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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T S E P T E M B E R 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 | V O L . 3 4 N 0 . 1 7

CALL IT A COMEBACK

Long mired in economic depression, Midvale’s Main Street dusts off its small-town charm. BY STEPHEN DARK


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY FROM MIDVALE WITH LOVE

Little city with a big heart is poised for a comeback. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 19 A&E 24 DINE 31 CINEMA 33 TRUE TV 34 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

ERIC GRANATO

Circulation Manager Chances are if you’re reading this paper, you have Salt Lake City native Granato and his dedicated fleet of drivers to thank. Asked about his favorite part of the new gig, the tatted bad boy’s answer is swift: “Being able to have an office on four wheels.”

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Makeshift refugee camp calls Library Square home. facebook.com/slcweekly

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CITYW

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

E E K LY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, Sept. 7, “Gentrify Me”

Can you really “gentrify” an already popular, already white area? The whole point of gentrification is moving into poor places, steamrolling the populations there (most often people of color). This is a whole other people, ’cause I didn’t see one person in that article that wasn’t white.

AMANDA GREEN Via Facebook

Yeah. Is this gentrification? From what I understand, gentrification involves the displacement of a lower income population of mostly non-white renters by a high-income class of owners who are largely white or east/south Asian. What’s happening in Sugar House looks like retail development and increased population density. What’s the alternative to either?

JUSTIN JOHNSON

Sugar House has lost its intrinsic allure and is quickly becoming just another bedroom and store-chain community. Another great place lost to those intent on getting richer.

fact, it’s very light traffic. I think the complainers are a bunch of home-owning NIMBYs.

Via Facebook

Thanks again to City Weekly for including us in this awesome article about Sugar House business owners!

ROBIN A. PAGE

/Old geezer mode/ A friend and I were lamenting that there is no longer a Snelgrove’s or Fernwood’s where you could sit down and get a decent hot fudge sundae. Still remember Fernwood’s “pig’s dinner” double banana split. /End old geezer mode/

ROCKY OLSEN SR. Via Facebook

I moved to SLC in 1966. I couldn’t tell you the number of times I visited the South Temple and 21st South locations.

JOHN CLARKE

I think many families, mine included, originally came here with the Mormons. Most were white. It seems logical to me. Sorry I’m not diverse enough. My family has lived in Sugar House since my whole block was an orchard.

KATIE GOLDMAN

Sugar House is tacky. There’s almost nothing you can get in there that you can’t get in an airport terminal.

YELE OMO

HOLLI DIANA Via Facebook

When I was a child, our family would drive to SLC once a year from Provo. My dad would always take us to Snelgrove’s. While he went in to get us a cone, he would tell us to watch these cones for drips and that he would surely be back with our cones before they dripped. Yes, he was right, and we totally believed him.

7, 2 0 1 7

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Via Facebook

@CBESUGARHOUSE Via Twitter

We’re always surprised to see Sterling Furniture is still in business. How is that possible? Do you ever see anyone in there? We don’t.

GENTRIFY M E

LONGTIME SUGAR HOUSE BUSINESS OW REFLECT ON THE EVE NERS R-CHANGING ’HOOD . BY DYLAN WOO LF HARRIS

@UTAHRDEDUTOPIA

The Beer Nerd, Sept. 7, “The Longest Shot-Ski” Doesn’t count when it’s not hard liquor.

WARREN MITERKO Via Facebook

Great cover.

Why I’m leaving Salt Lake

Via Instagram

Does anyone else remember the water slide? And that dance club (I think it was called The Palladium)? In the ’70s my grandma worked in a sewing shop about where Michael’s is. Crazy how much has changed since then!

MBER

TIFFANY YOUNG

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SEPTE

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Damn, City Weekly, so edgy.

@MILOAFRODESIAC Via Twitter

I really like the illustration, so kudos to the artist. But this gentrification of a 99.9 percent white area is a head-scratcher. It’s more population density, for sure. But I think the issue is home-owning NIMBYs whining about more renters moving in. There are still empty lots on 2100 South above 700 East. Traffic is only bad at rush hour. At other hours it’s downright breezy ... The traffic only seems bad if you have to commute through it. I never have any trouble between 10 a.m.-3 p.m. or after 7 p.m. In

Frank Zappa was for moving to Montana where he could “grow me up a crop of dental floss.” The idea appeals. So I called the Extension Services Office in Hamilton, Mont. They said the land is still fertile. With even limited irrigation, along with good dental hygiene, two crops a year can be grown. And they’re cash crops; no problem to sell. I did the math; verified the finances. Then I factored in the situation here in Salt Lake, what with talk now—sure to materialize within five years—of “fees” to drive Little or Big Cottonwood. Just like the anti-democratic slap-in-the-face that’s been happening in Millcreek Canyon, only double the amount. During a week this past summer when I tried in vain to find an afternoon where

the ozone levels were not in the “Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups” range, I began to see the light of a Montana sunrise. The “sensitive” groups that the Department of Environmental Quality says should not exercise outside include “children and older adults” and “people who are active outdoors.” Sounds like about everybody to me. Even after having been born here in the 1950s, even after having called this place home, I am getting set to leave. It just ain’t worth it anymore. I think I can live five years longer in Montana or someplace with sea breezes and less than 170,000 vehicles per square-mile. And no, I’m not staying to Make It Better Here. Half of California moves into the south end of the valley every week. The North Salt Lake refineries can produce Grade 3 gasoline and UTA can cover the county with light rail; the air is still going to be more poisonous every year. Goodbye, Salt Lake City.

TOM DICKMAN, Salt Lake City

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns BENJAMIN BENALLY, RACHELLE FERNANDEZ Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, STEPHEN DARK, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, HOWARD HARDEE, MARYANN JOHANSON, REX MAGANA, ASPEN PERRY, TED SCHEFFLER, ERIC D. SNIDER, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

Production

Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists SOFIA CIFUENTES, VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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Circulation Manager ERIC GRANATO

Business/Office

Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZKINNY, BEN BALDRIDGE, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS, LAUREN TAGGE, STEVEN VARGO

Marketing

Sales

Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS

Director of Advertising, Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF

Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives ANNE BAILEY, LISA DORELLI, PAULINA JEDLICA KNUDSON, ALEX MARKHAM, JEREMIAH SMITH Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS

Digital Sales DANIEL COWAN, MIKEY SALTAS Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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OPINION Keepin’ It Real What began as a documentary with the intent to capture the real lives of an American family has turned into a billion-dollar industry—but is spectating the lives of others making us better? The foundation of reality television morphed from an anthropological experiment into a more in-depth—while still being completely shallow—version of Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous. Except in the new realm, it’s not about being real; it’s about being a brand. When PBS aired An American Family in 1973, producers wanted to show audiences a documentary about the everyday life and struggles of an upper-middle-class family from Southern California. It was a show about a family who on the outside were perceived to have it all, while on the inside were falling apart. Fast forward two decades when MTV took the Rear Window concept of peeping into the lives of others (with permission) to the Gen Xers and created The Real World. In its early years, the show allowed audiences to meet people of varying backgrounds and beliefs while they simultaneously got to know each other, under one pimped-out roof in the best neighborhood of whatever city the season filmed in. While clearly not rooted in the reality of housing—as none of the cast would have actually been able to afford rent at those locations—these initial seasons did show cast members pursuing careers and early dreams in the works, whether fresh out of college or still finishing residency. Unfortunately, this initial anthropologic model was abandoned after seven seasons and replaced with a show about cramming a bunch of 21-year-olds (most of whom had never even held a part-time job) under one, still very tricked-out roof, to see who would hook-up with whom. Gone were the days of watching people pursue any type of real path, and in were the days of watching people try to hold onto their 15 minutes simply for being on television. This is where I think reality television went horribly wrong.

BY ASPEN PERRY

Don’t get me wrong. Growing up, I could not get enough of The Real World, and as I went into adult life I basically swapped that out for The Real Housewives—a show I wouldn’t even admit to watching until a couple years ago. I am one of those millions of viewers, but I still hate how these shows coupled with social media have messed with how many are choosing to live their lives. Once social media hit the scene, reality TV took on a new life that was less about becoming famous for accomplishing something and more about branding yourself to become famous. In a time when advertisers will pay big bucks to any egocentric douchebag with bleached teeth and enough time to hashtag their way into a million followers, why bother learning an actual skill? Therein lies my biggest beef with what reality television has become. The Kardashians, commonly referenced as one of the highest-rated reality series, is basically a show about a family who is well-known because of the role their deceased patriarch had in one of the biggest murder trials of the ’90s, and a daughter known for dating high-profile guys. When Kardashians first aired, the only person with any actual accomplishments was the Olympic athlete they constantly undermined as the silly father figure. In the bizarro world of Kardashian logic, being wellknown and building a brand to climb up the ranks of fame simply for fame’s sake trumps having any actual skill or talent. Nowadays, people go on reality television with zero clue as to who they are or what they want out of life with the sole intent of reaching notoriety. It’s the equivalent of trying to sit with the cool kids in the cafeteria at school, with one small problem, these are grown-ass adults who have not evolved past the superficial surface existence of a highschool adolescent.

Not only does the Kardashian television era glorify a superficial world lacking any sign of authentic life, it also takes the idea of faking it till you make it and adds steroids. Though the days of being recognized for creating a piece of work to be proud of are not gone, the probability of having that work noticed with no realm of pretending is slim. Most individuals in creative careers, me included, are told in order to get published or be noticed they must first create a brand with social media. Note, the industry advice is not to work on their craft, it is to pretend to work on their craft while tweeting their way to enough followers to be recognized by a publisher. At first glance, this advice makes sense, after all publishers are more strapped for cash then they once were and are often on the lookout for up-and-coming talent with a built-in following. However, after miserably cranking away on social media for a couple years, these same individuals (OK, maybe this time it’s just me) discover they are spending all their time on the show instead of focusing on actual creating. This results in having nothing to show for all those hours spent—except a rather embarrassing tweet incident with Ricky Gervais. The number of people wasting countless hours trying to brand themselves on Big Brother or Instagram—instead of honing an actual skill set—far outweighs the available slots for those to become famous, but society is never in shortage of individuals with the potential to leave their unique stamp on the world. Just imagine what those individuals could contribute to the world, if the same level of dedication was applied to really living their life, instead of just branding it. CW

NOTE, THE INDUSTRY ADVICE IS NOT TO WORK ON THEIR CRAFT, IT IS TO PRETEND TO WORK ON THEIR CRAFT ...

Aspen Perry is a Salt Lake City-based aspiring children’s book writer and self-proclaimed “philosophical genius.” Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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BY KATHARINE BIELE @kathybiele

The Missing Piece

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Well, it’s nice that someone is finally talking about the monster building boom in Salt Lake City. The Salt Lake Tribune asked readers if it’s “difficult to find an affordable place to rent in Salt Lake County?” Great question—but it totally missed the low-income people who maybe don’t get the paper or read Facebook much. A related story makes it clear that there’s a whole lot of building going on and that people are being priced out of the market. But it lacks a voice from the housing community, which has long been asking for more moderate- and low-income units. A read through the story’s comments gives the bigger picture. There, readers debated placing blame on greedy management companies and landlords or on the robust economy of the state. “The fastest growing segment of the population are those who qualify for housing assistance through section 8 and section 42,” one said.

Priorities

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

Her last name might be short, but Kathy Liu’s award-winning science project is a mouthful: “NatureBased Solid Polymer Electrolytes for Improved Safety, Sustainability and Efficiency in High-Performance Rechargeable Batteries.” Kathy is one of 20 teens nationwide to be named a Davidson Fellow, which comes with with a $10,000 prize. We chatted with the 18-year-old about her passion.

When did the science bug bite you?

My elementary school teachers made science so interesting and engaging, and I’ve loved it since. Science education and support from teachers, peers and organizations makes all the difference; increasing access, education and opportunities for students from all backgrounds is absolutely necessary to allow everyone the chance to get involved and find their own passions.

E-coli. There’s a yuck factor that obviously moved Salt Lake City forward on a lessthan-thoughtful route to totally rebuild Liberty Park’s Seven Canyons Fountain. By totally rebuild, I mean “tear out all of the existing water features, concrete, walkways, landscaping rocks, boulders and features,” Sam Goldsmith told KSL. Goldsmith is the son of artist Stephen Goldsmith, who painstakingly studied the canyons and took stones from each of them to create the fountain. Oh, yeah, and while the city said they’d be making upgrades, they neglected to say anything about demolishing the fountain. It also appears that they took a bid from only one company—and that was for $2 million. If this is all about making it baby-proof, the city might need to get its priorities straight.

What about batteries caught your interest?

An Opportunity

What are its advantages?

We can only hope that the state will delay—and delay— the unfortunate .05 percent blood alcohol limit passed by the Legislature. It’s not that people want to drive around drunk. It’s that, well, people do like to have a drink with dinner and not be considered drunk. Given that most of the Legislature probably doesn’t drink, it makes sense to listen to the tourism and hospitality industry. Gov. Gary Herbert apparently is willing to delay the law, according to his monthly news conference. But we can hope, can’t we, that the Legislature will reconsider and perhaps make texting while driving an offense instead. That increases your chances of an accident by 23 percent, according to Phillips Law Group. Almost 82 percent of DUI arrests were involved .08 BAC or greater, according to a report to the Legislature. A .05 limit is unnecessary.

MARIANNE LIU

HITS&MISSES

Batteries are critical to so many technologies that almost everyone uses every day, and are key to enabling next generations of mobile devices and transportation. Yet, battery performance has progressed much more slowly than those attained by other technologies.I was intrigued by how much of a bottleneck batteries pose to future innovations.

Did you invent a new type of battery? What have you discovered?

I innovated a new component for a relatively new type of battery: the lithium sulfur battery. I was able to develop a solid paste to replace the conventionally liquid electrolytes in batteries.

You say your battery is nature-based. How so?

The foundation for my paste is none other than sugar, a naturally occurring compound that is both cheap and widely available.

Does it pack as much punch as a conventional rechargeable?

The batteries I developed have a higher energy density than those on the market—so they pack more energy per unit of material.

One major advantage is safety: Liquid electrolytes are the main cause for the high flammability of modern commercial batteries, as we’ve seen in cell phone and airplane fires. Replacing the liquids with solids drastically improves battery safety. Additionally, the solid electrolyte simplifies and optimizes battery design and efficiency, allowing for more lightweight, long-lasting power. Switching out the solids may also pave the road to flexible batteries for wearable electronics.

Do you have any prediction about the future electric vehicles?

Electric vehicles are achieving increasingly higher driving ranges per charge, and I think they’re going to improve significantly in terms of capabilities, popularity and accessibility in the coming years. Exciting times to be a part of!

You’re going to college this fall, right?

Yes. I’ll be attending Stanford University this fall and am excited to start.

Besides science, you’re involved in other activities?

I was a Lincoln-Douglas debater on my high school debate team; I loved my team and all the memories from it. I also played the violin in the Utah Youth Symphony.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


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Just wondering which country has the loosest free-speech laws. I imagine there has to be one with even fewer limits than the U.S., right? —Velocity, via the StraightDope Message Board

The notion of American exceptionalism finds itself on thin ice nowadays, so congrats for locating one element of the ol’ national identity, anyway, that remains sui generis: the U.S. constitution is generally regarded as providing the most robust speech protections around. Being unique isn’t necessarily a virtue, of course, and in the eyes of much of the world the United States’ conception of free speech comes across as rather extreme—the legal scholar Frederick Schauer, a former First Amendment professor at Harvard, calls us a “recalcitrant outlier to a growing international understanding of what the freedom of expression entails.” Other countries, even (or especially) liberal democracies, have figured out ways to regulate speech for what they deem to be the overall social good—obviously sometimes a contentious concept. In 2012, for instance, France preemptively banned public protests against an online video perceived to be anti-Muslim, citing fears of violence. (It’s also outlawed burqas—uncovered faces help everybody “live together,” France argued before the European Court of Human Rights, which agreed.) But other restrictions are less divisive. Indeed, an understanding that some speech regulation is socially useful is just sort of baked into a lot of European governance, such that NPR did a story tied to that 2012 protest ban on how U.S. notions of free speech can be “perplexing” abroad. Most instances where other democracies limit expression are situations in which they’re trying to stem hatred. Schauer writes, “There appears to be a strong international consensus that the principles of freedom of expression are either overridden or irrelevant when what is being expressed is racial, ethnic or religious prejudice.” He mentions Germany and Israel, for instance, both of which have banned the Nazi party as well as other groups that promote racial superiority; Germany, France and Canada, which criminalize Holocaust denial; and a long list of countries that make it a crime “to engage in the incitement to racial, religious or ethnic hatred or hostility.” For much of the world, per Schauer, such utterances “are widely accepted as lying outside the boundaries of what a properly conceived freedom of expression encompasses.” Again, inciting hatred is the key concept here. Meanwhile in the U.S., it’s the incitement to harm or violence that marks the bounds of the First Amendment. (In the early ’90s the U.S. was one of only 12 countries out of 129 that objected to a United Nations convention calling for laws criminalizing speech “based on racial superiority, or hatred, [or] incitement to racial discrimination.”) You’re probably aware of at least one of the little jurisprudential holes carved out

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Freest Speech

over the years: the famous shouting-fire-ina-crowded-theater standard, a non-binding example set forth by Oliver Wendell Holmes in a 1919 Supreme Court opinion holding that citizens’ speech could be restricted only if it posed a “clear and present danger.” SCOTUS raised the standard a half century later with a requirement of “imminent lawless action” before speech could be criminalized—in the case in question, an Ohio Klan leader had been arrested after advocating attacks against Jews and black people. Generally, U.S. courts have tried to identify where speech might tip over into violence and set its limits there, while giving most other expression a wide berth. And folks here seem to like it that way: per a 2015 Pew study, 77 percent of Americans “support the right of others to make statements that are offensive to their own religious beliefs,” and 67 percent were OK with statements “offensive to minority groups”—higher numbers than seen in any other nation surveyed. But what of freedom of speech’s close First Amendment cousin, freedom of the press? Here’s where we don’t do so hot. The watchdog group Reporters sans Frontières ranks countries in its annual World Free Press Index, and its most recent report placed the U.S. at number 43 of 180 countries— down from 41 in 2016. The report cited the arrests of journalists at protests, the outgoing Obama administration’s prosecutions of leakers, and of course the gang recently installed in Washington, not known for their love of constitutional norms and especially unaffectionate toward the fourth estate. Who’s got the world’s freest press? Norway, lauded by RSF for a rarity of violence and political pressure directed at journalists, and for its strong laws limiting consolidation of media ownership. Nordic countries hold the first four spots on the 2017 list. Which might square with a theory Schauer offers for America’s free-speech exceptionalism: our love of personal liberty outweighs all. European social democracies, as exemplified in Scandinavia, strike a different balance between communal value and individual rights, so it makes sense they’d outshine the U.S. when it comes to protecting institutions like the media, seen as broadly benefiting society as a whole. What we lack in strong institutions, by contrast, we make up for in unaffiliated racist cranks exercising their right to publicly say more or less whatever they want. I guess that’s the good news. n

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 11


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

LEARN TO RUN FOR OFFICE

If you’re wondering why more women don’t run for political office, it might be because they don’t know how. You can change that during the monthly interactive and instructive training sessions that teach the essentials of running for public office at any level. The Women’s Leadership Institute brings together a cohort of women who, over the course of six months, can hear from a variety of political experts and participate in various workshops. Women ought to run for office “in order to have a seat at the table and have a vote on policy,” the WLI Political Development Series emphasizes. Salt Lake Chamber Offices, 175 E. 400 South, Ste. 600, 801-328-5085, Thursday, Sept. 21-Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., $125 for 6 sessions, wliut.com

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QUEER CONTINUUM CONFERENCE

Eight least-anticipated panels at this weekend’s Salt Lake Comic Con:

8. “An Inconvenient Lasso of

Truth: Why So Few Male Roles in Wonder Woman?”

7. “Nothing to See Here: Just

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12 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

@bill _ frost

CITIZEN REVOLT

a Roomful of Chairs to Rest Your Feet After a Full Day of Walking Around in Elf Shoes”

6.

“The Valiant Shroods of Castle Warmlia: A Thing We Just Made Up, or What?”

5. “SLCC After Dark: The Kinky Side of We’re Lalaloopsy”

STORE ★★★★★

4. “Writers Roundtable:

Choosing the Right PaperShredder for Your Screenplay”

3. “Cosplay Tips: How

Much Cleavage is Not Enough Cleavage?”

2. “Geek Podcasting 101: For

the Love of God, Please Don’t Start Another Geek Podcast”

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

1. “Marvel vs. DC: So You’ve

Wasted Your Life on This—Now What?”

Come explore what it means to be sexually fluid in our society. That’s the call from the third annual Queer Continuum Conference that offers a wide variety of panels and workshops. Topics range from health care to asexuality, queer representation in comics and art as a vehicle for radical change, including drag and zines. Local artist and activist Ella Mendoza is the keynote speaker. Donations are being taken online as there’s no entrance fee. Salt Lake Public Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801539-8800, Saturday, Sept. 23, 9 a.m.4 p.m., free, bit.ly/2fbKenj

COUNTER-PROTEST TO HATE SPEECH

Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro is coming to Utah, and a lot of folks aren’t happy. Shapiro will be met by protest when he speaks on the University of Utah campus at a free event sponsored by the Young Americans for Freedom. The former editor of Breitbart News founded The Daily Wire, where he hosts a popular podcast. As someone whose campus presence elicits protests and sometimes violence, he is speaking at the U’s Behavioral Sciences Auditorium. Students for a Democratic Society is planning a peaceful Counter Protest to the Hate Speech of Ben Shapiro, but caution, “We believe in self defense only. Do not even show up if you plan to cause violence in any way or plan to destroy any property.” University of Utah, 201 Presidents Circle, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 7-10 p.m., free, bit.ly/2y2aW5F

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net


NEWS

T R A N SPA R E N C Y

Full Disclosure

Dicey financials mar Sandy mayoral incumbent’s campaign. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris DEREK CARLISLE

A

Mo money mo problems: Political rivals claim Sandy Mayor Tom Dolan filed a “false financial report” following the August primary.

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 13

ent,” he writes. Had Bradburn not began scrutinizing the mayor’s campaign, Dolan likely wouldn’t have amended his report, leaving nearly $185,000 in contributions unreported. And if the public is entitled to know who is funding their elected leaders’ campaigns and how that money is being spent, the city’s filing period allows for years of darkness. Thomas says state law provides a baseline framework for municipal elections. Asked whether cities should be held to the same standard as the state, Thomas says he doesn’t think municipalities should be mandated to stricter filing regulations. It’s not uncommon for smaller cities to cancel elections altogether when no one files to run for office. To add more regulatory requirements might exacerbate that problem, Thomas speculates. And in the past, mayoral and city council candidates run thrifty campaigns. “A lot of them pay the filing fee and that’s it,” he says. However, Thomas adds, if municipalities wish to make their filing laws more stringent, they can pass ordinances that do so. Forbush went before the Sandy City Council last month to air his frustration, and members responded by saying it will look into possible ordinance changes. Dolan is not opposed to the city updating the rules, he says. “I think it’s a great idea. Let’s be totally transparent and get it out.” In addition, though, Forbush says the filing due dates need to give the public time to examine the data. As for Dolan, Forbush wants the mayor to retroactively amend all his financial disclosures since he started running for office more than two decades ago. Finally, Forbush says an office with more independence than the city recorder should be the arbiter of campaign complaints. “We need a financial watchdog.” CW

Dolan should be disqualified as a candidate under Utah law, which demands accurate and complete reporting. Bradburn filed an official complaint on Aug. 14 with the city recorder calling for the city to throw out the votes that went Dolan’s way in the primary. In an interview with City Weekly, Dolan retorts that his two forms didn’t reveal errors. One merely covered a longer period of time. “This is all about someone trying to find another way to get elected. It has nothing to do with the issues of the campaign,” he says. But Bradburn says the law is unambiguous and Dolan’s forms don’t comply. “I don’t understand exactly how compliance with campaign finance laws is a political football,” he writes via email. “It’s indicative of how transparent and compliant you desire to be, plain and simple.” The recorder’s office referred a reporter’s questions to the Utah Lieutenant Governor’s Office, which oversees elections. Elections chief Mark Thomas says the state doesn’t enforce municipal election code, plus, he notes, the law allows for candidates to file amended reports without penalty. In his complaint, Bradburn contends that Dolan shouldn’t be protected by a clause that allows for amended reporting because the law, he points out, says the candidate shall be disqualified if the inaccuracies are intentional or egregious enough. The city recorder’s office disagrees. Above all, a broad view of the episode highlights potential cracks in a system that is rife for abuse, a point Bradburn also raises in his complaint. “This action calls into question the integrity of our process and in order for the public to place any trust in our local elections, accountability must be pres-

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course, higher than what it was in 2013. Dolan maintains he was following city guidelines that ask for an accounting of contributions and expenses since the start of the year—not for the last three-and-a-half years. After consulting with the city attorney, who sided with Dolan, he decided to appease his critics anyway and file an exhaustive disclosure that detailed all financial transactions over nearly four years—a three-day endeavor that entailed combing through old bank records. The amended report is a comprehensive list of contributions and expenditures since Dec. 4, 2013. Dolan brushes off accusations that he was trying to hide these donations, arguing that with the amended disclosure, he’s released considerably more information than what is required. The fact that he volunteered years of his campaign’s finances, Dolan went on to say, is a gesture of transparency. “I bet you I’m the only candidate that has disclosed everything for the past four years,” he says. “We’ve never had to do that before, we never did that before, and I’m not sure if any other city has done such a thing.” But the amended document is revealing, says Gary Forbush, a Sandy City mayoral candidate who lost in the primary. In what would have been his final report, Dolan listed $94,000 in contributions; with the inclusion of the entire three-and-a-half years, that number swelled to $279,844. But for the amended disclosure, the public would be unaware of more than $185,000 coming into Dolan’s coffers. “He never really stopped campaigning. He’s fundraising the whole time, and he’s spending money,” Forbush says. The difference between the original document and its amended version is so significant, Bradburn argues, that

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

s the August primary drew near, Sandy Mayor Tom Dolan filed his first financial-disclosure report of the cycle—one that showed he had raised a formidable $94,000 since the beginning of the year. The six-term incumbent mayor also had north of $79,000 in his war chest from the last reporting period, his state-required document stated. Added together, Dolan had amassed more than $173,000 in contributions. But political rivals say the reporting period obfuscates the truth: that this is a fraction of the money Dolan raised, and the reported spending total of $129,000 is less than half of the actual figure. In the throes of a campaign, mayoral challenger Kurt Bradburn dug through the mayor’s documents and honed in on an ostensible discrepancy between the recent Aug. 1 form and the last one that Dolan submitted for the 2013 campaign. That year, Dolen reported an ending balance of about $44,000—tens of thousands less than the balance at the beginning of the report in 2017. Bradburn, an attorney and first-time candidate, asked the Sandy City Recorder’s Office, the entity that oversees municipal elections, to compel Dolan to account for the difference. By this time, the election was less than a week away, and Dolan had already filed his final disclosure. “I believe that Mayor Dolan filed a false financial report,” Bradburn writes in a formal complaint to the city, adding that the mayor “did not comply with the provisions” of the law. To Dolan, the hubbub is all political posturing. “If you don’t have any issues other than personal attacks—character assassinations—then these are the kinds of things you look for. That’s just typical,” he says. “Every campaign that I’ve ever had, it’s the same thing.” The difference is easily explained, according to Dolan. Some $44,000 was left over from the campaign in 2013, and in the intervening years, he collected about $35,000 more in contributions by the time he was asked to report in 2017. He says the dollar total in 2017 is, of


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Call it a

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By Stephen Dark | sdark@cityweekly.net |

W

@stephenpdark

Photos by Steven Vargo |

@mr.vargo

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 15

For 40 years, property owners and tenants, business and shop owners who populate the four blocks that make up Main from 7500 South to Center Street have been hoping that it will make a comeback, even as it has become the city’s highest concentration of poverty. “They’ve been waiting; they’ve been waiting,” Seghini says. Finally, Main Street appears poised for a facelift. It’s one of the last pieces of a development puzzle that’s seen Midvale undergo a revolution. Midvale Redevelopment Agency’s (RDA) former Director Danny Walz and Economic Development Director Christopher Butte spearheaded the conversion of hundreds of acres of dirt—once home to toxic slag heaps left over from decades of mining—into a mix of offices, shops and homes now valued at $400 million. The challenge facing Butte and new RDA Director Matt Dahl (Walz was hired by Salt Lake City in the spring), along with a new mayor to be elected this November, is in part, Butte says, to get the 5,000 office workers and residents who now work and live in what’s called Bingham Junction to view Main Street as a destination for entertainment and food. Right now, Butte says, “it’s a classic diamond in the rough.” What it needs is a lot of TLC. The city hopes that TLC will come out of what are, at this stage, preliminary discussions with taxing entities like Salt Lake County and the Canyons School District to create a Community Development Area (CDA) for Main Street. If successful, that would divert a chunk of future property taxes to the embattled street on the basis that it will result in enhanced property values in the future. While Canyons’ spokesperson Kirsten Stewart says it’s too early to comment on what’s only been conversation, Butte says the school district “wants to see the development consider the small businesses as well as larger business development.” Seghini shares that concern, but adds she wants some of the property owners to take greater care of their buildings. Since the 1950s, she says, owners on the west side of the street “have done nothing with their property. We want them to be partners to

hen Midvale City Mayor JoAnn B. Seghini walks down Main Street, she doesn’t see the dilapidated, empty buildings which haunt much of its west side. Or the elegant if anonymous buildings on Main’s east side that have been converted into retro-chic offices—often stripped down to the original brick walls—of hard-money lenders, accountants, architects and insurers. Rather she sees the world of her childhood, a street that, back then, was “the main shopping center of the south valley,” 80-year-old Seghini recalls. There was a JCPenney, five-and-dime stores, Berns “the working man’s market,” florists, clothing stores and taverns aplenty. “It had every kind of store you could want,” she says. What killed Main Street off was first the construction of the interstate through Midvale’s heart, segregating the west side behind an 18-foot wall, and then, in the 1970s, the boom in malls. Ironically, developers had wanted to build Fashion Place mall at 7200 South and Main, but local politicians worried it would sink an already floundering Main Street. Fashion Place went to Murray instead and “Main Street died anyway,” Seghini says. As stores struggled with declining numbers of customers, some still clung to their businesses. “It was interesting to watch people trying to hang on to what was never going to happen,” Main Street antiques store owner and former resident Clark Phelps says. “Dreams that die.” All that remains of Main Street’s glory days as a prime-shopping destination, Seghini says, “is a distant echo of the past,” epitomized by the weather-scrapped sign of the 10-year-closed Vincent Drug store. Vincent is the street’s dowdy star of yesteryear for its bit part in the 1993 cult movie The Sandlot. A nostalgia piece about kids and baseball in the 1950s, it forever froze Vincent Drug in celluloid amber. Peer through the grimy front door today and empty shelving stands forlornly in the semidark.

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Long mired in economic depression, Midvale’s Main Street dusts off its small-town charm.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

improve the properties that they have.” If Midvale can secure the CDA, the city will be able to financially assist them to do just that. That assumption, however, leads to a new challenge for the city—namely, Butte says, ensuring they “keep the bones of this gem as it is.” Walk Main, particularly the tree-shaded south part of the street, and you can still hear, however faintly, the hustle and bustle of its small-town history. “Out on foot is the only way to appreciate it,” recently appointed Midvale Police Chief Jason Mazuran says. “It’s a unique little road. You feel it in some of the buildings. It feels like Main Street has got some soul down there.” That “soul” matters, Midvale residents say. “Main Street represents for a lot of people the last vestige, the history of this city,” says software engineer Sophia Hawes-Tingey, who’s running against retired postal worker Robert Hale for mayor in November. She says many residents are concerned about “losing the past, losing something that graphically symbolizes the core value of Midvale.” Casualties of both progress and neglect buttress the street. At 7500 South, the new City Hall stands where a baseball diamond for generations provided a home for little leagues. At the junction with Center Street is a beloved Mexican restaurant, Los Machetes 2. Its doors have been chained shut for several years, the former bank building known as the Mint that housed the restaurant for a decade having been condemned. That followed the discovery that the property owner had dug out the basement to rent to people without papers in very cramped quarters for $200 a month. Progress inevitably goes hand-in-hand with acquisitions. Rents on Main have, until recently, languished well below those across Salt Lake Valley, mostly because landlords haven’t invested in their holdings. That’s changing now. Hi-tech and white collar businesses recognize Main Street’s potential and real estate investors are buying up long-neglected properties, stripping them down to the original brick and leasing them out at prices closer to the market average. That forces out some tenants accustomed to years of much lower rents, but Jake Copinga, a commercial real estate adviser and investor, says that doesn’t necessarily mean there are tenants willing to move in and pay market rate just yet. In an email responding to questions, Copinga writes that he’s bought five properties on Main and “renovated one or two. I want to renovate them all but the demand is low and rates are low. I wish I could get triple the rates but the area is just not ready.” Butte, Dahl and RDA Project Manager Annaliese Eichelberger accompany a reporter on a tour of Main Street. While cars frequently go up and down Main, pedestrians are few. Butte is a passionate advocate for the street and a connoisseur of its colorful history. He lifts up the mat at the entrance to the street’s only beer hall, The Old Town Tavern, to reveal the

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A mural on the wall of the Old Town Tavern depicting Midvale’s history

Interior designer Norm Nelson’s studio, soon to close

“Best little liquor store in the West,” says Midvale City’s Butte

tiled mosaic word “Drugs,” the property having been a drug store before, then points out buildings that housed brothels early in the 20th century. They halt before an open door to a newly renovated office building, a square room stripped of its plaster down to the early 1900s brick. Owner Jeff Beck is showing the space to a couple interested in leasing it for an office. “I believe in Main Street,” Beck says. “Its character is very unique. It’s walkable and millennials want that. It’s the kind of old building that people love.” He turns to Butte and jabs at him with his car key. “We’ve got to do it right,” he says about the city’s plans to redevelop Main Street. “And I’ve got to acquire more.”

NEIGHBORHOOD PRIDE

Clark Phelps was born in Midvale in 1950. Back then, he says, you knew the policemen by name, and if they caught you out after curfew, they’d take you home—but not before giving you a good scare. Life in Midvale, he says, was “just the childhood you wanted it to be”—baseball, riding bikes, “hitchhiking with impunity.” He’d know it was 8:15 a.m. because that was when the train went through Midvale. “The Jordan River was pretty rough” from pollution, Phelps recalls, “but it didn’t stop us playing in it. We’d go up to the Jordan, shoot guns, kill carp with bow-and-arrow. If we caught catfish, our mothers would fix it.” Mayoral candidate Robert Hale recalls going into Vincent Drug while working for the postal service. When he walked in, “it had the aroma of a drug store that is unforgettable: perfumes, apothecary drugs, personal care items and chocolate. It had a wonderful soda fountain, very colorful and typical of the 1940s, where you’d get an ice cream or a root-beer f loat.” In a recent piece for The Canyon Country Zephyr, Phelps wrote, “Because of the smelter [in Midvale] and the large open-pit mine in Bingham Canyon, Midvale was a blue-collar town with no real wealth. The doctor and the smelter superintendent lived in the largest houses. Midvale’s Avenues were crowded with 800- to 1100-square-foot homes kept near pristine by proud owners.” The streets, he continued, were divided by ethnicities; “the Greeks, Italians, Mexicans and Yugoslavians each had their areas.” The “Avenues,” directly behind Main to the east, are lined with small houses on cramped lots, some with well-maintained gardens. Seghini says the survival of the Avenues “is critical. It’s a neighborhood that has a lot of history and a lot of pride.”


Remembered for its role in The Sandlot, Vincent Drug is literally a shell of its former self

A TOUR OF THE RUINS

says. Robert Hale agrees, contrasting Midvale’s Main with Moab’s bustling Main Street. He envisions a place abuzz with tourists drawn by restaurants, the local theater and neighboring Midvale museum. The city “needs to support more [of] the businesses” on Main, Mendoza says. She’s never seen it “so alone, so very abandoned.” She complains about vandalism, broken windows and buildings in disrepair, echoing the owners of a nearby taco stand who claim Main’s state of neglect dissuades people from walking it. “Who wants to come and see ruins?” Mendoza says.

THE SECRET GARDEN

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Several doors down from Beli’s, Midvale Liquor Agency’s Robert Flygare, who runs what Butte calls “the best little liquor store in the West,” presents a more optimistic front. He’s been working on Main since 1998. “It used to be a lot more run-down than it is now.” What Flygare appreciates is the history in the buildings on Main’s southern end. “This building has been around since the 1880s,” he says, reflecting on a time when customers would pull up in horse and buggies. “For Utah, you don’t go too much further past that historically. This Main Street probably has some of the oldest Main Street buildings in the state.” Norm Nelson shares Flygare’s passion for historical buildings, but the interior decorator, located on the west side at the northern end of Main, is packing up his studio to move after investor Jake Copinga bought the property and informed him the rent would go up. Nelson’s been on Main Street for 15 years and recognizes that rising rents are inevitable. As buildings are renovated, landlords “can demand top dollar,” he says. “It’s strictly just progress.” A back door from his studio opens unexpectedly onto a city garden Nelson started cultivating a decade ago in a room where the ceiling and roof had caved in. He laid down a lawn, built an ornamental pond and planted trees, turning it into a hidden oasis with a quixotic, European feel. He finds that rent elsewhere in the valley is double or triple what he’s paid for the last decade on Main, but he hopes to find another bargain, perhaps in South Salt Lake or on the outskirts of downtown. He stands in the shade of a flowering apple tree, the pond burbling behind him, seemingly at peace with leaving his secret green space. “I’ve learned to be able to leave things,” he says. “To not attach myself. It’s all temporal.” He says wherever he ends up, he will design and build a new garden, indoors or not. “You take it with you in your heart,” he says about his Main Street garden. “I can feel it, I just can’t touch it.”

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Phelps credits local Latino businesses—hair salons, clothing stores, grocers and taco stands, among others—with keeping Midvale alive in the last few decades. Latinos make up the bulk of Midvale’s 33 percent minority population. Fifty six percent of the housing in Midvale is rental units, much higher than the rest of the valley. RDA director Dahl says 46 percent of renters in Midvale are “rent-burdened,” meaning they pay more than 30 percent of their income on rent. Dahl has earmarked affordable housing as part of the plan he’s working on this fall. Hawes-Tingey says the area around Main has been the home for many of Midvale’s Latinos for generations. “But it seems like they have been basically pushed and isolated to this corridor of the city,” she says. “I think there’s a sense of intergenerational poverty that’s keeping them in the area.” Serafina Ochoa is the chair of Midvale’s community council and welcomes the possibility of improvements to the street, which, she hopes, will balance “that small-town feeling, but still give you the option of an urbanized community.” Hers is a community of entrepreneurs. “I don’t think it will be a challenge for them to adapt at all.” Where the challenge will lie, she continues, is for newcomers “to adapt to the already established environment and diversity.” Butte highlights a recently opened Latino-owned market called El Potrero (The Ranch) on the street’s east side as a positive sign of things to come, as the store had moved over from the west end of the street. Whereas until recently there were three ethnic grocery stores, he notes, “one seems to be emerging as the front winner and has now expanded to this new location. I would foresee the best and brightest to emerge. The not so best and brightest won’t.” Close to El Potrero is Beli’s, a hair salon and money wiring service owned by Dania Mendoza. In Spanish, she says the street has a richness of history and architecture, but in the decade since she first opened, neighboring businesses have closed and local clients have disappeared. Now her clients come from West Jordan and Sandy. Midvale remains a popular destination for Latinos in neighboring towns, say residents. Mendoza needs customers, she says, and is frustrated the city won’t advertise Main Street. “We need club de bailes [dance clubs] like they have in West Valley,” that generate pedestrian traffic. Both Midvale’s mayoral candidates seek to boost foot traffic on Main Street. Hawes-Tingey wants to see a revitalized Main Street powered by arts and entertainment, with a strong restaurant offering. “I’d like to see Midvale Main Street be a multicultural arts center,” she

A rare sighting on Main: pedestrians

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Detail of Old Town Tavern’s mural

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 17

Latino commerce has played a key role in keeping Main afloat


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BUILT TO LAST

On a Thursday afternoon, down one of the numerous alleys that divide the one- and twostory buildings on Main, a middle-aged woman who says her name is Dianna sits on a doorstep, her walker in front of her. She pours vodka out of a large plastic bottle into a small one, while explaining that although she lives in South Salt Lake, Midvale Main has a deep, sentimental attachment for her. The self-described “chubby rummy alcoholic” points at the letters MMF scrawled on the brick wall before her. It stands for “Midvale Motherfuckers,” she says, written by a deceased boyfriend she still mourns. “I miss this stupid alley,” she says. Ask her what she thinks about the city’s plans to channel money into improving Main, she expresses disbelief. “Why in the world would you? If I had money, you think I’d give a rat’s ass about this alley?” While investors may steer clear of the alleyways, there’s a healthy appetite for the buildings themselves. In April 2017, a client asked commercial real estate adviser Dave Kelly to buy land on Main. “What do you think is the missing piece?” he recalls the client asking. “Offices, multi-family, retail?” Kelly believes multi-family dwellings is “the missing middle piece,” he says, as Main’s buildings are typically 5,000 or 10,000 square-feet, too small for most companies. Clark Phelps says two investors have approached him about buying his two stores. “They’re making silly offers substantially more than I think it’s worth.” He doesn’t think Main’s character and spirit can survive the money being thrown at it and all but concedes its demise. “Main Street is past tense, it was something. It’s a blue-collar worker that’s

Midvale Mayor JoAnn B. Seghini

hunched over with a broken back.” Norm Nelson takes a more optimistic view of the street’s future, even as he’s packing his studio away. It’s popular with film companies for location work, so he believes that guarantees, to some degree, that the city will fight to keep its character alive. Economic Development Director Butte says the key to Midvale’s future is knowing its past. “We recognize what we have, what the opportunities are,” he says. “We really don’t want to screw it up.” Hawes-Tingey worries about “the kind of development that may make some of our more marginalized communities feel unwelcome or forced out of their homes.” If elected, she says she will push for affordable housing and making sure that “all citizens of this city have a voice, especially when it comes to the heart of this city, Main Street.” If there isn’t an inclusive dialogue about Main Street’s future, she fears, “It will be a very divisive and troublesome issue for years to come.” Kelly isn’t sure if Main Street can survive the wave of coming investment. “I do think developers looking to buy on Main Street need to realize it will lose all the charm, everything that makes that little street unique in Salt Lake, if they come in, start leveling it and putting in high rises and density.” He argues for larger developments on the streets directly either side of Main. “I hope they try to keep that uniqueness.” One investor who wants to protect that uniqueness is Jake Copinga, the new owner of Nelson’s soon-to-be former studio. Midvale Main has gotten under Copinga’s skin and he’s putting his money where his heart is. “I love old brick buildings and I love old town Midvale. I wish more areas were like this … working class people that give a shit.” CW

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Economic Development Director Christopher Butte

Norm Nelson in his hidden Main Street garden

At the corner of Main and Center Street, the old Mint building awaits a wrecking ball


Riot Act Theatre: An Enemy of the People

COURTESY AARON RICHARDSON

Nordic music will ring in the halls of the Natural History Museum of Utah, where guests can experience traditional dance, feast like true Vikings and, along the way, learn a little history. Despite evidence to the contrary, many still think of Vikings as dull slaying machines. An MLitt in Celtic and Viking Archaeology Kristina Stelter, who will present a lecture at the event, says they were actually a clean people who carried combs, wore wool and even donned fancy jewelry on occasion. “To modern standards,” Stelter says in an email interview, “this is not ‘scary’ or ‘barbaric,’ and thus doesn’t fit nicely into our pop narrative.” Although killing innocent people was terrible, she adds, “They certainly were not leather-clad heathens who only appeared from the shadows to pillage and slaughter.” During NHMU’s event, you can explore your own non-pillaging Viking roots with the LDS Family History Library researchers. According to Icelandic histories, Vikings might’ve even been the first Europeans to explore North America, further explaining their far-reaching genetic influence. “Their ships were flexible and had a shallow hull, allowing for open-sea and shallow-river navigation,” Stelter says. Aaron Richardson, a Norse Fest historic interpreter and smithy (pictured), says blacksmiths were largely to thank: “They were responsible for many of the tools used in shipbuilding and the tools of other craftsmen.” Thankfully, the Norse Fest will represent many such different kinds of craftsmen, including a Scandinavian rug weaver, a tin box constructor and a fiddle maker. It’ll host you, too—for the price of admission. (Rex Magana) Norse Fest @ Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 801-581-4303, Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., included with regular museum admission, nhmu.utah.edu

Norse Fest

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Asked by the judges on America’s Got Talent what he does for a living, Preacher Lawson replied, “I’m a stand-up comedian … which means I’m unemployed and I do stand-up on the side.” That comment sums up Preacher’s self-effacing style: brash, effusive and intentionally absurd on the one hand, yet decidedly down to earth on the other. Take this intro posted on his website: “I want to give a special thank you to yourself for utilizing this page, because I have to pay every month for it and I’m not rich. I had to choose between this website or Netflix. You made it worth missing The Flash.” It’s that easy, agreeable attitude that has helped to assure Lawson’s success. Born in Portland, Ore., raised in Memphis and starting his career in Orlando, Fla., he started writing jokes at age 16, mainly to adapt to his ever-changing environs. “The one universal language everyone had in common was laughter,” he reflects on his website. “Even when I wasn’t the funniest, I was still the loudest.” He began stand-up at 17, and soon found himself warming up for various headline comedians. In 2015, he was chosen “Funniest Comedian in Florida,” and a year later he took top prize at the Seattle International Comedy Competition, leading up to his appearance on the live rounds of America’s Got Talent this season. For his part, Lawson remains philosophical. “Comedy is important,” he writes in an email. “It’s impossible to laugh without using a smile.” Amen to that. (LZ) Preacher Lawson @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Phone 801-5325233, Sept. 22-23, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15, wiseguyscomedy.com

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SATURDAY 9/23

Preacher Lawson

It might be hard to believe, given the timeliness of the subject matter, but Riot Act Theatre’s creative director Whit Hertford chose an adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People as part of the season before American politics went crazy. Yet the 1882 play—about a doctor daring to claim that his town’s popular public baths are unsafe—serves as a compelling look at how groupthink can be dangerous to a society. “In America, to be critical of democracy is really taboo,” Hertford says. For Riot Act’s Salt Lake City production, Hertford has adapted the controversial issue at the heart of the play from unclean water to one more fitting to our own location: air quality. “All you have to do is look out your window,” Hertford says. “That was a really easy change, and it kind of wrote itself.” The most significant element of Ibsen’s play, however, is that it doesn’t provide a conflict where it’s easy to take sides between the town’s whistle-blower, Thomas Stockman (Andy Rindlisbach, pictured), and those who believe the local economy will be shattered by pursuing Stockman’s allegations. This production dives into that uncertainty head-first by breaking the fourth wall and involving audience members in the debate. It’s a risky approach, but Hertford thinks he’s trying to be prepared for any eventuality. “In case nobody says anything, what happens?” he says. “If a lot of people say one thing, what happens? … What I try to never do is come up with an answer.” (Scott Renshaw) Riot Act Theatre: An Enemy of the People @ The Wherehaüs, 175 E. 200 South, 801-882-1949, through Oct. 7, WednesdaySunday, 7:30 p.m., $17-$19, PWYC Sept. 20, riotacttheatre.com

FRIDAY 9/22

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Say what you will about instrumental ensembles; there’s no more emotive or intimate form of expression than the human voice. It can evoke laughter, bring tears, communicate the deepest of feelings or the most fleeting of circumstances. From opera to oratorio, throughout history, many of the great composers recognized music’s transcendent ability to coax emotion from the sustained strains of inner conviction, and used it to create works that continue to resonate through the present. Emotion is indeed timeless, despite a changing world. It’s not surprising then that The Salty Cricket Composers Collective—an organization dedicated to presenting contemporary classical music performances, and fostering the talents of Utahbased composers and musicians—would choose to explore those vocal possibilities, accompanied by cello and piano, with Liederabend. Translated from German, the title means simply “an evening of song.” However, it promises to be far more than that. Salty Cricket concerts tend to be challenging, dynamic and wholly unpredictable. “Singing is an instinctual part of humanity and music,” Salty Cricket’s board chairperson Crystal Young-Otterstrom says. “Some of the music is avant-garde, some is tonal, some is song-like. Some of the music is emotional, some funny. You’ll experience the range of humanity,” she says of Liederabend. That’s their mission: to present thrilling, distinctive performances. It’s an evening that might inspire you to raise your own voice in appreciation. (Lee Zimmerman) Salty Cricket Composers Collective: Liederbend @ Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande Street, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m., $7.50$20, saltycricket.org

THURSDAY 9/21

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Salty Cricket Composers Collective: Liederabend

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THURSDAY 9/21

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, SEPT. 21-27, 2017

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ESSENTIALS

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20 thur, sept. 21 | the state room

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Star Power

How Salt Lake Comic Con became a desirable destination for a bevy of celebrities. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottrenshaw@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

W

hen Salt Lake Comic Con opens its doors this week, it will feature a guest lineup of familiar celebrity names like John Cusack, Christopher Lloyd, Elijah Wood and Dick Van Dyke. By now, this influx of talent seems like an almost predictable September occasion. But how did a relatively new pop-culture convention in Utah become one of the most desirable guest destinations in the country? According to Dan Farr—co-founder and producer of Salt Lake Comic Com—the answer is all about the underpinnings of the first event in September 2013. Farr had a background as a successful businessman and a base of working capital from his previous business—software company DAZ 3D—which had also given him initial contacts through attending other pop-culture conventions as a vendor. Yet there was still an understandable uncertainty about a start-up convention in a smaller metropolitan area. “There was some skepticism among celebrities about going to new cities and opening them up,” Farr says. “Salt Lake City, being a [smaller market], might be quite a ways down the list.” Farr himself was thinking relatively small when making plans for the inaugural Salt Lake Comic Con, including initially booking Sandy’s South Towne Expo Center as the venue. A first round of scheduled guests was announced—including Lou Ferrigno and Kevin Sorbo—and tickets started selling. And selling. And selling. “It wasn’t typical Utah, where people wait until the last minute to make decisions,” Farr says with a laugh. “People wanted to get their tickets, and they came in early. Because they started moving, it kept building, and we got comfortable enough to go, ‘Hey, let’s bring in a few more guests.’ And it was always comforting for [potential guests] to hear, ‘We’ve sold 3,000 tickets and we’re still three months away from the convention.’ “The fans didn’t realize how much impact they had by buying tickets early,” Farr adds. “That’s what made it so that talent was comfortable coming.” That initial guest list kept growing—including eventual big draws like William Shatner and comic-book legend Stan Lee— but the challenge then became creating an event where guests would not just want to come a first time, but would want to come again, and would spread positive word of mouth about their experience. In part, that meant making sure guests would be

SL COMIC CON VIA FACEBOOK

We sell tickets!

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financially successful—which means selling merchandise, autographs and photo opportunities. Since first-time convention guests don’t always understand how autograh and photo-op sales influence whether guests want to come, Farr and the organizers distributed $200,000 worth of “Comic Cash” which attendees could use on autographs and photos. “It was basically money out of our pocket to incentivize,” Farr says, “that was then cashed in to the celebrities. It wasn’t money that came back to us. It was a big investment, but many of the celebrities who were there said it was either the best show they’d ever had financially, or their best show in a long time. And that gets talked about, because the next weekend, they’re at another convention: ‘How was Salt Lake?’ ‘I killed there, it was great.’” Farr also says that they made big investments of time and money in making those first guests feel pampered and welcome. In part thanks to a suggestion from Kevin Sorbo, Farr’s wife purchased and put together a “care package” backpack full of items like snacks, hand sanitizer and aspirin. When deciding on which hotel to book for guests, they chose the fancier, more expensive option rather than paying 50 percent less. “[Co-founder Bryan Brandenburg] was riding in the transfer vehicle,” Farr recalls, “and a couple of the celebrities were talking, not realizing who Bryan was. They said, “Don’t these guys realize who we are? That we’re just B-actors? They’re really treating us well.’” Now that word of mouth has gotten around, and the initial Salt Lake Comic Con attendance of more than 50,000 people made it an instant phenomenon, the hard sell isn’t required for guests. Farr says a variety of factors come into play when

Dan Farr (left) and Bryan Brandenburg (right) with Mark Hamill at Salt Lake Comic Con 2016.

putting together a list of potential celebrity attendees: sorting through Google search analytics to determine local fan interest; following comments on the event’s social media; the reputation of the celebrities for being positive with fans. There is also the not-insignificant matter of finances, which makes it unreasonable to consider potentially blockbuster names like Harrison Ford, Johnny Depp or Robert Downey Jr. “There comes a point,” Farr says, “where I think the celebrities themselves or their agent thinks, ‘We can have you do a commercial for $3 million and you’re done in half a day, or you go to a convention, and have people online say, I can’t believe they charged $1,000 for an autograph.’” The fans do keep coming, though, and Farr can’t credit them enough—not just for those initial ticket sales that made Salt Lake Comic Con seem like a viable destination, but for their ongoing interactions with celebrities. He recalls a comment made by actor Edward James Olmos at one convention, who noted that “there’s just something unique here … these fans aren’t jaded.” “All of the perqs could go away,” Farr says, “and celebrities would still come back, because the fans treat them well.” CW

SALT LAKE COMIC CON

Salt Palace Convention Center 100 S. West Temple Sept. 21-23 $20-$250 saltlakecomiccon.com


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Works by 31 artists—including Vita Kobylkina (pictured)—comprise the annual Art2Go event at Art Access Gallery (230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, accessart.org), available for purchase in price ranges as low as $50, through Oct. 13.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

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Always ... Patsy Cline The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, through Sept. 22, 7:30 p.m., grandtheatrecompany.com Classical Greek Theater Festival: Ion 1355 W. 3100 South, Sept. 22, 7:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, through Sept. 30, times vary, pioneertheatre.org God’s Favorite Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Sept. 22-Oct. 8., times vary, artsaltlake.org Heart of Robin Hood Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Oct. 14, hct.org Next to Normal Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Sept. 22-Oct. 1, theziegfeldtheater.com Pillow Talk Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, through Sept. 23, times vary, haletheater.org Riot Act Theatre: An Enemy of the People The Wherehaüs, 175 E. 200 South, through Oct. 7, Wednesday-Sunday, 7:30 p.m., riotacttheatre.com (see p. 20) Surely Goodness and Mercy Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Oct. 15, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Wicked-er Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, through Nov. 4, desertstar.biz

DANCE

22 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

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moreESSENTIALS

The Dover Quartet Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Sept. 27, 7:30 p.m., cmofslc.org Chamber Orchestra Ogden: Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m., chamberorchestraogden.org Salty Cricket: Liederabend Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m., saltycricket.org (see p. 20)

Samarpanam: A Sublime Offering Eccles Theater, 131 Main, Sept. 22, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org Steel Pier Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East, through Sept. 24, Friday-Sunday, times vary, tickets.utah.edu

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Saint-Saëns & Dvorák Abravanel Hall, 123 W South Temple, Sep 22-23, 7:30 p.m., usuo.org Salute to Youth Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m., usuo.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Greg Warren Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 21, 7:30 p.m.; Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Sept. 22-23, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com The Hodgetwins Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 26, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Jonathan Falconer Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 24, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Preacher Lawson Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 22-23, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 20) Rachel Ballinger Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 23, 3 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Rob Schneider Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 23, 11:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Live Wire! w/ Luke Burbank SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Sept. 23, 7 p.m., livewireradio.org

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Benjamin Madley: An American Genocide: The United States and the California Indian Catastrophe Joseph F. Smith Building, Room B192, Sept. 21, 11 a.m., fhss.byu.edu Jay Hopler & Evie Shockley Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Sept. 21, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org Mark Sundeen: The Unsettlers: In Search of the Good Life in Today’s America Ogden Nature Center, 966 West 12th St., Sept. 22, 6:30 p.m.; Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave., Sept. 23, 5:30 p.m., utahhumanities.org Wendy Terrien: The League of Governors The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 22, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Author Paloooza Barnes & Noble, 10180 State, Sandy, Sept. 23, 1-4 p.m., barnesandnoble.com McKelle George: Speak Easy, Speak Love The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 23, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Rob Carney & Robert Terashima: Writing About Rights Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley


moreESSENTIALS Square, Sept. 25, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Emily R. King: The Fire Queen The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 26, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Scott Abbott:Standing as Metaphor: Homo Erectus in the Culture of Homo Sapiens Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Sept. 26, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Get Into the River Festival Various locations, through Sept. 29; Fairpark Trailhead, 1220 W. North Temple, Sept. 23, 3-7 p.m., getintotheriver.org Chile Independence Day Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, Sept. 23, 5-11:30 p.m., culturalcelebration.org Festival of India Krishna Temple, 8628 S. State Road, Sept. 23, 5-8 p.m., utahkrishnas.org Norse Fest Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., included with regular museum admission, nhmu.utah.edu (see p. 20) Salt Lake Comic Con Salt Palace Convention Center, 100 S. West Temple, Sept. 21-23, $20$250, saltlakecomiccon.com (see p. 22) Utah Hispanic Heritage Parade/Festival The Gateway, 90 S. 400 West, Sept. 23, 10 a.m.-2:30 Science vs. Dogma: Biology Challenges the LDS Paradigm SLC Main Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, Sept. 27, 7 p.m., thc.utah.edu

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

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Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 18, utahmoca.org Ali Mitchell: Oil Fields Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through Oct. 11, facebook.com/mestizoarts Anastasia Dukhanina Redman Gallery, 1240 E. 2100 South, floors 6 & 7, through Oct. 31, redmangallery.com Andrea Henkels Heidinger: Shared Artifacts Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, through Sept. 29, slcpl.org Anthony Solorzano: Popular Religiosity in the Latino Communities of Utah SLC Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Sept. 22, slcpl.org Art2Go Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, through Oct. 13, accessart.org (see p. 23)

Cary Griffiths: Reprise Art at The Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 14, artatthemain.com Cities of Conviction UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 6, utahmoca.org E. Clark Marshall: Of Stone and Substance Art Access Gallery, through Oct. 13, accessart.org Eileen Vestal: Love Letter to Italy Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Ilse Bing Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 31, umfa.utah.edu Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 9, utahmoca.org Janiece Murray Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Jason Manley: Shrinking Room UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 30, utahmoca.org Jimmi Toro: Kindle a Light Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Nov. 26, kimballartcenter.org Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here UMFA, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Laura Erekson Atkinson: Builders SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Sept. 23-Nov. 3; artist reception, Sept. 23, 4 p.m., slcpl.org Laura Sharp Wilson Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Logan Sorenson: A Land Further North: Images from Iceland Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, through Oct. 26, slcpl.org Mansa Adams SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Sept. 24, slcpl.org Matt Kruback and Naomi Marine: prima facie Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Nov. 10, visualarts.utah.gov Natalie Stallings: Microscopic Sovereign Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Sept. 23-Nov. 3; artist reception, Sept. 23, 4 p.m., slcpl.org Ryan Rue Allen: Flowing Imagination and Changes Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Sept. 30, slcpl.org Skate Deck Challenge Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., through Oct. 1; gallery stroll reception Sept. 22, urbanartsgallery.org Things Lost to Time SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 30, slcpl.org Tina Vigos: Seeking Grace Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Tom Horton Photography Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Oct. 8, redbuttegarden.org Utah Native American Artist Exhibition Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-965-5100, through Oct. 12, culturalcelebration.org

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DINE Order in the Court Find dining diversity at City Creek Center. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

C

DEREK CARLISLE

Contemporary Japanese Dining

hock full of posh shops, City Creek Center isn’t a place I tend to associate with diversity. However, among the hidden gems of the its food court are a handful of interesting, eclectic eateries that serve as an alternative to your typical Subway, Chick-fil-A or Jimmy John’s. I’m thinking of a food court trio that makes an excursion to City Creek worthwhile even if you’re not planning to shop. In the past, I’ve written about the excellent artisan sandwiches at Bocata, which are made with fresh-baked pizzastyle bread, brought to us by the owners of Settebello Pizzeria Napoletana. The Cuban pork, meatball, roasted lamb and Caprese bocatas are well worth seeking out. There’s also Taste of Red Iguana, which brings renowned flavors from the award-winning restaurant in fast-food form to the food court. Did you know that you can get migas for breakfast here? Fried corn tortilla strips are tossed with scrambled eggs and salsa española, then garnished with Mexican crema and cotija cheese. Other offerings include signature Red Iguana tacos and burritos, as well as fajitas, enchiladas, flautas and chimichangas. Sorry, no Tecate or Corona here, though. The newest addition to the City Creek dining scene is Albasha. I was surprised to come across the name here in Salt Lake City, since I knew it first as a Louisianabased eatery. The Greek and Lebanese group of restaurants is located in Baton Rouge, Metairie and a handful of other Louisiana cities. Well, it turns out that a relative of Louisiana’s Albasha founders lives in Utah, and decided to open a Beehive State outpost. Unlike so many of the mall’s dining destinations, this one—although technically part of a chain of restaurants— is far from cookie-cutter. No two Albasha eateries are quite the same. Some are fullservice restaurants and some serve booze, although certainly not this one. Portions are plentiful, the food is fresh and first-rate and there are only a couple of menu items that set you back more than $10. The offerings consist mostly of appetizers, sandwiches, salads and plates, plus side dishes. The sandwiches—a choice of fillings wrapped in Arabic pita bread— are especially good bargains that include either french fries or two side dishes.

Albasha’s chicken shawarma sandwich Options include a chicken shawarma ($8.99), a Greek-style gyro ($8.99), a falafel ($8.99) and souvlaki ($10.99). Side dishes ($1.99-$2.99) are hummus, salad, lemon rice mujaddara (lentils and rice) or Grecian sauce. Don’t bother with the fries. Having first enjoyed a large serving of spicy housemade hummus ($4.99), we moved onto the main event. My wife ordered an item brand-new to the Albasha menu: shrimp shish kabob ($13.99). It was a generous portion of medium-to-large shrimp, lightly seasoned, skewered, grilled and served with rice pilaf and spicy hummus. I was impressed at how tender and not overcooked the shrimp were—an unexpected but pleasant surprise for fast-food. Just as tender and juicy was the scrumptious beef and lamb blend that makes up the gyro meat sandwich, served with tomatoes, onions and a yogurt-based sauce. The accompanying mujaddara was plentiful and delicious, as was a side salad of fresh greens, feta cheese, tomato and red onion that could have passed for a main course. Other tempting items include a veggie plate ($9.99) consisting of stuffed grape leaves, spinach pie, hummus and falafel, or the moussaka plate ($9.99) with potato and eggplant slices layered with seasoned ground beef and topped with a house béchamel. My advice for dining at City Creek Center: Skip The Cheesecake Factory and order in the court. CW

ALBASHA

City Creek Food Court 28 S. State, SLC 801-359-4160 albashautah.weebly.com


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Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

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“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

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“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

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4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM


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28 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

DEREK CARLISLE

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Now open at Fashion Place Mall! Fancy Tacos

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FOOD MATTERS

694 East Union Square, SANDY

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Almost-October’s Fests

September is just barely winding down, but already plenty of events are getting into the harvest celebration spirit of Oktoberfest. In downtown SLC, the 4th West Oktoberfest (425 N. 400 West), sponsored by Mountain West Hard Cider, presents two days of games, vendors, live music and plenty of wonderful food from local food trucks from Sept. 30-Oct. 1 (Saturdays, noon-10 p.m.; Sundays, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.). Admission is $5-$7 per day, with discounts for twoday passes, additional cost for alcohol and free admission for kids 12 and under. Purchase tickets at eventbrite.com. Duck Creek Village (Sept. 23, duckcreekvillage.com), Sandy’s Grace Lutheran Church (Sept. 23, gracesandy.org), Historic 25th Street in Ogden (Sept. 23, historic25.com) and Castle Country (Sept. 29-30, castlecountry.com) are among locations hosting similar seasonal festivities full of specialty foods, beverages, music and general merriment. Meanwhile, events continue at the 45th annual Snowbird Oktoberfest (snowbird.com) every Saturday and Sunday through Oct. 15, including food and live music like the alp horns atop Hidden Peak. Parking at the resort fills up, so consider carpooling.

Rib-Sticking Flavors

There’s still time, even as summer fades away, to sneak in a little more enjoyment of food that speaks to the joy of outdoor cooking. The 2017 Rock ’n’ Ribs Festival at the Gallivan Center (239 S. Main) on Sept. 30, from noon-7 p.m., offers a chance for visitors to taste offerings from some of Utah’s best barbecue restaurants—all participating venues were not set at press time—for only $3 per sample plate. Admission to the event itself is free, which includes plenty of family-friendly activities and live music all day in addition to the finger-lickin’ good grub. Visit thegallivancenter.com for more info.

Quote of the Week: “Ribs are always good. If you walk by a group of people eating ribs, they’re always smiling.” —Bob Sloan

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2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


The ABCs and WTFs of pumpkin beer. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

round, which keeps the spices from being drying; the end is rounded out with a slight smack of hops. The finish is smooth and frothy. Overall: This no-frills pumpkin ale delivers everything promised on the packaging. A pretty solid take on the concept. Wasatch Black O’Lantern Pumpkin Stout: It pours black with one finger of tan head that settles into a thin creamy layer. The nose has a spicy and roasty malt aroma, with a good dose of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves along with dark roast. The taste starts off much like the nose: There’s a spicy and roasty dark malt-driven qual-

ity, with notes of those pumpkin spices. Dark roasted barley malt comes next, adding notes of cocoa, coffee, toast and a bit of smoke. Caramelized sugars round out the finish with light hops as a finale. Overall: This beer is a marriage between Squatters’ Outer Darkness Imperial Stout and Wasatch’s Pumpkin Ale. The two create a solid combo of a stout and pumpkin ale. Let it warm up a bit for the full flavor explosion to come through. Between lattes and candles, you’re probably already into fall spice overload. These three beers, however, will be worth your pumpkin pie dollars. As always, cheers! CW

SEPT 23RD

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2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

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serving breakfast, lunch and dinner

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got my first taste of pumpkin beer back in 1999, at Colorado’s Great American Beer Festival. It came from an Indiana brewery whose name I’ve long since forgotten. But it was one of the first things I ever had that demonstrated that beer could be more than just a traditional amber ale, pilsner or stout. It convinced me that I was actually drinking pumpkin pie, and for that I will always be grateful—not because I’m such a huge fan of pumpkin pie, but because it opened my eyes to a bigger beer world. During the season when everything has pumpkin spice in it, you owe it to yourself to find the best of what’s out there. My expertise is beer, and I’ve found three local examples of pumpkin brews that are far more than a gimmick.

Epic Imperial Pumpkin Porter: Served in a bulbous snifter, this unique creation has a nice pitch color with very little head. The nose is amazing: Chocolate, coffee, vanilla and a good dose of pumpkin pie spices. The first sip hints at bourbon and chocolate, which is present throughout. Then the pumpkin pie becomes more pronounced. There are notes of yellow cake and dark candied fruits, as well. Toward the end, coffee flavors start to emerge, giving the sweeter aspects of the malt something to balance with. As it warms, the bourbon becomes stronger, making it extra rich as it finishes with just a hint of that warming booze. Overall: This one is something special. It’s far more complex than Epic’s standard Imperial Pumpkin Porter, though IPP is still in there. This is probably the pumpkin beer that pumpkin beer haters will clamor for this year. Uinta Punk’n Pumpkin Ale: From a draft handle at the Uinta Brewing, this one pours a brilliantly clear amber color with a fluffy, oily looking head. As I get my nose on top of the foam, there’s toasted bread and malt, with hints of brown sugar and molasses that give way to nutmeg and cloves. As I swig, the pumpkin flavor is not overly strong, but it is pleasant. I like that this ale now has real pumpkin, and not just pumpkin pie spice. The malts are sweet and

MIKE RIEDEL

Gourd Almighty

BEER NERD

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 29


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30 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

TED SCHEFFLER

REVIEW BITES

Barcelona shrimp cazuela at The Eklektik

Eklektik

Its full name is The Eklektik Soul Kitchen, Brews and Store, and it might be the most appropriately named restaurant in town. The menu, like the restaurant’s visual style—virtually everything is recycled, repurposed, sustainable and environmentally friendly—is whimsical, offering dishes like traditional French onion soup ($7), Spanish-style patatas bravas ($12), lump crab macaroni-and-cheese ($14) and a caprese salad with goat cheese in place of traditional mozzarella ($10). I particularly enjoyed the chicken salad tostadas ($10)—a trio of lightly fried corn tortillas topped with pulled boneless chicken breast tossed with a delicate house chile-mayo, lettuce and corn, each topped with a different garnish. The Barcelona shrimp cazuela ($19) is a Spanish-style one-pot dish of about 18-20 small shrimp bathed in a sassy garlic and guajillo chile sauce with extra virgin olive oil and some chile de árbol thrown in to add a little zing. Tilapia Rodrigo ($13), rather than a boring filet, is minced and served in a terrine with a mélange of jalapeños, scallions, cilantro, lime juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, avocado slices and five fresh corn tortillas on the side. It’s simply delicious. Reviewed Aug. 17. 60 E. 800 South, 385-528-3675, theeklektik.com


FILM REVIEW

Deep Focus

CINEMA

Stronger tells a tragic story with an emphasis on human connection. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

LIONSGATE FILMS

E

Tatiana Maslany and Jake Gyllenhaal in Stronger watch but still restrained. Yet while that scene might serve as the emotional climax in a dumber, uglier version of this story, this movie instead builds to the meeting between Jeff and Carlos (Carlos Sanz), the man whose intervention at the scene of the bombing saved Jeff’s life. It’s a true lumpin-the-throat exchange—one of many in Stronger—because it’s all about the inexplicable things that people can need in order to feel whole again. This is why Stronger—even as the pacing drags a bit in its second half, and it makes unfortunate use of the cliché of the emotionally Purging Shower—proves so surprisingly touching when Jeff ultimately finds himself able to acknowledge why anyone might see him as a hero, when all he did in his own mind was lose his legs. Everything circles back to the vision embodied by that scene of Jeff’s dressings getting changed, because Green’s camera isn’t focused on what Jeff has lost. It focuses on two people, and on the connections that make it possible to crawl back from the abyss. CW

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STRONGER

BBB.5 Jake Gyllenhaal Tatiana Maslany Miranda Richardson R

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Gyllenhaal embodies those tangled feelings in a performance that’s more than just a showcase for representing a physical disability. He turns in wonderfully complex work, whether it’s representing Jeff’s panic attack during a public appearance at a hockey game, or conveying the emasculation he feels when getting into a bar fight where nobody is willing to punch him. Jeff Bauman’s story is inspirational, but the character’s arc in Stronger from selfpity to some measure of acceptance never feels like a product smoothed out for massmarket uplift. As great as Gyllenhaal is, however, Maslany is even better. There’s a fascinating dynamic built into the relationship between Jeff and Erin, predicated on the guilt Erin feels because Jeff was only at the finish line as a romantic gesture to support her running in the marathon, at a time when they were actually broken up. Maslany gets a couple of solid big speeches as she tries to tough-love Jeff out of his despair, but the real magic in her performance is physical—all about body language and eye movements, and revealing the ferocious strength in this woman. If there’s a better supporting performance in 2017, it will be a great year indeed. While Stronger never takes the spotlight off of the relationships between its main characters, the narrative eventually does circle back to the events of April 15, 2013, in a scene that captures the chaos and carnage in a way that’s honest and hard to

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

arly in Stronger, director David Gordon Green constructs a scene that should be taught in film schools as a paradigm for avoiding exploitation of a reallife tragedy. In this case, it’s the story of Jeff Bauman (Jake Gyllenhaal), a working-class Boston man who was one of the victims of the 2013 terrorist attack at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, losing both of his legs in the explosion. The scene in question is both simple and harrowing, involving doctors changing the bandages on Jeff’s amputated legs for the first time. As the actual dressing change takes place in an out-offocus background, Green keeps the focus in the foreground, as Jeff’s on-again/off-again girlfriend Erin Hurley (Tatiana Maslany) tries to comfort him through the pain. It would be easy enough to emphasize how much more gracefully Stronger approaches this horrible event than last year’s grotesquely misguided Patriots Day, but that wouldn’t be giving the creative team nearly enough credit. Even as it remains intently concentrated on one family’s very personal story, it feels like a mission statement on how art can tell that kind of story while still showing a deep respect for the pain—physical and emotional—that was involved. Green and screenwriter John Pollono do a terrific job from the outset of building the world in which these characters live, which could come off as a cliché of sportsobsessed, foul-mouthed, bar-dwelling Bostonians, yet instead simply feels richly authentic. The banter between Jeff and his buddies, or with his hard-drinking mother (Miranda Richardson), establishes the nononsense outward toughness that makes it perhaps more of a challenge for Jeff to begin his recovery. How do you heal when pissing and moaning is considered a cultural taboo, and where the omnipresent slogan of “Boston Strong” makes it harder to admit when you need help?

TRY THESE Orphan Black (2013) Tatiana Maslany Jordan Gavaris NR

Nightcrawler (2014) Jake Gyllenhaal Rene Russo R

Patriots Day (2016) Mark Wahlberg Michelle Monaghan R

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Prince Avalanche (2013) Paul Rudd Emile Hirsch R


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. BRAD’S STATUS BBB Built as it is around an interior monologue and reflections on the past, this film might have worked better as a novel—though it would have been a slight one. Instead, Mike White wrote and directed it for the screen, where it’s still rather lightweight but benefits from Ben Stiller’s honest, likable performance as Brad Sloan, a restless suburbanite for whom a Boston trip with his son (Austin Abrams) to look at colleges is an opportunity to stew over how his own college friends (Michael Sheen, Jemaine Clement, Luke Wilson and White) are now more successful than he. White knows his protagonist—gainfully employed, happily married (to Jenna Fischer), with a loving son—is a whiner who needs to check his privilege, and he doesn’t let Brad wallow in self-absorption for so long that it becomes exasperating. Instead, we watch in amusement as Brad fumbles from one simple epiphany to another, gradually learning the lessons that you’d have predicted he’d learn if you’d written down your guesses at the beginning of the movie. There’s nothing revelatory here, but it’s gently humorous and sympathetic to its hapless main character. Opens Sept. 22 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Eric D. Snider

32 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

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FRIEND REQUEST [ZERO STARS] If you’ve seen 2015’s Unfriended, then you’ve already seen Friend Request—except without even the bare-minimum freshness of that other movie presenting its “OMG Facebook is haunted!” story solely via a laptop screen. In fact, this movie has been languishing unreleased in the U.S. for more than a year, perhaps to get more air between it and the earlier film. College student Laura (Alycia Debnam-Carey) is the blandest kind of supernice: She likes everyone, even creepy new girl Marina (Liesl Ahlers), who dyes her hair black and wears a hoodie so you know she’s weird. But Laura learns quickly that you cannot lie about what

you’re doing to celebrate your birthday when everyone posts pix of your partying on their timelines. Soon, excluded Marina turns stalkerish and Laura has to unfriend her … and suddenly it’s all video suicides and haunted profiles and mysterious “unknown errors” on FB. There may be something insidious about how willingly we’ve given in to a self-surveillance society, but Request isn’t about that. It’s simply all random supernatural jump scares gone digital and the most obvious resolution imaginable. Click away now. Opens Sept. 22 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) —MaryAnn Johanson KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE [not yet reviewed] Further adventures of the super-secret spy agency as Eggsy (Taron Egerton) discovers the Kingsman’s American counterparts. Opens Sept. 22 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE BBB Returns might be diminishing from The LEGO Movie to The LEGO Batman Movie to this latest brick-based adventure, but there’s still more creativity and playfulness than most animated features can muster. In the town of Ninjago, teenager Lloyd (Dave Franco) is ostracized for being the son of super-villain Garmadon (Justin Theroux)—even as he fights his dad in disguise as part of a team of ninja warriors trained by Garmadon’s brother, Master Wu (Jackie Chan). The potentially rote father-son dynamic gets a bit of a clever kick—it’s basically “what if Luke Skywalker knew from birth that his dad was Darth Vader”—especially when sentimental moments provide a Jerry Maguire-esque Bruce Springsteen underscore. While there’s less of a dedication here to mimicking a child’s sense of anarchic play—outside of making one monstrous antagonist a live-action cat—the creative team keeps jokes coming at an almost Zucker-Abrahams-Zucker pace, right from the opening logo with a nod to Shaw Brothers kung-fu flicks. Even after the so-cliché-you-wouldn’t-believeme-if-I-told-you revelation for our hero, there’s enough humor that the whole thing just clicks. Opens Sept. 22 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—Scott Renshaw

REBEL IN THE RYE B.5 At the end of this biopic of author J. D. Salinger (Nicholas Hoult), writer/director Danny Strong does not include a photo or footage of the actual Salinger—and thus begins and ends the list of clichés he does not indulge. The narrative tracks his life and career beginning in 1939, as he finds a mentor in Columbia writing instructor Whit Burnett (Kevin Spacey), through his experience in World War II and his eventual celebrity after the publication of The Catcher in the Rye. While his contentious relationship with Burnett might provide a reasonable focal point, Strong instead bounces more or less chronologically through various bullet points, and checking off the list of Great Artist tropes. Discouraging father (Victor Garber)? Check. Wife (Lucy Boynton) who laments about how he ignores his family? Check. Clunky montages? Check, check, check. Hoult struggles to make sense of a character who remains undeveloped as anything more than a self-absorbed jerk—which might have been interesting, except that Strong actually seems to find his obnoxiousnesscloaked-as-integrity admirable. The result offers all the insight of a middle-school student report. Opens Sept. 22 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—SR STRONGER BBB.5 See review on p. 31. Opens Sept. 22 at theaters valleywide. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS DYING IN VEIN At Main Library, Sept. 26, 7 p.m. (NR) HOCKNEY At UMFA, Sept. 27, 7 p.m. (NR) MOONSTRUCK At Main Library, Sept. 27, 2 p.m. (PG) POLITICAL ANIMALS At Main Library, Sept. 20, 7 p.m. (NR) SAFETY LAST! At Edison Street Events, Sept. 21-22, 7:30 p.m. (NR)

THE WEDDING PLAN At Park City Film Series, Sept. 22-23, 8 p.m.; Sept. 24, 6 p.m. (NR)

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Trek Your Head

Star Trek: Discovery, Young Sheldon, The Good Doctor and more fall debuts.

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Ivanka Trump’s America (just kidding … or am I?). I’d say “first cancellation of the season,” but it’s a turrible year all around, so … No entertainment rag has declared “Autism is the new black!” just yet, but the season is young. As is The Good Doctor (series debut, Monday, Sept. 25, ABC), who’s played by former “Norman” Freddie Highmore (Bates Motel). Like Netflix’s Atypical, it’s a series about a young man living with autism; unlike Atypical, The Good Doctor’s Shaun Murphy (Highmore) is a 20-something surgeon with the power of life and death in his hands, man! Don’t you understand the gravity?! It’s probably going to be that every week, even though the pilot episode sets up what could have been an unusual medical drama—networks don’t like “unusual,” so ABC will micromanage this into a case-of-the-week yawner. Yes, Lifetime recently aired a Menendez Brothers movie (with Courtney Love as Momma Menendez!), but who cares? The first eight-episode installment of new anthology show Law & Order: True Crime (series debut, Tuesday, Sept. 26, NBC) gives ’90s murder dreamboats Lyle and Erik Menendez more of an in-depth, American Crime Storyesque treatment with bigger names (well, Anthony Edwards and Heather Graham), but no convincing answer to the question, “Uh, why?” It’s fun watching familiar stars playing historical dress-up (though Lolita Davidovich’s Kitty is no match for Courtney Love’s), but episodes 237 and 238 of crimecomedy series The Last Podcast on the Left are more entertaining, and educational. To appeal/pander to the red-state regressives who voted in the New Orange Order, CBS brings you SEAL Team (series debut, Wednesday, Sept. 27, CBS), a military procedural that’s just a weak clone of History Channel’s Navy SEAL drama Six that swaps out the incomparable Walton Goggins for the inconsequential David Boreanaz and adds more models in uniform. They’re pretty ’Merican heroes with ugly personal probs! Don’t we already have, like, eight NCISes? If I also don’t automatically thumbs-up similar new military dramas The Brave (NBC) and Valor (The CW … yes, The CW), am I just a Liberal Media weenie who doesn’t Support the Troops? Send those letters c/o this publication! CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

I

t’s finally here—and CBS won’t let TV critics see it in advance. Everything’s probably fine, just fine. Star Trek: Discovery (series debut, Sunday, Sept. 24, CBS) has been a troubled production since it was announced two years ago, the least of its problems being that it’ll move to yet another paid streaming service (CBS All Access, whatever that is) after it debuts on CBS proper. The showrunner (Bryan Fuller, moving onto America Gods) dropped out; casting the lead took forever (finally going to The Walking Dead’s Sonequa Martin-Green); the premiere date kept getting pushed back. Now, no reviews allowed? Maybe the debut will hook you into another subscription service. If not, there’s always The Orville. Young Sheldon (series debut, Monday, Sept. 25, CBS) … dear God, no. As if an origin story for the most annoying, played-out character on television weren’t enough, one-note Big Bang Theory star Jim Parsons also narrates this coming-of-meh tale of 9-year-old Sheldon Cooper (Iain Armitage). Pluses: There’s no laugh track, and Li’l Shelly’s mom is played by the daughter (Zoe Perry) of his Big Bang Theory mother Laurie Metcalf, which is a cool twist. Beyond that, Young Sheldon is just an overly sentimental sitcom that’s short on actual laughs and long on relying on a child actor who, oddly, displays more range than Parsons ever has. With all six seasons of The Wonder Years on Netflix, there’s no need for this. As irritating as Young Sheldon is, at least it has focus. Which is waaay more that you can say about Me, Myself & I (series debut, Monday, Sept. 25, CBS), a time-spanning, threegenerational sitcom that apparently wants to be a cross between a floor-demo single-camera comedy and, ugh, This Is Us. You have 1991 Alex (Jack Dylan Grazer), who’s dealing with high-school shit; 2017 Alex (Bobby Moynihan), who’s dealing with professional/marital stress, as well as Urkel (Jaleel White); and 2042 Alex (John Larroquette), who’s dealing with being a rich, white old guy in President

TRUE


Return Trip

MUSIC

Mark Gardener gets back on the road with his pioneering shoegaze band, Ride. BY HOWARD HARDEE comments@cityweekly.net

W

hen a classic band reforms, they run the risk of tarnishing the group’s legacy—and Mark Gardener knows it. “We were all very aware that if we came back and it wasn’t very good,” he says from his home in Oxford, England, “we wouldn’t be doing ourselves any favors.” For Gardener, it also wouldn’t have been enough to get back with his friends in the seminal shoegaze band, Ride, and run through the old songs on a kick of nostalgia. The music had to be fresh and exciting. As it turns out, the frontman was motivated by the prospect of running out of time. “You feel immortal in your early 20s,” he says. “Then you get older and you start losing people around you who were very close, and you realize how mortal we all are. [The band] ended so strangely, and I think we all felt there was a lot of unfinished business. I always believed we could make another great record because the chemistry has always been great between us. If we didn’t end up making the album we did, personally I think Ride, left to right: Steve Queralt, Andy Bell, Mark Gardener and Loz Colbert. it would have haunted me for the rest of my life.” Ride officially reformed in 2015 for a run of live shows, then went into the studio to, well, finish business. The because for a time it was all that we knew.” product is Weather Diaries (Wichita), released in June. As the band’s Following the well-publicized breakup, members of the band first record since splitting more than 20 years ago, it features many scattered. Bell played bass for Oasis and its offshoot Beady Eye. of the airy soundscapes, amplified textures and Beach Boys-esque Gardener initially played in short-lived band The Animalhouse vocal harmonies that defined the group’s early work, but it’s firmly with Ride drummer Loz Colbert, then moved to France to purrooted in the present thanks to glossy modern production. sue a number of solo projects, collaborations (Goldrush, Brian Weather Diaries, like the band’s entire catalogue, is driven by the Jonestown Massacre) and production work (Swervedriver, BJM). experimental guitar work of Gardener and fellow singer-guitarist Since reforming, they’ve discovered there are certain advanAndy Bell. That raises another reason Gardener wanted to get the tages to being older and more experienced. Back in the day, Ride’s band back together: He’s consistently underwhelmed by today’s live shows were messy and exciting, but hit-and-miss, Gardener guitar music. “A lot of the bigger acts have gotten a bit bland, resays as the band prepares for a seven-date U.S. tour. They’ve all ally,” he says. “Ride can be really weird, but it also has this sort of since grown into steadier players, singers and friends. “I’ve never pop element, and hopefully it’s, you know, interesting.” been satisfied with what we’ve done in the past, and maybe I never The group formed in 1988 and released Nowhere (1990) and Going will be,” he says. “But it feels good to be back with these guys and Blank Again (1992) on the cult U.K. indie label Creation Records. playing the music we’re playing.” Unlike most other records associated with the shoegaze scene, Gardener never anticipated the band’s music would appreciate the albums became both critically and commercially successful. over time. “In the beginning, we were totally content to be in a More than a quarter-century later, the LPs have aged well. Last room together making a real racket,” he says, adding they had no year, Pitchfork ranked them third and fifth, respectively, on its list conception that it would do well. “But it feels great to know it’s sort of The 50 Best Shoegaze Albums of All Time. Slowdive’s Souvlaki of made its mark and it’s in the books—that our music will always (1993) ranked second and My Bloody Valentine’s Isn’t Anything have some sort of place.” CW (1988) and Loveless (1991) landed at fourth and first—making the entire Top 5 Creation Records releases. RIDE Gardener still bristles slightly when Ride is classified as shoew/ Lo Moon gaze. After all, when the British press slapped that label on early ’90s bands that spent most of their stage time staring down at their Thursday, Sept. 21, 8 p.m. kicks and effects pedals, it wasn’t a compliment. “We had a lot of Metro Music Hall praise and a lot of critics,” he says. “But at the end of the day, the 615 W. 100 South harshest critics were ourselves.” 385-528-0952 Indeed, creative tensions arose and the band fell apart dur$30 ing the recording of universally panned Tarantula (1996). “The first time around obviously ended up being a bit of a car crash,” 21+ metromusichall.com Gardener says. “We all needed a good time away from the band,

ANDREW OGILVY

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Hit this L.A. soul legend’s page on Spotify and check out the top five tracks. You’ll probably know at least his signature 1967 hit, the deliciously blissful crush tune “The Oogum Boogum Song.” It’s been in some movies like Colors (1988) and Almost Famous (2000), and TV shows like Duck Dodgers (2005) and Eastbound and Down (2010). You might also know some of the other four, like “Gimme Little Sign,” from the same year. Once they play, you’ll wanna hear more, ‘cause Brenton Wood’s music is the best kind of soul, the kind that snaps you out of the doldrums and makes you wanna dance in spite of yourself. There’s gonna be a lot of smiling faces at Liquid Joe’s tonight, particularly the ones who missed his performance there last year. (Randy Harward) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 7 p.m., $20 presale; $25 day of show, 21+, liquidjoes.net

TUESDAY 9/26

Buckethead, Brain and Brewer

Buckethead doesn’t need the KFC bucket on his dome, or the Michael Myers mask— the prog metal/experimental rocker could blow minds just by playing guitar. But you’ve got to admire this mysterious mofo for pickin’ a gimmick and stickin’ with it, especially one that enables him to enjoy offstage privacy without TMZ worrying about if he likes Extra Crispy or Original Recipe in the bedroom. It also frees him to

Buckethead

DOUBLE SHOT RECORDS VIA WIKIMEDIA

Brenton Wood

indulge any urge, whether it’s trotting out his collection of cool and gory toys, dancing like a robot or tossing buckets to fans, encouraging them to let their own freak flags fly. But he’s never more impressive than when he’s playing his axe with extraterrestrial precision and soul. To borrow Bucket’s own words, scribbled on a CD given to local artist Erik “E-rok” Johnson in gratitude for his cover design on the eponymous 2001 debut by Bucket’s side project Thanatopsis: His talent is from the tombs. When you see this expressionless, 6-foot-6 dude-kid with the crazy long arms and lanky fingers that seem to move slowly (if at all) but play so many notes—you have to wonder if he didn’t emerge from the Royal Tombs of Ur speaking Sumerian and playing a lute of fire. Tonight he’s flanked by likewise supernaturally gifted ex-Primus drummer Brain (Bucket’s bandmate in Guns N’ Roses, Praxis and other projects) and bassist Del Rey Brewer (aka musician/composer/producer/engineer Daniel Monti), so expect things to get extra weird. (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $23 presale; $25 day of show, 21+, depotslc.com

Brenton Wood McDonald-era songs like “What a Fool Believes,” “Minute by Minute” or “Takin’ It to the Streets.” Whether they’re singing about a party town, going with the flow, love requited and otherwise, past mistakes or protests, the group oozes an infectious, liberating optimism. That’s why they’re timeless, and why the origin of their name is both relevant and not. After close to 50 years and with so many hits deeply rooted in popular culture, “Doobie” refers to the band more than anything else. (RH) Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 8 p.m., $50-$125, all ages, live-at-the-eccles.com

The Doobie Brothers

BASTIANBLUE1 VIA WIKIMEDIA

The Doobie Brothers

All these years, and still nobody has any idea how The Doobie Brothers got their name. Just kiddin’, stoners—that one’s as easy as the vibe that accompanies pretty much any song by these rock elder statesmen. It infuses all of their songs, whether it’s early-period stuff—the jubilant roadhouse rocker “China Grove,” the barefoot Huck-and-Tom number “Black Water,” the working-class keep-on-keepin’-on jam “Long Train Runnin’”—or even softer, moodier keyboard-driven Michael

ANDREW MACPHERSON

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

36 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER

FRIDAY 9/22

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| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

LIVE

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


2021 E Windsor St. Salt Lake City, UT 84105. JOIN THE TAP ROOM FOR THEIR ANNUAL MICRO MARATHON. IT’S .26 MILES. THAT’S RIGHT, JUST .26 MILES. September 24 at The Tap Room Pre Race Warm-up/Race Packet Pickup: 4p Race Start: 5p Full (0.26 mile) and Half (0.13 mile) Options Solo or Team (2-Person)

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

9.16-17 URBAN ARTS FESTIVAL @ GALLIVAN CENTER

Course Details: - Total Distances Full/Half: 0.26 Mile / 0.13 Mile - Total Elevation Gain/Lose: 4.1 Feet - Official Thirst Aid Station: Tap Room Bar

4:00 - 7:00 PM. Get there early to prepare for the race, register, and enjoy the pre-race festivities. Registration is $25. Pre-register by Sept. 23rd and save $5.

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All proceeds from this event will support Caring for Kearns and its mission of treating mental health.

EVERY THURSDAY:

Jazz & Blues Jam | Gonzo at 10:00 FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

DJ ChaseOne2 @ 9:00

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00 SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 8:00 MONDAY: Micro Monday & Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27TH:

RIVERFEST

JT Draper @7:00 followed by VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

SEPTEMBER 23, 2017

3:00PM - 7:00PM

AT FAIRPARK TRAILHEAD

SEPTEMBER 23, 2017

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

DOORS AT 7:00PM - 11:00PM

AT CLUB X

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 37

VIVA LA DIVA

| CITY WEEKLY |

UPCOMING EVENTS

TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! at 9:00

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY


RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

TUESDAY 9/26

Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen

Scorpions, Megadeth

Next to Himalayan Kitchen

The

Nightly Music

Chakra Lounge

Friday 9/22 - DJ Birdman Saturday 9/23 - J Godina & Caviar Club DJ’s Wednesday 9/27 - Live Jazz Thursday 9/28 - DJ - The SLC

and Bar

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun

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Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night small plate menu

NDS SALE E PT. SAT. SERD 23

∙ 500 WATT MONO AMP ∙ 10" SUB W/ BASS ENCLOSURE

CUSTOM AMP & SUB PORTED ENCLOSURE SUB BOX PACKAGE 1 YEAR

If you grew up in their pre-internet heyday, German rock band the Scorpions seemed a bit odd. To the average American teen, Germany meant Nazis, Hogan’s Heroes, Porsches and lederhosen. Seemingly everything written about the band whipped out the word “Teutonic” (whatever that meant). Klaus Meine’s vocals sounded like Ozzy harmonizing with Colonel Klink and Werner Herzog (the super famous documentary filmmaker) and we ignorant Yanks struggled to even say the names of these new heavy metal heroes. But man, those songs had a rock ‘n’ roll fluency that transcended language barriers—they were loud, raucous, smart, accessible and just different enough to be interesting, with a social and political consciousness that belied the stereotypes and stigmas of their country of origin. And onstage, they’re virtually peerless, with a stage show full of bells and whistles made compulsory because they must match the band’s musicianship, which is still as sharp and dangerous as the tip of their titular mascot’s tail. As for Megadeth, they’ve still got chops, but their previously provocative lyrics are now cartoonishly impotent now that frontguy Dave Mustaine revealed himself as more of a birther than a thinker. Just avoid reading interviews with him and

Heavy Dose

Scorpions

it’ll seem like the good ol’ days. (RH) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. Upper Ridge Road (6055 West), 7 p.m., $35-$90, all ages, usana-amp.com

WEDNESDAY 9/27

Heavy Dose tour sendoff, Scenic Byway, Season of the Witch, Green River Blues

Before going on hiatus, Heavy Dose, a local trio with brio, heads out on the road to celebrate the release of their debut selftitled EP. On it, producer/local music legend Terrance DH somehow performs the Herculean feat of capturing and balancing the stoner-psych band’s rifts in the psychic fabric, including the epic “Ted Nugz (Ain’t No Devil),” which moves miles beyond the perennial beginning-guitarist’s tutorial of “Cat Scratch Fever.” The band has obviously listened to the Nuge’s early work with the Amboy Dukes—their own journey to the center of your mind probably detours through, cough, Toquerville. The EP spans only two songs, but that’s a plenty-heady dosage, with Levi Jones’ reverb-y, overdriven guitar doin’ some heavy carburetin’. Rounding out the bill are laid-back hip-hop group Scenic Byway, self-dubbed pagan psych-rockers Season of the Witch and psych-blues group Green River Blues. (Brian Staker) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., free, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

WARRANTY

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MICHELLE WEST

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DR_ZOIDBERG VIA WIKIMEDIA

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

| CITY WEEKLY |

38 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

LIVE


SHOTS OF SUMMER

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu nfl football

LIVE Music

jersey giveaways every sunday,

thursday, september 21

monday & thursday

Ola, Junior, Lauren, Four

Crucialfest 201700 W 100 S 4 The Gateway /crucialfest/ facebook.com

great food & drink specials wednesday 9/20

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo Reggae

friday, september 22

at the Royal

$

Built To Spill

friDAY 9/22

amfs & long islands

8:30 PM KICKOFF

saturday, september 23

DJ LATU

1/2 off nachos & Free pool

Live Music October Rage

Weeknights monday

w/ Berlin breaks i penrose late night savior i a dead desire saturday 9/23

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

Live Music Every sunday

insatiable

Broncho

The Growlers

ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

spencer nielsen I walter james

Great food

Tuesday 9/26

$

5.99 lunch special

10/7

MONDAY - FRIDAY

expanders

w/ iya terra i for peace band

$

10 brunch buffet

SATURDAYS FROM 11AM-2PM

10/14

| CITY WEEKLY |

coming soon

open mic night YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

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5

inna vision funk & gonzo

utah @ arizona

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karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 9/21

$

IRON MAIDENS

$3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

10/20

royal bliss halloween party P.O.S.

w/ ginger & the giante i 5 state killing spree ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 39

12 sunday funday brunch


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| CITY WEEKLY |

40 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

SATURDAY 9/23

CONCERTS & CLUBS

JIM ARBOGAST

JJ Grey & Mofro, The Magpie Salute

Watch all College and NFL games

on our 30+ Full HD TV’s

They talk about paying your dues, but there aren’t many musicians who’ve worked harder than JJ Grey. His rendition of the blues idiom is often working-class soul catechism, at times funk revival, always honest and gut-wrenching. Emerging on the touring circuit from Jacksonville, Fla., in the early ’00s, and originally billed as simply Mofro, Grey released two acclaimed albums—Blackwater (2001) and Lochloosa (2004)—on the Fog City label before deciding to do business under this current, more specific name with Country Ghetto (2007), the group’s first album for blues boutique Alligator Records. His songwriting has fused the storytelling of old-school country singers with the instrumental proclivities of blues, funk and Southern rock. Their most recent release, Ol’ Glory (Provogue, 2015) is their eighth, and while it flies the blues/funk flag high, it’s not the Stars ’n’ Bars, either. The Magpie Salute unites Rich Robinson—guitarist co-founder of the Black Crowes—with a host of other musicians whose sound recalls that band’s classic heavy blues-rock groove, and reminds us why that particular combination of musical elements is deemed classic to begin with. (Brian Staker) Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., $25-$75, all ages, live-at-the-eccles.com

SPIRITS . FOOD . MUSIC

$3 Miller Lite Imperial Pints Sunday and Monday Enjoy APPY HOUR 1/2 off appetizers every day 4pm-6pm & 10pm-midnight. Play Geeks Who Drink Trivia every Tuesday at 6:30 Play Breaking Bingo every Wednesday at 9:00

call for reservations SEPTEMBER 21

SEPTEMBER 22

LA @ San Francisco Followed by Nate Robinson Trio

Utah @ Arizona 8:30pm DJ Godina

SEPTEMBER 23

SEPTEMBER 25

Saturday Brunch DJ Chase One 2

Monday Night Football Dallas @ Arizona Jazz Session after the Game

OPEN

LIVE MUSIC 9.21 LE VOIR 9.22 MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES 9.23 CROOK AND THE BLUFF 9.27 KEVYN DERN 9.28 RICK GERBER 9.29 STONEFED 9.30 STONEFED

365 DAYS A YEAR

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD ROAD 801.733.5567 | THEHOGWALLOW.COM


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

THURSDAY 9/21 LIVE MUSIC

Free Press Isn’t Free Support Local Journalism. Join Press Backers Today!

Antoine Dufour + Ethan Case + Nick Johnson (Velour) Froggy Fresh + Big O + House of Lewis (Kilby Court) Kris Johnson Quintet (The Gallivan Center) Le Voir (Hog Wallow Pub) Manchester Orchestra (The Complex) Peter Bradley Adams + Caitlin Canty (The State Room) Reggae Thursday (The Royal) Ride + Lo Moon (Metro Music Hall) see p. 34 SIAK + Matthew McMurray + Matthew Fit (Urban Lounge) Tove Lo + Daye Jack (The Depot)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Exclusive offers available only for Press Backers members at

www.pressbackers.com

KARAOKE

SATURDAY, SEPT. 23

SIX FEET IN THE PINE

9:00PM | NO COVER TUESDAYS

& BRINGING YOU SLC’S LONGEST RUNNING EDM NIGHT WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE

DJ RUDE BOY

LIVE MUSIC

LIVE MUSIC

DIAMOND POOL TABLES LEAGUES AND TOURNAMENTS

DART SUPPLIES 3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Tues & Fri: 3pm-1am Saturday: 11am-1am Sunday: 11am-9pm Closed Monday

UTAH @ ARIZONA 8:30 KICK OFF SUN • MON • THURS

NEXT MNF DALLAS @ ARIZONA SEPTEMBER 25

EVERY SUNDAY NFL GAME

7

DAYS REASONS

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

165 E 200 S SLC I 801.746.3334

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 41

PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22

| CITY WEEKLY |

PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS

BAD BOY BRIAN

KARAOKE (THURS)

STARTS @ 9PM

F R I D AY S

FRIDAY 9/22 Andrew W.K. (Metro Music Hall) Black Table + Hexis + Dipped in Whiskey + Disengaged (Club X) The Brocks + New Shack (Velour) Brenton Wood (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 36 Bros. Brimm (Brewskis) Changing Lanes Experience (Prohibition) Damian Marley (The Depot) Fleetmac Wood (Urban Lounge) Get Down Tonight (The Spur) In This Moment + Of Mice and Men + Avatar (The Complex) Kaleb Austin (The Westerner) Kevyn Dern (Snowbird Resort) Matt Hopper and the Roman Candles (Hog Wallow Pub) Natural Causes (Club 90) October Rage + Berlin Breaks + Penrose + Late Night Savior + A Dead Desire (The Royal) San Fermin + Briana Marela (The State Room) Tankerays + Hurricane Kings (ABG’s) Tylor and the Train Robber (Garage on Beck)

SHOT & A BEER

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

4

$

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DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Troy & JD (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ George Brown Quartet (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (‘80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. R3HAB (Sky)

HOME OF THE


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BAR FLY

DEREK CARLISLE

The Sun Trapp

Trapper slinging creative cocktails at The Sun Trapp. The Utah County Swillers + The Jail City Rockers (The Ice Haüs) Vagabon + Nnamdi Ogbonnaya + Bobo (Kilby Court) Zakk Sabbath + Them Evils (The Complex)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Brisk (Downstairs) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

KARAOKE

LIVE MUSIC

Black Uhuru + Onesty + Herban Empire (The State Room) Crook and the Bluff (Hog Wallow Pub) The Elders + Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Four Year Strong + Seaway + Like Pacific + Grayscale + Life Lessons (Kilby Court) GBH + The Casualties + Press Gang Union + Endless Struggle (Metro Music Hall) Gorilla Zoe (Club Elevate) JJ Grey & Mofro + The Magpie Salute (Eccles Theater) see p. 40 Jordan Young (Garage on Beck) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Kaleb Austin (The Westerner) Metal Dogs (Brewskis) Mondo Cozmo + Flagship + The Solarists (Urban Lounge)

Moonwalker + Echo Muse + Glaciers in Pangaea + Dream Collage (The Loading Dock) Natural Causes (Club 90) Pixie Party Grass Boys (The Spur) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) The Steel Belts (Pioneer Park) The Will Baxter Band (The Ice Haüs)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) DJ Ev (Downstairs) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Sky Saturdays w/ Markus Schulz (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

THUR 9.21• SLUG LOCALIZED: SIAK

MON 9.25 • RED BENNIES

TUE 9.26 • GOLDIE

TUE 9.26• TANK AND THE BANGAS SWEET CRUDE

WED 9.27 • BLU & EXILE

WED 9.27• HEAVY DOSE

THUR 9.28 • ATLAS GENIUS

MATTHEW MCMURRAY, MATTHEW FIT

FRI 9.22 • FLEETMAC WOOD SAT 9.23 • MONDO COZMO FLAGSHIP, THE SOLARISTS

SUN 9.24 • QUINN XCII SHALLOU

SUNDAY 9/24 LIVE MUSIC

Get the Led Out (Metro Music Hall) John Davis (Garage on Beck) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Quinn XCII + Shallou (Urban Lounge) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Slaves + Secrets + Picturesque + Out Came the Wolves (The Loading Dock) Sleeping Lessons + Panthermilk + Garret Williams (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle)

| CITY WEEKLY |

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 9/23

The Sun Trapp is a cool place to hang out, and here’s how I know. On my first visit, the employees and patrons were gathered around a laptop on the bar, lmfao-ing at that YouTube video where a guy tries to poop in a pasture and winds up being chased by a turgid jackass. That’s hilarious, and any place where the vibe’s that loose is good by me. On this same visit, I learned that my spirit animal is a bear, which was pretty cool, although I discovered later that it’s actually an otter. That’s fine, because otters are feisty and adorable—and it wasn’t a donkey. And earlier this summer, while chasing a photo for the City Weekly Pride Issue, I had a great conversation about Iron Maiden with a bartender and, while I don’t wanna brag, I’m pretty sure I was hit on by one man and one woman. That’s the most action I’ve seen, ever, so that was nice. There’ve been other visits, and each time there’s one constant: I have an interesting encounter with someone different. Not that kind of encounter; I’m talking about conversations. At the bar, at a table, on the front stoop or the sidewalk, I’ve always met someone nice and shared a laugh with them. And I’m not even the club’s target demographic. Except maybe I am. While The Sun Trapp might be the town’s oldest LGBTQ joint, it’s for anybody who wants to hang out someplace where it doesn’t matter who you are, just that you’re there. Only one complaint: I have so far never been there when the kitchen is open, so I’ve yet to try the chile verde burrito I keep hearing is so good. I guess that’s another reason to return. (Randy Harward) 102 S. 600 West, 385-235-6786, suntrapp.com

42 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

EVERY DAY

THUR 9.21 • RIDE 9/28: JUNIUS 9/29: FREE KITTENS COMEDY 9/29: 90S PARTY 9/30: QUIET OAKS FAREWELL 10/1: SEUN KUTI & EGYPT 80 10/2: DEAD RIDER

DURIAN DURIAN, 90S TELEVISION, NSPS

SEASON OF THE WITCH, SCENIC BYWAY, GREEN RIVER BLUES

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

LO MOON

FRI 9.22 • ANDREW W.K. SAT 9.23 • GBH THE CASUALTIES PRESS GANG UNION, ENDLESS STRUGGLE

SUN 9.24 • GET THE LED OUT LED ZEPPELIN TRIBUTE BAND

9/29: SUBTOMIK 9/30: WOLVES IN THE THRONE ROOM 10/1: NEKROMANTIX 10/2: SUGAR CANDY MOUNTAIN 10/3: THE TOADIES & LOCAL H 10/4: LORDS OF ACID

J. LAW, CHRIST WRIGHT, LOKI, STEEZ, TINK FU, JULIETTE

OCELOT, THE OUTSIDERS, SHELBADINE, DJ SAMEYEAM FLOR

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 9/25 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Chin up, Kid + Morning in May + Wired for Havoc (The Loading Dock) Overkill + Crowbar + Havok + Black Fast + Invidia (The Complex) Red Bennies + Durian Durian + 90s Television + NSPS (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

KARAOKE

TUESDAY 9/26 LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 9/27 LIVE MUSIC

Blu and Exile + Ocelot + ShelbaDine + DJ SamEyeAm (Metro Music Hall) Heavy Dose + Scenic Byway + Season of the Witch + Green River Blues (Urban Lounge) see p. 38 JT Draper (Twist) Kevyn Dern (Hog Wallow Pub) Live Jazz (Club 90) Metro Station (Liquid Joe’s) Patrick Sweeny + Jordan Young (Garage on Beck) Post Malone (The Great Saltair) Scott Foster (The Spur) Tim McGraw + Faith Hill (Vivint Arena) Tristen + Jenny O (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Buckethead + Brain & Brewer (The Depot) see p. 36 Darkrooms (Velour) The Doobie Brothers (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 36 Goldie (Metro Music Hall) Hundred Waters + Lafawnduh + Cool Banana (Kilby Court) Night Star Jazz Orchestra (The Gallivan Center) Riley McDonald (The Spur) Scorpions + Megadeth (USANA Amphitheatre) see p. 38 Tank and the Bangas + Sweet Crude (Urban Lounge)

Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Birdman (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Areaoke w/ KJ Ruby (Area 51) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90) Karaoke (The Wall at BYU) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Johnny’s on Second) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

THIS WEEKS RENTAL FEATURE

WWW.CITYWEEKLY.NET/HOMES

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 | 43

Bed: 2 Bath: 1 Sq. Ft.: 490 4185 South Highland Drive, Holladay, 84124

| CITY WEEKLY |

WITH

Dream Home FIND YOUR NEXT


© 2017

IT STINKS

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Band’s booking 2. Email address ending for a student 3. X amount 4. Mexican revolutionary played by Brando 5. Kind of spray 6. Fiery end? 7. “Gangnam Style” singer 8. Resulted in

Every Bird ____” 49. Proverbial waste maker 50. Pirouetting, perhaps 51. Irascible 52. Fashion item always seen in midManhattan? 56. It’s kept in a pen 57. Golf peg 58. Org. for Raptors and Hawks 59. What Rick called Ilsa 60. Filthy digs

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

9. “____ by land ...” 10. Center of moral corruption 11. Depletes 12. TV series set at Sacred Heart Hospital 13. Schleps 18. June portrayer in “Henry & June” 21. Summer cooler 22. Liverpool lavs 23. Earring style 24. Org. that tweeted “we’ll see him in court” a day after Donald Trump was elected U.S. president 25. “Movin’ ____” (“The Jeffersons” theme) 26. Fashion designer whose last name sounds like a popular hog call 31. Beat by a hair 32. Middle name of Sean Lennon 33. Hydroelectric project 34. Estadio cheer 36. Worker with light metal 37. It may follow eleven 38. “Cómo ____ usted?” 39. Info on a wine label 43. Cash cache 44. Nadir’s opposite 45. Call before a snap 46. Amt. 47. Story that’s “to be continued” 48. Emily Dickinson poem “For

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Gilberto’s partner on “The Girl From Ipanema,” 1964 5. Go out for a while? 8. Migratory insect 14. Notion 15. Animal in an Aesop fable 16. “Romanian Rhapsodies” composer 17. What one might say the NRA is? 19. Hot spot 20. Org. backing Obamacare 21. Under debate 22. What a Guinness-loving tourist in Dublin might exclaim when seeing all his options? 27. ____-Cola 28. Reverse of SSW 29. Black ____ 30. Note between fa and la 31. Mad Libs specification 33. Scooby-____ 35. Back street where everyone disparages Time’s 2007 Person of the Year? 40. Facebook had one in 2012, for short 41. A few 42. Naval burial site, maybe 44. “Kung Fu” actor Philip 46. Quid pro ____ 47. TKOs, e.g. 48. Homer’s cry of alarm after a violent robbery is committed at the Kwik-E-Mart? 53. A few 54. “Do not insert swab into ____ canal” (warning on boxes of Q-tips) 55. Narcissus, e.g. 56. Considering the additions to 17-, 22-, 35- and 48-Across, a valid assessment of this crossword puzzle 61. Mailed or faxed 62. Take home 63. Somewhat 64. [I find this mildly amusing] 65. Caps Lock, e.g. 66. ____ Gaga

SUDOKU

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

44 | SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) I got an email from a fan of Piscean singer Rihanna. He complained that my horoscopes rarely mention celebrities. “People love astrological predictions about big stars,” he wrote. “So what’s your problem? Are you too ‘cultured’ to give us what we the people really want? Get off your high horse and ‘lower’ yourself to writing about our heroes. You could start with the lovely, talented, and very rich Rihanna.” I told Rihanna’s fan that my advice for mega-stars is sometimes different from what it is for average folks. For Piscean mega-stars like Rihanna, Justin Bieber, Ellen Page, and Bryan Cranston, for example, the coming weeks will be a time to lay low, chill out, and recharge. But non-famous Pisceans will have prime opportunities to boost LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The poet E. E. Cummings said, “To be nobody-but-yourself—in a their reputation, expand their reach, and wield a stronger-thanworld which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody usual influence in the domains they frequent. else—means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.” On the other hand, naturalist ARIES (March 21-April 19) and writer Henry David Thoreau declared that “We are constantly Psychologists say most people need a scapegoat—a personifiinvited to be who we are,” to become “something worthy and cation of wickedness and ignorance onto which they can project noble.” So which of these two views is correct? Is fate aligned the unacknowledged darkness in their own hearts. That’s the against us, working hard to prevent us from knowing and show- bad news. Here’s the good news: The coming weeks will be ing our authentic self? Or is fate forever conspiring in our behalf, an excellent time for you to neutralize that reflex and at least seducing us to master our fullest expression? I’m not sure if there’s partially divest yourself of the need for scapegoats. How? The a final, definitive answer, but I can tell you this, Libra: In the coming first thing to do is identify your own darkness with courageous clarity. Get to know it better. Converse with it. Negotiate with months, Thoreau’s view will be your predominant truth. it. The more conscientiously you deal with that shadowy stuff within you, the less likely you’ll be to demonize other people. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “When you do your best, you’re depending to a large extent on your unconscious, because you’re waiting for the thing you can’t TAURUS (April 20-May 20) think of.” So said Scorpio director Mike Nichols in describing If the weather turns bad or your allies get sad or the news of the world his process of making films. Now I’m conveying this idea to you grows even crazier, you will thrive. I’m not exaggerating or flattering just in time for the beginning of a phase I call “Eruptions from you. It’s exactly when events threaten to demoralize you that you’ll Your Unconscious.” In the coming weeks, you will be ripe to have maximum power to redouble your fortitude and effectiveness. receive and make good use of messages from the depths of your Developments that other people regard as daunting will trigger psyche. At any other time, these simmering bits of brilliance breakthroughs for you. Your allies’ confusion will mobilize you to might remain below the threshold of your awareness, but for manifest your unique visions of what it takes to live a good life. the foreseeable future they’ll be bursting through and making GEMINI (May 21-June 20) themselves available to be plucked. “If at first you don’t succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.” declared comedian Steven Wright. My Great Uncle Ned SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Author Barbara Ehrenreich has done extensive research on the had a different perspective. “If at first you don’t succeed,” he annals of partying. She says modern historians are astounded told me, “redefine the meaning of success.” I’m not a fan of by the prodigious amount of time that medieval Europeans Wright’s advice, but Ned’s counsel has served me well. I recomspent having fun together. “People feasted, drank, and danced mend you try it out, Gemini. Here’s another bit of folk wisdom for days on end,” she writes. Seventeenth-century Spaniards that might be helpful. Psychotherapist Dick Olney said that celebrated festivals five months of each year. In 16th-century what a good therapist does is help her clients wake up from the France, peasants devoted an average of one day out of every four delusion that they are the image they have of themselves. to “carnival revelry.” In accordance with current astrological omens, you Sagittarians are authorized to match those levels of CANCER (June 21-July 22) What is home? The poet Elizabeth Corn pondered that quesconviviality in the coming weeks. tion. She then told her lover that home was “the stars on the tip of your tongue, the flowers sprouting from your mouth, CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Kittens made French Emperor Napoleon III lose his composure. He the roots entwined in the gaps between your fingers, the ocean shook and screamed around them. Butterflies scare actress Nicole echoing inside of your ribcage.” I offer this as inspiration, Kidman. My friend Allie is frightened by photos of Donald Trump. Cancerian, since now is a perfect time to dream up your own As for me, I have an unnatural fear of watching reality TV. What poetic testimonial about home. What experiences make you about you, Capricorn? Are you susceptible to any odd anxieties or love yourself best? What situations bring out your most natunervous fantasies that provoke agitation? If so, the coming weeks ral exuberance? What influences feel like gifts and blessings? will be a perfect time to overcome them. Why? Because you’ll be Those are all clues to the beloved riddle “What is home?” host to an unprecedented slow-motion outbreak of courage that LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) you can use to free yourself from long-standing worries. You’re most likely to thrive if you weave together a variety of styles and methods. The coming weeks will be a highly miscelAQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “The brain is wider than the sky,” wrote Emily Dickinson. “The laneous time, and you can’t afford to get stuck in any single brain is deeper than the sea.” I hope you cultivate a vivid aware- persona or approach. As an example of how to proceed, I invite ness of those truths in the coming days, Aquarius. In order to you to borrow from both the thoughtful wisdom of the ancient accomplish the improbable tasks you have ahead of you, you’ve Greek poet Homer and the silly wisdom of the cartoon character got to unleash your imagination, allowing it to bloom to its full Homer Simpson. First, the poet: “As we learn, we must daily power so it can encompass vast expanses and delve down into unlearn something which it has cost us no small labor and anxihidden abysses. Try this visualization exercise: Picture yourself ety to acquire.” Now here’s Homer Simpson: “Every time I learn bigger than the planet Earth, holding it tenderly in your hands. something new, it pushes out something old.” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Filmmakers often have test audiences evaluate their works before releasing them to the masses. If a lot of viewers express a particular critique, the filmmaker may make changes, even cutting out certain scenes or altering the ending. You might want to try a similar tack in the coming weeks, Virgo. Solicit feedback on the new projects and trends you’ve been working on—not just from anyone, of course, but rather from smart people who respect you. And be sure they’re not inclined to tell you only what you want to hear. Get yourself in the mood to treasure honesty and objectivity.

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Historical Fun

Every once in a while, I come upon something exceptionally groovy in a house I’m listing or showing. I’m not talking about Victorian soaking tubs or soft-close drawers in the kitchen, but a piece of history or archeology. It’s fun to see evidence of 100-year-old wallpaper in an old home that needs an update. Peeling paper reveals different eras, colors and patterns. There’s a property listed by Angie Nelden on 1354 E. Stratford Ave. in Sugar House. It’s a wowza to drive by (at $999,999, it should be). I’ve always watched that house—and in my 33 years in business, it’s never been for sale. I’ve had dreams about living there. The curb appeal of red sandstone, a tiled roof and a huge sitting porch on half an acre is enough to woo any buyer into the front door. The home, which was built in 1910, is mostly in original condition. One surprise is an unpainted brick upstairs with “S4 Oct. 13, 1929,” scrawled on it in pencil. The story is hilarious. Four 12-year-old girls lived in the neighborhood on what was then a dirt road. Betty Burton, Mary Brown, Ruthie Fisher and Margaret Naegle were thick as thieves and decided one fateful day to become blood sisters. They pricked their fingers and named their little group “the S4” and vowed never to tell a soul what the S stood for. They climbed upstairs and wrote on a brick by the chimney in Mary’s house and later they wrote a little ditty about themselves. The brick was never painted and over the years many folks speculated what the writing meant. But the girls had vowed to never tell anyone until they were 80. The “Great Disclosure” party was held in 1996 when they finally fessed up to a crowd of over 100 friends and family members. There are now memorial pages framed around the brick for the new owners to keep in perpetuity. They were “the Stripelets Four!” I closed escrow on a home in lower Marmalade last week and it also had a bit of history. The owner had found a postcard inside a wall, addressed and posted to an occupant of the house at 300 North. Back in 1906, 400 North was known as 300 North. On the card, the writer told her friend that she would be getting out of quarantine within a few days and that it had been hard but the candy her friend had sent her was much appreciated. The writer could have been quarantined for flu, smallpox or TB. The homeowner framed the card with coins found in the house from the same era, and it was given to me to pass on to the new owner. It made the coolest housewarming gift. n

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Seniors Gone Weird Guests at Scotland’s Macdonald Loch Rannoch hotel were terrorized by Robert Fergus, 72, and his wife, Ruth, 69, in February when the Troon couple rampaged through the lobby with scissors and threatened to shoot other guests. The incident apparently began when Mrs. Fergus pounded on a hotel room door at 1:45 a.m., leading the guest within to call front desk staff, who Mrs. Fergus told her husband treated her “with hostility.” That’s when Mr. Fergus “reacted disproportionately” by running naked into the lobby with scissors, cutting communications cables and shouting that he would “slit” and “kill” onlookers. Meanwhile, Mrs. Fergus told staff she was going to “get a gun and shoot you,” according to prosecutor Michael Sweeney. Staff and guests ran out of the hotel, while Mr. and Mrs. Fergus returned to their room to pack and took off in their BMW. They were apprehended when they flagged down a police car to accuse the hotel staff of abusing them, and Mr. Fergus could not pass a breath test. At their sentencing on Sept. 1, their attorneys blamed overconsumption of alcohol for their behavior, noting that Robert Fergus “had previously been of good character.” Nonetheless, they were fined 4,100 pounds and ordered to pay 800 pounds to cover the cost of damage to the hotel.

BY T HE EDITO R S AT A ND RE WS M C MEEL

Least Competent Criminals Steven Gomez-Maya, 20, handed tellers at the TD Bank North in Seymour, Conn., a note on Aug. 19, demanding money. He apparently failed to notice that his note was written on the back of his girlfriend’s pay stub, and when he tried to return to the bank (presumably to retrieve the note), the doors were locked. Seymour police tracked down the owner of the pay stub, and when they arrived at the girlfriend’s home, they caught Gomez-Maya as he was driving away. The hat he wore during the robbery and “a large amount of $10 bills” were found in the car, and he was charged with first-degree robbery.

WEIRD

Criminal’s Remorse An anonymous Australian tourist in August mailed back a small stone he lifted from the Cwmhir Abbey, a Cistercian monastery founded in 1176 in Wales. The thief included a note explaining his remorse: “I have been an avid follower of the Welsh kings and their history, and so I took this rock. Ever since, I have had the most awful luck as if Llewellyn [sic] himself was angry with me.” Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the last native prince of Wales, was beheaded and buried at the abbey in 1282, and legend says his ghost haunts the abbey. The trust that manages the abbey put the returned stone and the note on display, presumably to deter future sticky-fingered visitors.

Ironies A Turkish homeless man who was sentenced to house arrest in June has had his sentence altered to better reflect his circumstances. Baris Alkan, 31, had been confined to a specific area, an empty spot enclosed by metal plates, near a bus station after being detained for using and selling drugs. “I don’t have a home address, so I have to stay here,” he said. “Even though I don’t have a house, I’m under house arrest.” The court subsequently lifted the house arrest order and now requires Alkan to sign in at a nearby police station once a month.

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The Classic Middle Name Anthony Wayne Sandusky, 26, of Mascotte, Fla., was welcomed into the home of a Groveland woman on Aug. 22 because he had nowhere else to go. She went to sleep, and when she woke up, her mother said Sandusky had closed all the blinds, locked the doors and was carrying their possessions out the back door. She found two bags of items in a nearby field, including a stamp collection valued at $250,000. When confronted by police, Sandusky said he took the items because the woman was “being mean to him.” Compelling Explanation Andrew Shaw, 44, of Lancashire, England, appeared before the Blackpool Magistrates Court on Aug. 29, facing three counts of possessing obscene images of children on his computer. Shaw and his wife arrived at the court with their guide dogs, as both are legally blind (Shaw has a small amount of sight in one eye). His attorney explained: “It may be argued that difficulty with his vision makes it difficult to put an age to images he downloads. He may think he is looking at 16-year-olds.” Shaw was granted bail. Oops! Most news items about sinkholes highlight the large size of the hole. But a man in Brooklyn, N.Y., was trapped by a sinkhole in the middle of the street that was just big enough to swallow his leg. Steven Suarez, 33, was making a delivery with a hand truck on Myrtle Avenue on Aug. 29 when his foot disappeared into the pavement. “I was scared,” Suarez said. “It was my whole entire right leg, up until my tailbone basically.” Suarez was trapped for nearly an hour as bystanders directed traffic around him and rescue workers tried to free him. Co-worker Joe Grunbaum, 32, said Suarez seemed to be in a lot of pain, but the only casualty of the incident turned out to be Suarez’ right sneaker. What’s in a Name? The state administration for industry and commerce in China has had to put its foot down about long, ridiculous names for companies. New guidelines prohibit long-winded names, such as There Is a Group of Young People With Dreams, Who Believe They Can Make the Wonders of Life Under the Leadership of Uncle Niu Internet Technology Co. Ltd. This northern China company, which makes condoms, will now be known as just Uncle Niu. The new restrictions also prohibit words that are overtly religious or political or company names that claim to be the “best.” We can only guess what Beijing Under My Wife’s Thumb Technology Co. Ltd. will use as its new, shorter name. Send your weird news items to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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People Different From Us Emily Mueller, 33, of Ohio asked a photographer friend, Kendrah Damis, to take pictures of her pregnant with her fourth child— and covered in 20,000 bees. Mueller, who is a beekeeper, checked with her doctor before the photo session and was stung three times during the shoot. She said she associates bees with life and death: “Bees came into my life in a time that we had just suffered a miscarriage,” Mueller said. “That’s where everything fell into place for me—when honeybees entered my life.” She hopes the maternity photos will highlight the importance of bees.

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n An unnamed 35-year-old man in Liaoning Province in China was rushed to the hospital with intense pain and bloody urine in June, after having inserted sewing needles into his penis over the past year. It took doctors at the General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region only an hour and a half to remove 15 needles, measuring from about 2-4 inches long. The urologist, Dr. Cao Zhiqiang, said patients who engage in this type of behavior “are looking for excitement through unusual ways.” He suggested caution for those who “fascinate about peculiar sex.”

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A Singular Obsession In Wenzhou City, China, an 11-year-old boy underwent surgery in August to remove 26 magnetic Buckyballs from his penis. The balls caused a blockage in the boy’s urethra, which caused bleeding and swelling. He told pediatrician Wang Yongbiao that he put the toys in his penis because he was “curious.”

Animals Run Amok A swan on the grounds of Blarney Castle in Ireland suffered a harrowing experience on Aug. 31 when it landed in a field where cattle were grazing. At first, the cattle just looked the swan over, but when the bird hissed at them, they took off after it. The swan tried to fly away, but the cows butted and stamped on it. Garden manager at the castle Adam Whitbourn was finally able to lean over a fence and drag the swan out of harm’s way. “It was an aggressive attack,” Whitbourn said. “I put [the swan] back in the lake and have checked on him twice. He’s sitting there looking bedraggled so I’m hoping it’s a happy ending.” Rather than a swan song.

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