, Stephen Simmons noticed that while Utah seems to go all-out for Halloween, there was a certain sameness to the offerings. “We have a lot of haunted houses,” he says, “but they rarely change their theme. There are Halloween events, but usually for family-oriented audiences.” An October Evening was event co-organizer Simmons’ attempt at an alternative approach: a more adult-focused, multimedia “variety show” take on Halloween-themed entertainment that would incorporate live music, short films, interactive performances and even a fashion show of original costume designs. As the event has grown in popularity—adding a second show this year, technically making it plural October evenings—it has also evolved and shifted, adding new elements like last year’s string quartet playing unique cover versions of music like the Ghostbusters theme, which returns for 2017. It’s a way to keep things fresh for those who come back year after year. Sometimes, that even involves a change in tone. Simmons notes that while the 2016 show’s theme of 1980s horror movies lent itself to a more camp sensibility, this year has gone darker with its focus on ghosts. “Instead of going in a playful way,” he says, “we went in an opposite direction, focusing on what it is to lose somebody, why people are so scared of Ouija boards, something truly terrifying.” That includes Simmons’ own short film Night Terror, which was filmed at a real “haunted” mental hospital in Tooele, lending an extra level of creepy authenticity. Come join the madness if you dare. (Scott Renshaw) An October Evening @ Salt Lake Masonic Temple, 650 E. South Temple, 801-3474047, Oct. 20-21, doors 7 p.m., show 7:30 p.m., $15, facebook.com/anoctoberevening

Friends since eighth grade, Tracey Tee and Shayna Ferm were separated for years while they pursued show business careers on opposite coasts. It wasn’t until they both relocated to their hometown of Denver to start families—and move on to other occupations— that they discovered the concept that would allow them to become full-time entertainers. According to Tee, it was Ferm who came up with the idea in 2012—when the two friends were new mothers caring for infants just three weeks apart in age—for what would become The Pump and Dump Show, a musical-comedy cabaret about the perils and unintended humor of parenting. “She had been reading this listserve of a local mommy group,” Tee says. “These moms were so upset; someone had given her kid a non-organic cracker, and was freaking out. [Ferm said], ‘Everyone just needs a drink.’” Sharing drinks and stories is a big part of the resolutely non-man-bashing evening, in which Tee and Ferm perform songs like “Eat Your Fucking Food” and invite audience members to share their own anecdotes as a high-energy, therapeutic mutual support session. Tee recalls one mom at one of their earliest shows, who related having lost her kid for a short time at a Walmart. “You didn’t know if you were supposed to laugh or cry,” she says, “but everyone just started cheering, and high-fiving her. … We don’t judge each other. We’ve all been there. We get to be the jerks who say the things you think all day but are afraid to admit.” (SR) The Pump and Dump Show @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-5325233, Oct. 25-26, 7:30 p.m., $25, 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

Ballet West: Aladdin

Tim Allen

An October Evening

The Pump and Dump Show


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 19


Cirque du Lake We sell tickets! Salt Sparklepark glitters its way

check us first! low or no fees

upcoming shows angel olsen

to Trolley Square. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

$

25 mon, 10/23 The depot

rl grime

$

26 mon, 10/23 the complex

the cookers

$

29 mon, 10/23 capitol theatre

tim reynolds

$

20 mon, 10/23 the state room

FOR MORE SHOWS & EVENTS GO TO

CITYWEEKLYTIX.COM

t some point in the history of entertainment, the term “family-friendly” became shorthand for “boring.” Some might suggest that we’ve lost the ability to appreciate wholesome entertainment thanks to the internet, but a mouse named Mickey might tell you otherwise. People haven’t lost their taste for activities and events that adults and kids can enjoy together. The reason family-friendly entertainment has been tainted with mediocrity is because event planners and producers have developed a nasty habit of shooting for a community’s lowest common denominator in hopes of making a few bucks. Perhaps this unfortunate reality is why Jared Gold’s Sparklepark—an unapologetically over-the-top celebration of performance art, positivity and family togetherness—sounds so exciting. Gold has assembled a veritable army of local performers, designers and culinary artists to bring this vision to life, and his strategy to capture the attention of the whole family is to swing for the fences. “When you walk in, I don’t want you to see anything that you’ve seen before,” Gold says. “The show is ‘wow’ enough that it doesn’t matter who you are; you’ll come in and it will blow your mind.” Admittedly, this is a rather large bedazzled gauntlet to throw down, but nothing glitters quite like Gold. Those who are familiar with Utah’s fashion scene should recognize his name. After attending the Otis College of Art and Design in Los

JARED GOLD

A

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

20 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

A&E

THEATER

Angeles, he launched Black Chandelier—a fashion design studio and retail outlet—in 1994. In 2003, Gold relocated Black Chandelier to Salt Lake City, and opened his first retail store in Trolley Square. It soon expanded to several locations, and after nearly two decades of creating elegantly oddball fashion, Black Chandelier closed its studio doors in 2013. Since then, Gold has been doing a little bit of everything, so long as it could be considered no-holds-barred. “I went to L.A. and started doing corporate creative directing, I helped build a fashion department at a private university, and worked on a few big events at Disneyland,” he says. His return to the Rockies was spurred by the failing health of his father, who passed away last year in Idaho. As he moved on from this loss, he contacted T.R. Gourley of Sack Lunch Productions with the concept of Sparklepark, a radical new take on performance art that involved local performers, gourmet concessions and lots and lots of glitter. “[Gourley] is my absolute favorite person that I’ve ever worked with,” Gold says. “I had sketchbooks filled with drawings of the Sparklepark before I even came back to Salt Lake, and when I put it on the table, he wanted this to be bigger than anything he’d ever done.” Gold and Gourley assembled their performers from Utah’s own crop of upand-coming superstars. “We had an audition back in August, and we chose the best of the best—they’re killers,” Gold says. “We’re also one of the first, if not the rarest, to pay our performers well. I really want to send a very clear message to them that art is something to dedicate themselves to, and that they can live by it.” Under the choreographic tutelage of Andrea Kuhn, owner/director of Taylorsville’s Element Dance Center, performances vary from break-dancing to aerial ballet.

The bedazzled dancers of Sparklepark

While Gold tries to describe the logistics of Sparklepark in words, it’s likely going to be an event that must be seen to be believed. “Sparklepark is complicated to explain because it has no comparison right now,” Gold says. “It’s E=mc2 times a laser show.” At its core, Sparklepark is a three-hourlong dance park, surrounded by high-end concession stands, professional face-painting and souvenir shops. Every 15 minutes, Sparklepark’s main stage features a performance by one of the event’s professional troupes, decked out in lavishly designed costumes that evoke a mixture of Blade Runner and Sailor Moon. In between performances, attendees are encouraged to hit the dance floor themselves, where they can participate in events like crowd karaoke and dad dance-offs. “It’s nonstop entertainment for everybody,” Gold says. “It’s artsy, edgy, but it’s all squeaky clean.” Given Gold’s history with Trolley Square, it’s fitting that Sparklepark’s maiden voyage will launch from the downtown shopping center. From here, Gold has booked performances for Las Vegas, Phoenix and Los Angeles that will usher in a national tour throughout 2018. With all of Gold’s globetrotting, I had to ask why he decided to choose Salt Lake as the point of origin for Sparklepark. “It needed something special from Salt Lake City to get going, and that was optimism,” he says. “We have this kind of optimism here that is rare, and in this day and age, we need this pink laser beam to split the darkness. That’s the little Sparklepark, fueled by the hearts of all these little kids.” CW

SPARKLEPARK

Trolley Square, Building A 602 S. 700 East Friday-Saturday, Oct. 20-21 7 p.m. $30-$80 thesparklepark.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 21


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Sarah Malakoff’s photography of domestic interiors, inviting consideration of their inhabitants and their attempts to control their environment, make up the exhibition Second Nature  at Granary Art Center (86 N. Main, Ephraim, granaryartcenter.org) through Jan. 26, 2018.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Arsenic and Old Lace Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through Oct. 23, FridaySaturday & Monday, 7 p.m., drapertheatre.org A Comedy of Tenors Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, Oct. 20-Nov. 4, dates and times vary, pioneertheatre.org A Tale of Two Cities Center Point Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, through Oct 28, centerpointtheatre.org Forever Dead Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Nov. 4, Friday-Monday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org Forever Plaid Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 15, MondaySaturday, times vary, hct.org Guys and Dolls Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Nov. 4, times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com Hello Dolly Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Nov. 18, MondaySaturday, times vary, haletheater.org Mamma Mia Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, through Oct. 21, tuacahn.org Marie Antoinette Good Company Theatre, 2402 Wall Ave., Ogden, through Oct. 29, Friday-Sunday, times vary, goodcotheatre.com (see p. 8) Mercury Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North through Nov. 12, Wednesday-Sunday, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Perdida Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, through Oct. 28, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; 2 p.m. Saturday matinee, grandtheatrecompany.com Wicked-er Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, through Nov. 4, desertstar.biz

DANCE

Ballet West: Aladdin Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Oct. 19-22, times vary, balletwest.org (see p. 18) Odyssey Dance: Thriller Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. President’s Circle, through Oct. 30, days and times vary, odysseydance.com Sparklepark Trolley Square Building A, 602 S. 700 East, Oct. 20-21, 7 p.m., thesparklepark.com (see p. 20)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Utah Symphony: Beethoven’s Fifth Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Oct. 20-21, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Tim Burton’s A Nightmare Before Christmas Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Oct. 24, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Science On Tap with Jason Sheperd Piper Down, 1492 S. State, Oct. 19, 7 p.m., facebook.com/tapdatsci Tim Allen Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Oct. 20, 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Fortune Feimster Wiseguys SLC 194 S. 400 West, Oct. 20-21, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Oct. 20-21, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com The Pump and Dump Show Wiseguys SLC, 194. S. 300 West, Oct. 25-26, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18)

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Garden, 1000 S. 900 West, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 28, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Tuesday Harvest Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 31, Tuesdays, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, through Oct. 25, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Diwali Festival of Light Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 801-456-5437, Oct. 19, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., discoverygateway.org Infinite Possibilities Higher Consiousness Fall Faire with Flair Golden Spike Event Center Exhibit Hall, 1000 North 1200 West, Ogden, Oct. 20-22, goldenspikeeventcenter.com


moreESSENTIALS TALKS & LECTURES

Financing the Future: The Law and Politics of Student Debt in American Higher Education S. J. Quinney College of Law, 383 S. University St., Oct. 20, 8:30 a.m., law.utah.edu Scientist in the Spotlight: Migratory Bird Conservation Natural History Museum of Utah, Naturalist Lab, 301 Wakara Way, Oct. 20, 2-4p.m., nhmu.utah.edu Scientist in the Spotlight: Studying Zebrafish to Understand the Human Brain Natural History Museum of Utah, Naturalist Lab, 301 Wakara Way, Oct. 20. 2-4 p.m., nhmu.utah.edu Vandana Shiva: Lecture on Sustainability Libby Gardner Concert Hall, 1375 Presidents Circle, Oct. 20, utahpresents.org

HALLOWEEN

for our 1st Gallery Stroll

Pixels n Paint Gallery Inside Michael Berry Custom Framing

163 E. Broadway, Salt Lake City | (310) 621-5627 www.pixelsnpaint.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 23

Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 18, utahmoca.org Anastasia Dukhanina Redman Gallery, 1240 E. 2100 South, Floors 6 & 7, through Oct. 31, redmangallery.com

October 20th6 - 9pm

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Join us

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

VISUAL ART

Banyan Fierer: Swen of the Wirble Fringe Gallery, 345 W. Pierpont Ave., Oct. 20, 6-9 p.m., http://bit.ly/2ydqWph Billy Schenck, Ed Mell, and Gary Ernest Smith: The Legendary West Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, Oct. 20-Nov. 11, modernwestfineart.com Cabinet of Curiosities: Strange Objects From the Staff of the City Library Main Library Special Collections, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 17, slcpl.org Caryn Feeny: Two by Two Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 11, slcpl.org Cities of Conviction UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 6, utahmoca.org Downtown Artist Collective 1-Year Anniversary Show Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, Oct. 20, 6-9 p.m., bit.ly/DAC-opening Drew Grella: I Would Rather Wear a Cape Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, Oct. 23-Jan. 5, slcpl.org Eileen Vestal: Love Letter to Italy Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Gallery Stroll October 2017: Oct. 20, 6-9 p.m., multiple locations, gallerystroll.org Ilse Bing Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 31, umfa.utah.edu Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 9, utahmoca.org Jimmi Toro: Kindle a Light Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Nov. 26, kimballartcenter.org Justin Watson: |human| Nox Contemporary Gallery, 440 S. 400 West, Ste. H, through Nov. 10, bit.ly/2jP10tU Karen Horne: Ballet To Tango Exploring the Art of Dance Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, 801-533-4200, through Dec. 23, hornefineart.com Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here UMFA, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Laura Erekson Atkinson: Builders Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 3, slcpl.org Lexi Johnson: Second Hand Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Nov. 10, slcpl.org Logan Matthew Sorenson: A Land Further North: Images from Iceland Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, through Oct. 26, slcpl.org Matt Kruback and Naomi Marine: prima facie Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 10, visualarts.utah.gov Natalie Stallings: Microscopic Sovereign Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 3, slcpl.org Photo Alt. Group Photography Exhibition Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 17, saltlakearts.org Rebecca Klundt, Liberty Blake and Elise Ostraff Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 17, saltlakearts.org Sarah Malakoff: Second Nature Granary Art Center, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through Jan. 26, granaryartcenter.org (see p. 22) Strangely Enough Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through Nov. 5, urbarnartsgallery.org Susan Jarvis and Amber Egbert: Life As I See It Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, No. 125, Oct. 20-Nov. 13, accessart.org Tina Vigos: Seeking Grace Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Vincent Mattina: Altered States Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 10, slcpl.org

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Asylum 49 140 E. 200 South, Tooele, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, asylum49.com BooLights! Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave., through Oct. 27, 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., hoglezoo.org Castle of Chaos 7980 S. State, Midvale, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, castleofchaos.com The Corn Maize 2801 S. 3500 West, Ogden, through Oct. 31, thecornmaize.com Fear Factory 666 W. 800 South, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, fearfactoryslc.com Halloween Hoot Celebration Tracy Aviary, 589 E. 1300 South, Oct. 21-28 & Oct. 31, 1 p.m.-3:30 p.m., tracyaviary.org The Haunted Forest 6000 W. 6400 North, American Fork, through Oct. 31, times vary, hauntedutah.com Haunted Hollow 150 S. 1900 West, West Haven, through Oct. 31, days and times vary, hauntedutah.com The Haunted Maize 2801 S. 3500 West, Ogden, 801-645-5392, through Oct. 31, Fridays and Saturdays, 8-11:30 p.m., thecornmaize.com Leo After Dark: Hallow’s Eve The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m.-midnight, 21+, theleonardo.org Nightmare on 13th 300 W. 1300 South, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, nightmareon13th.com An October Evening Salt Lake Masonic Temple, 650 E. South Temple, Oct. 20-21, 7:30 p.m., facebook.com/anoctoberevening (see p. 18) Pumpkin Nights Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, through Oct. 29, 6:30 p.m., pumpkinnights.com Scarecrow Festival Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, through Oct. 21, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., thanksgivingpoint.org Strangling Brothers Haunted Circus 632 E. 1500 South, American Fork, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, stranglingbrothers.com Spooktacular Family Festival The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, 801-531-9800, through Oct. 22, 10 a.m.-5 p.m, theleonardo.org Witches’ Tea Party Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, 801-456-5437, Oct. 21, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., discoverygateway.org

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

24 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

TED SCHEFFLER

DINE

Haunting Japanese Cuisine

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

Come All Ye Sinners A trip to Purgatory is devilishly delicious. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

n a conservative, largely religious state like ours, it takes balls to open a business called Purgatory. But then, the “Welcome to Purgatory” sign that welcomes visitors to the bar isn’t really aimed at those folks anyway: This is a bar, not a restaurant, the now legally required signage states. That means you can wander into Purgatory—the bar, not the state of suffering inhabited by the souls of sinners—and enjoy a beer, glass of wine or cocktail without having to purchase food. You’ll want to order food here, though. It’s elevated bar cuisine that’s popping up more and more at places like Whiskey Street, Under Current, Copper Common and Bourbon House. Purgatory comes from Sapa owner Mai Nguyen, who has never shied away from cutting-edge. As with Sapa, she seems to have spared no expense in decking Purgatory out. It’s not fancy—there’s a walllength mural of netherworld characters bellying up to a bar in Limbo—but its design features, from the bar itself to the restrooms, are all first-rate. The glass wall opposite the bar opens onto an inviting patio that’s great for warm weather. Aside from the design and décor, the cuisine is innovative, as well. We’ll get to that soon, but first, let’s peruse the drink list. Beer aficionados are going to love drinking here. The beer list is one of the more extensive in town, with some 17 IPAs alone and seven “beertails.” The wine selection is another story—unless you consider two reds and one white a “selection.” How could I resist a house cocktail called Champagne Ho’s? The drink arrives deconstructed: a Champagne glass with pink and blue cotton candy puffs inside, along with a

Spicy chicken ssäm at Purgatory decanter holding a mixture of Champagne, yellow Chartreuse, lemon juice, rhubarb bitters and grapefruit juice. When I poured the liquid into the glass, the cotton candy dissolved, turning the cocktail a sort of gun-metal blue. It’s a sweet drink, and one I thoroughly enjoyed. Less enjoyable was a Tijuana Fog, a mélange of Lunazul tequila, mezcal, lemon, egg white and lavender—the latter of which overpowered the drink with its fragrance and flavor. As for the menu, this is not your daddy’s bar food—unless, that is, your pop was used to eating things like pork belly nigiri ($6), watermelon poke ($7) or a protein salad of tomato, carrots, chickpeas, quinoa, cucumber, dill, beet hummus, herbs and yuzu vinaigrette ($7). My wife and I really enjoyed the nearly incendiary heat of the spicy chicken ssäm ($6), which is a DIY lettuce wrap with a red chile-powered mix of chicken, leek, jicama and carrot morsels. The fresh, tender lettuce provided a cooling effect. There’s a large french fry selection—some eight or so—featuring different toppings and seasonings. There’s nothing special about the fries themselves, though; they taste like wholesale distributor fries from a bag. But the accoutrements are unique— ranging from versions like nacho and Buffalo to K-Pop fries, curry, enchilada and rosemary. We very much liked the Japanese fries ($7), where are thin-cut and smothered with shiso crema, dashi, tobiko, strips of nori, pickled onions and herbs. The wife’s Baja Bowl ($9) was outstanding. It’s literally a burger in a bowl—in this case, a housemade black-bean burger covered with pickled red onion, enchilada sauce, rice, cilantro, lettuce, tomato, scallions, shredded cheese and a fried egg. For those looking for something a bit more mainstream, I’d recommend the mozzarella/Parmesan/crema cheese sandwich ($6); it’s one of the best grilled cheeses in town. Purgatory is the perfect spot for foodies, libation lovers … and, yes, sinners too. CW

PURGATORY

62 E. 700 South, SLC 801-596-2294 purgatorybar.com


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

-CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

| CITY WEEKLY |

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

-Cincinnati Enquirer

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 25

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

26 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

FOOD MATTERS S ON U W FOLLO GRAM A T S IN

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

BY SCOTT RENSHAW @scottrenshaw

THE

Holiday Hours Starting Dec. 1st RESTAURANT

KLY

WEE @SLC

MON-SAT 5:30-END 801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM

Culture Exchange

Utah food artisans in a wide variety of fields have been honored internationally, nationally and locally—and now it’s time for cheese to take center stage. The first annual Utah Cheese Awards hopes to draw attention to the state’s thriving cottage industry of folks applying the art and science of creating cheese. Launched by artist/entrepreneur Steve Jerman—you might know him as the designer of the Downtown Farmers Market logo—created the event after his own four-month “internship” working at Cache Valley’s Rockhill Creamery inspired him to draw attention to Utah cheese-making. While judging on the 69 entries from 16 companies was completed in August, the winners will be revealed at the Expo-Fest on Oct. 28, 3:30-9:30 p.m. at Church & State (370 S. 300 East), which is free and open to the public; a $5 skip-the-line reserved ticket is available at select vendors. Enjoy live music and cheese samples, plus goodies from other exhibitors including City Weekly’s sister publication, Devour. Visit utahcheeseawards.wordpress.com for more details.

Thu: 6-9:30pm | Fri/Sat: 5:30-9:30 1458 South Foothill Drive

Award Winning Donuts

Dairy-Free Mac

The Utah Cheese Awards aren’t the only upcoming event where you can enjoy cheesiness—or at least the veganfriendly non-dairy equivalent. Factory Farming Awareness Coalition sponsors the 2017 Vegan Mac Down at Impact Hub Salt Lake (150 S. State) on Oct. 21, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Participating chefs from local restaurants—including Zest, The Big O Doughnuts, Seasons Plant Based Bistro and Piper Down—present their best for those who want the comfort-food joy of mac & cheese without any animal products. Attendees get a chance to sample all the offerings and vote for the winning recipe, be entered in a raffle for free prizes, plus taste food from several additional local vegan vendors, all while enjoying live music by Josaleigh Pollett. Tickets are $8 per person; visit bit.ly/2gAyMPu for more.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Quote of the Week: “Give me a good sharp knife and a good sharp cheese, and I’m a happy man.” —George R.R. Martin

Send tips to: comments@cityweekly.net

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181


Sampling Utah beers that brought home the gold. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

and banana salad with clove, pepper, herbs and bubble gum. In the mouth the same fruity pear, peppery clove and banana appear with the added harmony of earthy biscuit malts and lingering floral/herbal hops. The finish is drying, aided by its 7.7 percent ABV. It has a nice balance and complexity of flavors; not cloying at all. The body is medium to high with a fairly creamy and prickly mouthfeel that helps fan those bubble gum notes. The alcohol is well-hidden, with only the slightest bit of warming in the mouth as it finishes. This yeast-driven beer is a real treat, especially with the colder weather approaching. Overall: There’s a great complexity and

Red Rock Brewing’s award-winning team Lauren Lerch, Chris Harlin, Kevin Templin and Greg Giles festival founder Charlie Papazian (second from right). balance of flavors on display here; it’s very smooth and crisp to sip on. It’s available practically all year long, so there’s no excuse for not trying this gold-medal offering. Both Red Rock and the Utah Brewers Cooperative have been honored with Brewery of the Year awards from the GABF, in 2007 and 2010, respectively. These awards are no fluke; get out and enjoy these beers sooner rather than later. As always, cheers! CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Food You Will

LOVE

U TA H

O R IGI N A L

S I N C E

1 9 6 8

5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT

8 0 1 . 2 6 6 . 4 1 8 2 / H O U R S : M O N -T H U 1 1a -11p F R I - S AT 1 1 a - 1 2 a / S U N 3 p - 1 0 p

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

OCT 20TH

with sycamore slim

OCT 21ST

old jews telling jokes

third friday jam

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 27

italianvillageslc.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

A

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

n the craft-beer universe, our hallowed suds are not just an adult beverage; we consider them to be part of our cultural and social circles. It’s a common drink that has become more of a luxury than a staple, yet we still seek it out—preferably in the company of other like-minded devotees, hoping to share the experience of this simple libation. When beer nerds gather in large numbers, it’s truly a spectacle to behold, and there’s no greater such phenomenon than Denver’s Great American Beer Festival. Every fall, brewers and beer-lovers gather to celebrate our favorite drink with competition and comradery. Earlier this month, I finished my 19th year at the GABF, which welcomed some 3,900-plus beers from 800 breweries representing all 50 states. In total, 293 medals were awarded; of those, Utah managed

BEER NERD

JASON E. KAPLAN

Festival Favorites

to eke out two gold ones in this granddaddy of all-American beer competitions. Here are my impressions of these best-in-category winners. Red Rock Brewing Co.’s Zwickelbier: It pours a near hazy golden/copper color. This lager is definitely not filtered, which is wholly appropriate for the style. As I get my sniffer on top of the foam, spicy, grassy and floral notes start to pop, which gives the impression of a hop-forward beer, but instead finds a balance with subtle bread-like malt aromas. Upon first swig, I’m met with spicy European hops, as pleasant grassy, floral and lightly peppered bitterness lights up the sides of my tongue. The malt character slides in next, and is more apparent than the aroma lets on. Biscuit, bread and light crackers soften the bitterness, leaving just enough lingering dryness to tie it all together. It’s deceptive in its simplicity in that more keeps coming out with each sip, making it enjoyable and balanced. It finishes brilliantly clean and beautifully dry. This 4 percent ABV beer is pretty much all I drank on my birthday. Overall: This is one that I wish I could get every day. It’s an incredibly well-made lager that is, sadly, only a seasonal offering, but that season is right now at Red Rock locations, so don’t miss out on the best zwickelbier in the country. Squatters’ Hell’s Keep Belgian Golden Ale: This ale pours a somewhat clear, golden amber color with a nice 2-3 finger pillowy white foam. The nose is a spicy pear, apple


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

28 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

TED SCHEFFLER

REVIEW BITES A sampler of our critic’s reviews

STORE ★★★★★

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

Nuestra Cocina’s bountiful molcajete

Nuestra Cocina

The menu here is so wide ranging that it takes some time to get your bearings. Kids often opt for something simple like quesadillas ($4.99), which can also be filled with grilled beef, chicken, pork carnitas, al pastor, buche, chicharrón or barbacoa. The same options are available for the café’s burritos ($7.99) and gorditas ($4.99). On Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, the restaurant serves up two classic Mexican soups/stews: menudo ($10.99) and pozole ($7.99). Looking for an above-average, but affordable, sandwich? Try the tortas—warm sandwiches made with flaky bolillo rolls, smeared inside with black beans and avocado, and served with a choice of meat, all topped with shredded lettuce and salsa. Nuestra Cocina staff says their molcajete ($25.99)—named for the stone mortar it’s served in—feeds two-to-four people, but I’d put the estimate closer to five or six. The stone is set on the stove over a hot flame until seemingly molten-lava hot, then filled with ingredients like nopales (cactus), grilled chicken, beef, shrimp and mild Mexican green onions, as is topped with Oaxaca-style fresh cheese (queso fresco). It’s messy. It’s filling. It’s amazing. Reviewed Sept. 7. Multiple locations, ranchomarkets.com

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-andpop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. The Bayou

It’s “beervana” at The Bayou—with a selection of over 300 brews, it would take nearly a year to try them all, though owner Mark Alston is always making additions to his impressive stock. Still can’t decide on a particular brewski? Download The Bayou App, which randomly selects 10 beers from the complete menu. The Bayou doesn’t just serve the Devil’s nectar, though. They also have an amazing dining selection, such as the Cajun chicken sandwich, served with spicy chicken, chipotle aioli, provolone and onions. 645 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-961-8400, utahbayou.com

Oh Mai

Whether you have the classic pho soup with fragrant broth in mind, a banh mi sandwich served on a French baguette, or traditional noodle and rice bowls, Oh Mai has you covered on all things Vietnamese. The restaurant—which now has three Salt Lake City locations—first took off as a banh mi and sandwich shop, but now covers all bases with their extensive and delectable menu. Multiple locations, ohmaisandwich.com

Provisions

This American craft kitchen preaches seasonal, organic and locally produced ingredients. The house-inspired architectural design might even convince you that you’re sitting at your own dining room table. The small plates are all wonderful, including the steamed buns and roasted-beet salad, but don’t leave the restaurant until you try the tagliarini: braised rabbit coated with a sage brown butter sauce that melts in your mouth. 3364 S. 2300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-410-4046, slcprovisions.com

R&R BBQ

Seasoned veterans of the barbecue industry, Rod and Roger Livingston, take pride in their craft—a little smoke, fire and rub, and soon enough you’ll get the best in town. The slow-smoked brisket is second to none, and the smoked sausage, pulled pork, barbecue ribs and chicken are equally sensational. R&R BBQ fanatics can get their dose of smoked goodness at the downtown spot or the recently opened South Jordan location. Multiple locations, randrbbq.net


Unhappiest Place on Earth

CINEMA

A24 FILMS

FILM REVIEW

Lost souls gather around the margins of Disney World in The Florida Project. FOLLOW US ON

BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

TWITTER @CITYWEEKLY

T

Willem Dafoe and Brooklynn Prince in The Florida Project characters. All of the young actors are fascinating to watch as they roam, ramble and raise hell, but Prince becomes a magnetic center. Moonee’s beyond-her-years behavior—flipping off passing helicopter tours or twerking—isn’t meant to play as shocking in a “Harmony Korine goes to first grade” way, but instead as a demonstration of what we don’t see from Halley’s own history. She might be a loving mother, but she’s a terrible mother, and Moonee’s simply the next generation in a cycle that kills up-by-the-bootstraps mythology. Another kind of mythology also lurks forever around the edges of The Florida Project, and that’s Disney World itself. Though close enough that the evening fireworks appear in the sky, it’s practically another universe as far as these characters are concerned. Without wallowing in miserablism, Baker provides a reminder that there’s a certain kind of childhood innocence that just isn’t in the cards for many American kids. When the Magic Kingdom isn’t an option, the Magic Castle is all that’s left. CW

THE FLORIDA PROJECT

| CITY WEEKLY |

BBB.5 Willem Dafoe Brooklynn Prince Bria Vinaite R

TRY THESE Shadow of the Vampire (2000) John Malkovich Willem Dafoe R

Escape from Tomorrow (2013) Roy Abramsohn Elena Schuber NR

Tangerine (2015) Kitana Kiki Rodriguez Mya Taylor R

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 29

The Pursuit of Happyness (2006) Will Smith Jaden Smith PG-13

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

the more upscale hotels and prostituting out of her room when other options run out. There’s no hard-luck backstory to explain why Halley is the way she is, and it’s a bold move by Baker to treat the character as deserving of compassion because she’s a human being, not because she was perhaps once a victim. That doesn’t necessarily make it easier to spend time with her, especially when she seems gleeful about getting away with ripping off a bunch of Disney admission “magic bands” from one of her johns. The actual job of surrogate parenting is left to the Magic Castle’s manager, Bobby (Willem Dafoe), who deals with everything from fights on the property to a resident who won’t stop sunbathing topless by the pool. Dafoe brings a weary decency to the role, trying to do his job while still treating the struggling residents with respect. In one uncomfortably wonderful scene, he spots a stranger approaching a group of the resident kids, instantly senses a possible predator and swoops in to move the threat along. Baker perhaps underlines a bit too obviously the way the Magic Castle becomes a makeshift family for Bobby—briefly introducing an adult son (Caleb Landry Jones) he hires for odd jobs as an excuse to spend time with him—but there’s a lovely humanity to a man who could remain at a professional distance from the people around him, but finds it impossible to do so. The story mostly belongs to the children, though, and it’s here that Baker redeems whatever stumbles he makes with his adult

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

he walls of the Magic Castle Inn—the primary setting of Sean Baker’s The Florida Project—shine with pastel purple paint, desperately trying to evoke the happy playland of Walt Disney World just up the Orlando highway. The name might confuse someone into an online booking, thinking it’s actually a Disney hotel, but it’s a world of broken ice machines, bedbug infestations and semi-permanent residents who can barely make weekly rent. But it’s still a place where kids can have a summer of adventure and fun—even if they’re almost completely unsupervised, and some of the “fun” involves burning down an abandoned condo. The Florida Project is a messy movie full of messy people, and it would be easy to find many of them borderline irredeemable. The focus is on Moonee (Brooklynn Prince), a 6-year-old living with her unemployed single mother, Halley (Bria Vinaite), at the Magic Castle. Out of school for the summer, Moonee and her friend Scooty (Christopher Rivera)—who also lives with a single mom in the room just below hers—find a new playmate in Jancey (Valeria Cotto), who lives in the nearby, also-Disneyadjacent-named Futureland Inn. They spit on a car from the motel balcony. They scam tourists for change so they can buy ice cream. And yes, they set fire to a derelict building while using it as a playground. Baker (Tangerine) doesn’t soft-pedal the near-feral nature of his young characters, nor does he make most of the adults surrounding them particularly sympathetic. Halley is a complete mess, surviving on the freebies provided by Scooty’s mom Ashley (Mela Murder) from her job at a diner, selling wholesale perfume for a profit at


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

30 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. THE FLORIDA PROJECT BBB.5 See review on p. 29. Opens Oct. 20 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) GEOSTORM [not yet reviewed] Technology meant to stabilize global weather goes haywire, threatening worldwide catastrophe. Opens Oct. 20 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) HUMAN FLOW BBB.5 Ai Weiwei is a visual artist, and while you might first assume that a 140-minute documentary about refugees would be bleak and ugly, there are images of stunning beauty in Ai’s film. He’s ridiculously ambitious in his scope, touching on multiple humanitarian crises: Iraqis and Syrians fleeing to Greece; Kurds in eastern Turkey; Africans displaced by war and famine gathered in a massive camp in Kenya. Ai captures the scope of the crisis with arresting images, whether its refugees shimmering in the gold mylar blankets they’ve been given, rain pouring down on a tent city or figures emerging from a dust storm. But it’s also far from an abstract study of unimaginable numbers of suffering people, as the artist makes sure to pause for individual faces and stories. He’s not even timid about inserting himself into his narratives, like comforting one refugee sobbing over her plight. Though such a scene might come off as self-aggrandizing, it’s really an attempt by the filmmaker, even as he creates a beautiful work of art, to fulfill the guiding principle of one German aid worker: “Make people feel like they’re human beings.” Opens Oct. 20 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw MARIE CURIE B Marie Curie: She did something with radium and won some Nobel Prizes, right? But did you also know that she took sexy baths and lounged around naked contemplating her affair with her married lover? It’s true! We might presume that male scientists get down to their birthday suits once in a while, but only this joint French-Polish-German production dares to tell the truth about

the woman who developed the concept of radioactivity: That if a camera slowly panned along her naked, reclining body (as portrayed by Karolina Gruszka), she might be caught thinking about how unfair it was that her professional enemies would deploy salacious gossip in an attempt to deny her an unprecedented second Nobel Prize. If (she notes fairly) Stockholm refused to acknowledge the work of any men who had sex lives, there’d be no Nobel winners at all. So who needs a movie about Curie to actually expand upon how groundbreaking her work was? Director and cowriter (with Andrea Stoll) Marie Noelle wisely keeps the focus where it belongs: in the boudoir. See? A woman can be smart and sexy. That’s what really matters, isn’t it? Opens Oct. 20 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—MaryAnn Johanson MARK FELT: THE MAN WHO BROUGHT DOWN THE WHITE HOUSE BB As he did in the JFK assassination drama Parkland, writer/ director Peter Landesman looks at a pivotal moment in modern American history and asks, “How can I render this in the most mundane manner possible?” There’s the potential for fascinating material in this biopic about FBI Associate Director Mark Felt (Liam Neeson), who became the whistle-blower known as “Deep Throat” for The Washington Post’s investigation of the Nixon’s White House’s involvement in the 1972 Watergate break-in. Landesman paints Felt as an FBI lifer disturbed by the Bureau bending to political pressure to sweep the story under the rug, and Leeson effectively captures his righteous indignation. Unfortunately, Landesman also dwells on personal turmoil within the Felt family—including the disappearance of his hippie daughter—in a way that might be intended to humanize him, but simply buries the lead. Too much of the narrative turns into a series of scenes where Felt shifts uncomfortably as people wonder who’s leaking to the press, or groan-worthy declarative dialogue like Felt suggesting to Bob Woodward what might happen if certain information were known before Nov. 7, and Woodward responding with a gasp, “That’s Election Day!” Opens Oct. 20 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—SR ONLY THE BRAVE [not yet reviewed] Dramatized story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots firefighting team. Opens Oct. 20 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SAME KIND OF DIFFERENT AS ME [not yet reviewed] Adaptation of the inspirational non-fiction best-seller about the friendship between a wealthy art dealer (Greg Kinnear) and a homeless man (Djimon Hounsou). Opens Oct. 20 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

THE SNOWMAN [not yet reviewed] A detective (Michael Fassbender) follows the taunting clues of a serial killer. Opens Oct. 20 at theaters valleywide. (R)

TYLER PERRY’S BOO! 2: A MADEA HALLOWEEN [not yet reviewed] More silly spookiness with the Perry’s no-nonsense matriarch. Opens Oct. 20 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 4 DAYS IN FRANCE At Main Library, Oct. 19, 7 p.m. (NR) 11/8/16 At Main Library, Oct. 24, 7 p.m. (NR) ART BASTARD At Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Oct. 25, 7 p.m. (NR) COME BACK, LITTLE SHEBA At Main Library, Oct. 25, 2 p.m. (NR) LOST IN PARIS At Park City Film Series, Oct. 20-21, 8 p.m.; Oct. 22, 6 p.m. (PG-13)

NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968) At Tower Theatre, Oct. 20, 22-23 & 25, 2 p.m. & 7 p.m.; Oct. 21 & 24, 2 p.m. (R) THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA At Edison Street Events, Oct. 18-20, 7:30 p.m. (NR) THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW At Tower Theatre, Oct. 20, 11:30 p.m.; Oct. 21, 7:30 & 11:30 p.m.; Oct. 22, noon. (R)

TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE (1974) At Tower Theatre, Oct. 20 & 22-26, 4 & 9 p.m.; Oct. 21, 4 p.m. (R) THE UNKNOWN At Main Library, Oct. 20, 7 p.m. (NR)

more than just movies at brewvies FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: OCTOBER 20TH - OCTOBER 26TH

BLADE RUNNER 2049 ON BOTH SCREENS

AMERICAN MADE

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Spread the News

TV

Great News improves; Superstition debuts; At Home with Amy Sedaris skews.

W

Shannon) that takes the surreality of Martha & Snoop’s Potluck Dinner Party to a whole ’nother level. Speaking of Snoop, what’s this all about? Snoop Dogg Presents: The Joker’s Wild (series debut, Tuesday, Oct. 24, TBS) is based on ’70s game show The Joker’s Wild, which involved a giant slot machine and trivia questions; in Snoop’s house, the slot machine remains, but the trivia has been replaced with “giant dice, playing cards, streetwise questions and problem solving.” At least it’s kinda new, unlike Drop the Mic (series debut, Tuesday, Oct. 24, TBS), which is just a celebrity rap battle rip-off of Nick Cannon’s Wild ’n Out given a cheese-glaze finish. Then again, Lip Sync Battle looked none too promising when it debuted, and that gave us … well, Chrissy Teigen’s boobs. CW Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

| CITY WEEKLY |

News from the geeks.

Great News (NBC)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

T! O B O R Y N I H S BI G

star Leah Remini in Season 2, and not nearly enough about why this piece of shit is still on. So … why is this piece of shit still on? It’s a forced, painfully unfunny sitcom that’s an insult to even the intelligence of CBS viewers who’ve allowed four seasons of Scorpion to just happen, and the addition of Remini makes little difference when the writing is nowhere near the caliber of King of Queens’ (which wasn’t gold, but at least it was, you know, comedy). Please join me again in 2026 when I rewrite this paragraph for KCW’s Season 10 premiere. Like a bizarre collision of Martha Stewart Living and the comic actress’ cult favorite Strangers With Candy, At Home with Amy Sedaris (series debut, Tuesday, Oct. 24, TruTV) is the how-to crafting, cooking and hospitality show of the End Times—or, at least, the weirdest thing on TruTV. Modeled loosely on Sedaris’ books I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence and Simple Times: Crafts for Poor People combines utterly useless homemaking tips with sketch comedy and game guests (like Paul Giamatti, Jane Krakowski, Sasheer Zamata and the infamously humorless Michael

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ay back in April, I dismissed the debut of Great News (Thursdays, NBC) as an inferior Tina Fey production that lacked the snap of 30 Rock and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and saw no point in the casting of Nicole Richie. But, by the time the newsroom comedy wrapped its initial 10 episodes, Great News had found its goofy groove, and Richie proved herself to be an adept comic actress (let’s just pretend that VH1’s Candidly Nicole never happened). Sure, Andrea Martin could dial it down a little—OK, a lot—but so what? Season 2 continues the subtle-but-sharp transformation into 30 Rock 2.0, meaning Great News is no longer the worst sitcom on NBC … here’s looking at you, Will & Grace. Like Ghost Wars, Superstition (series debut, Friday, Oct. 20, Syfy) is an effectively creepy Syfy show saddled with a lame title—c’mon, Ghost Wars sounds like a reality series about haunted storage units, and Superstition sucks hard enough for Freeform. The setup for Superstition, however, is solid: The Hastings family (patriarch-ed by series creator/producer Mario Van Peebles) runs the only funeral home in a small Georgia town, and they also specialize in “afterlife care” for souls who met mysterious deaths by demonic “Infernals” (there’s your title!), and generally kick supernatural ass. Bonus: Where the wildcard of Ghost Wars is singer Meat Loaf, Superstition has pro ’rassler Diamond Dallas Page. Spooky! We’ll always have October, and we’ll always have The Walking Dead (Season 8 premiere, Sunday, Oct. 22, AMC). Like the zombie apocalypse and Christianity, it’s never going away, but we must keep fighting to vanquish them, anyway. Eight seasons is plenty, though I would argue that Showtime’s Shameless should run at least 20 because it is the greatest series on TV and I’d win so shut up. As for TWD’s Season 8 premiere, it’s more of the same: blood, action, dripping flesh, more blood, flannel, homoerotic glances between Rick and Daryl, etc. Me, I’m curious to see if the righteous morons who were outraged at Season 7’s “family-unfriendly” violence—in a cable show about zombies!—will be back. Too much has been written about why Kevin Can Wait (Mondays, CBS) killed off a perfectly good wife character in order to reunite Kevin James with ex-King of Queens co-

what’s new in comics, games,

exclusively on cityweekly.net

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 31

movies and beyond.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

32 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

Hoodie’s Good Moves

MUSIC

STEVEN TAYLOR

CONCERT PREVIEW

How a kid from Long Island mindfully maintains his own hype. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

H

oodie Allen (Steven Markowitz) is on a two-month world tour in, which started Oct. 10 in Columbus, Ohio. It’s the biggest jaunt of his career, yet he shows no anxiety. Not that he should; over the course of his wholly self-guided career, he has seemed incapable of making a bad move. Markowitz, 29, comes from humble beginnings as a Jewish kid from Long Island, and says his interest in hip-hop started with Outkast’s “Ms. Jackson” and Coolio’s “Gangsta’s Paradise.” The urge to create his own music was innate. “When I was about 11, and before I really understood what I was doing, I was writing songs, or what could amount to songs,” he says. Eventually, his efforts became more focused, and his voice developed, informed by the smorgasbord of music he found through Napster. “It caught me off guard how much I liked it, so I used the internet to find everything else that Outkast had done and found myself very involved in learning about all these new artists and all the old artists from before my time.” After graduating high school, Markowitz attended the University of Philadelphia, where he studied marketing while churning out his unique brand of alt-pop-infused hip-hop and rhymes that capture the nihilistic party vibe of young, uncertain collegians. “I put out an EP and two mixtapes during my time in college and I started to see a little bit of traction pick up,” he says. With some initial seeds planted and contacts secured, Markowitz wrapped up his degree and secured a job at Google. In 2011, when the Pep Rally mixtape increased his momentum, Markowitz took some meetings with record labels. Ultimately, he elected to stay independent, realizing he didn’t need a label in order to pursue his muse. “I decided to take a leave of absence at Google,” he says, “and haven’t looked back.” His self-released breakthrough EP, All American, premiered at the No. 1 spot on iTunes in 2012, establishing Markowitz as a genuine new voice in American hip-hop. His first full-length LP, People Keep Talking (2014), reached No. 8 on the Billboard 200, with the track “Act My Age” landing in a trailer for Spider-Man: Homecoming. He’s collaborated with Ed Sheeran, and toured with Fall Out Boy in 2015. His next album, Happy Camper (2016), hit No.1 on the Billboard rap and independent albums charts. So a world tour supporting its aptly titled successor—the newly minted and still self-released The Hype (hoodieallen.com)—makes perfect sense. In many runaway success stories like this, it’s not uncommon for artists to forget that if nobody’s listening to their material, then they don’t get to keep making it. Markowitz strives to ensure that the bond between him and his fan base remains sacred. “I wanted to interact with fans differently than a lot of the stars that I grew up listening to,” he says. “I wanted to be very open and communicative. I thought there was no reason not to invest in

Steven Markowitz, aka Hoodie Allen every person who came along to listen to my music.” All artists can give a quick online shout-out to their fans here and there, but a scroll through his Twitter account (@HoodieAllen) reveals someone who genuinely sees his fans as people. In place of platitudinous expressions of love and gratitude, he goes to great lengths to recognize his fans’ support. Before The Hype was released in late September, Markowitz chose three random fans who pre-ordered his album, hit them up via social media and flew to their hometowns so they could spend the day together riding go-karts and playing mini-golf. “I went to Cincinnati, Indiana and Arizona to spend time with three very different people,” he says. “You can’t lose sight of why you’re able to do this, and I love being able to go play a show and know the first 20 people in line.” Considering the way Markowitz combs his Twitter and Instagram accounts for people to reach out to, it’s a safe bet that he’s made a few connections with fans in Salt Lake City. In an age where it’s possible to take the reins of one’s own career, an artist must endeavor to do it mindfully. Staying engaged with fans can only lead to more authentic music and a genuine bonding. “For me, the fan interaction is how I still feel so connected with people year after year,” he says. “It all comes down to the fans.” CW

HOODIE ALLEN

w/ Luke Christopher, Mylesparrish Sunday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. The Complex 536 W. 100 South 801-528-9197 $25 presale; $30 day of show All ages thecomplexslc.com


— Over 72 Beers Available — Live Music & DJ Fridays & Saturdays Brunch Party with Live DJ Every 1st & 3rd Sunday Every Month

DJ’S FRIDAY & SATURDAY 9PM - CLOSE

FULL DINING MENU AVAILABLE FROM CAFE TRIO

HIGHLAND live music

I.S.I. SCI FI HORROR ART AUCTION 15 ARTISTS WITH DJ SCRATCHMO

DJ STREET JESUS

SUN FUN

5 TH

RESERVATIONS FOR SPECIAL EVENTS / PRIVATE PARTIES

FO

R PO Nov 3 WDER at Hi ghlan d

FRI SAT

NEXT BRUNCH PARTY SUNDAY , NOVEM BER

LIVE MUSIC FRIDAY & SATURDAY 6PM - 9PM

PRAY

ON EAS S L BAL E! FOOT IS HER DAY TICKET FL SUN S N K R O ION ETW PAC-12 N NF - BOTH LOCAT M

$2 MIMOSAS NEW BRUNCH MENU SMOKED PULLED PORK SAMMIES, POKER DURING THE NIGHT GAME, ALL GAMES TELEVISED

MNF

MAD MAX MONEY MACHINE $1 TACOS, FOLLOWED BY KARAOKE

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1,300 POT

THURS

11 4K HD TVS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

2PM

HIGHLAND

U

LUMPY’S BUS!

ALL UTAH HOME GAMES OCT 21 VS ARIZONA STATE 1:30 NOV 3 VS UCLA 7:30

U

2013

2014

DJ BAD HAIR DAY

SUN FUN

$2 MIMOSAS NEW BRUNCH MENU

MNF WED

$1 TACOS, SQUARES BOARD, GIVE AWAYS

FOOTBALL IS FOLLOWED BY KARAOKE, ALL GAMES TELEVISED

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $900 POT

OCT 22

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

8136 SO. STATE ST

| CITY WEEKLY |

“THE SCREAM OF FIRE” NOW QUALIFYING DRESS TO IMPRESS FOR OVER $500 IN CASH AND PRIZES.

WATCH ALL NFL GAMES EVERY SUNDAY, MONDAY, AND THURSDAY NIGHTS

MURPHY AND THE GIANT

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

FRI SAT

d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

STATE live music

6405 s 3000 e | 801.943.1696 | elixirloungeslc.com

801-566-3222

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 33

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD

THURSDAY 10/19

Don’tcha just love that synthwave— the cheesy-cool synthesizer music that soundtracked ’80s filmmakers’ concepts of the future—became a genre? And that guys like Com Truise have a seemingly inexhaustible supply of celluloid sci-fi scenes in their heads? If you put on one of his albums—like his latest, Iteration (Ghostly International)—and listen to it in your car at night, it makes even mundane stuff like hitting the Del Taco drive-thru ’80s-movie awesome. Co-headliner Nosaj Thing, aka Jason Chung, is a less specialized DJ/producer, working with hiphop artists like Chance the Rapper and Kendrick Lamar. But his fourth album, Parallels (Innovative Leisure), shows he’d make a fine composer in his own right. Opener Cleopold is from L.A. via Australia, and serves more song-oriented pop fare on his debut EP Altitude & Oxygen, released last year on Chet Faker’s Detail label. Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $18 presale; $20 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com

Huey Lewis and the News, Jamie Kent

Do you remember the first time you heard Huey Lewis and the News? Was it the infectious summer song “Do You Believe in Love?” from the San Francisco band’s second album, Picture This (Chrysalis, 1982)? If it wasn’t then, it had to be the magical summer of 1984 when they had five singles from Sports—like “I Want a New Drug”—on the radio and MTV. That’s when we fell for their doo-wop vocals, saxophone skronk, Lewis’ gritty blues harp

Huey Lewis and the News

EFFIXX

Com Truise, Nosaj Thing, Cleopold

(which he wielded on the Irish hard-rock band Thin Lizzy’s heralded 1978 album Live and Dangerous), summery power-pop hooks, new wave keys and arena-worthy guitar solos. They were—and remain— everyman rockers that appeal to almost anyone, and represent a much-needed reminder of happier and (superficially, at least) simpler times. Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 8 p.m., $45-$125, all ages, live-at-the-eccles.com

FRIDAY 10/20

The Afghan Whigs, Har Mar Superstar

What a perfect coupling: dark, brooding alternative rock giants led by a guy who’d make a brilliant stand-up comic, and a proto-nerdcore pop/R&B champion/ satirist/goofball, who sometimes pretends to be dark and brooding. Yeah, at first, it doesn’t seem like a musical love connection, but the two acts are surprisingly complementary. Greg Dulli’s songs are emotionally heavy, but he’s quick wit with

Com Truise a knack for zeroing in on absurdity and bullshit in any situation. Har Mar’s tunes are more lighthearted, and sometimes he’ll lose his pants onstage, but with each new album, he demonstrates a growing tendency for stashing bombs of profundity among his goofy lyrics. Since he’s playing first, it’s as if they’re bringing us up only to drop us. Except for one thing: Bummer music has a paradoxical effect. It’s cathartic—particularly when it’s loud— and therefore healing. So what’s more likely to happen is that Har Mar will get us dancing and make us laugh, releasing tension so that the Whigs can go deep and clear out our emotional cobwebs. Which, barring an epic hangover, should leave everybody feeling great. Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $25, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

The Afghan Whigs

CHRIS CUFFARO

RICHARD FROLLINI

34 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY EVERY THURSDATY:

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21

Jazz & Blues Jam | Gonzo at 10:00 FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

DJ ChaseOne2 @ 9:00

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00 SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 8:00 MONDAY: Micro Monday & Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00! TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! at 9:00 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25TH:

JT Drapper @7:00 followed by VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

KARAOKE BASH!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28TH HALLOWEEN COSPLAY

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 35

1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492 PIPERDOWNPUB.COM


4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu nfl football

monday & thursday

great food & drink specials

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 10/18

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 10/19

Reggae

at the Royal

Ital vibes herban empire

$

5

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 10/20

halloween costume party with a special guests

5 state killing spree

saturday 10/21

Live Music

DOMINIC KF WONG

jersey giveaways every sunday,

SATURDAY 10/21

Lyrics Born

Lyrics Born

The Kickstarter page for Lyrics Born’s current release—a greatest hits project called Now Look What You’ve Done, Lyrics Born—lays it out: “Twenty-three years. Eight albums. Seven mixtapes. Now it’s time to hit ’em with the GREATEST HITS!” That’s a lot of music to boil down to 18 tracks representing the best of this rapper/ producer’s distinguished canon, which dates all the way back to 1993 and features collaborations with dudes like Lateef the Truthspeaker, Gift of Gab, Galactic, Ivan Neville, Dan the Automator, Cut Chemist, KRS-One and more. But it’s not just the quantity of music and co-creators that sets Lyrics Born—Tom Shimura—apart from the crowd. It’s that dusky voice and brainy flow, those lyrics born of a rare mind that has soaked up a lot as he migrated from Tokyo to SLC to Berkeley, where he moved in a creative and social circle that included Gift, Lateef, DJ Shadow and others. Tonight,

Kesha

Opal Hill Drive Mojave Rose Fear Of Rejection Tuesday 10/24

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon 10/28

11/9

finn and tennelle josh heinrichs

ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

OLIVIA BEE

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

LIVE

backed by a full band, he’ll take The State Room crowd on a nearly quarter-century trip, showing what, exactly, he’s done— and why he keeps doing it. The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $18, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

WEDNESDAY 10/25 Kesha, Savoy Motel

When she first emerged, the claim that Kesha was arguably the most authentic of the plastic pop divas didn’t hold much water. What good are intelligence, talent and an independent personality that’s supposedly resistant to manipulation by svengalis who stand to profit from you when you’ve enlisted one of those selfsame profiteers (Dr. Luke) as your main collaborator? This, and singing vapid, materialistic songs while claiming to be repulsed by the gluttony and excesses of fame? That earns a lingering sidelong glance. But still, some of the songs on her debut album Animal (2010) were actually really good. Then Kesha began pushing back, demanding more room on her albums for guitar rock and working with cats like Wayne Coyne and Iggy Pop on Warrior (2012). When that snowballed into taking on her label and accusing Dr. Luke of sexual and emotional abuse—essentially risking her career in the process—she demonstrated she’s made of something far more durable. Rainbow (RCA/Kemosabe) is the bold, ass-kicking album you’d expect from someone of Kesha’s considerable intangible attributes. It gets lyrically deep, even brutal, and veers into country and rock territory while remaining unapologetically pop—and teaching synthetic divas, pop fans and grouchy critics a thing or two about what’s really real. The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $35.50 presale; $38 day of show, all ages, thecomplexslc.com


SHOTS IN THE DARK BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

Mandate Pressgn Week Salt Lake Desi 1077 Main St. ss.com themandatepre

LIVE Music thursday, october 19 kansas city @ oakland

INTRODUCING! $5 STEAK NIGHT @ 5PM EVERY THURSDAY NEW! karaoke w/ dj bekster 9p,m

Melissa Zappa, Ben Webster, Gabriel Danilchik

friday, october 20

TOM BENNETT saturday, october 21

UTAH VS ARIZONA STATE 1:30

DJ LATU

Anna Coronado, Heidi Chamorro

monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

wednesday

THE TRIVIA FACTORY 7PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Taylor Lines, Gui Pelaez, Richard Cardenas

Gaelen Davis

Chris Connelley, Teri Morgan

Great food 5.99 lunch special $

10 brunch buffet

SATURDAYS FROM 11AM-2PM

| CITY WEEKLY |

MONDAY - FRIDAY

$

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Weeknights

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Mike Askerlund

$

12 sunday funday brunch

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC Amanda Walker, Brett Millet, Ben Wayman

Susen Sawatzki, Alysha Smith

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 37

$3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM


Tim Reynolds & TR3

CHRIS BICKFORD

SPIRITS . FOOD . MUSIC

Not a fan of the Dave Matthews Band? You’ll change your mind after seeing Matthews perform as part of an acoustic duo with guitar wizard Tim Reynolds. Longtime friends, they met in Virginia at the bar where Matthews worked. Reynolds, along with sax player LeRoi Moore (RIP) and drummer Carter Beauford, were among the older and wiser musicians who urged Matthews to start a band. All three were invited to join the group—but Reynolds declined, saying he was happy with his own project, prog-rock trio TR3. That didn’t stop him from playing on some DMB albums, occasionally joining the band on tour and Matthews for those duo shows—one of which occurred at Kingsbury Hall in 1999. Matthews’ songs take on a new life with only Reynolds to accompany him. But “only” sells it short: Reynolds is no ordinary guitar player. Through technique and technology, he supplements Matthews’ tunes with anything from subtle textures to mesmerizing extended intros and solos. Reynolds joined DMB full-time in 2008, but still records and tours solo and with TR3. His solo records are mind-scrambling jaunts into alternate guitar universes, while TR3 is a bit more straightforward and songoriented (as much as a prog act can be those things) with room, of course, for quantum side trips—exercises in string theory, if you will. (Randy Harward) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, thestateroom.com

Watch all College and NFL games

on our 30+ Full HD TV’s

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

38 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

MONDAY 10/23

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight. Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Tuesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

LIVE MUSIC 10.19 10.20 10.21 10.23 10.25 10.26 10.27 10.28

LE VOIR STONEFED STONEFED OPEN BLUES JAM JOHN DAVIS KAPIX SUPERBUBBLE WILL BAXTER BAND

call for reservations

OCTOBER 19

OCTOBER 21

THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL SATURDAY BRUNCH 10-3 KANSAS CITY @ OAKLAND COLLEGE FOOTBALL ALL DAY LIVE MUSIC WITH UTAH vs ARIZONA STATE @ 1:30 MICHELLE MOONSHINE DJ CHASEONE2 AFTER THE GAME

OCTOBER 22

NFL SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-3 SUNDAY GAME NIGHTENJOY FREE POOL, SHUFFLEBOARD, BAGS, AND AN ASSORTMENT OF BOARD AND CARD GAMES

OCTOBER 23

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL WATCH ALL GAMES ON OUR 30+FULL HD TV’S STAY FOR OUR MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION WITH DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ AFTER THE GAME

OPEN

365 DAYS

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM

A YEAR

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 10/19 LIVE MUSIC

Clean Bandit (The Complex) Com Truise + Nosaj Thing + Cleopold (Metro Music Hall) see p. 34 Deep Love (Velour) Huey Lewis & The News + Jamie Kent (Eccles Theater) see p. 34 Marlon Craft + Overtime (In The Venue) Mitski + Strong Words (Urban Lounge) Red Rock Hot Club (Gallivan Center) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Telluride Meltdown (O.P. Rockwell) Tera Melos + Speedy Ortiz (Kilby Court) Tropicana Thursdays feat. Rumba Libre (Liquid Joe’s) Yelawolf + Mikey Mike + Big Henri + Cookup Boss (The Complex)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

10.8 @ VIVA LA DIVA

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Prohibition)

FRIDAY 10/20 LIVE MUSIC

Afghan Whigs + Har Mar Superstar (Urban Lounge) see p. 34 Après Ski (The Cabin) Bob Schneider + Ryan Hamilton & The Traitors (The State Room) Bruiser Queen + The Four07’s (The Loading Dock) Changing Lanes Experience (Prohibition) The Coverdogs (The Spur Bar and Grill) Dreamscape Drivers (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Foreign Figures + Saylo (Velour) Kaleb Austin (Westerner) Folk Hogan + Scary Uncle Steve (Ice Haüs)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) Dueling Pianos: Troy & Dave (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/Joe McQueen

(Garage on Beck) Jazz/Blues Jam (Twist) The New Wave (’80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Infected Mushroom (Sky)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

10.13 @ WARREN MILLER’S | LINE OF DESCENT

OCTOBER 22, 2017

AT CLUB X

SHOW STARTS @ 2PM

TICKETS AT PARROTTIX.COM

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 39

BROADWAY BRUNCH

| CITY WEEKLY |

UPCOMING EVENTS


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

40 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

EVERY DAY

BAR FLY

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

The Garage on Beck

The Garage on Beck’s hefty Cowboy Burger Joe Friday (Brewskis) Live Music (Lake Effect) Chad Ellis Band (Outlaw Saloon) Marilyn Manson + Alice Glass (The Complex) Michelle Moonshine (O.P. Rockwell) Olate Dogs (Peery’s Egyptian Theater) Radical Face + Aisha Badru (Metro Music Hall) Royal Bliss (The Royal) Sound of Ceres (Alleged) Torres + Dove & The Wolf (Kilby Court) Um.. + Pressha + Colt 45 (Sky)

(Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Brisk (Downstairs) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke (Kamikazes)

SATURDAY 10/21 Après Ski (The Cabin) Eagle Twin + Mananero (Urban Lounge) Folk Hogan (SLC Farmers Market) Kritta + Princere (In The Venue) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur Bar and Grill) Luke Bryan (Usana) Lyrics Born (The State Room) see p. 36 Michael Ferguson (Funk ’n’ Dive)

THUR 10.19• MITSKI

The section of Beck Street separating downtown SLC from suburban North Salt Lake and overlooking an oil refinery couldn’t be a better location for a place that, in name and content, caters to greasers. Well, not exclusively. Hotrod-driving, leather-clad pomade-heads probably account for only a sliver of this rockin’ roadhouse’s demographic pie, but they’re certainly represented (sans hair products), especially when there’s a rockabilly act shaking the joint. But it’s more a state of mind that we’re talking about. Every town needs a club that caters to a crowd that appreciates retro-’50s culture, particularly its music: early rock ’n’ roll, country, roots, blues, surf and its combinations and derivatives. We used to have that on certain nights at Burt’s Tiki Lounge and the Dead Goat Saloon, but The Garage on Beck is all about it, from its façade to its patio. Depending on the weather, the bands—acts like Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys, the Joe McQueen Quartet, Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons, Megan Peters or Mark Chaney and the Garage All-Stars—perform on either the indoor or outdoor stage, while patrons gorge themselves on beer and foods both fresh and greasy, like burgers, barbecue, salads, hushpuppies and the mountainous Nachos Garachos. When the joint is jumpin’, it’s easy to believe you’ve found a place that exists somewhere between home and the proverbial “no particular place to go.” (Randy Harward) The Garage on Beck, 1199 Beck St., 21+, garageonbeck.com

Mimi Valentine + Voodoo Darling Burlesque (Prohibition) Motion Coaster + Michael Barrow & The Tourists (Velour) Opal Hill Drive (The Royal) Sam Pace & The Gilded Grit (Ice Haüs) Kung Fu Vampire + Locksmith (Club X) Chad Ellis Band (Outlaw Saloon) Live Trio (The Red Door) Mullet Hatchet (Brewskis) Mutemath + ROMES + Colony House (The Complex) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) The World Is A Beautiful Place & I Am No Longer Afraid To Die (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) DJ Dance Party (Club 90) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig)

DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) DJ Soul Man (Downstairs)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 10/22 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin) Candace + Lord Vox (Urban Lounge) Galina Diveeva (University of Utah Dumke Recital Hall) Hoodie Allen + Luke Christopher + Mylesparrish (The Complex) see p. 32 Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur Bar and Grill) Remo Drive + Diners (Kilby Court) Rosetta + North (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

THUR 10.19 • COM TRUISE

STRONG WORDS

FRI 10.20 • THE AFGHAN WHIGS HAR MAR SUPERSTAR

FRI 10.21 • EAGLE TWIN MANANERO, SEVEN DAGGERS

SAT 10.22 • CANDACE

10/26: AGENT ORANGE 10/27: MAX PAIN & THE GROOVIES HALLOWEEN 10/28: CHELSEA WOLFE 10/29: CULTS 10/30: ALVVAYS 10/31: DEER TICK

LORD VOX, DREAM SLUT, THEORY/THEORY

NOSAJ THING, CLEOPOLD

FRI 10.20 • RADICAL FACE AISHA BADRU

SAT 10.21 • NEFF PARTY W/ MATTY MO FLASH & FLARE, BO YORK

SUN 10.22 •ROSETTA NORTH, GLOE, YETI WARLORD

SUN 10.23 • MR. ELEVATOR

MON 10.23 • ARIEL PINK

MON 10.24 • DINE KREW

TUE 10.24 • KMFDM

TUES 10.25• ZEKE

WED 10.25 • THE GENITORTURERS

CAMERA, PANSIES, COOL BANANA

AURATORIKAL, NEGRODAMUS, IVIE, SWELL MERCHANTZ, UNDERGROUND AMBITIONZ KAPIX

BITE MARX

LORD OF THE LOST, OHGR

NATAS LIVED, SHECOCK & THE ROCK PRINCESS, DJ REVEREND 23

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •

10/26: BRUJERIA 10/27: THE DEVIL’S HARVEST 10/28: PHUTUREPRIMITIVE 10/29: BOB LOG III 10/31: THE FLOOZIES 11/1: JON MCLAUGHLIN


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

MONDAY 10/23

PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED

KARAOKE

LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur Bar and Grill) Angel Olsen (The Depot) Ariel Pink + Bite Marx (Metro Music Hall) The Cookers (Capitol Theatre) Frankie & The Witch Fingers + Brain Bagz & Rzrsnk (Diabolical) Live Music (Lake Effect) Mr. Elevator + Camera (Urban Lounge) Music from the Americas (Westminster) RL Grime + Graves + Kittens (The Complex) Tango West (Covey Center) Tei Shi + Twelve ‘len (Kilby Court) Tim Reynolds + TR3 (The State Room) see p. 38

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

TUESDAY 10/24 LIVE MUSIC

Authority Zero + Mouse Powells (Elevate) Bell Witch + 2 Headed Whale & Tomb Of Belial (Diabolical) Crunk Witch + Wicked Notions (Ice Haüs) KMFDM + Lord of the Lost + Ohgr (Metro Music Hall) John Flanders Jazz Quartet (The Garage) Jazz Ensemble (Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts) Lostboycrow + Prelow (Kilby Court) Michelle Moonshine (The Spur Bar and Grill) The Last Ten Seconds of Life + Rue The Day + Dawnlit + Always 2 Late + Elysiu (Club X) Token (The Complex)

OF THE WEEK

WEEKLY & SHARE YOUR PHOTOGRAPHS WITH CITY NG ISSUE OMI UPC AN IN ED GET A CHANCE TO BE FEATUR

TAG YOUR PHOTOS

#CWCOMMUNITY ESTD ESTD

KARAOKE (THURS) PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS

DIAMOND POOL TABLES LEAGUES AND TOURNAMENTS

DART SUPPLIES PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

2005 2005

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Tues & Fri: 3pm-1am Saturday: 11am-1am Sunday: 11am-9pm Closed Monday

We Serve ALL KINDS!

CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

165 E 200 S

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

| CITY WEEKLY |

Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen Next to Himalayan Kitchen

The

Chakra Lounge and Bar

Nightly Music

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night small plate menu

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUN/MON/THURS

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

RUDE BOY BAD BOY BRIAN

LIVE MUSIC: PUDDLE MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS

FREE BETTING BOARD NFL GAMES ON ALL DAY

DISCO KLOWN & GROOVE TUESDAYS

KARAOKE

7DAYS REASONS

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 41

Friday 10/20 - DJ Birdman Saturday 10/21 - J Godina & Caviar Club DJ’s Wednesday 10/25 - Live Jazz Thursday 10/26 - The SLC

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED

PHOTO

LIVE MUSIC

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

VENUE DIRECTORY

LIVE MUSIC & KARAOKE

A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, trivia Tuesday, DJ Wednesday, karaoke Thursday A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, karaoke Tuesday ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, karaoke Wednesday, ‘80s Thursday, DJs Friday & Saturday BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-463-4996, karaoke Tuesday, live music Saturday THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, live music Friday & Saturday BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, local jazz jam Tuesday, karaoke Thursday, live music Saturday, funk & soul night Sunday BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400, karaoke Friday-Sunday CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871, karaoke Saturday CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, live music & DJs; karaoke Thursday CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-566-3254, trivia Monday, poker Thursday, live music Friday-Sunday CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, live music & DJs THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, free pool Wednesday & Thursday; karaoke Friday & Saturday DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-261-2337, live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134, karaoke Wednesday; live music Tuesday, Thursday & Friday; DJ Saturday DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, live music & DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-953-6374, live music

THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, karaoke Thursday FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, trivia Tuesday; live music Friday & Saturday FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, karaoke & live music FUNK ’N’ DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music & karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, live music & DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, live music ThursdaySaturday HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-268-2228, poker Monday; ladies night Tuesday; ’80s night Wednesday; karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, karaoke Thursday; DJs & live music Friday & Saturday HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, karaoke HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, reggae Tuesday, DJs Friday & Saturday ICE HAÜS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs JAM 751 N. Panther Way, SLC, 801-3828567, karaoke Tuesday, Wednesday & Sunday; DJs Thursday-Saturday JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tuesday & Friday; karaoke Wednesday; live music Saturday KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-363-3638, karaoke Tuesday & Wednesday; dueling pianos Thursday-Saturday KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, live music Tuesday-Saturday THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, trivia Wednesday LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714

LUMPY’S ON HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, live music & DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, poker Tuesday; DJs Friday & Saturday METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, live music ThursdaySaturday, all ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, poker Monday, acoustic Tuesday, trivia Wednesday, bingo Thursday POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, live music Thursday-Saturday THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Friday, live jazz Saturday THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, live music SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, live music, All ages SUGAR HOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, dueling pianos WednesdaySaturday; karaoke Sunday-Tuesday TIN ANGEL CAFÉ 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, live music URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, live music TWIST 32 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-322-3200, live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, live music, all ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thursday-Saturday THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, trivia Wednesday; karaoke Friday-Sunday; live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

Simon & Garfunkel Story (Capitol Theatre)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU) Open Mic (The Royal) Pavel Haas Quartet (Libby Gardner Concert Hall)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 10/25 LIVE MUSIC

The Black Angels + Ron Gallo (The Depot) Genitorturers + Shecock and The Rock Princess + DJ Reverend 23 + Dave Industrial (Metro Music Hall) I The Mighty + Hail The Sun + Good Tiger (Kilby Court) Kesha + Savoy Motel (The Complex) see p. 36 Keychain (Kamikazes) Live Local Music (Moose Lounge) Live Jazz (Club 90) Live Music (Lake Effect) NeedToBreathe (The Complex) Passafire + Pacific Dub (Elevate) Papadosio + bioLuMigen (The State Room) Shannon Runyan (The Spur Bar and Grill) Michale Graves + Three Sixes + LHAW + Version Two (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Zeke + Kapix (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. JD & Dave (Tavernacle) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

Is Hiring AN ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Responsibilities include: Selling print and digital advertising to local and some regional businesses.

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ KJ Ruby (Area 51) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second) Scary-oke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

U KNOW THE BURGER

Email your resume to jennifer@cityweekly.net

2115 S. State Street TO-GO:must801 - 935 - 4014 be 21+ · free parking


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Support Local Journalism. Join Press Backers Today!

Exclusive offers available only for Press Backers members. Check us out! www.pressbackers.com

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 43

If truth matters, if standing up to the big fellas matter, we invite you to become a Press Backer. Support local journalism. Support local voices. Help us tell the stories no one else will tell. Truth does matter. Make a difference today.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Free Press Isn’t Free


© 2017

EITHER WAY

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Jason who was the 2000 A.L. MVP 2. Nut 3. Like apple juice 4. Main character in Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” 5. Very loud

49. Precisely, after “on” 50. Common antiseptic 51. Help for one with serious allergies 53. Cheese from cow’s milk 54. City where LeBron James was born 55. Monopoly purchase 56. Mammal that may swim on its back 58. Assistance 59. Cousin of a clarinet 61. Discovery magazine subj. 62. QB Newton 63. Admit ____

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

6. Page (through) 7. Museum near Westminster Abbey 8. Groundbreaking 1990s ABC sitcom 9. Matchmaking site that asks “Do you keep kosher?” 10. Ages and ages 11. Busy bee in Apr. 12. Some univ. instructors 14. Provide staff for a one-named supermodel ... or a guy who likes getting his nails done 22. Sanskrit for “awakened one” 24. Watch a season’s worth of episodes in one sitting, say 26. Three or four 27. Bareilles who sang “Love Song” 28. Website used by a lot of artisans 30. Backbone 31. Granola morsel 34. Sings in the Alps 36. Frame job 38. Longtime radio rival of Stern 39. Wedding reception need 40. No longer at anchor 41. Interjection that’s a homophone and anagram of 44-Across 42. Was in charge of a Middle East country ... or an Indian royal took off

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Big inits. in trucks 4. Margarita option 8. DVD player button 13. “____ to please” 15. Bailiwick 16. Drug used to treat Parkinson’s 17. Forever ____ day 18. Water under the bridge? 19. Actress Turner and others 20. Appearance 21. Pretty sure thing 23. Prohibit a construction piece ... or a place to get a drink along the Adriatic 25. Discomfort 29. “This was posted earlier,” in brief 30. Surfacing for a golf course 32. Weight-watcher’s worry 33. Nonspecific amount 35. Football gear 37. 24/7/365 facilities 38. “Whichever is fine by me!” (or an apt observation about 23- and 55-Across and 14- and 42-Down) 43. “Live ____” (Taco Bell slogan) 44. Old Testament paradise 45. ____ snail’s pace 46. It might be picked for a song 47. Verb that’s a homophone and anagram of 41-Down 48. Loosen, as a knot 52. “Under Siege” star 55. Jump over a breakfast chain ... or a Southwest tribe’s high school dance 57. “I’m ready for your questions” 60. Quick, in trade names 61. Search far and wide 64. Touch 65. Go for ____ (swim) 66. Positive, as an attitude 67. What smells 68. Zilch 69. “Er ... um ...” 70. Road sign animal 71. Highest point value for a Scrabble tile

SUDOKU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

44 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) A woman I know, Caeli La, was thinking about relocating from Denver to Brooklyn. She journeyed across country and visited a prime neighborhood in her potential new headquarters. Here’s what she reported on her Facebook page: “In the last three days, I’ve seen three different men on separate occasions wearing sundresses. So this is definitely the right place for me.” What sort of signs and omens would tell you what you need to do to be in the right place at the right time, Libra? I urge you to be on the lookout for them in the coming weeks. Life will be conspiring to provide you with clues about where you can feel at peace, at home, and in the groove. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Simon & Garfunkel released their first album in October 1964. It received only a modest amount of airplay. The two musicians were so discouraged that they stopped working together. Then Bob Dylan’s producer Tom Wilson got permission to remix “The Sounds of Silence,” a song on the album. He added rock instruments and heavy echo to Simon & Garfunkel’s folk arrangement. When the tune was re-released in September 1965, it became a huge hit. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I suspect you’re now at a point comparable to the time just before Tom Wilson discovered the potential of “The Sounds of Silence.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) I predict your ambitions will burn more steadily in the coming months, and will produce more heat and light than ever before. You’ll have a clearer conception of exactly what it is you want to accomplish, as well as a growing certainty of the resources and help you’ll need to accomplish it. Hooray and hallelujah! But keep this in mind, Aquarius: As you acquire greater access to meaningful success—not just the kind of success that merely impresses other people—you’ll be required to take on more responsibility. Can you handle that? I think you can.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Sigmund Freud was a medical doctor who laid the groundwork for psychoanalysis. Throughout the 20th century, his radical, often outrageous ideas were a major influence on Western culture. When Freud was 50, he discovered a brilliant psychiatrist who would become his prize pupil: Carl Jung. When the two men first met in Vienna in 1907, they conversed without a break for 13 consecutive hours. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you could experience a comparable immersion sometime soon: a captivating involvement with a new influence, a provocative exchange that enchants you, or a fascinating encounter that shifts your course. CANCER (June 21-July 22) In the next 12 months, I hope to help you track down new pleasures and amusements that teach you more about what you want out of life. I will also be subtly reminding you that all the world’s a stage, and will advise you on how to raise your self-expression to Oscar-worthy levels. As for romance, here’s my prescription between now and October 2018: The more compassion you cultivate, the more personal love you will enjoy. If you lift your generosity to a higher octave, there’ll be another perk, too: You will be host to an enhanced flow of creative ideas. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Are you interested in diving down to explore the mysterious and evocative depths? Would you be open to spending more time than usual cultivating peace and stillness in a sanctuary? Can you sense the rewards that will become available if you pay reverence to influences that nurture your wild soul? I hope you’ll be working on projects like these in the coming weeks, Leo. You’ll be in a phase when the single most important gift you can give yourself is to remember what you’re made of and how you got made. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Louisa May Alcott wrote a novel titled A Long Fatal Love Chase, which was regarded as too racy to be published until a century after her death. “In the books I read, the sinners are more interesting than the saints,” Alcott’s heroine, Rosamund, says “and in real life people are dismally dull.” I boldly predict that in the coming months, Virgo, you won’t provide evidence to support Rosamund’s views. You’ll be even more interesting than you usually are, and will also gather more than your usual quota of joy and self-worth—but without having to wake up even once with your clothes torn and your head lying in a gutter after a night of forlorn debauchery.

ImmedIate OpenIngs In Our sLC and JaCksOn HOLe saLes departments

Grow with our growing list of Copperfield Publishing Products

Newsprint • Magazines • Digital • Events • Sponsorships Base Salary + Commission and Bonus Contact or send work history and cover letter to:

Pete Saltas • pete@cityweekly.net • 801-413-0936

Free Press Isn’t Free Support Local Journalism. Join Press Backers Today!

If truth matters, if standing up to the big fellas matter, we invite you to become a Press Backer. Support local journalism. Support local voices. Help us tell the stories no one else will tell. Truth does matter. Make a difference today. Exclusive offers available only for Press Backers members at

www.pressbackers.com

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 45

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) What’s your top conspiracy theory? Does it revolve around the Illuminati, the occult group that is supposedly plotting to abolish all nations and create a world government? Or does it involve the stealthy invasion by extraterrestrials who are allegedly seizing mental control over human political leaders and influencing them to wage endless war and wreck the environment? Or is your pet conspiracy theory more personal? Maybe you secretly believe, for instance, that the difficult events you experienced in the past were so painful and debilitating that they will forever

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “Happiness comes from getting what you want,” poet Stephen Levine said, whereas joy comes “from being who you really are.” I surmise that the coming weeks will bear a higher potential for joy than for happiness. I’m not saying you won’t get anything you want. But I do suspect that focusing on getting what you want might sap energy from the venture that’s more likely to thrive: an unprecedented awakening to the truth of who you really are.

is hiring!

| COMMUNITY |

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) In 1969, two earthlings walked on the moon for the first time. To ensure that astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed there and returned safely, about 400,000 people labored and cooperated for many years. I suspect that in the coming months, you might be drawn to a collaborative project that’s not as ambitious as NASA’s, but nevertheless fueled by a grand plan and a big scope. And according to my astrological calculations, you will have even more ability than usual to be a driving force in such a project. Your power to inspire and organize group efforts will be at a peak.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) I am my own muse,” painter Frida Kahlo wrote. “I am the subject I know best. The subject I want to know better.” Would you consider trying out this perspective for a while, Aries? If so, you might generate a few ticklish surprises. You might be led into mysterious areas of your psyche that had previously been off-limits, discovering secrets you’ve been hiding from yourself. What would it mean to be your own muse? What exactly would you do? Here are some examples: Flirt with yourself in the mirror. Ask yourself impertinent, insouciant questions. Have imaginary conversations with the person you were three years ago and the one you’ll be in three years.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) “Consider how hard it is to change yourself,” wrote author Jacob M. Braude, “and you’ll understand what little chance you have in trying to change others.” Ninety-nine percent of the time, I’d advise you and everybody else to surrender to that counsel as if it were an absolute truth. But I think you Sagittarians will be the exception to the rule in the coming weeks. More than usual, you’ll have the power to change yourself. And if you succeed, your self-transformations will be likely to trigger interesting changes in people around you. Here’s another useful tip, also courtesy of Jacob M. Braude: “Behave like a duck. Keep calm and unruffled on the surface, but paddle like the devil underneath.”

prevent you from fulfilling your fondest dream. Well, Pisces. I’m here to tell you that whatever conspiracy theory you most tightly embrace is ready to be disproven once and for all. Are you willing to be relieved of your delusions?


| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

46 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

FANTASTIC MASSAGE

FOLLOW US ON

TWITTER @CITYWEEKLY

Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

801-577-4944 3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

Your dog’s home away from home -overnight dog boarding-cageless dog daycare-dog washing stations-

801-683-3647 • www.utahdogpark.com Woods Cross: 596 W 1500 S (Woods Cross) | Airport Location: 1977 W. North Temple

URBAN L I V I N

G

WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Haunted Houses for Sale

Have you ever lived in a haunted house? You might have worked at one, but have you actually lived in one? I’ve resided in several and currently share one with a friendly ghost. There’s a corner of the front room where our haunter doesn’t like plants. He/ she doesn’t kill them, but for no reason will just fling them off a table or push them over while I’m looking directly at the pot. I’m not kidding; it’s happened several times. I now know not to place houseplants there. If we sold our home, would we have to tell the buyer that the place is haunted? Let’s consider that by penning this column, I’m making it a public fact. But what if our buyer is from out of town and has never read City Weekly? Or lives here and prefers to only read Breitbart News? Do I have to put in writing somewhere during the sales process that the place is inhabited by a plant-hating spirit? No, I don’t have to disclose this—but would anyway. I believe honesty is the best policy, and would want a buyer to be happy with their purchase and be able to decorate around their new invisible friend. If a buyer directly asked, “Is the place haunted?” I’d have to answer the question. But what if there had been a murder in a house? In 1974, a family of six was slain in Amityville, N.Y. A year after the crime, a new family purchased the home. They hadn’t heard about the murders, and later claimed that unseen forces possessed the place and made it a hell house. They called a priest and ghost hunters came to investigate. As you might know, the story was made into a wildly popular movie. If we were required to report every murder or death in any home for sale, you can imagine how much harder our jobs as Realtors would be. Depending on the state, the sellers might be required to disclose a previous death in the home. The Wasatch Front listings form library doesn’t have a space that asks a seller to disclose a death, or a haunting. My advice, though, is to always ask a seller about specific history of a home that might lead you to not want to purchase it. In California, you must disclose if a death has occurred on the property in the past three years, but there’s no similar law in Utah. The only disclosure explicitly required by state law is whether there has been “use, storage or manufacture of methamphetamines” in the home. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner .......... YOUR PERFECT WORLD........

You wanted me to cut down on my words, So I could fit more perfectly into this world,...

You want me to act as you do, ? For it seems like the right thing to do, You want me to rhyme for you?, To conversate like the common people do,.... If you only knew of the hidden wonders I had instore for you, If only you could take a walk in my shoes, Maybe then you would get it from a different point of view, Maybe then, You would understand something that’s Beyond you.

Tara J Anderson Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

RENTALS FOR BOYS AND GHOULS!

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED PARTLOW RENTALS:

LIBERTY PARK

DOWNTOWN

Perfect 1 bdrm w/ hardwood floors, skylight, hook-ups, covered parking + storage! $745

Delightful 1 bdrm w/ hardwood floors, on-sight laundry, vintage details! $715

BOUNTIFUL

MILLCREEK

2 bdrm. six-plex Large rooms, Covered parking, A/C, hook-ups! $945

Must Have 2 bdrm. w/ private patio! Extra storage, hook-ups, covered parking! $895

WVC/MAGNA

WEST VALLEY

Affordable 2 bdrm four-plex w/ new carpet! Hook-ups, patio! ONLY $745

Luxury 2 bdrm. w/ designer details! Stackable hook-ups, carport, private patio! $765-$795

VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT PARTLOWRENTS.COM VISIT OUR OFFICE LOCATION AT 440 S. 700 E. STE 203 801-484-4446


S NEofW the

What’s Old Is Weird Again You might have seen the widely distributed weird news story about the Mad Pooper, a woman who has been seen defecating on lawns in Colorado Springs, Colo. According to krdo.com, on Sept. 25, an unidentified man claiming to be a spokesman for the Pooper posted (and has since removed) two videos in which he tried to justify her movements and win sympathy for her. In the videos, the spokesman says the unidentified Pooper is not responsible for her actions because she has suffered a traumatic brain injury and has had gender reassignment surgery, leaving her unable to control herself. He also claims her actions are protected by the First Amendment, in response to which Colorado Springs attorney Jeremy Loew called foul: “Defecating in someone’s yard is definitely not protected under the First Amendment and it is actually a crime.” Loew went on: “People all over the world are talking about this, and police will catch her.”

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL

It’s Good to Have Goals Octogenarians Ray and Wilma Yoder of Goshen, Ind., have finally achieved a goal they set nearly 40 years ago: to visit every Cracker Barrel location in the U.S. On Aug. 31, they checked off the last of 645 stops in Tualatin, Ore., where they each received a Four-Star apron, the company’s highest honor. The Yoders once stopped at 10 Cracker Barrels in one day as they traveled up the East Coast. “I’ve always walked away feeling refreshed,” Ray Yoder told ABC News. “For two old people, we’re pretty fast moving.”

WEIRD

What’s in a Name? Death Wish Coffee—a cold-brewed, canned coffee the company touts as “fiercely caffeinated” (as much as 4 1/2 times more caffeine per fluid ounce than regular coffee), with a skulland-crossbones logo—recalled its 11-ounce cans on Sept. 20 because they could possibly contain the deadly toxin botulin. Company founder Mike Brown, 37, said no incidents have been reported, but he is very serious about the safety of his product. “I know our logo and name might not seem like it reflects that,” Brown told The Washington Post. Production has been halted, and customers can request refunds from Death Wish’s website.

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 33 years in the Land of Zion

n And police in Cumbria County, England, responded on Sept. 23 to a call for help from 3,210-foot Scafell Pike (England’s highest mountain), where four men ran into trouble while hiking. However, their problems didn’t stem from dehydration or a painful fall. Instead, it seems the group had become “incapable of walking due to cannabis use,” police told The Guardian. A police spokesperson wrote on Facebook: “Now having to deploy rescue, air support and ambulance to rescue them. Words fail us ...” Cumbria police superintendent Justin Bibby reminded hikers that “alcohol or any other substance that could impair your judgment ... has no place on a mountain.”

Crime Report Apparently, even crime goes better with Coke! The manager at Rally’s restaurant in Henderson, Ky., was busy preparing for the day’s business on Sept. 25 when a man dressed in a CocaCola bottle costume robbed him at gunpoint, stealing more than $500. The Coke bottle then left the restaurant without hurting the manager and headed north in a gray minivan, according to WFIE-TV. Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 4 years

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

n Even Superman underwear couldn’t protect Nathan French, 19, from Halewood, Merseyside, England, as he climbed to the top of the highest mountain in Wales, 3,600-foot Snowdon. French managed to hike to the summit on Sept. 9, but he quickly succumbed to the elements—perhaps because he was wearing only Superman underwear, shoes and gloves. French, who is studying sport, nutrition and health in college, told The Guardian, “It was when I was at the top I was shaking uncontrollably.” He rode the Snowdon mountain railway back down, but fell ill on the train: “I started to go deaf and my sight started to go funny.” Paramedics said his blood sugar had dropped and he was showing signs of hypothermia. Miles Hill of the Llanberis mountain rescue team noted, “We hope Mr. French is back in the mountains soon, perhaps in the full suit [cape optional], rather than just the underwear.”

The Passing Parade South Western Railway in England took over for South West Trains in August and in its first six weeks collected more than 10,000 items left behind on trains—including an inflatable shark, an ironing board, a barrister’s wig, false teeth, a leather chair and hundreds of jackets. The BBC reported that lost property manager Michael Pugh is beseeching riders to check their seats before leaving the train. While his staff works hard “to ensure passengers are reunited with their belongings,” Pugh said, items can be kept for only three months.

Julie “Bella” Hall

HOME LOANS MADE BRIZZÉE Julie Bri-ZAY, makes home buying ea-ZAY Loan officer I NMLS#243253

Julie Brizzee Citywide Home Loans NMLS#67180

801-747-1206

Providing All Mortgage Loan Services

OCTOBER 19, 2017 | 47

The Farce Is Strong A black-and-white photo depicting the signing of the Charter of the United Nations in San Francisco in 1945 has prompted the recall and reprinting of Saudi social studies textbooks because it pictures Saudi King Faisal seated next to the Jedi master Yoda. The photograph was created by 26-year-old Saudi artist Abdullah Al Shehri, who mixes pop culture icons into historic photographs. Shehri told The New York Times in September he inserted Yoda into the photo because he reminded him of the king. “He was wise and was always strong in his speeches,” Shehri said. “I am the one who designed it, but I am not the one who put it in the book,” he clarified. Saudi education minister Ahmed al-Eissa apologized for the mistake, but the mystery of how the photo got into the book remains unsolved.

Babs De Lay

| COMMUNITY |

n An anonymous bidder in the United States has purchased a pair of Adolf Hitler’s boxer-style underwear for about $6,700, according to auctioneer Bill Panagopoulos of Alexander Historical Auctions in Chesapeake City, Md. The drawers, with a size 39 waist and “A.H.” embroidered on them, apparently were left in the Parkhotel Graz in Austria in 1938, Panagopulos told Metro News on Sept. 24. The seller was the grandson of the people who owned the hotel at that time. Panagopulos supposes the buyer will frame the underwear and hang them on a wall in his or her home: “It would be the most talked-about relic in the house.”

GOOD SOULS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

People Different From Us Mermaid Aries, 18, of Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England, likes to wear her specially made mermaid tail when she swims at local pools. But the Dolphin Centre in Bromsgrove, under new management, has banned her from using the flipper because “they worry I might hit someone with my tail or might get into trouble in the water and drown,” Aries (real name Leia Trigger) told the Worcester News on Sept. 22. “It is my ambition to become a professional mermaid that attends children’s parties and other events. The only problem is that I have nowhere to swim.” Update: After the story made headlines, the Perdiswell Leisure Centre stepped up. Aquatic development officer Vanessa Bale welcomed Aries to the pool, offering her “early mornings and late evenings.” Aries is thrilled: “I am absolutely ecstatic. I never thought I’d be able to swim with my tail ever again.”

Bright Ideas The Detroit Red Wings’ new promotion commemorates the Joe Louis Arena, where the team played until this year, when they’re moving to a new rink. The Detroit News reported in September that fans who want to keep the old home ice close to their hearts and contribute to the team’s foundation can buy a small vial of limited edition “melted ice” taken from the arena’s surface (otherwise known as water) for $85. Only 3,000 vials have been produced; they are accompanied by a framed photo of The Joe.

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &


The

Backstop

It may be on the BACK but readers stop here to see your ad FIRST! Call for rates 801-575-7028

WORDS sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947 IF U DON’T WANT TO PICK UP Your Dog’s Poop...I DO $10/wk. most yards. Prefer big dogs. Text 801.673.4372

DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

CITY WEEKLY STORE

DUCES WILD IS FOR SALE

Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

DIVORCE ONLY $297 Easy and Fast (48 hrs) www.callthedivorcefirm.com

801.668.7988

Free Consult 801-981-4478

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

South Salt Lake SOB license Class D liquor license

801-918-3066 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

FEEL BETTER TODAY!

- 2 locations to serve you

Software QA Engrs: At Proofpoint’s Draper office, idtfy dsgn issues, promote & improve testability, create & automate test cases, & idtfy & rprt defects in Scrum/ Agile envrnmnt. Send resume w/ Job#IMM-20 to HR at 892 Ross Dr., Sunnyvale, CA 94089.

NEW WINDSHIELDS Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

WE WAIVE

$100 OF YOUR

INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-414-4103

NOW HIRING - COMMISSION & BOTH RENT OPTIONS AVAILABLE

AWINDSHIELDREPLACEM ENT.COM

Certificates available in

reviveslc.com

48 | OCTOBER 19, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

717 S 300 W #D • 801.486.5500 pridemassageslc.com

4500 s. 535 e. #D170 801-590-9521

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

Sell Your Car Today

OGDEN

With One PhOne Call

763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

Thai-NOW HIRING!

AMERICAN MASSAGE.COM

N E W !!

Steam Room and Sauna Now Available

801.448.5954 | 801.835.5988 | 801.839.1960 Hablamos Espanol: 801.835.5988 Open 7 days | 9am-10pm | 1740 South Main Street | thai-americanmassage.com

• We Make “House Calls” • Simple and Hassle Free • Paid For or Not • Quickly Sell Your Car, Truck or Van • Have a Check About 15 Minutes After We Arrive

“It’s Worth Your Time To Call”

Call or Text 24/6

801-560-9933 WWW.CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

City Weekly October 19, 2017  

Satanists Are People, Too