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GHOST MALL Amid growing competition and rebranding, can The Gateway survive? By Dylan Woolf Harris

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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY TOO LITTLE TOO LATE?

The Gateway banks on new ownership and rebranding to survive. Cover photo by Derek Carlisle

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News, p. 13 On the topic of national parks, the science journalist recalls an adventure with her partner last summer in Washington’s Olympic National Park. “We thoroughly enjoyed the spectacular ocean views and stunning mountain vistas,” she says, “but my favorite part of the trip was finding that perfect spot for lunch and a peaceful swim.”

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

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News, Sept. 14, “Taking the Plunge”

Thank you, City Weekly and Dylan Woolf Harris, for covering the nooks and crannies of Salt Lake. We love you! If you haven’t already, please visit the Warm Springs Alliance website and sign the petition. We’ve just topped 1,300 signatures and every one matters.

SYLVIA NIBLEY

Via cityweekly.net I missed this on my Highway 89 photo adventures. Kudos to City Weekly for telling this story.

@ANNTORRENCE Via Twitter

How is funding so hard to find to restore this building? With talk of only millions and not tens of millions, the cost is tiny compared to what stuff comes up on the regular. I mean, a couple cents out of the liquor tax pool would pay for it in a couple years.

MICHAEL W. GOODE Via cityweekly.net

I’m a huge fan of the Children’s Museum of my childhood! I was under the impression that the building was deemed no longer safe/usable because it sat on a fault and the foundation had deteriorated. I hope the building can be salvaged.

REBECCA BAKER Via Facebook

This building has sat empty for a decade and the city organizes a massive campaign to harass homeless people? Am I alone in seeing the obvious?

STEVE HALEY

It should be restored to its original beauty and purpose.

ROBIN A. PAGE

LUCKY TUCK

Via Facebook

Via Facebook Re-establish soaking pools! I have daydreamed of resurrecting this building for years.

Oh my stars. Is it the End of Days?

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Back in the ’70s, my company made a proposal to turn the facility into a water-based recreation center for the city. The city received, at my request, a $300,000 grant to conduct a feasibility study. We quickly found that it would be impossible to restore the pool area to any kind of waterbased activity, scrapped the proposal and released the rest of the funds back to the city, which they used to develop the Children’s Museum. The sulphur in the spring water used previously has fatally damaged the structural integrity of the concrete. More of it will slowly fall down. Need to get over the “historic” nature of the building and simply remove all of it. Sorry about that for the Train Club, but the building cannot be counted on to remain stable for any use whatsoever.

Ya mean openly, instead of with their 64-ounce diabetes drinks from Maverick?

KIMM LOFTHOUSE

T. LEE BURNHAM Via cityweekly.net

Opinion, Sept. 14, “Worst Deal-Maker Ever”

I would be game to get it up and running again. Let’s get a team together and make something happen. Grant writing, etc. I would love to help anyone else interested.

TRACY CALLAHAN Via Facebook

TRINA TIMOTHY NACHE

@JUSTALEX54 Via Twitter

It’s a gateway drink.

NICK PURINTUN Via Facebook

But still no coffee. I would never have got through finals.

Via Facebook

is noticeable on both the women and the men, continuing to affect family life and the children. Divorce versus “working things out” a solution? Just curious what the statistics are. Thank you for your interesting paper and topics.

God said it’s OK now!

Sandy

Via Facebook

A tribute to beer

CAROLE GIBBS Via Facebook

Temple attendance will now be adversely affected.

THANE HEISER

MRS. MARLENE LUNDQUIST,

DAVE CALDWELL

Disagree. Trump is the best deal-maker.

KEVIN SAVAGE Via Facebook

Nah. Whoever gave North Korea and Iran the opportunity to have nukes is far worse.

Via Facebook

nouncement about a revelation to allow beards and maybe even gays on campus.

@JAKEINUTAH Via Twitter

Blog, Sept. 21, “BYU + Coke: It’s the Real Meme”

In about 50 years, they’ll have a big an-

The way we were

Has anyone done a comparison of “the way it was”—housewives staying at home cooking, baking, house cleaning, looking after their own children—versus “the way it is now”? I am older, but have had many different experiences. Only now, at my later age, can I see the huge differences and all the problems caused by women working in the workforce versus staying at home. Relationships seem to be falling apart, stress

I see that the saints on Capitol Hill are batting around the idea of removing the sales tax on food. I propose they also remove the sales tax on beer. Beer was one of the original forms of food preservation. The pyramids were built with limestone and beer. Beer is loaded with “B” vitamins and gets you loaded with vitamin “A.” Beer is good food—legalize it!

ALAN WRIGHT, Salt Lake City

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OPINION

Turn On, Tune In, Don’t Drop Out While national news syndicates are busy projecting the exact moment at which millennials will have a significant impact on government affairs, given the lack of participation I see on even the most local levels—the ones where your voice can actually count—I’m not holding out much hope for said takeover. In the past year of covering various city councils on assignment for a local publication, I have been surprised at the lack of involvement by both the Gen X and millennial crowd. Regularly scheduled council meetings aside, public participation at town halls is concerning. Though these events are able to put more butts in the seats (unless it’s a night with Jason Chaffetz), the age demographic is not representative of our population. Considering that city councils regularly adopt development plans by thinking 15-plus years into the future, the lack of involvement from the population that will be most affected is concerning. The worry is not mine alone. Many city councils are attempting to make it easier for Gen Xers and millennials to air their views on public transit, roads, master plans, development and green space. To be fair, as an individual who barely made the start date of being considered a millennial, I tend to live a more Gen X lifestyle. Having first-hand experience of an individual in their 30s with a young family—in addition to the close proximity of my college memories and the nonstop

BY ASPEN PERRY schedule I had as a student—I understand how difficult it is to carve out time. Recent articles, like one published by The Washington Post titled “Millennials aren’t taking over politics just yet,” will have you believe the lack of political involvement has more to do with the younger generation needing to “grow up,” without taking into account the majority of these individuals are either starting families, climbing the job ladder or in the depths of college study. Regardless of if one has a newborn or is in the midst of finals, the mode in which millenials live is the same—basic survival and complete sleep deprivation. Some cities are taking into account the over-scheduled lives of the citizens they wish to gain more perspective from. They’re attempting to make it easier for these two generations by providing online coverage of council meetings, as well as having active social media pages to keep residents in the loop. In addition to city attempts to broaden their audience, organizations like Emerging Leaders Initiative (ELI) and Real Women Run (RWR) have embarked on a mission of recruiting a more diverse group of civic leaders. According to ELI, a local nonprofit dedicated to increasing millennial political involvement, Utah ranks No. 1 in being both the youngest state in the nation, as well as having the fastest growing population. Additionally, ELI reports high percentages of millennials who wish to make a difference in their communities (98 percent), with 88 percent reporting they value community leadership. Yet despite these numbers, in the last general election, only 37 percent of millennials turned out at Utah polls—a statistic ELI hopes to improve. It’s not that the priorities of older generations are illintentioned or fuddy-duddy. In fact, I often wish my generational counterparts were at council meetings to hear the

experiences of previous generations. It’s difficult to plan for a generation that is not part of the decision-making process—but that you can bet money on will voice their annoyance once plans are carried out and paid for. The notion that one generation should plan what is best for another is flawed simply on the principle that their ideals and priorities are bound to clash. While we should look at the past for guidelines of what did or did not work, and why, the varying life experience from one generation to the next is bound to result in differing priorities and preferences. If you can’t attend meetings, at least try to catch the latest council recording. It might require swapping out a favorite podcast for the week, but will be well worth the time when you realize a project is taking place that you can offer insight to. From there, emailing or calling your local district representative takes mere minutes, and they can be easily accessed on the official website of the city in which you reside. Community involvement and political process goes beyond the notion that if you didn’t vote, you can’t complain. If you don’t participate at some level—even if it means just showing up for debates on larger-scale projects—your city is unlikely to reflect your needs. I have been in meetings where residents voice complaints of conspiracy over a project already in the works, without taking any ownership of their inability to attend even one of the five advertised town halls regarding said project. At some point, we need to realize it is not the fault of the city for listening to the voices of those who bothered to show up. That was our bad. CW

Aspen Perry is a Salt Lake City-based aspiring author and self-proclaimed “philosophical genius.” Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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ANNUAL SHOW 2017 Friday Noon-9pm Saturday 10am-9pm Sunday 10am - 5pm • Mineral, jewelry, & fossil dealers • Outstanding showcase exhibits • Hourly drawings for minerals

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Arts schmarts! Who needs it? And who needs health education? Can’t you get that info from dear old Mom and Dad? Then there’s physical education. Wouldn’t it be best if we just let kids sit and study all day—of course, after they’ve eaten a hearty meal of mac ’n’ cheese and doughnuts? The state school board considers these programs unnecessary. This is again an argument for local control, as Deseret News quoted Royce Van Tassell, executive director of the Utah Association of Public Charter Schools, saying. In 2003, the Legislature cut funding for arts—and guess what happened? Charter schools focusing on the arts. A petition from the Utah Cultural Alliance explains why this is unwise: “… Schoolchildren exposed to drama, music and dance are often more proficient at reading, writing and math.”

Religious Influence

Some of you might remember a pivotal issue when John F. Kennedy ran for president: Religion. “How will it affect your decisionmaking?” they asked. We haven’t got over this thinking yet. Sen. Dianne Feinstein is being excoriated because of her questions for a judicial nominee. “There is no secular-sacred divide. Just because we may be offended by a belief we disagree with does not give us the right to shut it out,” writes Mike Fullilove of the Biloxi, Miss., Sun Herald. But it’s a legitimate concern, as a Washington Post article by Christine Colbert demonstrated. Mormons, she says, think differently about public lands because of their history, religion and culture. They are motivated by distrust of the feds, of the outside world and the belief that the land was given to them by God. The religious question will always be legitimate; how it plays out in public policy is the real concern.

Construction Takeoff

The $3-billion reconstruction of the Salt Lake City International Airport is moving along, and airlines and passengers can rejoice. It might be three more years before the expansion is finished, The Salt Lake Tribune notes, and it’s good to know engineers are thinking about issues like airplane takeoffs and landings, baggage, parking and terminal amenities. It’s even more reassuring that they are aware of and planning to mitigate the effects of the water table. Pillars have to support the weight of buildings in places where the water level is just seven feet below the surface. The airport has long had these concerns, which have cost millions to alleviate. Too bad the state didn’t consider these same problems when siting the new Utah State Prison on wetlands. Those wetlands, the Trib noted in 2015, made the Salt Lake City site the most expensive of the four.

COURTESY SLUTWALK SLC

Mineral Collectors of Utah

The state statistics are sobering: According the Utah Department of Public Health, one in eight women and one in 50 men will experience rape in their lifetimes, and one in three Utah women will experience some sort of sexual violence. These rates are significantly higher than national ones—which seems to be a symptom of Utah’s attitude toward sex and relationships, says Rachel Jensen, director of SlutWalk SLC. As part of a worldwide movement against rape culture, “The Walk of No Shame” happens downtown on Saturday, Sept. 30, at noon.

What’s new about this year’s event?

This year, we’re aiming to educate the public on intimate partner sexual violence, which would be girlfriends, boyfriends, partners, spouses. It’s a problem that’s not really talked about in Utah as much as it should be, so we want to get the message out there that this is something that can happen between intimate partners. We have some amazing speakers coming for that aspect. And we’re also working to empower survivors to work through the healing process by using art and expression. … So we’ve got a bunch of survivors coming out to tell their story about how they’ve used different forms of expression to help them to go through that journey, too.

Can you explain what intimate partner sexual violence is?

It’s under that sexual-assault umbrella but crosses lines into domestic violence as well. In Utah, we tend to get married a lot younger and have a lot less experience with sexual partners when we get married, so the thinking is: If I’m married to this person, I owe them certain aspects of my body. … It’s something that’s very coercive, very subtle, something that kind of hides under the surface where people may not think that it’s a form of abuse. … We want to break that myth. We want to get out there and say, ‘No, this is your body; nobody owns your body’—our slogan this year is ‘Nobody owns me.’ You still have the ability to consent or not consent to these things even in a tight relationship, even in a marriage. It’s still up to you.

Why did you choose to focus on this?

Last year we had a lot of people out at the event who were talking to us and among themselves about how ‘this is something that my ex-boyfriend did to me,’ ‘this is something that my husband did to me.’ So we thought, maybe this is something that we need to talk about as a society, really get it out there on the forefront that this isn’t normal and, if you’re in this situation, there’s help and resources for you, too.

What do you and your team of volunteers hope to achieve with these annual walks?

We’re trying to educate and empower. We want to educate people as to what these different forms of sexual violence and sexual health are, but we want to empower people as well, especially this year. We want the allies and survivors who come out to know that there are processes to help with healing, and that they’re not alone.

What has been the biggest win this year?

Last year, [Utah State Rep.] Angela Romero—and we’re gonna have her speak again—talked about a bill she was introducing to add additional funding to test the backlog of rape kits, and that bill passed. So now we have more funding to pay for the processing of those. A lot more survivors are getting justice, a lot more perpetrators are being put behind bars, and this has only been within this last year. This has been a huge win, not only for the fight that we’re fighting, but for our state, and just to know they’re taking steps to show that they’re working for survivors.

—ANDREA HARVEY aharvey@cityweekly.net


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Is the West kidding itself about the good intentions of Islam? On one hand, many followers of Islam, especially in the West, claim it’s a religion of peace. On the other hand, in majority-Islamic countries, huge chunks of the population are all about going to holy war with the West and striking as many deadly blows as possible. Are we fooling ourselves about the peaceful nature of Islam if this focus on jihad is at its philosophical core? —Astro, via the Straight Dope Message Board

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Let’s not be alarmist. Islam has roughly 1.5 billion adherents. I haven’t taken a recent head count, but surely 99 percent wish their non-Muslim neighbors nothing but the best. OK, that leaves 15 million who might have other ideas. Worrisome? Yes. Cause for panic in the West? No. If we analyze jihad, the subject of immediate concern, we find there’s much we can work with. Likewise, Islamic fundamentalism is potentially our friend. Why, look how well it’s worked out in the case of Iran. IRAN? YOU’RE NUTS! THEY EXPORT TERRORISM! THEY THINK WE’RE THE GREAT SATAN! Now, now. Iran isn’t my notion of the ideal society. I’m just saying it’s a step on the road. Back to that later. First some basics. Jihad, commonly interpreted as “holy war,” literally translates as “struggle.” Whether it’s at Islam’s philosophical core, I leave to the theologians. But it’s a basic Islamic concept. A sizable body of Islamic tradition, dating back to the 11th century, distinguishes two types of jihad. “Greater jihad” is the inner struggle against unworthy impulses. “Lesser jihad” means fighting the infidel. It’s reasonably clear jihad in the military sense is the original connotation of the term, with jihad as spiritual struggle grafted on later. Some Islamic thinkers claim such latter-day elaborations are spurious, even heretical. Western fearmongers have seized on these contentions as proof that the accepted, orthodox meaning of jihad is holy war, suggesting that those who claim otherwise are deluding themselves. But Islam doesn’t have a central doctrinal authority; it’s got competing schools of thought. Sure, plenty of Islamists think they have a religious duty to wage war against unbelievers in the West. So what? Ideas don’t drive passions; passions drive ideas. It doesn’t matter what the “real” meaning of jihad is: Those determined to see it as a mandate for violence are going to do so. But a billion-plus other Muslims don’t see it like that—and they’ve got longstanding (if disputed) doctrinal support. That’s the comeback to dire claims that Islam isn’t a “religion of peace.” Of course it isn’t. No world religion is inherently anything; it’s what its adherents make of it. Christianity, with its own impressive history of violence,

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE The Real Holy War

can today be said to have a sizable peaceloving wing. So can Islam. That brings us to Islamic fundamentalism. Has it been the seedbed for radical Islamic terrorism, to use a phrase some like to trumpet? Yup. Is sharia law a medieval throwback? Yup again. Are death-to-America sentiments more common among fundamentalist than than non-fundamentalist Muslims? Likely so. But you know what? Setting aside your al-Qaeda/ISIS/Taliban suicide-bomber types, we can work with these guys. Take our buddies in Iran. In 1979, in the midst of the hostage crisis, Iran was the U.S.’s worst nightmare. Today? Yes, there’s the nukes, oppression of women, etc. But look at the bright side. This is a stable theocratic regime. It appears to have a modicum of popular support, due largely to Islamic fundamentalism. It’s not a North Korea-style police state; on the contrary, they hold elections where sometimes the candidate we like wins. Let’s not get goofy. If I’m the leader of a Western democracy, I’m not inviting the Iranian theocrats on a long fishing trip. But can we do business with them? I’d want to count the change, but sure. They’re running a country; they have much to lose. They’ve got an intelligible goal, namely regional dominance, which admittedly puts them in the crosshairs of many others in the Middle East. But come on. Of such ingredients are bargains made, and we’ve made them. Will they hold up? No idea. But I like the chances better than I would with Islamic State. In short, we need to be realistic. Can Islamic teachings be read as supporting violence? Undeniably. Is holy war the heart and soul of the religion? Fanatics think so, but every public-opinion survey I’ve seen shows most Muslims reject violence. Sharia law, it’s true, enjoys broad support, accounting for the majority of believers in many Islamic countries, according to Pew Research. Sharia means tension with the West but not necessarily outright hostility. Iran’s not a U.S. fan, but Saudi Arabia, equally fundamentalist (and no less problematic), is our ally. Look, you play the cards you’re dealt. Peace? Not happening soon. But if you’re panting for war to the death with 20 percent of the planet, that’s easy: Act like that’s what we’re in now. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill _ frost

West

7. SoSaLofts of South Salt Lake 6. Liberty Park Luxury Pods 5. La Boîte Carboard Court at City Creek

3. Lakeview Gardens at Saltair East

1. Lockdown Square at Rio Grande

RALLY FOR PATRICK HARMON

It’s hard to know what’s happening with the police, but trust has definitely eroded. Patrick Harmon was fatally shot on Aug. 13 while riding his bike near State Street and 1000 South. One of three officers on the scene shot and killed Harmon and the public has not been allowed to see the body cam footage. With speakers from Utah Against Police Brutality, Black Lives Matter Utah, Cop Watch and others, the Rally for Patrick Harmon is followed by a march to the mayor’s office. This is a call for transparency from the SLPD. Salt Lake City Public Safety Building, 475 S. 300 East, free, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2-4 p.m., bit.ly/2favaTa

HELP THE HOMELESS

Just so you know it’s not all talk or handcuffs, here is a chance for you to step up for the homeless. Project Homeless Connect needs volunteers to fill some 500 slots at Salt Lake City’s one-day, one-stop event to provide much-needed services to this vulnerable population. Can you help out with medical and dental care, housing intakes, employment assistance, haircuts, foot care, educational services, bike maintenance, a massage or something as simple as a library card? Whatever you can contribute helps. The Salt Palace Convention Center is donating space and transportation is provided. Mayor Jackie Biskupski has taken a lot of flak for her efforts, and wants this to be a “day of hope.” Salt Palace, 100 S. West Temple, 801-535-7174, Friday, Oct. 6, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., free, phcslc.org

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 | 11

2. 300 West Walmart Pointe

Despite the public outcry, rape culture persists and sexual assault still carries a significant community stigma. As a survivor or an ally, you can make a statement of solidarity at SlutWalk SLC’s Walk of No Shame while fighting back against sexual harassment, slut-shaming, victim-blaming and sexual violence. “Our 2017 focus is on intimate partner sexual assault, as we reach out to educate our community that sexual assaults aren’t just committed by a shadowy figure hiding in a dark alley,” organizers say. Educators, activists, government officials and survivors will be there to speak before and after everyone marches up Capitol Hill to protest and empower. Salt Lake City and County Building, 451 S. State, free, Saturday, Sept. 30, noon-3 p.m., bit.ly/2xzUj4q (for more, see p. 8)

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Dwellings

WALK OF NO SHAME

4. Dunford Dumpster

CHANGE THE WORLD

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8. Hellmouth Village at 666

In a week, you can

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Eight under-construction Salt Lake City apartment developments you might still be able to afford but probably not:

CITIZEN REVOLT


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12 | SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

NEWS

H AT E G R O U P S BAYNARD WOODS

American Carnival

On costume and class in Trump’s America. BY BAYNARD WOODS comments@cityweekly.net @baynardwoods

T

he heat of 2017 has finally boiled all political chants down to their essence: “Fuck that shit!” More than 1,000 “juggalos”—fans of the horror-art rap group the Insane Clown Posse (ICP)—chanted this refrain in front of the Lincoln Memorial on Sept. 16. Many wore clown paint or proudly sported tattoos or other signs that signified they are down with the clown. Farris Haddad, who was introduced as “the motherfucking juggalawyer,” spoke when the chant broke out for probably the fifth or sixth time. “We’re talking about freaking music here,” he said. “If this is allowed to stand—and so far it has been—then we definitely don’t live in a free society anymore.” He was talking about the fact that the FBI designated juggalos as a “loosely organized hybrid gang”—a 2011 distinction, which, juggalos say, has real consequences. One speaker, Jessica Bonometti, said she was fired from her job as a probation officer in Virginia because she liked ICP-related photos on her personal Facebook page. Another, Crystal Guerrero, said she lost custody of her children for going to an ICP show. So Haddad, as juggalawyer, is trying to sue the FBI. “The federal court in Detroit actually tried to dismiss our case twice now, saying basically that the FBI did nothing legally wrong by gang-listing thousands of normal everyday Americans,” he said. “Fuck that shit,” the crowd roared back. “That’s what we said—‘Fuck that shit,’” Haddad retorted. As Haddad announced a new trial date (Oct. 11 in Cincinnati), Chris Lopez—a man with a Vandyke beard, long hair and a D.A.R.E. baseball hat—walked up and handed a sweatshirt and a sandwich to Michael Troy, who sported a suit, a red toboggan hat and a handlebar mustache. They did not know each other. “He’s like a brother I never met before,” Troy said, biting into his sandwich. “I give sandwiches to everybody,” Lopez said, opening up a cooler containing a couple dozen. “He gave me a jacket, too, because it’s gonna get cold later,” Troy added. Troy came from California on an

Juggalos rallyin front of the Lincoln Memorial on Sept. 16, protesting the FBI’s designattion of them as a “loosely organized hybrid gang.” overnight flight on Friday night and was planning to leave Sunday morning. I asked him why he felt it was worth so much trouble and money, which for most people here is scarce. “It’s my family,” he responded. “Family has family’s back no matter what. They are there for each other in times of need.” Maybe it was the California contingent who wore suits because a guy from Oakland who called himself “Ape” also was in a suit beneath his clown makeup. He was part of a group called Struggalo Circus, which describes itself as a “ragtag and messy coalition between radicals and juggalos.” One of Ape’s comrades, a black man, carried a sign reading “Black Juggalos Matter.” There weren’t that many black juggalos. But, many juggalos and their supporters feel that class is at the center of the campaign against them. “If juggalos are a gang, then why aren’t individual fraternities gangs?” writer Camille Dodero said at the rally. “What’s the difference between those groups and juggalos? To me … the difference with those kids is that those kids’ parents have money.” As a helicopter flew over, everyone held up their hands, shooting big ol’ double birds. “Most juggalos I know don’t have parents with money,” Dodero added. “In some cases, you don’t even have parents.” At the same time, on the other side of the National Mall, another rally was taking place. Organizers of the proTrump meeting disastrously dubbed it the Mother of All Rallies—even though they were significantly outnumbered by the juggalos. But with the exception of the Proud Boys, they didn’t look like fraternazis with rich parents. Bik-

ers for Trump, Three-Percenter militia guys, 4chan Kekistan shitposters and Captain America cosplayers, like juggalos, were each distinguished by their uniform. The militia guys, for instance, wore Under Armour camos and backpacks and the “Western chauvinist fraternity” Proud Boys wore black polos with yellow stripes on the collars and sleeves. And Captain America, well … Pretty much all the groups somehow saw themselves as “security.” They were there to protect the free speech of Trumpists from the media and dreaded antifa. It was mostly just them and the press, though, so when a couple antifa activists walked up to use the portajohns, a palpable thrill went through the crowd. Finally! These speakers suck! What are we even here for! Antifa! The activists were quickly surrounded by U.S. Park Police and then by militia guys. As Drew Ambrogi, who works with No Justice No Pride, tried to get close to the counter-protesters, one of the militia members told him to step back. “You’re not a law enforcement officer,” Ambrogi said in video. “They work for me,” a Park Police officer said of the militia man. But when Proud Boys came up looking like they wanted to fight, it seemed like the militia managed to calm them down and keep them away. None of them agreed to an interview. That’s when something kind of amazing happened. Inside this circle, one of the antifa activists named Iggy, stood and talked for nearly an hour with a leader of the militia. “I’ve spent a lot of time trying to understand you guys, to understand the socialist mentality, to understand the commu-

nist mentality,” the militia leader said. “To me, you guys are my brothers and sisters … Why is there that difference? That’s what I’m trying to figure out.” “It’s a divide and conquer,” Iggy said of the encounter. “There’s not that much difference.” Some antifa groups, like Redneck Revolt, have been actively reaching out to the militia groups. “A diversity of tactics,” Iggy said later, at the juggalo march where the presence of a black bloc made some people nervous. “These people, they’re not fascists. They’re definitely trying to distance themselves from the fascist movement.” He added that the further alienated these militia-types feel, the more likely they are to side with the fascists. At one point, as the juggalos marched, they chanted, “One of us! One of us!”—a reference to the 1932 film Freaks. The juggalos, antifa and the militia are all freaks. All three groups are hated and feared by the average Americans—the normies. But there are still very real differences. A couple hours later, as the juggalos marched and a black bloc of antifa activists, with their faces covered, carrying a sign that read “Whoop Whoop Fuck Nazis,” it was clear the competing rallies and their attendant fashions are the essence of our spectacle-oriented politics. If you dress in black, you might be called a terrorist; if you wear clown paint or the hatchet man, chances are you’ll be classified a gangster. But if you dress in a militia uniform, the cops will likely claim you as their own. And, we are reminded again, as protests continue in St. Louis, if you are wearing a police uniform, you can still shoot black people and walk free. “Fuck that shit!” CW


Leaked Zinke memo provides a skewed view of protections. BY EMILY BENSON, HIGH COUNTRY NEWS comments@cityweekly.net @erbenson1

L

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A version of this article originally appeared in High Country News on Sept. 19.

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Mountain regional Earthjustice office. Recently protected objects include biodiversity at Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument—the “spectacular variety of rare and beautiful species of plants and animals” that live there, according to the proclamation that established the monument in 2000. Cascade-Siskiyou also is a “biological crossroads,” an area that links several rich ecosystems. “By protecting that bridge itself, you’re benefitting much more area than just the bridge,” Dave Willis, chair of environmental group Soda Mountain Wilderness Council, says. To safeguard that biodiversity, the original proclamation included a rule against driving motor vehicles off-road; the leaked report incorrectly states that all motorized transportation was prohibited. That error is emblematic of the report, which, Willis asserts, discounts years of scientific and public support. “To have [that support] dismissed with such a slapdash, error-filled report is extremely frustrating,” he says. The report argues for shrinking or changing monuments, in part to bolster mining, timber production, grazing and other natural resource-dependent industries. That focus has environmental groups concerned that Zinke is more interested in exploiting the landscapes than protecting them. Despite evidence that the economies of counties bordering national monuments are not negatively impacted by protections, the report repeatedly links monuments to financial hardship and calls for opening up protected areas to extractive activities. “This is all political posturing,” McIntosh says of the review process. “This is not about doing right by the land or the majority of people who cherish these places.” And many people do cherish national monuments. More than 2.8 million comments on the review were submitted to the Department of the Interior—the vast majority in favor of keeping them intact. The report, however, states that most originated from a handful of nonprofit campaigns, rather than individuals’ comments. Earthjustice and several other environmental organizations plan to sue the federal government if Trump follows the recommendations outlined in Zinke’s report and shrinks any monuments. “These are national treasures,” McIntosh says. “They deserve a vigorous defense—and that’s what they’re going to get.” CW

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ate last month, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke submitted a report on his review of 27 national monuments to the White House. Zinke’s suggestions, kept secret at the time, recently were made public by The Washington Post. The report calls for significantly shrinking boundaries at Utah’s Bears Ears and Grand StaircaseEscalante national monuments, Gold Butte in Nevada, and Cascade-Siskiyou, which straddles the Oregon-California border; and looser restrictions on activities at Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and Rio Grande Del Norte national monuments, both in New Mexico. It also proposes changing allowed activities at three marine monuments and one in Maine. Monument status protects significant landmarks, structures or “objects of historic or scientific interest” on federal land under the 1906 Antiquities Act. The leaked memo, however, claims recent monument proclamations have gone too far in designating things like ecosystems and biodiversity as “objects.” But a century-old U.S. Supreme Court ruling shows that judges have long recognized that the definition of an “object” in this context is expansive—large enough, in fact, to encompass the Grand Canyon itself. Despite the report’s rhetoric, there’s legal and historical support for a broad definition of what constitutes an “object” in need of protection. “It’s clear from the very beginning of the act that it doesn’t mean an object you can hold in your hand,” says Kristen Boyles, an attorney with Earthjustice based in Seattle. “It has always meant something broader.” Several national parks were first protected as national monuments, including the Grand Canyon; the landscapes themselves were the objects protected. In 1920, the Supreme Court explicitly stated that the Grand Canyon qualifies as “an object of unusual scientific interest.” Zinke’s report says that decisions to shelter certain objects in some modern monuments were “likely politically motivated.” Later, it states that “the Secretary has concerns that in modern uses of the act, objects are not consistently and clearly defined.” But the argument for a narrower definition, implying “that Congress really intended just to protect small areas, or objects that are relatively limited, is just wrong,” according to Heidi McIntosh, managing attorney of the Rocky

U.S. BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

PUBLIC LANDS NEWS Monumental Fumble


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Amid growing competition, new ownership and rebranding, can The Gateway survive? By Dylan Woolf Harris dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris


THE GATEWAY MALL DOESN’T EXIST. The beige buildings are still standing. The sleepy road down its spine remains open. Storefronts continue to beckon customers—albeit fewer today than a decade ago. On a recent weekday morning, a shopper skirts the upper floor balcony gripping an Abercrombie & Fitch bag while a young couple sits awkwardly close to one another on the steps leading down to the ground level, and another woman, pushing a toddler in a stroller, B lines to a food vendor. shopping malls and you’ll notice one recurring name: Rick Caruso, a California developer who owns The Grove, a renowned L.A. shopping complex. In a plethora of news outlets, Caruso prognosticates the indoor mall’s demise. Delivering the keynote address at a conference for the National Retail Federation in 2014, Caruso described a dire end for the American mall. “I’ve come to a conclusion that within 10 to 15 years, the typical U.S. mall, unless completely reinvented, will become a historical anachronism,” he said. “A 60-year-or-so aberration that no longer meets the public’s needs, the retailer’s needs or the community’s needs.” For thousands of years, Caruso notes, dynamic outdoor fish markets or bazaars have served as central gathering

cause it’s a really cool experience to talk to the farmer who grew your tomatoes, and see your friends and neighbors, and have interesting food experiences that you can’t have anywhere else,” he adds. “The Gateway understands that, and that’s the direction they’re headed.” The Downtown Alliance plays a supportive role in the city’s redevelopment—“We’re really good cheerleaders,” Mathis points out—but it also helps facilitate conversations between power players who have overlapping interests. East of The Gateway, Vivint Smart Home Arena is also in the middle of a major renovation. The Downtown Alliance recognized that the two entities might be able to complement each other and scheduled a sit-down. “We brought them together and said, ‘You guys should try to find some type of synergy,’” he says.

IT’S PART OF A GRANDER MASTER PLAN

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DEREK CARLISLE

spaces across the globe. Modern shopping districts, he adds, must model their businesses on these traditional spaces that have a time-tested history of success. Salt Lake City Downtown Alliance Executive Director Jason Mathis agrees that an open-air, community-driven market is much more likely to succeed in today’s environment. The Downtown Alliance-sponsored farmers market illustrates this idea. Filling Pioneer Park on summer Saturdays, the booths packed with fresh food and odd wares draw people, Mathis says, as much for the atmosphere as they do anything else. “It’s not because you can’t buy tomatoes from the Harmons down the street from your house. You go there be-

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The Downtown Alliance envisions a day when the old depot district is a sports and entertainment hub, with a refurbished Gateway being one piece in the overarching tapestry. “The idea is that there is a neighborhood where there are entertainment options. There are cool restaurants and bars. There’s usually some specific branding and signage and retail components that go on to support that,” Mathis says. “Investment breeds investment,” Mathis likes to say. Developers see what’s happening at Vivint and what Vestar is doing with The Gateway, and it creates a domino chain. “People now want to invest in that neighborhood. It seems to be the place to put your money.” For example, a nearby development project called Block 67, he says, will add new apartment units and a hotel to Salt Lake City’s skyline near 200 South and 200 West. Downtown Alliance helped open lines of dialogue between these entities, too. “We were saying, ‘The sum of the parts can be a lot better than each of the parts themselves,’” he says. Money being pumped into that part of town over the next five years could top $1 billion. “Sometimes development happens, and it displaces something that’s really charming. In this case, the development is beautiful, high-quality development replacing stuff that I don’t think anyone has any affection for,” Mathis says. “We’re excited for it, and it totally complements what The Gateway is doing.” Vestar’s attempt to jolt The Gateway alive is ambitious but far from foolproof. “The biggest obstacle is the perception that people have of the property, especially people who have lived here for a long time because they remember The Gateway in the heyday,” Trott says, adding, “We’re not going back to what The Gateway was; we’re moving forward with a new concept.” The Gateway mall opened in 2001 in the Rio Grande District at a time when the city was buzzing with anticipation for the 2002 Winter Olympics. Salt Lake City was starting to feel more cosmopolitan than it had ever before. The mall saw an initial boom that seemed to be sustainable.

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Mall staples like Zumiez, Hot Topic and Fanzz are steadfast Gateway tenants. In fact, the entire scene ticks most of the clichéd shopping-mall check boxes, but that doesn’t waver the new owner’s branding, or its attempt to disassociate The Gateway from a traditional mall. “I cringe a little bit when people still say ‘The Gateway Mall,’ because it’s just The Gateway,” says Edie Trott, marketing director for Vestar, an Arizona-based property company that acquired The Gateway in early 2016. Since then, Vestar has crafted a path to defibrillate the space back from the brink with a $100 million, three- to five-year revitalization plan. The facelift is more than a glossy coat of paint; Vestar is hoping to rewrite The Gateway’s DNA and transform it into a new, reimagined space. To Trott, the word “mall” grates like fingernails on corrugated siding because it doesn’t fit with the revamped vision. The Gateway, she says, is transitioning into a place that is more attuned to community and experience than merely a spot to buy stuff—though retail will remain a component. “What we’re doing is creating an entertainment, arts, culture and lifestyle destination,” she says. The mission is to build off the cornerstone entertainment venues that already have made Gateway home. The list of established businesses, such as Wiseguys Comedy Club, The Depot, Megaplex Theatres, Clark Planetarium and Discovery Gateway have been joined by newcomers that offer virtual-reality games, escape rooms and acoustic stages. The Gateway also leases to a spa and other health-centric businesses, such as Accuscan Health Imaging, whose expertise is elective CT scans, fetal ultrasounds and heart calcium scores. Manager Eileen Matheson says she sadly watched over the years as retailers uprooted. But she likes the location, and she’s hopeful the property will turn around. “For a little while, it was a little sketchy,” she says. “It’s starting to change.” The Gateway’s shift is also aiming to cash in on spending habits of a burgeoning generation. In part, Vestar is abreast of purchasing trends, which shows younger people prefer experiences over goods. “Our target audience, if you will, is millennials,” Trott says of a demographic that is more likely to be attracted to activity-driven businesses. Last spring, The Gateway ran an ad campaign with the tagline “We’re not your mall; we’re your neighborhood.” The slogan encompasses the branding Gateway wants to exude—to be a place that feels more like a community. Broadly, The Gateway also has its pulse on a national trend of “de-malling,” Trott says. A report by Credit Suisse, an international financial company, predicted up to a fourth of all shopping malls across the U.S. are doomed to die within five years. Attributing the extinction to online retailers that are siphoning business away from brick-and-mortar, a recent Los Angeles Times article citing the study notes that many shopping centers across the nation are shifting their focus to food and entertainment as a means of survival. Search for commentary about the future of American


DEREK CARLISLE

DEREK CARLISLE

Walk through The Gateway, and you’re likely to see as many vacant doors as you are businesses. Only two retailers remain on the secondfloor circle that looks down onto the fountain: Barnes & Noble and a T-Mobile. Stretches of the mall give off a ghost town vibe. “We still have a big job ahead of us—of filling the spaces,” Trott admits. Starting with a letter of intent, potential occupants entering a lease might experience a six- to eight-month process before it’s finalized. At the beginning of the summer, Gateway had nine merchants that were somewhere in that timeline. Even as the revitalization process unfolds, tenants have fled The Gateway. Dick’s Sporting Goods, for example, decided to pack up its gear and leave less than a year after Vestar purchased the property. People like Mathis expect that to change. In June, The Gateway announced that it’s bringing in a new high-profile tenant. Dave & Buster’s, a national chain restaurant/arcade/bar, committed to opening its first Utah location in a retail space where The Gateway’s food court used to reside. The property is on its way to “re-establishing itself as the heart of downtown,” Trott wrote in an email. For The Gateway, this is “a win” that counters the news narrative Salt Lake City had come to expect. One thing Vestar brings to the table is a portfolio of properties where big-name brands already reside. Dave & Buster’s, in this case, has a history with The Gateway owner. “What we’re able to do because we have all those properties is we already have established relationships. We can go to these people and say, ‘You’d be a great fit at The Gateway,’ go to them and propose it,” Trott says. John Mulleady, senior vice president of development at Dave & Buster’s, said in a statement that Salt Lake City appealed to the company for several reasons, but foremost because of the families it hopes to welcome through its doors. “The Gateway provided us with the perfect opportunity to introduce Utah families to our brand of entertainment and dining. With something to offer everyone—at any age—we think this brings something special to the community,” he said. DEREK CARLISLE

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Around 2008, when Mathis began working for the Downtown Alliance, The Gateway was thriving. As he sees it, Gateway’s success was due to a confluence of factors: Salt Lake City’s other malls were floundering. On their last leg, ZCMI and Crossroads were themselves ghost malls. Trolley Square was undergoing major renovations. And the malls in the surrounding valley were also struggling. Fashion Place Mall was a construction zone, and “Cottonwood was a hole in the ground,” Mathis says. “For the whole region, Gateway was kind of the only shopping option if you wanted an upscale shopping experience.” And of course, a few major shopping centers hadn’t yet come into existence. “The southern part of Davis County, they used to all come to Gateway because there weren’t a lot of options,” Mathis says. “Now in Farmington, you have Station Park which is really vibrant. They’ve done a really good job.” In 2012, City Creek Center opened. The shopping mall built by the business arm of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints was a game changer. A 110-store mega-mall that straddles Main Street on prime real estate next to Temple Square, the shiny new space with a retractable roof lured shops, like the Apple Store, into its halls. “Fashion Place saw City Creek Center coming and stepped up with an H&M, and Crate & Barrel, and a Cheesecake Factory, and brought a lot of things to Utah that weren’t here before,” he says. But The Gateway experienced an exodus, and the fate of the property was up in the air. “When we found out that Vestar bought it, we were elated,” Mathis says. “Vestar has a long history of turning around troubled retail projects. They know what they’re doing. They have a ton of capital, so they’re willing to invest, and they also understand the current retail market.” Vestar has properties throughout the West, including one other in Utah—West Valley City’s Valley Fair Mall. Converting outdated property into hip areas is the company’s MO. They aim to create destinations. “You go there because you want to see other people. You go

there because it feels like a cool environment. You go there because you want to have a social experience,” Mathis says. “And the shopping is secondary. You might buy something while you’re there, but really you’re attracted to that location because of the experience. “The folks at The Gateway understand that better than anyone else,” he says. “They understand how to create this experiential economy where you’re going to be going there because it’s cool and you’re going to see fun things and you’re going to meet other people.” But it’s evident that the center has a ways to go. Compared to City Creek, The Gateway on a random weekday is anything but crowded. You’d be lucky to run into folks who are interested in socializing. More likely, you’ll find employees taking a quick break, or item shoppers briskly picking up a cell phone or book. The Gateway declined to disclose its occupancy rate. But the empty spaces on either side of PacSun is a reminder of what was being etched onto The Gateway Mall’s epitaph.


bitious “cure Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.” The security member says he has to erase lascivious submissions, like when people write in things like “get laid.” It’s not a bad gig, he says before he walks away just as slowly as he came by.

BANKING ON EVENTS

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Vestar replaced the lawn with AstroTurf, so the brilliant emerald grounds look impeccably groomed at all times. On an early afternoon, a maintenance worker donning a Gateway pullover arrives on a golf cart in front of new bulbous, pastel lawn furniture. Fishing his hand into the pond, he pulls out the mesh filter, wipes gunk off it then pours a powdery solution into the water. A cascade of condominium balconies hangs overhead. A part of the master plan focuses on beautifying the space. The Gateway commissioned artists to paint murals on blank walls. They’ve hung other installations that’s sole purpose is aesthetic, such as glowing signs that Trott refers to as “Instagram moments.” Vestar hopes the scene is welcoming, one that will attract festivals and events, like a free summer concert series, the Brazilian Festival or a gospel brunch. Trott says The Gateway isn’t trying to compete with City Creek Center. In any event, it’s keenly aware of City Creek’s closed-on-Sunday policy. “There’s a part of Salt Lake City that is looking for things to do on Sundays. So how do we capture that audience? And what is that segment of the community looking for?” Trott asks. Gospel brunch—which Mathis claims was a Downtown Alliance-inspired idea—was organized with the sabbath shopper in mind. Billed as a twice-per-month gathering this past spring, events centered around a gospel choir performing while patrons ate a Sunday morning meal. The best part, according to Trott was “a 20-foot bloody mary bar. That has everything from pretzel rods, to bacon, to shrimp, to eight different hot sauces. We have different salts you can rim your cups with. It’s really a production.” Last weekend, colorful booths and food vendors lined The Gateway’s interior road and walkways for the Hispanic Heritage Parade and Street Festival. A DJ spun Latin records, and

a parade featuring traditional dress and dances promenaded down Rio Grande Street. A modest crowd mingled on the lawn and dry splash pad. Randal Serr, director at Take Care Utah, which organized the festival, says The Gateway grounds look much better than they did last year for the inaugural event. “It’s getting better all the time,” he adds. “We knew that it was on the rise, so we wanted to be a part of it.” Attendee Irma Solis says where she’s originally from in Idaho, they don’t have things like the heritage festival and she appreciates The Gateway for hosting. “I feel like The Gateway was going down, but it’s an awesome place,” she says while waiting to see her daughter march in the parade with the Salt Lake City police Explorers program. “If they can do more events like this at Gateway, I think it’s going to bring it back up.” Attendee Stephanie Burdick, who studied urban planning, says to her eye, The Gateway still resembles a traditional mall. “A lot of it is store, store, store, store,” she says. “And I don’t know if the stores are representative of the changing demographic of Utah.” Local Grace Mathews says Urban Outfitters was the sole reason she went to Gateway. When the retailer hightailed it to another mall last spring, she figured she no longer had a reason to visit The Gateway. But yet on Saturday, there she was with a friend, Maddie Carpenter, from Park City to attend the celebration. “I only came down here occasionally,” Carpenter says. “Once everything was gone, I didn’t come down.” In that sense, the festival succeeded in attracting people who might otherwise have brushed off The Gateway. The question remains, though, whether festival crowds lead to retail sales. Down the line, Alvaro Aguirre stands outside Slate Creek, a shop that sells “SL,UT” shirts, locally produced salt and other souvenirs, as well as convenience-store items. He watches as the parade passes then heads back into the shop where he works. Slate Creek depends on tourists more than local festivalgoers, he says. Asked whether he expected an uptick in customers on Saturday, Aguirre was doubtful. “For us, not much,” he said. CW

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The collective perception of The Gateway is also based on a part of town that has earned a blighted reputation. Just south of The Gateway, homeless folks line up for services provided by The Road Home Shelter and Catholic Community Services. Over the past decade, Rio Grande Street and 500 West devolved into an open-air drug market, where peddlers hid among the homeless population, slinging heroin, cocaine, meth and spice. The problem was enormous enough that the state, city and county joined forces to try to eradicate the criminal element in a sweeping mission known as Operation Rio Grande. While elected leaders continue to tackle the scourge of narcotics, Vestar increased surveillance. “One of the first things we did when we bought the property was we brought in a new security company that we’re familiar working with,” Trott says. “Our reported incidences from security have gone way down. We’re talking, like, 80 percent.” Trident Security guards the premises 24 hours a day. Officers wander on foot or bike, and the upgrades called for better lighting, as well. “What we’ve also done with security is making sure that when addressing anybody, it’s done with dignity and respect. That’s been really important for us,” she says. Security on the property is evident. Around lunchtime on a recent weekday, three food trucks have set up shop below the landmark clock tower, which was at one time the spire to a Starbucks that now sits empty. A trickle of customers keeps the kitchens in motion. Music is pumped through a sound system, and the rush of water pushed up through the spigots of the splash pad slaps back down on wet cement. A security guard wearing black pants, a matching jacket and dark shades perched atop his head speaks into an earpiece while he wanders around, adrift like a guy who’s gone stag to a school dance. Moments later, he’s shuffled in front of an art project called “Before I Die.” On a chalkboard, guests are encouraged to finish the sentence that begins, “Before I die I want to .” All the slots are filled in and include the wanderlustful “go to Rome,” the peculiar “start an ostrich farm,” the benevolent “spread joy,” the heartbreaking “feel love again” and the am-

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MALL SECURITY

Dancers at the Hispanic Heritage Parade and Street Festival

DW HARRIS

SETH MANNION

Jason Mathis


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DEAN KAYLAN

MICHAEL POOL

JUST FOR LAUGHS

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, SEPT. 28-OCT. 4, 2017

SCOTT RENSHAW

ESSENTIALS

the

THURSDAY 9/28

FRIDAY 9/29

FRIDAY 9/29

SATURDAY 9/30

You can take the boy out of the Mountain West, but you can’t take the Mountain West out of the boy. At least that appears to be true of Ryan Hamilton, an Idaho native who spent several years performing locally at Wiseguys before relocating to New York. His new Netflix special Happy Face finds him riffing heavily off of the juxtaposition between his small-town roots and his current home, like challenging the “If you can make it there, you can make it anywhere” idea of New Yorkers: “I’m from a town of 1,000 people in Idaho, and I don’t think New Yorkers could make it there. ‘We wandered off looking for gluten-free cupcakes? Where are they?’ Three days later, they found a body. Turns out he couldn’t make it here.” A Netflix special might be all the indication needed that Hamilton has made it in the world of stand-up comedy, but he’s been parlaying his clean-cut, straight-laced stage persona into a successful career for more than a decade. From two semi-finalist stints on the reality program Last Comic Standing to winning at the 2011 Great American Comedy Festival, Hamilton has been delivering the kind of classic observational humor that often earns comparisons to Jerry Seinfeld—albeit an Idaho-bred version of Jerry Seinfeld. Hamilton returns to his old SLC stomping grounds for a weekend engagement that is likely to find him joking about his background, his non-existent romantic life and, yes, his unusually happy-looking face. He made it here, and it turns out that meant he could make it anywhere. (Scott Renshaw) Ryan Hamilton @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Sept. 28, 8 p.m.; Sept. 29-30, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., $20, wiseguyscomedy.com

He’s one of the most successful actors in Hollywood, and one of the more prolific. With an Emmy nomination, a Golden Globe, a pair of Screen Actors Guild Award ensemble awards plus two individual nominations and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Rob Lowe boasts a list of credits that include several exceptional television series (The West Wing, Parks and Recreation, The Grinder and currently Code Black and The Lowe Files), but it’s work in films that made this former member of the Brat Pack part of the cultural lexicon: The Outsiders, Bad Influence, St. Elmo’s Fire, Wayne’s World and two Austin Powers sequels among them. After some 40 years, it’s natural that Lowe has plenty of stories and lots of juicy anecdotes as well. His two New York Times bestselling memoirs—Stories I Only Tell My Friends and Love Life—detailed his show-biz career and provided the inspiration for his unique one-man touring show, which includes film clips and a chance for audience Q&A. So will he discuss his scandals? We seem to recall a 1988 sex tape that involved him, a 16-year-old girl and a young American model. There was also that nasty lawsuit against some of his former employees. He owns up to it all. “I’ve learned the importance of admitting when you have made a mistake,” Lowe once told People magazine. “And I learned that you must accept the consequences. That’s part of being the man that I want to be.” (Lee Zimmerman) Rob Lowe: Stories I Only Tell My Friends— Live @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-3552787, Sept. 29, 8 p.m., $52.50-$200, live-at-the-eccles.com

Sometimes, it’s the particular circumstances of your life that turn you into a fan of something. For actor Charles Ross, it was moving to a small farm in British Columbia, where TV reception was poor and one of the few things he could watch was a VHS tape of Star Wars— which he did, over and over again. In 2000, Ross turned that passionate familiarity with the original Star Wars movies into a one-man show, inspired both by his love of the trilogy and, as he describes a familiar problem for a young actor, “by wanting to not be unemployed.” The result was One Man Star Wars Trilogy, a fast-paced 90-minute ride through A New Hope, The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi in which Ross does every character voice, provides all the sound effects and even hums the theme music when needed. “I tried it in the cheapest way possible, and it turned out that was the overall selling point,” Ross says. “Here I am doing this show of this high-tech movie with zero tech.” Over the more than 15 years Ross has been performing the show—including getting a licensing seal of approval from Lucasfilm—the structure has changed little, though he occasionally adds new jokes or references to the newer Star Wars films. “As I’ve gotten older, I’ve realized there’s just such a difference between a child who watches something and a fan who watches something,” he says. “For me, it’s easier to just love what I loved naturally as a kid.” (SR) Charles Ross: One Man Star Wars Trilogy @ Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m., $20$30, tickets.utah.edu

Comedian, author and actor Chelsea Handler isn’t unfamiliar with stirring up a little controversy in Utah—not that she’s seemed reluctant to stir up controversy wherever she happens to be. In January, Handler served as one of the organizers and de facto celebrity emcee for a Main Street march and rally in Park City, right in the middle of the Sundance Film Festival’s busy opening weekend, as a protest coinciding with the inauguration of Donald Trump. On that cold and snowy morning, Utahns got a chance to see that when Handler believes in a cause, she’ll show up for it. This week, Handler returns to the state as the keynote speaker for Equality Utah’s annual Allies Dinner, joining a list of notable guests that has in recent years included Neon Trees singer Tyler Glenn, Emmy Award nominee/ transgender activist Laverne Cox and feminist icon Gloria Steinem. Handler also is far from the only entertainment on the bill, as a lineup of local singers, dancers and other entertainers are set to energize the festivities. But the most important reason to attend is to support the work of Equality Utah, which has been fighting for the rights of Utah’s LTBTQ community since 2001, including hatecrimes legislation reform, insurance access for transgender Utahns and preventing gender identity or sexual orientation-based harassment in public schools. While a little star power never hurts to help rally the troops, the event is both a chance to celebrate how far we’ve come, and to remember how much work there is still to be done. (SR) Equality Utah Allies Dinner with Chelsea Handler @ Salt Palace Convention Center, Sept. 30, 6 p.m., $200 individual ticket, scholarships available, equalityutah.org/allies

Ryan Hamilton

Rob Lowe: Stories I Only Tell My Friends—Live

Charles Ross: One Man Star Wars Trilogy

Equality Utah Allies Dinner with Chelsea Handler


Low or no service fees U r ba n lo U n g e 路 m U r r ay t h e at e r k i l by co U rt 路 m av e r i c k c e n t e r ba r d e lUx e 路 t h e co m p l e x 路 a n d m o r e !

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| CITY WEEKLY | SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 | 19


Trauma Class

Paisley Rekdal uses one event to explore the psychic ripples of violence in The Broken Country. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

O

Mon - Sat 8am to 5pm • Closed Sunday 9275 S 1300 W 801-562-5496 glovernursery.com

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n April 26, 2012, Kiet Thanh Ly—a 34-year-old Vietnamese-born homeless man—attacked several people in the parking lot of a downtown Salt Lake City Smith’s Marketplace with a knife, specifically targeting adult white males. For most people, if they thought about the incident at all beyond the day the news broke, this might seem like just another sad story of homelessness and mental illness. Paisley Rekdal wanted to dig deeper. A faculty member at the University of Utah and the state’s current poet laureate, Rekdal turned her fascination with Ly’s crime into The Broken Country, a booklength essay that plunges head-first into multiple complex issues: Americans’ narrow perspective on the legacy of the Vietnam War; the way individuals and communities process trauma; the immigrant, and particularly refugee immigrant, experience in America; her own identity as biracial, and the confusion of those who don’t fit into their environment in a conventional way. The project required her to work outside of her writing comfort zone, doing multiple interviews including some of the victims of Ly’s attack and members of the Utah Vietnamese immigrant community (Ly himself was not interviewed as he awaited trial, on advice of counsel). “It was terrifying, and it gave me a huge respect for journalists,” Rekdal says. “I found asking people to tell me about their lives—and potentially the most devastating aspects of their lives—very frightening. I would be responsible for that story. I was in a cold sweat coming home from interviews.” Over the course of those interviews, and through accompanying research, Rekdal learned about dynamics both specific to the Vietnamese refugee experience— which varied depending on which “wave” of post-war immigrants an individual was part of—and common to displaced and outcast populations of all kinds. Expectations of assimilation collide with new homes that don’t always provide resources to facilitate that assimilation. Then there’s the way in which America talks about refugees, which, according to Rekdal, tends to involve polarities. “The first images of post1975 Vietnamese refugees focused on [nonthreatening] women and children,” she says. “From a propaganda standpoint, that helps us try to imagine wanting to relocate

AUSTEN DIAMOND

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20 | SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 | CITY WEEKLY |

A&E

BOOKS

refugees. The end result, however, is twofold: It places refugees in the space of being needy children, but if they display some agency, they quickly become a threat. They went from children in our imagination to welfare-seekers to violent gang members.” The way history becomes part of a narrative—the stories we start to tell ourselves about the after-effects of a traumatic event like a war—turns into one of the most fascinating subjects of The Broken Country. Rekdal discusses the way American popular consciousness about the Vietnam War has been shaped by Hollywood movies that emphasize the American veteran experience at the expense of the suffering of the Vietnamese people, or how the controversial Vietnam War Memorial in Washington, D.C., frames the story of the war. “There’s a paradox at the heart of the way we narrate trauma,” Rekdal says. “We want to represent it accurately, but we have to rely on certain tropes to make it interesting and, to a certain extent, emotionally available to the audience. It becomes something between the fictional and the real. … As we think about the ways we memorialize wars, we think about ways we want to memorialize ourselves in those wars.” While Rekdal spends a majority of The Broken Country trying to understand the perpetrator of the crime—including epigenetic research that suggests how trauma could be passed down to someone of Ly’s generation who didn’t experience the war first-hand—she’s also careful to respect the experience of Tim DeJulis and Keltin Barney, the two victims most severely injured in Ly’s attack. Yet she identifies a strange similarity between the implicit expectations of both refugees like Ly, and victims of a crime like DeJulis and Barney: “That event is over, and you should get over it. We like to resign

Writer and Utah poet laureate Paisley Rekdal

things to history. It speaks to a larger culture of American amnesia. We like to erase things that make us feel uncomfortable.” Ultimately, Rekdal attempts no simple diagnosis of Ly, and has no easy answers for avoiding a similar act of violence in the future. She does address the absence of support services for at-risk individuals and communities. “The biggest thing to blame is the slashing of mental health care budgets, especially around addiction,” Rekdal says. “If there’s one thing we can say, it never hurts to offer more community services. You can look at it through the lens of history and war, but also through the lens of health care budgets cuts.” Mostly, there’s a desire to keep probing our assumptions about the experiences of refugees, immigrants and American “others” of all kinds, especially as political rhetoric grows heated. “What is crazy?” Rekdal asks, paraphrasing a response of one of her interview subjects. “The dayto-day experience of fearing the police, or not knowing the language, can be a crazymaking experience. It is a day-to-day grind of low-level stress. It’s something we underestimate unless we see it up close.” CW

PAISLEY REKDAL: THE BROKEN COUNTRY

The King’s English Bookshop 1511 S. 1500 East 801-484-9100 Saturday, Sept. 30 6:30 p.m. Free kingsenglish.com


moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Salt Lake City native Justin Watson presents a multimedia installation focusing on artificial intelligence and existential inquiry, employing two synchronized projections to represent a conversation between two synthetic entities in the exhibition |human| at Nox Contemporary Gallery (440 S. 400 West, Suite H, bit.ly/2jP10tU), through Nov. 10.

PERFORMANCE

Wicked-er Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, through Nov. 4, desertstar.biz

THEATER

DANCE

Parallax Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Sept. 28-29, 7:30 p.m.; Sept. 30, 1 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Rachel Call & Linda Margetts Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Sept. 30, 7:30 p.m., saltlakesymphony.org

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COMEDY & IMPROV

Equality Utah Allies Dinner with Chelsea Handler Salt Palace Convention Center, Sept. 30, 6 p.m., equalityutah.org/allies (see p. 18) God Awful Movies Podcast The State Room, 638 S. State, 801-596-3560, Oct. 1, 8 p.m., thestateroom.com Rodney Norman Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801-622-5588, Sept. 29-30, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Ryan Hamilton Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Sept. 28, 8 p.m.; Sept. 29-30, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18)

LITERATURE

| CITY WEEKLY | SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 | 21

Ben Hatke: Mighty Jack and the Goblin King The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 28, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Joe Totten and Michael Gills Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, Sept. 28, 7 p.m., saltlakearts.org Rob Lowe: Stories I Only Tell My Friends Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 385-468-1010, Sept. 29, 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Paisley Rekdal & Dana Levin The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, Sept. 30, 6:30 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 20) Stephen Trimble The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Oct. 3, 6:30 p.m., kingsenglish.com

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

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A Tale of Two Cities Center Point Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-2981302, through Oct 28, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee 2:30 p.m., centerpointtheatre.org The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, through Sept. 30, times vary, pioneertheatre.org Forever Dead Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Sept. 29-Nov. 4, FridayMonday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org Forever Plaid Hale Center Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-984-9000, through Nov. 15, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2 & 4 p.m., hct.org God’s Favorite Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, through Oct. 8., times vary, artsaltlake.org Heart of Robin Hood Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-9849000, through Oct. 14, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2 & 4 p.m.hct.org Hello Dolly Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Nov 18, Monday-Saturday, times vary, haletheater.org How to Fight Loneliness Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7880, through Oct. 14, times vary, bard.org Mamma Mia Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3200, through Oct. 21, times vary, tuacahn.org Next to Normal Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Oct. 1, theziegfeldtheater.com One-Man Star Wars Trilogy Ellen Eccles Theater, 43 S. Main, Logan, 435-752-0026, Sept. 30, 7:30 p.m., cachearts.org (sse p. 18) Riot Act Theatre: An Enemy of the People The Wherehaüs, 175 E. 200 South, 801-882-1949, through Oct. 7, Wednesday-Sunday, 7:30 p.m., riotacttheatre.com Surely Goodness and Mercy Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Oct. 15, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org


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22 | SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 | CITY WEEKLY |

moreESSENTIALS

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Garden, 1000 S. 900 West, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 28, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Tuesday Harvest Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 31, Tuesdays, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, through Oct. 25, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

4th West Oktoberfest Mountain West Cider, 425 N. 400 West, Sept. 30, noon-10 p.m.; Oct. 1, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., mountainwestcider.com Open Streets Festival Aggie “Bullevard,” 700 North, Logan, Oct. 3, 4:30-6:30 p.m., sustainability.usu.edu Rumi Festival Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, Sept. 30, 2-4:30 p.m., slcpl.org

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 18, utahmoca.org Ali Mitchell: Oil Fields Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through Oct. 11, facebook.com/mestizoarts Anastasia Dukhanina Redman Gallery, 1240 E. 2100 South, floors 6 & 7, through Oct. 31, redmangallery.com Andrea Henkels Heidinger: Shared Artifacts Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Sept. 29, slcpl.org Art2Go Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Oct. 13, accessart.org Cary Griffiths: Reprise Art at The Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 14, artatthemain.com Cities of Conviction UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 6, utahmoca.org E. Clark Marshall: Of Stone and Substance Art Access Gallery, through Oct. 13, accessart.org Eileen Vestal: Love Letter to Italy Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Ilse Bing Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 31, umfa.utah.edu

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 9, utahmoca.org Jason Manley: Shrinking Room UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 30, utahmoca.org Jimmi Toro: Kindle a Light Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Nov. 26, kimballartcenter.org Justin Watson Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 17, saltlakearts.org Justin Watson: |human| Nox Contemporary Gallery, 440 S. 400 West, Ste. H, 801-2896269, through Nov. 10, bit.ly/2jP10tU (see p. 21) Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here UMFA, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Laura Erekson Atkinson: Builders Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 3, slcpl.org Lexi Johnson: Second Hand Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Nov. 10, slcpl.org Logan Sorenson: A Land Further North: Images from Iceland Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, through Oct. 26, slcpl.org Malicia Dominguez: The Golden Cage Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801594-8611, through Nov. 9; artist reception Sept. 28, 6 p.m., slcpl.org Matt Kruback and Naomi Marine: prima facie Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 10, visualarts.utah.gov Natalie Stallings: Microscopic Sovereign Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Nov. 3, slcpl.org Photo Alt. Group Photography Exhibition Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-5965000, Sept. 29-Nov. 17, saltlakearts.org Rebecca Klundt, Liberty Blake and Elise Ostraff Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Sept. 29-Nov. 17, saltlakearts.org Ryan Rue Allen: Flowing Imagination and Changes Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Sept. 30, slcpl.org Strangely Enough Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., Oct. 3-Nov. 5, urbarnartsgallery.org Things Lost to Time SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 30, slcpl.org Tina Vigos: Seeking Grace Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Tom Horton Photography Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Oct. 8, redbuttegarden.org Utah Native American Artist Exhibition Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-965-5100, through Oct. 12, culturalcelebration.org


Provo Persian

Find killer kebabs in Utah County at Café on Fire.

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180 N. University Ave., Provo 801-373-3473 cafeonfire.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

CAFÉ ON FIRE

feta cheese, tomatoes, cremini mushrooms, chopped romaine, banana peppers and cucumbers. In addition, there’s a garlicky sauce and another spicy one. I found the seasoned ribeye steak kebab to be superb: tender and juicy atop the house Fire bread. The pounded lamb, flavored with onion and saffron, was a tad dry, however. The pounded beef kebab is a better choice, especially with garlic sauce slathered on top. There is one salad on the menu, and it is divine: The house walnut salad ($6.99) is a hefty serving of mixed greens with olives, cucumber, feta, grape tomatoes, strawberries, chopped walnuts and your choice of dressing. If you’d like to add a kebab, any of the aforementioned are available for an additional $2.99-$4.99. The generously portioned side dishes include a small version of the house walnut salad ($2), cucumber tomato salad ($1.50), pita bread ($1.50), house Fire bread ($1.50), grilled fire-roasted pepper (50 cents), basmati rice ($1.50) and fire-roasted tomato (50 cents). Service here is friendly and helpful— particularly to confused first-timers like me—and Borzin is usually on hand to help with suggestions and explanations. The food, in general, is as fresh as fresh can be, and all the kebabs are cooked to order. Perhaps this is a Utah County thing, but I did encounter an oddity here. You know how some restaurants offer loyalty promotions like a free meal after a purchase of 10? Or maybe a contest where the winner gets a night’s stay at a local hotel? Well, Café on Fire customers are encouraged to enter a giveaway contest, and are allowed one entry with the purchase of a kebab or house salad. The prize? A shotgun from Provo’s Ready Gunner. “Utah gun laws strictly enforced,” read the addendum. The shotgun was hanging over the cashier’s head. Along with delightful Persian food, there’s something you don’t see every day. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

omewhat indicative of its demographics, Utah County—Provo and Orem in particular—doesn’t offer the most diverse array of dining options. So, naturally, I was intrigued to discover that Provo has a restaurant serving the fare of Persia (aka Iran). But calling itself “the one and only Persian restaurant in downtown Provo” is an understatement; Café on Fire is one of the few Persian restaurants in all of Utah. The owners are husband and wife Mary and Borzin Mottaghian, and at this independent family affair, you might spy their kids—Bo, Maximus and Malia—running around. Prior to opening the business, the couple served in the United States Marine Corps. And both are well educated: Borzin earned a Juris Doctor degree from University of California, Hastings, College of the Law and Mary is currently working on her law degree at BYU. The restaurant is modern, sleek and spotless; you could eat off the floors here. It’s a walk-up-and-order affair with rapid service, as meals are generally prepared in less than 10 minutes. The menu is pretty straightforward, with a selection of kebabs and side dishes. The prices top out at $8.99—a total bargain for such quality meals. The fresh, flame-grilled kebab choices start at $6.99, including pita bread, lettuce, basmati rice or Fire bread (which is housemade Persian flat bread that’s baked in the restaurant’s tandoor). Options (all 1/3 pound) are turmeric-infused Sultan chicken, The Shah (ribeye filet), pounded lamb, pounded beef or The Garden (vegetarian eggplant). Kebab toppings are included and unlimited: red onions, black olives,

Café on Fire’s house walnut salad and chicken kebab

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BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

TED SCHEFFLER

DINE


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FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW

RICK HUNTER

@scottrenshaw

Park City Sampler

As downtown Salt Lake City’s Dine O’Round winds down, another chance emerges to sample great Utah restaurants at great bargain prices—this time in Park City. Dine About Park City, from Oct. 1-15, gathers 31 venues under the umbrella of one event, giving diners a chance to try out a new-to-them spot. Each restaurant participates in its own way with special menu offerings in one or more of several categories: two-course lunches for $10 or $15 and three-course dinners for $20 or $40. Before the ski crowds hit, enjoy a peaceful trip up the mountain and taste creations by some of the state’s finest chefs. Visit parkcityrestaurants.com for full list of participating locations.

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Harvest Pop-Up

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While you’re hanging around Park City, consider dropping in on a pop-up restaurant experience. Culinary Crafts presents a Harvest Dinner Adventure on Friday, Oct. 6, from 7-10 p.m. at the Big Moose Yacht Club (657 Park Ave., Park City). The eight-course dinner begins with a complimentary signature cocktail, then features an amuse-bouche of buffalo carpaccio; soup, salad, pasta and fish courses; an entrée of doublecut lamb chop with roasted-garlic-andbacon mamalade; as well as dessert and a cheese-and-chocolate tasting. Tickets are $160 per person; visit culinarycrafts.com to make your reservation.

Devour Some Chocolate & Cheese

If you’re not reading City Weekly’s sister publication Devour, you’re missing even more great coverage of Utah’s best restaurants, chefs and artisan food creators. On Thursday, Oct. 5, Devour sponsors a pop-up Cheese and Chocolate Tasting at The Chocolate Conspiracy (774 S. 300 West), from 7-9 p.m. The host venue’s own sweet treats are featured, along with the cultured creations of Heber Valley Artisan Cheese. You can enjoy up to five samples from each vendor, plus suggested cheese and chocolate pairings, a beer pairing featuring a participating brewer from the Utah Beer Festival and a chance to talk with those who created these foods. Reservations are required for $50 per person, and space is limited; visit devourutah.com for more information. Quote of the Week: “All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.” —Charles Schulz Send tips to: comments@cityweekly.net

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Keeping the “Fest” in Oktoberfest Utah’s take on German Festbiers. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

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rewing beer has always been a very serious and highly regulated part of life in Germany. It seems like there are more laws pertaining to the brewing of German beer than there are actual beers in some regions of the world. One of my favorite German styles is the Bavarian Märzenbier (pronounced Maerzen-beer). By law, it can be brewed no later than March. The special recipe of this style allows it to withstand the long lagering process—cool fermentation—for its debut in early autumn. The timing of its public release makes it the beer of choice for fall celebrations, including the beloved Oktoberfest.

If you’d like to know what all the fuss is about, I’ve provided three local examples that will keep lederhosen and dirndls in mind, if not in body. Red Rock Brauhaus Festbier has the color of deep saturated copper when backlit through my window, with some golden highlights. The nose is rich with caramel and earthy malts. A flash of baked apple pops through in the middle, along with a soft, herbal aroma at the end of the sniff. On the tongue, caramel coats the every taste bud while toasted bread follows close behind. Subtle vanilla bean and Nutella flavors begin to emerge next, adding complexity to an already rich base. The end brings along grassy and herbal hops to balance out the sweetness, adding depth along with bitters. The alcohol is barely noticeable at 5.5 percent ABV. Overall: This beer is plush and luxurious; examples such as this have made me a huge fan of the märzen style. It manages to stay clean while still being a malt-forward lager. This will be in my fridge throughout autumn. Bohemian Oktoberfest pours a bright, clear golden-amber hue. The nose brings biscuits, caramelized sugars, roasted nuts and grass. The first sip begins with toasted grains, caramel and some bready notes; subtle nuttiness, along with some vague orchard fruits, tease the front of the

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

tongue. A floral and grassy hop bitterness causes the sweeter aspects of the beer to make a sharp turn, providing a nice herbal counterbalance to the malt bill. For a 4 percent ABV lager, it weighs on the tongue like a slightly bigger brew. Overall: This is a properly constructed märzen for sure, with a clean malt bill augmented by a restrained noble hop presence. Märzen fans fans should keep their eyes peeled for this clean-tasting, extremely drinkable malt-forward seasonal lager. It’s a refreshing pleasure. Uinta Helles Festbier: This seasonal offering pours a clear honey orange, with a foamy eggshell-colored head that settles to a small cap on top of the beer. A deep whiff offers malty and grainy scents, with a good dose of herbal hops and grass. The taste is

much the same, plus a bit of burnt caramel and honey that transitions into toasted nuts and herbs. There’s a subtle apple fruitiness as well. On the back end, you’ll find an ample amount of noble hop bitterness to tie it all together; keeping it from being overly sweet. Its 5.5 percent ABV is more freshening than boozy. Overall: Though not technically a Märzebier, the German Helles-style lager is a close cousin to the style. While it lacks some of the more caramel-forward aspects of a märzen, it offers a slightly drier palate for those looking for less sweetness. These are all seasonal beers, designed for the crisp fall air. Do yourself a favor and enjoy these now, while they’re fresh and bright. As always, prost! CW


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. HSL

Salt Lake City’s HSL is the latest installment from partners Melissa Gray and Meagan Nash, the same proprietors behind Handle in Park City. The concept behind HSL—which has since burst onto the robust downtown dining scene—is to incorporate locally grown and produced food into a dining experience second to none. Choose from savory options like steelhead trout, a beef cheek burger and grilled flap steak. 418 E. 200 South, 801-539-9999, hslrestaurant.com

Mazza

Riverhorse on Main is a pioneering eatery of sorts: Established in 1987, it was one of the first finedining restaurants to enter the competitive Park City market. The craftily prepared meals look almost like artwork, and the ultra slick and modern interior is equally impressive. As far as the fare goes, there’s something special about the grilled local rack of lamb, served with cumin-scented couscous, honey, cucumber-mint relish and cauliflower. 540 Main, Park City, 435-649-3536, riverhorseparkcity.com

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Mazza offers an assortment of Middle Eastern cuisine such as lamb and rice dolaa, musakhan, shawarma and kebabs, delectable baked kafta, maghmoor and much more. Owner Ali Sabbah takes pride in keeping his restaurants authentic, so the food and service is always top-notch. It wouldn’t be complete without the sizable wine list, with bottles from Lebanon, Morocco and Greece. 912 E. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801-521-4572; 1515 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9259, mazzacafe.com

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Mixed Double

CINEMA

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

FILM REVIEW

Battle of the Sexes captures the stop-start frustration of social progress. BY MARYANN JOHANSON comments@cityweekly.net @maryannjohanson

T

here’s that saying: Two steps forward, one step back. With gender equality, it’s more like: Half a baby step forward, a dozen steps back. That’s how it’s possible that the 1973 “Battle of the Sexes” tennis match—meant to settle the question of whether female athletes were the equals of their male counterparts—did no such thing. Does anyone who was too young (or not yet alive at the time) even know about it? The match was an enormous cultural event that transcended sports. Yet it seems to have been all but forgotten in the popular consciousness. Certainly the “question” of women’s athletic prowess continues to be posed, most recently in the “debate” over whether Serena Williams is the best tennis player ever or merely the best female tennis player. So, as usual, there’s a necessity to a movie like Battle of the Sexes, an urgency that it should be seen, that goes beyond its enormous sheer entertainment value. Somehow, the directing team of Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris (Little Miss Sunshine) has captured the amusement value of retro-kitsch without their film being actually kitschy. Quietly debunking the spurious notion that feminism can’t be fun, the film is full of cheery bashes at outrageous sexism and an aura of sporting—in all senses of the word—can-do spirit. “I’m gonna put the ‘show’ back in ‘chauvinism,’” announces larger-than-life Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell), a 55-year-old former champion. He says this at a televised press conference once Billie Jean King (Emma Stone)—the 29-year-old No. 2-ranked woman in the world—has finally accepted his challenge to play him in an exhibition match. Everyone laughs, including King. But while he might be entertaining, he’s an entertaining asshole, and entirely representative of attitudes she has been battling for years. She is under no illusions about how vital it is to

win this game. That’s at the end of the film, though. The movie opens with King—Stone is wonderful in the role, all quiet determination and ambition—pulling out of the tennis federation run by Jack Kramer (Bill Pullman) over his refusal to pay women the same prize money men receive; the women, after all, sell as many tickets as the men do. The likes of Kramer, a respected authority figure, are the real problem and the most insidious misogynists, not clowns like Riggs. (Carell is an absolute hoot in the role. Ghastly, but a hoot nevertheless.) King doesn’t just pull out of Kramer’s organization: She leads other women players in boycotting his tourneys and setting up their own league. Screenwriter Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire) finds a lot of sly humor in how the women’s tournament grows and succeeds, stuff that wouldn’t have caused anyone at the time to bat an eye but seems amusingly ironic today, such as the fact that it’s tobacco company Philip Morris sponsoring what is billed as “the Virginia Slims Tour.” Our eye today cannot help but pick out appalling condescension and casual abuse that was passing unnoticed in 1973, including how Battle of the Sexes commentator Howard Cosell—a legend of sports journalism and another authority figure—has no compunction about delivering his blow-by-blow with his arm draped possessively around the shoulders of his co-commentator, King colleague

Emma Stone and Steve Carell in Battle of the Sexes

and fellow tennis player Rosemary Casals (Natalie Morales, very convincingly CGI’d into the original Cosell footage). It’s so … ugh. Perhaps the more trenchant history lesson, though, that Battle of the Sexes has to offer is this: Behind every victory, even a short-lived one, is another campaign for dignity and respect waiting to be started. Battle does a lovely job depicting the absolute necessity of King keeping her homosexuality a secret; this movie is as much a sweet and gentle romance between King and new girlfriend Marilyn (Andrea Riseborough) as it is a story about a push for fairness in professional sports across gender lines. But that relationship had to be conducted outside the public eye, lest it taint the ongoing fight for equal pay and equal esteem. Battle of the Sexes is a bittersweet reminder that not all battles can be fought at once, and that this battle hasn’t yet been won. CW

BATTLE OF THE SEXES

BBB.5 Steve Carell Emma Stone Andrea Riseborough PG-13

TRY THESE Little Miss Sunshine (2006) Greg Kinnear Alan Arkin R

Slumdog Millionaire (2008) Dev Patel Freida Pinto R

Crazy, Stupid, Love. (2011) Steve Carell Emma Stone PG-13

Suffragette (2015) Carey Mulligan Helena Bonham Carter PG-13


NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. AMERICAN MADE BB.5 Ever since he was a kid, Tom Cruise wanted to work for the Colombian drug cartels? Not quite, but American Made—based on the true story of Barry Seal, a commercial airline pilot turned international criminal mastermind—hits a lot of the same beats as GoodFellas. Seal graduates from petty delinquency— smuggling Cuban cigars in his TWA cockpits—to taking spy photos for the CIA, to acting as a bagman in transactions between the agency and Noriega, to smuggling drugs into the U.S. for the Medellín Cartel, to becoming a DEA informant. Then comes the Iran-Contra scandal. There’s a certain charm and a lot of humor in how director Doug Liman and star Tom Cruise regale us with Seal’s adventures, and therein lies the film’s one real problem: The tone feels really inappropriate for a movie about this level of corruption and outright lawless banditry from the U.S. government. You can’t even call the film’s attitude cynical; it’s more a winking shrug of acceptance. Made has style galore—a vintage ’70s color palette; Domhnall Gleeson’s performance as a hustling junior CIA agent—but really: Should it? Opens Sept. 29 at theaters valleywide. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson BATTLE OF THE SEXES BBB.5 See review on p. 30. Opens Sept. 29 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

CALL ME DAD At Main Library, Oct. 3, 7 p.m. (NR)

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE BB Plenty of adjectives could be applied to Matthew Vaughn’s 2015 Kingsman: The Secret Service, but “tedious” definitely wasn’t one of them. The follow-up finds young super-secret agent Eggsy (Taron Egerton) the lone surviving Kingsman after an attack by a pathologically perky drug lord (Julianne Moore), sending him to find help from their American counterparts (including Channing Tatum, Halle Berry and Jeff Bridges). Colin Firth’s theoretically dead Harry Hart returns for shut-up-and-don’t-think-about-ittoo-hard reasons, making for a cast stuffed with talented actors. But it’s also just plain over-stuffed, finding time for endless chunks of exposition after the wild opening set piece. Worst of all, it adds even more smugness to its laddish lack of concern for your snowflakey whining about “problematics,” attempting something resembling political commentary. Wake me up when the bad-boy James Bond wannabe isn’t trying to be woke. (R)—Scott Renshaw

STEP At Park City Film Series, Sept. 29-30, 8 p.m.; Oct.1, 6 p.m. (PG-13)

CURRENT RELEASES BRAD’S STATUS BBB Built as it is around an interior monologue, it might have worked better as a novel; instead, Mike White wrote and directed it for the screen, where it’s still rather lightweight but benefits from Ben Stiller’s honest, likable performance as Brad Sloan, a restless suburbanite on a college-visiting trip to Boston with his son (Austin Abrams) while stewing over how his own college friends are now more successful than he. White knows his protagonist is a whiner who needs to check his privilege, and he doesn’t let Brad wallow in self-absorption for too long. Instead, we watch in amusement as Brad fumbles from one simple epiphany to another, gradually learning all the lessons that you’d have predicted he’d learn. There’s nothing revelatory here, but it’s gently humorous and sympathetic to its hapless main character. (R) —Eric D. Snider FRIEND REQUEST [ZERO STARS] If you’ve seen 2015’s Unfriended, then you’ve already seen Friend Request—except without even the bare-minimum freshness of that other movie. Blandly super-nice college student Laura (Alycia Debnam-Carey) likes everyone, even creepy new girl Marina (Liesl Ahlers), who dyes her hair black and wears a hoodie so you know she’s weird. But Laura learns quickly that you cannot lie about what you’re doing to celebrate your birthday when everyone posts pics of your partying on their timelines. Soon, excluded Marina turns stalkerish, Laura has to unfriend her and suddenly it’s all video suicides, haunted profiles and mysterious Facebook “unknown errors.” There might be something insidious about how willingly we’ve given in to a self-surveillance society, but Request isn’t about that. It’s simply all random super-

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REBEL IN THE RYE B.5 Writer/director Danny Strong does not include a picture of the actual J. D. Salinger at the end of his biopic—and that’s the only cliché he doesn’t indulge. The narrative tracks the life and career of Salinger (Nicholas Hoult) beginning in 1939, as he finds a mentor in Columbia writing instructor Whit Burnett (Kevin Spacey), through his experience in World War II and eventual post-Catcher in the Rye celebrity. While Salinger’s contentious relationship with Burnett might provide a reasonable focal point, Strong instead bounces through a bullet-point checklist of Great Artist tropes: discouraging father; wife who laments about how he ignores his family; clunky montages. Hoult struggles to make sense of a character who remains undeveloped as anything more than a self-absorbed jerk—which might have been interesting, except that Strong actually seems to find his obnoxiousnesscloaked-as-integrity admirable. (PG-13)—SR STRONGER BBB.5 It would be easy enough to compare this film—based on the memoir by Boston Marathon terrorist bombing survivor Jeff Bauman (Jake Gyllenhaal), who lost both of his legs in the blast—to last year’s grotesquely misguided Patriots Day, but that wouldn’t be giving the creative team nearly enough credit. They show a deep respect for the experience of the people involved, exploring how this working-class milieu’s cultural taboos against pissing and moaning might make Jeff’s recovery even more challenging. Gyllenhaal embodies those tangled feelings in a performance that’s more than just a showcase for representing a physical disability, while Tatiana Maslany is even better as Jeff’s on-again/ off-again girlfriend. Stronger refuses to exploit the event that sets the story in motion, focusing on people and on the connections that make it possible to crawl back from the abyss. (R)—SR

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A QUESTION OF FAITH [not yet reviewed] Members of three families search for answers after being touched by tragedy. Opens Sept. 29 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

natural jump scares gone digital and the most obvious resolution imaginable. Click away now. (PG-13)—MAJ

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FLATLINERS [not yet reviewed] Sorta remake/sorta sequel about researchers trying to figure out if they can come back from death. Opens Sept. 29 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

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TRUE

TV

X-Meh

2017

Marvel’s Inhumans fails where The Gifted shines; Curb Your Enthusiasm returns!

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ot much was expected of Marvel’s Inhumans (series debut, Friday, Sept. 29, ABC), and the two-hour pilot doesn’t … not? … deliver on that lowered bar. Like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. with more ridiculous outfits, or dollar-store X-Men, Inhumans Black Bolt (Anson Mount), Medusa (Serinda Swan), Gorgon (Eme Ikwuakor), Triton (Mike Moh), Karnak (Ken Leung), Crystal (Isabelle Cornish), Maximus (Iwan Rheon) and supersized teleporting dog Lockjaw are a royal family of don’t-call-them-mutants who flee the moon for Hawaii to establish a persecuted superheroes-as-Dreamers narrative. An underwritten, obscure Marvel property dumped on Friday night doesn’t really need to perform, but it should do … something. Craig Robinson and Adam Scott in a paranormal comedy? Sounds like Adult Swim material, but Ghosted (series debut, Sunday, Oct. 1, Fox) fits nicely into Sunday-night broadcast between The Simpsons and Family Guy, maybe even better than The Last Man on Earth (which also returns tonight, Tandy fans). Cop-turnedmall-security-guard Leroy (Robinson) and professor-turned-bookstore-clerk Max (Scott) are recruited into a secret government agency to find a missing agent and track alien/supernatural activity on Los Angeles because why not? Ghosted is ridiculous, and Robinson and Scott go all-in (as does Ally Walker as their hard-ass boss). A rare bright spot in fall TV 2017. Remember last season, when there were several new shows about philanthropic tech billionaires with troubled pasts buying and operating hospitals, police departments and waffle houses for the greater good? (I made one of those up; good luck guessing which.) Wisdom of the Crowd (series debut, Sunday, Oct. 1, CBS), starring Jeremy Piven as a Silicon Valley heavy rallying millions to use the info-sharing app he created to—wait for it—solve his daughter’s murder, is just another CBS procedural with pretty techies, just with bonus constitutional and privacy concerns. Even with Piven in vintage Ari Gold/Entourage

BY BILL FROST

@bill_frost

Marvel’s Inhumans (ABC)

mode, Wisdom of the Crowd is innocuous enough to skate by on CBS for years. When we last saw Larry (Larry David) six years ago, he’d split the country for France with Leon (J.B. Smoove) to avoid spending any time with sick children—totally understandable. Curb Your Enthusiasm (Season 9 premiere, Sunday, Oct. 1, HBO) doesn’t need gimmicks like “character development” and “change,” only Larry! Larry! Larry! (Thanks, Leon.) In addition to Smoove, Curb regulars Jeff Garlin, Cheryl Hines and Richard Lewis are back, and the S9 guest list includes Carrie Brownstein, Elizabeth Banks, Bryan Cranston and Lauren Graham, among others. Awkward Larry moments to look forward to: “Larry offends Jeff’s barber” and “Larry bribes a funeral usher.” Curb always delivers good blurb. Attention Marvel’s Inhumans: This is how you do a not-really-but-totally-X-Men series. Also, The Gifted (series debut, Monday, Oct. 2, Fox) is nowhere near as bizarre as FX’s Legion, so relax. Suburban couple Reed (Steven Moyer) and Caitlin Strucker (Amy Acker) learn that their teen kids possess mutant abilities, go on the run from the mutie-hating government and hook with an underground mutant network; action and/or adventure ensue. In the hands of XMen vet Bryan Singer and X-Men fan Matt Nix, The Gifted nails both splashy superheroics and emotional undertones (because, you know, teens), and is easily the best new show of the new fall season. Which is saying little, but watch, anyway. In sitcom The Mayor (series debut, Tuesday, Oct. 3, ABC), a young rapper (Brandon Michael Hall) runs for the mayoral office of his city as a publicity stunt to bolster his flailing career—guess what happens? The title probably gave it away. Later, in onehour dramedy Kevin (Probably) Saves the World (series debut, Tuesday, Oct. 3, ABC), miserable Texan Kevin (Jason Ritter) is drafted into a mission to save humanity by a “guardian angel.” Neither of these series are cheesedick Throwback Tuesday gags from Fox circa 1987; they’re premiering right damn now on current-season ABC. And these aren’t even the lamest shows of the Worst Broadcast Fall Season in recent memory—2017, you might just kill me yet. CW

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.


FALL PREVIEW

Bring Me the Horizon

MUSIC

Summer’s done—but fall has plenty of live music ahead. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

Bob Dylan

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place at theaters, the sweet spot between clubs and arenas—and we’ll get to those arena shows. The State Room’s slate boasts buzzy folk-rockers The Accidentals (Oct. 18), rapper Lyrics Born (Oct. 21), singer-songwriter Alejandro Escovedo (Nov. 7), high-energy soulrock band Vintage Trouble (Nov. 8) and the Todd Snider-fronted supergroup Hard Working Americans (Nov. 15). The Egyptian Theater in Park City hosts yacht rockers Pablo Cruise (Oct. 12-14), singer-songwriter Mason Jennings (Oct. 20-21) and a treat for folk, rock and jazz fans with ex-Byrd Chris Hillman, Herb Pedersen and acoustic shredder John Jorgenson (Oct. 26-28). On the larger end, the Eccles Theater is adding shows like crazy, including alternative rockers Cake (Oct. 4), the iconic Bob Dylan with Mavis Staples (Oct. 17-18), rock ’n’ soul legends Huey Lewis & the News (Oct. 19), jazz singer-songwriter Gregory Porter (Nov. 6), altfolkie Ani DiFranco (Nov. 4) and blue-eyed soul/classic rock legend Michael McDonald (Nov. 14). United Concerts’ venue The Depot has George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic (Oct. 13), indie darling/ guitar heroine Angel Olsen (Oct. 23), alt-metal bands HIM with CKY (Oct. 28), singer-songwriter The White Buffalo (Nov. 15), experimental electro-rapper/DJ Flying Lotus (Nov. 18) and the return of Mexican rap-rockers Molotov (Nov. 21). At The Complex, you can look forward to appearances by stoner/alt-rock band Queens of the Stone Age (Oct. 9), shock rocker Marilyn Manson (Oct. 20), rapper Hoodie Allen (Oct. 22), popsmith Kesha (Oct. 25), country duo Dan & Shay (Nov. 15) and death metal legends Cannibal Corpse (Nov. 20). Finally, we all know arena shows are some of the best concert experiences—a massive room of people who are all stoked on the same music, played at ear-ringing volume. The return of the Vivint Smart Home Arena, following an extensive renovation, will close out 2017 with some of those blockbusters. That includes pop/R&B icon Janet Jackson’s third attempt performing in SLC (Oct. 16)—after postponing in Oct. 2015 and canceling in June 2016—as well as pop diva Katy Perry (Nov. 24), piano guy Billy Joel (Nov. 29), the mighty Foo Fighters (Dec. 12) and the one and only Lady Gaga (Dec. 14). That’s a lot of shows for fall in Salt Lake City. In fact, in 20 years of covering music here, it’s the busiest fourth quarter I’ve seen. In the beginning, concert news site pollstar.com used to return maybe eight pages of results for the entire state at the height of summer— and maybe three pages this time of year. Currently, the site has 15 pages of shows from now through mid-December. It says a lot about how much Salt Lake City has grown as a music market, and it certainly gives us plenty to help us forget about the coming winter. CW

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XAVIER BADOSA VIA FLICKR

S

ummer is all sunblock, BluBlockers, block parties and blockbuster films, plus a jam-packed schedule of concerts and festivals. Fall? Generally, not so much. It’s winter’s opening act—but, instead of getting us pumped for the headliner, it signifies the end of fun, back to school, imminent expensive holidays and a general uptick in downtime which, for some, verges on hibernation, or at least seasonal affective disorder. Brace yourselves; winter is coming. Every year, I fall into the same trap, bemoaning the coming bummer. It’s a reflex. When the season finally kicks in, I see it for what it is: a time for reflection, for slowing down and appreciating pretty colors, delicious cool air and fresh episodes of favorite TV shows. Also, the year isn’t over. Good days remain to be seized. And good shows remain to be seen. As a music nerd, that’s my metric, my way of measuring the quality of coming days. Give me something to look forward to, a reason not to shut down. Bring me the horizon, or at least point out the speck that is The Jesus and Mary Chain’s tour bus, headed for a stop at my front stoop. They’re comin’, you know—Chain, as we fans of the Scottish shoegazers like to call them. We’re giddy over this extremely rare Salt Lake City show (Nov. 2, The Complex). The group, after all, does fairly small U.S. tours nowadays, and we’re one of just 20 dates. These are the kinds of shows that tend to pop up in the fall: the surprises that, while they might have been in the works all summer, we didn’t hear about over the noise of the blockbusters. Often, these shows are tailored to smaller crowds at smaller venues, like clubs. And club shows, no matter how interesting, are often left off those big Summer Concert Kesha Preview lists, like the one we ran months ago (City Weekly, June 15, 2017). Fall is the season where these smaller events often outshine the big tours. The NPR crowd will undoubtedly dig psych-eclectic bands Chicano Batman with Khruangbin at Urban Lounge (Nov. 2). We aging hipsters are all aflutter over dark altrock group The Afghan Whigs with funky freak Har Mar Supersta r who’s also at Urban (Oct. 20), as well as the Oingo Boingo Dance Party (Oct. 28) at Liquid Joe’s (yes, without Danny Elfman). That doesn’t mean the fall concert season is all club fodder. Most of what’s happening takes


BY RANDY HARWARD & ALEX SPRINGER

THURSDAY 9/28

Curren$y, Kent Jones, Corner Boy P, T.Y., DJ Ski Beatz

SUNDAY 10/1

Seun Kuti & Egypt 80, Samba Fogo

It’s been two decades since Fela Kuti, the Nigerian Afrobeat/highlife pioneer and human rights activist, passed away from complications resulting from AIDS in August 1997. The ensuing wave of revived interest in his music included a slew of reissues that sold like hotcakes, an annual festival (Felabration) and Alex Gibney’s

Seun Kuti

CJ WALLIS

“King Kong ain’t got shit on me,” boasts Shante Scott Franklin—otherwise known as Curren$y—on “King Kong” from Pilot Talk (DD172, 2010). That’s a helluva claim to make, but Curren$y’s discography is so long, it could probably become sentient and start swattin’ planes from atop tall buildings. Since 2004, the dude has dropped nearly 50 mixtapes and 12 studio albums. And that’s just solo; we’re not counting collaborations and guest appearances, which also number in the dozens. Factor in that he’s been active since 2001 as part of Lil Wayne’s Young Money Entertainment brand, and works with the likes of Snoop Dogg, Devin the Dude and Raekwon, and you see just how large the dude is. But what really sells it is his music, with beats informed by old-school funk and soul, pop and rock and flowing bars that never work too hard to prove anything but still assert his dominance. (Randy Harward) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $22.50 presale; $27 day of show, all ages, thecomplexslc.com 2014 documentary Finding Fela (plus a rumored Steve McQueen-directed biopic that has yet to materialize). It was also a boost to the emerging careers of his eldest son Femi and his youngest scion Seun. At 14, Seun wound up taking the reins of his dad’s band Egypt 80—and doin’ him proud. With him at the helm, Egypt 80 has four albums of slinky, exotic tunes that carry on Fela’s sound and message, indicting political and social injustice, not to mention corporate greed in the form of blood-diamond purveyors and Frankenfood pushers Monsanto. Twenty years later, Fela lives on within his offspring. (RH) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 7 p.m., $20, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Curren$y constructed coffin bass, is some of the best around. Look no further than the band’s latest album, A Symphony of Wolf Tones & Ghost Notes (Hellcat, 2016), which finds them still at the top of their game after close to 30 years. (RH) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $14 presale; $16 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com

Nekromantix

Psychobilly is a punked-up strain of rockabilly (which is a rocked-up strain of country), and it’s usually preoccupied with comic-booky horror-movie imagery. In other words, it’s pretty fuckin’ sweet. Popped, choked, slapped upright bass dovetails with driving drums, maniacal guitar solos, rebel-greaser vox and lyrics about gargoyles, dead cheerleaders, were-coyotes and ghost babes—it just doesn’t get much more fun than that. The psychobilly performed by Danish trio Nekromantix, led by singer-bassistsongwriter Kim Nekroman and his self-

NOTABENE1 VIA WIKIMEDIA

Nekromantix, Hi-Fi Murder, Utah County Swillers

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TUESDAY 10/3 Toadies, Local H

I don’t think any of us could have gotten through the hellstorm of ’90s nü-metal if it wasn’t for bands like the Toadies and Local H. With lead vocalists who knew how to dig deep into the vulnerability of their screaming, pissed-off personas, these bands had the misfortune of being drowned out by gimmicky contemporaries who wouldn’t know vulnerability if it threw on a backward baseball cap and covered George Michael. It’s actually a testament to both bands that they weathered said hellstorm by continuing to tour and release good, new material, which makes a show like this a special kind of victory over the legions of chuckleheads who crapped their JNCOs whenever a new Korn album was inflicted upon us. Come to the show not only to celebrate two battle-hardened survivors of the nü-metal apostasy, but to revel in the fact that we don’t have to hear “Break Stuff” on the radio in this day and age. Then bask in the twisted new tunes from the Toadies’ upcoming album, The Lower Side of Uptown (Kirtland Records). And definitely see if you can get Local H to do their kickass cover of Foreigner’s “Jukebox Hero.” (Alex Springer) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $28 presale; $30 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com

Toadies

WEDNESDAY 10/4 Ben Ottewell, Buddy

U.K. alt/indie rockers Gomez are a threeheaded hydra of ridiculously skilled singersongwriters, and Ben Ottewell is one of ’em. He’s the first voice heard on the band’s 1998 debut, Bring It On (Hut/ Virgin). His sandpapery intonations are a stark contrast to the clearer vox of Ian Ball and Tom Gray—and also a tremendous background complement to them, adding not only harmony but texture. Each man’s songs helped Bring It On win the Mercury Prize for best U.K./Ireland album, and the band become darlings of critics and fans alike, who met each of the group’s six subsequent studio albums with copious drool. Well, it’s been six years since we’ve seen an album from the band, but Ball has dropped two solo joints and Ottewell’s on his third—A Man Apart (Sunday Best) came out in May. While he’s gravitated toward more of an Americana sound in his solo work, Ottewell’s tunes remain as lucid and personal as ever, and his dusky, weathered voice is well-suited to the rustic context. With Gomez on hiatus, it’s good to see Ottwell staying sharp (RH) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $18, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

Ben Ottewell

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SUN 10.1 • NEKROMANTIX HI-FI MURDER, UTAH COUNTY SWILLERS

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MON 10.2 • SUGAR CANDY MOUNTAIN

MON 10.2• DEAD RIDER

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SAMBA FOGO

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SATURDAY 9/30

CONCERTS & CLUBS

ERIC J. REED

Quiet Oaks: Farewell to Nashville Show

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The problem with the once-again-expanding local music scene is that some acts outgrow it and move on. Case in point: Quiet Oaks, the group founded in 2015 by four-fifths of beloved band The North Valley. Both acts built a reputation for great songs and shows, and Quiet Oaks wasted little time maintaining TNV’s momentum, releasing the EP Put Your Dreams Where They Belong in 2016 and the full-length Pretty Alright (quietoaks.bandcamp.com)—which is that, at least. On record, the tunes are incredible, and they become even more powerful on stage. That makes Quiet Oaks a must-see—even in places like Chicago and Nashville, where they’ve performed to sold-out crowds. If you have a following in either city, you might as well see where it leads—which is why, two days after this show, Quiet Oaks will leave SLC for Nashville. “This is the goodbye party!” drummer Spencer Sayer says, adding that the set is sequenced chronologically and will include “really old songs all the way up to the new stuff. We also have some surprise guests coming to join us.” Reading between the lines, that suggests we might see a brief TNV reunion, and/or hear songs by pre-TNV band The Spins. If not … well, you know what they say about making assumptions. Opening the show this Saturday are Panthermilk and Sunsleeper. (Brian Staker) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., free, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

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THURSDAYS

BAR FLY

JOSH SCHEUREMAN

TK

Therapy Thursdays at Sky

THURSDAY 9/28

FRIDAY 9/29

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

Acoustic Showcase, feat. The Celebrated + Sarah Allen + JoVial Lee + Tyler Downs (Velour) Atlas Genius + Flor (Metro Music Hall) Curren$y + Kent Jones + Corner Boy P + T.Y. + DJ Ski Beatz (The Complex) see p. 34 Dead Meadow + Green River Blues + Spiral Jetties + Marla Stone (Alleged) El Dub + Chris Caviar (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Rick Gerber (Hog Wallow Pub) Hot House West (Gallivan Center) Junius + Black Mare + MGR (Urban Lounge) Los Hellcaminos (Gracie’s) Reggae Thursday, feat. Zolopht + Triumphant (The Royal) Whethan + Bearson + Opia (The Complex)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: South & JD (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/Mark Chaney and the Garage All Stars (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (‘80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. GTA (Sky) Twist Jam Session (Twist)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke Thursdays (Prohibition) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

If any night of the week is ripe for lying on a couch and telling your problems to strangers, Thursday is probably about right. Therapy Thursdays—a joint venture between downtown nightlife hotspot Sky and local EDM promoters V2 Presents—would be a radical new form of cognitive behavioral treatment. Instead of working with a dedicated, educated advocate, a whole team helps you sort through the existential wreckage that is your life. Every week, a different touring electronic music act (like GTA on Sept. 28 and Aly & Fila on Oct. 5) pumps out aural vibes so you can you burn off the stress through the random gyration of appendages. Throughout the night, a team of bartenders (licensed clinical mixologists) is on hand to prescribe and prepare non-pharma cocktails to take the edge off. No appointments are required, unless you want to incorporate some of that couch jazz. In this case, you’ll need to reserve one of 20 VIP suites. Then, when the cognitive dissonance exceeds the decibel level of the music, you can take a load off, let your head flop backward, gaze through the retractable glass roof and consult the actual sky for answers while basking in the colorful performance lighting and images from the 300-inch video screen. Failing that, hopefully you have friends to talk to (and hold your hair back) when things get rough. Sky doesn’t accept health insurance, even if you have mental health benefits—but the rates are reasonable and the treatment is effective. (Note: Therapy Thursday isn’t a substitute for real professional help.) There is no dress code on Thursdays, but there is on most Sky Saturdays and every Mi Cielo, Sky’s occasional Latin night. (Randy Harward) Sky, 149 Pierpont Ave., 9:30 p.m., $15-$30, 21+, skyslc.com

Après Ski (The Cabin) Bassmint Pros (Brewskis) Defenders of the Faith + Cry Venom (Liquid Joe’s) El Dub + Sun Divide (The Ice Haüs) Florida Georgia Line + Nelly + Chris Lane + Russell Dickerson (Usana Amphitheatre) Hot Buttered Rum + Six Feet in the Pine (The State Room) Japanese Breakfast + Mannequin Pussy + The Spirit of the Beehive (Kilby Court) Jeff Crosby + DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Jen Blosil + Tishmal (Velour) JT Draper and the Dusty Boxcars (Garage on Beck) Lantern by Seas (Alleged) Lil Wayne (The Complex) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Nelly (SKY) Opal Hill Drive + Ginger and the Gents (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Rage Against the Supremes (The Spur) Rail Town (The Westerner) Rune + Kapix + Balls Capone + The Wicked Notions (The Royal) Ruth B (In the Venue) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) SubtomiK + Mr. Vandal + Regular Ass Dude + Thoroughbred + Enderr + Viscious + TobiAli + SNXFF (Metro Music Hall) Timeless (Club 90) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE ’90s Dance Party w/ Flash & Flare (Urban Lounge)

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Bachata Fest, feat. DJ Azuquita + DJ Rolas + DJ Ju Crazy (UCCU Center) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos: Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) DJ Stario (Downstairs)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 9/30 LIVE MUSIC

A Tribute to Reggae Legends, feat. Natural Roots + Terek + Jan + Junior Maile + DJ Seany Boy (The Royal) Aaron Lee Tasjan + Ghost of Spring (The State Room) Après Ski (The Cabin) Band on the Moon (Brewskis) Bob Bland (Feldman’s Deli) Crook and the Bluff + The Stratmores (The Ice Haüs) High Octane (The Spur) Holy Revolver + DJ Funkee Boss (The Cabin) J-Funk (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Jerry Joseph + Patrick Kenny + Bob Smith (The Garage on Beck) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Live Band (Johnny’s on Second) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Live Trio (The Red Door) Murphy and the Giant + Out of System Transfer (Piper Down)

Noble Bodies (Elaine B. of Neon Trees) + Telesomniac + Kambree (Velour) Quiet Oaks (Farewell to Nashville Show) + Panthermilk + Sunsleeper (Urban Lounge) see p. 38 Rock ‘N’ Ribs Festival (Gallivan Center) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Timeless (Club 90) Sublime with Rome + The Offspring (Usana Amphitheater) Vadawave + Sam + Josh Keays (Kilby Court) Will Baxter Band (Pioneer Park) Wolves in the Throne Room + Pillorian (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Brisk (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos: Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Fetish Night (Area 51) Sky Saturdays w/DJ Ruckus (Sky) Top 40 All-Request Dance (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 10/1 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin) Conor Oberst + Tim Kasher (Eccles Theater) Goldlink + Masego (The Complex) Jen Blosil + Grey Glass + Faith Marie (Velour) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Nekromantix + Hi-Fi Murder + Utah County Swillers (Metro Music Hall) see p. 34 Patrick Ryan (The Spur)


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Seun Kuti & Egypt 80 + Samba Fogo (Urban Lounge) see p. 34

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Garage Artist Showcase (Garage on Beck) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 10/2 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

TUESDAY 10/3 LIVE MUSIC

Allen Rayman (Urban Lounge) Jordan Matthew Young (The Spur) Lia Menaker (Piper Down) Strung Out + Runaway Kids + Racist Kramer (The Complex)

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© 2017

ONE DIRECTION

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

56. Pennsylvania’s “Gem City” 57. “Quit your joshin’!” 58. Gift on a 10th anniversary 59. Scores by RBs and WRs 60. Narrow inlet 61. “____ day now ...”

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

24. Reddish-brown 25. Sequoia, e.g. 27. Subj. of the 2006 film “Bobby” 28. Surgery locales, for short 29. R.S.V.P. part 30. ‘80s missile shield plan 31. “The Great Dictator” Oscar nominee Jack ____ 34. Admission evidence DOWN 35. College just north of New York City 1. Name hollered in the “Flintstones” theme 36. Crime film genre song 37. Two of nine? 2. Broadcasting sign 38. Raid target 3. Saxophonist featured in the video of Katy 39. One-named singer Perry’s “Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.)” with the 2016 #1 hit 4. Awaken “Cheap Thrills” 5. The Beach Boys’ “____ Around” 40. Hamilton’s place 6. Check alternative 44. Valuable discoveries 7. Study of the heavens: Abbr. 45. Lasting forever 8. Blue-pencil 46. Inflicts upon 9. Amount to “kick it up” 47. Iraq War subj. 10. Wes Anderson’s “The Life Aquatic with 48. Composer Steve ____” Shostakovich 11. Amo : I love :: ____ : I hate 51. Subjects of some 12. Burgundy of “Anchorman” loans 13. DreamWorks ____ (film studio) 52. Common lunch hr. 15. Film studio once owned by Howard 54. “Hmm, how shall Hughes ____ this?” 20. Bird on Australia’s coat of arms 55. Artist Magritte 23. “Let me think ... yeah, that’s stupid”

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Stir-fry vessel 4. “The Bicycle Thief” director Vittorio De ____ 8. They may be involved in close shaves 14. Neon or helium 16. City about 250 miles SW of Topeka, KS 17. Most gangly 18. Giving two tablets, say 19. Third-party candidates, typically 21. Suffix with planet 22. “Angela’s Ashes” author 26. Feature of Garbage Pail Kids trading cards 32. Mexican artist Kahlo 33. Typical Scottish Brexit vote 34. Goes under fast 41. “____ late!” 42. About 90% of people have one 43. Words of solidarity 49. Place with screwdrivers and rusty nails 50. Unit now known as a siemens 53. “Up All Night” boy band ... or something featured in 19-, 26-, 34- or 43-Across 59. Country crooner Randy 62. “If I may ...” 63. Patronize, as a restaurant 64. Worker’s advocate 65. Refuses 66. Many an Instagram user 67. Suffix with sex

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Be realistic, Libra: Demand the impossible; expect inspiration; visualize being able to express yourself more completely and vividly than you ever have before. Believe me when I tell you that you now have extra power to develop your sleeping potentials, and are capable of accomplishing feats that might seem like miracles. You are braver than you know, as sexy as you need to be and wiser than you were two months ago. I am not exaggerating, nor am I flattering you. It’s time for you to start making your move to the next level. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to take extra good care of yourself during the next three weeks. Do whatever it takes to feel safe and protected and resilient. Ask for the support you need, and if the people whose help you solicit can’t or won’t give it to you, seek elsewhere. Provide your body with more than the usual amount of healthy food, deep sleep, tender touch and enlivening movement. Go see a psychotherapist or counselor or good listener every single day if you want. And don’t you dare apologize or feel guilty for being such a connoisseur of self-respect and self-healing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) A queen bee can keep mating until she gathers 70 million sperm from many different drones. When composing my horoscopes, I aim to cultivate a metaphorically comparable receptivity. Long ago, I realized that all of creation is speaking to me all the time; I recognized that everyone I encounter is potentially a muse or teacher. If I hope to rustle up the oracles that are precisely suitable for your needs, I have to be alert to the possibility that they might arrive from unexpected directions and surprising sources. Can you handle being that open to influence, Sagittarius? Now is a favorable time to expand your capacity to be fertilized.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) One of the oldest houses in Northern Europe is called the Knap of Howar. Built out of stone around 3,600 B.C., it faces the wild sea on Papa Westray, an island off the northern coast of Scotland. Although no one has lived there for 5,000 years, some of its stone furniture remains intact. Places like this will have a symbolic power for you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. They’ll tease your imagination and provoke worthwhile fantasies. Why? Because the past will be calling to you more than usual. The old days and old ways will have secrets to reveal and stories to teach. Listen with alert discernment. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) The bizarre U.S. presidential election system is unlike any other democratic nation’s on Earth. Every four years, the winning candidate needs only to win the electoral college, not the popular vote. So theoretically, it’s possible to garner just 23 percent of all votes actually cast, and yet still ascend to the most powerful political position in the world. For example, in two of the past five elections, the new chief of state has received significantly fewer votes than his main competitor. I suspect that you might soon benefit from a comparable anomaly, Leo. You’ll be able to claim victory on a technicality. Your effort might be “ugly,” yet good enough to succeed.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) I found this advertisement for a workshop: “You will learn to do the incredible! Smash bricks with your bare hands! Walk on fiery coals unscathed! Leap safely off a roof! No broken bones! No cuts! No pain! Accomplish the impossible first! Then everything else will be a breeze!” I bring this to your attention, Virgo, not because I think you should sign up for this class or anything like it. I hope you don’t. In fact, a very different approach is preferable for you: I recommend that you start with safe, manageable ARIES (March 21-April 19) Conceptual artist Jonathon Keats likes to play along with tasks. Master the simple details and practical actions. Work on the music of nature. On one occasion he collaborated with achieving easy, low-risk victories. In this way, you’ll prepare Mandeville Creek in Montana. He listened and studied the mel- yourself for more epic efforts in the future.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) There are enough authorities, experts and know-it-alls out there trying to tell you what to think and do. In accordance with current astrological factors, I urge you to utterly ignore them during the next two weeks. And do it gleefully, not angrily. Exult in the power that this declaration of independence gives you to trust your own assessments and heed your own intuitions. Furthermore, regard your rebellion as good practice for dealing with the little voices in your head that speak for those authorities, experts and know-it-alls. Rise up and reject their shaming and criticism, too. Shield yourself from their fearful fantasies.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) It’s high time to allow your yearnings to overflow, to surrender to the vitalizing pleasures of nonrational joy, to grant love the permission to bless you and confound you with its unruly truths. For inspiration, read this excerpt of a poem by Caitlyn Siehl: “My love is honey tongue. Thirsty love. My love is peach juice dripping down the neck. Too much sugar love. Sticky sweet, sticky sweat love. My love can’t ride a bike. My love walks everywhere. Wanders through the river. Feeds the fish, skips the stones. Barefoot love. My love stretches itself out on the grass, kisses a nectarine. My love is never waiting. My love is a traveler.”

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In 1901, physician Duncan MacDougall carried out experiments that led him to conclude that the average human soul weighs 21 grams. Does his claim have any merit? That question is beyond my level of expertise. But if he was right, then I’m pretty sure your soul has bulked up to at least 42 grams in the past few weeks. The work you’ve been doing to refine and cultivate your inner state has been heroic. It’s like you’ve been ingesting a healthy version of soul-building steroids. Congrats!

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Some newspapers publish regular rectifications of the mistakes they’ve made in past editions. For example, editors of The Guardian once apologized to readers for a mistaken statement about Richard Wagner. They said that when the 19th-century German composer had trysts with his chambermaid, he did not in fact ask her to wear purple underpants, as previously reported. They were pink underpants. I tell you this, Taurus, as encouragement to engage in corrective meditations yourself. Before bedtime on the next 10 nights, scan the day’s events and identify any actions you might have done differently—perhaps with more integrity or focus or creativity. This will have a deeply tonic effect. You are in a phase of your astrological cycle when you’ll flourish as you make amendments and revisions.

FANTASTIC MASSAGE

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You’re approaching a rendezvous with prime time. Any minute now, you could receive an invitation to live up to your hype or fulfill your promises to yourself—or both. This test is likely to involve an edgy challenge that is both fun and daunting, both liberating and exacting. It will have the potential to either steal a bit of your soul or else heal an ache in your soul. To ensure the healing occurs rather than the stealing, do your best to understand why the difficulty and the pleasure are both essential.

odies that emanated from its flowing current. Then he moved around some of the underwater rocks, subtly changing the creek’s song. Your assignment is to experiment with equally imaginative and exotic collaborations. The coming weeks will be a time when you can make beautiful music together with anyone or anything that tickles your imagination.

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Forced From Home

Many of you have probably just come back to reality after your big Comic Con cosplay adventures at the Salt Palace, fantasizing your role as a ruthless tyrant or a wideeyed victim. It was a mighty con, all right. There were comic books to buy and get signed, with stories of people/creatures scrambling to flee a dark evil. But the very same weekend, something very different was happening just up the street at the Salt Lake Library—a touring exhibit called Forced From Home presented by Doctors Without Borders. It raised more than hair and goosebumps for those lucky enough to see it. Aid workers from around the world took visitors behind the headlines to show them what the global refugee crisis really looks like from their point of view. The interactive outdoor displays were extra chilling. For example, there was one in which you climbed into an overcrowded rubber raft with only what you could carry in your arms—fleeing for your life in search of hope and freedom. The group set up eight stations on the library plaza for a realistic, educational demonstration. You could feel their experience when asked to pick up a 10-gallon container of water (half empty but still heav y) and told to imagine that it’s all the water your family has for a week and that you might have to carry it across a desert to then hopefully reach a refugee camp. Tents and living situations recreated a refugee camp. Through VR goggles you could get 360-degree views of various placement centers, and watch people running or swimming for their lives. The 10,000-square-foot space was manned by actual Doctors Without Borders staffers who talked not only about their basic needs, but also about the legal status of those forced to flee from their homelands, as well as their medical needs and the details of where they go and why. They also told stories about unaccompanied minors whose families are dead, and what they have to do to survive. It was heartbreaking and eye-opening. There are 65 million people displaced around the world. Now, more than ever, we need to look beyond our own borders to help others in whatever way we can. The exhibit is traveling to many Western cities in the U.S., so go to forcedfromhome.com and see if you can take part in the experience. n

Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner

I LOVE YOU TIRED

I love you tired. Delirious and poetic Drunk on sweet, evening mead.

Eyelids like velvety curtains Descending on a weary, beaten stage. Bravo! I kiss your eyes and tell them goodnight. They glitter with stardust And dance. Sleepy, happy sighs Lullabies Will you dream of me?

Jamie Black Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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Ewwwww! Forget the horrifying clown from It. The newest inhabitant of your nightmares is a giant “fatberg” in the sewer system beneath the streets of London. A fatberg is created by a buildup of fat and grease combined with used diapers, sanitary napkins and wipes. This one is almost the length of three football fields and weighs more than 140 tons. Matt Rimmer with London’s Thames Water said the current glob is “a total monster and is taking a lot of manpower and machinery to remove, as it’s set hard.” He said it’s basically like trying to break up concrete.

BY THE EDITORS AT ANDRE WS M C MEEL

oped a painful, long-lasting erection, known as priapism. As he recovered in a Serbian hospital, Ciganovic was denied painkillers and was only relieved of the condition after another surgery, although he says it will be months before he is fully recovered. The tattoo-covered Ciganovic is hoping his latest nose operation will improve his looks enough to launch him to international stardom.

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Wait, What? Entrepreneur Miki Argawal, 38, of Brooklyn, N.Y., was a hit at this year’s Burning Man gathering in Nevada, where she pumped breast milk and offered it to fellow attendees to help with hangovers or use in lattes. She even tried some herself, saying it tasted a bit like coconut milk. She estimated that 30 to 40 people tried her milk. “The fact that any part of that could be seen as taboo … It’s time that conversation changes,” Argawal said. Least Competent Criminals Terror suspect and Uber driver Mohiussunnath Chowdhury, 26, of Luton, England, was detained in London on Aug. 25 after using his navigation program to direct him to Windsor Castle. But the technology led him astray, and he pulled up outside The Windsor Castle pub in Windsor. After realizing his mistake, Chowdhury headed for London, where he parked his car next to a marked police van outside Buckingham Palace, brandished a 4-foot-long sword and yelled “Allahu Akbar.” Chowdhury was charged in the Westminster Magistrates Court with one count of preparing to commit an act or acts of terrorism.

The Price of Vanity Neven Ciganovic, 45, of Croatia was undergoing the latest in a series of plastic surgeries (this one a rhinoplasty) in Iran when he “reacted badly” to the general anesthesia and devel-

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n Farmer Jeremy Goebel of Evansville, Ind., has honored the late actress Carrie Fisher with a corn maze planted in the shape of her iconic character, Princess Leia from Star Wars. He planted the maze last spring using a GPS device, and it was scheduled to open in early September. “I’ve always been a Star Wars fan and I just wanted to pay tribute to Carrie Fisher,” Goebel said.

Why Not? In Santa Fe, N.M., tens of thousands of people gathered at a city park on the evening of Sept. 1 to revel in the burning of the effigy Zozobra, a six-story puppet filled with handwritten notes about anxieties and problems they hoped to send up in smoke. Locals dropped their notes in a “gloom box” at a shopping center, with subjects ranging from an ill family member to hurricane victims to government corruption. The tradition began in 1924 and was named for the Spanish word for upset or worry. Errant Butt-Dials The New York court system’s former spokesman David Bookstaver, 59, is under investigation after accidentally admitting to a New York Post reporter in August that he “barely shows up to work.” The incident happened after Bookstaver had talked with the reporter on his cell phone. Without realizing it, Bookstaver redialed the reporter’s number, and the reporter listened in as Bookstaver talked with two other people about how little he works. The court system’s inspector general is working with the district attorney’s office on an inquiry, and two county officials are calling for Bookstaver to repay $149,900 of the “ill-gotten” taxpayer money. Dumb Luck Forklift driver Arron Hughes, 28, of Ruthin, Wales, England, has claimed the distinction of being the first person to successfully swim across the Hoover Dam reservoir on the border between Nevada and Arizona. The dam, which provides electricity and water to Las Vegas, has sucked in and killed 275 other swimmers. But Hughes, on a 37-hour bender during a bachelor party with 10 friends on Aug. 10, jumped in on a day when nine of the 10 hydroelectric turbines were not operating. “I just thought, let’s do it … so told the lads I was off. Got sucked in—well, pushed by—the flow of the dam, so had to swim hard,” Hughes noted. “It’s a hell of a sight to see the dam from underneath.” He credits his fearlessness to his Welsh upbringing. “I’m a bit of an adrenaline junkie, really,” he said. Still, he couldn’t escape the police waiting on the other side when he pulled himself out of the water. They fined him and sent him on his way. Send weird news items with to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Sweet Revenge After arguing with a security guard about the high price of parking, a woman in Benxi, Liaoning Province, China, left her car in front of the entrance gate to a housing community on Aug. 22. But people have to get in and out, so a crane was employed to lift the car onto the roof of the security building next to the gate. Onlookers can be heard laughing in a video of the incident. The car was later lowered to the ground using the crane.

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Life Imitates TV Paul J. Newman of Rensselaer, N.Y., was sentenced to prison for up to seven years (with a minimum of two years and four months) on Sept. 6 after pretending to be a licensed and registered architect, after an investigation the New York Attorney General’s Office dubbed “Operation Vandelay Industries” in a nod to Seinfeld. Newman’s charges included larceny, forgery, fraud and unlicensed practice of architecture. He will also have to pay more than $115,000 in restitution to his victims.

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Bright Ideas An unnamed man in Plymouth, Minn., went to extraordinary lengths and wasted two days of police investigators’ time just to get a few days away from his wife, police Sgt. Keith Bird said. The woman reported her 34-year-old husband missing on Aug. 28 and showed police a text from him saying he had been kidnapped. The kidnapper demanded a paltry $140 for his return, and the wife agreed, but the kidnapper said she could wait for the husband to receive his paycheck. Eventually, police caught up with the husband, who insisted he had indeed been kidnapped but asked officers to stop investigating. “He’s fine,” Sgt. Bird said.

Unusual Hobbies British tree surgeon Gary Blackburn, 53, moved to Germany 32 years ago but holds a soft spot for Britain. So when the Brexit vote passed last year, “I decided to make my own little Britain here in Germany,” Blackburn said from his home in Kretzhaus. His exhibition includes a demilitarized Centurion tank (decorated with poppies and white doves, to symbolize peace), red telephone boxes and a life-sized model of Queen Elizabeth II. Neighbors have complained about the tank parked on his lawn, but so far officials have not demanded that Blackburn remove it.

Julie “Bella” Hall


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