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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T

OCTOBER 12, 2017 | VOL. 34

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Curbing Panhandling New legislation aims to make panhandling safer. But is it working? By Dylan Woolf Harris


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY CURBING PANHANDLING

New legislation aims to relocate panhandlers. But is it really working? Cover photo illustration by Bethany Fuller

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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Blog post, Oct. 4, “Patrick Harmon Body Cam Video Released”

This is very questionable. ... I’m for all lives matter, and this one appears to be unjustified to me. And if shooting needed to happen, is it protocol to shoot three times at a running assailant? Is there no protocol to take them down, rather than out? I’m just an unaware citizen, asking serious questions here. I don’t know law enforcement standards and procedures.

Hey, just a suggestion to the author of this post: Perhaps a more detailed explanation would help. I saw this as police shooting and killing another black man. I was outraged. I shared it online. Turns out they had been looking for this man after he [pleaded guilty to felony aggravated assault]? More information instead of a video would assist your viewers in not spreading the hysteria and having a better understanding of what’s happening. Justified or not—we should have context

Via cityweekly.net

Via Facebook

Poor man. Period. His death was not justified. Excessive force was clearly used. Reminds me of an incident when a man’s home was invaded, he grabbed a bat and chased the would-be robber from his home. Outside of his home he caught the robber, swung the bat, striking the robbers head, killing him instantly. This man was charged with first-degree manslaughter and sentenced to over 20 years in prison. Why? Because the would-be robber was running away, no longer posing a threat. Pure and simple.

You can’t catch him so you kill him?! This is murder. Some will say, “Well, if he had just done what they asked, he would have been fine.” But the police are not judge, jury and executioner. We have a legal system and due process of law for a constitutional reason. This abuse of power flies in the face of that and we should all be outraged.

LISA STRENO WENNINGER

AMANDA ROMAN

RYAN CREEK Via Facebook

Wait. What?! The body-cam video doesn’t support the DA’s statement: As he ran he turned toward police officers with a knife and said, “I’ll cut you.” Where’s the coverage of this murder?

Every single African-American in the U.S. has a legitimate reason to run from the cops. They know that they have a good chance of being murdered once in contact with the police—it may be their only chance of survival. It’s a basic fight-orflight instinct. Didn’t Massachusetts even propose legislation to make it legal for non-whites to legally flee police officers?

Via Twitter

Via Facebook

“Threatened with a knife”? What a joke. In what, the 3.9 seconds he was running away before he was shot in the back? The threat came then?

And this is why we kneel! How can we show respect to America when America refuses to show respect to the rights we as people deserve? Respect is earned, not forced! Whether this guy was guilty or innocent, he still deserved his rights to a proper arrest. We just want equality and for police to properly do their jobs: “protect and serve.”

ROHNDA DELPINO COX Via cityweekly.net

@ONE_N_SITE

@CAMERONFOWLER87 Via Twitter

I spent 28 years in law enforcement and this does NOT look like a good shooting. If an officer is so quick to shoot someone for fleeing, he has no business being in law enforcement. Furthermore, this shooting should land him in jail. I surely wouldn’t have wanted a partner like that.

LESLIE JAMES Via Facebook

The discharge of firearm is for the response to an immediate threat to the health and well-being of either the officer or thirdparty. This satisfies neither of these scenarios. It was murder.

CODY SALYER Via Facebook

I watched the show Cops all my life and waited for the suspect to run. That made the show! But I never saw them shoot a runner in the back or side. Is this a new thing, or a lazy cop thing? Or is it an “I need some paid time off” thing?

ADRIAN THOMAS Via Facebook

KARA GO SOUNDERS

COURTNEY JACQUET Via Facebook

He wasn’t unarmed; he reached for a knife in his waistband and lunged at the officers, then fled. Totally justified! Don’t jump to conclusions! Do your research before you spread lies. When he is lying on the ground, the knife is between his legs. If you freeze stop the video you can see him turn with the knife in hand as he attempts to assault the officers. He then turns to run and is shot. There are videos out there showing this and the knife.

JIM BUCSKO

Via cityweekly.net If he had a knife or not—clearly his goddamn back was turned!

NIECY DAVIS Via Facebook

Warrants or not, threats or not, to shoot a man in the back is an execution, period.

JAY RAMSHANKA Via cityweekly.net

Patrick Harmon Handcuffing him instead of performing first-aid! Good job, boys. ...

JUSTIN DURFEE Via Facebook

I guess no one watched the video? He shot him in the side as he was turning toward him. Not in the back. And guess what? Cops always have to handcuff the suspects even if they are dead, dying or unharmed. That is their protocol. I love how people are more willing to stand up for criminals over cops. Guess who doesn’t get shot by cops? People not breaking the law.

HUNTER CARLSON Via Facebook

I know people will not like me this but THIS is why we protest. Has nothing to do with the flag, anthem or military. If they tased him no one would have really had a problem with this. The use of lethal force was not warranted. It’s sad when a flag or an anthem means more than a black person’s life. And this is from me, a two-time Iraqi War Veteran that is 100 percent totally and permanently disabled.

TYRONE WAKLATSI Via Facebook

Kudos to you guys. Every comment I read from a white person on this thread said this act is wrong. As a black man, I never know what to expect from the comments section when things like this are posted, but it’s often filled with hate that I have to jump in and counter. I’m happy for once I don’t have to comment because you guys spoke truth. Thanks again.

JAY MAYOR MARTIN Via Facebook

Looks like the de-escalation and sensitivity training worked well, Mayor Jackie Biskupski. A cop can shoot a man running away? There has to be more to this video. They shot him because he had a knife, running away from them. Starting to not feel safe in this city. It’s sad. Every week the cops are killing someone in Salt Lake. Last week your goons get beat up by a guy with their own weapons then kill him, and now this. Yeah, that training is going really well. Keep up the good work, mayor!

JOSH JOHNSTON Via Facebook

I can’t believe how many people are calling for justice here. The dude was a convicted felon for aggravated assault. He had a knife in his right hand with the blade exposed and was turning toward the cop about 5 feet from him. Had the cop hesitated at all, he would have been stabbed. But keep sitting in your chair at work and sleeping safe at home, judging officers, while cops are out fighting convicted felons that would rob or assault you.

AUSTIN HARRIS, Via Facebook We have every right to judge officers. We, the taxpayers, pay them to do their jobs, which is to protect and serve. Which, most do, but this one did not. ... They work for us. They are employed by us. Cops aren’t lawyers or judges or the courts; they are public servants. They are the taxpayers’ employees—you better believe that we have a right to judge them.

SUSAN COLEMAN COHEN, Via Facebook I’ve watched this video twice now. I didn’t see a knife at all. Furthermore, if there is one, why is it not being secured or being talked about being secured? There is no knife. He also didn’t need to shoot three rounds at point-blank. One would have sufficed. Not to mention there are three able-bodied officers that could have tripped that dude down. He shouldn’t have ran. But you can tell he is very scared. This could have been handled very differently. I lived in Utah for 25 years before moving to New Zealand. Cops in Utah could learn a great deal living in another city or even country for while. Then maybe learn some compassion for the offenders. Shit needs to be innocent until proven guilty. Not the other way around.

STEVEN YEITER, Via Facebook Body cameras certainly are not perfect, and this video certainly is cause for concern, however I would encourage everyone in the feed to become acquainted with the facts. ... It is impossible to tell from the video what he had in his hand, which is why photos were also released by the district attorney’s office. Mr. Harmon had a knife, he turned to address the officers, and the officer responded with deadly force. I am sorry for Mr. Harmon’s family, however, his actions caused this, not the officer.

MICHAEL HOLLEN, Via Facebook


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OPINION

Grand Gestures

Will sharing Columbus Day help Utah’s Native Americans to feel heard and have their history known? Or will it be just another grand gesture without much political follow-through? Despite the recent well-attended Salt Lake City council meeting wherein members announced Columbus Day would be celebrated in conjunction with Indigenous Peoples Day, it seems uncertain. I mean, what can an extra day do that a dedicated month could not? Don’t get it twisted; I wholeheartedly support a month of education and celebration for Native American cultures, I just also think Utah’s indigenous communities deserve more than token political intent. While I understand the symbolism of not celebrating a man whom many feel committed atrocious crimes upon arriving in new lands, and can certainly see the point of revisiting the way we think about holidays, in review of history, Columbus Day seems a small fish to fry, considering how it came to be. According to an NPR Code Switch report, “How Columbus Sailed Into U.S. History,” the holiday was first celebrated in 1892, one year after 11 Sicilian immigrants were lynched for a crime they didn’t commit. It was a time in American history when Italian immigrants faced daily discrimination from earlier (also immigrant) settlers. Thus, the decision was made to use the 400th anniversary of Columbus sailing to America as a means to bring Italians legitimacy. The fact that Columbus never reached America—at best setting foot in the Bahamas—in addition to his behavior upon arrival, was of little importance. For Italian immigrants, the holiday was a symbol of overcoming obstacles—a feat all immigrant communities can relate to. By 1934, Columbus Day

BY ASPEN PERRY was named a federal holiday and Italian immigrants continued to work their way into the fabric of mainstream society. This view becomes quite different through the looking glass of the population whose ancestors were enslaved and died of foreign disease. For them, Columbus symbolizes the beginning of the end of their way of life. Though I agree with the notion of not celebrating atrocities, I must also admit, as I read the signs some folks were carrying outside the Salt Lake City government building Columbus committed genocide, I questioned the logic of blaming one man for something hundreds, if not thousands, of settlers took part in. In my mind, to blame one person for the horrendous mistreatment of indigenous people spanning hundreds of years, is as much a disservice as celebrating him. If Columbus was solely responsible for killing millions of natives, then whom did the pilgrims massacre? Why are we going after a holiday in October, and not the real mass acquisition holiday celebrated with feasts in November? My off-the-cuff assumption is the marketing cash cow Thanksgiving has become. It is well known that our early educational view of pilgrims and “Indians” is retold through the rosiest of lenses. Yet no city councils are making any addendums to the celebration of Thanksgiving. Instead of shifting how we celebrate Thanksgiving, a former president offered a month of recognition back in 1990. Granted, grand gestures of this nature are still accomplishments and certainly attribute to viewing history differently. However, they can also be attempts by those in power unprepared for real change to appear as though they are part of the revolution. Even SLC council’s handling of the joint cultural celebrations strikes me as disingenuous. In an email to the Italian American Civic League, treasurer Nick Fuoco told me they were locked out of any discussion. Not only is that a missed opportunity to bring two groups capable of building up

their communities together, but it also tells a narrative that lacks authenticity. Our society seems to be able to move past and accept the mistreatment of those who immigrated to this country in generations past. But when it comes to coping with how the government and our ancestors treated those native to this land, there is almost too much shame to face it. Meaning, the road to seek justice will be much tougher for Utah’s native population. Luckily, the Utah League of Native American Voters’ mission is to bring political awareness and participation to Native American communities, but will their largest support base (ahem, millennial voters) turn out when the issues are not as high-profile as holiday sharing or protecting monuments? The number of Millennials and Gen Xers who overflowed council chambers to hear tear-jerking Native American speeches prior to council was noteworthy. Almost so impressive that I thought I’d have to write a retraction on their lack of political involvement. Disappointingly, this fear rapidly vanished as the majority of them left seconds after the council announced the new joint holiday arrangement. While the younger crowd could not be bothered by the low-profile agenda items, the older generation stayed to provide feedback. Had the younger crowd been able to pay attention past the first 10 minutes, they could have provided input on topics greatly affecting their daily life. Hence my fear our indigenous friends will not have the necessary support when attempts for legislative aspirations are made. At the end of the day, it would be a shame if recognition became the consolation prize for change. CW

Aspen Perry is a Salt Lake City-based aspiring author and self-proclaimed “philosophical genius.” Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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Far be it for us to say what daily newspapers should do. But we can say what they shouldn’t. Let’s talk podcasts and the state of affairs for The Salt Lake Tribune. Like most newspapers, the Trib has been woefully behind the curve as readership relentlessly moves to more exciting platforms. But now it’s jumping into the podcast world seemingly in a frenzy of desperation. Its latest, Agree to Disagree, had pretty much nothing new to offer from two voices better “heard” in print. Mormon Land might be better, although it aims at a pretty specific audience and again tries to turn the best reporters into talking heads. An analysis of podcasting from NiemanLab makes a few good points: Keep episodes creative and surprising and use them as “a vehicle to get stuff we might not otherwise be getting into.” And let’s not forget: “Good content will drive people.”

Redistricting Update

Since we’re talking about platforms, let’s move to videos, some of which are pretty good. Take The Hinckley Report, for instance. While again not always using polished talkers, it touches on controversial topics. A recent report took on the gerrymandering issue. Utahns, according to polls, like the idea of an independent advisory commission on redistricting, and in a pass to the woeful Democrats, Matt Canham of The Salt Lake Tribune noted that a less partisan redrawing of districts would likely only give the Dems three more seats in a Legislature with 75 members in the House and 29 in the Senate. Maura Carabello of the Exoro Group said both this and the Count My Vote initiative could help the many independent voters in the state.

Local Coverage

We could ask why local television stations would send reporters to Las Vegas, and that would be a great question if you listened to the nightly local news. We got to see a shot of concrete barriers blocking Las Vegas Boulevard on the way to the Mandalay Bay hotel, thanks to KUTV’s Jeremy Harris. He took us on a walk down the deserted road because the cops let him go. It was a sorry waste of money to send him. That’s not to say local coverage isn’t worth something. At home, there were stories of families whose loved ones were killed. But for the bigger picture, Howard Berkes, NPR’s Salt Lake City correspondent, gave us an in-depth and colorful look at the shooter, “the guy next door,” and his secretive planning. He did have the aid of other national reporters who produced a worthwhile story of the tragic and puzzling event.

Don’t fret over the straight-outta-Westeros clashing of steel swords this Saturday at Liberty Park; it’s not an epic, bloody battle for the Iron Throne, but it should be entertaining nonetheless. Local sword-fighting academies are hosting their annual tournament, and they’re welcoming the public to observe the time-honored tradition. Jordan Hinckley, an instructor at Salt Lake City-based United Clan Swordsman Association, has been swinging a sword on and off since the late ’90s, around the time a fanatic friend introduced him to the art. The competition takes place on the east side of the park just past the pond. It starts around 10 a.m. and should wrap up around 3 or 4 p.m., but times could vary.

What is this about a sword fighting competition?

It looks like we’ll have about 20 competitors. They’ll be fighting in either steel or synthetic, both long sword as well as short sword. It’s a really good opportunity for our students to get out, fight with some other people and, overall, it’s a good gathering point for students.

Who can participate?

Students who are coming up from True Edge Academy of Swordsmanship in Salt Lake as well as in Provo. We actually have some students coming up in Las Vegas. You have to be a current member of one of the groups competing, but we’re definitely open for anyone to come watch and ask questions.

But you’re sword fighting with real swords?

We use European long sword; it’s a two-handed sword primarily from Europe. In the steel competition, you’re using real swords. They’re, obviously, not sharp, but they’re the same weight, same length as a sharpened weapon would be. … The synthetics are as close as you can get without being steel. They don’t require as much protective equipment. More of our beginners are fighting with synthetics. The more advanced students are fighting with steel.

How does someone win a competition? Is there a point system or is it whoever stabs the opponent in the chest first?

What we’re doing in this competition is you go to a certain number of points scored. So each round it’s 10 points. A hit to the head or a hit to the torso is worth two points, hits to the arms or legs are with one point. If somebody is being really defensive, there is still an opportunity for them to score some points and do well.

Even though the swords are blunt, how do you prevent gnarly accidents?

What we use for head protection is actually Olympic fencing masks. That gives you visibility that you need but also protection against cuts and thrusts to the face. Heavy padded jackets, elbow cups, knee pads, shin protection and then heavy gloves.

—DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net


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Lots of ads on TV these days for various DNA test kits. You send a sample off to the company and they tell you . . . what? What are they actually telling you? Is this real scientific exploration or just intrusive data mining? —Jenny

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If you’re suggesting the as-seen-on-TV approach might not be the best way to understand the most complex, private and fundamental parts of your personal makeup, Jenny, you might be onto something. In hospitals and laboratories, the field of genetic testing is still something like the Wild West. In your bathroom, it’s practically the OK Corral. The nut of the issue is that these at-home tests are increasingly looked at as avenues for determining folks’ personal dispositions toward certain illnesses or conditions—say, breast cancer. The objections are what you might imagine: You really want to learn something like that through the mail? Or make medical decisions based on it? Let’s start with the wide-angle view. DNA testing—typically looking at cells collected via cheek swab or blood or saliva sample— can tell you any number of things. The U.S. National Library of Medicine lists seven categories, ranging from newborn screening (all states require testing for phenylketonuria, a genetic condition that can lead to intellectual disability if left untreated) to forensic analysis (establishing paternity) to carrier testing—like identifying mutations of BRCA1, a gene that ordinarily produces tumor-suppressing proteins in the breasts. Even in the hands of professionals, genetic tests aren’t surefire. A 2016 paper in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology suggested that standard screening of invitro embryos before implantation might be needlessly hurting the patients’ chances of becoming parents: A higher-than-expected number of false positives for aneuploidy (abnormal chromosome count) likely means healthy embryos are getting discarded.  Maybe more worrisome, a 2016 Boston Globe investigation described would-be parents spending thousands of dollars on multiple rounds of prenatal genetic tests at for-profit labs, sent there by genetic counselors who might have undisclosed financial ties to the companies doing the testing. One pregnant client said a counselor told her that her daughter had a “near certainty” of being born with Turner syndrome, a growth disorder, claiming the test had a falsepositive rate of just 1 percent and recommending the lab run a second test. Instead the woman consulted a second counselor, at Tufts Medical Center, who figured the child’s chance of having Turner’s was only 14 percent. Another Globe story, from 2014, reported that companies doing prenatal risk screening weren’t always being clear about the tests’ limited reliability; some patients had gotten screening results back and chosen abortion, but subsequent exams on the fetuses showed they’d been fine. And again, all this is with trained pros administering the tests and interpreting the

results. It’s hard to figure accuracy improves when the amateurs give it a shot instead. Of course, testing for health risks is just one kind of DNA analysis, and others concern themselves with more benign matters, like genealogy. Some companies offer genetic tests they say can help you optimize your beauty and exercise regimens. But overall this market is skyrocketing—estimated to hit $340 million worldwide by 2022, up from $70 million in 2015, according to The Guardian—and health and disease screening are clearly where it’s headed. Earlier this year the Food and Drug Administration approved the first direct-to-consumer test (as they’re called) to help customers determine their risk of developing diseases including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. Otherwise, though, the FDA has struggled to assert regulatory control over these athome tests; the vast majority on the market, indeed, aren’t FDA-regulated. Historically, the agency has worried consumers would use them to make medical decisions, and they’re not the only ones. In a 2015 statement, the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics called for a set of minimum standards to apply to direct-to-consumer genetic testing, stressing the needs for clear explanation of what such tests can and can’t tell people about their health, counselors to explain the results, and privacy safeguards. Which brings us to the last part of your question: What becomes of the data generated by genetic testing? It’s true the testing service may reserve the right to sell it—make sure you read the fine print before spitting into any test tubes. But I’d suggest the risk is actually less in how the test companies might use your results than in how you do.  Here’s a scenario: Since 2008, health insurers have been forbidden from engaging in “genetic discrimination,” like denying coverage based on (to return to our earlier example) a BRCA1 mutation. But that’s not true for life, disability or long-term-care insurance. And, of course, when you apply for something like life insurance, you’re expected to self-report your medical information.  So say you’ve taken a genetic test—even just a fun one. Finally, you can confirm that Viking ancestry—that happens as a byproduct to identify a genetic predisposition toward some disorder. That’s information you’re now obligated to share, unless you’d like to lose that policy down the road—or lose the payout due to your beneficiaries after your death—if your insurer finds out. For now, maybe just stick with the Slanket. n Send questions to via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill _ frost

Eight top-trending podcasts right now:

Lover, My Killer

Seduced by the Tinder Slasher

6. The Kind-Eyed Stranger

and the Dumpster Full of Dead Waitresses

5. Wake Up and Die: The Bed & Breakfast Butcher

Save Her

2. Tap and Ride … and Die: Tales of the Uber Executioner

Targeted Perfectly Attractive Career Women Who Were Single Through No Fault of Their Own

DACA WRITE-IN

If you care about the future of young immigrants, don’t just scream your frustrations. Write them down and mail them to Washington. It’s estimated there are 10,500 young immigrants in Utah who could be affected by the president’s plan to eliminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The Community Writing Center and the staff from the University of Utah’s studentrun newspaper Venceremos host a DACA Response Write-in Workshop to help you write an effective letter to your representatives. Throughout the day, they’ll be offering short workshops on the ins and outs of public letter-writing after which you’ll have time to craft your own missive. Salt Lake Community College Writing Center, 210 E. 400 South, 801-957-2192, Saturday, Oct. 14, 12-4 p.m., free, bit.ly/2ysYkbR

VOLUNTEER FOR SANCTUARY

Every day brings a new fear for undocumented immigrants. Never mind what the Washington elite say. Salt Lake City is determined to protect its immigrants—documented or not. In the First Volunteer Orientation: SLC Sanctuary Solidarity Network, you can learn how the law has changed over the past year, and how to participate in this humanitarian effort. Whether you’re a person of faith or not, you can become a part of this national movement, and bring Salt Lake City into the fold. Christ United Methodist Church, 2375 E. 3300 South, 801-486-5473, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2-4 p.m., free, bit.ly/2z3hwdg

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 11

1. The Handsome Murderer Who

If you thought Ben Shapiro’s speeches ignited a firestorm in the battle over thought, then take a listen to Sarah Gailey. The self-described “writer, shrill feminist harpy and bad influence” gives a series of talks and readings, including “Fear of the Female Voice,” which will surely get your feminist or anti-feminist juices flowing. Her series of readings at Utah State University is meant to embolden “female writers and activists in one of the nation’s most conservative states,” according to the sponsoring academic departments. Gailey, who’s called a speculative fiction author and social critic, didn’t start writing until 2015, and was nominated for a Hugo award the first year she was eligible. MerrillCazier Library, 3000 Old Main Hill, Logan, 435-797-3292, Thursday, Oct. 12, 1:30 p.m.; Friday, Oct. 13, 11 a.m., free, journalism.usu.edu

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3. Not Even Her 16 Cats Could

FEMINIST WRITER SPEAKS

4. The FedEx Man Rings Once

CHANGE THE WORLD

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7. Swipe Right, Knife Left:

In a week, you can

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8. My Personal Trainer, My

CITIZEN REVOLT


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12 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

NEWS

P O L I C E B R U TA L I T Y

‘I Believe in Community Involvement’ Sim Gill responds to outcry following justified ruling in deadly Patrick Harmon shooting. BY ENRIQUE LIMÓN elimon@cityweekly.net @enriquelimon

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

C

hants of “Fire Sim Gill” and “Sim Gill, let’s be clear, cops committed murder here,” joined “No justice, no peace” and “Whose streets? Our streets!” Sunday afternoon, when members of Black Lives Matter, Utah Against Police Brutality and the public gathered outside the Public Safety Building to demand justice for Patrick Harmon. Microphone in hand, Black Lives Matter organizer and United Front Party founder Lex Scott’s message to Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill was clear: “He is not going to justify one more murder in this city, is he?” Scott told the crowd around 200 strong. “We’re coming for your job, Sim. We’re coming for justice.” Wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the phrase “Black identity extremist”—a term plucked from a recently leaked FBI memo labeling BLM activists terror threats—Scott also called for increased de-escalation training and more diversity in hiring within the SLCPD ranks, as well as the creation of a community-controlled civilian review board with the power to bring formal charges against police officers. Harmon, 50, was stopped by police along State Street on Aug. 13 for not having a rear light installed on his bicycle. After being asked about active felony warrants, Harmon attempted to flee and was lethally shot. Following an investigation, Gill’s office released the results from an OfficerInvolved Critical Incident review calling the shooting “legally justified,” on Oct. 4. The 18-page report says Harmon turned toward officer Clinton Fox and threatened him with a knife as he was running. It also quotes Fox during an interview in which his attorney was present, saying that in 10 years of law enforcement and two military deployments, the exchange was “the scariest situation” he’d ever found himself in. That same evening the report was disseminated, SLCPD released body-cam footage from three officers on the scene. One of the videos shared on City Weekly’s

Black Lives Matter organizer Lex Scott leads supporters on a march to the City and County Building following last Sunday’s protest. Facebook page has been viewed more than 2 million times. “This isn’t the first time we’ve seen Sim Gill side with his peers,” Utah Against Police Brutality member Matt Romrell said in response to the footage, citing the DA’s almost carbon-copy results from other cases, like the February 2016 police shooting of 17-year-old Abdullahi “Abdi” Mohamed. Gill, it turns out, was also initially shocked by the Harmon footage. “The first time I saw the videotape without any context, honest to God, my first reaction was ‘Oh, my God, this isn’t right; there’s something wrong here,” Gill told City Weekly over the phone on Tuesday. “As we started to go through this process—and looking at that and what the law requires me to do, and what the evidence was and what my obligations are—we ended up where we ended up, consistent with the statutory framework that I’m obligated to follow.” Far from being offended, Gill said he encourages public outcry. “I believe in community involvement,” he said, adding that he’s been a vocal advocate for social, political and criminal justice change over the past 20 years. “I think the debate questioning it is an integral part of our democratic process. So in that sense, I encourage it; I embrace it; I accept it— because I believe in it.” His track record shows he’s been a champion of transparency, Gill said, pointing out his office shied away from the previous “one-sentence justification or conclusion” norm and has instead opted to share full investigations to the public on his website. “That initial idea of being transparent and sharing all that with our community [was] met with resistance,” Gill said,

calling the move “a progressive incremental gain.” He also said he’s been called to train other DA offices across the country to follow his lead. Moreover, his office has been ahead of the curve in regard to responding to officer-involved shootings, Gill noted, and the proposal to have outside agencies review his decisions was part of his platform when first elected. “This was seven years ago. Before Ferguson, before the other issues around the country. … Before, it used to be police officers reviewing their own agencies.” The change, he says, is now operational. On the topic of showing a pattern of siding with law enforcement in police brutality cases, Gill said in certain instances, he’s found shootings unjustified, “because that’s what the facts showed” with no fanfare. Still, the shadow of the ones on the other side of the equation linger. At Sunday’s rally, community advocate Preslie Paur recited the names of those justifiably shot down—James Barker, Dillon Taylor, Darrien Hunt, Damian Huth, Nicolas Sanchez, Mohamed and Harmon. Referring to some of the cases as “racial profiling,” Paur called on her own white privilege and said had the tables been turned and she were riding her bicycle across several lanes of traffic with no rear light, at most an officer would ask if she was safe. “They even would’ve given me a goddamn ride home,” she said. Fighting back tears, Paur, an adoptive mother to a 2-year-old black child called on Gill and said she fears her son might become another statistic. “I cannot raise my son in a state where I don’t think he’s gonna grow up to be a man.”

Gill is aware of his sliding popularity with either cops or the public whenever his findings are released, but remains firm that any and all cases that come through his desk are exclusively facts-driven. “It’s not about pleasing anybody,” he said. “It’s about creating a process and being open about it.” Part of that openness, he said, was meeting with Harmon’s nephew Lamar Ross on Tuesday morning. “I told him, ‘Man, ask me anything you want.’ I go, ‘Be critical—you don’t have to agree with me, but questioning the process is important if we’re going to make the kind of changes that we want to make.’” Moving forward, the DA says he welcomes probes on the standard of review his office currently adheres to. In addition, he favors reforming procedures within law enforcement communities, with one caveat: “I don’t get to control law enforcement agents— they’re not my agents,” he said. “But we can talk about how to engage these law enforcement agencies and how can we standardize policies which maybe then need to be reduced to statutory framework.” Further defending his decision in the Harmon case, Gill said he personally invited the FBI to review his determination. “I believe in transparency; I believe in accountability, and my administration has done a lot to move that along,” Gill said. “We just sent out a letter to the FBI yesterday and we said, ‘Look, come down and review what we’ve done.” For people like Utah Against Police Brutality’s Romrell, it seems like too little too late. “If shooting Patrick Harmon in the back while he was running away is policy,” he said, “then it’s clear to me we need to change the system.” CW


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I

t’s a crisp Monday, and a man is on a mission for a morning smoke. As the squeaking brakes of a Trax train caterwaul behind him, he lifts the lid on a small waste receptacle affixed to a trash can and pulls out a butt. “Not enough here,” he says of the cigarette stump, but puts it to his lips and lights it anyway. His dog, Squirt, lifts his leg and empties his bladder on the curb. Then man and dog continue along the City Creek Center’s Main Street facade, and hook a right just past Starbucks, on the hunt for another butt. There he sees it, in the middle of the sidewalk, a cigarette intact save for the singed tip. He continues to smoke what he can of the first and stashes the second away for later. He knows the habits of smokers. He knows, for example, that when people sneak a quick puff while they wait for their coffee order, they’re prone to ditch half-smoked sticks when they go back inside. “The guy that works at Subway smokes these,” he says, holding up the bounty he just collected. “But he never smokes a full one.” He runs his hand along the edge of the raised planter looking for a third. Nothing. The two will have to last for now. “A lot of times you can’t find one,” he says. “A lot of people grab them.” Scrounging the city’s nooks for partially smoked cigarettes might seem desperate, but for this man, it’s a quotidian task in his morning routine. Waiting for the train to pass before he heads back to his stuff, he holds fast the leash on his dog—a beaglelabrador mix—who is urinating again. “He’s a piss machine,” the man says. This is a typical workday for Robby M. (he asked that his last name not be used), where for the next several hours he’ll sit on a sleeping bag with his back leaned on a signpost, facing the mall’s doors, waiting for pedestrians to drop money into a plastic container. To fill his belly, quench his thirst or pay for miscellany, Robby earns his keep with the spare dollar bills and loose coins pedestrians have jingling around in their wallets, purses or pockets. In brief, Robby’s a full-time, bona fide panhandler. Wearing an unkempt beard, greasy hair and clothing that droops from his body, he sits for minutes on end with his head bowed like a monk or a sleep-deprived man nearly keeling over in slumber. He’s almost completely inert, except for a hand that is lightly stroking his dog’s ear. Water bottles stick up around him like plastic stalagmites. Today, most people walk by without looking directly at him. But then a man stops in front and pulls out his wallet. Robby, head down, hasn’t made any sign that he’s noticed. The man drops two bills in Robby’s lap, waking him from his prayer. Robby gives a thankful nod then stuffs the cash in his pocket. The panhandler assumes his obsequious position until another man drops $5 and pets the pooch. Earlier this morning, another man sleeps under a pile of blankets 15 feet away beneath the mall’s sky bridge. He also has a dog in tow. Robby says most people know this turf is his and his friend Corey’s, who spell each other when one needs a rest, and he seems a little peeved that another person is setting up shop so close. Robby is less concerned, however, when he notices the resting man doesn’t have a panhandling sign. “Probably just sleeping there to get out of the rain,” he says. A halfhour later, the unknown man wakes and moseys away. Panhandlers in the Salt Lake Valley, like every metropolitan area, are ubiquitous, but an ongoing SLC Homeless Outreach Service Team campaign is aimed at ending it. Red meters downtown read: “Give a hand up not a handout,” and HOST billboards are plastered around


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OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 15

BETHANY FULLER

By Dylan Woolf Harris dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

While nonprofits are trying to change the behavior of charitable folks who want to give money to panhandlers, the state is also nudging panhandlers off certain street corners. After taking a trip to Florida where he witnessed roving panhandlers, Rep. Steve Eliason, R-Sandy, decided to push for a law here to eliminate spaces shared by moving vehicles and pedestrians. “There were panhandlers wandering up and down the off-ramps between cars. I thought that’s probably coming to Utah,” he says of his Florida observations. “I also saw a family in the median with their children panhandling. That was troubling on several fronts.” He thought about the potential tragedy of a driver buzzing too close to the middle line and clipping a child. “Although I haven’t come—quote—‘close’ to hitting someone, I have passed people standing in medians at a high rate of speed and it does concern me,” Eliason says. “It absolutely takes your attention off driving if you think, ‘Am I going to hit that person or are they going to step in front of me?’ and so there is no question that it’s an increased traffic hazard. It doesn’t take a traffic engineer to tell you that.” So he introduced a bill last session— House Bill 161, the Pedestrian Safety Amendments—that prohibits exchanges between motorists and pedestrians. The first two times a person is cited under this law, he or she can be issued a citation. On the third offense, the panhandler could be hit with a misdemeanor. But it doesn’t only apply to the person receiving money. Equally, a motorist who hands money or food is in violation. The state passed an anti-panhandling bill in 2014, House Bill 101, but a judge struck down portions of the law on grounds that it trampled the right to free speech. Reviewing case law, Eliason realized he needed to be careful and precise if he wanted this piece of legislation to be upheld. So he worked with the ACLU of Utah to draft its language. ACLU Legislative and Policy Counsel Marina Lowe confirmed that the representative consulted with the ACLU before submitting his bill. The ACLU didn’t oppose his stated goal of preventing individuals from stepping onto the roadway, Lowe said, but it took a neutral position on the bill during the session. Eliason points to distinct differences between his legislation and the prior unconstitutional law. The former bill banned panhandling along every road in the state. HB 161 was narrowly written to include controlled freeways, on-ramps and off-ramps, and paved roads with a speed limit of 35 mph or greater. “It doesn’t apply to the majority of the lane miles in the state,” he says. “It’s only when pedestrians enter traffic to do business and risk themselves as well as slow the flow of traffic that are generally high-speed lanes.”

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New legislation aims to relocate panhandlers.

Safe Streets

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Curbing Panhandling

the city. The message is that if you want to help people begging for money, instead put your money in the meter and it will be distributed to service providers. All the money is deposited into the Pamela J. Atkinson foundation and then dispersed to more than a dozen providers. Robby is skeptical: “I don’t see any of that.” And the perception of panhandlers, he believes, is mired in misconceptions. “Everybody thinks we make so much money out here because they’ve seen some documentary on TV that found one guy somewhere that does somehow make tons and tons of money at it, and everybody thinks that’s how it goes for everybody. But it’s not,” he says. “I go days where I’ll sit out here for 12 hours and make $4. That’s not the life of luxury to me.” Whether panhandling is lucrative or not, Sgt. Scott Stuck, SLC HOST supervisor, says help is readily available. “That’s the real key. If you’re giving to the guy on the corner, he’s not the one who wants help because he’s not the one going to the service providers,” Stuck says, and as long as there is an incentive to panhandle, people will continue to do it. Stuck would like to see the special meters expand out to the valley, particularly along Trax lines, to discourage panhandling in other hotspots. “They make sure that the resources get allocated to the right facilities that can then get them to the right individuals. When someone panhandles, that money is going primarily to drugs and alcohol. They’re not spending that money the way these resource facilities like the Catholic Community Services can,” he says. Last month, Salt Lake City began dispatching outreach teams that comprise a HOST officer or crisis-intervention officer and a social worker. “They’ll follow up with homeless individuals, they’ll stop and talk to panhandlers and see if there’s resources they can provide them. We’re trying to go out proactively and meet the problem and figure out what we can help with,” Stuck says. The homeless population knows where to get food or shelter, he continues, but sometimes they don’t know where to get specific services. “If it’s a mental health issue, they might not know where to go. Alcoholics or drug addicts who want to get off the street, sometimes they don’t even know how to begin that.” HOST officer Matt Overman says he’s encountered people knocked out on the synthetic narcotic known as spice, “and their pockets will be full of change. It’s the same people you see on Main Street asking for change.” St. Vincent de Paul provides three meals a day, and Overman says people are only turned away if they’re on the shortlist— meaning they were kicked out for fighting— but even they can get a sack lunch. The Community Connection Center on 200 S. and 500 West is set up to be a centralized service facility.


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16 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

Eliason’s colleagues at the Capitol agreed with him, and HB 161 breezed through the Legislature. If it appears Eliason’s ultimate goal with his bill is to wash the streets of panhandlers, he says that’s not true. The bill, he argues, isn’t merely couched in public safety terms and, in fact, it doesn’t outlaw panhandling. Instead, he hopes that those people who chose to panhandle will relocate to safer areas. If the goal had been to completely eliminate it, the bill would have been written differently, he points out. “If you pull over to the side of the road to a safe spot, knock yourself out. Give them as much money or food as you desire. They have every right to stand there and do that,” he says. “My bill says you can stand there all you want with your sign and megaphone and say whatever you want. The problem is when you enter traffic to commence some sort of exchange, whether that’s property or money or food or whatever.” The ACLU’s Lowe says sometimes the way a law is applied reveals a better picture than a lawmaker’s expressed intentions. “If the intent is to prohibit the act of panhandling or reduce the presence of people in our midst that are asking for help, then that is problematic,” she says. But enforcement among the jurisdictions will determine whether the law successfully relocates panhandlers from dangerous intersections, Eliason says. Salt Lake City Police Detective Greg Wilking told City Weekly in early September that their officers hadn’t cited any panhandlers in the city under the new code. Not only was panhandling a lower priority, but the on-ramps and off-ramps are Utah Highway Patrol jurisdiction, he noted. The majority of panhandling-related calls the police receive are complaints of aggressive panhandling. Unless an officer witnesses it, Wilking says, it’s hard to enforce. “Most of the time by the time we get there, they’re gone,” he says. And although threatening a person is a crime, annoying someone isn’t. West Valley City spokesperson Sam Johnson said last month that his city had also issued zero citations to drivers or panhandlers. Rather, police were focusing on educating the public about the new law. Prior to the state law, Midvale City—a municipality that partially falls in Eliason’s district—passed a panhandling ordinance and enforced it by first issuing warnings. The effect, Eliason says, was that panhandlers relocated to nearby cities that didn’t have ordinances or took a lax approach. “When I would get on the freeway at 90th South and I-15, it was not uncommon to see people on four corners down there,” he says. “So if some cities choose to enforce it and others don’t, then the problem is going to be much worse in those cities that have a stand-down policy.” Though not engaging in an all-out blitz, Utah Highway Patrol has begun ticketing panhandlers when it’s apparent, says Lt. Jeff Nigbur. On Aug. 17, the UHP began making “contact” with panhandlers. Troopers ran the names of three people spotted panhandling on the first day—on 400 South, 1300 South and 3300 South. “All three had warrants,” Nigbur says. “All three had narcotics on them.”

Some Kind of Ordinance

Somewhat redundantly, West Valley City council passed an ordinance that mirrors state law. Spokesman Johnson says it’s a way to ensure the city has control over its high-speed intersections, regardless of what happens at the state level. “Safety is always a concern,” he says. “In the busier intersections, you’ll see someone running across the street to exchange money. It has been a concern for us.” But there are signs that point to panhandling ordinances being less about safety, and more about eliminating what many in the public see as a discomfiting nuisance—but one that is constitutionally protected, nonetheless. None of the emails sent to any West Valley City council member in the past two years mentioned concerns that a car might hit a panhandler, a records request revealed. Consider, instead, an email sent from a constituent to West Valley City Councilwoman Karen Lang in December 2015: The panhandling situation at a shopping district near 3500 South and 5600 West

On that same day and only a few blocks north of the I-80 and 1300 South nexus, a young couple held an “Anything Helps” sign up to drivers leaving a fastfood restaurant. They claim to be stranded in Utah. Their stuff was stolen, they tell a reporter, and they’re looking to gather $180 to buy two bus tickets that would get them back to California. It was a hard row, they said. They’d been sneered at and had only earned half of the money they needed. They look tired, and cut the interview short, saying to talk more would only eat into the time they could be panhandling. A few moments later, the man sits down beneath the shade of a tree.

Follow the Money

Although Eliason’s bill is only an attempt to solve a traffic issue, he has a few thoughts about panhandling in general. For one, he wouldn’t recommend giving money to them wherever they might be standing. Eliason has sat on the Shelter the Homeless board for 12 years, and even served as chair for a stint. One day, he says, he asked people whether The Road Home administration gave money to panhandlers. The response, an unequivocal no, stuck with him: “I know all full too well that the currency I give them could be used to purchase the fatal dose of heroin that takes their lives,” he says. It’s no secret that among the homeless, many are wracked by addiction— and disease threw them into the depths of poverty. Handing someone who is struggling with addiction a wad of cash compounds the problems, Eliason argues. “The money you give these folks, within minutes or hours, could end up in the hands of a drug cartel in exchange for black-tar heroin.” He’s talked to panhandlers in downtown Salt Lake City he says, and recommends they grab a meal at St. Vincent de Paul’s or get shelter at The Road Home. In these cases, he says he’s met with excuses, like that the shelter is full, that they won’t allow dogs, or that—despite its reputation—drugs are barred. “If a dog is more important than a warm bed, that’s your choice,” he says. But the services exist, whether it’s at the Fourth Street Clinic, The Road Home shelter, Volunteers of America or the YWCA, all of which are accountable for how they spend their money. From a business perspective, Eliason says, he’s considering the return on investment. “Am I going to see that money effectively used or wasted?” he asks. “And I consider narcotics not just a waste of money but a tragedy. If I’m helping fuel that addiction I’m exacerbating the issues that they’re dealing with.” As a homeless man, Robby at City Creek Center acknowledges the link between panhandlers and drugs. “I’m not going to lie; there are people out here who do that. There’s a lot of them,” he says, but if someone wants to give money, they should have that option, he counters, rather than have the choice foisted upon them. As for him, he denies using the money for drugs. He says he buys food and other necessities. A recent ankle tweak meant he needed medical supplies. “I

“The money you give these folks, within minutes or hours, could end up in the hands of a drug cartel in exchange for black-tar heroin.”

—Rep. Steve Eliason, R-Sandy

was out of control, it began. The emailer said she and her elderly mother were bothered by a young panhandler at an ATM, then spotted the same man in a Walmart parking lot a day or so later. The emailer felt intimidated walking to the store, she said. “West Valley City needs to come up with some kind of ordinance that either stops the panhandling or restricts it to certain locations like street corners,” the email states. Ironically, the ordinances and laws passed by the city and state do the opposite. Instead of relegating panhandlers to intersections, it pushes them to areas such as storefronts or parking lots. In its first month enforcing the new law, UHP continued to make contact with panhandlers and drivers, and Nigbur says it’s working—that panhandling is slowing on the busier streets and intersections. On an uncharacteristically warm fall day, a rocky area at the bottom of the I-80 and 700 East off-ramp is vacant. It’s a place where panhandlers, even in the frigid winter, are a permanent fixture. But on this late afternoon, in the 70-degree air, there’s not a soul to be seen. Nigbur says it’s unclear whether the new law is changing the behavior of panhandlers, or merely ushering them to different spots.


“I go days where I’ll sit out here for 12 hours and make $4. That’s not the life of luxury to me.”

OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 17

soon enough. Harrison also suffers from Bell’s palsy, and to top off his troubles, he hasn’t been able to see out of his left eye after two dog hairs lodged behind it. Doctors pulled them out but weren’t able to save his vision, and he now wears an eye patch. “People tell me to get a job. Give me a job. I don’t really have use of my hands,” he says, emphasizing that he’d rather not beg for money. “This is embarrassing to me. It’s degrading.” He says in his condition, he’d think he’d qualify for housing. “I should be one of the ones on top of the list. Plus I’m dying,” Harrison says. Those trying to curb panhandling, however, argue that almost anyone is employable. Utah enjoys one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation, Eliason points out, and “now hiring” signs are plentiful. “Most temp agencies don’t do a background check, a credit check or check most references. They just need anybody who can show up and work on an assembly line or make tacos. If people are wanting to work, we have plenty of opportunities in our economy right now,” he says. “There’s plenty of social service places for people who are hungry, want a place to sleep, are victims of domestic violence, are suffering from substance abuse.” People just have to chose to use them, he adds. CW

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His anger and desperation grew with each day. “After three days, I pulled a knife,” he says, resulting in an assault charge and a 120-day stint in jail. (Court records, however, indicate a Frank Harrison was sentenced to 120 days for drug possession last year. None could be found for an assault charge under that name.) Harrison’s run-ins with the law started when he was teenager in Florida. Beaten by his stepfather, he says he ran away at age 17. One night, Harrison broke into a house while the owners slept to nab some food. The cat-burglar crime led to an arrest, a felony conviction and a lengthy prison sentence. Post-sentence, he took labor jobs, such as roofing. Then he met a woman on an internet poker site, he says, and soon they fell in love. Harrison moved to be with her in West Valley City around 2010. Like him, she was disabled. He served as her partner and care provider until she died, he says. Now he’s penniless and shoeless, and his prospects aren’t great. Harrison suffers from porphyria cutanea tarda, a rare blood/skin disease that “eats you up from the inside out,” he says. The spot of skin between his gloved hand and shirt sleeve reveals an open sore, about an inch and a half in diameter that looks festering and infected. He points to two other dark spots that he says will burst into open sores

used most of the money I made this weekend to buy relief cream, ibuprofen, Ace bandages and stuff like that,” he says. Robby doesn’t only panhandle; he recently held a temp job, he says. Originally from Washington State, he’d been married, living with his wife and four kids until he moved to Utah to sell meat. Around the time he was struck with medical problems, the company he worked for relocated, and he’s been down on his luck for the better part of a year. Robby says he stayed at the shelter for a few days, but the drugs and violence scared him away. Now he camps in a park with his pal, Corey. He’s not alone; plenty of homeless avoid the Rio Grande area. Outside the Starbucks on Main Street, three despondent panhandlers sit and wait. At the feet of one man, a display of small, handcrafted dreamcatchers fail to catch the eye of any passerby on this morning. Another in the group, Frank Harrison, sits next to a cart that holds a few of his possessions and a panhandling sign. When he first started experiencing homelessness, Harrison stayed at the shelter, sleeping on the floor in the front office while his stuff, including a cell phone, was stowed behind a counter. One morning, it went missing, he said, and an agitated Harrison began demanding the staff help him find his stuff.

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—Panhandler Robby M.


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ESSENTIALS

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, OCT. 12-18, 2017

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

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THURSDAY 10/12

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In a way that only dance can, Disembodied We examines challenges posed by the modern world. For this production, BRINE—a Salt Lake City dance collective that nurtures artistic opportunities for choreographers, dancers and designers—uses art to enlighten its audience with seven original works. Consequently, Ashley Creek’s A.D. Part Two: Terra (a sequel of sorts to an earlier piece) relates to responsibility. Monica Campbell’s Passage becomes a rumination about the ability to leave the past behind. Gaslighting Blatherskites, as imagined by Alicia Trump, dissects the art of the argument and the ways that words can misrepresent real meaning. Gina Terrell’s Kwashiorkor looks at the modern epidemic of malnutrition, and encourages audiences to help end it. Symmer Andrews’ Fragmented examines alienation and the isolation that separates individuals from each other. University of Utah School of Dance faculty member Sara Pickett’s What Breaks Us delves into the divide between compassion and conforming and how it impacts on our humanity, while LajaMartin allows Lucy (Part I) to imagine what life was like at its inception. “I feel that each piece plays a part in conveying questions about society, culture, community relationships and how we act overall as humans,” Ashley Creek says. “Are we taking care of ourselves? Who are we as a species? Where do our actions take us? How do we treat our fellow humans? I encourage our audience members to treat our show as a choose-yourown-adventure novel.” (Lee Zimmerman) BRINE Dance: Disembodied We @ Leona Wagner BlackBox Theater, Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, Oct. 12, 6 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m., $12-$18, brinedance.com

Anyone who saw Steve Yockey’s Blackberry Winter—a poignant drama about a woman becoming caregiver to a mother with dementia—at Salt Lake Acting Co. last season might have a sense for what to expect from his new play, Mercury. But director Shannon Musgrave learned first-hand at a 2015 theater festival that he’s not so easy to pin down. “He had this 10-minute play [at the festival],” Musgrave says, “and I was floored that he had written this and also Blackberry. Getting to know more of his work since then, dark theatrical comedy is more of his style, and Blackberry Winter more of the outlier.” While Musgrave prefers not to reveal too many specifics about the plot in order to preserve surprises, she notes that Mercury is particularly appropriate for the season, in that “it really delves into the horror genre: scary, dark and bloody. It’s really exciting to see that kind of work live, happening right in front of you.” The production’s fantastical elements are also proving to be an intriguing logistical challenge, especially for a venue like SLAC that lacks some conventional off-stage spaces. “There are a lot of things on the page that were just like, ‘OK, how is that going to happen?’” she says. There’s also an element of social satire at work, described in a press release as about “missing empathy.” “It really is this modern myth about what happens when we lose our ability to walk in another person’s shoes,” Musgrave says. “We have to deal with each other, talk to each other and have a little humanity.” (Scott Renshaw) Mercury @ Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, Oct. 11-Nov. 12, dates and times vary, $37-$44, saltlakeactingcompany.org

For lovers of campy, macabre entertainment, there is no better time of the year than the Halloween season. For lovers of grisly and delightfully ridiculous humor looking to expand beyond The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Sackerson Theater Co. delivers the truly gruesome, dark comedic musical Shockheaded Peter. Based on an 1845 German children’s book— full of tales of naughty children facing gruesome and sometimes fatal punishments for behavior like sucking their thumbs—Shockheaded Peter  ups the stakes by having each child die to a jaunty tune for their misbehavior. Alex Ungerman, producer and co-director of the show, says he and Dave Mortensen chose this for their Halloween offering because it’s an internationally acclaimed show unlike anything else being performed in Utah this season. “It’s really dark and delightful,” Ungerman says. “You’ll best enjoy it if you grab a drink before the show, and probably one after.” It also lends itself well to a shoestring budget, Ungerman says, and a do-it-yourself grit that fits into Sackerson’s mission “to work in unconventional spaces with new works for bold audiences.” With a cast of nine (four of whom are the band) set in a space that the cast and crew have transformed into an intimate cabaret-style theater, this production delivers on that promise. Sackerson also puts their own spin on the tale, favoring the physicality of their actors over the puppetry often used to portray the doomed children. (Kylee Ehmann) Shockheaded Peter: A Gruesome Cabaret @ The Art Factory, 211 W. 2100 South, 801613-0582, Oct. 13-14 & Oct. 20-21, 8 p.m., $17-$23, sackerson.org

There are many different kinds of live music you might expect to see at a nightclub. But classical symphonic probably isn’t one of them. That’s only part of what makes the MOTUS After Dark event at SKY—offered in collaboration with Salt Lake City-based creative support group 3 Irons—such a unique experience. MOTUS stands for “Musicians of the Utah Symphony,” and that’s exactly who you’ll find performing: talented musicians like principal flutist Mercedes Smith, associate principal cellist Matthew Johnson, keyboardist Jason Hardink and new concertmaster Madeline Adkins. And that’s not taking into account other “surprise” performances by Utah Symphony members that will pop up throughout the venue over the course of the evening. This evening’s program is scheduled to feature visiting artist Patricia Kopatchinskaja, who will serve as violin soloist for Ravel’s Tzigane and vocal soloist for Arnold Schoeberg’s operatic Pierrot Lunaire. Plus, just to class up the evening even more, Utah Symphony maestro Thierry Fischer will conduct the performance. According to violist Joel Biggs in a press release statement, “Kopatchinskaja is a fearless, electrifying artist. Her MOTUS performance at SKY SLC with Thierry and some of our most charismatic musicians will be unforgettable.” Guests can enjoy custom cocktails with their entertainment, but mostly it’s a chance for something that even regular symphony attendees rarely get a chance to experience: an up-close-and-personal evening with great artists, and at a fraction of the cost. After this, it might be hard for other nightclub entertainment to measure up. (Scott Renshaw) MOTUS After Dark @ Sky, 149 Pierpont Ave., Oct. 18, 8:30 p.m., $10, motusafterdark.com

BRINE Dance: Disembodied We

Salt Lake Acting Co.: Mercury

Shockheaded Peter: A Gruesome Cabaret

MOTUS After Dark


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A&E Salt Lake’s Greatest Escapes

Offering immersive, real-world adventures, escape rooms are growing in popularity—in Utah and beyond. BY BRYAN YOUNG @swankmotron comments@cityweekly.net

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er Café (watchtower-cafe.com) features a smaller experience where a handful of participants must prevent a zombie apocalypse. Castle of Chaos (castleofchaos.com) also offers two scary escapes. Roberto Fernandez, location manager of the Mystery Escape Room at The Gateway (mysteryescaperoom.com), says part of the allure is the collaborative facet. “It’s that sense of teamwork, accomplishment and immersion,” he says. “Nowhere else can you get an in-depth dive into a new world with a challenge in real life. The Mystery Escape Room particularly prides itself in helping people realize how to build better relationships and teams through our games.” They, too, have Halloween-themed rooms: one set in Dracula’s Castle, where the end-game is to put a stake through the king vampire’s heart; another one takes

Treasure island Adventure at Mystery Escape Room

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Y

ou’re in a train station. A magical creature has escaped, and you need to make sure it’s captured before someone gets hurt or killed. Or you’re in a spaceship, hurtling toward a star with classified cargo that puts the entire universe at risk. While these scenarios might sound like cut subplots from Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them or Interstellar, they’re not movies. They’re games you can play— right here in Salt Lake City. Over the past few years, escape rooms have skyrocketed in popularity. For those who don’t know, escape rooms are immersive real-world games. You and your team are locked in a room and have to solve a series of puzzles—organized around a particular story—to get out. Sometimes those puzzles take on the theme of a film, a book or some other part of pop culture. Local escape room plots include dozens of mildly familiar universes—such as those of Harry Potter, Sherlock Holmes, Alice in Wonderland and dozens of others. For the Halloween season, a few venture into zombie worlds: Get Out Games (getoutgames.com) has a room with a zombie chained in the middle of it, challenging trapped players to get out alive. Watchtow-

Chthulu’s Library of Horror Adventure at Mystery Escape Room

you into the maddening depths of Lovecraft, working to prevent the Old Ones of Cthulhu from devouring the earth. In a world dominated by video games and other on-screen entertainment, there’s something refreshing about keeping your phone in your pocket for an hour and dedicating yourself to solving a puzzle. Escape rooms take the idea of team sports one step further with the element of intellectual stimulation. “All generations can enjoy them,” Fernandez says. “They are so versatile; it’s hard to only do just one.” Brian Dove, the mastermind behind the Castle of Chaos and Watchtower Café installations, says video games are actually the origin. “It is believed that the first escape room game was built in Japan in 2007, inspired by mobile escape-game apps. The creator loved the mobile games, and wanted to create a real-life version,” he explains. “From there, the games spread through Japan, then surfaced in Europe in 2011 and the U.S. in 2012.” With more and more augmented and virtual-reality games providing immersive experiences, it’s no wonder the rooms are gaining popularity around the world. The Mystery Escape Room at The Gateway opened in November 2014, but has since moved to a larger space and sprouted a second location in St. George. Watchtower Café added their single-room experience just this year. There’s no doubt the trend will continue to grow. And the Halloween season is the perfect time to try. CW


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OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 21


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moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

The Natural History Museum of Utah (301 Wakara Way, nhmu.utah.edu) hosts its 5th annual Indian Art Market Oct. 14-15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The market features paintings, pottery, jewelry, hand-carved Kachina dolls and more for sale by a roster of more than 20 Native American artists (painting by Norman Lansing is pictured).

PERFORMANCE THEATER

An American in Paris Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through Oct. 15, times vary, broadway-at-the-eccles.com Forever Dead Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Nov. 4, Friday-Monday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org Forever Plaid Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, through Nov. 15, MondaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2 & 4 p.m., hct.org Heart of Robin Hood Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Oct. 14, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2 & 4 p.m., hct.org La Bohème Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, through through Oct. 15, dates and times vary, utahopera.org Marie Antoinette Good Company Theatre, 2402 Wall Ave., Ogden, 801-917-4969, through Oct. 29, Friday-Sunday, times vary, goodcotheatre.com Mercury Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North 801-363-7522, through Nov. 12, WednesdaySunday, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org (see p. 18) Perdida Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, through Oct. 28, ThursdaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; 2 p.m. Saturday matinee, grandtheatrecompany.com Shockheaded Peter The Art Factory, 211 W. 2100 South, Oct. 13-14 & Oct. 20-21, 8 p.m., sackerson.org (see p. 18) Surely Goodness and Mercy Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Oct. 15, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Wicked-er Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, through Nov. 4, desertstar.biz

DANCE

Brine Dance: Disembodied We Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Oct. 12, 6 & 8 p.m.; Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m., brinedance.com (see p. 18) Odyssey Dance: Thriller Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. President’s Circle, 801-5881-7100, through Oct. 30, days and times vary, odysseydance.com

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Time and Space: Celebrating 40 Years of Star Wars Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801-746-0792, Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m., westvalleysymphonyutah.org MOTUS After Dark Sky 149 Pierpont Ave., Oct. 18, 8:30 p.m., motusafterdark.com (see p. 18)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Joshua Fonokalafi Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Oct. 13, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Michael Quu Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomdey.com Nick Swardson Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Oct. 13-14, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Bailey Harris and Douglas Harris: My Name is Stardust The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 14, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com Craig Johnson: The Western Star Sandy Library, 10100 S. Petunia Way, Sandy, Oct. 14, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Jennifer Jenkins: Fearless The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 17, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Margot Singer: Underground Fugue The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 12, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Mylene Dressler: The Last to See Me The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 13, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Paul Cohen: The Glamshack The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 18, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Robert Beatty: Serafina and the Splintered Heart The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Oct. 16, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Garden, 1000 S. 900 West, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org


Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 28, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Tuesday Harvest Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 31, Tuesdays, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, through Oct. 25, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort 9385 S. Snowbird Center Drive, Snowbird, Saturdays & Sundays through Oct. 15, snowbird.com Pumpkin Nights Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, Oct. 13-29, 6:30 p.m., pumpkinnights.com 2017 Indian Art Market Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 801- 5816927, Oct. 14-15, nhmu.utah.edu (see p. 22) Utah Inclusive Arts Festival Fall 2017 Hartvigsen School, 1510 W. 5400 South, Taylorsville, Oct. 14, noon-3 p.m., facebook.com/utahinclusiveartsfestival Scarecrow Festival Ashton Gardens, 3900 N. Garden Drive, Lehi, 801-768-2300, Oct. 16-Oct. 21, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., thanksgivingpoint.org

TALKS & LECTURES

Disease: A Direct Threat To National Security Gore School of Business, Westminster College 1840 S. 1300 East, 801-832-3270, Oct. 12, 7 p.m., utahdiplomacy.org

HALLOWEEN

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

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Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 18, utahmoca.org Anastasia Dukhanina Redman Gallery, 1240 E. 2100 South, Floors 6 & 7, through Oct. 31, redmangallery.com Cabinet of Curiosities: Strange Objects From the Staff of the City Library Main Library Special Collections, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 17, slcpl.org Caryn Feeny: Two by Two Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 11, slcpl.org Cities of Conviction UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 6, utahmoca.org Ilse Bing Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 31, umfa.utah.edu Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 9, utahmoca.org Jimmi Toro: Kindle a Light Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Nov. 26, kimballartcenter.org Justin Watson: |human| Nox Contemporary Gallery, 440 S. 400 West, Ste. H, through Nov. 10, bit.ly/2jP10tU Karen Horne: Ballet To Tango Exploring the Art of Dance Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, 801-533-4200, through Dec. 23, hornefineart.com Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here UMFA, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Laura Erekson Atkinson: Builders Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 3, slcpl.org Matt Kruback and Naomi Marine: prima facie Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 10, visualarts.utah.gov Natalie Stallings: Microscopic Sovereign Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 3, slcpl.org Photo Alt. Group Photography Exhibition Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 17, saltlakearts.org Rebecca Klundt, Liberty Blake and Elise Ostraff Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 17, saltlakearts.org Strangely Enough Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through Nov. 5, urbarnartsgallery.org Tina Vigos: Seeking Grace Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Vincent Mattina: Altered States Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 10, slcpl.org

from the creator of SLEEPWALK WITH ME, MY GIRLFRIEND’S BOYFRIEND and THANK GOD FOR JOKES

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Asylum 49 140 E. 200 S., Tooele, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, asylum49.com BooLights! Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave., through Oct. 27, 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., hoglezoo.org Castle of Chaos 7980 S. State, Midvale, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, castleofchaos.com The Corn Maize 2801 S. 3500 West, Ogden, through Oct. 31, thecornmaize.com Fear Factory 666 W. 800 South, 801-6923327, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, fearfactoryslc.com The Haunted Forest 6000 W. 6400 North, American Fork, through Oct. 31, times vary, hauntedutah.com Haunted Hollow 150 S. 1900 West, West Haven, through Oct. 31, days and times vary, hauntedutah.com The Haunted Maize 2801 S. 3500 West, Ogden, 801-645-5392, through Oct. 31, Fridays and Saturdays, 8-11:30 p.m., thecornmaize.com Leo After Dark: Hallow’s Eve The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, 801-531-9800, Oct. 20, 7:30 p.m.-midnight, theleonardo.org Nightmare on 13th 300 W. 1300 South,

through Nov. 4, days and times vary, nightmareon13th.com Strangling Brothers Haunted Circus 632 E. 1500 South, American Fork, through Nov. 4, days and times vary, stranglingbrothers.com

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24 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

TED SHEFFLER

DINE

The Joy of Soy

We lost Rice Basil, but gained another great sushi restaurant. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

O

ne of my favorite local restaurants to emerge during the past few years was Rice Basil in Holladay. It was among a handful of excellent sushi and sashimi spots in town, so I was bummed to hear that they lost their lease, and the building would be razed. Then I heard about the opening of a new Murray restaurant on State Street called Soy’s. As it turns out, Soy’s Sushi Bar & Grill is the namesake restaurant of former Rice Basil owner/chef Ariunbold Batsaikhan— aka “Soy.” With a mouthful of a name like his, you can see why he might prefer his nickname. If nothing else, it saves on the cost of signage. I’m thrilled that Batsaikhan has a new place to call his own. He’s one of the sweetest guys I’ve met in the restaurant biz, and one with enormous talent. At Soy’s, he runs the restaurant; he’s not behind the sushi bar anymore, but it’s in great hands with sushi artists like Eko, a fellow Mongolian and friend of Batsaikhan’s. The vibe at Soy’s couldn’t be more different than Rice Basil. Whereas the latter was dark and hushed, This place is vibrant and bustling, with orange booths and sushi bar, contemporary pendent lighting and modern art adorning the walls. It’s a very inviting and friendly atmosphere. After bellying up to the sushi bar and chatting with Eko (who didn’t know who I was) we were treated to a gratis seaweed salad ($5)—a scrumptious plate of julienned seaweed, cucumber, squid and sliced strawberry and avocado, seasoned with a light gingery sauce and sprinkled with white sesame seeds. It was a great start to a meal.

Soy’s scrumptious seaweed salad From the small but well-selected wine list, we chose Calcu rosé to sip with dinner; it paired beautifully with the delicate (and decadent) salmon belly in a subtle habanero sauce ($8). The torched morsels of salmon belly aren’t exactly fat-free, but practically melt in the mouth much like bone marrow. Then we enjoyed the simplicity of negihama ($5), a maki-style roll of yellowtail and green onion. I was surprised to find so many traditional rolls—spicy scallop, unagi maki, California, spicy tuna, futomaki, spider, etc.—priced at a mere $4-$6. The portions are generous, and prices are beyond fair. While I was talking with Batsaikhan and Eko, they let me in on a little secret. Although fresh fish arrives daily, they get special deliveries on Wednesdays—which always contain something not on the normal menu. So, Wednesday evening would be the best time to visit for new items that tend to sell out quickly. I typically favor the straightforward, unadulterated flavors of nigiri and sashimi over more complex sushi rolls. However, the Snowbird roll ($11) is an exception. High-quality sushi rice envelops yellowtail and jalapeño, which is topped with escolar and served with jalapeño vinaigrette. You might think all that jalapeño would be incendiary, but it’s not. In fact, the roll is quite subtle—and sensational. BTW, if you’d like to learn to make sushi yourself, Soy’s offers sushi-making classes every Saturday. We enjoyed ocean trout and escolar nigiri ($6/two pieces) before moving on to the evening’s finale: sashimi. The understated addition of a single small sprig of dill to the escolar nigiri turned it from good to sublime. Opting for the 10-piece “small” sashimi platter for $20 (there’s also a large, 20-piece $35 version), we were treated to an artistic arrangement of fresh, raw salmon, escolar, tuna and yellowtail, adorned with microgreens, fresh ginger, avocado slices and flying-fish eggs. Simply put, there’s nothing not to like about Soy’s. It’s a joy. CW

SOY’S SUSHI BAR & GRILL

4923 S. State, Murray 801-278-8682 soysushiutah.com


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-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-


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FOOD MATTERS

MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS

BY SCOTT RENSHAW @scottrenshaw

THE

Holiday Hours Starting Dec. 1st RESTAURANT

MON-SAT 5:30-END 801.582.1400 or FIVEALLS.COM

A Whole New Whole Foods

Whole Foods (wholefoods.com) is moving its Park City store, but there’s a bit of a twist to what would otherwise be a standard relocation. On Wednesday, Oct. 18, the new store opens at 6598 N. Landmark Drive, just up the road from the old location in the Redstone Center. Part of that move includes the launch of a first for Whole Foods in Utah: a pub location inside the store. Silver Mine Taproom will offer a rotating tap of two dozen local and hardto-find brews—including specials from Park City Brewery and Red Rock Brewing Co.—plus bottled beers, wine by the glass and made-to-order lunch and dinner options. For those who choose not to imbibe, there’s the also-brand-new Ritual Chocolate Bar, with small-batch drinking chocolate plus a full-service coffee bar. Come to the grand opening beginning at 9 a.m. for live music, prizes and giveaways of reusable bags featuring an original design by a Park City artist.

Thu: 6-9:30pm | Fri/Sat: 5:30-9:30 1458 South Foothill Drive

Farmers Market Season Winds Down

If you’ve been enjoying the produce at the Downtown Farmers Market at Pioneer Park (350 W. 300 South), don’t take it for granted. The 2017 season concludes Saturday, Oct. 21, so make it a point to visit before another long winter wait for the fresh stuff.

Chili at the ’Bird

The weather might be turning cooler, but there’s nothing like a steaming bowl of chili to warm the body and soul—especially as you’re getting back into the habit of heading up to local ski venues. Snowbird Resort (9385 S. Snowbird Center Drive, Little Cottonwood Canyon, snowbird.com) hosts a Chili Bird Showdown Oct. 21-22, noon-5 p.m. daily, as five of the resort’s chefs put their recipes to the test. Attendees get a “people’s choice” ballot along with their sampler of the five options, plus condiments and corn bread. Call 801-933-222 for prices. Quote of the Week: “Next to jazz music, there’s nothing that lifts the spirt and strengthens the soul more than a good bowl of chili.” —Harry James

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

Award Winning Donuts

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705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


There are no limits for RPM Brewing Co. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

A

rector of RPM’s operations. “I’d love to convert a Bud Light drinker with one of our craft beers that’s directed specifically towards him or her, and not try to push a 9 percent double IPA on them right out of the gate.” That doesn’t mean that RPM will be all about easy-drinking beers; with a talented brewer such as Parker on the team, you have to let him fly. “The long-term game plan,” Parker says, “is to have a full range of products that will meet the needs of all of our customers. Yeah, we’ll start with the basics—IPAs, pale ales, blonde ales and amber ales—but we’re also seeing early

Left to right: Scott Parker, Jeremy Ford and Steve Pruitt of RPM Brewing Co. success with beers like our Auto Baan Berliner Weisse and our New England IPA.” RPM currently has quite a range of brews pouring at the Garage Grill in Draper, and coming soon to Toscano. Their plan is to have 12-ounce cans in stores by January, as well as a beer store and taproom/bar at the production brewery at 2020 Industrial Circle in Salt Lake City. Keep checking back for updates. As always, cheers! CW

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bout a month ago, we talked about Utah’s newest beer haven, Kiitos Brewing Co. Their reign as the newest beer guys in town was short lived. Now we have the pleasure of introducing you all to the new-new suds, RPM Brewing Co. This concept in the burgeoning local beer scene is the brainchild of owner Steve Pruitt. Pruitt has had his hands in the local hospitality game since 2009 when he opened up Toscano restaurant and, shortly after, acquired the Utah rights to Italy’s Illy Coffee. He’s always had a fondness for beer, and wanted to bring his foamy vision to the mostly untouched area of southern Salt Lake County. “The downtown beer market is pretty saturated,” Pruitt says. “We found there’s a little different beer market down in the south end of the valley that needs some attention.” To implement his idea, Pruitt established

BEER NERD

MIKE RIEDEL

Building a Brewery

the Garage Grill on Draper’s east side about a year and a half ago. “We went through the entire process of getting all of the licenses to brew on premises,” he says, “but because the restaurant just took off, we need that space for customers.” Pruitt still wanted his vision of a south-end brewpub to succeed, so he simply changed his business model. “We used to run a professional race team out of a building I own on the west side of Salt Lake City. We’ve now converted it into a full-on production brewery”. RPM is not just a brewpub; it’s a legitimate beer-making machine. That’s Part 1 of the company’s evolution. Part 2 requires a talented brewer to make beer people want to drink. “We had a very lengthy search looking for the right person,” Pruitt says. “Then we got the equivalent of a No. 1 draft pick in our guy, Scott Parker.” You might have heard of Parker’s previous employer, Firestone Walker Brewing Co. in California. As head brewer there, he helmed some of the most popular beers in the world. So what the hell is he doing in Salt Lake City? “My wife got into dental school here, so we pulled up our roots and headed to Utah,” Parker says. “Scott was the perfect missing piece,” Pruitt adds. “His skill in the brew house is exactly what we needed to get our vision off the ground.” And their vision is simple: Get craft beer to those that don’t necessarily drink craft beer. “We’re definitely going after the noncraft beer drinkers,” says Jeremy Ford, di-

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. Communal

Food You Will

LOVE

This restaurant boasts serving its guests farm-fresh and in-season cuisine using locally sourced and produced ingredients. It’s best to go as a group, as the dishes are served family-style—hence the restaurant’s name. Entrées like roasted chicken, Utah trout and grilled hangar steak are prepared in a no-nonsense, simple but sensational style. We’re darn jealous of you, Provo. 102 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-373-8000, communalrestaurant.com

serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

Hector’s

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

OCT 14TH OCT 20TH

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OCT 21ST

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The Salt Lake Valley let out a collective wail of mourning when Hector’s announced it would no longer serve its unparalleled Mexican grub 24 hours a day, and instead close its doors at a reasonable hour (8 p.m.). Although you can’t get your smothered burrito fix in the early light of dawn anymore, Hector’s still stands at the pinnacle of local Mexican takeout, and is the go-to for customers from all walks of life. For a meal on the go, there’s no wrong choice, though the carnitas torta is a must-try. 2901 E. 3300 South, 801-487-3850

Log Haven

The century-old log mansion in Millcreek Canyon that’s home to Log Haven is known for its beautiful ambiance and fine dining, and as one of Utah’s premier destinations for weddings and other special events. With impressive indoor and outdoor venues surrounded by foliage, it feels like another world just minutes away. Plus, their wine list is impressive and their food is superb—try the bacon-wrapped elk strip steak. 6451 E. Millcreek Canyon Road, 801272-8255, log-haven.com

Tin Angel

Tin Angel integrates a fun, lively ambiance with quality local ingredients and creative dishes, making the perfect atmosphere for first-daters. The family-run restaurant has found the recipe for success with their specialty tapas—such as the Moroccan-spiced cauliflower and chickpeas; spiced almonds, gorgonzola and pear; or gypsy pork empanadas. In warm weather, the patio is a great place to take in the neighborhood sights and sounds. 365 W. 400 South, 801-3284155, thetinangel.com

Tona

Tony Chen and Tina Yu’s sushi restaurant is one of the hottest and busiest establishments in Ogden. The extensive tapas list includes a delicious gyoza plate (pan-fried pork pot stickers with sesame-seed vinaigrette); charred Brussels sprouts (with fresh basil, lemon zest, diced chili and sweet soy) and “Bacon Bubble Gum” (mochi rice cake, pork belly, grapefruit and sweet soy), to name a few. Not into sharing? The bento boxes are bountiful and beautiful, as are the traditional sushi rolls. 210 25th St., Ogden, 801622-8662, tonarestaurant.com

italianvillageslc.com A

U TA H

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8 0 1 .2 6 6 .4 1 8 2 / HOUR S : M ON-T HU 1 1 a- 1 1 p F R I- S AT 1 1 a- 1 2 a / S UN 3 p - 1 0 p


FILM REVIEW

Subtle Tease

CINEMA

The beautiful Columbus melds architecture with deep humanity. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

SUNDANCE INSTITUTE

“I

Haley Lu Richardson and John Cho in Columbus building, looking outward through the glass at Casey; we’re unable to hear her speak, only watching her face as she begins to explain something about which she feels passionately. Richardson’s performance is stunning, thanks in part to a director who knows how to capture her in repose, and just as well when she dances, furiously and drunkenly, in front of a car’s headlights. There’s another self-aware moment in Columbus, as Gabriel explains to Casey something he had read about attention span, and how an inability to pay attention to something—whether it’s a book, a video game or a movie—is more about interest in that thing than about an inherent character flaw in the observer. Maybe it’s a nod by a filmmaker to the reality that a movie about two people sharing a brief connection in a city of magnificent buildings isn’t going to be everyone’s cup of tea. It’s a tale of personal uncertainty set in a world of monuments to solidity. There’s an ocean of beautiful humanity there, if you’re comfortable with a movie that’s going for something subtle. CW

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My Architect (2003) Documentary NR

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BBBB Haley Lu Richardson John Cho Parker Posey Not Rated

27

COLUMBUS

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parent issues, and indeed both of them are—consciously or unconsciously—looking for someone to talk to about their frustrations. But Kogonada repeatedly complicates their interactions, whether through Jin’s curt manner or simply through the manner in which he films them together— often separated by fences, or placed on opposite sides of the picture. Forming connections isn’t easy for these two people, and Columbus repeatedly finds the placement of characters in the frame accentuating their isolation, especially when Kogonada shoots Jin reflected in mirrors for entire scenes. If that all sounds chilly and remote, nothing could be further from the truth. Kogonada anchors Columbus in the two central performances, and while Cho is good as Jin—particularly in awkward scenes with his father’s colleague, Eleanor (Parker Posey), for whom he has long carried a torch—Richardson is a revelation. She radiates an intelligence that’s also edgy and insecure, reacting defensively when her co-worker Gabriel (Rory Culkin) comments about her lack of college education. Whether she’s speaking or simply contemplating a favorite building, there are layers built into every look. Kogonada captures this quality in her work most beautifully in one of the most breathtaking pieces of directing you’ll see all year. As Casey and Jin talk about one Columbus landmark, he catches her lapsing into docent-speak, and pushes her to speak from her heart about why the place moves her. Kogonada cuts to inside the

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was going for something subtle,” 20-year-old Casey (Haley Lu Richardson) says to her mother (Michelle Forbes) early in the quietly masterful drama Columbus. She’s talking about a recipe she’s made for dinner, but it’s hard not to smile a little at whether writer/director Kogonada—a critic and video essayist—is taking a little poke at likely reactions to his debut feature. Because Columbus is the kind of movie that will never inspire a must-watch reaction in somebody who asks, “What’s it about?” You could tell them that it’s about an unlikely friendship between two very different people, and maybe you’d get a flicker of interest. Then you’d say it’s also about the improbable wealth of modernist architecture in the small Indiana town of Columbus, and just wait for their face to go blank. Columbus is nominally about those things, but the “what”—as is the case in any great work of art—is infinitely less important than the “how.” It’s a masterwork of cinematic composition that’s also a profoundly human narrative. Like the study of architecture itself, it’s not just about cold structures, but about the way those structures tell a story, and provide a shape to the people who move within them. At the center are Casey and Jin (John Cho), who meet under unexpected circumstances. Casey, a year removed from graduating high school in Columbus, works in the local I.M. Pei-designed public library, putting off her own life and her fascination with studying architecture to keep an eye on her mother, a recovering meth addict. Jin has arrived to attend to his estranged father, a renowned Korean scholar of architecture who collapsed and fell into a coma on the eve of a lecture there. On a superficial level, it seems that Casey and Jin might bond over their respective


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CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. COLUMBUS BBBB See review on p. 29. Opens Oct. 13 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR) THE FOREIGNER [not yet reviewed] A businessman (Jackie Chan) seeks answers—and possibly revenge—after his daughter’s death in a terrorist attack. Opens Oct. 13 at theaters valleywide. (R) HAPPY DEATH DAY [not yet reviewed] A college student experiences a Groundhog Day of horror as she repeatedly relives her own murder. Opens Oct. 13 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) LUCKY BBB.5 It’s impossible to deny that the recent passing of Harry Dean Stanton adds resonance to his final role, but it would be insulting to suggest that praising the actor’s work here is all about sentimentality. The premise itself certainly invites metacontemplation, as Stanton’s character—an aging loner named Lucky, living in a small Arizona town—becomes obsessed with considering his mortality after an unexplained fainting spell. The screenplay by Logan Sparks and Drago Sumonja takes an unusual tack in that Lucky is not technically dying, making the character’s fears more interesting in their lack of a specific focus. Actor John Carroll Lynch’s first feature directing effort embraces the slowpoke rhythms of his setting—an early shot of a desert landscape focuses on a crawling tortoise—and gives great supporting character moments to Ron Livingston, David Lynch and Stanton’s old Alien crewmate Tom Skerritt. But the glory is in Stanton’s performance, tough and irascible without ever falling into crotchety-old-man cliché. When Lucky sings with a mariachi band at a birthday party, it’s a recognition of how much we all need to connect, and how a great actor can do that. Opens Oct. 13 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw MARSHALL [not yet reviewed] Biographical drama about the life of pioneering Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall (Chadwick Boseman). Opens Oct. 13 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

PROFESSOR MARSTON AND THE WONDER WOMEN BBB.5 Wonder Woman’s fresh take on the superhero-origins movie was a welcome addition to a stagnant genre. Now here’s the story of how the character was created—a superhero-origins-origins movie—disrupting traditional biopic formulas with affection, humor and an irresistible “love is love” philosophy. Written and directed by Angela Robinson, the fascinating true story stars Luke Evans as William Moulton Marston, a Radcliffe (Harvard for ladies) psychology professor in the late 1920s whose outspoken wife, Elizabeth (Rebecca Hall), is an equally competent (though not equally degreed, thanks to sexism) scientist. The Marstons’ open relationship makes them amenable when beautiful research assistant Olive (Bella Heathcote) comes along and the three all sort of fall in love with each other. Polyamory raises eyebrows in 2017; imagine how it went over during the Depression. The three grapple with their unorthodox feelings, experiment with bondage fetishes and invent the lie detector! Now Wonder Woman’s fondness for ropes and truth-telling makes sense. Robinson gives us biopic tropes—the framing story has Marston defending his comic book against a panel of prudes in 1945—but focuses on righteous, feminist characters and their sexy, often funny, slyly progressive attitudes. Opens Oct. 13 at theaters valleywide. (R)—Eric D. Snider ROMEO & JULIET [not yet reviewed] Made-in-Utah version of Shakespeare’s tale of star-crossed lovers. Opens Oct. 13 at Megaplex Jordan Commons and Megaplex The District. (NR) SO B. IT BB.5 Director Stephen Gyllenhaal’s adaptation of Sarah Weeks’ award-winning youth novel wraps an affecting story of a girl’s search for her identity in some pretty weird plot dynamics. Our heroine is 12-year-old Heidi (Talitha Bateman), who lives with her severely autistic mother (Jessica Collins), an agoraphobic caregiver (Alfre Woodard) and little information about her family history—until Heidi’s obsession with a mysterious word uttered by her mother sends her on a solo cross-country journey. That trip itself is effectively handled, making use of a talented supporting cast—Cloris Leachman and the late John Heard among them—to support Bateman’s endearing work as a girl on a mission. It’s just wrapped a whole bunch of odd flourishes—like Heidi’s strange “luck” ability to do stuff like win slot machines and guess gumballs in a jar, or the story of a childless couple Heidi encounters—that might be necessary to move the story forward, but distract from the central emotional anchor. It’s well

made as gentle family-friendly dramas go, but perhaps too timid about leaning on one girl’s need to find herself. Opens Oct. 13 at Megaplex Jordan Commons. (PG)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AUDITION At Tower Theatre, Oct. 14, 11 p.m.; Oct. 15, noon. (R) A LATE STYLE OF FIRE At Main Library, Oct. 17, 7 p.m. (NR) NOSFERATU At Main Library, Oct. 13, 7 p.m. (NR) WIND RIVER At Park City Film Series, Oct. 13-14, 8 p.m.; Oct. 15, 6 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES

BLADE RUNNER 2049 BBB What should a sequel be? Here’s a particularly weird answer to that question. This 30-years-later follow-up deals with a blade runner called K (Ryan Gosling) assigned to erase evidence of a strange discovery that could blur the fragile line between humans and replicants. While 2049 certainly doesn’t avoid the original’s rain-drenched, neon-lit aesthetic, director Denis Villeneuve creates plenty of new settings that gives this world a unique sensibility as the screenplay digs deeper into ideas of what constitutes consciousness and an entity with a soul. Yet by diving more deeply and literally into those questions—for 163 minutes—2049 also becomes considerably more lugubrious, and can’t resist frequent references to the original. It helps to pick one way of making a sequel and go with it, rather than try to be every kind of sequel at the same time. (R)—SR

DOLORES BBB Director Peter Bratt’s documentary profile of activist and United Farm Workers co-founder Dolores Huerta captures the non-stop forward momentum of her life, including a role at the side of César Chávez despite never being similarly enshrined as a civil rights leader. Bratt mostly avoids hagiography, recognizing the impact of her actions on her children, many of whom were separated from her for long stretches. While it’s impossible to avoid the inherent drawbacks of talking-head/archival footage docs, Dolores also digs into little-explored areas of 1960s activist intersectionality, as Huerta saw her efforts for Latino Americans overlap—and

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sometimes clash—with African-American civil rights, feminism and environmentalism. It’s hard not to wish we could’ve heard more from present-day Huerta reflecting on her life, but it seems clear that she’s not interested in looking back. (NR)—SR THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US BBB It’s good that stars Kate Winslet and Idris Elba are beautiful, because the plot is so absurd the audience needs beguiling by the stars’ looks. The leads’ talents take the curse off this by-thenumbers tale of two victims—Winslet’s Alex and Elba’s Ben—of a small plane crash surviving in the Rockies in January. Luckily, Ben is a doctor—always a handy survivor in a plane crash—and Alex has deep desire to survive so she can return home and get married. The dangers that befall them—falls off cliffs, cougars, lack of food, three-foot snowdrifts, co-star Beau Bridges’ hambone accent—amount to nothing because each night, they keep finding shelter. Even Alex’s fall into an icy pond can’t bring her, or Ben, down. It’s silly and predictable, but it somehow works. Just don’t think about it too much. (PG-13)—David Riedel

VICTORIA AND ABDUL BBB.5 Twenty years after Mrs. Brown, Judi Dench again plays Queen Victoria as she develops a close friendship in the last years of her reign with Indian emigre servant Abdul Karim (Ali Fazel), whom she adopts as a diverting companion. Director Stephen Frears mines good-natured humor out of the outrageousness of royal existence, but much sharper are the cutting observations on the privilege and prejudice of those surrounding the Queen— including her son, the Prince of Wales (Eddie Izzard)—who cannot abide a commoner so close and influential to Victoria. This true story (“mostly,” an opening card notes wryly), while charming, does not ignore the deeply problematic issues of historical colonialism, and there is a resonance for today, too, almost an admonishment to be more open to learning about other cultures—perhaps particularly the ones that seem extra-foreign and scary. (PG-13)—MAJ

NIGHT LIGHTS

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

Elevate

outh 155 W. 200 S belevate @thehotelclu

Latin night with DJ TATO!

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MY LITTLE PONY: THE MOVIE BBB As a My Little Pony novice, I was not expecting one of 2017’s most trenchant political metaphors, however unintended it might be. The world of Equestria is threatened when a pony named Tempest (Emily Blunt) helps the villainous Storm King (Liev Schreiber) try to steal the magic of the princess ponies, and only Princess Twilight Sparkle (Tara Strong) and her friends can save the day. The ensuing quest narrative is simple stuff with energetic musical numbers, but the plot comes down to a weirdly timely cautionary tale about what happens when you help a cruel idiot gain immense power, just because you think he can get you what you want. It’s an amusing adventure for kids, but there’s a little something extra for the grown-ups, too. (PG)—SR

THE STRAY BB Director/co-writer Mitch Davis takes an episode from his life and turns into a vaguely Christian-themed drama with tonal issues. It begins as a standard-issue “workaholic dad learns What Really Matters” tale in 1990, as would-be screenwriter Mitch (Michael Cassidy) tries to re-connect with his son Christian (Connor Corum) thanks to the arrival of the titular dog, a stray they name Pluto. Davis plays much of the movie for broad comedy, leading up to a climactic sequence involving a camping trip turned harrowing after a lightning strike. But Davis seems determined not to let even this moment get too dramatic, undercutting it repeatedly with silly humor and leaving a long stretch where nothing much seems to be at stake. Lovely mountain scenery and gentle life lessons can’t make up for a drawn-out sentimental finale that doesn’t feel earned. (PG)—SR

Megan Smalley, Olivia Jones

Adam Tran, Andrea Cotton

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Latin Night

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OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 31

DJ Delmaggio, Solomon Mesi, Cary Mess


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2 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Love, American Style

TV

Sarah Silverman’s I Love You, America unites; Loudermilk, not so much.

I

n her new weekly series I Love You, America (series debut, Thursday, Oct. 12, Hulu), comedian Sarah Silverman is “looking to connect with people who may not agree with her personal opinions through honesty, humor, genuine interest in others, and not taking herself too seriously … Silverman feels it’s crucial, now more than ever, to connect with un-like-minded people.” If you’re skeptical of Liberal Elite Hollywood’s motives for hanging out with Red State rednecks while promising to not to shit on them, join the club. But, it’s a promising chat show/travelogue setup, and Silverman is more capable of pulling it off sincerely than, say, Chelsea Handler—she still does that thing on Netflix … doesn’t she? With a cool title like Mindhunter (series debut, Friday, Oct. 13, Netflix), you’d expect a sci-fi series loaded with psychic warfare and exploding heads, or is that just me? Sadly, this Mindhunter is another cop show, starring Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany as FBI agents who interview imprisoned serial killers to analyze their motives to help solve current cases … zzz. So far, so Criminal Minds, but Mindhunter (singular? There’s two of ’em!) is produced by David Fincher, who delivered at least a couple of good House of Cards seasons, and co-stars Aussie treasure Anna Torv, absent from ’Merican TV since the 2013 demise of Fringe, so there’s that. Maybe one exploding head, just for me? I had no idea that today’s kiddies were clamoring for a reboot of ’70s Saturday-morning cheese lump Sigmund and the Sea Monsters (series re-debut, Friday, Oct. 13, Amazon Prime), but here it is. The original S&SM was part of the Sid and Marty Krofft acid-trip factory that included H.R. Pufnstuf and Lidsville, as well as the proto-superheroine Strong Female Characters of Electra Woman and Dyna Girl. This iteration seems more aimed at ironic-nostalgiahungry Gen-Xers than children, but at least David Arquette found work (as Captain Barnabas, local loon out to expose the Sea Monsters as “real”), and we get The Roots’ updated version of Sigmund’s theme song. So where’s the Lost Saucer remake? Do we really need another cable dramedy about how tough it is to be a comedian? When it stars ex-Saturday

Night Live-er Jay Pharoah and is helmed by Tom Kapinos (Lucifer, Californication) and Jamie Foxx (everything else), maybe. White Famous (series debut, Sunday, Oct. 15, Showtime) is essentially Foxx’s story, centered on a black comic (Pharoah) on the rise who’s straddling the line between street cred and mainstream (read: white) appeal. While White Famous offers few insights into Foxx’s real coming-up career (even when he shows up as himself in the first episode), it does make it abundantly clear that SNL blew it with the talented Pharoah. As a “prestige” series, this is more Dice than Louie. Speaking of wasting perfectly good comedic talent, seen 9JKL (new series, Mondays, CBS)? That filler half-hour between The Big Bang Theory and Kevin Can Wait? Oh, yeah, no one watches “live” TV anymore—it’s all on-demand with your Hulus and your Rokus and your Flibberzoos. Safe to say, no one is “demanding” 9JKL, not even to justify the $9.99 they blew on CBS All Access for Star Trek: Discovery. Mark Feuerstein, David Walton, Elliott Gould, Linda Lavin and Liza Lapira, all funny people, star in the most forgettable family sitcom since … well, damn, I’ve forgotten. Chances

I Love You, America (Hulu)

are, by the time this column finally reaches print (’member that?) or interwebs, 9JKL will be canceled. Never mind. Much in the same way that White Famous seems like a stylistic throwback, Loudermilk (series debut, Tuesday, Oct. 17, Audience/DirecTV) could be a lost early 2000s comedy from the trope dawn of A A (Asshole Antihero). While it’s a misuse of a young actor like Pharoah, it’s perfectly OK in the case of Loudermilk, because the titular Sam Loudermilk is played by been-there comedy vet Ron Livingston (sorry, Ron—loved ya in Office Space). Sam is a former alcoholic and, even worse, former rock critic, who hates pretty much everything and everyone. Sounds familiar, but as scripted by one Farrelly brother and a Colbert Report writer and delivered by Livingston, Loudermilk really works. CW Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

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Open Plunge

MUSIC

KACIE TOMITA

CONCERT PREVIEW

Girlpool’s ebb-and-flow is powered by connection. BY HOWARD HARDEE comments@cityweekly.net

S

Cleo Tucker and Harmony Tividad

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OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 33

w/ Palm Tuesday, Oct. 17, 7 p.m. Kilby Court 741 S. 330 West 801-364-3538 $12 presale; $14 day of show All ages kilbycourt.com

GIRLPOOL

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2015) soon earned them a devoted following in L.A.’s DIY punk scene. The barebones, two-chord songs also caught the attention of critics, many of whom praised the raw emotion and mysterious power of Girlpool’s creepy nursery rhymes. Shock might also have been a factor in their quick rise to national relevance, considering the don’t-give-a-shit punk-rock attitude apparent in songs like “Slutmouth” and “American Beauty,” which is about receiving oral sex while watching American Beauty. But they’ve proven themselves more than a novelty act with their latest record Powerplant (Anti-). Released in May, it features a fullband sound for the first time, thanks to drummer Miles Wintner. The record sounds bigger and better produced, but doesn’t obscure the strange tension between the twin vocals that made the duo distinct in the first place. Tividad says it was a challenge to invite another person into such an intimate creative space, but ultimately it was a rewarding move. “It was bizarre at first, but also very empowering to find creative solace in other people,” she says. It likewise enhances life on the road. “It’s really taxing and strange,” she says, “but also really powerful. I love the people in the band and I feel really connected to them.” CW

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peaking from her home in Philadelphia after a tour in Europe, Harmony Tividad says life on the road with the indie-pop band Girlpool is a rollercoaster. On one hand, she’s traveling the world with her best friend, Cleo Tucker, and drawing inspiration from “incredibly creative people.” On the other, touring is a physical grind and she’s glad to finally have some down time at home. The power of human connection has always been at the forefront of Girlpool’s music, especially back when the band was just Tividad and Tucker. The natural ebb and flow of the singers in imperfect harmony—feeding off each other’s emotions to a sparse backdrop of simple guitar and bass lines—recalls the give-and-take that makes any good relationship work. It’s also representative of Girlpool’s songwriting process, which usually begins with a single riff or lyrical phrase and builds collaboratively, with each continually compromising on where to take the melody. “We’re sensitive to each other but also honest about how we feel,” Tividad says. “There’s a lot of back-and-forth.” Tividad, 22, was raised in Hollywood, and learned to value the exchange of musical ideas from her father, a jazz bass player from New Orleans. “We’d be driving to school and he’d put on different music in the car,” she recalls. “He’d ask me what instruments I could hear and teach me about different beats, like a train beat or a swing or whatever. He taught me to listen to music in a more critical way.” She also attended various public music magnet schools, where one choir teacher told her to “listen louder than you sing.” Since she was “pretty bad” at singing harmonies, Tividad took the advice to heart. “I was always singing under the pitch, lying a little flat,” she says. But her father devised ways around that, including laying out vocal melodies with the music production program GarageBand for her to sing along with and teaching her to harmonize with songs on the radio. As a guitarist, Tividad began the ongoing process of experimenting with various tunings and listening for something new. Playing guitar doesn’t come to her as naturally as singing, but she enjoys the fluidity of the instrument and learning her way around it. “It’s like taking a piece of marble and shaping it even though you don’t really know what you’re doing,” she says. Tividad met Tucker in 2012 when she was working the door for a DIY punk show at The Smell, a venue by Skid Row in Los Angeles. She says she was struck by the precocious energy of Tucker, who was dancing in a group “free and uninhibited.” At the time, they were playing in separate punk bands and Tividad was booking shows for both groups. It wasn’t long before they started making music together and became best friends. Their musical connection felt electric, almost telepathic. They easily bounced ideas back and forth and learned the nuances of each other’s playing and singing styles inside and out. “It was a natural synchrony,” Tividad says. They played as a duo with no percussion, leading to a strippedback, lo-fi mix of guitar, bass and Tucker and Tividad’s eerily dissonant, interweaving voices. The sound, which was captured perfectly on their debut album, Before the World Was Big (Wichita,


LIVE

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER

THURSDAY 10/12

FRIDAY 10/13

George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic

Maybe there’s something to that Planet Kolob noise that the Dominant Local Religion doesn’t wanna talk about anymore, lest their doctrine start sounding like an L. Ron Hubbard book. But that’s the only explanation for the yearly visits from Dr. Funkenstein’s intergalactic hoopty The Mothership—unless Salt Lake City has finally amassed enough Funk Points to rate inclusion in the Lonely Planet

George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic

Guide to Surprisingly Funky Predominantly White Cities. Or we’re just lucky. Or we’re conveniently located on the most expedient tour routing. Let’s go with luck, because when the world’s foremost purveyors of intergalactic space-whomp hit you three years in a row, you’re cool. Then again, if you think about it, we probably spend a shit-ton of money on flashlights, what with all those 72-hour kits we like to assemble in the event of an apocalypse—and one of P-Funk’s biggest hits is “Flash Light” … (Randy Harward) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $35 presale; $37 day of show, 21+, depotslc.com

The War on Drugs, The Building

Blame Nixon. He’s the one who declared the war on drugs that the U.S. government has been waging for more than four decades. But when it comes to the Philadelphia-based indie-rock band The War on Drugs, it’s more Vile—Kurt Vile, to be precise. He founded the group with singer-guitarist Adam Granduciel a dozen

The Church or so years ago, though he split in late 2008 to do his own thing. The band’s latest, A Deeper Understanding (Atlantic Records), is their third under Granduciel’s exclusive oversight, and it emphasizes their identity as a more synth-oriented unit in the niche between atmospheric, mildly psychedelic sounds and pop music. Like the government program after which it is named, the band seems to have taken on a life of its own, but unlike that other War on Drugs, the musical one is much more pleasant to be in the midst of. Opening the show is folk duo The Building, featuring TWOD guitarist-keyboardist Anthony LaMarca and his bro, Angelo. Their album Reconciliation (thebuilding.bandcamp.com) is a feast of gauzy songs that recall Neil Young’s lonelier moments. (BS) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $31, all ages, thecomplexslc.com

The War on Drugs

SHAWN BRACKBILL

Unless you’ve been keeping yourself captive under some soundproof blanket, you know “Under the Milky Way,” the 1988 hit that brought the Australian light psychedelic pop band The Church to U.S. acclaim. In much the same way the galaxy obscures the viewing of other astral bodies, the band’s biggest hit obscures a stellar catalog that includes 26 full-length releases. Fans know this, but casual listeners who only know “Under the Milky Way” will find their money well-spent on this show, as they recognize other hits like “Metropolis” and discover brilliance in the rest of the band’s oeuvre. This show comes on the heels of their latest release, Man Woman Life Death Infinity (Unorthodox), extending the efforts of 2014’s Further/Deeper (Unorthodox) to explore lyrical galaxies. Beaverton, Ore., indie-rock duo Helio Sequence opens, still riding high on their acclaimed self-titled sixth album on Sub Pop Records. (Brian Staker) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $40-$106, 21+, thestateroom.com

DREW REYNOLDS

The Church, Helio Sequence

WILLIAM THOREN

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34 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS


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OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 35


PRAY

ON EAS S L BAL E! FOOT IS HER DAY TICKET FL SUN S N K R O ION ETW PAC-12 N NF - BOTH LOCAT M

HIGHLAND live music

FRI SAT

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UTES @ USC

FOLLOWED BY DJ BAD HAIR DAY

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2014

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FOOTBALL IS FOLLOWED BY KARAOKE, ALL GAMES TELEVISED

MNF WED

$1 TACOS, SQUARES BOARD, GIVE AWAYS

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $850 POT “THE SCREAM OF FIRE” NOW QUALIFYING OVER $500 IN CASH AND PRIZES.

OCT 22

9 60” 4K HD TVS, 2 GIANT HD PROJECTORS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

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MONDAY 10/16

Janet Jackson

Janet Jackson

Third time’s a charm—or is it? This marks attempt No. 3 by Janet Jackson to perform here since Oct. 24, 2015. The second was to take place on June 29, 2016. Each time, she canceled the show after we devoted some of this prime paper real estate to her imminent appearance. Then she’s all, “Psych! I’m gonna have a baby and get a divorce instead. Peace.” Eh. Life happens. And at least she kept trying—some acts would’ve been all, “Never mind. I’m gonna hit the bigger markets and forget about you.” But Ms. Jackson, SLC will get real nasty if you burn us again. (Just kiddin’. If there’s one town that totally understands putting procreation above all else, it’s us.) Anyway, Unbreakable (Rhythm Nation), her latest, came out in 2015 and was produced by Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis

Bob Dylan CLAXTON TELLTALE

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1,250 POT

11 4K HD TVS, PAC-12 NETWORK, NFL SUNDAY TICKET

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MAD MAX MONEY MACHINE $1 TACOS, FOLLOWED BY KARAOKE

THURS

FRI SAT

J0 ANNA VIA WIKIMEDIA

$2 MIMOSAS NEW BRUNCH MENU SMOKED PULLED PORK SAMMIES, POKER DURING THE NIGHT GAME, ALL GAMES TELEVISED

MNF

2013

LIVE

LOS HELLCAMINOS

SUN FUN

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36 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

FO

R PO Nov 3 WDER at Hi ghlan d

(formerly of The Time). It’s fresh while also redolent of her classic material. (RH) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $26.75-$122, all ages, vivintarena.com/events

TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY 10/17-18

Bob Dylan and His Band, Mavis Staples

So about 18 years ago, Bob Dylan came through Utah on a co-headlining tour with Paul Simon. Helluva show, right? Two legendary songwriters in the same town at the same time is crazy. In the same building? Bonkers. On the same stage? Nuh-uh! Hugging? Now you’re just bein’ silly. But it happened. Sensitive Simon played first and curmudgeonly Dylan played last, bookending a joint set that saw Simon graciously introduce Dylan, who ambled on stage with a “We’re not gonna hug again, are we?” look before, consigned to his fate, stiffly embracing his fellow headliner and friend. It was fuckin’ awesome. ’Cause we can construct images of a musician’s character from their music, media appearances and secondhand, single-perspective anecdotes and think we know them. But when you observe them in their element, on a stage before thousands of fans in hot icon-on-icon action, a collision of two stars with crazy gravity—and it looked awkward? That was a fascinating glimpse of Dylan’s humanity, which he doesn’t display, except in those incredible songs. And it just might play out that way again tonight, because you know gospel luminary Mavis Staples is a hugger. (RH) Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., $50-$125, all ages, live-at-the-eccles.com


AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY EVERY THURSDATY:

Jazz & Blues Jam | Gonzo at 10:00 FRIDAY:

MURPHY & THE GIANT

SATURDAY:

DJ ChaseOne2 @ 9:00

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 FAT CANDICE

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00 SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 8:00 MONDAY: Micro Monday & Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00! TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! at 9:00 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 18TH:

Crook & The Bluff @7:00 followed by VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

SLC - CD RELEASE PARTY THE SALT FLATS

2PM

HIGHLAND

U

LUMPY’S BUS!

ALL UTAH HOME GAMES OCT 21 VS ARIZONA STATE NOV 3 VS UCLA

U

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21

WATCH ALL NFL GAMES EVERY SUNDAY, MONDAY, AND THURSDAY NIGHTS

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d ken Wee h Until nc Bru

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14 THE RHYTHM COMBO

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

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3000 S Highland Dr, Salt Lake City, UT 84106 801.484.5597 | Lumpysbar.com

OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 37

1492 S. STATE · 801.468.1492 PIPERDOWNPUB.COM


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38 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

FRIDAY 10/13

CONCERTS & CLUBS

PEDRO CASTRO

The Spacetime Ripples, Manhigh

There’s a lot of great music in Ogden, and every once in a while a cool touring band sneaks through there unbeknown to us down in SLC. It ain’t happening this time. Stoner rockers The Spacetime Ripples hail from Belo Horizonte in Brazil’s Minas Gerais state—the same one that gave us one of the world’s biggest thrash acts, Sepultura. The band started out under the name Tempo Plástico, issuing the album IT (tempoplastico.bandcamp.com) in 2015 before deciding their new music was heavier and more psychedelic and, as such, needed a new name. The moniker signifies, they say on their website, “a chance, a shortcut, a possibility to get further, to a place never thought before.” The difference between IT and the new eponymous EP (thespacetimeripples.com) is negligible—it’s all hard-driving, spacetruckin’ stoner rock, so it’s hard to follow that logic. But what matters is that it’s badass, and you’ll probably pick up a few words of Brazilian Portuguese. (Sorry, guys, all I know is, “Não falo bem Portugues” and “vai se foder.”) The foursome’s current tour started in late September with an appearance as Youbloom Fest in Los Angeles, and now they’re circulating throughout the Western end of the U.S., hitting major cities in Arizona, Texas, California, Washington, Colorado and New Mexico. Why they’re landing in Ogden is anyone’s guess. Maybe something in the Ripple is wonky—or maybe, in an alternate universe, it’s easier to see that Ogden’s a decent place to hang out. Albuquerque desert rockers Manhigh open. The lone track on manhigh.bandcamp.com, “Love Letters from Space,” is their debut release. (Randy Harward) Brewskis, 244 25th St., 10 p.m., $5, brewskisonline.net

Watch all College and NFL games

on our 30+ Full HD TV’s

SPIRITS . FOOD . MUSIC

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight. Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Tuesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

call for reservations OCTOBER 12

OCTOBER 14

THURSDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL SATURDAY BRUNCH 10-3 PHILADELPHIA @ CAROLINA COLLEGE FOOTBALL ALL DAY LIVE MUSIC WITH SOULSHINE UTAH @ USC AFTER THE GAME FOLLOWED BY DJ CHASEONE2

OCTOBER 15

NFL SUNDAY BRUNCH 10-3 SUNDAY GAME NIGHTENJOY FREE POOL, SHUFFLEBOARD, BAGS, AND AN ASSORTMENT OF BOARD AND CARD GAMES

LIVE MUSIC

OCTOBER 16

MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL INDIANAPOLIS @ TENNESSEE MONDAY NIGHT JAZZ SESSION AFTER THE GAME w/ DAVID HALLIDAY AND THE JVQ

OPEN

10.12 10.13 10.14 10.16 10.18 10.19 10.20 10.21

MORGAN SNOW RICK GERBER & THE NIGHTCAPS COOLABIBUS OPEN BLUES JAM DYLAN ROE LE VOIR STONEFED STONEFED

365 DAYS A YEAR

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 10/12 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

SATURDAY, OCT. 14

monday & thursday

great food & drink specials

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 10/11

9:00PM | NO COVER SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14

UTAH VS. USC 6PM KICK OFF

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 10/12

Reggae

at the Royal

5

servants natural roots makisi

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

friDAY 10/13

Live Music

PUNK NIGHT lhaw i hi fi murders

U SWAG GIVEAWAY EVERY GAME SUN • MON • THURS

NEXT MNF

INDIANAPOLIS @ TENNESSEE

OCTOBER 16 | 6:30PM EVERY SUNDAY NFL GAME

FREE

TUESDAYS

suburban hell kill i lsdo saturday 10/14

Live Music

BETTING BOARD

& BRINGING YOU SLC’S LONGEST RUNNING EDM NIGHT

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$

2115 S. State Street TO-GO:must801 - 935 - 4014 be 21+ · free parking

SHOT & A BEER

jersey giveaways every sunday,

LIVE MUSIC

U KNOW THE BURGER

4

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nfl football

FRIDAY 10/13 Après Ski (The Cabin) Atriarch + Deep State + Sex with God + TBA (Diabolical Records) DJ Feral Williams + Regular Ass Dude + Stackhouse (Urban Lounge) Draize Method + 4-Trey (Funk ’n’ Dive) The Fall River Band (The Acoustic Space) Fat Candice + Murphy & the Giant George Clinton & Parliament

HOME OF THE

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American Dischord + LSDO + LHAW (Funk ’n’ Dive) The Blow + Zealyn + Mark Swink (Kilby Court) The Church + Helio Sequence (The State Room) see p. 34 Huascar Barradas (Liquid Joe’s) Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Matt Hopper & the Roman Candles + Leeroy Stagger (Urban Lounge) Michael Vee + Tristan Cole + Mel Soul + Brooke Mackintosh (Velour) Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow Pub) Pablo Cruise (Egyptian Theater) Reggae at the Royal feat. Servants + Natural Roots + Makisi (The Royal) Soulfly + Cannabis Corpse + Noisem + Lody Kong + Hooga + DiseNgaged (Metro Music Hall) Steve Lyman Septet (Gallivan Center) Wolf & Bear + Andres + VIS + Noise Ordinance + A Lost Asylum + Lincoln Matheson (The Loading Dock)

DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Dave & South (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (’80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. K?D (Sky) Twist Jam Session (Twist)

WEDNESDAYS

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

Tuesday 10/17

open mic night

10/20

halloween party TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

F R I D AY S

DJ RUDE BOY

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

coming soon

w/ ginger & the gents 5 state killing spree ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

STARTS @ 9PM

7

BAD BOY BRIAN

DAYS REASONS

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

165 E 200 S SLC I 801.746.3334

OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 39

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

w/ reloaded i lost carnival

KARAOKE

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CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

IRON MAIDENS

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED


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40 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

EVERY DAY

BAR FLY

DEREK CARLISLE

The Bayou

Bayou employees Kelly Corbitt, Jes Ney and Gabby Benavidez Funkadelic (The Depot) see p. 34 Get Down Tonight (The Spur) Highball Train (The Ice Haüs) Imagine Dragons + Grouplove + K.Flay (Usana Amphitheater) Metal Night on Friday the 13th feat. Incrypted (EP release) + Truce in Blood + Mouth of Sheol + Jessica Keil (Liquid Joe’s) Jonwayne + Danny Watts + DJ EMV (Kilby Court) N-U-Endo (Club 90) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music (Lake Effect) Mark Owens (The Westerner) Pablo Cruise (Egyptian Theater) Punk Night at the Royal feat. LHAW + Hi Fi Murder + Suburban Hell Kill + LSDO (The Royal) Rick Gerber & the Nightcaps (Hog Wallow Pub) Silver Strike Band (O.P. Rockwell) The Spacetime Ripples + Manhigh (Brewskis) see p. 38

It gets hot around these parts, but not sticky, like it do in the real bayou. But that’s the point of places like The Bayou, right? To give us a taste of somewhere we’ve never been, or wish we could visit again. To that end, what it lacks in wet heat and colorful/lovable/dentally challenged swampdwellers and waterboys, it makes up for in atmosphere. Although it can get metaphorically hot in here: On any given night, you can hear Cajun, zydeco, jazz and blues on the overhead speakers—and three nights a week, it’s live courtesy of local artists like the Red Rock Hot Club and David Halliday. Then there’s the food, a full Cajun menu, with plenty of it verging on culinary arson. You also gotta watch out for the wildlife, but only because you’ve never had cheesecake like Alligator Cheesecake. And Sweeto Burrito ain’t got nothin’ on The Bayou’s Cajun burrito: jambalaya in a flour tortilla, smothered in crawfish étouffée—the swamp’s answer to chile verde—topped with avocado slices. If it gets too hot, you’re in luck: Besides the aesthetic and atmosphere, The Bayou’s claim to fame is the Sophie’s Choice of beer menus, with almost too many to choose from. The good news is that even the ones that come warm will snuff out the blaze in your burrito-hole. I guar-ON-tee! (Randy Harward) The Bayou, 645 S. State, 801-961-8400, utahbayou.com

Tony Holiday & the Velvetones (Garage on Beck) Uncle Reno (feat. Isaac Russell) (Velour) The War on Drugs + The Building (The Complex) see p. 34 Warriors of the Salt feat. Visigoth + Deathblow + Necrowolf + Tomb of Belial + Silence of the Mortuary (The Loading Dock) Wild Country (Outlaw Saloon)

Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hex! Occult Masquerade feat. DJ/DC + Morbidkitty (Metro Music Hall) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Mi Cielo: A Latin Dance Concept feat. David Rolas (Sky)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

SATURDAY 10/14

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Brisk (Downstairs) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad

THUR 10.12• MATT HOPPER & THE ROMAN CANDLES THE BULLY, SELFMYTH

FRI 10.13 • GIVE A DAMN

A BENEFIT COMEDY SHOW FOR RELIEF IN PUERTO RICO 6PM

FRI 10.13 • DJ FERAL WILLIAMS REGULAR ASS DUDE, STACKHOUSE 9PM

SAT 10.14 • ZOLA JESUS

10/18: SLUG LOCALIZED 10/19: MITSKI 10/20: THE AFGHAN WHIGS 10/21: EAGLE TWIN 10/22: CANDACE 10/23: MR. ELEVATOR

JOHN WIESE

SUN 1015 • BROKE CITY REUNION SHOW STARMY, HEARTLESS BREAKERS

MON 10.16 • MORTIGI TEMPO IMELDA MARCOS, HEMWICK

TUES 10.17• THE BRONX

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

LIVE MUSIC

Alison Krauss + David Gray (Usana Amphitheater) Après Ski (The Cabin) Caleb Chapman Crescent Super Band & Voodoo Orchestra (Viridian Center) Certified (The Ice Haüs) Coolabibus (Hog Wallow Pub) Get Down Tonight (Brewskis) Great White Shore (album release) +

Violet Nei + Palmegranate (Velour) High Waisted + The Coax + The Hound Mystic (Diabolical Records) Highly Suspect + Bones + DJ Redbees (The Depot) The Iron Maidens (The Royal) Inside Job (Flanagan’s on Main) Jim Fish (Feldman’s Deli) King Strang and the Stranglers (Funk ’n’ Dive) La Zenda Norteña (801 Event Center) Lil Peep + Bexey + GBC (The Complex) Live Bands (Johnny’s on Second) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music (Lake Effect) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Live Trio (The Red Door) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) N-U-Endo (Club 90) Otter Creek + The 3 Muses (The Acoustic Space) Pablo Cruise (Egyptian Theater) Paul Kelly (The State Room)

THUR 10.12 • SOULFLY PERFORMS “POINT BLANK” CANNABIS CORPSE, NOISEM, LADY KONG, HOOGA, DISENGAGED

FRI 10.13 • DANCE EVOLUTION: HEX OCCULT MASQUERADE SAT 10.14 • ETERNAL VOID DRAG SHOW SUN 10.15 •VAGUE MARKET “STRANGER THINGS” SUN 10.16 • BORIS SUBROSA, ENDON

MON 10.17 • TRASHCAN SINATRAS **SEATED EVENT**

TUES 10.18 • WAND DARTO

PLAGUE VENDOR, ‘68

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •

10/19: COM TRUISE / NOSAJ THING 10/20: RADICAL FACE 10/21: NEFF DANCE PARTY 10/22: ROSETTA 10/23: ARIEL PINK 10/24: KMFDM


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET The Rhythm Combo (Pioneer Park/ Downtown Farmer’s Market) The Rhythm Combo (CD release) + The Salt Flat Trio (Piper Down) Snyderville Electric Band (O.P. Rockwell) Social Repose + Hotel Books + The Funeral Portrait (The Loading Dock) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) together PANGEA + Tall Juan + Daddy Issues + PAWS (Kilby Court) Triggers & Slips (Garage on Beck) Wild Country (Outlaw Saloon) Young Dro (Elevate) Zola Jesus + John Wiese (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) Sky Saturdays w/ SNBRN (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 10/16

NEXT BRUNCH PARTY SUNDAY , OCTOBE R 15 TH

LIVE MUSIC

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Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

TUESDAY 10/17

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Barb Wire Dolls + The Svetlanas + 57 + Revolt (Club X) Bob Dylan + Mavis Staples (Eccles Theater) see p. 36 The Bronx + Plague Vendor + ’68 (Urban Lounge) Corey Adam (The Spur) Girlpool + Palm (Kilby Court) see p. 33 Stickley Trio (Piper Down)

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OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 41

Friday 10/13 - DJ Birdman Saturday 10/14 - J Godina & Caviar Club DJ’s Wednesday 10/18 - Live Jazz Thursday 10/19 - The SLC

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CONCERTS & CLUBS Open Mic (The Royal) CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

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The Accidentals + Jake Allen (The State Room) Baker Street Blues Band + The Arvos + One Night Band (Liquid Joe’s) Bob Dylan + Mavis Staples (Eccles Theater) see p. 36 CAAMP + The Wonderfool (Kilby Court) The Creepshow + Sammy Kay + Spooky DeVille + Jeff Dillon (Club X) Dylan Roe (Hog Wallow Pub) Issues + Volumes + Too Close to Touch + Sylar (Venue) Jim & Sam + Abe Vogel + Corinne Gentry & Kiki Jane Seiger (The Acoustic Space) Live Jazz (Club 90) Poet + Kaotic + G-Life (Urban Lounge) Scott Klismith (The Spur)

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© 2017

DIDDY SPELL

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Beer hall turn-ons? 2. Words from a nervous postman? 3. Goofy to the max 4. Beliefs 5. ____ code 6. Shoulder muscle, for short 7. “Maybe yes, maybe no” 8. GI’s mess work 9. Earsplitting 10. Golden State campus inits. 11. Box office purchase: Abbr. 12. #26 of 26

47. Hawn of Hollywood 50. Dirt movers 51. Modest poker holding 52. Played for a sap 53. It’s an OK city 54. Part of a flower 55. %: Abbr. 56. Upshot? 57. Prefix with -dermis

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

13. Jan. 1 till now 15. “And ____ the field the road runs by”: Tennyson 20. Fourposter, e.g. 23. One White of rock’s White Stripes 24. Pub pint 25. Outdated 27. Stop working for good 28. ____-equipped 29. Burned rubber 30. Skillet, e.g. 32. 1956 Gregory Peck role 34. Vicious of the Sex Pistols 35. Big galoot 36. Scratch, say 37. “... ____ woodchuck could chuck wood” 38. Bolt go-with 39. POTUS #34 40. “We should get going” 41. Butler, e.g. 42. Actress Bening of “American Beauty” 43. Sound systems 45. Milk dispensers 46. Unhappy

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Irritated state 5. Recipe instruction 8. All thumbs 14. Car air freshener shape 16. Keep for oneself 17. “Allow me to assist” 18. Checked for fingerprints 19. Directive to Herman Melville to develop the title character of his final novel? 21. Start of a number of Keats titles 22. Safety device 23. Image in Tiananmen Square 26. Ring ____ 27. “I Need a Girl” rapper’s incantation? 31. The Beatles’ ____ Pepper 32. Is sick 33. Summoned 34. “Where the Sidewalk Ends” poet Silverstein 35. “You can say that again!” 37. “Slumdog Millionaire” country 40. Popular tablet 41. Nordic airline 44. Bugs Bunny, when he’s foiled his nemesis? 47. Man who might tip his cap 48. Took courses 49. Marx’s “____ Kapital” 50. Songstress Lena 51. Someone who jumps over the remnant of a downpour? 55. “The magic word” 58. Go back further than 59. Office machine 60. Connects with 61. Alternatives to ‘Vettes 62. The Oilers, on NHL scoreboards 63. Hot times in Haiti

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) “I am more interested in human beings than in writing,” said author Anais Nin, “more interested in lovemaking than in writing, more interested in living than in writing. More interested in becoming a work of art than in creating one.” I invite you to adopt that perspective as your own for the next 12 months, Libra. During this upcoming chapter of your story, you can generate long-lasting upgrades if you regard your life as a gorgeous masterpiece worthy of your highest craftsmanship. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Scorpio actress Tara Reid told the magazine Us Weekly about how her cosmetic surgeries had made her look worse than she had been in her natural state. “I’ll never be perfect again,” she mourned. I bring this up in the hope that it will inspire you. In my astrological opinion, you’re at a tuning point when it’s crucial to appreciate and foster everything about yourself that’s natural and innate and soulfully authentic. Don’t fall sway to artificial notions about how you could be more perfect than you already are.

FANTASTIC MASSAGE

B R E Z S N Y

effects of their innovation. For example, the Nile River below the dam no longer flooded its banks or fertilized the surrounding land every year. As a result, farmers had to resort to chemical fertilizers at great expense. Water pollution increased. Marine life suffered because of the river’s diminished nutrients. I hope this thought will motivate you to carefully think through the possible consequences of decisions you’re contemplating. I guarantee that you can avoid the logic of failure and instead implement the logic of success. But to do so, you’ll have to temporarily resist the momentum that has been carrying you along. You’ll have to override the impatient longing for resolution.

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Poets Corner

In these latter latter days Of numbing dystopian darkness, Of the Earth and the Heavens changed and changing, broken and awry, Of chilling casual killing, Of an angry mad mediocre man who chirps hatred and idiocy, Of painful and wrenching inequity, Of the renewed whiff of mushrooming war, Can there be any doubt that Love is All?

Brian Burke Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 45

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Are you primed to seek out new colleagues and strengthen your existing alliances? Are you curious about what it would take to infuse your best partnerships with maximum emotional intelligence? From an astrological perspective, the next nine weeks will be a favorable time to do these things. You will have opportunities to deepen your engagement with collaborators who cultivate integrity and communicate effectively. It’s possible you might feel shy about pursuing at least one of SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) I didn’t go to work today. I woke up late, lingered over a leisurely the potential new connections. But I urge you to press ahead breakfast and enjoyed a long walk in the autumn woods. When I anyway. Though you might be less ripe than they are, their found a spot that filled me with a wild sense of peace, I asked my influence will have a catalytic effect on you, sparking you to gut wisdom what I should advise you Sagittarians to attend to. develop at an accelerated rate. And my gut wisdom told me that you should temporarily escape at least one of your duties for at least three days. (Escaping two GEMINI (May 21-June 20) duties for four days would be even better.) My gut wisdom also “I was satisfied with haiku until I met you,” Dean Young tells a suggested that you get extra sleep, enjoy leisurely meals and go on new lover in his poem “Changing Genres.” But Young goes on long walks to spots that fill you with a wild sense of peace. There to say that he’s no longer content with that terse genre. “Now I want a Russian novel,” he proclaims, “a 50-page description you should consult your gut wisdom about your top dilemmas. of you sleeping, another 75 of what you think staring out a window.” He yearns for a story line about “a fallen nest, speckled CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) A snail climbed to the top of a big turtle’s shell as it was sleeping eggs somehow uncrushed, the sled outracing the wolves on the under a bush. When the turtle awoke and began to lumber away steppes, the huge glittering ball where all that matters is a kiss in search of food, the snail was at first alarmed but eventually at the end of a dark hall.” I bring Young’s meditations to your thrilled by how fast they were going and how far they were able attention, Gemini, because I suspect that you, too, are primed to to travel. “Wheeee!” the snail thought to itself. I suspect, move into a more expansive genre with a more sumptuous plot. Capricorn, that this little tale is a useful metaphor for what you CANCER (June 21-July 22) can look forward to in the coming weeks. Statistical evidence suggests that Fridays falling on the 13th of the month are safer than other Fridays. The numbers of fires and AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “If these years have taught me anything, it is this,” wrote novel- traffic accidents are lower then, for example. I find this interestist Junot Díaz. “You can never run away. Not ever. The only way ing in light of your current situation. According to my analysis, out is in.” That’s your plucky wisdom for the coming weeks, this October’s Friday the 13th marks a turning point in your ongoAquarius. You have arrived at a pivotal phase in your life cycle ing efforts to cultivate stability and security. On this day, as well when you can’t achieve liberation by fleeing, avoiding or ignor- as the seven days before and seven days after, you should receive ing. To commune with the only kind of freedom that matters, especially helpful clues about the future work you can do to feel you must head directly into the heart of the commotion. You’ve even safer and more protected than you already do. got to feel all the feelings stirred up by the truths that rile you up. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Too much propaganda and not enough real information are cirPISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) J. Allan Hobson is a scientist of sleep who does research at culating through your personal sphere. You’re tempted to traffic Harvard. He says we dream all the time, not just at night. Our in stories that are rooted more in fear than insight. Gossip and subconscious minds never stop churning out streams of images. hype and delusion are crowding out useful facts. No wonder it’s a During the waking hours, though, our conscious minds operate challenge for you to sort out the truths from the half-truths! But at such intensity that the lower-level flow mostly stays sublimi- I predict that you will thrive anyway. You’ll discover helpful clues nal. At least that’s the normal state of affairs. But I suspect your lodged in the barrage of bunkum. You’ll pluck pithy revelations dream-generator is running so hot right now that its stories from amidst the distracting ramblings. Somehow you will manage might leak into your waking awareness. This could be discon- to be both extra sensitive and super-discriminating. certing. Without the tips I’m giving you here, you might worry you were going daft. Now that you know, I hope you’ll tap into VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) the undercurrent to glean some useful intuitions. A word to the A journalist named Jenkin Lloyd Jones coined the term wise: The information that pops up won’t be logical or rational. “Afghanistanism,” which he defined as “concentrating on problems in distant parts of the world while ignoring controversial It will be lyrical and symbolic, like dreams. local issues.” I want to urge you Virgos to avoid engaging in a personal version of Afghanistanism. In other words, focus on ARIES (March 21-April 19) In his book The Logic of Failure, Dietrich Dorner discusses the issues that are close at hand, even if they seem sticky or prickly. visionaries who built the Aswan Dam in Egypt. Their efforts Don’t you dare let your attention get consumed by the dreamy brought an abundance of cheap electricity to millions of people. distractions of faraway places and times. For the foreseeable But the planners didn’t take into account some of the important future, the best use of your energy is here and now.

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46 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

HOMES IN THE CAPITOL REEF AREA TWO-STORY COLONIAL Much of it original. Looking for the right owner.

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Sweet, Smelly Revenge! I’m staying with my October theme of ick factors in homes I see or sell, so bear with me or turn the page if you tend to gag easily. Last week, I mentioned the house of horrific smells, where the poor man had lost his marbles, turned off the water and used plastic newspaper bags instead of a toilet for two years before his family came to the rescue. This week, I want to give you a few quick anecdotes about some other gross things I’ve experienced. Famous rotten stories in real estate are often associated with bad smells. There’s the ex-husband who got the house after a bitter divorce: A month after moving back into the home, he noticed a bad odor that kept getting worse. He had professionals come in and check vents for dead rodents and had his carpets cleaned, but the stench remained. You see, the ex-wife spent the last night in the home feasting on shrimp and caviar and a bottle of wine. When she was done stuffing herself, she went into every room and put the remaining shellfish (dipped in the leftover caviar) into the hollows of all the curtain rods. The story goes that the husband couldn’t get rid of the smell and wanted to sell the home, but no one would buy it. Realtors didn’t want the listing but, hmmm, the ex eventually offered him 10 percent of what the house was worth through her attorney. He happily signed the sales papers and a week later, the movers came and took out the husband’s furniture, including the curtain rods, to his new home. You want revenge to haunt you? It’s your karma, baby. Here are some other stories I’ve heard or witnessed over the years: n A renter who hated his landlord made sure that when he moved out, the landlord met him at the apartment while the carpet cleaners were there. The owner was so pleased at the extra effort that he gave him his deposit back, in cash, on the spot. The landlord left and the tenant sprinkled grass seeds over the entire wet carpet, got in his car and moved to California—no forwarding address. n Chicken bomb: Again, it’s a stinky thing. You get some raw meat and put in in a glass jar with milk. You hide it in the back of the furnace area. The heat makes stuff rot and expand. The jar will explode—smelling up the furnace and the vents throughout the house. n

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Mother of the Year Ebony Woody, 34, of Columbus, Ohio, was nothing if not thorough on the morning of Sept. 18 when, following an argument with her daughter, she purposely drove her car onto the sidewalk and struck the 17-year-old, who was walking to school, according to Columbus police. After knocking the girl down and running over her leg, Woody stopped and backed up, driving over the leg a second time. QFM96 reported Woody generously gave the girl a ride to her father’s house, where she dropped her off without reporting the incident. Woody later turned herself in at police headquarters and faces charges of felonious assault, aggravated vehicular assault and endangering children. The daughter was treated for two fractures to her left leg.

WEIRD

Animals on the Lam Auburn, Mass., police received a number of calls over the weekend of Sept. 15-17 about a wayward goat, but it wasn’t until the wee hours of Monday, Sept. 18, that No. 448 was finally corralled at the La Quinta Inn in Auburn, reported CBS Boston. The “mischievous runaway farm animal” was seen on surveillance video entering the lobby of the hotel and wandering the halls, “presumably to rest a bit,” police said. Peter Blash, No. 448’s owner, said the goat jumped a 5-foot-high fence and “took off like a criminal.” However, Blash said, “I had one that made it all the way to Sturbridge.”

n The Caving Club at Indiana University explored Sullivan Cave in southern Indiana on Sept. 17, but when they headed back to campus, they forgot one thing: a 19-year-old freshman physics major who had become separated from the group and was trapped behind a locked gate. When the club president realized two days later that a caver had been left behind, members rushed

The Weird Apocalypse Cable television viewers in Orange County, Calif., were stunned on the morning of Sept. 21 when an ominous message accompanied by an “Emergency Alert” banner flashed on the screen. At increased volume, a man’s voice boomed: “Realize this, extremely violent times will come,” said viewer Stacy Laflamme of Lake Forest, who was watching HGTV on Cox Communications’ cable system. Spectrum customers also received the alert. The warning seemed especially timely given that doomsday writer David Meade had predicted the end of the world “as we know it” to occur two days later. Laflamme told The Orange County Register the message “sounded like a radio broadcast coming through the television.” Dennis Johnson, a spokesman for Spectrum, said: “We have confirmed that we were fed an incorrect audio file,” but neither company could determine where the audio had come from.

WE SUPPORT LAS VEGAS Julie “Bella” Hall

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com Selling homes for 4 years

n Prosecutors in Geneva, Switzerland, are looking for the culprits who flushed about $100,000 in 500-euro notes down four toilets in the city in May—one in the vault area of the UBS Bank, and the other three in nearby bistros. While neither throwing money away nor blocking a toilet is a crime, Vincent Derouand of the Geneva Prosecutor’s Office told the Tribune de Genève, “we want to be sure of the origin of the money.” The cash was confiscated during the investigation, but Derouand said there was no immediate reason to think it was dirty money.

Awesome! The Greene County (Tenn.) Sheriff’s Department alerted drivers along Chuckey Pike on Sept. 20 not to be alarmed by a body that appeared to have been crushed by a house’s garage door. “This is a Halloween decoration!” the department’s Facebook page warns. “Do not call 911 reporting a dead body.” Officers had rushed to the scene with sirens blaring after a caller reported the body, but then discovered the clever (but really early) holiday tableau.

Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 33 years in the Land of Zion

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Bright Ideas Kevin Michael Cook, 24, of New Castle, Pa., was too drunk to drive on Sept. 3, so he enlisted the help of an 8-year-old girl. WPXI News reports the girl told Darlington Township police that Cook, a family friend, ordered her into a car at her grandmother’s house and forced her to drive him toward East Palestine, Ohio. The car stopped after nearly wrecking twice, as bystanders called 911. Police tried to give Cook a sobriety test, but he was too impaired to finish it. He was charged with endangering the welfare of a child, driving under the influence and driving without a license.

Government in Action Texas state Rep. Dawnna Dukes’ corruption trial is scheduled for Oct. 16, when she will face charges of giving a taxpayer-funded raise to a legislative aide as compensation for ferrying Dukes’ daughter between school and home. The Austin AmericanStatesman reports that prosecutors in Travis County also plan to present evidence of 19 additional “extraneous acts,” including accusations that Dukes spent $51,000 in taxpayer money on an online psychic, was absent for roll call 65 percent of the time, and appeared impaired at a House committee meeting when she showed up late, explaining: “I know I’m talking a lot. I’m full of morphine and will be headed out of here soon.”

Babs De Lay

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OCTOBER 12, 2017 | 47

Oops! A family in Coventry, England, are “quite mortified” after calling the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in September to rescue a lizard peeking from underneath a bed in their home. But when officer Vic Hurr arrived at the home, she discovered the “lizard” was not a “lizard at all, it was a pink stripy sock.” The dirty imposter sock, about 7 inches long and 2 inches wide, wasn’t moving, Hurr noted. “I think the family eventually saw the funny side,” an RSPCA spokeswoman told The Independent. “The sock had obviously been there quite a while. It was a typical teenager’s bedroom, I suppose.”

trekkies

back to save him. “You could tell they were pretty shaken up,” the caver told the Indiana Daily Student. “They did near kill me.” The student reported he licked moisture off the cave walls during the ordeal and wrote goodbye letters to his family on his iPhone until the battery died. (Bonus: The rescued caver’s name is Lukas Cavar.)

| COMMUNITY |

Questionable Judgment Coolidge, Ariz., resident Victor Pratt boasts that he’s played with snakes his whole life. So when a rattlesnake slithered by during a family party at a nearby lake on Sept. 7, Pratt grabbed the viper and showed the kids “how to catch it and I was playing with it like little kids do. I wasn’t thinking. I was showing off,” he admitted to FOX 10 News. The rattler apparently didn’t want to play along and bit Pratt on his face and neck. Pratt’s sons quickly drove him to a nearby emergency room, and he was later airlifted to Banner-University Medical Center Phoenix, where Dr. Steven Curry treated him. “There is a 100 percent chance he would have died if he’d not made it to the hospital within minutes,” Curry noted. Pratt remained unconscious for several days. He told reporters he had learned his lesson and would not play with rattlesnakes again.

We sell homes to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

n Just north of Benton, Kan., a rancher posted signs promising a reward to anyone who could help him find his missing longhorn cow, Mercedes. The Wichita Eagle reported the 3-year-old black-and-white bovine went missing on Sept. 11 during Cross Trails, a weekly cowboy church service at Greg Johnson’s Prairie Rose Ranch. Friends, neighbors and family have searched high and low for Mercedes, recognizable by her 5-foot-wide horns, but the only sighting of her has been near the El Dorado, Kan., Walmart, about 10 miles away. Johnson says this isn’t the first time she’s run off: “She is more of a loner.”

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M cMEEL


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CITY WEEKLY STORE Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

801-560-9933

NEW WINDSHIELDS

DUCES WILD IS FOR SALE

WWW.CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

WE WAIVE

4500 s. 535 e. #D170 801-590-9521

WORDS

DIVORCE ONLY $297

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

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| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

48 | OCTOBER 12, 2017

Sell Your Car Today

$100 OF YOUR

INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-414-4103

AWINDS HIE L DRE P L ACE ME NT.CO M

Certificates available in

Easy and Fast (48 hrs) www.callthedivorcefirm.com Free Consult 801-981-4478

South Salt Lake SOB license Class D liquor license

801-918-3066 SERIOUS INQUIRES ONLY DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

S ON U W O FOLL TAGRAM INS

CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

SLC 652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

KLY

WEE @SLC

OGDEN 763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

best bingo lady out there #wendover #orzo Love, Y o u r f av o r i t e g r a n d k i d s

City Weekly October 12, 2017  

Curbing Panhandling