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CITY WEEKLY

U TA H ' S I N D E P E N D E N T N E W S PA P E R S EPTEM B ER 14, 2017 | VOL. 34 N 0. 16

FINDING THEIR 10 LOCAL ARTISTS TALK ABOUT THEIR CREATIVE PROCESS. BY ALEX SPRINGER


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY (NOT) #FAKEMUSE

Local artists share tips on how find your muse and live your inspired life to its fullest. Cover photo by Nejron

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4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 14 DINE 42 A&E 45 CINEMA 47 TRUE TV 48 MUSIC 61 COMMUNITY

SAMANTHA SMITH

Marketing coordinator This self-described “coffeeaddicted, dog-loving, extroverted workaholic” is one of our newer members of the CW family. “I get to go to all of the events around Salt Lake and constantly am inspired to create more,” she says. “I never want to hear a Utah transplant say there’s nothing fun to do in SLC!”

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Utah leaders react to proposed DACA repeal. facebook.com/slcweekly

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Cover story, Aug. 31, “Triggered”

Seems like the new Trump VA Accountability Office is giving people hope at the Salt Lake VA. That opposing wrongdoing will actually result in something other than retaliation. Does anyone else know about the other investigation that just started? It’s a doozie.

JEFF MANN

Via cityweekly.net Excellent article.

has never seen combat outside the boudoir or boardroom, swift boating heroes like John McCain and others with their fingers on the button. He’ll probably give himself a Purple Heart for spraining his wrist on the 19th hole at Mar-a-Lago. Winston Churchill said, “Meeting jawto-jaw is better than war.” There’s an African proverb: When elephants stampede, the grassland gets trampled. Peace, boys and girls; let’s play nice in our little sand box … it’s the only one we have!

ALAN WRIGHT,

JILL WALTON

Salt Lake City

Via Facebook

More on climate change

Good job, Mr. Dark. Thank you.

LARRY CHADWICK Via cityweekly.net

News, Aug. 31, “Losing Bet” This is NIMBY-ism.

MICHAEL WARNER Via Facebook

Rational responses

.NET

When Col. Flagg and Dr. Strangelove tell us not to worry because Kim Jong-un is “rational and responsive to adverse circumstances,” I worry! That’s like calling Adolf Hitler and Donald Trump rational. This is the same jingoistic dream thinking that “bombed ’em back to the Stone Age” and brought us strategic hamlets that cost the lives of almost 60,000 Americans, not counting the walking wounded, and nearly tore our country apart. There’s also the matter of collateral damage, i.e., the countless dead and wounded Asians whose survivors can’t even harvest timber in the forest because it has so much shrapnel from U.S. Gen. William Westmoreland’s carpet bombing of places like Laos, where [more than 2 million tons of bombs were dropped from 1964-1973 during the Vietnam War]. ... We have a commander in chief who

I would like to see in your articles more news on what’s going on in climate change. Are the tides getting higher, the sea levels deeper, the temperature hotter and colder, the winds faster, the floods more often and more severe? Have we, the people, removed too much of our earth’s protective cover? What can we do to change this? Can we fix it? I don’t want to see my grandkids suffer because I don’t understand what’s going on. Please tell me what’s going on—how much rain, or snow? How fast are the icecaps melting? … How many people are being flooded out of their homes? How many are moving inland? How long can we survive if we keep doing what we are doing? … For about 100 years, [the connection between vegetation and climate change] has been known, but very few now talk or think about this. The more vegetation on the earth’s surface, the better off she will be, the better off we will be. Please help any way you can. Let something green live. Plant greenery and grow mentally. Don’t burn, or kill all. Do some select weeding. Please, think. Help the beaver come back; he works to save our earth for free!

ERIC JENSEN,

Everything’s fine

of

ballot p.13

Look back in history and study most of the dictators in the world and it’s never their fault. It was never Hitler’s fault; it was always his generals’. It’s never Trump’s fault. It’s always the media or the people working for him. I recall Trump made the statement in Charlottesville that both sides had fine people. As I recall, Hitler blamed the Jewish race and planned to exterminate the entire race. Out of 9 million, he killed 5 million to 6 million children, men and women. I guess we are lucky (I am Jewish) that his son-in-law is Jewish. The KKK, they’re fine people. They don’t like anyone—Catholics, Jews, Muslims, African-Americans, etc. They’re fine people who butchered, raped, lynched African-Americans. They call for white supremacy, as Hitler called for the superior race, but they’re fine people? If you disagreed with either party, they would try to eliminate your family and anyone else related to you. In conclusion: It amazes me how the people of Utah’s Republican Party will not admit to themselves or do not want to acknowledge that Trump is a psychopath. He has all the characteristics, which include ego-mania, narcissism, only his opinion counts, always blames someone else and eliminates anyone who doesn’t agree with him, and lack of sincere empathy. But he’s a fine person.

TRIGGE

BARRY HECKER, Salt Lake City

Fredonia, Ariz.

RED

VE TE RA TO H EL NS AF FA IR S EX IS TS P VE TS TH E SA . LT LA KE SO W H Y DI D VA AP PO AN AN TI -V ET ER AN CH IN T IE F? BY ST EP HE

N DA RK

Soap Box, Aug. 31, “No fun in the shun”

It’s obvious that Ted Ottinger is promoting a belief system that he considers superior to the beliefs of others, although he keeps the details to himself. Perhaps he is an atheist who, when he dies, finds himself all dressed up with nowhere to go. Or maybe he supports the Islamist idea of creating No Go Zones in America that would exclude Mormons and Scientologists, and anyone else who disagrees with Sharia law. Another possibility is the belief found among the BAMN and Antifa folks that violent actions are justified against anyone who disagrees with their agenda. Mr. Ottinger has been given a Soap Box. It’s time for him to expand on the promises of his Sunday morning sermons and rituals, and invite people to come forward to repent and accept forgiveness, while the choir sings “How Great Thou Art.”

LOREN BODDY, Provo

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6 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

OPINION Worst Deal-Maker Ever Time and time again, President Donald Trump has proved to be the worst deal-maker ever. Let’s look at the latest screwup. Trump says he is canceling the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration policy because his predecessor exceeded his constitutional authority. Trump’s plan is to dump it back in the lap of Congress where its resolution should have been all along. That sounds good. But, by throwing thousands of lives into turmoil, is this good for the country? Does it make us stronger? Are you safer now that many of your friends and neighbors are living in jeopardy? You may disagree with me, but I believe that Trump’s call on DACA is the stupidest, most wasteful, damaging decision for the American economy that has ever been made. There are approximately 10,000 undocumented “dreamers” in Utah, and hundreds of thousands across America, who make our economy greater than it would be if they weren’t here. They have become educated at America’s expense—yours and mine—and they pay us back. State and local taxes from these immigrants are projected at around $12 billion. The Penn Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania publishes scads of charts and studies showing that deportations have a direct impact on the retarding of America’s GDP. According to The Economist, illegal immigrants make up 5 percent of America’s labor force—most of whom are at the lowest end of the economic spectrum. DACA kids, on the other hand, are upper-end producers—educated, law abiding and a boon to the economy. Sending these American-educated dreamers to Mexico will Make Mexico Great Again, at our expense. It will create a brain drain of some of our brightest and best educated. Recall that this isn’t Trump’s first go at mega-stupid.

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

When he was a young businessman, he made stupid deals and got his rich father to bail him out. When he was middle-aged, banks and bankruptcy laws bailed him out while others who trusted his bravado suffered. Now, it’s the innocent childrens’ turn. Fifty years ago, I first read about a wall, the Berlin Wall, which turned out to be a political mistake; became a rallying cry for outraged freedom seekers; was a great photo-op for former President Ronald Reagan; and the removal of which is today remembered as a triumph of morality over political stupidity. Author John le Carré recently added a new introduction to his book about that wall, The Spy Who Came in From the Cold, writing that the book “asked the same old question that we are asking ourselves 50 years later: How far can we go in the rightful defense of our Western values without abandoning them along the way?” Let’s talk about America’s version of the Berlin wall. Last week, while everybody was trying to keep their heads above water in Texas, a contingent of Mexican rescue workers crossed the border to help. They did it because they could, and maybe also because there wasn’t yet a fortress-like addition to the already-existing U.S./ Mexico border wall. The Cruz Roja Mexicana (Mexican Red Cross) deployed skilled volunteers to Texas, with hundreds more expected in coming weeks and months. The Mexican volunteers are supporting sheltering and distribution efforts, while also connecting with Spanish-speaking disaster survivors to keep them informed about available support. Twelve years ago this month, Mexican troops were deployed to the U.S. to aid in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Thank you for that, Mexico. Why bother helping when it’s not your own brethren who are displaced, hungry or under water? In his new book, Strange Contagion, author Lee Daniel Kravetz tries to explain a phenomenon that causes people to do both good and bad things in groups. His catalyst for the book

was the nine Palo Alto, Calif., high school students who committed suicide by walking in front of freight trains. It appeared these kids were well adjusted—they were doing well in school, had awesome futures and were privileged overall. Kravetz spent a few years traveling the world, visiting scientists to determine how and why we tend to, in essence, copy group behavior—like protesters carrying “Resist” signs and rocking pink-knit pussy hats; demonstrators donning Nazi symbols representing a culture that tried to destroy America; or those flying Confederate flags. I read Kravetz’ book last week and didn’t get the why, but I got the what. “Groupthink” got the Palo Alto kids to kill themselves. “Groupthink” gets some Americans to promote antiAmerican ideas. You and I will contribute billions of dollars to help Texans—Texans whose congressional delegation voted not to fund East Coast Sandy victims and whose governor, Rick Perry, campaigned for a state secession when Obama was president. Perry, you’ll remember, also campaigned to abolish the federal Energy Department before he became secretary of energy. No, I am not lobbying against helping Texans. Wayward as some with a pedestal might act, they are part of our family we call America. When members of the family hurt—even if they won’t help out other family members, even if they yell and scream that they no longer want to be in our family, or carry the battle flags of America’s enemies, even after all that—they remain family. “How far can we go in the rightful defense of our Western values without abandoning them along the way?” Regardless of popularity, politics or rhetoric, some of us will uphold our true Western values, no matter what. The time for passiveness has ended; the time to act up started yesterday. We will stand up for the DACA kids. CW

WAYWARD AS SOME WITH A PEDESTAL MIGHT ACT, THEY ARE PART OF OUR FAMILY WE CALL AMERICA.

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Erase Our Sour Feelings

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38

What About Democracy? SAT, sept. 16 | CAPITOL THEATRE

TROY BOI

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Dear Sen. Wayne Harper, you are fabulous and smart, and we will keep saying that as you carefully and thoughtfully consider reining in the Utah Transit Authority. We know that many of the board members and developers are your close friends. But they’ll forgive you. We’ll call you brave and say you have your constituents’ best interests at heart, if only you will choose to make the quasi-public UTA a state agency under the direction of a transportation secretary—one of the main reform options recently discussed by a legislative task force, according to a Salt Lake Tribune report. That would instantly erase our sour feelings about those bonuses, junkets and secret deals that have tainted UTA’s reputation.

20 TUES, sept. 19 | THE DEPOT

PETER BRADLEY ADAMS

Republicans in charge: Maybe it’s human nature, and Democrats in charge would be just as territorial, but the powers that be just won’t give democracy a chance. So please, Sean Reyes, think about the people. Think about the voters. You just signed an amicus brief for Utah, asking the U.S. Supreme Court to support partisan gerrymandering. But they call it “redistricting,” something our Legislature does every 10 years to preserve their power. Utah’s attorney general joined 15 other Republican AGs, saying it’s just dandy and constitutional as hell. In fact, there are good arguments that voters need to choose their representatives, and not the other way around. Alliance for a Better Utah brought the brief to light, even though it had been filed a month ago.

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We are huge fans of transparency in government. In fact, truth in all forms is a pretty good goal. The Center for Constitutional Rights and Defending Rights & Dissent just released a report that points to “powerful corporate interests” including the American Legislative Exchange Council as the drivers behind states’ “ag-gag” laws—which purport to protect farms from “eco-terrorism” and prohibit the whistleblowing and undercover investigations that often embarrass the agriculture industry. Idaho’s law was ruled unconstitutional by a federal court in 2015, and Utah’s was similarly struck down earlier this year. Utah Sen. David Hinkins told the judge the law targeted vegetarian people trying to kill the animal industry. And state records quoted a farmer saying he didn’t “want some jack wagon coming in taking a picture of them.” A KUER report noted 16 states have passed such laws since the 1990s. With lawsuits and appeals pending, there’s more controversy come.

CINDY LOWE

$

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8 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

FIVE SPOT

Decisions … decisions … decisions. Life’s full of them, says former Utahn Philip Kimble, who tries to eliminate the guesswork in his just-published The Art of Making Decisions. The businessman, who now lives in the Atlanta area, earned degrees from both BYU and the U of U. Speaking of decisions, he confesses, “I’m a conflicted fan whenever they play each other.”

What prompted you to write a book on decision-making?

I saw a number of situations from my own family and in professional settings where people struggled with making decisions of all magnitudes. Some of the principles and practices regarding decision structure that I learned through my career, I felt could be modified to fit those situations.

We make thousands of decisions daily, right?

There are studies that demonstrate a person will make about 30,000 decisions a day, about 200 of them just on eating alone.

Why do you say decision-making is an “art”?

A good decision structure is a blend of fixed, quantitative and qualitative components. It is the blending that makes it a near art-form.

How do we avoid bad decisions?

There are three components to decision structure: our absolutes (Booleans), our quantitative preferences and our qualitative reasoning (gut feel, wisdom, experience). The breakdown usually occurs when we ignore one of these components or rearrange their sequence.

What about choosing the lesser to two evils?

That’s still a decision. The trick is finding out which one that is, and having the propulsion to carry it out.

Can you share a couple of tips on how to make “right” decisions?

The book goes into detail about a good-decision process. For example, someone about to purchase an automobile might fall for the emotional hype that the television commercials try to generate, or he could analytically decide first his absolute needs, then his preferences—and then apply the emotional aspects to it.

What do you tell a person whose mantra is “YOU decide”?

That is typically a person who doesn’t want to deal with the risk of making a sub-par decision, whether it is painting the house a particular color or where to eat tonight. Risk adversity is a common problem, especially in today’s society. We want someone else to take the fall for a bad decision.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill _ frost

7. Weakened at Bernie’s 6. A Series of Un-FuckingFortunate Events

5. Put Down the Corndog and A Year of Feigning Emotion

3. Blow Me, Wisconsin Democratic Party, No One Else Will

1. Did Nazi That Coming

CANDIDATES TALK HOUSING CRISIS

Everybody’s talking about it, but no one really knows how to fix the problem. Homelessness, for one. And if that isn’t hard enough, try taking on the low-income housing crisis, especially with the population explosion expected in the next few years. The Salt Lake City and County mayors have been taking heat for their actions. Here’s your chance at SLC District 7 Candidate Forum on Housing & Poverty to ask the candidates—Amy Fowler and Abe Smith— in Salt Lake City’s District 7 how they would address the problems when one of them wins Councilwoman Lisa Adams’ seat. All Saints Episcopal Church, 1710 S. Foothill Drive, 801-581-0380, Thursday, Sept. 14, noon-1 p.m., free, bit.ly/2vKmGJn

WALK FOR SUICIDE AWARENESS

Who hasn’t known someone who’s been touched by suicide or mental illness? Have you lost a friend, a parent or a child? The Out of the Darkness Walk brings the community together for education and support as each person acknowledges the effect on their lives. Join hundreds of thousands nationwide in the goal to reduce the annual suicide rate 20 percent by 2025. There will be a memory table, so bring a photo of your loved one. You can participate in a silent auction and pick up honor beads to wear in remembrance. Information tables open at 9 a.m., along with registration and check-in for those who have not registered online. Liberty Park, 900 S. 600 East, 801-836-0958, Saturday, Sept. 16, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., donations encouraged, bit.ly/2f84MKb

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | 9

2. Kill Shot: If I Can’t Have the

Utahns aren’t ready to send the innocents packing, but it looks like the Trump Nation might be. Stand together with the children and young adults who by no fault of their own live, learn and even pay taxes in the United States. The president of this country has sent frightening and confusing messages signaling the end of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). Or maybe not, he tweets. Join members of the community at We Are All Dreamers, a rally to tell our public officials that deportation will not be tolerated. Wallace Bennett Federal Building, 125 S. State, 801-5243356, Saturday, Sept. 16, 12-3 p.m., free, bit.ly/2wNdRSZ

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4. This Human Skinsuit Is Itchy:

DREAMERS RALLY

Read This, You Slack-Jawed Yokels

CHANGE THE WORLD

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8. It’s Not Me, It’s You

In a week, you can

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Eight other titles considered for Hillary Clinton’s new book, What Happened:

CITIZEN REVOLT


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Why are increases in gas prices often so abrupt and large, while decreases are small and incremental? Where I live, we’ve had two six- to 10-cent increases in the last two weeks, all happening on one day. But earlier this summer, I’d note one- to two-cent drops once every day or three at just about every local station. And why, during these increases, are the stations often in lockstep—yet when they’re falling, they get pretty far out of whack with each other? —John DiFool, via the StraightDope Message Board

Here’s a question where the most obvious answer, and the most cynical, is pretty much the correct one. Say you’re a gas station operator, John. If you’re seeing crude oil costs rise, you’ll want to promptly adjust the prices you charge at the pump to make sure your margin is secure. Seeing crude fall? Hey, no need to be hasty; if your prices take a little while to float back down, well, that’s money in your pocket. There’s actually an econ term for this— “rockets and feathers,” describing prices that shoot up rapidly but decline slowly— and a pretty robust body of economics thought surrounds it. The issue we’re looking at is what’s known as pass-through, which refers to how so-called upstream costs, in this case the price of crude, affect downstream prices at gas stations. Crude oil prices and refining costs tend to account for about 70 percent of what drivers wind up paying. So you’d expect there to be some proportionality to the oil-gas price relationship, and there generally is—crude rises, prices at the pump adjust upward; crude falls, pump prices decrease. When the numbers don’t track as closely, that’s called asymmetric pass-through. (We stipulate that there’s some debate over whether price asymmetry in the gasoline market is really a big deal. The phenomenon you observe, John, obviously exists. Consider, though, the research of analyst J.D. Karrenbrock [back in the ’90s, but still]: If wholesale gasoline prices went up by 10 cents one month, he found, average retail prices would jump up by about seven cents that month, then three cents more the next. If the wholesale price dropped 10 cents, conversely, pump prices would go down just three cents that same month, but another seven in the month following. So retail prices did fall more slowly, but there wasn’t any meaningful asymmetry, Karrenbrock argued—after two months it was a wash.) As I say, the easiest explanation is basically correct, but this being a complex market, there are other factors in play. The lag in price reduction may reflect gas station operators’ need to sell the more expensive stuff they’ve already bought before restocking with cheaper gas, only then passing along the lower price to consumers. Sellers aren’t acting in a vacuum, either; they do this because buyers will accept it. When gas prices head up, drivers will reliably seek out the cheapest gas around. When prices

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Got Gas?

fall again, though, they do less comparison shopping, which keeps pressure off station operators to rush their pricing back down. As one expert put it to the Los Angeles Times, “If every consumer kept searching for the best price, this asymmetry would likely pretty much go away.” It also depends on the station, which gets us to the second part of your question. The owner of the only gas station at a highway exit has less incentive to hurry up and lower prices than the three competing stations at another exit 50 miles up the road, who are all trying to pull in the same customers. A 2008 study of gas prices in Southern California found that having a rival nearby did, in fact, restrain stations’ tendency toward rockets-and-feathers behavior. Consider, too, the type of station. Is it also a convenience store? Those tend to make most of their money on non-gas items, meaning they can afford to be among the first to reduce prices when wholesale costs drop— they’ve got a cushion. These are short-term fluctuations, of course—we’re seeing a price spike now following Hurricane Harvey’s disruption of Houston-centered gas-production facilities—and there’s plenty more ink to be spilled about price variation over a longer time frame. Prices rise in the summer, for instance, not just because road-trippers produce more demand but because we’re pumping a different product: the Environmental Protection Agency mandates what’s called summer-blend gas, a pricier variety formulated to reduce evaporation into the ozone during warmer months. There’s geography, too: stations closer to refineries benefit from lower distribution costs, and thus can charge less; and, of course, taxes vary by state, which is why gas is a good deal cheaper in South Carolina, for instance, than in North Carolina. The larger context here, though, is that current gas prices are historically low— for a number of reasons, including an increasing gulf between supply and demand, which has been dropping as fuel efficiency improves and electric cars gain ground. Remember the hubbub over peak oil? Supply anxiety seems almost retro at the moment; these days there may be more concern about peak oil demand—if you’re an oil company, that is. The rest of us should probably just enjoy it while it lasts. n

Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654


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NEWS

P R E S E R V AT I O N

Taking the Plunge

Once flourishing, derelict bath house faces uncertain future. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris PHOTOS BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @jscheuerman

B

etween two lonely parks in northern Salt Lake City sits a perpetually locked building from a bygone era. Hidden within its decaying chambers, dusty museum exhibits feel locked in time and give off an eerie feeling that the previous occupant might have been suddenly raptured away. Novice wall paintings, origami, toys and kids’ socks intermingle with loose screws, wayward plaster scraps and casual litter. Venturing further inside, an eastern door opens into a cavernous concrete room where a massive swimming pool sits empty but for the debris, rubbish and leftover office junk resting on its bottom. Sounds echo off the chipped tile, and caution tape wards away all from the wooden balcony bleachers above. A second, smaller pool room abuts the first. It’s just as empty—has been for more than 40 years. Except for the occasional squatter or city employee, the rooms and halls of this elaborate building on 800 North and Beck Street have been vacant for 10-plus years. But it hasn’t always been so desolate. In its nearly 100-year history, the Warm Springs Plunge building has seen thousands of faces pass through its doors. At its peak, folks soothed themselves in its naturally heated pools and massage parlors; they ate and lounged in its eatery; and they socialized in its chambers until it closed in the 1970s. For a dormant decade, the building was quiet. The space sprang to life again in the early 1980s when the Utah Children’s Museum moved in. Around 2006, the museum relocated, and the building hasn’t had a new tenant since. Because of the alluring warm springs that trickled out of the mountainside and puddled up among the vegetation, this area of town historically has been a communal rendezvous. Not three days after LDS prophet Brigham Young authoritatively declared Salt Lake “The Place,” the Mormon leader paid a visit to the warm springs—voluminous enough to cast up plumes of steam, even in the summer. Within weeks, a team

The city’s Real Estate Services & Capital Asset Management division’s Dan Rip (far left) says there are no funds to restore the property. had excavated a pool that could hold up to 16 bathers at once, according to Michael McLane, author of a forthcoming book about the history of Beck Street. The settlers used the springs to perform baptisms, but the pioneers also believed the warm water held healing properties, making it a ceremonial and clinical nexus. Well before Mormons commandeered the Salt Lake Valley, the springs were used as wintering grounds for Native Americans until about 1848, when measles decimated scores of tribe members. McLane speculates that either the water was a vector for the virus or that the popular gathering place put Native Americans in proximity to a newly arrived, infected Latter-day Saint. Where the Utes and Shoshone saw ominous death, the settlers saw dollars signs. “Young was an incredibly astute leader. Say what you want about anything else about him, but he was very savvy,” McLane says. “He knew that the city, even with its communal economics, was going to need external revenue coming in.” A potential respite for East Coasters traveling to California, the pools were marketed as a place gentiles could soak for a bit on their westward treks, and Salt Lake’s warm springs were among the most premiere on this side of the Mississippi. Despite its burgeoning reputation, the warm spring industry never reaped the expected bounty. James Hendricks, an ecclesiastical leader of the fledgling 19th LDS Ward, built the first bath house, which doubled as a church. Hotels and saloons popped up nearby. Describing Hendricks as a “great bishop, but a terrible businessman,” McLane says the enterprise floundered. The bath house

changed hands several times with only modest levels of success. Construction began in 1921 on the bath house that now stands for a city-owned amenity with hot spring water piped into its pools. For half a century thereafter, the building, known as Wasatch Warm Springs Plunge served as a communal swimming area. The city pools weren’t without problems. In the 1950s, it was discovered that the water was rife with sanitation concerns. When the city tried to chlorinate the water, it didn’t work, McLane says, and instead created harmful vapors. So officials capped the pipes, drained the large pools of spring water and then refilled them with ordinary water. All was well until the roof started falling down. One day, pool staff returned to find a 4-ton chunk of concrete in the water. “Had that happened at peak hours, you would have had dozens of people killed, most likely,” McLane says. The bath house closed in the early 1970s and reopened in 1983 as the Children’s Museum of Utah. Nearly 20 years later, the museum moved to The Gateway. One occupant, however, remains. In the basement, the Golden Spike Train Club of Utah holds monthly open houses, where guests are invited to marvel at the assiduously crafted model-train layout. The club has called the place home since 1984. Through the years, they’ve constructed an elaborate train system with switch lines, bridges and tunnels that cut through a miniature mountain pass. Figurine people dot the rail yards, and evergreen trees spring from the artificial granite slopes. The 20-scale-mile network of rails and

meticulous scenes are a perpetual workin-progress that would be impossibly cumbersome to relocate, notes club member Mark Forslund. “We are hoping to sign a lease eventually to secure our future,” he says. But the city is cautiously reluctant to enter a long-term tenant agreement while the future of the building is questionable. “We have a huge stake in this,” Foslund adds. Over the years, the city has received numerous restoration plans, but those proposals always smash into a big brick funding wall. Leaving the building vacant will only exacerbate its path toward abject disrepair. “The longer it sits, the more dilapidated it becomes,” says Dan Rip, the city’s Real Estate Services & Capital Asset Management division’s property manager. “We don’t have the funding to renovate or restore it. The problem that we’re having is the roof is in terrible condition, and our fear is that the longer we let it sit, the roof is going to give.” The concrete swimming pool floors are irreparably damaged, as well. In the wet months, he says, rain pours through the ceiling, and to fix the roof alone is an estimated $1 million project. A year ago, the city issued a request for proposals, an offer to developers, asking for $2.5 million for the building and about 2 acres of land. The city received two responses by the late 2016 deadline. David Ross Scheer, a member of the Capitol Hill Neighborhood Council, was selected as a community representative to sit on an ad hoc board to review the proposals. The more viable of the two submissions, he says, was a housing development plan from Woodbury Corp.


Mon - Sat 8am to 5pm • Closed Sunday 9275 S 1300 W 801-562-5496 glovernursery.com

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an architect and city planner by trade, guesses that number would be in the ballpark of $12 million to $15 million today. Because the building is historic, whoever purchases it should be able to apply tax credits to the sum of the restoration costs. Nibley is more sanguine than Scheer or Rip. “We have some projected funding sources, preliminary business plan and strong interest from people and organizations who would utilize the space,” she writes in an email. The train club might have a funding role, as well. Members are eyeing Union Pacific grant dollars, one of three railroad companies the yard is based on. Originally, the train club opted to remain neutral on the development proposals. Since then, club members agreed to side with the alliance. “We are looking at the best community-driven plan because we are part of the community ourselves,” Forslund says. Even when you add up all the tax credits and possible grant dollars, the price gap to refurbish and maintain the building is huge, Rip says. First and foremost, the alliance exists to preserve and protect the area’s history; Nibley says it will continue appealing to the public with that end in mind. As the alliance continues to grow and gain steam, it can collate ideas and formulate a solid alternative. “We also see its potential for being a community gathering place again. We would love the opportunity to restore it and bring it back to serving the community. “That’s its purpose,” she says. CW

Is the proposal feasible? “It’s hard to say,” Rip says. The corporation is expected to present its latest draft at an October meeting. Scheer believes that if the neighborhood voices “strong public opposition to something that is already teetering, it could easily push it in a direction of denial.” And that would leave the city in the same spot it’s been: watching an architectural treasure crumble before its eyes. Sylvia Nibley, founder of the Warm Springs Alliance, notes that the space has historically been used as a public good, and it would be a shame, she says, now to privatize it. A visionary, Nibley describes herself as “a protective mother of this place, and I love it.” Her concept is ineffably grand in scope, but cuts to the core of what it might mean to the community. The alliance envisions a place where connectivity is more important than commerce— a spot filled with art, music, lectures, dining and dancing, where people of all backgrounds feel welcome. The alliance also wants to re-establish soaking pools. “I see it as the potential to be many things to many people,” Nibley says. “Bringing back the hot springs allows us to have this public feel in coming together around healing and health and well-being. More like a European spa or Asian spa. Not the kind of exclusive, only-for-thewealthy day spa. A place for everyone.” On its website, the alliance links to a petition that favors its plan as an alternative to the Woodbury proposal. Funding, Scheer agrees, is still a major obstacle. In 2009, the city estimated restoration costs to be $9 million. Scheer,

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“I knew that the community did not want housing there,” he says. “But at the time, it looked like the only chance to save the building.” No one from the Woodbury Corp. familiar with the project was available to comment. But a Salt Lake City Historic Landmark Commission work session memo provides a detailed proposal. The plan calls to erect a seven-story apartment complex in the parking lot that would loom between the Plunge building and the hillside beyond. Four town homes would line the southern edge, and the Warm Springs Plunge building would be renovated and leased as commercial office space. The Woodbury plan is primarily targeting development on the parking lot. Rip reasons the proposal leaves open the door to renovate the historic building for private and public use in creative ways. But others worry a giant building would dominate the surrounding parks and ruin the viewshed. Don’t expect apartments to sprout up overnight, however. Woodbury has considerable hurdles to clear before it can break any ground. The building is on the National Register of Historic Places. More importantly, Wasatch Warm Springs Plunge is on the list of Salt Lake City landmarks, which means in order to continue with the proposal, the developer would have to get approval from the Salt Lake City Landmarks Commission. The space is currently zoned as public lands, which would have to be changed by the planning commission before housing could be a permitted use. The city is also asking the Capitol Hill Neighborhood Council for feedback.

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In its heyday, the Warm Springs Plunge was marketed as a place where travelers could soak and replenish on their westward treks.


Now open at Fashion Place Mall! & FINE TEQUILA

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TED SCHEFFLER

Fancy Tacos

Culinary Karma

To Hell’s Backbone Grill and back. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

COMING SOON!

LEHI

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FASHION PLACE MALL 6191 SOUTH STATE #1997 801-2662487

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DINE

Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

T

o paraphrase a cautionary note that the late, great Jim Harrison once said to me: “Dining in restaurants, like literature, is a crapshoot.” Like Forrest Gump’s big box of chocolates, you never know what you’re going to get. This is mostly true, yet we still seek them out, because the tribal urge to eat, drink and share space and time with others is a primal one. Perhaps that’s in part what leads us to restaurants to break bread. It’s usually no fun dining—and especially drinking—alone. Wine is to be shared. With a good four decades of serious gourmandizing under my increasingly tight belt, I still consider only a handful of restaurants not to be crapshoots, including Chez Panisse in Berkeley and Taillevent in Paris. Mario Batali’s Esca is my favorite seafood restaurant, and Salt Lake City’s own Takashi is the go-to for sushi and sashimi. Comme Chez Soi in Brussels, Le Bistrot du Paradou near Saint-Rémy, France and Le Fournil in Bonnieux inevitably super-satisfy. Oh, and then there’s this truly off-the-beaten-path destination eatery in Boulder, Utah: Hell’s Backbone Grill. I’ve written about it in the past, so I won’t rehash its challenging—and ultimately joyous—history here. Better that you turn to the fine book written by HBG’s owners, Jennifer Castle and Blake Spalding, called With a Measure of Grace. Fans of HBG will be happy to know that Spalding and Castle are publishing a second book this fall, entitled This Immeasurable Place: Food and Farming from the Edge of Wilderness. Revisiting Hell’s Backbone Grill, I’m again reminded that this is a special place—a sanctuary, of sorts. The frayed Tibetan prayer flags that line the restaurant’s exterior, colorful wildflowers, a contented feline named Jezebel lazing on the dining deck, Buddhist fountains and the overall

Idaho steelhead trout filet vibe of the place say, “Welcome! Please join us.” There’s an “honor system” rack of goodies just outside the restaurant offering homemade jams, heirloom tomatoes and potatoes, herbs, pottery and more for customers to purchase. Just leave your cash in the jar. Enter the restaurant proper, and you’ll most likely be greeted with hugs, whether you’re a first-timer or long-timer. If you believe in karma, as I do, it should come as no surprise that this outpost eatery should have become such a success—a place shining brightly enough to be written about in The New York Times and other big publications. My family toured the restaurant’s own farm recently, and was struck by the sheer volume of produce that it takes to run the restaurant; HBG still must turn to local farmers for items like carrots and potatoes, since its own farm can’t keep up with the demand. Yes, this is a special place. But it’s not just about the setting and welcoming atmosphere; it’s also about the food. Believe me, I wouldn’t drive 4-plus hours to dine there if the food wasn’t excellent. For breakfast, I love the super spicy chile migas ($13), a taste of Jen’s New Mexico upbringing, with three farm eggs scrambled in red chile sauce, jack cheese and blue corn tortillas chips. At dinner time, steelhead trout ($29) with lemon-tarragon butter, basmati rice and organic veggies is superb. One of the most memorable chicken dishes I’ve encountered in a long time is “Lemony Cluck” ($29)—an impossibly tender, skin-on, pan-cooked Mary’s chicken breast, sliced into thin medallions and served in a snappy lemon, shallots and herb sauce—simply outstanding. Our current president—who I believe to have grown up unloved and unloving— became a brief topic of one evening’s dinner there. In this spiritually rich spot, I found myself actually feeling compassion for a man with so much self-loathing that he can’t possibly ever have a truly happy moment. POTUS needs to make his way to Hell’s Backbone Grill. It would be good for him, and probably would be good for our country. After all, karma is a bitch. CW

HELL’S BACKBONE GRILL

20 North Highway 12, Boulder 435-335-7464 hellsbackbonegrill.com


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FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW @scottrenshaw

DEREK CARLISLE

Stoneground

Dig Into Downtown

If there’s a downtown Salt Lake City restaurant you’ve always wanted to try, there’s likely no better time than the annual Downtown Dine O’Round. Running Sept. 15-Oct. 1, this showcase of more than 40 locations features specials of $5 and $10 lunches, or $15, $25 and $35 three-course dinners. For more info, visit dineoround.com, and ask for the special menu when you dine. As an added incentive: Post a #dineoround tagged photo of your experience on Instagram, and you’re entered for a chance to win free dinners for a year.

Celebrity Chef Tour in Park City

The James Beard Foundation’s “Celebrity Chef Tour” makes a Utah stop at Riverhorse on Main (540 Main, Park City, 435-649-3536, riverhorseparkcity.com) on Saturday, Sept. 16, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Local chefs Shawn Armstrong (Montage Deer Valley), John Murcko (Firewood) and Seth Adams (Riverhorse on Main) will be joined by Sheamus Feeley (SF Hospitality Group, Denver), Neal Fraser (Vibiana and Redbird, Los Angeles) and pastry chef Dahlia Narvaez (Mozza Group, Los Angeles) for a six-course dinner featuring Chef Armstrong’s Hudson Valley foie gras terrine, local peaches, Creminelli speck ham and pistachio, followed by Chef Feeley’s boiled peanut hummus and pecan-smoked chicken. Cost is $225 per person; register online at jamesbeard. org/events/park-city.

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2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 -CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

Local Grower Showcase

“Farm to table” and “locally sourced” aren’t just buzzwords; they’re a different way of approaching eating in a way that supports local economies and reduces the carbon footprint of food distribution. Snowbasin Resort (3925 E. Snowbasin Rd., Huntsville, snowbasin.com) explores some of the bountiful Utah-grown options in a Farm-to-Table “Dining Discovery” event on Friday, Sept. 22, 6-9 p.m. Community-supported agriculture partners including Borski Farms and Sandhill Farms will be showcased at this five-course dinner, which also offers the opportunity to meet and talk with the chefs and farmers. Reservations are required at 801-6201021; cost is $75 per person, which includes dinner, entertainment, lift ride to Needles Lodge and first featured beverage. Quote of the Week: “Know your food, know your farmers and know your kitchen.” —Joel Salatin

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

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Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


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New Brew for You

Kiitos brings efficiency to its beer-making BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

T

ake a look at the beverage racks at your local grocery and liquor stores. You may notice that the beer selection has greatly expanded over the last couple of years. This is due to a massive resurgence in the the popularity of craft beer; there are currently over 5300 breweries operating the United States, according 2016 data that’s provided by the Brewers Association. There have never been this many breweries in our fair land, and the last time we were even close to this number was back in 1873, before monopolies and, later, Prohibition managed to kill off what was a vibrant beer culture. Utah has not been immune to this resurgence, despite our arcane liquor laws. Our growth in the craft beer market has lagged

behind other states over the last decade or so, but Utah’s industry is catching up, and and we’ve finally gotten our second wind. How much growth? So far since 2016, Utah has already seen the rise of three breweries: Talisman, Fisher and The RoHa Brewing. To finish out 2017, we may likely see an additional four breweries open up shop: Kiitos, RPM, Saltfire and Toasted Barrel. Kiitos Brewing Co.—the name, pronounced “kee’-tos,” means “thank you in Finnish—looks to be the next. Owner Andrew Dasenbrock has been managing dozens of obstacles and roadblocks over the last two years to bring his dream project to life. Thankfully, he persevered, because he/ we all get a brand new brewery out the deal. Every brewery has its niche; some do IPAs, some do low-point beers. Kiitos is shooting for green beer. No, not that shit you drink on St. Patrick’s Day. I’m talking beer that is made with as little impact on the environment as possible. What makes this brewhouse unique from other traditional breweries is its use of a high-efficiency brewing system (HEBS) with the ability to squeeze as much liquid as possible from the spent grains that are used. This cuts down on the amount of weight and waste, not to mention the savings on water. All of these cool gadgets are great, but at the end of the day what we are really looking for are the beers that will be eventually be making their way into our tummies, this

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

is the part where the brewers come in. Helming that big brewing machine is head brewer Clay Tunbow, who has been a member of Utah brewing community for quite a few years, first with Epic Brewing Company and most recently with 2 Row Brewing Company. Tunbow’s familiarity with our market provides Kiitos with technical expertise that will help them navigate Utah’s two beer worlds: the high-point and low-point alcohol game. The plan for Kiitos will be to debut with three different 4 percent ABV beers. As early as next week, you’ll be able to purchase cans of Kiitos Pale Ale, Blonde Ale and Amber Ale. If all goes according to the beer gods’ plans, you should be able snag six-

Kiitos head cellerman Chad Allen

packs at Kiitos’ beer store (608 S. 700 West In SLC) by the third week of September. Dasenbrock and Tunbow aren’t content just to sell you their session beers; they’ve also got plans to get you the higher-alcohol stuff by December. At that time, look for IPAs, Porters, stouts and any other beer style that they can come up with. Keep checking back here for more updates on this new brewery, and all of the other breweries that are making their way to a pint, chalice or stein near you. As always, cheers! CW


GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Red Iguana

The owners of Red Iguana—the Cardenas family—have been in the restaurant business for more than 50 years. Following humble beginnings (the first iteration opened with a dining area that could seat just 18 guests), the restaurant has since grown a national following for serving some of the finest Mexican fare in America—it’s been featured on Diners, DriveIns and Dives, The New York Times and countless pictures and signatures of celebrities adorn its colorful walls. For authentic Mexican fare, turn to dishes like Red Iguana’s signature cochinita pibil, papadzules and puntas de filete a la Norteña (sirloin with bacon). Multiple locations, rediguana.com

Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Takashi

Not only is it the best Japanese in Utah, it might very well be the best sushi and Japanese on this side of the Mississippi. Takashi Gibo’s eclectic and ever-changing list of sushi rolls and dishes traditional to his native homeland makes one wonder if sushi is appropriate for all three meals of the day. For the mild palate, try the crunch ebi roll with shrimp tempura, and for the venturesome, order a round of citrusy mussel shooters with a quail egg yolk. There’s no such thing as a bad meal at Takashi. 18 W. Market St., Salt Lake City, 801-519-9595

now serving breakfast

SEPT 15TH SEPT 16ND SEPT 23RD

Sycamore Slim otter creek

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2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

third friday

Jam w/ JT Draper & Nate Spencer

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GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

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STORE ★★★★★


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CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

9.9 @ AVENUES STREET FAIR

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SEPTEMBER 17, 2017

DOORS AT 12:30PM, SHOW AT 2:00PM

AT CLUB X


O

nce an artist gets past that romantic idea of what it means to create and be creative in the world today, they’re often discouraged to learn that making art isn’t just an effervescent process that miraculously ends with something beautiful. True artists have pushed past that misinterpretation and persevered even when they learn that creating art is about discipline, confronting personal demons and meeting tight deadlines. True artists don’t sit around waiting for inspiration to just fall in their lap. They do as Jack London said—“Go after it with a club.” For this issue, we tracked down 10 local artists whose realities and processes are as varied as their disciplines and asked what inspires them. Their introspective responses reflect exactly which club they like to use to hunt down their respective muses and make their work jump from the sketchbook, canvas or, in some cases, the rawest of instruments—their bodies.

FINDING THEIR

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BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

| COVER STORY |

10 LOCAL ARTISTS SHARE TIPS ON HOW TO STAY INSPIRED.

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Gabriel Danilchik

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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Danilchik’s medium of choice is the ancient art of intaglio, which consists of etching designs into a letterpress plate, slathering them with ink and creating a stamp-like image on a surface. A look at his work reveals a dark, frightening world inspired by Eastern European mythology, medieval weaponry and Gothic horror. “I’ve always been an artist of some kind—from doodling on my homework to taking figure-drawing classes,” Danilchik says. “I got into printmaking during a post-bac community college program in Portland.” Once in Utah, he secured a position at Salt Lake City’s Mandate Press. “I’ve had the opportunity to focus on the polymer-plate letterpress-printed art that I’ve been doing,” he says. In addition to his work at Mandate, Danilchik recently appeared as a vendor at Craft Lake City and Crucialfest. Because his prints can be easily produced and copied from his original plates, it makes it easier for Danilchik to keep his original art. “I grow attached,” he says. “Selling one painting that I’ll never see again would break my heart.” As his aesthetic embodies eerie, fantasy-influenced tones, that’s where he looks for inspiration. “I like to depict scenes that tell a story but are not entirely spelled out,” he says. “The inspirations for a lot of these come from my love of sci-fi and fantasy, as well as classic literature … and from listening to heavy metal.”

GREYFRAMEPHOTO.COM

ETCHING, ENGRAVING AND PRINTMAKING ARTIST


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Mylo Fowler NATURE PHOTOGRAPHER

24 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

MYLO FOWLER

MYLO FOWLER

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MYLO FOWLER

The quest for inspiration is one that Fowler considers a spiritual endeavor. “The root of creativity is a conviction to pursue a craft,” he states. “Being Navajo allows me to share the important and meaningful ties we have to the land and light of the Great Creator.” Fowler is a professional photographer who draws upon his cultural identity and his family’s love for adventure to inform his work. “I love including my kids and wife in most, if not all, of my adventures. They make the experience more meaningful,” he says. Having two young children who are constantly asking questions about the world around them provides him with a constant stream of new ideas and perspectives. “They inspire me to learn more about shapes of rocks, geology, formations of landscapes or distinct animal features in their environment,” he says. Fowler’s career as a photographer has given him a unique opportunity to help out those in need. When the giant mine spill in Colorado contaminated the San Juan River in 2015, Fowler sold prints to raise funds to purchase drinking water for Navajo Nation residents. The effort eventually raised enough money to send 40,000 bottles of water to the reservation. “I’m always learning about unique lifestyles and viewpoints people have about the land,” he says. “It seems that once you know, you know, and the deep roots fuel the ‘what’s next.’”

T! O B O R Y N I H S BI G News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

exclusively on cityweekly.net


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Rebecca Fenton FASHION DESIGNER

As one of Utah’s most sought-after fashion designers, Fenton doesn’t have time to be uninspired. She creates her Gothic and sci-fi-influenced pieces at her Farmington home studio—an inviting space filled with velvet furniture and Lego box-sets. “Legos are the ultimate symbol of creativity,” she says as I geek out over her collection. Fenton is a fan of art and design that has a slightly creepy aesthetic without veering too much into horror territory—think Edward Gorey meets Tim Burton. Her unique take on fashion began early in her childhood. “I have always had my own style and wanted to express that, but it wasn’t something that you could ever buy in the shops—so I started creating for myself,” she says. Fenton has been designing clothes for 22 years, and has enjoyed participating in several runway shows. When she needs an extra jolt of creativity, she taps into the imaginations of others. “I am inspired by art and music. Both play a vital role in my design process and keep the creativity gears working,” she says. “I have to surround myself in art. There is always music playing when I am creating.” Discussing some of her favorite bands—The National and HÆLOS among them—she explains that her creativity comes from exploring the worlds of other artists and imagining her own entry point into those worlds: “I love discovering new songs that just spark the artist in me.”

MODEL: MARIA MORENO ARCHULETA PHOTOGRAPHY: RUSSELL ANDERSON HAIR: STEFANIE TYLER MAKEUP: NICHOLLE ROBERSON

MODELS: MANDY SULLIVAN AND AMBER PEARSON PHOTOGRAPHY: JESSICA JANAE MAGALEI HAIR AND MAKEUP: STEPHANIE MARSH


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ACTOR AND PLAYWRIGHT

RICK POLLOCK COURTESY PLAN-B THEATRE

When most kids his age sat around bitching about how there was nothing to do, a young Bluford consumed films and recreated them himself. “I used to watch my favorite Disney movies like The Lion King and Beauty and the Beast and memorize every single word, sound and phrase—it was literally my favorite pastime,” he recalls. With a childhood hobby like that, and a mother who encouraged him to recite poetry and perform monologues at retirement homes, Bluford’s career as an actor began pretty much at birth. “Performing is part of my DNA,” he says. In addition to the performing arts, Bluford is an accomplished writer. His play Mama won a grant from the David Ross Fetzer Foundation for Emerging Artists, then it was performed as part of Plan-B Theatre Co.’s 2015 season. “As an actor, you revel in the world that someone has created for you; as a writer, it’s your job and responsibility to create those environments,” he says. “Storytelling is really what I love. Acting, directing, writing, dancing, singing—all of it is a sort of storytelling.” With such a wide range of interests, Bluford doesn’t find it terribly difficult to stay inspired. “Life has so many stories to tell. That’s why those of us who tell stories must hold ourselves responsible for the kind of inspiration we put out in the universe,” he says. “People are full of wonderful stories—all you have to do is watch and listen.”

Kalyn West and Carleton Bluford in The Third Crossing

RICK POLLOCK COURTESY PLAN-B THEATRE

RICK POLLOCK COURTESY PLAN-B THEATRE

Dee-Dee DarbyDuffin in Mama

28 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

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Carleton Bluford

MAKE-UP

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MEGAN KENNEDY

I was first drawn into Kennedy’s foreboding and necrotic world when I spotted one of her pieces on display at Watchtower Café. Ever since, I’ve become enamored of her photography skills, which capture the beauty of typically unsettling images. “My consistent themes are death, isolation, power, insanity, nature and dreams,” she says. “I typically have a dark, femme, pagan aesthetic.” Kennedy discovered the therapeutic nature that art and photography can have in her late teens. “I was coping with undiagnosed PTSD and an unstable family life,” she says. “I discovered dark, digital art and along with it, a way for me to express the ugly and upsetting emotions I was enduring because of my life circumstances.” When she branched out from writing, which she has done consistently throughout her life, she started to see visual art as a way to process the pain that she had experienced. “I’ve been lucky enough to develop my style and skills over the past decade and create something I’m very proud of,” she says. That something is Abuse of Reason Art and Photography, her online digital studio. She maintains her craft and creativity by believing in her work and the story that she has to tell. “Nothing cripples my imagination or output faster than self-doubt,” she says. “I don’t have a quick fix for recharging that faith in oneself, I just know that I’m never better than when I’m acting as my own champion.”

MEGAN KENNEDY

PHOTOGRAPHER AND DIGITAL ARTIST

MEGAN KENNEDY

Justin Watson NEW MEDIA ARTIST

One of the most recent artists in residence at Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Watson has defined himself by his ability to break boundaries and seek artistic expression in a wide range of media. “A lot of my work processes are in direct opposition to the definition of art brands,” he says. “Currently, my interests are aligned with multi-channel nonlinear video installations, 3-D animation and sound.” Watson’s origins built a solid foundation for his more modern, technology-based pieces. “I painted and used pen and ink for nearly a decade,” he says. “My process is quite cyclical, however, so I wouldn’t be surprised if I eventually shift back in that direction.” Even after embracing the tech component, some might be surprised at his back-to-basics approach. “Pen and ink, in particular, still fascinates me for its high degree of risk versus choice,” he says. “There’s no turning back, no undo button.” Watson’s migration to technology and screen-based mediums has helped him turn any space that he currently occupies into a creative one. “There’s a real pragmatism that stems from being able to carry a laptop anywhere and keep working,” he says. “I’ve modeled it in a way that I can work anywhere.” Outside of places like coffee shops and bustling city streets that contain a lot of different stimuli, Watson uses his own curiosity to fuel his inspiration. “Curiosity in how things work; curiosity in what makes us human,” he clarifies. “I have an intense passion about most things. I could probably sit through a lecture on the various striations of limestone discovered throughout the world and still find fascination and awe.”

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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Megan Kennedy


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Laura BrickKempski

NATHAN SWEET PHOTOGRAPHY

Entering her fourth year with Odyssey Dance Theatre, Brick-Kempski’s inspiration flows from keeping in motion. “I’ve been dancing since I was 3 years old. I loved moving my body through space when I was young,” she says. “As I aged, dance became a stabilizer in my life. When I’m feeling disheartened, unbalanced or merely out of sorts, I know when I walk into the studio and move my body, I’ll be back to a centered place.” Working with the group of professionals at the theater also keeps her creativity in high gear. “It’s hard not to be inspired on a daily basis dancing for Odyssey,” she says. “I’m surrounded by talented dancers who are constantly pushing themselves to make new choices every day.” Her time there also has fostered a deeper love for the process of finding new and exciting perspectives within herself. “I’ve fallen in love with creating characters and surprising myself with what characters are bubbling within me, just waiting to make a stage appearance,” she says. When not dancing, she finds inspiration in other forms of expression. “I’m an avid yogi, and journaling inspires me to find my most genuine being and bring that into the studio every day,” she explains. “Staying open and available to the talented humans around me and the positive energy in the room allows for my creativity to flourish.”

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NATHAN SWEET PHOTOGRAPHY

PROFESSIONAL DANCER

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Jared Steffensen CURATOR AND EDUCATOR

Maintaining a staple like the Utah Museum of Contemporary Art is a creative process in and of itself, which is why Steffensen, curator of exhibits there, likes to stay on top of his artistic game. “I’m interested in the potential of objects to have use beyond their intended purpose, and I usually end up using whatever material it takes to realize my ideas,” he says. “I bounce around from wood to fabric to plastic to digital works on paper. I’m all over the place because I like to constantly be learning a new material or process.” Steffensen’s career as an artist and curator began when he lived in Heidelberg, Germany in the mid-1980s. He had a transformative experience while visiting the Pompidou Center in Paris, where he first saw Knife Ship, a towering sculpture of a Swiss army knife turned Norse longship by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen. “There was something about the fact that I could walk all the way around it that clicked with me,” he reminisces. “It made me realize that the artist had to consider every angle and vantage point while making the sculpture, and that appealed to me.” Steffensen’s trick for staying inspired is to keep in touch with his younger self, which his children help him to do. “I try to keep up with them to stay inspired,” he says. “I still go skateboarding, which is much harder to do in your 40s.”


Star Gate Music Productions Presents

WORLD GOLDEN MEMORIES INTERNATIONAL TOUR

Anna Berezkina Concert Pianist

Bella Chen Concert Pianist

Featuring an International piano duo and all-female orchestra

Peery's Egyptian Theater October 6, 2017

www.stargatemusicproductions.com

224-616-3060

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GRAPHIC DESIGNER

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Creativity and an eye for design are things that make artists attractive to all sorts of companies, even real estate ones. Fox-Huntress works at one such organization as marketing coordinator and director. The day gig, he says, eschews the term graphic designer for picture-put-together-er. “Everything I do comes down to putting a picture together— whether it’s graphic design, video editing, brand building, PR management or social media advertising,” he says. “It all comes down to putting together an experience for an audience.” His interest in graphic design and video editing came from discovering MS Paint and Windows Movie Maker when he was 8. From there, he became interested in how principles of design and striking visuals related to the field of marketing. “I’ve always fallen in line with people who held my same vision,” he says. “I want everything I touch to turn to gold. I’m here to make an impact and inspire the stragglers.” When engagement is often the key to a solid business outcome, it’s crucial to keep the ideas fresh and plentiful. “I take good care to notice what my environment is doing to my immediate thoughts,” he says. “I start my day by sitting down with a cup of coffee and journaling. I write down my goals, my dreams and my aspirations.” Once he’s on a project, FoxHuntress finds that solid time management—and a steady stream of music—helps his thoughts and ideas take shape. “All in all, there are no excuses for living life in the medium,” he says.

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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Samuel Fox-Huntress

Kim-Cerise Damaskin WOODWORKER

Signed & Numbered is one of Salt Lake’s most eclectic home décor shops—they specialize in framing works of art within works of art. Based on the creative nature of the shop’s business, each staff member has their own creative spark. Damaskin, one of the shop’s woodworkers, came from a rich cultural background that helped shape her love of art. “I am French-AmericanNorwegian-Ukrainian, born in Los Angeles. I was lucky enough to travel back to France several times during my childhood and adolescence,” she says. The backand-forthness of it all defined her craft. “My French culture, along with having parents and grandparents that were artists, is what ultimately birthed my love of art,” she says. When she was a teenager, her love of art eventually blossomed into a passion for woodworking. “What I love most about the creative process of working with wood is the trial and error,” she says. “When I’m learning a new form of jointing or learning how to make a new piece, the way the gears start to turn in my brain as it’s trying to figure out how to do it for the first time. It’s an amazing and satisfying process to be able to go through.” Like many artists with full-time jobs, Damaskin’s creativity occasionally gets stifled by time management. “I have only experienced creative blocks a few times in my life, and when I did, I found this incredible workbook called The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity by Julia Cameron to be a great tool to get those creative juices flowing again,” she says. Through personal challenges, professional demands and parenthood, these artists survived and thrived in honing their creative spirit. Think it’s too late to surrender to your own artistic passion? Perhaps Cameron said it best in her book: “But do you know how old I will be by the time I learn to really play the piano/act/paint/write a decent play? Yes … the same age you will be if you don’t.” CW


NOW WHAT? SIX EXPERTS IN THEIR FIELD OFFER ARTISTIC ADVICE. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

T

Adam Sklute, artistic director, Ballet West

“Work hard, believe harder. Never underestimate the role fate plays in your success, but you have to listen and stay alert to possibilities. Opportunities can look different from what you were expecting. Don’t play the age game of, ‘I am too late for this,’ or, ‘I can only take that kind of chance as a young person.’ Your passion opens doors automatically. Never judge your path against another person’s journey. Above all, leave time for yourself to ponder and be awed by the world and the creative works of others.”

Shannon Hale, author

“There are 1,000 different ways to do it— what worked for one person might not work for the rest. There are so many lies out there: You can’t make a living at this; you have to know people on the inside; a degree in the arts is a waste, etc. In my experience, there’s usually a way to make a living doing what you love, though it probably won’t turn out to be exactly the way you imagined.”

Lisa Sewell, director, Utah Arts Festival

“Having been involved with the festival since the mid-’90s, I have had a great opportunity to see the tremendous growth in the arts in our state and across the country. There’s been an explosion of artists applying in all the artistic formats—visual, performing, literary, film—over the years. Gone are the days when we’d have 50 musical groups submitting cassette tapes to perform, or 100 visual artists submitting slides of their images. It’s a much more competitive market for artists these days to get in front of audiences and get their work noticed. I’ve seen a huge leap in the quality of artwork out there. I’m always blown away that artists are pushing the envelope and stretching and moving in new and different directions—that’s exciting to see each year. That would be my advice: Keep exploring new ground; recognize and value the energy and agony that goes into being an artist. I don’t think it comes easily to any of us.” CW

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“One word comes to mind: commit. For me, if one really wants to have a successful career—not just in the arts, but any industry— one has to commit and give it 100 percent. A great career is the product of about 25 percent talent, about 25 percent luck, (taking the opportunities when they present themselves). However, that other 50 percent is just hard work and commitment. The thing about commitment is—if you do it—you will not have any regrets. You may not find success, you may not reach all your goals. However, if you endeavored 100 percent toward your objective, you will likely have success and definitely have the gratification and pride in knowing you gave it your all.”

John Cooper, director, Sundance Film Festival

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“You must love what you do, and if you can imagine yourself doing something else, do that. But if there is nothing else in the world you can see yourself doing, take every opportunity you can find to practice your craft, to interact, to network, and to collaborate with other artists. Never say no to an offer of work; you never know where that connection will lead you. Accept problems and challenges as opportunities to make a more creative choice. And finally, trust your inner voice. At the end of the day, you only have yourself to answer to.”

“Don’t shy away from controversial or divisive subjects for your work. Our country is in a time with so much hate, violence, inequality and fear, and we need art that challenges people, changes perspectives and makes our community stronger.”

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Karen Azenberg, artistic director, Pioneer Theatre Co.

Shandra Benito, exec. director, Art Access Gallery

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

he prospect of making a career in the arts seems like a daunting one, as every dad who ever asked “How are you going to pay your rent?” will tell you. But plenty of people manage to succeed—and some of those who have are willing to share their thoughts on how others might join them. We asked professionals across multiple disciplines in the Utah arts community what advice they would give to aspiring artists, and their answers were honest, revealing and—best of all—encouraging.

NIJRON

SO, YOU FOUND YOUR


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TED PETERSON

COURTESY RIRIE-WOODBURY DANCE CO.

2017-2018 PERFORMING ARTS CALENDAR

BYU Dance in Concert

Ballet West (balletwest.org) Oct. 19-22, Aladdin Nov. 3-11, Carmina Burana Dec. 2-30, The Nutcracker Feb. 9-25, Cinderella April 13-21, The Shakespeare Suite May 18-26, National Choreographic Festival Broadway at the Eccles (broadwayattheeccles.com) Oct. 10-15, An American in Paris Nov. 24-26, Elf Dec. 5-10, The Bodyguard: The Musical Dec. 14-16, A Kurt Bestor Christmas Jan. 9-14, Something Rotten! Feb. 27-March 4, The Sound of Music April 3-8, Riverdance April 11-May 6, Hamilton June 15-17, Jersey Boys July 11-22, The Phantom of the Opera BYU Arts (arts.byu.edu) Sept. 22-23, BYU Dance in Concert Sept. 25, Greek Theater Festival: Ion Sept. 28, Roomful of Teeth Sept. 29, FZF Piano Trio Oct. 3, BYU Choir Showcase Oct. 7, BYU Spectacular with Kristin Chenoweth Oct. 11, Julie Fowlis Oct. 12, Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band Oct. 19, Julian Lage & Chris Eldridge Oct. 20-21, Octubafest Oct. 27-28, A Grand Night of Opera Oct. 28, Orpheus Winds Nov. 1, BYU Symphony Nov. 2, Joshua Bell Nov. 3-18, The Mill on the Floss Nov. 7, Deseret String Quartet Nov. 10-11, Dancensemble Nov. 16-17, The King’s Singers Nov. 17-Dec. 9, Into the Woods Nov. 17-18, Ballet Showcase Dec. 1-2, Christmas Around the World Chamber Music Society of Salt Lake City (cmsofslc.org) Sept. 27, Dover Quartet Oct. 24, Pavel Haas Quartet Nov. 15, Pacifica Quartet Feb. 7, Doric String Quartet Feb. 26, Apollon Musagète Quartet March 15, Horszowski Trio April 12, Fauré Piano Quartet

Live at the Eccles: John Cleese

Egyptian Theatre Co. (parkcityshows.com) Sept. 22-Oct. 8, Odyssey Dance: Thriller Oct. 12-14, Pablo Cruise Oct. 20-21, Mason Jennings Nov. 10-11, Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. Nov. 17-25, Guys & Dolls Dec. 7-9, Elf the Musical Jr. Dec. 14-17, Park City Holiday Spectacular Jan. 4-6, Richard Thompson Grand Theatre (grandtheatrecompany.com) Aug. 24-Sept. 22, Always … Patsy Cline Oct. 12-28, Perdida Nov. 30-Dec. 2, Amahl and the Night Visitors & A Christmas Carol Feb. 8-24, The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940 March 22-April 7, A View from the Bridge May 17-June 9, Monty Python’s Spamalot Jazz SLC (jazzslc.com) Sept. 23, Bill Charlap & Renee Rosnes Oct. 23, The Cookers Nov. 13, Cecile McLorin Salvant Jan. 6, Arturo Sandoval Sextet Feb. 26, Turtle Island Quartet March 31, Joey Alexander Trio April 28, Benny Green Trio May 21, John Clayton Jazz Variety Show Live at the Eccles (live-at-the-eccles.com) Sept. 26, Doobie Brothers Sept. 29, Rob Lowe: Stories I Only Tell My Friends—Live Sept. 30, Wild Kratts Live Oct. 1, Conor Oberst Oct. 4, Cake Oct. 17-18, Bob Dylan & Mavis Staples Oct. 19, Huey Lewis & The News Oct. 20, Tim Allen Oct. 24, The Simon & Garfunkel Story Oct. 24, Travis Wall’s Shaping Sound, After the Curtain Oct. 27, Snap Judgment Nov. 4, Ani DiFranco Nov. 6, Gregory Porter Nov. 14, Michael McDonald Nov. 18, Down the Rabbit Hole Nov. 19, John Cleese and Monty Python & the Holy Grail Dec. 11, Gentri Dec. 12, Lindsey Stirling Jan. 6, Markiplier’s You’re Welcome Tour

Ririe-Woodbury Dance: Parallax

NOVA SLC Chamber Series (novaslc.org) Oct. 29, Madeline Adkins & Fry Street Quartet Nov. 19, Quartet for the End of Time Jan. 14, Mozart, Father and Son Feb. 25, Microconcerto April 15, Bach and New Horizons May 6, Season Finale Peery’s Egyptian Theater—Ogden (egyptiantheaterogden.com) Sept. 18, Mariachi Sol de Jalisco & Ballet Folklorico de las Americas Sept. 23, Chamber Orchestra Ogden Sept. 26, Turtles Live Action Parody Sept. 29, Elvis Rocks Ogden Oct. 6, World Golden Memories International Tour Oct. 13, Fifty Shades of Men Oct. 14, Rocky Mountain Choreography Festival Winner Oct. 27-28, Rocky Horror Picture Show Oct. 30, Crosscurrents Dec. 8-16, Imagine Ballet Theatre: The Nutcracker Pioneer Theatre Co. (pioneertheatre.org) Sept. 15-30, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Oct. 20-Nov. 4, A Comedy of Tenors Dec. 1-20, Newsies Jan. 12-27, Bright Star Feb. 16-March 3, “I” March 16-17, In the Heights: Concert Version March 30-April 14, Twelfth Night May 11-26, Mamma Mia! Plan-B Theatre Co. (planbtheatre.org) Nov. 9-19, The Ice Front March 1-11, The Weird Play April 5-15, Jump Pygmalion Theatre Co. (pygmalionproductions.org) Nov. 3-18, The Weyward Sisters Feb. 2-17, I & You April 20-May 5, Red Bike Repertory Dance Theatre (rdtutah.org) Oct. 5-7, Sanctuary Nov. 16-18, Top Bill Jan. 5-6, Emerge Feb. 24, Regalia March 16-18, Dabke April 12-14, Current

SLAC: Saturday’s Voyeur

Ririe-Woodbury Dance (ririewoodbury.com) Sept. 28-30, Parallax Feb. 2-3, Strata April 26-28, Return Odyssey Dance Theater (odysseydance.com) Oct. 6-30, Thriller Dec. 13-23, Redux Nut-cracker March 1-10, Shut Up and Dance Salt Lake Acting Co. (saltlakeactingcompany.org) Sept. 6-Oct. 15, Surely Goodness and Mercy Oct. 11-Nov. 12, Mercury Dec. 1-29, The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs Jan. 18-28, Stag’s Leap Feb. 7-March 11, Hir April 4-May 13, Fun Home June 27-Sept. 2, Saturday’s Voyeur Tuacahn (tuacahn.org) Through Oct. 18, Newsies Through Oct. 20, Shrek: The Musical Through Oct. 21, Mamma Mia! Nov. 11, Bill Engvall Dec. 8-30, Fairy Tale Christmas University of Utah Theatre (theatre.utah.edu) Sept. 13-14, Steel Pier Oct. 20-29, Love’s Labour’s Lost Nov. 10-19, You Never Can Tell Feb. 16-March 4, The Beautiful Game March 9-17, Up: The Man in the Flying Chair April 6-15, Our Country’s Good Utah Chamber Artists (utahchamberartists.org) Sept. 18-19, In Memoriam Dec. 4, Celebrate March 12, Refuge May 7, Let’s Dance Utah Opera (utahopera.org) Oct. 7-15, La Bohème Jan. 20-28, Moby-Dick March 10-18, Pagliacci/Gianni Schicchi UtahPresents (utahpresents.org) Sept. 14, Kaki King Sept. 26, Roomful of Teeth Sept. 29, One-Man Star Wars Oct. 1, Sichuan University Art Troupe Oct. 20, Vandana Shiva Oct. 28, Ananya Dance Theatre Nov. 4-Dec. 2, White Rabbit, Red Rabbit Nov. 8, Erth’s Dinosaur Zoo Live


Wasatch Theatre Co. (wasatchtheatre.org) Sept. 22-Oct. 8, God’s Favorite April 27-May 12, Clybourne Park May 14-16, Page-to-Stage Festival Westminster College Sept. 14-16, Greek Theater Festival: Ion Oct. 12-21, Love and Information Oct. 23, Music from the Americas Nov. 9-18, Clybourne Park Nov. 20, Chamber Music: A Trip to England Dec. 2, SugarTown Fall Concert Wiseguys, SLC (wiseguyscomedy.com) Sept. 24, Jonathan Falconer Sept. 26, The Hodge Twins Sept. 28-30, Ryan Hamilton Oct. 5-7, Norm MacDonald Oct. 8, Christopher Titus Oct. 12, Michael Quu Oct. 13-14, Nick Swardson Oct. 20-21, Fortune Feimster Oct. 25-26, The Pump and Dump Show Oct. 27-28, Ron Funches Nov. 2-4, Colin Quinn Nov. 9-11, Russell Peters Nov. 17-18, Dave Attell Nov. 24-25, Bryan Callen Nov. 30-Dec. 2, Jon Reep Dec. 8-9, John Heffron Dec. 14-17, Justin Willman Dec. 29-31, Nate Bargatze Jan. 5-6, Gary Gulman Feb. 2-3, Jeff Dye For additional listings, including literary events, museums and galleries, visit cityweekly.net

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | 41

Utah Symphony (usuo.org) Sept. 22-23, Saint-Saëns & Dvorák Sept. 26, Salute to Youth Oct. 20, Beethoven’s Fifth Oct. 24, The Nightmare Before Christmas Oct. 27-28, Broadway Divas Nov. 3-4, Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances Nov. 17-18, Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini Nov. 25-26, Messiah Sing-In Dec. 1-2, Saint-Saëns Organ Symphony Dec. 8-9, Saint-Saëns Piano Concerto No. 2 Dec. 12, Holiday Hits with Midtown Men Dec. 15-16, A Broadway Christmas Dec. 19, Leann Rimes Dec. 21-23, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Live Jan. 4, Dvorák’s Violin Concerto Jan. 11, Rachmaninoff and Stravinsky Feb 2-3, Mozart and Haydn Feb. 9-10, Dancing & Romancing Feb. 17, High Noon in Concert March 2-3, Bernstein at 100 March 17, Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham April 6-7, Tchaikovsky’s “Little Russian” & Prokofiev April 13-15, Elvis: The King’s Songbook April 14, Enchantment Theatre: Scheherezade April 20-21, Grieg’s Piano Concerto April 27-28, Shostakovich

Vivint SmartHome Arena (vivintarena.com) Sept. 27, Tim McGraw & Faith Hill Oct. 16, Janet Jackson Nov. 1, Air1 Positive Hits Tour Nov. 16-19, Disney on Ice Nov. 21, Trans-Siberian Orchestra Nov. 24, Katy Perry Nov. 29, Billy Joel Dec. 8, The Piano Guys Dec. 12, Foo Fighters Dec. 14, Lady Gaga Dec. 16, Gabriel Iglesias Feb. 6, The Killers

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Utah Shakespeare Festival (bard.org) Sept. 27-Oct. 21, The Tavern Summer 2018, dates TBD: Henry VI Part 1; The Merry Wives of Windsor; The Merchant of Venice; Othello; Big River; The Liar; The Foreigner; Pearl’s in the House

May 4-5, Strauss’ Don Quixote & Zarathustra May 22, All-Star Evening May 25-26, Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2

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Utah Repertory Theatre (utahrep.org) Nov. 25-Dec. 10, Bridges of Madison County

Wiseguys: Ron Funches

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Dec. 4-9, The Lower Lights Christmas Concerts Feb. 1-2, Molly Sweeney Feb. 10, Scott Silven: Wonders at Dusk Feb. 14, Steven Page & the Art of Time Ensemble Feb. 20-22, Banff Film Festival Feb. 23-24, Doug Varone and Dancers Feb. 27, Black Violin March 5, Radical Reels March 7, Globalfest March 16-17, School of Dance Gala March 23-24, Schoolhouse Rock Live Jr. March 29, Manual Cinema April 6, The Singing Bois April 13, Whose Live Anyway? April 20-21, Candide April 27-28, Compagnia TPO: Farfalle

DAVE INGRAM

UTAH SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

Utah Shakespeare: Othello


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42 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

FRIDAY 9/15

“Prima facie” is a Latin phrase sometimes used in legal documents that means “at first glance” or “based on first impressions.” It’s a fitting title for a multimedia art exhibition that challenges such impressions, and questions the nature of perception itself. Alice Gallery’s new exhibit prima facie—presenting photography, sculpture and drawings by Matt Kruback and Naomi Marine—doesn’t take common assumptions about perception at face value. Their pieces navigate different routes around the subject matter, utilizing schematic drawing, scientific illustration, taxidermy and documentary photography, in addition to elements of the fantastical. Kruback’s 2016 pigment print “Rhetoric” (pictured), for example, fixes its eye on the most solid of objects—rocks—while Marine’s ink-onpaper “Apparition” seems to reveal the most ethereal, cloud-like images of the imagination. But the artists’ bodies of work bridge the gap between those two extremes. Marine explains via email, “Some of the works use precise details, diagramming elements or other visual indicators of exactitude, measurement and evaluation to present abstract marks/ forms, offering a contradiction between language and our assumptions about the content from imagery. Other works combine concrete, even hyper-real, elements to disrupt perception.” Art thus becomes a project of philosophy, allowing us to consider how we understand the world through what we see—or what we think we see. (Brian Staker) Matt Kruback & Naomi Marine: prima facie @ Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801-236-7555, free, Sept. 15-Nov. 10; Gallery Stroll reception, Sept. 15, 6-9 p.m.; visualarts.utah.gov

When comedian Collin Williams talks about the origin for his new one-man show My Suicide Note, he’s not merely speaking metaphorically. “I sketched out original note August of last year,” Williams says. “And as a comedian, it gets ingrained in you to write jokes into things. When I finally released it, I said, ‘I’m not sure if this is going to be a suicide note or a show.’” Fortunately, it turned out to be the latter—a confessional and darkly humorous exploration of his own history with suicidal thoughts and mental health issues, built on an actual 12-page note. “A lot of time people will think, oh, this one thing happened and that’s why [someone considers suicide],” Williams says. “It’s not one thing; it’s an extended river of shit that overflows the dam, and floods the town below called Hope. In my case, it was a lifetime of stuff.” While Williams has performed much of the material in pieces at other shows, this week’s event—which also serves as a fundraiser for the Utah chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness—marks its world premiere. The comedian hopes that audiences are entertained and perhaps even inspired by the personal struggle he describes, including surviving childhood sexual abuse, but he’s also forthright about the show’s role in his own attempts at healing. “Number one, honestly, it’s my own catharsis,” he says. “You definitely want people to enjoy the show, and I’ve worked hard, but this is literally what I live for at this point.” (Scott Renshaw) Collin Williams: My Suicide Note @ Club at 50 West, 50 W. 300 South, Sept. 15, 7:30 p.m., $12, suicidenote.me

Collin Williams: My Suicide Note

TODD KEITH

TWILA VICTORY

COURTESTY OF THE ARTIST

FRIDAY 9/15

Matt Kruback & Naomi Marine: prima facie

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

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ESSENTIALS

the

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, SEPT. 14-20, 2017

FRIDAY 9/15

Pioneer Theatre Co.: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time One of the perqs of being a theater company’s artistic director is deciding not just which shows become part of the season, but which ones you can direct yourself. The flip-side is the challenge Pioneer Theatre Co.’s Karen Azenberg discovered when she took on directing the Tony Award-winning play The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. “I saw the New York production,” Azenberg says, “and was really affected by the story, and the artistry of what this play achieved with a very different kind of technical design concept. I felt excited that I could have my own try at that. Then it’s, ‘What am I going to do?’ and the panic can set in.” Self-deprecation aside, Azenberg has terrific material in the adaptation of Mark Haddon’s best-seller, about a young British man named Christopher investigating the killing of a neighborhood dog. While specific reference to autism or Asperger’s syndrome isn’t in the text, Christopher is generally understood to be on the spectrum, presenting unique challenges and opportunities in bringing that character to the stage. “What researchers and parents of children on the spectrum said to us, is, ‘When you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism.’ What that gives you, and I say this not at all glibly, is the ability to pick and choose how specific aspects serve the storytelling. … At its heart, the play is about a family. The autism piece, while in one sense critical, in another sense is secondary.” (SR) The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time @ Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-7522, Sept. 15-30, dates and times vary, $25-$49, pioneertheatre.org

SATURDAY 9/16 Lights Fest

The time is coming for the nights to grow long and the days to turn chilly. The sun that has been keeping us warm—even if it wasn’t always within the range we preferred—will be less available to extend its golden rays. As summer comes to a close, it seems only fitting to have a final celebration of light. Eagle Mountain’s Lights Fest offers music from live performers and delicious eats from a variety of food trucks, in addition to a few more kid-focused activities like face-painting and bouncy houses. But these merely set the stage for the main event: a mass lantern launch. Each ticket for The Lights Fest comes with a “sky lantern” (sort of a small hot-air balloon), as well as a marker and key-chain flashlight. As one, you and every other attendee can light and release an eco-friendly, biodegradable lantern into the sky. You can fill yours with marker-written wishes, dreams or goals, or leave it empty of everything but that small glimmer of light. The festival is more than just a goodbye to what was; it is also a way to prepare for the change that is to come. It’s a simple symbol of hope to remind us that: Winter may be on its way, but no one has to face the cold darkness alone. And while the Lights Fest is for-profit, they are partnering with the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy nonprofit Mitchell’s Journey for the Utah event. So you can take comfort in the fact that you’re having fun for a good cause. (Casey Koldewyn) Lights Fest @ Cory Wride Memorial Park, 806 N. Pony Express Parkway, Eagle Mountain, Sept. 16, 4:30-9 p.m., $27-$53, thelightsfest.com


A&E

Border Crossing BY KATE MATTINGLY comments@cityweekly.net @kategmattingly

Kaki King

Kingsbury Hall 1395 E. Presidents Circle 801-581-7100 Thursday, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m. $10-$25 tickets.utah.edu

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KAKI KING: THE NECK IS A BRIDGE TO THE BODY

Theatre (ADT), a Twin Cities-based, contemporary Indian-American dance company dedicated to social justice, comes to Salt Lake City for the first time on Oct. 28 with their performance Shyamali: Sprouting Words. Dr. Ananya Chatterjea, director of the company, was inspired in part by the work of author and activist Vandana Shiva, one of the founders of Navdanya, an Indiabased program that promotes biodiversity. On Oct. 20, Shiva is set to deliver a public lecture at Libby Gardner Hall, the firstever collaboration between UtahPresents and the University of Utah’s Sustainability Office. During the week before the performance, Ananya Dance Theatre will be in residence at the university to work with students from environmental and sustainability studies and the School of Dance. Chatterjea looks forward to bringing her company to the campus where she has been a guest artist. “I hope that the majestic mountains of Utah inspire us to connect individual and ecological differences and resonances.” Liz Ivkovich—research, communication and education coordinator of the Sustainability Office—organized this collaboration and says she’s grateful for Horejsi’s enthusiasm. “She’s such a ‘yes’ person. She said, ‘Let’s make it happen,’” Ivkovich says. It’s just another example of UtahPresents’ effective mission: “Exploring and enriching the human experience.” Or, as Horejsi says, highlighting the “positive impact of creativity in a community.” CW

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S

tage doors tend to attract uninvited groupies and fans seeking an autograph after a show. But with its new “Stagedoor” series, UtahPresents invites audience members right in. In fact, those at guitarist and composer Kaki King’s Sept. 14 performance at Kingsbury Hall will be seated on stage with her. Brooke Horejsi, director of UtahPresents, says concepts like this one create an environment that’s “intentionally intimate” and “less traditional.” A self-defined connecter, Horejsi says she continually asks herself, “Who is in this community? And who in this community regularly doesn’t get represented?” Thursday’s event, The Neck is a Bridge to the Body, is also unconventional in other ways: King incorporates large-scale, often abstract digital projections with her music. It’s one of UtahPresents’ many offerings this season that highlight distinct and multidisciplinary performances. “When I curate a season, I’m thinking about how I’m making space in my programming for artists who identify in nonconventional ways,” Horejsi says. “Their voices are just as important as a traditional ballet company or amazing violinist. The opportunity to experience the voices of a diversity of artists is what can make us, as audiences, better and more thoughtful community members and world citizens.” Over the course of the 2017-2018 season,

UtahPresents plans to showcase several performances with unconventional approaches, and which connect members of the arts community in unique ways. In November, the theater production White Rabbit, Red Rabbit invites eight individuals over the course of eight nights to perform a play that they’ll see for the first time when they open an envelope containing the script an hour before showtime. February brings a performance by Doug Varone and Dancers which includes participation by members of Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. and students from the University of Utah dance program. Horejsi is keenly aware of the diversity in Salt Lake City, and her programming includes a spectrum of artists and audiences. When Obie-winning performance artist and provocateur Taylor Mac appeared last season, Horejsi recalls, “People I had never met before were hugging me in the lobby and there was a literal avalanche of emails, texts and Facebook posts. Many said, ‘We can’t believe this artist was on stage at Kingsbury Hall because this part of our community hasn’t traditionally been on that historic stage.” Horejsi’s vision is supported by a budget that comes from varied sources. “As a mission-driven presenter, focused on the positive impact of creativity in a community, the performances themselves are a revenue negative endeavor,” she explains. The operating budget of UtahPresents is “a hair over $2 million,” with income from private philanthropy, government grants, ticket revenue and the university, as well as a $16 per student annual fee. This fee enables students to see all of its offerings for $5 a show, and Horejsi believes that by requiring a small sum for UtahPresents’ events, they are reinforcing the importance of the arts. “When we make all arts events free, it may send a message that they have no value,” she says. “It trains generations of people to question the significance of art and artists.” Other scheduled performances this season blur borders between artistic creation, education and activism. Ananya Dance

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UtahPresents hosts a season of collaborative and unconventional events.

SIMONE CECCHETTI

THEATER


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44 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | CITY WEEKLY |

moreESSENTIALS

DAVID VOGEL

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

A photographic exhibition capturing three decades of Salt Lake City’s Twilight Concert Series—including work by Fred Hayes, Dave Brewer and David Vogel (Vogel’s shot of Solange is pictured)—is featured in 30 Years of Twilight Concerts at The Clubhouse (850 E. South Temple), in a free public exhibition on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2-11 p.m.

PERFORMANCE

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

THEATER

Classical Greek Theater Festival: Ion Westminster College Courage Theater, 1840 S. 1300 East, Sept. 14-16, 7:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, Sept. 15-30, times vary, pioneertheatre.org (see p. 42) Desire Under the Elms Regent Street Black Box, 131 S. Main, through Sept. 16, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m.; stingandhoney.org Forever Plaid Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, through Nov. 15, Monday-Saturday, times vary, hct.org Next to Normal Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, through Sept. 17, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m., egyptiantheatrecompany.org Sister Act: The Musical Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, through Sept. 16, FridaySaturday, times vary, empresstheatre.com Surely Goodness and Mercy Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Oct. 15, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org

DANCE

Anton Nel Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Sept. 15, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Augustin Hadelich Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Sept. 15-16, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Beethoven’s Violin Concerto Abravanel Hall, 123 W South Temple, Sep 15-16, 7:30 p.m., usuo.org Kaki King: The Neck Is a Bridge to the Body Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., $10-$25, tickets.utah.edu (see p. 43)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Alex Edelman Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Collin Williams Club 50 West, 50 W. 300 South, Sept. 15, 7:30 p.m., comiccollin.com (see p. 42) Nick Guerra Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Sept. 15-16, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Sept. 15-16, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Steel Pier Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East, Sept. 15-24, Friday-Sunday, times vary, tickets.utah.edu

John Day: The Longevity Plan Park City Library, 1255 Park Ave, Sept. 14, 6:30 p.m., utahhumanities.org

Rodrigo Toscano: Explosion Rocks Springfield Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, Sept. 14, 7 p.m. & Sept. 15, 12 p.m., utahhumanities.org Dar Williams: What I Found in a Thousand Towns The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 15, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Franny Choi & Abraham Smith Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, Sept. 15, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Alyson Peterson: The Exiled Prince The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 16, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Camille Andros: Charlotte the Scientist Is Squished The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Sept. 16, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Richard Paul Evans: Michael Vey 7: The Final Spark Barnes & Noble, 1780 Woodland Park Drive, Layton, Sept. 17, 7 p.m. barnesandnoble.com Bruce Campbell: Hail to the Chin: Further Confessions of a B-Movie Actor Tower Theatre, 876 E. 900 South, Sept. 19, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com McKelle George: Speak Easy, Speak Love DayRiverside Branch Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, Sept. 19, 7 p.m., slcpl.org Adam Gianelli & Kase Johnstun SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Sept. 20, 7 p.m., utahhumanities.org

SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Festa Italiana The Gateway, 18 N. Rio Grande St., Sep 16-17, festaitalianaslc.com Get Into the River Festival Various locations, through Sept. 29; Fairpark Trailhead, 1220 W. North Temple, Sept. 23, 3-7 p.m., getintotheriver.org Lights Fest Cory Wride Memorial Park, 806 N. Pony Express Parkway, Eagle Mountain, Sept. 16, 4:30-9 p.m., $27-$53, thelightsfest.com (see p. 42) Utah State Fair Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, 801-538-8400, through Sept. 17, utahstatefair.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

30 Years of Twilight Concerts The Clubhouse, 850 E. South Temple, Sept. 16, 2-11 p.m., clubhouseslc.com (see above) Ali Mitchell: Oil Fields Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, Sept. 15-Oct. 11, facebook.com/mestizoarts Anastasia Dukhanina Redman Gallery, 1240 E. 2100 South, floors 6 & 7, Sept. 15-Oct. 31; artist reception Sept. 15, 6-9 p.m., redmangallery.com Anthony Solorzano: Popular Religiosity in the Latino Communities of Utah SLC Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Sept. 22, slcpl.org Amy Fairchild: Color My World SLC Main Library,

210 E. 400 South, through Sept. 15, slcpl.org Art Meets Fashion SLC Fashion Institute, 231 E. 400 South, Sept. 16, 7 p.m., artmeetsfashionamf.com Art2Go Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Sept. 15-Oct. 13; artists’ reception Sept. 15, 6-9 p.m., accessart.org Cary Griffiths: Reprise Art at The Main, 210 E. 400 South, through Oct. 14; artist reception Sept. 15, 6-9 p.m., artatthemain.com E. Clark Marshall: Of Stone and Substance Art Access Gallery, Sept. 15-Oct. 13; artist’s reception Sept. 15, 6-9 p.m., accessart.org Eileen Vestal: Love Letter to Italy Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Expressions of Us Tracy Aviary, 589 E. 1300 South, Sept. 19, 5-7:30 p.m., workactivitycenter.org Ilse Bing Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 31, umfa.utah.edu Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Dec. 9, utahmoca.org Janiece Murray Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Jason Manley: Shrinking Room UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 30, utahmoca.org Jimmi Toro: Kindle a Light Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, through Nov. 26, kimballartcenter.org Joseph Bishop: Smoke Signals Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, through Sept. 14, slcpl.org Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here UMFA, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Laura Sharp Wilson Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Logan Sorenson: A Land Further North: Images from Iceland Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, through Oct. 26, slcpl.org Mansa Adams SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Sept. 24, slcpl.org Matt Kruback and Naomi Marine: prima facie Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, Sept. 15-Nov. 10, visualarts.utah.gov (see p. 42) Ryan Rue Allen: Flowing Imagination and Changes Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, through Sept. 30, slcpl.org Skate Deck Challenge Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande, through Oct. 1; gallery stroll reception Sept. 22, urbanartsgallery.org Things Lost to Time SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, through Sept. 30, slcpl.org Tina Vigos: Seeking Grace Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Tom Horton Photography Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, Sept. 15-Oct. 8, redbuttegarden.org Utah Native American Artist Exhibition Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, through Oct. 12, culturalcelebration.org Yidan Gou Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org

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FILM REVIEW

Double-EhSeven

CINEMA

American Assassin stumbles through a mix of gritty and crowd-pleasing espionage. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw LIONSGATE FILMS

F

Michael Keaton (2nd from left) and Dylan O’Brien (far right) in American Assassin. mined to interject big ideas about who the bad guys really are in geopolitics, and proving its hardcore bona fides by including an extended sequence in which Hurley is tortured with pulled fingernails and car batteries. It’s a philosophical burden that the movie isn’t remotely equipped to carry, not when it also wants to be the kind of movie where the good guy and bad guy duke it out on a runaway, nuke-laden speedboat. Even more unfortunate, however, is the absence of charismatic leading men. O’Brien’s a perfectly serviceable actor, but he never has the presence required to be convincing as a killer—even when wearing the beard that suggests a college junior cosplaying as his dorm room Che poster—nor does Kitsch convey the requisite haunted nihilism. Keaton gets to play the kind of crazed intensity that brings out the best in him, but he’s got nobody to play off of. American Assassin keeps stumbling through an uncomfortable middle ground between would-be blockbuster wildness and chinstroking intensity, never really working as either one. It’s fakin’, not stirring. CW

AMERICAN ASSASSIN

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BB Dylan O’Brien Michael Keaton Taylor Kitsch R

TRY THESE Homeland (2011) Claire Danes Mandy Patinkin NR

The Americans (2013) Keri Russell Matthew Rhys NR

The Scorch Trials (2014) Dylan O’Brien Kaya Scodelario PG-13

SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | 45

Casino Royale (2006) Daniel Craig Eva Green PG-13

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

than and David Suchet), who recognize his unique skills and passion, and send him to train with badass mentor Stan Hurley (Michael Keaton). And just in time, too, since a mysterious figure known only as Ghost (Taylor Kitsch) appears to be helping Iran obtain stolen plutonium to build a nuclear weapon. The timeline for Mitch’s autodidactic transformation might be just a tad improbable—it basically takes him just over a year to turn himself from Random Scruffy American Dudebro into Batman—but it allows the efficiency of throwing him head-first into the no-posers-allowed training program led by Keaton’s Hurley. Between the virtual-reality target-practice simulations, there are plenty of through-gritted-teeth lessons about killing and trying not to be killed, all of which is meant to establish an emotional connection between Mitch and Hurley. That’s something James Bond movies aren’t generally all about: giving Bond a surrogate father figure. There are, however, plenty of establishing shots of cities like Istanbul and Rome, and at least one possible femme fatale in the form of an agent (Shiva Negar) whose loyalties might be unclear. Kitsch provides the requisite villain who has a lot to say about how justifiable his actions are—it’s not a far cry from Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon’s The Trip to Italy shtick about Bond villains who purr “we’re not so very different”—on the way to a big showdown between Mitch and Ghost on a runaway speedboat that also happens to be carrying an armed-andcounting-down nuclear warhead. Those are big stakes, 007-style. But American Assassin also seems deter-

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

or decades, producers and filmmakers have been trying to solve a challenging dilemma: How to make a James Bond movie without James Bond? Since 1962, the film franchise built on Ian Fleming’s British superspy has established a reliably crowdpleasing formula: exotic locations, overthe-top action, beautiful women and a dashing, unflappable hero. So while certain legal niceties preclude just anyone from making a movie about James Bond, creators have tried with varying degrees of success—and a rare home-run like the Fast & Furious series—to duplicate the formula. If you can’t serve them a Coke, at least serve them a distractingly similar off-brand equivalent. It’s not entirely fair to suggest that American Assassin is trying to be ersatz Bond, since many members of the creative team—including director and former Homeland executive producer Michael Cuesta, and co-screenwriter and The Americans writer/producer Stephen Schiff—have experience with grittier, more complex approaches to international espionage. Yet in its attempt to tell the origin story of author Vince Flynn’s counterterrorism agent protagonist Mitch Rapp, American Assassin seems balanced unsteadily between serious political thriller and action spectacle. This is what happens when somebody tries to take a James Bond movie and make it, you know, about something. The story opens on a sunny Spanish beach, where young Mitch (Dylan O’Brien) is about to have the happiest day of his life after proposing to his girlfriend, Katrina (Charlotte Vega). Ah, but happiness is not to be: A terrorist attack leaves Katrina dead, and 18 months later, Mitch has committed himself to infiltrating the cell responsible and getting revenge. He also catches the attention of U.S. intelligence operatives (Sanaa La-


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46 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. AMERICAN ASSASSIN BB See review on p. 45. Opens Sept. 15 at theaters valleywide. (R) BEACH RATS BBB Writer/director Eliza Hittman—following up her 2013 Sundance feature It Felt Like Love—continues to find poetry in young people trying to figure out their sexual identity. Here, she tells the story of Frankie (Harris Dickinson), a Brooklyn youth who hides his interest in gay chat sites while putting on a straight front with his buddies, his family and a local girl (Madeline Weinstein) whom he begins dating. Hittman frames Frankie’s flailing and aimless days—living at home, seemingly unemployed and hanging with his friends getting high or playing handball—through the lens of his father’s terminal illness, providing a compassionate look at a guy who might come off as just another screw-up. But it’s mostly the tale of a guy who isn’t even ready to admit his sexual orientation to himself, with Dickinson’s performance captured in Hittman’s lingering close-ups of his anxious eyes as he experiments with men and probes those close to him to find out who might reject him. While the plot may be thin in a conventional sense, Beach Rats offers a simple, sad character study of someone unsure about where and how he might find love. Opens Sept. 15 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw ENDLESS POETRY [not yet reviewed] Filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s autobiographical exploration of his youth among artists in Chile. Opens Sept. 15 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—SR MOTHER! [not yet reviewed] The lives of a married couple (Jennifer Lawrence and Javier

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Bardem) are changed forever by the arrival of two mysterious strangers. Opens Sept. 15 at theaters valleywide. (R) VICEROY’S HOUSE BBB With political “philosophies” of Brexit and Trump turning people against one another across national and religious lines, an earlier similar catastrophe is worth revisiting. British filmmaker Gurinder Chadha’s look at the partition of India in 1947—into Hindu and Sikh India and Muslim Pakistan—in the wake of that nation’s independence from Britain is a snappy, snappish costume drama in which the last viceroy of India, Lord Louis “Dickie” Mountbatten (Hugh Bonneville), is initially a rather cheery midwife to the closing of the final curtain on the British Empire. He and his wife, Edwina (Gillian Anderson), seem confident that their great white Western beneficence will ensure a smooth path to freedom and progress for the people of India. Chadha (Bend It Like Beckham) gets in a few sly comedic digs at the pompous grandeur of the British Raj, but she treats the Mountbattens themselves with respect, even as their adventure in nation-building descends into the opposite of a white-savior story. The ensuring refugee crisis and sectarian violence during partition—which displaced and killed millions—feel like warnings from the past about paths we seem to be on again today. Opens Sept. 15 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—MaryAnn Johanson

SPECIAL SCREENINGS MR. GAGA At Rose Wagner Center, Sept. 20, 7 p.m. (NR) OBIT. At Park City Film Series, Sept. 15-16, 8 p.m.; Sept. 17, 6 p.m. (PG-13) QUEST At Main Library, Sept. 19, 7 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES HOME AGAIN B Reese Witherspoon’s 40something Los Angelino Alice launches yet another of her rich-white-girl hobbies turned “careers” as an interior decorator and writer-director Hallie Meyers-Shyer— daughter of filmmakers Nancy Meyers (It’s Complicated) and Charles Shyer (Father of the Bride)—does the same with this dreadful rom-com. Unlike her parents’ films—in which causal displays of wealth may be aspirational, but characters are recognizably human—Meyers-Shyer proposes that it’s totes relatable for a single mom of young daughters to invite three wannabe filmmaker dudebros to live in her guest house and take on babysitting chores moments after meeting them. Yet the movie treats as wildly unlikely that 20something Harry (Pico Alexander) would be a suitable romantic partner for her merely because he’s younger. The big “romantic” moment? Harry engages in minor home repairs, inducing swoons in Alice. It’s like a parody of bad porn. (PG-13)—MAJ IT BBB Director Andy Muschietti adapts only half of Stephen King’s novel for this story of seven Maine teenagers doing battle with a malevolent supernatural entity in the form of a creepy clown (Bill Skarsgård). It generally works as a horror movie—leaning hard into disturbing images rather than jump-scares—while the impressive young actors do a fine job with the coming-ofage material emphasizing adolescent awkwardness and anxiety. Yet even with the focus entirely on the young versions of these characters, their individual stories are still shortchanged, and the absence of the decades-spanning part of the narrative leaves it as a “kids in peril vs. evil” scare-fest with no way for childhood trauma to resonate through the years, the way it’s bound to do in the planned Chapter Two. “Pretty good” might be the upper quality range for half a story. (R)—SR MENASHE BB.5 Regional and cultural specificity can only carry a story so far. Menashe (Menashe Lustig) is a widowed Hasidic grocery clerk with a young son, Rieven (Ruben Niborski)—and as is the custom of this community, it’s expected that Rieven will be raised by his wife’s family until he remarries, which Menashe is in no hurry to do. Co-writer/director Joshua Z. Weinstein builds Menashe as a shlimazel who shows low-key rebellion through his resistance to wearing a hat and coat, but once you get past the intriguing details about the setting, there’s an underlying rote quality where it’s easy to anticipate every plot turn. The interaction between Menashe and Rieven brings some complexity to a tale that’s basically about a hapless guy trying to do his best; there’s just more to hope for from any movie than, “Well, that was nice.” (NR)—SR

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BY BILL FROST

@bill_frost

Snark at the Moon

Better Things and Vice Principals return; Salvation finally ends.

T

TV

Better Things (FX)

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Drama), Baskets’ Louie Anderson (Supporting Actor, Comedy), and Westworld’s Thandie Newton (Supporting Actress, Drama). Now you don’t have to watch the Emmys. The first season of Creepypasta (usergenerated internet stories and urban legends) weirdness turned out to be more hype than horror, but Channel Zero: NoEnd House (Season 2 premiere Wednesday, Sept. 20, Syfy) looks more like the one to kick the anthology series into high gear. The setup for No-End House is familiar: A young woman (Amy Forsyth) and her friends trip through “a bizarre house of horrors consisting of a series of increasingly disturbing rooms,” but then throws in the twist that her perceived “reality” might be just another room. Like the current season of American Horror Story (how ‘bout them clowns?), Channel Zero: No-End House is the stuff of mind-melting nightmares. Yay! The funniest aspect of afterlife sitcom The Good Place (Season 2 premiere Wednesday, Sept. 20, NBC) could very well be Concerned Christians breathlessly exclaiming “That’s not the real Heaven!” How could it be? What with the non-judgmental fun and the presence of brown people? After the big reveals that closed Season 1 (spoilers: The Good Place is actually the Bad Place, Ted Danson’s Michael is a lying liarface, and Kristen Bell’s Eleanor is, well, still a terrible person), The Good Place is open to more possibilities now: Could Michael be pulling a double fake-out as a worthiness test? Is the Bad Place the better place? Is Eleanor actually in Twin Peaks? If so, who’s playing the Bang Bang Club tonight? CBS has defined Stoopid Summer TV for the last several years—not even counting Big Brother—with hilariously obtuse shows like Under the Dome, Extant, BrainDead and Zoo, but Salvation (Season 1 finale Wednesday, Sept. 20, CBS) is the best/worst yet. For 11 weeks now, an MIT student, a maverick tech billionaire and a woman who does … something? … at the Pentagon have been postulating, posing and occasionally even working to find a way to stop an asteroid from wiping out the planet. The title implies they’ll figure it out, but I’ve been rooting for the mass extinction event since the first episode wherein the phrase “gravity tractor” was uttered. Bring on oblivion! We’ve more than earned it. CW

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he first season of Better Things (Season 2 premiere Thursday, Sept. 14, FX) debuted quietly and closed to a deafening chorus of critical huzzahs, but no one had an answer for the question “Is it a comedy, or is it a drama?” Creator/ Star Pamela Adlon has summed it up best as an “incredible feelings show,” so there. Better Things is a different animal than other Comics Kinda Play Themselves series; thanks to the influence of Adlon’s creative partner, Louis C.K., the closest comparison is Louie. Adlon’s a far better actor than C.K., and she can make you laugh, cry and scream along with single mom Sam and her three daughters—the most layered, interesting kids on TV, BTW—with uncanny ease. Catch up, non-critics. Eastbound & Down Goes to School is back in session! Vice Principals (Season 2 premiere Sunday, Sept. 17, HBO), which reunites E&D creators Danny McBride and Jody Hill, is a study in hysterical vulgarity second only to Veep; the heated exchanges between McBride and brilliantly-cast costar Walton Goggins take it to whole ‘nother level above Kenny Powers. Season 1 ended with frenemy vice principals Gamby (McBride) and Russell (Goggins) becoming “co-interim principals,” a dirty, dubious victory dampened by Gamby being gunned down in the high school’s parking lot. Nonspoiler: He’s alive, and things are going to get even weirder and darker in Vice Principals’ final (yes, final) nine episodes. Very few nominations to complain about in The 69th Primetime Emmy Awards (Sunday, Sept. 17, CBS); the quality is so high, I can let a few Stranger Things nods slide, if not the unbelievable snub of BoJack Horseman (seriously—WT fuck?). And I’ve already decided who’s going to win: Veep (Comedy Series), Better Call Saul (Drama Series), Shameless’ William H. Macy (Lead Actor, Comedy), Veep’s Julia Louis-Dreyfus (Lead Actress, Comedy), Better Call Saul’s Bob Odenkirk (Lead Actor, Drama), The Handmaid Tales’ Elisabeth Moss (Lead Actress,

TRUE


R’Solved

MUSIC

Desi Rexx, frontman of ’80s glam rockers D’Molls, finds happiness in his new life. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

Y

ou’d think that Desi Rexx, who fronted underrated ’80s glam band D’Molls, would have a phone voice as flashy as his struttin’ stage persona. But he sounds clearheaded, mature, responsible— more like a dad than a guy who rocked the Sunset Strip alongside the likes of Mötley Crüe and Poison. At his request, we meet at a salon called Unity. He’d dyed his hair brown for a video shoot. Before D’Molls performs with fellow Chicagoans and glam scene vets Enuff Z’Nuff this Friday, he needs to get it back to its usual color: bleach-blond. In the chair, Rexx’s usually fluffy mop is heavy with bluish chemicals. As his stylist, Christie Golightly, shampoos them away, Rexx spins a story about seeing an early version of Aerosmith as a three-piece Rolling Stones cover band with Steven Tyler on drums and vocals at someone’s house in Boston. She seems only mildly interested until he’s out of the chair. Then, she says her husband knows Desi’s music and is jealous—how about a photo? Rexx is happy to oblige, scooping her up in time for the shutter-click. “I hope this didn’t poke you,” he tells her, gesturing to the spiky skull belt buckle above his groin. This unintended double-entendre is as close as he gets to the lecherous hair-band stereotype. He hasn’t brought up a single conquest or uttered a four-letter word, and proudly proclaims he’s never touched a drop of booze. “I’m LDS,” he says later at Crown Burger. He then asks to pause the recorder so he can bless our bacon cheeseburgers. It’s only the blessing he wants to keep off-the-record sacred. “It’s Salt Lake, isn’t it?” he says, implying there’s nothing to be ashamed about, being a Mormon in this, The Place. Of course there’s not, but it’s fascinating to imagine D’Rexx singing D’Molls’ “D’Stroll,” which is about doin’ a groupie. We don’t explore his faith much further; Rexx is a raconteur, given the spontaneous telling of glory-days stories. Here, he tells one whopper of a tale featuring an abundance of candid scenes involving stars like Mötley Crüe’s Nikki Sixx and SNL alum/Blues Brother Dan Aykroyd (Rexx does a fair impression of Aykroyd saying, “Desi, that’s some crunchy rock ’n’ roll!”). It dovetails with the Aerosmith yarn, and explains how Rexx helped Cheap Trick reunite with original bassist Tom Petersson. There’s a lot more to it, with details and asides that’d cause ecstatic spasms in any music geek, but it’s feature-film length. Finally, it resolves to D’Molls. Formed in the mid-’80s as The Chicago Molls, the band truncated its tag as tribute to the Chicago power-pop band D’Thumbs. In 1985, D’Molls moved to Los Angeles seeking a deal. The band’s high-voltage performances won them a contract with Atlantic Records, a slew of fans, a single (“777”) in moderate rotation on MTV, and management by David Lee Roth and his handlers. Sadly, the record failed to chart. That, along with intraband conflict, led to D’Molls’ original lineup falling apart less than two weeks after a second album, Warped (1990), hit shelves. Almost immediately, Rexx joined Roth’s touring band for a brief run as rhythm guitarist. Afterward, he busied himself with various other projects and attempts at D’Molls reunions, none of which took. In 2007, Rexx reconnected with guitarist S.S. Priest, and they’ve kept D’Molls alive with various rhythm sections. Six

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CONCERT PREVIEW

D’Molls frontman Desi Rexx sprays his locks while stylist Christie Golightly looks on. years ago, Rexx married and converted to Mormonism. This led to him moving from Chicago to Centerville, where he lives with his wife and their three children, and works in real estate. Used copies of D’Moll’s out-of-print debut fetch at least $40 online. On the strength of that demand, glam revival label FnA International contacted Rexx in 2011 about doing an album of unreleased D’Molls tracks. At the time, local bass wizard and producer Jonni Lightfoot (Honest Engine, Air Supply) was working with FnA on a reissue from his own old glam band, Skit Skat. The two hit it off, leading to Lightfoot joining D’Molls. Hence, the upcoming show—and imminent new album. For now, Rexx is keeping a tight lid on details about the new music, but he pulls out his phone and plays one track, “Little Sister.” The anthem has all the bombast, hooks and riffs of classic D’Molls tracks, and find’s Rexx’s voice in top form. He smiles like a proud papa anticipating the birth of a child, only he insists the record has dual paternity. “I wanna say how important that Jonni is to the band,” he says. “I couldn’t have done this without him.” While it would’ve been great to see D’Molls realize their potential, Rexx enjoys the best of both worlds, as a family man and a rock star who still has creative juice. He’s mindful of his luck in this regard, implying he knows his rocker side verges on childish—but that’s how you stay happy. “When I grow up, I wanna be just like my kids,” he says. “I keep that in mind and it makes everything go right. If you’re not careful, life will steal your smile.” CW

ENUFF Z’NUFF

w/ D’Molls, Transit Cast, Loss of Existence Friday, Sept. 15, 7 p.m. Liquid Joe’s 1249 E. 3300 South 801-467-5637 $20 presale; $25 day of show 21+ liquidjoes.net


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LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD

THURSDAY 9/14 There’s a song by Los Lobos called “Canción del Mariachi” that portrays mariachi musicians as itinerant, passionate badasses that drink liquor like water, have lovers in every town and are generally heroic in every sense. It’s interesting, because we ugly Americans are conditioned through popular culture to regard them as the annoying guys that play trumpets and guitarrónes while we’re trying to inhale our six-item combo plates. But if you put down the flauta and listen, you’ll see mariachis for what they are: heroes in velvety charro suits whose goal is to elevate you via the bright notes of the trumpet, the jaunty rhythmic plunking of the guitarrón, the singing violins and soaring, impassioned voices. The idea is to encourage you to live life to the fullest, embracing adventure and romance at every turn. This is true for any mariachi performer, whether it’s Utah County-based Yunuen Carillo performing solo or this seven-piece, a perennial favorite of fans of Excellence in the Community’s free weekly concerts. This week, there are two chances to enjoy them: The regular Thursday night show and another free performance in Ogden at Peery’s Egyptian Theater with Ballet Folklórico de las Americas on Monday, Sept. 18 at 7:30 p.m. The Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 7:30 p.m., free, all ages, excellenceconcerts.org

Tight Fright, Baby Gurl, Turtleneck Wedding Dress

The email from Brooklyn-via-Tucson foursome Tight Fright asks in the subject line, “Do you like to party?” How did they know that music journalists not only enjoy a swanky soiree but also fester to be included in these little get-togethers and will therefore always take that bait? It was just the right preamble for Tight Fright’s economical PR payload: one concept video (“I Can’t Stop Being Hungry Today”), one live video (“Look Out Below”), two recent press clips and two social media links. The two videos clinched it: “Hungry” shows the glistening, largely hirsute band rubbing their naked bodies while eating cheeseburgers, fries and a footlong hotdog while flashing either bedroom or crazy eyes. In the live clip, the band—a power trio, but with two drummers—gets serious onstage, playing what they describe on Facebook as, “Captain Beefheart wandering the desert tripping on peyote with Motörhead, leaving a trail of empty baggies and beer bottles, giving zero fucks.”

LEX B. ANDERSON

Mariachi Sol de Jalisco

Loosely translated, that’s an unhinged hybrid of boogie, noise, jazz and metal that’s surprisingly catchy. So … Do you like to party? Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $5, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

FRIDAY 9/15 Stiff Little Fingers + Death by Unga Bunga

When punk rock ‘sploded in 1977, it was also the height of the Northern Irish conflict, also known as the Troubles. So naturally, this group of Irishmen from Belfast, led by singer-guitarist Jake Burns, wrote songs that blended pub rock with street punk, and focused on their experiences of the violent clash of ideologies. The band went on to become one of the genre’s greatest. But for a six-year break in the mid-’80s, they’ve continued to record and tour. Their current releases are their 10th studio album, No Going Back (PledgeMusic, 2014) and the live CD/LP/DVD/Blu-ray Best Served Loud: Live at Barrowlands (earMUSIC, 2017). Joining Stiff Little Fingers tonight is Norwegian garage/fuzz/surf/

Mariachi Sol de Jalisco power-pop band Death by Unga Bunga, named for a joke that says death lurks at your back door. Huh. Maybe they should call this show Friday, Bloody Friday. Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, metromusichall.com

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 9/16-17

Urban Arts Festival: Mix Master Mike, Afrolicious, Insatiable, La Calavera, Talia Keys, Conquer Monster, Mojave Jive and more

Hip-hop pioneer Grandmaster Flash is a tough act to follow—but how do ya like Mix Master Mike? You know this gifted and influential turntablist from the Beastie Boys, or perhaps you caught him on with Metallica this summer (assuming you crossed Utah’s borders to do so). The

Death by Unga Bunga

MARIUS ERIKSEN

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

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fact he’s headlining this free show down at the Gallivan Center is enough to warrant scratching out Saturday night on your calendar. But you might wanna block out the entire weekend in order to enjoy the visual art displays—including some interactive and live stuff, dance performances, virtual reality and other new media, street basketball league and slam-dunk contest, fashion show, food trucks and custom cars. Not to mention tons more tunes by Sunday night’s headliners, San Franciscobased dance-fusion collective Afrolicious and—on both days—some killer local acts, including the MusicGarage student band, alt-rock en Español quintet La Calavera, Latin dance band Samba Fogo, rock/funk/ jam outfit Mojave Jive, rap groups House of Lewis and Numbs, funk-minded songsmiths SuperBubble, singer-songwriter Talia Keys, retro-electro duo Conquer Monster, pop-rock duo MiNX, Utah’s preeminent ska maestros Insatiable and more. The Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Saturday, noon-10 p.m.; Sunday, noon8 p.m.; free, all ages, utaharts.org/ urban-arts-fest

La Calavera

SUNDAY 9/17

Samantha Fish, special guest TBD

Three months to the day from her blistering set at the Utah Blues Festival in June, this 28-year-old guitar-slinging spitfire of a singer-songwriter returns to burn down the State Room. Her fourth offering of sultry, swampy blues, Chills & Fever, dropped on Ruf Records earlier this year and trust this: Nobody is immune to this absolute party of a record, which features members of The Detroit Cobras and was produced by Bobby Harlow of garage-psych band The Go (which at one time also featured Jack White on guitar). That’s owed mostly to Fish, with her bewitching voice, mesmerizing guitar playing and blend of blues, ’50s/’60s roots rock and soul is the musical equivalent of the common cold. Once you hear her music, you’re gonna pass it along to everyone you encounter—and none of us will bother to seek a cure. The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $15, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

Samantha Fish

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THURSDAY 9/14

CONCERTS & CLUBS

JACOB BLICKENSTAFF

Gov’t Mule

When they issued their eponymous debut LP and contributed “Don’t Step On the Grass, Sam” to the pro-pot comp Hempilation in 1995, Gov’t Mule was a hoof-to-face surprise. We’d almost completely kicked our ‘80s glam bands ‘n’ booze habit and switched to grunge and heroin, aka “horse.” And here came this ornery trio. Coming out of his revitalizing tenure with the Allman Brothers Band, Warren Haynes’ voice sounded like the spirit of Otis Redding had possessed Ozzy Osbourne—ardent, gravelly and almost terrifyingly loud. His Les Paul was an extension of his voice, vibing likewise in Haynes’ gritty power chords, sinewy solos and keening slide licks. This, as bassist Allen Woody and drummer Matt Abts formed a tight, towering foundation for Haynes’ lucid, heart-on-sleeve tunes on Gov’t Mule and later alsums where he indicted political corruption and hypocrisy (“Grass”), reflected on loss (“Painted Silver Light”), warned us to look out for number one (“Blind Man in the Dark”), and encouraged us to be ourselves, brightly (“Soulshine”). Then there were the mind-scrambling instrumentals like “Thelonious Beck” and “Trane,” where the trio tributized their virtuoso heroes with their own dazzling virtuosity. And if they weren’t performing originals, the band interpreted the work of Neil Young, Black Sabbath, the Beatles, Screamin’ Jay Hawkins, Pink Floyd, James Brown—and even traditional gospel numbers like the a cappella “John the Revelator”—faithfully but uniquely. Some 23 years later, the band has evolved, losing Woody in 2000 and morphing into its current four-headed entity, with keyboardist Danny Louis and bassist Jorgen Carlsson. The group released its 10th studio album, Revolution Come… Revolution Go (Fantasy), in June and the platter finds Mule evolved into an even more majestic beast, as if that were possible. (RH) Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7 p.m., $35-$42, all ages, redbuttegarden.org

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THURSDAY 9/14 LIVE MUSIC

S ON U W O FOLL TAGRAM INS

Banks (The Depot) Carbon Leaf + Kat Myers & The Buzzards (The State Room) Gov’t Mule (Red Butte Garden) see p. 56 Jason Aldean + Chris Young + Kane Brown + Deejay Silver (USANA Amphitheatre) Kaki King (Kingsbury Hall) Kalifornia Krauts (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Mariachi Sol de Jalisco (Gallivan Center) see p. 50 Morgan Snow (Hog Wallow Pub) Reggae Thursday (The Royal) The Sunmills + Lovely Noughts + The Face Cards (Kilby Court) Tight Fright + Baby Gurl + Turtleneck Wedding Dress (Urban Lounge) see p. 50

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5 State Killing Spree (The Ice Haüs) Ásgeir + Ethan Gruska (The State Room) Badfeather + DJ Marty Paws (The Cabin) Cody Jinks (The Depot) Colt.46 (Outlaw Saloon) Enuff Z’Nuff + D’Molls + Transit Cast + Loss of Existence (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 46 Fictionist + Noble Bodies + Kambree (Velour) Grease Sing-A-Long (Sandy Amphitheater) JT Draper + Spencer Nelson (Feldman’s Deli) Judd Warrick (Snowbird Resort) Kosha Dillz + Freemind Movement + Benjamin + Siaki + Juttin Lee (Kilby Court) Kublai Khan + No Zodiac + Left Behind + I Am + Zodiac Killer + Threar (The Loading Dock) Lavelle Dupree (Downstairs) Mark Owens (The Westerner) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music (The Cabin) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Penrose (Brewskis) Pistol Rock (The Spur) Stiff Little Fingers + Death By Unga Bunga (Metro Music Hall) see p. 50 Tops + She Devils (Urban Lounge)

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | 55

PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

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SHOT & A BEER

SATURDAY, SEPT. 16

DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Drew & JD (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (‘80s Night) (Area 51)

FRIDAY 9/15

LIVE MUSIC

4

$

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EVERY DAY

BAR FLY

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Piper Down Pub

Piper Down Monthly Championship Vibe: A Concert for the Deaf & Hearing feat. Pulse Regime + Josh Volt + Kwantum + Wat Music? (Sky) You Topple Over (Hog Wallow Pub) Zeds Dead + NGHTMRE + Mr. Carmack + Unlike Pluto + Boogie T (The Great Saltair)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ OG Skilz (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Dueling Pianos feat. Drew & JD (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

SATURDAY 9/16 LIVE MUSIC

Backwash (Hog Wallow Pub) Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals (Sandy Amphitheater) Book on Tape Worm + Pipes (Velour) Colt.46 (Outlaw Saloon) Cory Mon (Snowbird Resort) Haken + Sithu Aye + Mammoth (Urban Lounge) Iceburn + Seven Daggers + I Hear Sirens (Club X) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Kalifornia Krauts (The Ice Haüs) Kidz Bop Kids (Kingsbury Hall) Los Hellcaminos (The Spur) Mark Owens (The Westerner) Michelle Moonshine (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Opal Hill Drive + DJ Battleship (The Cabin)

THUR 9.14• TIGHT FRIGHT BABY GURL, TURTLENECK WEDDING DRESS

FRI 9.15 • TOPS SHE-DEVILS, GOLDMYTH

SAT 9.16 • HAKEN SITHU AYE, MAMMOTH

SAT 9.17 • SARTAIN NIGHT

9/21: SLUG LOCALIZED 9/22: FLEETMAC WOOD 9/23: MONDO COZMO 9/24: QUINN XCII 9/25: RED BENNIES 9/26: TANK & THE BANGAS

GENE SARTAIN, MIKE SARTAIN, WILL SARTAIN

SUN 9.18 • THE ROAST OF TERRENCE WARBURTON MON 9.19• SEXTILE FOSSIL ARMS, MARTIAN CULT

TUE 9.20• WIDOWSPEAK INDIGO PLATEAU

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

If you squint your eyes on an overcast day, Piper Down looks a bit like the Slaughtered Lamb in An American Werewolf in London. Except the film was based England, and this “olde world pub” is Irish through ‘n’ through, and you won’t hear anybody say, “There’s no food, ‘ere!” then send you off to get slaughtered like a ... What do they slaughter in Ireland except ideological opposite potato poachers? I dunno, but if you do, that might be a bit o’ trivia that’d come in handy on Wednesdays and Sundays, when Piper hosts “Geeks Who Drink” pub quizzes for prestige and prizes. It might also be a good way to put Catholic opponents on tilt on poker night (Tuesdays, 8 p.m.). On most any other day, Piper’s a great place to chill on the back or rooftop patio, or inside at tall booths of dark wood, while sippin’ Jameson and eatin’ a Smothered Leprechaun (guac drowned in spicy queso). If you’re a student at Salt Lake Community College across the street, it’s pretty quiet in the back room during the day, which is great for having a stein while studying. On the weekends, you can dance a jig to live music from locals acts like Folk Hogan, The Axtell Duo and King Strang and the Stranglers. The point is—and this is something that the regulars will happily point out—there’s a lot to do at Piper. And, unlike at the Slaughtered Lamb, there’s plenty to eat. (Randy Harward) Piper Down Pub, 1492 S. State, 801-468-1492, piperdownpub.com

RKDN + City Animals + The Sardines (Kilby Court) Shook Twins + TBD (The State Room) Six Feet in the Pine (Pioneer Park) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Urban Arts Festival feat. Mix Master Mike + La Calavera + Numbs + House of Lewis + Mojave Jive + Samba Fogo + more (Gallivan Center) see p. 50 Zion I + The Perceptionists + Jabee + The Outsiders (Metro Music Hall)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Sky Saturdays w/ Kyle Flesch (Sky)

THUR 9.14 • BURLESQUE & BLUES FRI 9.15 • STIFF LITTLE FINGERS DEATH BY UNGA BUNGA

SAT 9.16 • ZION I

THE PERCEPTIONISTS, JABEE, THE OUTSIDERS

TUE 9.19 • THE VIBRATORS

SUNDAY 9/17 LIVE MUSIC

Changing Lanes Experience + Scott Klismith + Slim Chance & His Psychobilly Playboys (Park Silly Sunday Market) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Samantha Fish + special guest TBD (The State Room) see p. 52 Gene Sartain + Mike Sartain + Will Sartain (Urban Lounge) Urban Arts Festival feat. Afrolicious + Insatiable + Conquer Monster + Talia Keys + more (Gallivan Center) see p. 50

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

9/23: GBH 9/24: GET THE LED OUT 9/26: GOLDIE 9/27: BLU AND EXILE 9/28: ATLAS GENIUS 9/29: SUBTOMIK

JAIL CITY ROCKERS, SEX ROOM

WED 9.20 • DEATH VALLEY GIRLS LORD VOX, OLD FASHION DEPOT

THUR 9.21 • RIDE LO MOON

FRI 9.22 • ANDREW W.K. • METROMUSICHALL.COM •


Sunday Brunch Party, September 17th DJ, Bloody Mary, Mimosa & Bellini bar 11am-3pm

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Live Music and DJ’S every Friday & Saturday

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | 57

9/16 CAUSE PLAY KARAOKE 9/19 MARK DEE 9/22 MELODY & THE BREAKUPS W/ LANTERN BY SEA

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LIVE MUSIC

A Lot Like Birds + I’m Alive + Let’s Get Famous + Rejoin the Team (The Loading Dock) Amanda Johnson (The Spur) KnowMads + All Star Opera + Binson (Kilby Court) Mariachi Sol de Jalisco w/ Ballet Folklórico de las Americas (Gallivan Center) see p. 50 Shaggy (The Depot) Witchtrap + Goro + Disannulleth (Club X)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

PIG-EON @7:00 followed by VJ Birdman @ 10:00 on the Big Screen

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

TUESDAY 9/19

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Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

MONDAY 9/18

SATURDAY:

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saturday, september 16

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Birdman (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Rick Gerber Request Line (The Cabin) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

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friDAY 9/15

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slow ride leopard skin zebras dj deuce saturday 9/16

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utah vs san jose 8:00pm game time

followed by live music from

dawnlit I star crossed lovers

coming soon 9/22 10/7

october rage expanders w/ iya terra

IRON MAIDENS ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | 59

10/14

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open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

Tuesday 9/18

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5

teki dj dubwise

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ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun

wednesday 9/13


© 2017

6-5-4

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. Words before reckoning or rest 2. Justice Kagan 3. ____ mignon 4. Grp. that brought Colbert to Baghdad 5. Hem and ____ 6. City community, informally 7. ____ to go 8. “Like me” 9. Some turban wearers 10. Pulsate painfully 11. Pal of Piglet and Pooh 12. Beer variety, familiarly 13. ____ Xing (street sign) 18. “Well, ____-di-dah!” 19. Cornfield call

52. For all to see 53. Hub 54. Lauder of cosmetics 57. Org. with a Most Wanted list 58. Hi-____ monitor 59. “Where did ____ wrong?” 60. La-la preceder 61. Spots for getting stitches, in brief 62. It may be seeded

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

23. White-tailed eagles 24. Need for tug-of-war 25. Miniskirts reveal them 26. Online application intended to make a task easier 27. Taste or touch 28. Lock of hair 31. Gym bag attachment 32. Gladiator fight site 33. Jacob’s father-in-law, in the Bible 34. Fort Worth campus, for short 35. Thickness 36. Poet Ginsberg 37. ____ get-out (to the utmost degree) 38. “Putting the phone down for a sec,” in texts 40. Visitor to Rick’s Café Américain 46. “Forever Your Girl” singer, 1989 47. 2016 Disney film set in Polynesia 48. Suffix with custom or diet 49. Stop 50. “With respect to ...” 51. ____ Buddhist

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. “____ Comedy Jam” 4. Kirk’s partner in a groundbreaking 1968 interracial kiss 9. Unit of bacon 14. “Moonlight” Oscar winner Mahershala 15. Singers Bareilles and Evans 16. “Fingers crossed!” 17. It’s followed in a classic movie in 6, 5, 4 ... 20. Prime draft classification 21. Boise’s home 22. Classic TV sitcom in 6, 5, 4 ... 29. “Apollo 13” director Howard 30. Thrice, in prescriptions 31. “Let’s Talk About Sex” group 37. “I have ____ to pick with you!” 39. Golden Globe-winning actress for “black-ish” in 6, 5, 4 ... 41. Picture puzzle 42. This clue has four 43. Ortiz of “Ugly Betty” 44. Subj. for the foreign-born 45. Former U.S. territory with the motto “The Land Divided, the World United” in 6, 5, 4 ... 55. Snoozers 56. Anticipatory days 57. 2002 film comedy sequel in 6, 5, 4 ... 63. Kicked off 64. Classic board game with the slogan “The Game of Sweet Revenge” 65. Regret 66. Sardegna o Sicilia 67. Wipe out 68. Mao ____-tung

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In the coming weeks, you might want to read the last few pages of a book before you decide to actually dive in and devour the whole thing. I also suggest you take what I just said as a useful metaphor to apply in other areas. In general, it might be wise to surmise the probable outcomes of games, adventures and experiments before you get totally involved. Try this fun exercise: Imagine you are a psychic prophet as you evaluate the long-range prospects of any influences that are vying to play a role in your future. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) “Dear Dr. Astrology: I’m feeling lost, but am also feeling very close to finding my new direction. It hurts! It would be so helpful if I could just catch a glimpse of that new direction. I’d be able to better endure the pain and confusion if I could get a tangible sense of the future happiness that my pain and confusion are preparing me for. Can you offer me any free advice? -Lost Libra.” Dear Libra: The pain and confusion come from the dying of the old ways. They need to die a bit more before the new direction will reveal itself clearly. I predict that will happen soon—no later than Oct.1.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) The coming weeks will an excellent time for you to raise funds in support of political prisoners, or to volunteer at a soup kitchen, or to donate blood at a blood bank. In fact, any charitable service you perform for people you don’t know will be excellent for your physical and mental health. You can also generate vivid blessings for yourself by being extra thoughtful, kind and generous toward people you care for. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when unselfish acts will yield maximum selfish benefits.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Love won’t exactly be free in the coming weeks, but there should be some good deals. And I’m not referring to risky black-market stuff obtained in back alleys, either. I mean straightforward liaisons and intriguing intimacy at a reasonable cost. So if you’re comfortably mated, I suggest you invest in a campaign to bring more comedy and adventure into your collaborative efforts. If you’re single, wipe that love-starved look off your face and do some exuberant window-shopping. If you’re neither comfortably mated nor single, money may temporarily be able to buy you a bit more happiness. CANCER (June 21-July 22) The current state of your fate reminds me of the sweet confusion alluded to in Octavio Paz’ poem “Between Going and Staying”: “All is visible and elusive, all is near and can’t be touched.” For another clue to the raw truth of your life right now, I’ll quote the poet William Wordsworth. He spoke of “fleeting moods of shadowy exultation.” Is the aura described by Paz and Wordsworth a problem that you should try to fix? Is it detrimental to your heroic quest? I don’t think so. Just the opposite, really: I hope you can hang out for a while in this pregnant mystery—between the yes and the no, between the dark and the light, between the dream and the reality. It will help you learn what you’ve been too restless to tune in to in the past. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) The imminent future will be a favorable time for refurbished models and revived originals. They are likely to be more fun and interesting the second time around. I suspect that this will also be an auspicious phase for substitutes and alternatives. They may even turn out to be better than the so-called real things they replace. So be artful in formulating Plan B and Plan C, Leo. Switching over to backups may ultimately bring out more of the best in you and whisk you toward your ultimate goal in unexpected ways.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | 61

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In his novel The Jungle, muckraker Upton Sinclair (1878-1968) exposed the abominable hygiene and working conditions of the meat-packing industry. The uproar that followed led to corrective legislation Congress. Sinclair remained devoted to serving the public good throughout his career. He liked to say that the term “social justice” was inscribed on his heart. Drawing from his inspiration, Aquarius, I suggest you decide what your soul’s main motto is—and imagine that it is written on your heart. Now is a perfect time to clarify your life’s purpose and intensify your commitment to it; to devote even more practical, tender zeal to fulfilling the reason you were born.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The Simpsons is an animated sitcom that will soon begin its 29th consecutive year on TV. During its run, it has told over 600 stories. The creators of another animated sitcom, South Park, once did an episode entitled “Simpsons Already Did It,” which referenced their feelings that it was hard to come up with new tales because their rival had already used so many good ones. I bring this up, Taurus, because I suspect your life story will soon be spinning out novel plots that have never before been seen, not even on The Simpsons or South Park. You could and should be the Best Storyteller of the Month.

170,000

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Almost two-thirds of us confess that if we are alone, we might sip milk directly from the carton rather than first pouring it into a glass. Fourteen percent of us have used milk as part of our sexual activities. One out of every five of us admit that we have “borrowed” someone else’s milk from the fridge at work. Most shockingly, four percent of us brag that we have blown milk out our noses on purpose. I expect that in the next two weeks, you Sagittarians will exceed all these norms. Not just because you’ll be in the mood to engage in mischievous experiments and playful adventures with milk, but because you’re likely to have a loosey-goosey relationship with almost everything.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Two animals are pictured prominently on Australia’s coat of arms: the kangaroo and the large flightless bird known as the emu. One of the reasons they were chosen is that both creatures rarely walk backward. They move forward or not at all. Australia’s founders wanted this to symbolize the nation’s pledge to never look back, to remain focused on advancing toward the future. The coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to make a similar commitment, Aries. Is there a new symbol you might adopt to inspire your intention?

10 acres near Teasdale with red rock views. $

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Welcome to “Compose Your Own Oracle,” a special edition of Free Will Astrology. Departing from tradition, I’m temporarily stepping aside so you can have the freedom to write the exact horoscope you want. Normally, you might be in danger of falling victim to presumptuous arrogance if you imagined you could wield complete control over how your destiny unfolds. But in the days ahead, that rule won’t be as unyielding, because cosmic forces will be giving you more slack than usual. Fate and karma, which frequently impel you to act according to patterns that were set in place long ago, are giving you at least a partial respite. To get the maximum benefit out of “Compose Your Own Oracle,” identify three plot developments you’d like to weave into a self-fulfilling prophecy for your immediate future. Then start weaving.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You know that “patch of bothersome weeds” growing right in the middle of your life? Is it really a patch of bothersome weeds? Or is it perhaps a plot of cultivated blooms that once pleased you but has now turned into a puzzling irrelevancy? Or how about this possibility: Is it a chunk of languishing beauty that might flourish and please you again if it were cared for better? Those are excellent questions for you to pose in the coming days, Pisces. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, it’s time for you to decide on the future of this quizzical presence.

L A N D I N T E AS DA L E A N D T O R R E Y


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62 | SEPTEMBER 14, 2017

My son, ASHFAQ, s/o FEROZ KUNJAPPU, born on 08/31/2010. (Place of Birth Cochin, Kerala) residing at 9300 Redwood Road, West Jordan, Utah - 84088 shall henceforth be known as ASHFAQ FEROZ. FEROZ KUNJAPPU

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WITH BABS DELAY Broker, Urban Utah Homes & Estates, urbanutah.com Trustee, Utah Transit Authority

Poverty in Utah

It sucks to rent these days. Prices are high and pickings are few—unless, perhaps, you make more than $60,000 per year. According to a study done at Harvard University, the U.S. poverty rate is rising—and lowdensity suburban neighborhoods are feeling the brunt of it. But weirdly, Salt Lake City is different. Our poverty rates are soaring, but it’s happening in the city’s urban neighborhoods. To explain it simply: Higher income residents have moved to the suburbs over the past 15 years, lowering the per-capita income figure of those remaining in the city. Apartmentlist.com further analyzed the data from Harvard’s study and found that poverty levels in low- and mid-density areas of the Salt Lake Valley dropped 11 percent in those 15 years. The best example is Daybreak, a master-planned community built in 2004 by Rio Tinto. Up until that time, the only residents there were snakes and pot guts. Now, the average price of a home in that area—South Jordan’s 84009 zip code—is around $360,000. What you don’t see, however, are apartments for $800 per month. Honestly, every time I drive up to a fastfood joint and order an iced tea, I think to myself, “If they’re working full-time for $10 per hour, or about $1,600 per month, how are they able to affording to live anywhere these days? Certainly, they have to live with one or two other wage-earners to have a decent place to live.” The SRO (single resident occupancy) buildings around Pioneer Park are absolute rat holes. And the crappy motels that offer low-cost housing on State Street and North Temple are proven magnets for all sorts of crime. Provo and Ogden have their share of lowincome housing, but O-Town in particular has seen a huge decrease in urban poverty. In the past 15 years, many low-income residents have moved to the suburbs. Historic 25th Street and light rail have brought people back to Ogden’s urban area. It’s also much cheaper to live there than in Salt Lake City. Mortgage interest rates still are extremely low. It’s “rentonaomics” vs. “buyonomics”—because house payments are basically as cheap as rent. But to buy, you have to have good credit and a good job history with pretty low debt. And that’s a whole different column on how to buy these days. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner

DARKN ESS AND LIGHT

The darkness of the light Cant get it right Everything changes Then goes its way Dancing in the light until the night Everything fades, until you find your way.

~the garbage man

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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Wait, What? The People’s Liberation Army Daily, a Chinese state-run military newspaper, has declared on its WeChat account that fewer Chinese youth are passing fitness tests to join the army because they are too fat and masturbate too much, resulting in abnormally large testicular veins. The web article cited one town’s statistics, where 56.9 percent of candidates were rejected for failing to meet physical requirements. China’s military quickly beat down the article’s assertion, saying: “The quality of our recruits is guaranteed, and the headwaters of our military will flow long and strong.”

BY THE EDITORS AT ANDRE WS M C MEEL

Least-Competent Criminals Jocsan Feliciano Rosado, 22, was driving a stolen car on Aug. 21, when he stopped off at a Harbor Freight store in Kissimmee, Fla., to pick up a welder’s helmet for viewing the solar eclipse. As he dawdled next to the vehicle, looking up at the sun with his helmet on, members of the Orange County Sheriff’s Office Auto Theft Unit interrupted his reverie and arrested him.

WEIRD

The Entrepreneurial Spirit Police in Osnabruck, Germany, stopped a vehicle on Aug. 19 and found an unusual trove of drugs inside: Plastic bags filled with about 5,000 ecstasy tablets, with a street value of about $46,000—all in the shape of Donald Trump’s head. The orange tablets depicted Trump’s signature sweep of hair and his rosebud mouth. An unnamed 51-year-old man and his son, 17, also had a large sum of cash and were taken into custody. Cultural Diversity The Japanese funeral industry demonstrated its forward thinking on Aug. 23 when practitioners gathered for the Life Ending Industry Expo in Tokyo. Among the displays was a humanoid robot named Pepper who can conduct a Buddhist funeral, complete with chanting and tapping a drum. Pepper is a collaboration between SoftBank and Nissei Eco Co., which wrote the chanting software. Michio Inamura, Nissei’s executive adviser, said the robot could step in when priests are not available.

FAN-antic Jeffrey Riegel, 56, of Port Republic, N.J., left ’em laughing with his obituary’s parting shot at the Philadelphia Eagles. In it, Riegel asked that eight Eagles players act as pallbearers, “so the Eagles can let me down one last time.” Riegel owned season tickets for 30 years, during which the Eagles never won a Super Bowl. Inexplicable An Arkansas Highway Patrol officer spotted “an unusual sight” on Aug. 23 on I-30: a black Hummer with a casket strapped to the top of it. When the officer pulled over Kevin M. Cholousky, 39, of Van Buren, Ark., he took off and led police on a chase along the interstate, where his vehicle eventually was stopped by road spikes. Although the casket was empty, Cholousky was charged in Pulaski County with fictitious tags, reckless driving and fleeing.

Your Cold, Cold Heart A police officer on maternity leave was ticketed and fined 110 pounds after she pulled her car into a bus stop in west London to help her newborn baby, who was choking in the back seat. Rebecca Moore, 31, of Aylesbury, said her son, Riley, was “going a deep shade of red in the face, his eyes were bulging and watering, and he was trying to cough but was struggling.” Moore appealed the fine, but the Harrow Council rejected her appeal, as did the London Tribunals. “The law about stopping in bus stops is exactly the same everywhere in London,” a council spokeswoman said. “You can’t do it.” News That Sounds Like a Joke One reveler at an Aug. 19 street festival in Worcester, Mass., caused a dust-up when he aggressively confronted a police horse. Donald Pagan, 59, was cutting through a column of mounted police when an officer asked him to stop. Instead, Pagan raised his fist “in an attempt to punch the horse in the face,” a police statement said. The horse jumped backward, away from Pagan, which officers noted could have injured Pagan, the horse or the mounted officer. Pagan was charged with assault and battery on a police officer, resisting arrest and interfering with a police horse. Social Media to the Rescue! Epping, N.H., resident Leslie Kahn, 61, found herself trapped in her swimming pool on Aug. 11 after the ladder broke. She was not strong enough to pull herself out of the pool, so she used a pool pole to drag a nearby chair, with her iPad on it, closer. On a community Facebook page, Kahn posted her desperate situation under the heading “911,” and soon police and neighbors showed up to rescue her. Send your weird news items to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 | 63

Latest Religious Messages Sonogram photos are notoriously difficult to decipher, but one couple in Franklin County, Pa., are sure theirs shows a man watching over their unborn daughter. “When they gave it to us … Umm, to me, it’s Jesus. And it looks like Jesus,” said mom Alicia Zeek. She and father Zac Smith have two older children, both born with birth defects, and the image is putting them at ease about their third child. “Once … we looked at the picture, I was like—look, babe, we have nothing to worry about,” Smith said.

Court Report Jordan Wills, 22, of Dover, England, provoked the ire of Judge Simon James of the Canterbury Crown Court in Kent when he appeared before him. Wills called the judge a prick, and when James asked him to refrain from using obscene language, Wills said, “Who are you to tell me what to do?” James replied: “Well, I am the judge … and I need to make it clear to you and others that such behavior is not going to be tolerated.” Wills was found in contempt of court and sentenced to two weeks in jail.

Babs De Lay

Julie “Bella” Hall

| COMMUNITY |

n In Iran, the education department has banned people who are considered “ugly” from being teachers. The list of conditions and features that prevent one from being a teacher includes facial moles, acne, eczema, scars and crossed eyes. Also on the list of unsavory conditions are cancer, bladder stones or colorblindness, none of which can be observed by others.

Bright Ideas Tuffy Tuffington, 45, of San Francisco was walking his dogs, Bob and Chuck, when he came up with a way to respond nonviolently to a right-wing rally at Crissy Field Aug. 26. So he launched a Facebook page asking San Franciscans to bring dog poop to spread in the park in advance of the event. “It seemed like a little bit of civil disobedience where we didn’t have to engage with them face-to-face,” Tuffington said. Contributors to the project also planned to “clean up the mess and hug each other” afterward.

GARDENERS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

n Also at the Life Ending Industry Expo in Tokyo, four undertakers competed on stage as funeral music played to see who could best display the ancient skills of ritually dressing the dead. The Shinto religion in Japan believes that the dead are impure just after death and that dressing the body purifies the spirit. The contestants dressed live human volunteers and were observed by three judges. Rino Terai, who won the contest, said, “I practiced every day to prepare for this competition.”

n Adam Darrough, 29, of Little Rock, Ark., tried to elude officers who had arrived at his girlfriend’s house to arrest him by climbing out a back window. But when that didn’t work, he hid in her attic. Meanwhile, Erinique Hill, 20, held police at bay outside her home. Things went south for Darrough when he fell through the attic floor, and Little Rock police officers arrested him for a number of felonies, including hindering arrest.

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