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COVER STORY ALL GOOD IN THE SUGAR HOOD?

Longtime Sugar House business owners reflect on the area’s ever-changing landscape. Cover illustration by Trent Call trentcall.com

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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 21 A&E 26 DINE 31 CINEMA 33 TRUE TV 34 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

STEPHEN DARK

News, p. 15 It’s fitting that Dark’s last piece as a staffer with us is titled “Love Letters.” Over the span of 11 years, he’s shown support, compassion and humanity to the city’s downtrodden. Do not fret—you’ll still see the dogged Brit’s byline around our pages. Thanks for everything, Stephen.

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CITYW

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, Aug. 24, “15 Ways to Fix SLC”

I think author Ryan Cunningham missed the mark by leaving out the idea of a lottery. Since Utah’s state legislators would never permit any form of gambling, perhaps Salt Lake City could have its own lottery, and all proceeds could go to providing services for the homeless.

JANICE RINSKY,

Can a story be both comprehensive and hypothetical? If it’s written by @RyCunn, it can. @YearofJen Via Twitter Some provocative out-of-the-box ideas in @CityWeekly about improving Salt Lake. Thanks, @RyCunn! Interesting.

@REPBRIANKING Via Twitter

Salt Lake City Dear Ryan, We just left SLC after a 14-hour layover on a trip to leave our son at University of Colorado, Boulder. We picked up City Weekly at Even Steven’s sandwich spot. I just read aloud your “15 Ways to Fix SLC” to my husband as we drove west, and we were laughing out loud during your call to replace your city’s flag. You are a talented journahumourist. It would be interesting to hear who you would appoint to the subcommittee. Thanks for a summary of your city’s issues. It is not unlike those we confront in San Francisco—that bastion of liberalism. We were thinking it would be great to have a book introducing all major cities in this way. Wishing you well with appreciation.

DEBBIE LEE,

Salt Lake City Weekly, I love your tonguein-cheek. Great goals. Great article.

CHRIS WHITING Via Facebook

Fix the air first, numb nuts.

BEN TAYLOR Via Facebook

Your writers have been reading Marx again, I see. Lots of contradictory ideas to save the city (build cheap housing in expensive districts but keep historical buildings). How will your white readers in the Avenues react to that? I will give you your due on alcohol. Our system in Utah is not at all free market. GOP claims to support the free market. On that we totally agree!

JAY LALIK

Via Facebook

San Francisco I have to say that I like most of these ideas for change in Salt Lake, especially an underground rail system, i.e. London. In addition, I am fed up with drivers going 85 mph, driving recklessly, putting on makeup, texting, you name it! Some highway patrol we have.

@KATEMUR90128560 Via Twitter

This was quite the good read!

LAURA JANE Via Facebook

Panhandler Entertainment

I love reading City Weekly and keeping myself updated with this city. I moved here seven years ago and have noticed the drastic changes that have occurred in that time. Reading the article “15 Ways To Fix SLC,” I noticed the author mentioned needing creative ideas. Well, this idea I had came about from noticing the overwhelming growth of panhandlers and homeless. Now, I know there’s more research that needs to go into this idea, and with that said:

ST 24 , 2017

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I, myself, am sick of the acts some of these people put on—the frowning faces, the props they use. I think if we are to wait in traffic, and they want money, we should make a productive, useful reason to help each other out. Some of the ideas I have, and please know this is just brainstorming is: A sign—recycled—saying, “I’m a panhandler here to stay. What can I do to help or entertain you without going back Handy tips and tricks to ensure th or to jail? Maybe this e surviva l and gro can be on a T-shirt wth of o ur fair to and on the back it w n. By Ryan can say, “Deal with the issue!” … Cunningh am We can even incorporate ways to clean up the streets. Maybe the intersections or sides of town that have the panhandlers appreciate it, and are so happy that you encontributing to the environment can rejoyed your visit to We Olive. ceive money donated from big businesses The one thing I wanted to reach out to there or … from the residents. It could you about was the name of the store. As far bring more pride and give them useful as my understanding, the original location work. (which was retail only) in Paso Robles was I know if you’re a criminal, you may not named, or at least the tagline of the store get hired and I am sure there are many was “You Live, I Live, We Olive (We All reasons for panhandling, but either way, Live).” So, it’s a play on words paying tribwe all know that competition makes you ute to the health benefits when it comes to better and forces you to think outside the olive oil, healthy living and that Mediterbox. ranean lifestyle. I think panhandlers need to step up The current principal owners of the their game and maybe not be so depresscompany are the ones that introduced ing for themselves and us. the wine bar concept to the business, and SAMANTHA REESE, branded the company We Olive. But I will Salt Lake City be honest with you, even within the company there is a dispute about the etymology of the name since the original owners are no longer involved. My name is Josh Garcia, one of the ownIt’s just one of those funny things, I ers of We Olive in Trolley Square. First, I guess, that creates mystery within the want to say thank you for your kind words company and its guests. and fantastic write-up. It was a pleasant JOSH GARCIA, surprise when a friend texted me a link to Salt Lake City the article earlier this morning. We really

AYS TO FI X SLC

Dine, Aug. 24, “The Power of We”

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns REX MAGANA, JULIA VILLAR Contributors CECIL ADAMS, MICHAEL BERRY, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, JOHN RASMUSON, MIKE RIEDEL, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, CHUCK SHEPHERD, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

Marketing

Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS

Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZKINNY, BEN BALDRIDGE, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS, XANDER PRISKOS, LAUREN TAGGE, STEVEN VARGO

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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OPINION

Saving Stories

I have no aptitude for science, but I read science-lite articles when they crop up in the back pages of the newspaper. I look for stories about Otzi the Iceman, a mummified hunter killed by an arrow in the back 5,300 years ago, and I read most articles about dinosaurs. The latest one casts doubt on the theory that an asteroid strike was the proximate cause of their extinction. The clues are sealed in sedimentary rock layers—tracks in primordial mud, literally—and it takes a scientist to interpret them. I occasionally ponder my own footprints in the mud, so to speak. What residual part of me might be as interesting to my progeny as Otzi’s copper axe and flint knife are to me? It won’t be the 35 mm slides that chronicle my life experience. They are already relegated to the same status as daguerreotypes—relics from a pre-digital age. Besides, I’ve learned that unless a photo or slide is captioned, follow-on generations will discard them. First into the dumpster go pictures of European cathedrals, babies, cats and beaches at sunset followed eventually by pictures of unidentified people mugging for the camera. Words have a better prospect, I think. A few years ago, I set out to write about a young physicist. She was a quick study, sizing me up as a science know-nothing. She agreed to an interview so long as I permitted her pre-publication review. “What you write may live on the internet forever,” she said. “It has to be accurate.” If she’s right, these very words may be unearthed from electronic sediment a hundred years hence. I would prefer that they would be found on the yellowing pages of a journal, but there’s no chance of that. I have never kept a journal. It

BY JOHN RASMUSON is a minor regret on par with not having seen the aurora borealis or not having eaten a Psilocybin mushroom. I wish I had been disciplined enough to keep a journal. I don’t mean a fancy, leather-bound book but something along the lines of a recipe-card box into which I stashed anecdotes, newspaper clippings, quotations and odd facts like “75 million people visit the adult website Pornhub each day.” The box journal is an impractical scheme, of course. With no index or organizing principle, I could never find anything. I do have a few anecdotes that stay close at hand because I sense they have an integral place in something soon to be written. Here are three anecdotes in waiting: n In 1979, the Army sent me to the first Nuclear Weapons Accident Exercise (NUWAX) at the Nevada Test Site. At the time, nuclear bombs were still being detonated under the desert there, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. NUWAX tested procedures for recovering nuclear weapons from an airplane crash. One night, after NUWAX had ended, I drifted into a PX snack bar. Most of the chairs were taken, so I sat next to a guy dressed in construction garb. We struck up a conversation over cans of Coors. He told me that he had worked on a logistics support team at the Nevada Test Site for a few years. He explained that with each underground nuclear explosion, there was a chance of a rupture of the earth that would allow deadly clouds of vaporized rock and radiation to spew forth. If that happened—and it hadn’t happened to him yet—his job was to pour truckloads of concrete into the fissure for as many hours or days as it took to stop the leak. A dangerous but critically important job, he said, for which he was paid a premium, hazardous-duty wage. “It sounds scary,” I said. “Yeah, man, pretty scary,” he replied, pausing, “there’s no way I would do it.”

n I grew up with Bob Rose. Early on, he had a Midas touch in the stock market. He was cruising to country club soirees in a Porsche while the rest of us were cruising State Street in rusting Chevys. He died in 2013. Judging from the crowd at his funeral, Rose was a man about town. The well-dressed mourners gathered under a huge white tent at Red Butte Garden on a hot afternoon. The eulogies included descriptions of Rose’s love of skiing and his unique relationship with the game of golf. Explained one speaker: “He loved every facet of the game—the clubs, the clothes, the shoes, the tradition, the luxuriant courses and manicured greens—everything but golf. He disliked playing the game.” n My wife and I moved to Venezuela just as Hugo Chavez reclaimed power after the abortive coup of 2002. Our apartment was on the ninth floor. Our balcony looked down on a palm-lined, urban canyon created by tall apartment buildings. Chavez was a populist who, like his idol Fidel Castro, loved giving speeches extolling his socialist Bolivarian Revolution. On Sundays, he held forth on the radio. He talked for hours. The audience response, called cacerolazo, was immediate. People took to their balconies with pots and pans and banged them together as if the citywide din would drown out Chavez’ interminable bluster. Beside a few anecdotes like those, I don’t hold on to much. I throw away pay stubs, bank statements, bills and receipts. I do accumulate stuff left over from repairs—bike parts, sprinkler heads, wire nuts and such—in the hope that I’ll eventually use them. I also save the little tubes of superglue even though I know that when I need the halfused tube, it will be fossilized beyond use. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

S ON U W FOLLO RAM G A T INS

KLY

WEE C L S @

Has Mother never told you: You don’t do something just because someone tells you to. Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski didn’t get the memo—you know, the memo that says she, a public servant, should be open with information unless there is a legal reason to keep it under wraps. But Biskupski, when asked by the City Council to give it up, said she’d promised Utah Transit Authority CEO Jerry Benson not to tell. Tell what? The newest design for the airport extension of Trax. That’s right—a design. There is nothing in law that forbids officials from talking about designs of anything—not even costs. Benson was kind of shocked, according to reports from The Salt Lake Tribune and Deseret News. Big misunderstanding, he said. He just didn’t want her saying that UTA preferred one design over another. Biskupski said she wanted the UTA trustees to be “looped in” first. Right. That’s the unelected board of trustees that has seen nothing but trouble with secrecy over the years.

Air Shmair

Soup. It’s not for drinking anymore. That’s what you’re breathing along the Wasatch Front, and now not even the business scions are happy about it, according to The Salt Lake Tribune. Thirty of them, including Zions Bank and Mark Miller car dealership, are pleading with Gov. Gary Herbert to grow a pair, although they didn’t say it quite like that. Utah is about to miss an EPA deadline for small particulate pollution, but maybe the EPA under Scott Pruitt doesn’t care. Businesses, people who breathe—they do. Deseret News ran a story about new research that could be key to our winter inversions, and Rocky Mountain Power gave solar companies a pass on onerous fees until 2035. So it looks like some residents of the state are working to clean up the air. If Utah is truly expecting this population boom by 2020, Herbert should be looking out for his now-murky legacy.

Smells Fishy

The desert tortoise is almost a poster-reptile for the anti-environmentalist movement. But who knew that cutthroat trout could be just as controversial? Fish managers are worried that the nonnative rainbow trout is moving the cutthroat inextricably toward extinction. And you know what that means—an endangered species. Many native fish are already federally protected, and that may be why Utah fish managers are about to kill off rainbow trout and restock the waters with the cutthroat. The Salt Lake Tribune reported on the plan, but barely touched on the controversy.

STAN ROSENZWEIG

What Transparency?

Rico Plautz went from Army brat, to computer programmer, to mobile data developer, to extraordinary philanthropist, playing in rock bands all along the way.

What was growing up in an Army family like?

My dad was assigned to the Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Ala., when I was a kid. The most thrilling event I remember was when he took me to work to see the Saturn rocket up close. That was amazing. In grade school and in high school I loved pop music and wanted to be a guitar player, but I kept running into so many of other kids who had experience and just didn’t need another guitarist. But they needed someone to play the bass, so I took it up. At age 15, kids on the Army post started our first band, Sound Sensations. We made good money playing at the skating rink and teen club.

How did you end up in Utah?

My dad retired from service and moved us to Salt Lake where I went to Judge Memorial High School. I formed a band with other kids, called Peanut Benders, and we are still together almost half a century later. After high school, I graduated with a major in computer science from the University of Utah in 1975 and was a career programmer for Sperry Corp. in Salt Lake City until the mid-’90s. More recently, I got involved with a startup and did interesting work in Wi-Fi, mobile technology and early Bluetooth development.

All the while, you kept up music. How did you get into philanthropy?

Our high school band Peanut Benders stayed together and we have been playing for charities including muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, and more recently St. Jude Research Hospital for Children. One of our band members’ daughters, Savannah, developed a brain tumor at age 7 and St. Jude took her in and helped her and her family for many years. So, we created the Savannah Song Committee in her honor raising $27,000 the first year and increasing to $65,000, $140,000, and $187,000 this past year for St. Jude. We have set a new goal going forward of $1 million.

That’s quite an accomplishment. What else have you been doing?

My wife and I have done some traveling. I am also happy to visit my two sons and our grandchildren. I am proud that I got my sons into music and they play drums and guitar and bass. I am part of a different band that is into rock, it’s called Bone Pile. We’ve played at Salt Lake area places like A Bar Named Sue and we are in regular rotation at Barbary Coast on State Street.

When is your next Peanut Bender fund raising event?”

In November we will be at the Hidden Valley Country Club working to raise that million for St. Jude.

—STAN ROSENZWEIG COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET


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BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Caffeinated History Coffee: let’s grow this plant, pick the berries, take the seeds out, roast and then grind the beans, pour hot water through the grounds, and throw the beans away. Drink the water! How did we get there? —Old Blue Eyes

Remember Solomon, OBE? Wise and just, son of David, king of Israel, etc? He’s who did it, according to one 17th-century Arab writer. The story goes that Solomon encountered a plague-struck village and was counseled by the angel Gabriel to roast coffee beans— anticipating the single-origin craze, Gabriel specified beans sourced from Yemen—and soak them in hot water. He gave the resulting beverage to the villagers, curing them. Despite coffee’s proven miraculous qualities, this version of history has it then falling off everyone’s radars for a couple millennia, till about the 16th century. OK, maybe not the most convincing. But Yemen and the 16th century, or thereabouts, are where coffee actually begins to show up in the (non-scriptural) record. We pause to note, first, that these folks certainly weren’t the first to come up with the idea of immersing vegetable matter in water and consuming the results. I’d propose that’s just one of those things humans wind up thinking of over time, if only because they’re bored; when the coffee craze first swept the Gulf of Aden, the Chinese had been brewing tea for centuries. You could similarly look at the practice of grinding grain, adding water, and exposing the resulting dough to heat—i.e., making bread, which I wrote about back in July. An unlikely process at first glance, but if you’ve got a sheaf of wheat and a need for nutrition, you’ll figure it out eventually. Coffee is nutritionally useless, though— what need could it have been filling? This is where the era and locale come into play: some convincing histories place coffee’s emergence in Yemeni communities of Sufis, members of a Muslim sect, who allegedly discovered that drinking it helped them stay awake during long religious ceremonies. There are a number of competing stories here and no small amount of lore, but if you squint hard enough you can see the rough outline of a narrative: coffee trees grow wild in this part of the world; somebody decided to see how their seeds tasted and realized that, taste notwithstanding, they make you feel good; thus are caffeine addictions born. It probably didn’t hurt that this was a region famous for the stimulant khat, which are leaves people chew on; there pre-existed a local enthusiasm for getting a buzz off plants. Various of these stories are laid out in the 1985 book Coffee and Coffeehouses: The Origins of a Social Beverage in the Medieval Near East, by historian Ralph Hattox. Hattox doesn’t even mention the first tale you’ll likely come across if you do any searching: one about an Ethiopian goatherd named Kaldi, who observed his flock becoming

particularly animated after nibbling on a certain bush. After trying it himself, Kaldi shared his find with a local imam, who dried the beans and took to steeping them in hot water whenever he needed to pull an all-nighter down at the mosque. Apocryphal for sure, but the accounts Hattox does relate support the idea of coffee being an agrarian discovery embraced by Sufi Muslims; he finds one story, for instance, of a notable Yemeni Sufi known as al-Dhabhani, who sometime in the 1400s traveled to Ethiopia and, there discovering coffee, brought some back to Aden and shared it with his co-religionists. This story also contains “more than a bit of legend,” Hattox concedes, and is complicated even by the language employed: Dhabhani is said to have encountered people in Ethiopia “using” (i.e., not “drinking”) what the 16thcentury writer recounting these events called qahwa, leaving it unclear whether they were brewing it or chewing on it, a la khat. Evidence on the side of brewing is provided by the word qahwa itself, a term that previously had sometimes referred to wine, another mood-altering drink. Still, that or something like it is about as close as we’re going to get: though we don’t know the play-by-play, we know roughly where coffee drinking caught on (Yemen, perhaps running with an Ethiopian concept) and when (the mid-15th century), as well as the religious tradition that midwifed it. A little note on that: In Yemen, the drink ran into early contention over whether it was even acceptable by the standards of the Quran. The prophet Muhammad, you’ll recall, forbade his followers from getting intoxicated, and when coffee made its way to Mecca, in the early 1500s, it sparked a debate: was caffeine an intoxicant? In 1511 a local religious leader “literally put coffee on trial,” writes Tom Standage in A History of the World in 6 Glasses (2005): “He convened a council of legal experts and placed the accused—a large vessel of coffee—before them.” After talking it over they decided coffee was indeed an intoxicant, and therefore haram, and the drink was banned—burned in the streets, Standage reports, its vendors beaten. Within months, though, a higher council overturned the ruling. Apparently cooler heads had prevailed in the interim; maybe everyone switched to decaf. n

Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope. com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@bill _ frost

Eight reasons the 2017 summer movie season tanked:

8. King Arthur: Legend of the

Sword: Dungeons & Dragons nerds didn’t leave the house. Knight: Mark Wahlberg wasn’t believable as a brainiac inventor who can’t get laid. Dead Men Tell No Tales: Johnny Depp was too believable as a winesoaked fop who’s only in it for the money.

5. An Inconvenient Sequel:

Truth to Power: 80 percent of screens were blocked by Al Gore’s carbon footprint.

4. The Dark Tower: Was widely for nonsensically-scripted comicbook fare was depleted by Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.

scenes between The Rock and Zac Efron didn’t play well in red states.

1. The Mummy: Graphic sex

scenes between Tom Cruise and himself didn’t play well anywhere.

There’s been a lot of talk about the gender pay gap in the United States, but women across the world have a much harder path to professional acceptance. You will have two opportunities to hear from Shihana Alazzaz, one of the first women to practice law in Saudi Arabia. She will speak first on A Saudi Woman in the Corner Office and then at the Hinckley Institute on Working Women & Globalization. Alazzaz had to argue for her own inheritance rights at the age of 16, studied abroad to become a lawyer and eventually returned to her native Riyadh where she is head of transactions at the Public Investment Fund. Because of her experiences, Alazzaz is dedicated to mentoring other young women and ambitious young people in her field. Little America Hotel, 500 S. Main, 801-832-3273, Thursday, Sept. 7, 7-8:30 p.m., free with registration, bit.ly/2wmaPSQ; Hinckley Institute of Politics, 332 S. 1400 East, Room 102, 801-581-8501, Friday, Sept. 8, 12-1 p.m., free, bit.ly/2gmBQ4K

News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

RECOVERY DAY RALLY

Do you know someone who has substance abuse issues? September has been designated Recovery Month by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration as a way of increasing awareness and understanding of substance use and mental health for the 23 million people in recovery across the nation. Walk with thousands of others in Salt Lake, the city that’s been selected as the national hub site for the Faces and Voices of Recovery and SAMHSA Recovery Month Rally. You’ll walk through the streets of Salt Lake from the Gallivan Center, where there will be live bands, dignitaries from the national recovery movement and more. Gallivan Plaza, 239 S. Main, 385-210-0320, Saturday, Sept. 9, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., free/register, recoveryday.org

FINANCIAL LITERACY FOR WOMEN OF COLOR

It’s all about the tools you have. Financial tools have been a bit scarce for women, and particularly for those of color. It may be subtle, but racism is systemic in the realm of financial management. The Utah Women of Color Council in collaboration with Ally Bank’s Wallet Wise Financial Literacy program is offering a two-part series to help these women create longterm financial goals through wise money management. Empowering Women of Color: Financial Literacy Part I (broaching the topics of budgeting, banking and investing) happens Saturday, Sept. 9 from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the city library’s Glendale Branch—1375 Concord St., 801-633-1997. The session is free, but registration is required at bit.ly/2vFRTgF

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SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 11

2. Baywatch: Graphic sex

WOMEN’S SUCCESS PATH

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3. Valerian: America’s patience

T! O B O R Y N I H S BI G

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CHANGE THE WORLD

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6. Pirates of the Caribbean:

In a week, you can

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7. Transformers: The Last

CITIZEN REVOLT


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Best of Utah 2017 Readers Poll

2017

The original. The best. readers choice MEDIA + POLITICS

GOODS + SERVICES

VOTING DEADLINE:

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 AT NOON MDT

(Entered online, postmarked or dropped off in person)

Best atmosphere ————————————— Best breakfast ————————————— Best brunch ————————————— Best Chinese restaurant ————————————— Best desserts ————————————— Best downtown SLC restaurant ————————————— Best French restaurant ————————————— Best gluten-free ————————————— Best Greek restaurant ————————————— Best Indian restaurant ————————————— Best Italian restaurant ————————————— Best Japanese restaurant —————————————

Best appetizer ————————————— Best BBQ ————————————— Best bakery ————————————— Best brew pub ————————————— Best burgers ————————————— Best hard cider ————————————— Best coffee shop ————————————— Best distillery ————————————— Best donuts ————————————— Best ethnic/specialty market ————————————— Best food truck ————————————— Best french fries ————————————— Best gyros ————————————— Best pizza —————————————

Best bar menu ————————————— Best beer selection ————————————— Best craft cocktails ————————————— Best dance club ————————————— Best dive bar ————————————— Best gentleman’s club ————————————— Best karaoke ————————————— Best LGBTQ bar ————————————— Best late-night grub ————————————— Best neighborhood bar ————————————— Best new bar ————————————— Best Ogden bar ————————————— Best open-mic ————————————— Best Park City bar ————————————— Best pool bar ————————————— Best sports bar ————————————— Best theme night —————————————

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THE FINE PRINT

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1) Keep it local. Yes, we’re aware Taco Bell chalupas are awesome. 2) Ballots can be filled online at cityweekly.net/bestofutah, mailed or handdelivered by to 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 84101 by Tuesday, Sept. 12. 3) Only one ballot per person; don’t be sneaky. 4) You must vote in at least three categories for your ballot to be counted. 5) You too can be a winner! Name, phone number and email address must be included in your ballot for validation and prize eligibility.

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Vote Now!

RESTAURANTS

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Best barber ————————————— Best bookstore ————————————— Best boutique ————————————— Best comic-book store ————————————— Best gear store ————————————— Best garden supply ————————————— Best pet supply store ————————————— Best piercer/body modifier ————————————— Best salon —————————————

Best bike shop ————————————— Best bowling alley ————————————— Best city park ————————————— Best community event/festival ————————————— Best kid-friendly hiking trail ————————————— Best overall hiking trail ————————————— Best public golf course ————————————— Best recreation destination ————————————— Best running event ————————————— Best skate shop ————————————— Best ski resort ————————————— Best snowboarding —————————————

Best salads ————————————— Best sandwiches ————————————— Best seafood ————————————— Best soups ————————————— Best sushi ————————————— Best tacos ————————————— Best brewery ————————————— Best vegan ————————————— Best wings —————————————

Best all-ages venue ————————————— Best concert of the year ————————————— Best dance company ————————————— Best DJ ————————————— Best friend of the arts ————————————— Best gallery ————————————— Best Instagram feed ————————————— Best live music venue ————————————— Best movie theater ————————————— Best museum ————————————— Best music festival —————————————

Best alternative medicine ————————————— Best chiropractor ————————————— Best dentist ————————————— Best family practice ————————————— Best fitness classes ————————————— Best gym ————————————— Best massage therapist ————————————— Best physical therapy ————————————— Best Pilates studio ————————————— Best plastic surgeon ————————————— Best psychic ————————————— Best urgent care ————————————— Best yoga studio —————————————

OUTDOORS & REC

Best Korean restaurant ————————————— Best Mexican restaurant ————————————— Best Middle-Eastern restaurant ————————————— Best new restaurant ————————————— Best Ogden restaurant ————————————— Best Park City restaurant ————————————— Best patio ————————————— Best place to take Mom ————————————— Best Salt Lake Valley restaurant ————————————— Best Thai restaurant ————————————— Best Utah County restaurant ————————————— Best Vietnamese restaurant ————————————— Best vegetarian restaurant ————————————— Best wine list —————————————

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A&E

HEALTH + WELLNESS

Best smoke/vape shop ————————————— Best tattoo artist ————————————— Best thrift/consignment store —————————————

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Best elected official ————————————— Best nonprofit organization ————————————— Best podcast ————————————— Best political scandal ————————————— Best radio show ————————————— Best radio station ————————————— Best social cause ————————————— Best sports reporter ————————————— Best TV anchor ————————————— Best TV news reporter ————————————— Best TV news station ————————————— Best Utahn ————————————— Best weather reporter ————————————— Worst Utahn —————————————

Best overall band/group ————————— Best piece of public art ————————— Best record shop ————————— Best theater company ————————————— Best visual artist —————————————

WRITE-IN Best thing we forgot and where to find it:

of


14 | SEPTEMBER 7, 2017

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NEWS

I M M I G R AT I O N

Love Letters

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH

Correspondence between a young woman at the Topaz internment camp and her beloved, sheds light on Trump’s America. BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net @stephenpdark

D

David Hisato Yamate, right

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SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 15

between them all the more, calling it the “acid test” of their relationship. On the train to Chicago, “they were singing songs that reminded me of you so much I had tears in my eyes.” He continued, “I sure hope it won’t be long before you are out.” He would return to Topaz to see her for several days, but leaving proved painful. “I feel so damn rotten leaving you alone in Topaz for Christmas and New Year’s, darling,” he wrote. She replied she had cried herself to sleep. She chafed at her lack of freedom, writing that she wished she were free, if only to see the movies she wanted to. Feelings of rejection penetrated her dreams: “I dreamt last night that I went to where you worked and got kicked out. I really have crazy dreams.

They really get me down.” Yamate moved to Salt Lake City and worked at the Hotel Utah coffee shop. Being so close to Topaz was hard. “I wish I was back at camp with you. It sure seems every time I’m out I wish I was back there and when I’m back there I wish I was out but not in Salt Lake.” Problems emerged when Tsubokura became friends with a younger female at the camp who, according to the letters, seemed intent on creating problems. “She says that she gets along better with you than you do with me,” an anguished Tsubokura wrote. Rumors of his straying reached her ears. “I love you a lot and I hate to see you mixed up with another girl.” FBI agents came to the camp “investigating some mimeographed copies of some articles,” Tsubokura wrote Yamate. The agents instructed internees not to plan to relocate, despite the exclusion order banning JapaneseAmericans to the camps having been lifted. When Yamate went to see her in early February 1945, he was frustrated because she had gone to a show rather than see him. He broke up with her shortly after his visit—via letter. Tsubokura wrote to explain she’d made a firm promise to go to a show with the female friend, and could not break the promise. Yamate hit the bottle when she informed him she’d attended a Valentine’s Day dance with a young man. He was stung, too, that she’d typed the note, instead of writing in her usual elegant script. He got up at noon “and started drinking,” he wrote. “Boy, I guess you get drunk fast on an empty stomach.”

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mass deportations of hundreds of thousands of youth currently legally studying and working in the U.S., the shadows of such precedents seem only more threatening. Yamate and Tsubokura’s letters began in earnest after he left the camp to provide much-needed local wartime labor. Being released was a mixed blessing, given Tsubokura was still there. “At first I was glad to be out here free and fooling around, but now I wish I [were] back there,” he wrote. Much of their letters are devoted to movies they had seen and songs that reminded them of each other. Before winter hit, Yamate picked tomatoes near Roy. He wrote Tsubokura that he hoped a frost would freeze them so he could return to Topaz. He read magazines “to keep the loneliness away.” Life at Topaz was tedious. When a fire broke out in one of the huts, Tsubokura wrote, “it sure broke the monotony.” Mostly her letters were about working at the camp’s welfare office, the climate and missing her beau. “It’s windy like anything. There’s more dust than you can imagine.” When she looked up from her desk, she could barely make out the post office across the way. Their letters were more than lifelines through which to express their feelings; they were an integral part of every day. Yamate set his alarm clock for 10:30 each morning to know when the mailman came. Tsubokura would leave work early, running to the barracks to see if he had written her. In December 1944, Yamate left Utah for Chicago and wrote that he felt the distance

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avid Hisato Yamate and Tamaki Tsubokura’s courtship began in the summer of 1944. Like so many young lovers, they would go for long, soulful walks. Their choice of location, however, was severely limited by the barbed-wire fence that surrounded the Central Utah Relocation Center. They were born and raised near San Francisco—Yamate in November 1925; Tsubokura a year later. Shortly after the Pearl Harbor bombing of Dec. 7 1941, the War Relocation Authority forced their families and many other JapaneseAmericans to move to the hastily assembled black tarpaper barracks at the Topaz internment camp near Delta, Utah. The story of their relationship until they got married in 1946 is told through several hundred letters held at the J. Willard Marriott Library’s special collections department at the University of Utah. The “David Hisato and Tamaki Tsubokura Yamate papers” also include pictures of Yamate but not of Tsubokura, perhaps because cameras were not allowed in the camp. The letters were rescued from a landfill dump in Berkeley, Calif., according to a 2013 report by the Eureka Times-Standard, and sold to the Marriott through a deal brokered by a Berkeley book dealer and local rare books guru, Ken Sanders. A City Weekly reporter read the letters which covered Tsubokura’s time at Topaz, after reference librarian Alison Elbrader organized a tour of some special collections materials at the reporter’s request. The correspondence, which stretches from September 1944 to January 1947, reveals two young people negotiating their feelings through pen and paper. It also offers a chilling insight into life within and without a government-sponsored mass incarceration program for a specific ethnic group. In November 2016, a key financial supporter of President Trump, while promoting the idea of a Muslim registry, called such internment camps “precedents.” With Trump now publicly committed to ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA), throwing up the specter of


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With the prospect of the camp closing, and her and her family returning to San Mateo, Calif., she had increasing doubts about a future for them. “I feel as though I want to cry and yet I can’t,” she wrote. By the end of the month, they were slowly healing the rift—one letter at a time. Yamate went to Topaz in March to straighten things out. Days before his arrival, she wrote about how going to a sad movie made those around her cry. She, however shed no tears. “Guess I am getting pretty hardboiled since coming in camp. I never was like that back home.” Face-to-face, the couple resolved their differences. After he left, she wrote, “The days I spent with you [are] the happiest days I have spent in my whole life. I know I’ll never have that happiness with anyone else.” Yamate attended BYU in late March, studying algebra and chemistry, while also playing tennis for the university. Come late June, days before Tsubokura and her family left Topaz, Yamate went to the camp, putting her “on the spot,” he later wrote, although he didn’t mention about what. “That day you came to say goodbye, it frightened me more than anything had in all my life,” she wrote. Topaz closed four months later, on Oct. 31, 1945. Back in San Mateo, Tsubokura felt happier in some ways. “The feeling here is very good,” she wrote. “No one looks to stare at you. It feels as though I never left it except for memories.” She rediscovered her softer self, she wrote, but wished they could be together. “I rather have the barracks if you were there where I could see you, darling.” Tsubokura worked for the U.S. Navy as a secretary, while Yamate found employment in Salt Lake City until he could afford to return to California in October 1945. The

following year, Yamate joined the Army. Shortly before Yamate was sent to Japan in late 1946, they were married. Special collections had no details of their lives after Yamate returned from Japan on Jan. 3 1947. Perhaps what kept them together was the strength of a love that distance, rather than eroding, finally confirmed. “I miss you terribly darling,” Tsubokura wrote from the gentle climes of San Mateo. “I loved you in the past but I love you more now. I think distance makes the heart grow fonder.” CW

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH

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One of Utah’s


E M Y F I R T GEN GAR HOUSE BUSINESS OWNDER. S

LONGTIME SNU THE EVER-CHANGING ’HOO M AN R E F L EC T O S BY JOSH SCHEUER

SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 17

That is, of course, also a touchy subject. Ask many of the business owners along 1100 East what they think of a proposed train line down their street from 2100 South to Westminster College, and frustration emerges in tone and word. And finding the money to fund another Trax line is a separate headache. The city applied for federal dollars through the highly competitive Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant program, which would have allowed Utah Transit Authority to extend the S-Line, but the application was denied— a missed opportunity or dodged bullet, depending on who you ask. “There are some people who love everything that’s going on; there are some people who don’t mind some of it, and there are people who hate all of it,” Barry says. “We are across the board, a diversity of ideas, values and outputs. I don’t think there is one particular voice in Sugar House about anything.” The community master plan outlines priorities for development, but those are often overlooked, according to community council members. “We strongly advocate all the time for connectivity through the blocks, for pedestrian activation, walkability, preserving historic nature and character, local businesses,” she continues. Long-standing small businesses have ridden the waves of change. And with the most at stake, they exemplify the multiplicity of opinions. City Weekly spoke to 10 Sugar House establishments to pick their brains about the evolving neighborhood:

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“We’ve added over 1,000 apartments—and there is still more coming—in the last five years,” she adds. “When the business district started developing, there were no apartments in that core district like we’re seeing now.” But, when assessing the character of the neighborhood, Barry says an eclectic spirit remains. “Sugar House is made up of diverse people with diverse values and diverse ideas,” she says. “I look at our ethos now, and we’re a diverse community of young and old and everything in between.” No community is static, and Sugar House in particular—a favored destination generally recognized as the slice of city east of 700 East, from 1700 to 3000 South— has gone through many phases. But it’s the recent influx of tall apartment buildings and subsequent traffic that has prompted many nostalgic residents to flood the inboxes of the community council. Judi Short, the first vice-chair for the Sugar House Community Council, sees the brunt of complaints, despite the reality that the council has no power to approve or deny building permits. “Just wait until they see the eight-story building going up back by the street car,” she says, referring to the soon-to-be-erected Sugarmont Apartments on McClelland Street and Sugarmont Drive. Emphasizing that her opinions don’t always align with those she receives, Short has become familiar with the chorus of complaints: “Look at the tall buildings; the traffic is a mess; the local businesses are disappearing. Some of them find places to rent, others don’t and they just go away,” she says. “One thing we really need in this town is a good transportation system.”

s the sun reaches its noon apex, an obnoxiously long train of northbound vehicles on 1300 East—waiting to turn into the heart of Sugar House— extends so far back that the caboose, a forest-green hatchback, can’t avoid jutting into the intersection a block away. That driver will have to wait through three cycles of green arrows before he turns west at 2100 South and follows the procession through one of Salt Lake City’s premier shopping and dining destinations. Though well established, Sugar House has in the past few years seen refurbished storefronts along its main arteries. It was just two years ago when officials commemorated the Sugar House Monument Plaza, a longanticipated renovation project, by burying a time capsule set to be unearthed in about 50 years. By then, the neighborhood might well be a forest of high-rise buildings looking down on a network of train lines. On this day, a towering red crane points skyward, and its perpendicular arm casts a shadow inside a cordoned construction crater. Inside the hole is the thick rebar foundation of a five-story apartment complex that will soon stand where Utah Idaho Supply and a Subway sandwich shop once sat. Traffic and construction are symptoms of the area’s popularity. And in this regard, Sugar House is more than a neighborhood; it’s a brand, a bankable market that has kept developers salivating as shovels move dirt. Naturally, not everyone is as thrilled by the sleek new facades. “Some of them are shit-ugly. I mean, they’re atrocious architecture,” Amy Barry, a member of the Sugar House Community Council, says.

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A

HARRIS | PHOTO

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BY DYLAN WOOLF


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Sterling future

Older than Utah’s statehood, family-operated Sterling Furniture opened up shop in downtown Salt Lake City in 1875 before moving to Sugar House in the 1940s. Now, co-manager Mark Williamson thinks of Sugar House as a bifurcated district along a south/north line. “The challenge for Sugar House has always been whether or not people will cross 2100 South,” he says. “You can have a lot of street traffic on the south side of the street and not necessarily cross over to the north side of the street.” Sterling sits on the northeast corner of 2100 South and 1100 East in a building that the store owns (in fact, the family that owns Sterling Furniture owns several buildings on the block and rents space out to local business tenants). Furniture stores are almost always destination stores. Those who frequent them, Williamson points out, aren’t typically casual shoppers who might make an impromptu purchase, and doubly so in his case because Sterling doesn’t carry cheap items. “We’re not in the low pricing. We’re trying to give them a good quality at a reasonable price,” he says. “It’s not the low-end, which you see all the time. It’s not the high-end. It’s a good medium.” Pedestrians, he says, aren’t as inclined to cross over 2100 South. And although traffic is a nuisance, and in Williamson’s estimation “already maxed-out at certain times of the day,” he thinks the lack of visible parking is a bigger barrier to businesses than the congestion. In its 135-year existence, Sterling has established itself in the market, and its goods are furnishing homes along the Wasatch Front. Business is fine, Williamson says, and during that long history, he and his predecessors have seen the neighborhood evolve. “What attracted people in the first place was the small-town atmosphere of Sugar House,” he says. “And that’s changing.”

For the books

Less than 400 feet from Central Book Exchange—a momand-pop book shop that has called the neighborhood home since 1968—looms the ubiquitous book chain Barnes & Noble. It might seem the behemoth has enough muscle to quash out the little guys, but according to CBE owner Pam Pedersen, having a similar store a block away is a boon for her business. “Barnes & Noble has a whole lot of a little. We have a little bit of a lot,” she says. “They can’t compete with me in a lot of ways.” Though not deep, her inventory is diverse enough to attract even the super-retailer’s employees through her doors, she says. Together, they draw voracious readers to the neighborhood, who, she believes, will hit up both places. These days, small bookstores are also competing with online vendors like Amazon. But, she says, the store has a loyal customer base. Pedersen’s shop sits on congested 1100 East. It’s a point of concern for her, and though she’s not sure how to mitigate the traffic, there’s one option she rejects: “It’s not a streetcar, it’s not that,” she says. “Stop already with that foolishness.” She’s concern that construction, though temporary, would ward off customers for a long enough period to cripple sales—and that the store might never recover. It would be a mistake to assume Pedersen can’t adapt, though. When she purchased the store in 2005, she switched from a loosely tracked exchange program to one that involved cash—though used books have remained a vital part of the business. “We take books in of any kind for our point system,” she says. “You don’t have to have an appointment. There’s no stress. There’s no anxiety. You just bring them in and we’ll put you in our system.”

Different kind of buzz

Pipe dream

Paul Schaaf, owner of Plumbing Plus, is in the minority of local business owners near the 1100 East/2100 South crossroads who eyes the morphing neighborhood with a rosier disposition. “It’s a progression. It’s not a regression,” he says. “I think it’s great.” Then, without provocation, he launches into one of the area’s most controversial topics—the proposed Trax line down 1100 East. “I think there should be a train that goes down the street. Everybody says it’s the worst thing that could happen, but I think it’s a wonderful idea.” Acknowledging the construction could be disruptive, Schaaf says it would be as temporary as it was downtown while Trax rails were laid. “I’m all for improving mass transit. Salt Lake City is becoming a little larger and busier. To me, it’s an improvement.” Schaaf has been observing the city’s progression for a while. Before he was old enough to drive, he was asked by a neighbor if he’d be willing to dig trenches for around $2 per hour. “I said I’d do anything for $2.10 an hour,” he remembers. This was his first foray into plumbing. Eventually, he started working for a plumber who later offered to sell him a truck and loan him the money to buy it. For a long while, he worked out of his apartment above Sterling Furniture until he was able to move into the space down the street. The Sugar House explosion, he says, has increased foot traffic in the evenings, though not so much to his place. But he embraces the scene: customers out walking to various dining spots. Schaaf does miss small things about Sugar House, like the “old style” Christmas lights that used to be strung across the street. “I do kind of miss the character of the old frontage,” he adds, “the diversity that used to be in the store fronts.”

Emily Potts, co-owner of Sugar House Coffee, established in 2002, consciously tries to foster an inviting hangout in the eatery tucked off 1100 East. “The culture at Sugar House Coffee is that we make sure that we provide the community with a safe space,” she says. Open on weekdays from 6 a.m.-midnight and on weekends 7 a.m.-midnight, the clientele varies—sometimes by the hour. Regardless, the café doesn’t cater to one particular type of coffee drinker. “Our demographic of customers range from young high school kids to middle-aged hipsters to older business people,” she continues. “We want to attract everyone rather than one small demographic. We want everyone to be a part of our community.” Echoing that sentiment is a broad spectrum of people inside the building, but the blocks outside, Potts worries, are starting to look like a repeating loop of apartment high-rises. “I think they need to stop building,” she says. “I don’t want to see Sugar House lose its charm. I think Sugar House has always been a very local community with artists and a very eclectic group of residents and businesses. It’s starting to lose that with all the apartments.” Recognizing the frustrating traffic and a lack of parking, Potts understands the inclination to build rail lines, but she, like many others, says tearing up the already small road on 1100 East is a poor option. Instead, she suggests, if the city wants to run a line through the business district, a train route down 2100 South would make more sense. While the population boom has been good for business, Potts believes it’s reaching a tipping point. “It’s losing too much of its charm. There are still so many high rises coming in, and Sugar House can’t handle the vehicle traffic. There were some things that needed to be improved, but they’ve done that and now I think it’s time that we make sure we stay that tight-knit, local community.”


Round round, baby

Making a splash

Make some coin

In his boyhood days, Bob Campbell, a precocious young Sugar House tike, used to hit up Wally’s Coin Shop on 2100 South to buy or sell rare currency—earning his nickname, Bobby the Wiz Kid. Fitting trajectory then, that Campbell is now a renowned numismatist and owner of a rare-coin shop in the same spot Wally’s was years ago. His store, All About Coins, has been in business for 38 years and is a one-stop shop for coins, gems and other collectible items. Campbell sees the streets around him growing more vibrant—a network of food and shopping that can collectively lure people out of their cars and past store windows. “We have all these fantastic new restaurants that have opened. If you don’t know about it, come down during lunch time and you’ll realize it by the traffic that’s here because everybody else is coming here,” he says. “Most people will find a place to park and they might visit a shop, get lunch, they might visit another shop. “It doesn’t happen anywhere else but [Sugar House and] downtown.” While a Trax line down 1100 East that would run from 2100 South to Westminster College could inject the neighborhood with more bustle, he doesn’t welcome what he believes would result in chaos and commotion. In fact, he says, the mere proposal has sown discontent toward public officials among like-minded business owners. When the proposals were being crafted, he says, local businesses weren’t at the table. “The people here don’t trust the mayor’s office or city council, because they feel like their voice is not heard here, yet they’re the ones who will be directly impacted,” he says. And as a Sandy resident, Campbell says he doesn’t even have the option of voting out a city office holder, whose decisions can directly affect his livelihood.

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SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 19

Ryan Hahn, a professional locksmith at family-run Rudy’s Key & Repair Service, notes that the Sugar House-based business has moved offices four times, but the most recent was to get distance from a new “gaudy monstrosity of condos.” Hahn doesn’t hide his displeasure that the neighborhood has been invaded by national chains and brick-and-mortar taller than the treeline. Although Rudy’s only moved a block west, the difference is noticeable, Hahn says. “We saw how busy it was getting up there, and when the city started talking about putting the Trax on 11th East, we wanted to get out,” he says. But Rudy’s isn’t out of the woods yet. Now situated on 1000 East and around 2000 South, the business will be down the road from another towering housing unit. The unbridled growth, he fears, will strangle the unique local businesses that attracted people in the first place: “The ground was too fertile and now it’s becoming overcrowded,” he says. And while it’s true that locks and keys are necessary parts of a new living quarters, Hahn says that doesn’t immediately lead to new business because the builders fit the units with in-house locks. But he’s not entirely pessimistic, either. “Regardless of all the changes, we still love Sugar House,” he says. “And we’re here to do what we can.”

Locked and loaded

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Lori Zoun, partner at Neptune Divers, established in 1978, views Sugar House with ambivalent eyes. The community, she says, is vastly more walkable. But the new neighborhood is losing itself in the process: “The sad part of it is how much the small mom-and-pop shops have been scooted out with all the chains that are coming in,” she says. Neptune offers swim lessons and snorkeling courses but primarily built its business on scuba training and equipment. And it has a home in Sugar House where Zoun would prefer it stay—in spite of rent prices that continue to inch up. “Other parts of the valley are saturated with scuba shops,” she says. “We need to stay here, and figure out how to make it work.” As for changes in transportation, she appreciates the push to get folks out of their cars. The corridor that follows the S-Line train is frequented by cyclists and joggers, she notices, but the train ridership seems low. And the new development isn’t diversifying the local economy in a way that excites her. “They’re focusing so much on restaurants and condos,” she says. If Sugar House is intended to be a contained neighborhood, she says, they’re missing an all-purpose shopping destination like Target. “Since Shopko closed, we need something like that,” she says. “If they’re making it a community where you don’t have to leave, they’re missing that one store.”

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Stickers plastering the front door and windows of Raunch Records fits with how owner Brad Collins sees his shop’s place in the neighborhood. “We are the bad apple of Sugar House, and we’re hoping to stay that way,” he says. Collins ponders whether the punk-rock label is limiting. Raunch specializes in vinyl records. But it’s also a skate shop and sells odd collectibles. Recently, Collins has ventured into dealing art. “We take local art on consignment and the local comic books that kids make,” he says. When reflecting Sugar House’s churning business community, Collins is resigned. “For some people it’s good—for developers.” Raunch opened in the ’80s, relocated a few times, then closed down in the subsequent decade for 12 years because of “inconsequential stuff” that “doesn’t mean anything to anybody.” Collins reopened Raunch in 2009. All the while, he’s witnessed the changes to Sugar House, especially the retail space south of 2100. But beyond the expensive prices, in true punk-rock fashion, Collins has resisted relocating to the newer buildings because he doesn’t want to conform to the rules, such as a requirement that stores stay open till 9 p.m. “I don’t really know where I’d take the store if they decided to demolish this part of the block,” he says. And then there’s the traffic. The walk-ins don’t always walk out with music. “People just get disappointed. They just want to see a Led Zeppelin record and I could give a fuck, you know? So I don’t care. I don’t even do that. If I get some used ones in, then whoever comes in is lucky,” he says. As far as Collins is concerned, you can’t foist Trax upon a community. “It’s not an integral part of our transportation, like in the Bay or New York,” he says. “We’re way more like L.A. than we are San Francisco.”


Fishers Cyclery came into being in 1930 thanks to a cyclist name Joe Fisher—who, according to current store manager Wayne Baxter, was the “nicest human being on Earth.” “Everybody came to Joe with their Schwinn when they were a kid, and their crazy, high-end racing bike when they weren’t a kid,” Baxter says, while admitting that the origins of a store that opened more than 80 years ago are difficult to pin down. It might have originally been a welding garage or lawn-mower repair shop and is rumored to be one of the first concrete buildings in Utah, he says. Although Fishers has remained a Sugar House staple, plenty of other businesses have come and gone the way of the dodo. “Progress is going to happen,” Baxter reasons. “I try not to have sour grapes.” The stores that have endured formed the bedrock of Sugar House’s reputation— one that is known beyond the Salt Lake Valley. In fact, Baxter says he encounters visitors who, having read about the neighborhood online, say they’re looking for the “funky part of Sugar House.” This is especially disorienting when travelers white-knuckle their way to the center of town only to find big-box stores. “I have friends who won’t come here. Go up 21st. It sucks,” Baxter says of the traffic. As for the strategy to get drivers out of their vehicles, he’s pessimistic. “I don’t think you force Americans very well. If you make it popular to walk, everybody will walk. If you tell them you have to walk, they’ll probably buy a bigger car,” Baxter says. “We’re contrarian by nature.”

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Contrarian by nature

Home of the Millie burger

In its 38-year history, Millie’s Burgers has managed to maintain its identity as a place that offers “good old-fashioned, cooked-to-order fast-food,” owner Dan Neilson says. “It’s kind of a dying art form, so to speak. We cook everything to order, use fresh ingredients.” The burger joint makes its french fries and onion rings. The breaded mushrooms and zucchinis are homemade, and they don’t use frozen beef on their signature burgers. Across the street from his establishment, a new apartment complex is being erected. Although the behemoth structure will bring new patrons, Neilson says the downside is road congestion. “You can’t have one without the other.” But the boom has also brought in more competition. “Tons of new eating establishments around here,” he says. He says the proposed rail line is a waste of money, and he thinks the S-Line isn’t utilized enough to justify its existence. “Most people, to go where they’re going, they’re driving,” he says. “That’s just the way we Americans are.” He also wonders whether the apartment complexes will fill up with tenants or struggle to find renters. Before it was Millie’s, the restaurant was an Arctic Circle run by Neilson’s mother-in-law. He got into the burger business about the time it became Millie’s. Through the restaurant window, he’s seen the demolition and rebuilding of his town. “Sugar House is a great area. It’s been a great area to us all these years. Hopefully it continues to be so. Hopefully it doesn’t get so crowded that nobody wants to be here anymore. Hopefully it doesn’t go backward,” he says. CW


LINDA IVERSON

Back in June, ABC premiered The Gong Show, a revival of the hit talent show from the ’70s and ’80s. Now, the original gong has made its way to the 17th annual Gangrene Comedy Film Festival for an evening of family-friendly talent acts, short films and live music. One reason the festival has continued for so long is its wide variety of entertainment. “We actually have lots of fans who come for the live parts of the show more so than for the films,” founding member Craig Nybo says. Performances have included a motorcycle daredevil, luchador wrestlers and a mime—accompanied, of course, by Stephen Hawking (sort of) singing David Bowie’s “Space Oddity.” The festival’s music choices are well-known for their eccentricity—a steampunk rock opera performed by the band Rustmonster, or the hairy Wasasquatch Bigfoot band covering such classics as Spice Girls’ “Wannabe.” This year’s show promises the return of Sparkling Planet, a smaller-sized big band that’ll play authentic Gong Show music. The festival is not a large one, but thanks to an active and open community, has already gathered a cult following more feverish than the Brontë sisters. One reason for this is its simple premise. “The festival originated,” Nybo says, “as a large backyard party where films were shown on a bedsheet stretched between two volleyball posts.” Although the posts and sheet have seen their time come and go, the films have continued to get better, and the Gangrene adage “funny wins” still rings just as true. (Rex Magana) Gangrene Short Comedy Film Festival @ Ed Kenley Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Road, Layton, Sept. 8, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., $10/$40 family pass, gangreneproductions.com

Longtime fans of the TV series Whose Line Is It Anyway?—whether in its British or American versions—might think they have a sense for what to expect from an evening of improvisational comedy from two of the show’s regular cast members, Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood. But while many of the fundamentals might be the same, it’s a bit of a different ball game when it’s a two-man show, compared to a larger troupe with a moderator. “We had to figure out ways to adapt games to either be self-run by us while we’re playing, or give that power to the audience,” Sherwood says. “But you also have to make it fairly foolproof. An audience member pulled up out of the crowd doesn’t necessarily have the comic timing. You have to make it turnkey for them.” Even the kind of venue—an amphitheater rather than a small comedy club or a studio audience—changes the dynamic of audiencegenerated improvisational comedy. “When you ask a theater of 150 people [for a suggestion],” Mochrie says, “it’s different from 2,000 people yelling ‘gynecologist’ at you.” Despite the challenges, Mochrie and Sherwood have mastered the art, after more than 25 years working together, of making a show that’s different every night run like a well-oiled machine. “Improv seems very casual and informal,” Sherwood says, “but we’ve turned it into a big comedy show. We’re doing scenes and goofiness, so it has this element of danger. It’s like a play that keeps messing up, and we turn it into something that’s still working and funny.” (SR) Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood: Scared Scriptless @ Sandy Amphitheater, 1245 E. 9400 South, 801-568-2787, Sept. 9, 8 p.m., $18-$35, sandyamp.com

Colin Mochrie & Brad Sherwood: Scared Scriptless

SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 21

The popular clichés that typically accompany any mention of Greek heritage—from Zorba the Greek to My Big Fat Greek Wedding—offer an incomplete view of a particularly hallowed legacy. It’s certainly not a surprise to most people that ancient Greece was the birthplace of democracy, and that its mythology became the basis of modern storytelling in many kindred forms. Consequently, any celebration of Greek culture becomes bigger than an isolated event. It reflects both a timeless legacy and lessons learned that can easily be applied to modern society. Likewise, the invitation offered by the Greek Orthodox community of Greater Salt Lake City to share in its celebration of tradition, heritage and culture bears heeding. One of the city’s largest annual ethnic festivals, it provides people of all ages the opportunity to dine on native delicacies like dolmathes, souvlaki and spanakopita, sample a rich array of arts and crafts and to get swept up in the rousing music and folk dance the Greeks are justifiably famous for providing. “Become Hellenes for a weekend by sharing in our rich ethnic culture,” says the church’s new priest, the Very Reverend Archimandrite George Nikas. “Our community is delighted to share this beautiful cultural event with all Utahns, as we come together for a celebration of life, friendship and thanksgiving.” Given the turmoil that’s so prevalent in our country and our world, the timing couldn’t be better. (Lee Zimmerman) Salt Lake Greek Festival @ Holy Trinity Cathedral Courtyard, 279 S. 300 West; Friday & Saturday, Sept. 8-9, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 10, 11 a.m.8 p.m.; $3 (children 5 and under free), saltlakegreekfestival.com

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SATURDAY 9/9

Gangrene Short Comedy Film Festival

FRIDAY 9/8

Salt Lake Greek Festival

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In a state as notoriously racially homogenous as Utah, it can be a challenge to present a play about racial minorities and not have it become a sweeping statement about The Way Things Are for members of that group. When Alicia Washington agreed to direct Salt Lake Acting Co.’s production of Surely Goodness and Mercy—New Jersey-based playwright Chisa Hutchinson’s story of an African-American boy’s friendship with a cranky school cafeteria lady—she recalls having a candid conversation with the company’s management team. “For the story to ring true for me,” Washington says, “the characters need to come across as fleshed-out and relatable. “The last thing I wanted people to do was walk out feeling, ‘Well, that was a show about African-Americans, and now I understand their culture better.’” Instead, Washington wanted a focus on the story’s small-scale, simple tale about kindness—something that Washington described as “what is to be there as a friend and an ally; like a Cosby Show episode, but a little more gritty.” It was also a story that presented some unique challenges for a director, since it required casting younger, less-experienced actors in lead roles, and splitting the casting so the actors only performed alternate shows. “They take care of each other on stage,” Washington says of her cast members. “I just wanted to create this arena where they felt encouragement every day.” That’s a fitting approach to a story Washington believes is about “a community of people taking care of their own, and how those stories sometimes go under the radar.” (Scott Renshaw) Surely Goodness and Mercy @ Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-3637522, through Oct. 15; Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 1 & 6 p.m.; $24-$43, saltlakeactingcompany.org

FRIDAY 9/8

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Salt Lake Acting Co.: Surely Goodness and Mercy

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

MIKE VARANAKIS

ERIKA AHLIN

THURSDAY 9/7

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, SEPT. 7-13, 2017

MILLS ENTERTAINMENT

ESSENTIALS

the


Utah’s Got Tallent

A Salt Lake City writer brings his California background to My Absolute Darling. BY MICHAEL BERRY comments@cityweekly.net @mlberry

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STORE

★★★★★

GIFT CERTIFICATES TO UTAH’S FINEST

DEVOURUTAHSTORE.COM

t’s one thing to be a 30-year-old debut novelist. It’s another to be a 30-year-old debut novelist whose book is published by the prestigious Penguin Random House, has received advance rave reviews from renowned booksellers, critics and fellow authors, and is the cause for an 18-city national tour. That’s the situation in which Salt Lake City writer Gabriel Tallent finds himself with My Absolute Darling, a chronicle of a young girl’s reckoning with her abusive father. Stephen King called it a “masterpiece,” and said that it, like To Kill a Mockingbird and Catch-22, is one of those books that “we remember forever.” The novel has its roots in Tallent’s Northern California childhood and adolescence, but the novel came to fruition in Salt Lake City, where he moved with his wife for her to attend graduate school at the University of Utah. Born in New Mexico and raised by two mothers, Tallent grew up on the Mendocino coast. One of his mothers is acclaimed short story writer and Stanford professor Elizabeth Tallent, author of Mendocino Fire. “I spent a great deal of time outdoors, roaming around,” he says of his upbringing. “It was an endlessly explorable home base.” Tallent’s novel reflects an appreciation for where he grew up. Set amid the Northern California forests and coastline, My Absolute Darling follows 14-year-old Turtle Alveston as she navigates an isolated existence between the home of her survivalist widower father, Martin, and the natural world where she’s free to test her skills as she chooses. Certain that the world will end soon, Martin is given to elaborate rants and unpredictable cruelty, alternately professing his love for Turtle and breaking down her confidence so that she will never leave him. When Turtle meets Jacob, a high school boy from town, she begins to suspect that there might be alternatives to the way she lives with Martin, and that the hard lessons she’s learned might be used to save herself and others. “This is the story of one strong-willed and determined young woman searching for the tools and the strategy of resistance when resistance seems impossible,” Tallent says.

ALEX ADAMS

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22 | SEPTEMBER 7, 2017

A&E

BOOKS

The novel is intense in its depiction of physical, emotional and sexual violence. A scene in which Turtle is suspended over an unsheathed knife and forced to do pull-ups is especially harrowing. It’s also notable in its descriptions of the flora and fauna surrounding her. Whether investigating a tide pool, hiding or hunting in a forest or tending her own garden, Turtle sees more lush detail in her environment than any other character in the novel can manage. Tallent, however, bristles slightly when asked whether it was difficult to write from the perspective of a teen girl. “I think when people overstate how difficult it is to sympathize with these characters, it is an attempt to put them out of mind, and has little to do with the limits of our compassion and understanding,” he says. “She grows up in my culture,” he adds. “She’s not a psychological foreigner.” In contrasting his former and current residences, Tallent notes that Mendocino is a town characterized by its extreme liberal counterculture. Compared to Salt Lake, he says, “There’s a much stronger presence of old communes and hippie roots, and a much stronger fringe liberal element.” In Utah, his experience has largely been in the outdoors. Among his first stops after relocating was International Mountain Equipment, where Tallent outfitted himself with rope, harnesses and other items needed take up rock climbing. Now he climbs three or four days a week. “I’m self-taught, which I don’t recommend,” he jokes. “Most of the people I hang out with here are athletes,” he adds. “They are politically involved, but not to the same extent [as in Mendocino]. Conversations are generally less political, and focus more on the envi-

Author Gabriel Tallent

ronment and personal projects.” Having been raised by parents affected by California’s Proposition 8—the samesex marriage prohibition supported by the LDS church and receiving significant financial support from Utah donors—Tallent admits he had “tremendous reservations” about moving to the state. “I found that my reservations were outsized in comparison to my experience,” he says. “Which has been that Utahns, though very different from [Californians], are generous and hardworking and openminded.” Even as the cross-country book tour gears up, Tallent is at work on a new novel, one set closer to his current home. It’s about climbers, including one who suffers a horrific head injury. No matter what he writes next, he sees the value of fiction in divisive times. “Political discourse is increasingly deadlocked,” he says. “Perhaps storytelling is one of the few ways we have to communicate across differences, seek consensus and heal misunderstandings.” CW

GABRIEL TALLENT: MY ABSOLUTE DARLING

The King’s English Bookshop 1511 S. 1500 East 801-484-9100 Saturday, Sept. 9 6 p.m. Free kingsenglish.com


moreESSENTIALS

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The newly remodeled Utah Museum of Fine Arts (410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, umfa.utah.edu) showcases the work of German photographer Ilse Bing—mostly captured in Germany, France and New York during her most active period between the World Wars—in a solo exhibition through Dec. 31.

PERFORMANCE

THEATER

DANCE

DRYPP Rose Wagner Center, Black Box Theater, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, Sept. 6-7, 8 p.m., artsaltlake.org Bonneville Chamber Music Festival Browning Center, 1901 University Circle, Weber State University, Ogden, Sept. 6-9, weber.edu/bcmf Utah Symphony: Raiders of the Lost Ark Live Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-3552787, Sept. 7-8, 7 p.m., usuo.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 23

Ella Joy Olsen: Where the Sweet Bird Sings The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 7, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Leigh Bardugo: Wonder Woman: Warbringer The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 7, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Dan Hanna: The Pout-Pout Fish and the Bully-Bully Shark The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 9, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com Gabriel Tallent: My Absolute Darling The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, Sept. 9, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 22)

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LITERATURE

Don Friesen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801-622-5588, Sept. 8-9, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Marcus and Guy Seidel Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Sept. 9, 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Steve Soelberg Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Sept. 8, 7 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

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CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

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Always ... Patsy Cline The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, through Sept. 22, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; 2 p.m. Saturday matinee, grandtheatrecompany.com Annie Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Highway 89, Perry, 435-723-8392, through Sept. 16, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., heritagetheatreutah.com A Midsummer Night’s Dream Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 453-5867878, through Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org Classical Greek Theater Festival: Ion Westminster College Courage Theater, 1840 S. 1300 East, Sept. 7-9 & 14-16, 7:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu Forever Plaid Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-9849000, through Nov. 15, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinees, 2 & 4 p.m., hct.org Heart of Robin Hood Hale Centre Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-9849000, through Oct. 14, hct.org How to Fight Loneliness Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7880, through Oct. 14, times vary, bard.org Mamma Mia Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3200, through Oct. 21, tuacahn.org Next to Normal Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, Sept. 8-17, Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 6 p.m., egyptiantheatrecompany.org Pillow Talk Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Sept. 23, times vary, haletheater.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Sept. 10, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Sister Act: The Musical Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, 801-347-7373, through Sept. 16, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; 2 p.m. Saturday matinee; Monday family night, Sept. 11, 7:30 p.m., empresstheatre.com Surely Goodness and Mercy Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Oct. 15, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org (see p. 21)

Utahoma Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Sept. 16, Friday, Saturday & Monday; 7:30 p.m., theobt.org Wicked-er Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, 801-266-2600, through Nov. 4, desertstar.biz William Shakespeare’s Long-Lost First Play Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435586-7878, through Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org


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24 | SEPTEMBER 7, 2017

moreESSENTIALS Jean Reagan: How to Get Your Teacher Ready The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Sept. 9, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Jennifer A. Nielsen: Deadzone The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, Sept. 11, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Jane Hinckley: Jane Austen’s Joke Book Taylorsville Library, 4870 S. 2700 West, 801943-4636, Sept. 12, 7 p.m., slcolibrary.org Alexandra Bracken, Tamara Ireland Stone, Elizabeth Eulberg & Ally Condie The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, Sept. 13, 6:30 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 28, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Downtown Tuesday Harvest Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 31, Tuesdays, 4 p.m.-dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org South Jordan Farmers Market 1600 Towne Center Drive, South Jordan, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., sjc.utah.gov Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, through Oct. 25, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Gangrene Short Comedy Film Festival Ed Kenley Amphitheater, 403 N. Wasatch Road, Layton, Aug. 8, 7 & 9:30 p.m., gangreneproductions.com (see p. 21) Get Into the River Festival Various locations, through Sept. 29; Fairpark Trailhead, 1220 W. North Temple, Sept. 23, 3-7 p.m., getintotheriver.org Salt Lake Greek Festival Holy Trinity Cathedral Courtyard, 279 S. 300 West; Friday & Saturday, Sept. 8-9, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 10, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; saltlakegreekfestival.com (see p. 21) Utah State Fair Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, 801-538-8400, Sept. 7-17, utahstatefair.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Practicing Law in Saudi Arabia Little America Hotel, Ballroom C, 500 S. Main, 801-832-3270, Sept. 7, 7 p.m., utahdiplomacy.org TEDx Salt Lake City Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. Presidents Circle, Sept. 9, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., tedxsaltlakecity.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Nov. 18, utahmoca.org Andrea Henkels Heidinger: Shared Artifacts Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-5948680, through Sept. 29, slcpl.org Anthony Solorzano: Popular Religiosity in the Latino Communities of Utah SLC Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 22, slcpl.org Amy Fairchild: Color My World SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 15, slcpl.org Art, Politics & Alternative Realities Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, through Sept. 8, phillips-gallery.com

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Cary Griffiths: Reprise Art at The Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, Sept. 10-Oct. 14; artist reception Sept. 15, 6-9 p.m., artatthemain.com Cities of Conviction UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Jan. 6, utahmoca.org Eileen Vestal: Love Letter to Italy Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Ilse Bing Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Dec. 31, umfa.utah.edu (see p. 23) Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Dec. 9, utahmoca.org Janiece Murray Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Jason Manley: Shrinking Room UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-420, through Sept. 30, utahmoca.org Jimmi Toro: Kindle a Light Kimball Art Center, 638 Park Ave., Park City, 435-649-8882, through Nov. 26, kimballartcenter.org Joseph Bishop: Smoke Signals Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Sept. 14, slcpl.org Joy Nunn: Journey Back Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through Sept. 9, artatthemain.com Las Hermanas Iglesias: Here, Here Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, 801-581-7332, through Jan. 28, umfa.utah.edu Laura Sharp Wilson Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Logan Sorenson: A Land Further North: Images from Iceland Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Oct. 26; artist reception Sept. 9, 4 p.m., slcpl.org Mansa Adams SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 24; artist reception Sept. 11, 6:30-8 p.m., slcpl.org Milton Cacho: Camera Collection SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 16, slcpl.org Ryan Rue Allen: Flowing Imagination and Changes Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through Sept. 30, slcpl.org Sabrina Squires: Natural Kaleidoscope SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 15, slcpl.org Skate Deck Challenge Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande, 801-230-0820, through Oct. 1; gallery stroll reception Sept. 22, urbanartsgallery.org Safe and Sound UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 23, utahmoca.org Sticks Laid In Patterns and Other Mundane Oracles Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801236-7555, through Sept. 8, heritage.utah.gov Things Lost to Time SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 30, slcpl.org Tina Vigos: Seeking Grace Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through Oct. 21, slcpl.org Trent Call, Michael Murdock and Gailon Justus Evolutionary Healthcare, 461 E. 200 South, through Oct. 13, evolutionaryhealthcare.com/blog Utah Native American Artist Exhibition Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-965-5100, Sept. 7-Oct. 12; opening reception Sept. 7, 6-8 p.m., culturalcelebration.org Yidan Gou Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org


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SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 25

WWW.SALTLAKEGREEKFESTIVAL.COM

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SEPTEMBER 8TH - 10TH 279 SOUTH 300 WEST


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26 | SEPTEMBER 7, 2017

TED SCHEFFLER

DINE

Molcajete Magic

Authentic Mexican fare at Nuestra Cocina. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

D

uring my undergraduate college days in Colorado, a buddy Jamie introduced me to Mexican food. He took me to a place called La Cafetería, where you could eat all the burritos, tacos, enchiladas, tostadas, sopaipillas and sides that would fit in your stomach for $1.89. The place became our go-to dining spot on Sunday evenings, when the university’s cafeterias were closed. Last month—decades after college—that same friend visited me in Utah. Our palates— including our fondness for Mexican fare— have evolved significantly over the years, and I figured it was time to introduce Jamie to the wonders of molcajetes. For our Mexican immersion, I chose Nuestra Cocina at Rancho Markets on Redwood Road. The menu is so wide-ranging that there’s literally something for everybody, but it takes some time to get your bearings. Kids often opt for something simple like cheese quesadillas ($4.99), which can also be filled with grilled beef, chicken, pork carnitas, al pastor, buche, chicharrón or barbacoa. The same options are available for the café’s burritos ($7.99) and gorditas ($4.99). One of the more popular dishes is mojarra frita ($11.99). This is a seasoned, deep-fried whole fish (tilapia), served with yellow rice, tomatillo sauce and an avocado salad. It reminds me of eating fresh whole fish at beachside cafés in Mexico, and is an excellent option if you don’t mind dealing with fish bones. On Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, the restaurant serves up two classic Mexican soups/stews: menudo and pozole. The pozole

Nuestra Cocina’s bountiful molcajete ($7.99) is fantastic, but then again, I’ve never really tried pozole I didn’t like. Shredded roast pork and whole hominy is served in a rich red chile broth with accoutrements like onion, shredded cabbage and radishes, plus fresh tortillas to help soak up all that tangy broth. Menudo (also sometimes known as pancita, which translates as “little gut” or “little stomach” in Spanish) is a soup that is often served in Mexico on weekends, and is said to be a helluva hangover cure. Well, hangover or not, I love it. The key ingredient is beef tripe, which is served, like pozole, in a red chile broth with chopped onions, hominy, lime and fresh cilantro ($10.99). Looking for an above-average, but affordable, sandwich? Look no further than the tortas here. At $5.99 each, these are warm sandwiches made with flaky bolillo rolls (sort of a south-of-the-border variation on a baguette), smeared inside with black beans and avocado, and served with a choice of beef barbacoa, al pastor, roast pork, buche, chicharrón, chicken or carnitas, all topped with shredded lettuce and salsa. It’s a sensational sandwich. Now, for the big finale. I’ve written about molcajetes in the past, but here is a refresher. Named for the Mexican stone (often made from lava rock) mortar it’s served in, it’s is a daunting dish. Nuestra Cocina staff says their molcajete ($25.99) serves twoto-four people. I’d put the estimate closer to five or six. At any rate, it’s a quintessentially sharable item. The stone is set on the stove over a hot flame until seemingly molten-lava-hot, then filled with a mélange of ingredients that includes nopales (cactus), grilled chicken and beef, shrimp and mild Mexican green onions (cebollitas), topped with Oaxacan-style fresh cheese (queso fresco). The cheese gets all gooey, runny and delicious when it comes into contact with the hot rock that is used both as a cooking and serving vessel. It’s messy. It’s filling. It’s amazing. Go get one. CW

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LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW

DEREK CARLISLE

@scottrenshaw

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Fun fact: Among the many interesting “official” state things in Utah, the Dutch oven is the official state cooking pot, recognizing the Utah home of the International Dutch Oven Society (idos. org). That organization holds its biggest annual event—the World Championship Dutch Oven Cook-Off—once again at the Utah State Fairpark (155 N. 1000 West) on Saturday, Sept. 9 from 2-7 p.m. Entries are accepted until Friday, Sept. 8, and participants must not be professional cooks or cooking instructors, so it’s a genuine showdown of talented amateurs. Judges will score a full menu of main dish, bread and dessert, with a couple of interesting twists. The Utah Beef Council will provide a “mystery meat” protein that must be used in the main dishes, and 20 percent of judges’ scores will be based on the use of locally sourced ingredients. For more info, visit utahstatefair.com/dutchoven.

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While there are many wonderful ways to bolster the local arts community, it’s always a treat when that support can be accompanied by food and refreshments by great local purveyors. Ballet West presents the annual Beer and Ballet event at the Rose Wagner Center (138 W. 300 South) Saturday, Sept. 16, 6-9 p.m. Guests can enjoy catered pre-show reception featuring Epic Brewing craft beers and appetizers from Blue Iguana. The performance itself will showcase a sneak peek at works being prepared by the Ballet West II company for the program of original choreography Works from Within, scheduled for premiere in St. George in March. Tickets are $35 advance/$40 door; visit balletwest.org for more details. Quote of the Week: “An apple is an excellent thing—until you have tried a peach.” —George Du Maurier

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The Longest Shot-Ski Park City and Wasatch Brewery aim to reclaim a world record. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

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here’s something magical about shot glasses. When filled with alcohol, they have some kind of mystical power that unite many people into one for a brief moment. It’s a fleeting encounter that generally lasts a few seconds, and not all of those who wield the tiny 2-ounce glass emerge from the other side better for it. So why do we do it? I suppose it has a lot to do with sense of community, or maybe it’s the more celebratory aspects of the ritual that draws us in. All I know is that it’s a worldwide phenomenon with only the slightest of cultural differences. Up here in the mountains, we’ve developed a challenging apparatus to help bring

our alcohol shooting enjoyment to the next level. I’m referring to the shot-ski. The idea is as simple as the shot glass itself: Take a ski—preferably one that has seen its last days on the slopes—mount shot glasses to the plank shoulder-widths apart and fill said glasses with the mob’s choice of alcohol. Now, the trick here is that everybody holding the ski has to be in perfect synch. Both hand, eye and gullet must be one with the shot-ski to keep yourself from wearing whatever trendy cinnamon/eucalyptus/ cucumber whiskey is in front of you. Now, you can imagine that if a fourperson shot-ski is challenging, an eightor 10-person rig would be even more so, right? What about a shot-ski that was 937 feet long that contained 666 shot glasses? I have your attention now, don’t I? You see, back in January 2014, the town of Breckenridge, Colo., created a shot-ski massive enough to break the world record. The aforementioned rig was comprised of 219 skis hinged together into one long plank. That record stood for nearly two years, until a bunch of upstarts at Park City’s Wasatch Brewery decided they could do better—much better. To celebrate the 30th anniversary of Utah’s first brewery/ brewpub, the staff invited 1,191 of their closest friends, and on Oct. 22, 2016, they broke the record by a whopping 525 bodies on the city’s Main Street. The thing about

MIKE RIEDEL

BEER NERD

records is that, by design, they’re made to be broken. Breckenridge did what we all knew they’d do—they took it back months later with a 1,234-person shot-ski. Hey, screw those guys! Park City and Wasatch will prevail once again. The newest version of the shot-ski will be hoisted at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 14. This year’s goal is to recruit a total of 1,250 people to throw back some of the brewery’s fine craft beers. And to keep the celebration going, Wasatch will host a beer garden in the brewpub parking lot from noon till 6 p.m., complete with games, live music, a food truck and,

of course, a selection of award-winning brews. The word is spreading fast about this new attempt, and organizers anticipate it’ll sell out quickly. Wasatch is encouraging everyone to come in costume, as founder Greg Schirf will be handing out gift cards and swag to entrants dressed in the best regalia. The goal, like last year, is to have fun while raising money for the Sunrise Rotary Club of Park City, a worthwhile cause. I participated in the event last year, and had an absolute blast. I’d recommend that you all give it a “shot.” As always, cheers! CW


FILM REVIEW

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Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan in The Trip to Spain can’t stand being upstaged by his secondbanana. Those moments, however, generally feel more clipped and truncated, perhaps indicating that the background material takes the brunt of the TV-to-cinema editing in favor of the flat-out comedy. There’s a sense that these movies are trying to creep into the same passage-of-time thematic territory as the Hawke/Delpy Before trilogy, with comments about certain leadingman rolls having passed the 50-something actors by, and Coogan discovering that his 20-year-old son is about to be a father. They just never quite achieve the same sense of accumulated consequence—especially when one of the key plot developments from The Trip to Italy, involving Brydon’s brief extramarital fling, never comes up once. It’s obvious how much these movies depend on the episodic nature of the individual dinner conversations when The Trip to Spain ends in as weirdly abrupt a manner as any movie in recent memory. There’s plenty of fun in the individual bits of verbal pas-de-deux; there’s just not much reason to care about the material attempting to connect them. That’s what happens when a wonderful sketch-comedy series tries to do an impression of an actual movie. CW

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Those scenes are still crackling comedic bits, familiar though the rhythms now are. Much of the relationship between the Coogan and Brydon we see in these movies is built on professional competitiveness, and Winterbottom knows by now how to optimize that dynamic. Often that means Coogan—theoretically the more famous alpha-dog of the pair—slow-burning whenever Brydon attempts to one-up him or refuses to let a particular premise wind down, like when the latter takes off on a seemingly endless riff involving Roger Moore and the Spanish Moors. While Brydon is presented as the more easygoing of the two, it’s always clear how much he enjoys showing off his own skills—and if those skills make Coogan ever-so-slightly more insecure, all the better. Yet venturing into that territory of the characters’ insecurities and personalities is exactly where these movies get harder to figure out. All three of them have included personal asides—usually when they’re not together, and are making personal or professional phone calls—that emphasize Coogan as a divorced dad perpetually chasing career opportunities, while Brydon is a family man content to enjoy what life brings him. The most amusing such material here finds Coogan perpetually reminding people of his Oscar nominations (as co-writer and producer) for Philomena, and unable to understand why that achievement isn’t granting him carte blanche to get his next pet project rolling. In theory, those scenes should provide a richer context for the interactions between our protagonists, emphasizing why Coogan

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s movie trilogies go, The Trip is certainly an odd one. In part, that’s because the three movies didn’t begin as movies, but as a six-part BBC TV series—collaborations between director Michael Winterbottom and actors Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon, playing loosely fictionalized versions of themselves—edited down to feature length. But it’s also because, perhaps by virtue of the editing required for theatrical presentation, it’s not entirely clear what these movies are meant to be. On the one hand—and on the level that they’ve always worked best—they’re simply delightful hangout pictures taking advantage of the prickly frenemy chemistry between the two leads. As was the case in 2010’s The Trip and 2014’s The Trip to Italy, this version finds an excuse to send Coogan and Brydon out on the road together, ostensibly some journalistic assignment to eat in great European restaurants and see the sights. So they set out on a weeklong excursion to Spain, eating delicious food and serving up equally delicious banter. Their largely improvised exchanges— there’s not even a writing credit associated with The Trip to Spain—provide the bulk of the material, and once again it’s generally hilarious watching Coogan and Brydon serve-and-volley their comedic gifts. By now there’s a bit of a formula to those exchanges, often involving the pair stumbling upon a celebrity who becomes the subject of dueling impressions. Where The Trip memorably showcased their respective takes on Michael Caine, and The Trip to Italy found them running through the various James Bond actors, here they compete over the proper way to impersonate Mick Jagger, or what it would sound like if David Bowie were trying to convince someone to follow him on Twitter.

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BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw


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32 | SEPTEMBER 7, 2017

CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. 9/11 [not yet reviewed] Five strangers are trapped together in a World Trade Center elevator during the 2001 terrorist attacks. Opens Sept. 8 at theaters valleywide. (R) HOME AGAIN [not yet reviewed] A single mom (Reese Witherspoon) takes in three boarders— all younger men. Opens Sept. 8 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) IT [not yet reviewed] Adaptation of Stephen King’s novel about a group of kids encountering small-town evil in the form of a killer clown. Opens Sept. 8 at theaters valleywide. (R) MENASHE BB.5 Regional and cultural specificity can take a story a reasonably long way, but perhaps only so far. Menashe (Menashe Lustig) is a widowed Hasidic grocery clerk with a young son, Rieven (Ruben Niborski)—and as is the custom of this community, it’s expected that Rieven will be raised by his wife’s family until he remarries, which Menashe is in no hurry to do. Co-writer/director Joshua Z. Weinstein builds Menashe as a unique character, a shlimazel who shows his low-key rebellion to his conservative religious community through his resistance to wearing a hat and coat. But once you get past the intriguing details about the setting, there’s an underlying rote quality where it’s easy to anticipate every plot turn; if you don’t see what’s coming the moment Menashe puts a kugel in the oven, it’s possible you’ve never seen a movie before. The interaction between Menashe and Rieven brings some complexity to a tale that’s basically about a hapless guy trying to do his best; there’s just more to hope for from any movie than, “Well, that was nice.” Opens Sept. 8 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw RUMBLE: THE INDIANS WHO ROCKED THE WORLD BB.5 Catherine Bainbridge has some setting-the-record-straight to do in her broad documentary overview of Native American musicians’ influence on distinctively American popular music forms like rock ’n’ roll, jazz and the blues—which doesn’t mean she has a particularly elegant way of doing it. The film covers a broad range

of subjects—from lesser-known people of Native descent who were genre trainblazers (guitarist Link Wray, vocalist Mildred Bailey, blues songwriter Charley Patton), to “bet you didn’t know they were Native Americans” bigger names (Jimi Hendrix, Robbie Robertson, the Black Eyed Peas’ Taboo). There’s no particular logic to the organization, bouncing across the decades as talking heads narrate Wikipedia entries with a soundtrack. There’s much more compelling material in the broader looks at how Native musical and vocal styles, particularly in the South, blended with African-American culture to influence the birth of the blues, and it’s certainly valuable to address the historical erasure of Native peoples from the American story. But as wellmeaning as Rumble might be, it feels like a feature-length version of Adam Sandler’s “Hanukkah Song”: cultural pride in the form of name-dropping. Opens Sept. 8 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR

I DO … UNTIL I DON’T BB The facility for ensemble comedy Lake Bell showed with In a World … gets in the transition from the entertainment industry to theoretically everyday people. The story revolves around three couples participating in a documentary made by a controversial filmmaker (Dolly Wells) advocating for fixed-term rather than lifelong marriage, including a financially strapped married couple (Bell and Ed Helms) and a perpetually bickering older pair (Mary Steenburgen and Paul Reiser). Bell handles some of her physical comedy effectively, but Well’s character is too broad a stereotype at the center, and it feels almost too obvious that her attempt to prove her thesis by dividing her subjects will instead end up pulling them together. Despite some slick punchlines, the individual stories too rarely feel like they’re pulling in the same direction. The reality of marriage remains elusive between cynicism and romanticism. (R)—SR

THE TRIP TO SPAIN BBB See review on p. 31. Opens Sept. 8 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)

LOST IN PARIS BBB The cinematic clowning tradition of Jacques Tatí gets a pleasantly silly updating from the husband-and-wife team of Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon. Gordon plays a Canadian woman named Fiona who journeys to Paris at the request of her aging Aunt Martha (Emmanuelle Riva), then promptly loses all her belongings, can’t find the missing Martha and becomes intertwined with a homeless man (Abel). The plot is merely a thin structure on which to hang the physical comedy, with the gangly pair showing off amusingly choreographed bits. The material is a bit less effective when the humor isn’t based on slapstick, and perhaps too locked in to manufacturing a romance between its two awkward leads. But when you can get a sequence like Riva and farceur Pierre Richard sharing a seated soft-shoe pas de deux, it’s best not to quibble. (NR)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS MAUDIE At Park City Film Series, Sept. 8-9, 8 p.m.; Sept. 10, 6 p.m. (PG-13) RESISTANCE At Main Library, Sept. 12, 7 p.m. (NR) THE SHADOW At Main Library, Sept. 13, 2 p.m. (PG-13)

CURRENT RELEASES THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD BBB You might never duplicate the ineffable chemistry of Midnight Run, but if you’re gonna make an ersatz version, this’ll do in a pinch. Private security agent Michael Bryce (Ryan Reynolds) is brought in to escort hired assassin Darius Kincaid (Samuel L. Jackson) from England to The Hague to testify at the war-crimes trial of a genocidal world leader (Gary Oldman). The unpleasant history between Bryce and Kincaid puts to fine use the two actors’ gifts for florid vulgarity, a dynamic complemented by plenty of weird background business and some solidly constructed chase sequences. Indeed, banter and bullets would add up to something pretty great if it didn’t feel so … damn … dragged … out. It’s like the EuropaCorp version of Midnight Run, except Luc Besson would have pulled this ticking-clock action comedy into the station in under 100 minutes. (PG-13)—SR

PATTI CAKE$ BBB A gender-flipped 8 Mile with more comedic flair? Sure, sign me up. Danielle Macdonald plays Patricia Dombrowski, a 23-yearold New Jersey bartender who dreams of bringing her skills as a rapper to the world with the help of her best friend (Siddharth Dhananjay) and a taciturn anarchist experimental musician (Mamoudou Athie). While there’s a familiar vibe to the narrative, and scenes like the big rap-battle showdown, there’s an effective secondary level in the relationship between Patti and her embittered mother. Writer/director Geremy Jasper also brings spark to his visuals, but the movie really belongs to Macdonald, who evokes both the insecurity of a plus-size woman conditioned to expect failure, and the kid spitting out crazy rhymes. Plus, as played-out as the “we just created amazing art” scene might be, it’s great when it involves Cathy Moriarty rasping out “PB&J.” (R)—SR

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BY BILL FROST

@bill_frost

Horsin’ Around

BoJack Horseman and Outlander return; The Orville and The Deuce debut.

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2017

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mos suggest, but The Orville could break out this season … or just as easily flame out. After all the ordeals Claire and Jamie have endured thus far in Outlander (Season 3 premiere, Sunday, Sept. 10, Starz), what’s the worst that could happen now? Being separated two centuries and a continent, that’s what! As Jamie (Sam Heughan) faces the post-Battle of Culloden fallout back in 18th century Britain, Claire (Caitriona Balfe) is pregnant and stuck with Frank (Tobias Menzies) in 20th century Boston. As Celine Dion says, their hearts will go on, but just barely: Jamie’s a ginger shell without his time-traveling love, and headstrong Claire is even worse off in mansplaining 1948. Outlander might not be Starz’ flagship series anymore (hello, American Gods), but it’s still as tear-jerkingly compelling as ever. The Wire and Treme ended years ago, but they’re still more revered than most current series—writer David Simon can do no wrong, not even when working with wildcard James Franco. In The Deuce (series debut, Sunday, Sept. 10, HBO), co-producer Franco plays twin brothers Vincent and Frankie, 1971 Brooklyn knockabouts who get in too deep with the mob and, eventually, prostitution and porn. He’s effectively subdued in the roles, and by the time Maggie Gyllenhaal (playing a nicely nuanced hooker) shows up to remind everyone she can bring it when called upon, it’s clear that The Deuce is neither rosy glamorization nor cautionary tale—it’s just life on the street, and Simon writes the hell out of it. The dual return of South Park (Season 21 premiere, Wednesday, Sept. 13, Comedy Central) and Broad City (Season 4 premiere) was rescheduled from August for no real reason, but who cares? They’re back! South Park is wisely getting out of the Trump business after a hit-and-miss 2016 of trying to satirize our IRL Idiocracy— though “Member Berries” is a theme worth revisiting—but at least Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer are treating the president’s name as an F-bomb (T-bomb?) in their first post-Obama season of Broad City. The women still have plenty to say through their Brooklyn-stoner misadventures, but can South Park rediscover its boys-willbe-awful-boys magic? Again, who cares? They’re back! CW

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o animated series, not even the vaunted Rick & Morty, makes you feel the feels like BoJack Horseman (Season 4 premiere, Friday, Sept. 8, Netflix). Last season was especially dark, culminating with BoJack (Will Arnett) once again pulling defeat from minor comeback victory and attempting highway suicide (told ya—dark). Now, he’s gone missing and Hollywoo—they still haven’t fixed the D—is without its third, or maybe fourth, favorite ’90s sitcom horse. Diane (Alison Brie) and Mr. Peanutbutter (Paul F. Tompkins) are dealing in their own ways (and not well), while Todd (Aaron Paul) has stumbled into a fashion modeling gig with Sharc Jacobs. Oh, how I’ve missed the animal puns … Rescued from the obscurity of Vimeo, Con Man (network debut, Saturday, Sept. 9, Syfy) is going to be a pleasant surprise for casual nerds. While his former co-star (Nathan Fillion) of the 10-years-canceled space-adventure series Spectrum has gone on to become a big deal, Wray Nerely (Alan Tudyk) can only get work at sci-fi conventions, which are slowly (but hilariously) crushing his soul. If the Firefly/Serenity meta-signals have already eluded you, there’s no point in mentioning geektastic Con Man cameos like Gina Torres, Summer Glau and Jewel Staite, as well as Tricia Helfer, James Gunn, Felicia Day, Seth Green and even the now-controversial Joss Whedon, himself. Seth MacFarlane can do whatever the hell he wants at Fox anymore—even cast himself as a live-action lead, which is always a dicey proposition. His hour-long sci-fi comedy The Orville (series debut, Sunday, Sept. 10, Fox) looks like one of the more promising new shows of the fall 2017 season, which isn’t saying much. For one, it’s not a dirty, “dystopian” future in MacFarlane’s space, but more of a sleek, earnest Star Trek-via-Galaxy Quest vehicle. For two, the U.S.S. Orville’s shipmates (including Adrianne Palicki and Scott Grimes) make up for their captain’s not-quite-Shatner shortcomings. It’s not as wacky as the pro-

TRUE


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BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

I

missed the party—the one Skullcandy threw in June to flaunt their new headquarters. As a longtime user of the company’s earbuds and headphones, I was keen to check it out. So I was tickled when the company agreed to give me a personal tour and interview with CEO Jason Hodell. In my head, Castle Skullcandy was secreted among rolling hills in the Park City mountains. My mental image spliced Dr. Weird’s mountaintop lair in Aqua Teen Hunger Force with Willy Wonka’s fantastic chocolate factory—only instead of a platoon of ominously singing Oompa Loompas perfecting Everlasting Gobstoppers, there’d be a team of audio dorks seeking perfect sound. As it happens, the company’s new digs sit immediately off of I-80 on Landmark Drive, just beyond a McDonald’s. But it does skew Wonka-esque. The spacious, modern-designed lobby instantly conveys chill; with anti-Muzak bumping overhead and a retail annex, it feels like a mall store. I arrive and am given a visitor pass—a wood-carved, two-dimensional skull logo on a lanyard; I wanna flash it around like the Alice Cooper backstage passes in Wayne’s World. And, lo, there is candy! A giant bowl (alas, not a skull) of mostly Dubble Bubble bubblegum. Next to the reception desk sit three scooters—hope springs that we’ll ride these on the tour. “We were busting out at the seams,” Senior Global Brand Manager Kathryn Smith says as we walk. The old building, the company’s home for its first 13 years, had become a chaotic, cluttered, cramped workspace. She continues, “We really knew that we kind of needed to grow up just a little bit more.” But not too much, because you gotta keep the Oompas humming; happy workers are productive workers. Skullcandy is geared toward the young and young-at-heart, anyway, so the new HQ has all kinds of youthful, stress-busting amenities: a putting green; a basketball court; and an employee lounge with a half-pipe, foosball, billiards and ping-pong tables that opens onto an expansive south-facing deck with a mountain view. The deck was party central, where attendees danced to Watsky and mingled with brand ambassador athletes, like Olympic snowboarder Mark McMorris and Australian motorbike stunt rider Robbie Maddison. As if on cue, as we enter from the deck, Hodell—tall, ginger and fit—descends the stairs. We exchange pleasantries and plan to meet in the employee green room shortly. Upstairs, Smith shows

Skullcandy’s anechoic chamber off the new open workspaces. The lack of cubicle walls and abundance of windows provide an appealing blend of artificial and natural light, and inspiring pastoral views. The atmosphere, she says, is meant to foster collaborative creativity. Back on the main level, the green room is decorated in contemporary furniture. There’s a fridge, a bar and musical instruments for break-time jams. Hodell chooses a seat in the middle of the room. The towering redhead seems too chill to be a CEO, which shouldn’t be a surprise, given Skullcandy’s vibe. But he’s no executive manchild; his comportment splits the difference between casual everydude and the measured gravitas expected of a head honcho. He leans toward the former, indulging personal questions like the first time he listened to music on headphones. It was while attending the United States Military Academy at West Point, where music was the only escape from the rigid, disciplined environment. He and his fellow cadets freely shared their CD collections, so Hodell lost himself in the sounds of the Cure, Depeche Mode, Erasure, Yaz, Simple Minds, AC/DC and Billy Idol. Until late 2016, Hodell was the company’s chief financial officer/ chief operations officer. He took the reins just as the new building opened, following the purchase of Skullcandy by Mill Road Capital in October. Previously, he’d been concerned with financial planning, forecasting, results, factories, inventory, product development and quality. He says the work made him very tactical, and prepared him for his new gig, where he’s constantly thinking strategy, with both eyes on “getting back to the roots of the brand in music. That’s thrilling for me—’cause, you can tell, I dig [music].” Business beckons, and Hodell excuses himself. Smith introduces Senior Manager of Product Experience Sam Noertker, who leads us through the main-floor workspaces where techies tinker and build prototypes. Once more, the work areas are open. There’s still clutter in the form of tools, wires and workshop detritus, but even that seems to have a place. Noertker saves the best part—the anechoic chamber—for last. It’s a room without reverb, ensconced by, but not actually attached to, the building, to avoid electrical interference and ambient noise from things like heating and air-conditioning systems. Every wall and the ceiling features patterns of noise-dampening wedges caged in wire. A similar surface sits below the floor, a wire grid that feels like a trampoline; the urge to jump and shout is nighirresistible. Noertker explains that the room’s purpose is to enable Skullcandy’s mad scientists to hear only the audio emanating from their products. “The reason [the wedges] are so big is that deep bass frequencies are really big,” he explains. The entire experience lasts roughly 90 minutes, but ends too soon. In the car, I realize I’m still wearing my visitor’s badge. I consider keeping it as a souvenir, then decide to return it, because maybe they’ll let me stay. But instead of asking, “Are you hiring?” I leave the badge without a word, and head down the mountain, leaving the occupants of Castle Skullcandy to their fun. CW


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LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER

THURSDAY 9/7

This show is the sleeper hit of the summer—a dizzying, nonstop parade of music and memories where you’ll know every last song. That’s because the artists are under a directive to play only their hits. If you’re Tommy Tutone and all you’ve got is “867-5309/Jenny” and two minor singles, that’s all you play. Same goes for everybody else. To use a word that’s been abused like a redheaded stepchild since the Day-Glo decade, it’s awesome! Damn near every act hangs out after their sets to pose for photos and sign stuff. Last year, I met my junior-high MTV crush Valerie Day of Nu Shooz and chatted briefly with A Flock of Seagulls’ Mike Score—who’s lost his iconic hair, but whose headlining set was the lengthiest and best, capping off an incredibly satisfying night. Granted, it was weird that Wang Chung singer Jack Hues was inexplicably absent—and will be again this year—but Cutting Crew guitarist Gareth Moulton was a fine substitute. Berlin’s Terri Nunn still sings like a badass and kinky little bird, but although she’s at work on a new album with her former bandmates, she tours with scabs for the time being. As for the other acts, expect them to deliver the goods while you’re effectively reduced to your awkward teenage self. No word on the surprise special guest for this date, other than it’s not Dramarama, which sucks ’cause they’re on other Lost ’80s dates. (Randy Harward) Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 6:30 p.m., $35-$75, all ages, lost80slive.com

FRIDAY 9/8

MICHAEL GRECCO

Lost ’80s Live: Tony Hadley (Spandau Ballet), Cutting Crew, Wang Chung, Naked Eyes, Berlin, The Flirts, Tommy Tutone, special guest TBA

Circle Jerks and Fear in Penelope Spheeris’ (Wayne’s World) celebrated documentary The Decline of Western Civilization. This commenced a period of hotness that ended in hiatus after 1987’s See How We Are. A brief reunion produced another studio album and an acoustic album before the band returned to their solo and side projects. In 2004, they got back together for good—releasing no new music, but playing to adoring fans who didn’t care about that. Now X is the subject of a four-decade retrospective at the Grammy Museum®, and they’re stopping in SLC so we can see how they are now. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $23 presale, $28 day of show, 21+, thecomplexslc.com

Berlin (Terri Nunn)

SATURDAY 9/9

Givestock: Dr. Dog, Joshua James, Joe McQueen Quartet, The National Parks, Fictionist, RKDN, Beachmen, Cinders, Panthermilk and a “local mystery band”

So Even Stevens, the sandwich shop chain that famously donates a sammich for every one purchased in its stores to hungerthwarting nonprofits, is behind the community music and art fair Givestock. Check this out: When you buy a ticket, Even Stevens steps up the ratio by donating two meals to the Utah Food Bank. What we get for our

X

X, Skating Polly

Forty years ago, Exene Cervenka, John Doe, Billy Zoom and DJ Bonebrake formed X. They were at the vanguard of first-wave LA punk and, as they increasingly folded in elements of American roots music into their literary noise, they helped pioneer the cowpunk scene alongside noteworthy acts like Jason & the Scorchers, The Beat Farmers, The Blasters (whose Dave Alvin replaced Zoom for a spell), the Meat Puppets, Rank & File (featuring Alejandro Escovedo) and some band called Social Distortion. On the strength of their 1980 debut Los Angeles and 1981 follow-up Wild Gift (both on Slash), they were featured alongside Black Flag, the Germs, the

FRANK GARGANI

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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36 | SEPTEMBER 7, 2017

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

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money keeps with the chain’s rep for high quality, the lineup is as tasty as their droolinducing food. Philly indie rockers Dr. Dog headline the bill featuring locals of national and international renown, including jazz master Joe McQueen, singer-songwriter Joshua James, alt-rockers Fictionist, indie folk troupe The National Parks, dance rockers RKDN, indie-alt rock trio Beachmen, acoustic pop group Cinders, funk-pop foursome Panthermilk, and a “local mystery band.” On top of that, there’s gonna be art displays (live mural painting, a gigantic dichroic glass skull), food trucks and Even Stevens pop-up shops, vendors, a piratethemed adult playground, charity personal grooming services, hammock garden and hands-on musical education with a “musical petting zoo” (watch the goat-ar; it bites) and the DrumBus. Those of legal age will appreciate the availability of booze. That’s an awful lotta fun and feels for such a cheap ticket. Kinda makes you wonder who’s giving to whom. Then again, maybe the point is that we should all practice generosity, so the world becomes a festival for everyone. (RH) Fort Buenaventura Park, 2450 A Ave., noon-10 p.m., $10 at Even Stevens, $20 online, all ages, givestockfestival.com

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SATURDAY 9/9

Local Women Who Rock: Talia Keys and the Love, VadaWave, Ginger and the Gents

There’s nobody better qualified to present an evening of local women who rock than singer/songwriter Talia Keys, who’s known as much for her captivating stage presence and refreshingly frank lyrics as her passion for important issues, including feminism. Her latest band, Talia Keys and the Love, is going on two years as her main musical vehicle, and they’re fresh from opening for Andrew Bird at the Twilight Concert Series last month. Now Keys is working with local community radio station KRCL to produce the third annual Local Women Who Rock concert and, in addition to Keys’ reggae and soul-influenced sounds, the bill is rounded out by the more punkish/new wave VadaWave (featured last year in Entertainment Weekly) and Ginger and the Gents, whose hard-edged rock is reminiscent of No Doubt. The common denominator: Each is fronted by confident, demonstrative artists who just happen to be women. (Brian Staker) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $15, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

MONDAY - FRIDAY

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Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! at 9:00

TUESDAY:

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13TH:

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AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! NEW MENU ADDITIONS! SATURDAY & SUNDAY BRUNCH, MIMOSA, AND MARY EVERY THURSDAY:

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SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 39

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am


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MONDAY 9/11

CONCERTS & CLUBS

SCOTT JARVEY

Charley Jenkins

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Roosevelt, Utah, native Charley Jenkins didn’t take long to recognize that his dream of playing country music would draw him to Nashville. Working for a music publishing company there, he honed his songwriting and performing skills, and by 2013 released his fourth album, The Way It Is (Refinement). His career has taken a few detours, like returning home in 2008 to help care for his father, who was suffering from cancer (and later passed away). But around that time he was a finalist on Nashville Star— the country take on American Idol—and he’s since opened for Taylor Swift, Lady Antebellum and other country luminaries. His story epitomizes a struggle to maintain authenticity in a genre dominated by stereotypes. To that end, he infuses rock and pop elements into a relatively purist American style. With local bass wizard Jonni Lightfoot (from mid-’90s alt-rockers Honest Engine, soft-rock legends Air Supply and Sunset Strip glam rockers D’Molls) in his band, it definitely gives Jenkins’ twangy tunes a low-end boost—some honky-tonk badonkadonk, if you will. (Brian Staker) Sandy Amphitheater, 1245 E. 9400 South, 8 p.m., $10-$25, sandyarts.com/sandy-amphitheater

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THURSDAY 9/7 LIVE MUSIC

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FRIDAY 9/8 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin) Channel Z (Club 90) Dubwise + DJUNYA (Urban Lounge) Exodus + Villain + Death Blow (Metro Music Hall) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) Ghostowne (Garage on Beck) Highball Train (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit + Frank Turner & The Sleeping Souls (Red Butte Garden) Lionel Young Band (Brewskis) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Mojave Nomads + Panthermilk + DeelanZ + Doctor Barber (Kilby Court) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) The Proper Way (Piper Down Pub) Sego + Star Crossed Loners + New Hollywood (Velour) Sounds Like Teen Spirit (The Spur) The Spazmatics + My Private Island + Trainwreck (O.P. Rockwell) Stephen Pearcy (The Royal) Sturgeon General + The Gringos + Press Gang Union (The Ice Haüs)

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SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 41

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karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 9/7 Reggae at

Beachmen + Umbels + Martian Cult + The Spiral Jetties (Metro Music Hall) Conner Youngblood (Kilby Court) Fehrplay + Versat (Urban Lounge) Joe McQueen Quartet (Garage on Beck) Lost ‘80s Live, feat. Tony Hadley (Soandau Ballet) + Cutting Crew + Wang Chung + Naked Eyes + Berlin + The Flirts + Tommy Tutone + special guest TBA (Gallivan Center) see p. 36 Reggae Thursday feat. Pato Banton (The Royal) Saphyre Rain + Detour (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Spawnbreezie + New Kingston (Elevate)


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BAR FLY

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Pretending to Be a Badass at the Barbary Coast Saloon

X + Skating Polly (The Complex) see p. 36

SATURDAY 9/9

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Gray (Snowbird Resort) DJ Jpan (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Mi Cielo + Candy Boy (Sky)

KARAOKE

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Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

THUR 9.7• FEHRPLAY

42 | SEPTEMBER 7, 2017

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EVERY DAY

PANSIES, PEACH DREAM, DJ NIX BEAT

Après Ski (The Cabin) Armers + Smoke Season + Patternist (Kilby Court) Big Dipper + DJ Shutter + Cartel Chameleon + London Skies + Willard (Metro Music Hall) Bonobo + Nombe (The Depot) Che Zuro (Snowbird Resort) Early Successional + SeasOnSapphire (Piper Down Pub) Epica + Lacuna Coil + Insomnium + Elantris (The Complex) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) George Nelson + Michelle Moonshine (Johnny’s on Second) Givestock feat. Dr. Dog + Joe McQueen Quartet + Joshua James + Fictionist + The National Parks + Panthermilk +

Did you know that the Barbary Coast is named after a slave-trader- and pirate- ridden section of 16th- to 19th-century coastal North Africa? And/or a particularly sketchy and violent part of 19th-century coastal Northern California? I thought it was some kinda Jimmy Buffett reference. That didn’t exactly match the place’s rep as a biker bar, but that’s cool; bikers can dig Buffett’s mellow, island-paradise vibe. That’s why I figured nobody effed with me. Every time I come in here, everybody’s cool and the beer is cold. Nobody’s breakin’ bottles over anyone’s heads, and I’ve used the restroom many times without incident. In fact, the only violence I’ve witnessed there was in a music video by local metal mavens Antix, where the bouncer took a fairly devastating fake punch to the jaw from the drummer, “Psycho Bald Dude.” The staff is unfailingly sweet, even when I ask stupid questions like, “Do you need to see my I.D.?” or “Does a Diamondback mountain bike count?” I always seem to stay longer than I intended because—near as I can figure—it’s just a good place to chill out for a while. You can drink your beer alone and watch sports, eat fries with the dude from Pinetop Inferno (toughest band in O-town!) or strike up a conversation with a stranger. Or, if you decide you really dig life at the Coast, you can roll up on your hog (Diamondback does not count, by the way) and ride up to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally with your new friends after rockin’ out with the world’s foremost chopper rockers, the Fryed Brothers Band. Hunter S. Thompson, eat your heart out. (Randy Harward) Barbary Coast Saloon, 4242 S. State, 21+, Murray, 801-265-9889 more (Fort Buenaventura) see p. 36 Herban Empire (Pioneer Park) Jake Miller + The Stolen (In the Venue) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Lake Effect (The Spur) Live Band (Club 90) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Live Trio (The Red Door) Ms. Fridrich + Salduro + Doctor Barber (The Ice Haüs) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) The Living End + Darts (Urban Lounge) SassyBlack + Madge + Marina Marqueza + Pierre, the Lamb (Diabolical Records) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Local Women Who Rock, feat. Talia Keys & The Love + VadaWave + Ginger & The Gents (The State Room) see p. 38 Timmy the Teeth + Josh Snider (Velour)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Chris Cutz + DJ Stario (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Sky Saturdays w/ Sharps (Sky)

KARAOKE

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SUNDAY 9/10 LIVE MUSIC

Bill N Diane + The Twin Flames + Los Hellcaminos (Park Silly Sunday Market) La Luz + Pansies + Peach Dream + DJ Nix Beat (Urban Lounge) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

THUR 9.7 • BEACHMEN

VERSAT

FRI 9.8 • DUBWISE W/ DJUNYA SAT 9.9 • RISK! 6PM DOORS SAT 9.9 • THE LIVING END DARTS 9:30PM DOORS

9/13: THE SHADOWBOXERS 9/14: TIGHT FRIGHT 9/15: TOPS 9/16: HAKEN 9/17: SARTAIN NIGHT 9/18: THE ROAST OF TERRENCE WARBURTON

SUN 9.10 • LA LUZ

UMBELS, MARTIAN CULT, SPIRAL JETTIES

FRI 9.8 • EXODUS, VILLAIN, DEATHBLOW SAT 9.9 • BIG DIPPER

DJ SHUTTER, CARTEL CHAMELEON, LONDON SKIES, WILLARD

WED 9.13 • TELESOMNIAC MORTIGI TEMPO, TBA

MON 9.11• COAST MODERN

THUR 9.14 • BURLESQUE & BLUES FRI 9.15 • STIFF LITTLE FINGERS

TUE 9.12• GEOGRAPHER

SAT 9.16 • ZION I

SALT CATHEDRAL

STRANGE FAMILIA

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

LIVE MUSIC

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WEDNESDAY 9/13 LIVE MUSIC

SEPTEMBER 7, 2017 | 43

DJ Birdman (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour)

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

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American Coast + COLD BEAT + Opaline + Gallow Humor (Kilby Court) Benjamin Booker + She Keeps Bees (The State Room) Josh Field (Piper Down Pub) JT Draper (Twist) Live Jazz (Club 90) The Shadowboxers + Harts + Joshy Soul (Urban Lounge) Shannon Runyan Duo (The Spur) Sheryl Crow (Red Butte Garden) Willow Bay + Justin Sane + Hoppy + Harpers + Scott Carter (The Loading Dock)

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Cory Smaller (The Spur) Geographer + Strange Familia (Urban Lounge) Haim + LPX (Red Butte Garden) Josh Field (Piper Down Pub) Uvluv + Black Lab + Second Hat + Mia Grace (Kilby Court) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee)

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TUESDAY 9/12

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© 2017

STAMEN

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

according to the U.S. Census 52. Painter Matisse 53. Start 55. Kids’ road trip game 56. Richard of “American Gigolo” 57. George Orwell’s alma mater 58. Some 59. Crank (up) 60. Fib

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

13. Oomph 21. British singer/actress Rita 22. Smartened (up) 26. Mall stand 27. Squash or squelch 28. ____ Plaines, Illinois 29. Singer of a famous bath time song 30. Tic-tac-toe winner 31. ____ Rida (“My House” rapper) 32. “Goodbye, mon ami!” 33. Cuban’s home? 37. Hunt in Hollywood 38. Suffix with deposit 39. “Oh, ____ cryin’ out loud!” 40. Back muscle, DOWN informally 1. Negative attention from the press, briefly 41. Artist Jean who pio2. He’s @SHAQ on Twitter neered in Dadaism 3. There are five on China’s flag 45. Use for support 4. Transmitted 46. 2017 Jordan Peele 5. “Your work is wonderful” horror film 6. Tile art 47. Where primatolo7. Grad student’s mentor gist Dian Fossey worked 8. Rank below marquis 48. It was a dark period 9. Fascinated by for Poe 10. Aid after a computer crash, say 51. Most common 11. “They say ____ are made in heaven. But surname in the U.S. in so is thunder and lightning”: Clint Eastwood 1990, 2000 and 2010, 12. Actress Thurman

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. One calling the shots 5. Louvre pyramid architect 10. “No need to wake me!” 14. A penny is a small one 15. Erin of “Happy Days” 16. Break 17. Figure in academia 18. Of ____ (somewhat) 19. 1960s civil rights leader ____ Brown 20. St____ 23. “Treasure Island” monogram 24. Italy’s equivalent of the BBC 25. “____ your style” 28. Fl____co 32. Pro 34. Auditioner’s hope 35. Loki or Thor 36. R____ 41. Notorious 2008 bailout recipient, for short 42. “... ____ saw Elba” 43. Question 44. L____t 49. Cuisinart setting 50. Female in a pasture 51. HBO competitor 54. “Who agrees with me?” (or this crossword solver’s cry while deciphering the clues for 20-, 28-, 36- and 44-Across) 59. Cumming of “The Good Wife” 61. Determined to do 62. Dive shop rentals 63. Sushi bar soup 64. Haughty 65. French I verb 66. Rounded hammer end 67. Gossipmonger 68. Tiny amount

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y

R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Will a routine trip to carry out an errand take you on a detour to the suburbs of the promised land? Will you worry you’re turning into a monster, only to find the freakishness is just a phase that you had to pass through on your way to unveiling some of your dormant beauty? Will a provocative figure from the past lead you on a productive wild-goose chase into the future? These are some of the possible storylines I’ll be monitoring as I follow your progress in the coming weeks. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Let’s meet in the woods after midnight and tell each other stories about our origins, revealing the secrets we almost forgot we had. Let’s sing the songs that electrified our emotions all those years ago when we first fell in love with our lives. Starlight will glow on our ancient faces. The fragrance of loam will seep into our voices like rainwater feeding the trees’ roots. We’ll feel the earth turning on its axis, and sense the rumble of future memories coming to greet us. We’ll join hands, gaze into the dreams in each other’s eyes, and dive as deep as we need to go to find hidden treasures.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) There was a time when not even the most ambitious explorers climbed mountains. In the western world, the first time it happened was in 1492, when a Frenchman named Antoine de Ville ascended to the top of Mont Aiguille, using ladders, ropes and other props. I see you as having a kinship with de Ville in the coming weeks, Capricorn. I’d love to see you embark on a big adventure that would involve you trying on the role of a pioneer. This feat wouldn’t necessarily require strenuous training and physical courage. It might be more about daring creativity and moral courage.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) You’re half-intoxicated by your puzzling adventures—and half-bewildered, as well. Sometimes you’re spinning out fancy moves, sweet tricks and surprising gambits. On other occasions, you’re stumbling and bumbling and mumbling. Are you really going to keep up this rhythm? I hope so, because your persistence in navigating through the challenging fun could generate big rewards. Like what, for example? Like the redemptive transformation of a mess into an asset. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “Free your mind and your ass will follow,” funk pioneer George Clinton sings in his song “Good Thoughts, Bad Thoughts.” What’s the best way to free your mind? Clinton says, “Be careful of the thought-seeds you plant in the garden of your mind.” That’s because the ideas you obsess on will eventually grow into the experiences you attract into your life. “Good thoughts bring forth good fruit,” he croons, while “Bullshit thoughts rot your meat.” Any questions, Taurus? According to my astrological analysis, this is the best possible counsel for you right now. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) James Loewen wrote a book called Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong. He said, for instance, that during the Europeans’ invasion and conquest of the continent, it wasn’t true that Native Americans scalped white settlers. In fact, it was mostly the other way around: Whites scalped Indians. Here’s another example: The famous blind and deaf Helen Keller was not a sentimental spokesperson for sweetness and light, but rather a radical feminist and socialist who advocated revolution. I invite you to apply Loewen’s investigative approach to your personal past, Gemini. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to uncover hidden, incomplete and distorted versions of your history—and correct them. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Roger Hodge writes books now, but when he worked for Harper’s magazine, he had an unusual specialty. He gathered heaps of quirky facts, and assembled several at a time into long sentences that had a nutty poetic grace. Here’s an example: “British cattle have regional accents, elephants mourn their dead, nicotine sobers drunk rats, scientists have concluded that teenagers are physically incapable of being considerate, and clinical trials of an ‘orgasmatron’ are underway in North Carolina.” Use Hodge as a role model in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Be curious, miscellaneous and free-flowing. Let your mind wander luxuriantly as you make unexpected connections. Capitalize on the potential blessings that appear through zesty twists and tangy turns. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) In Japan, you can buy a brand of candy that’s called The Great Buddha’s Nose Snot. Each piece consists of a rice puff that resembles the Buddha’s nose filled with bits of brown sugar that symbolize the snot. The candy-making company assures customers that eating this treat brings them good luck. I invite you to be equally earthy and irreverent about your own spiritual values in the coming days. You’re in prime position to humanize your relationship with divine influences … to develop a more visceral passion for your holiest ideals … to translate your noblest aspirations into practical, enjoyable actions.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Science fiction proposes that there are alternate worlds alongside the visible one—hidden, yes, but perhaps accessible with the right knowledge or luck. In recent years, maverick physicists have given the idea more credibility, theorizing that parallel universes exist right next to ours. Even if these hypothetical places aren’t literally real, they serve as an excellent metaphor. Most of us are so thoroughly embedded in our own chosen niche that we are oblivious to the realities that other people inhabit. I bring these thoughts to your attention, Aquarius, because it’s a favorable time to tap into those alternate, parallel, secret, unknown or unofficial realms. Wake up to the rich sources that have been so close to you, but so far away.

8.31 @ TWILIGHT CONCERT SERIES: THE ROOTS

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Now that you’re getting a taste of what life would be like if you ruled the world, I’ll recommend a manual. It’s called How To Start Your Own Country, by Erwin Strauss. (Get a free peek here: tinyurl.com/yousovereign.) You could study it for tips on how to obtain national sovereignty, how to recruit new citizens and how to avoid paying taxes to yourself. (P.S.: You can make dramatic strides toward being the boss of yourself and your destiny even without forming your own nation.)

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR UPCOMING EVENTS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/EVENTS

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) I don’t usually recommend giving gifts with strings attached. On the contrary, I advise you to offer your blessings without having any expectations at all. Generosity often works best when the recipients are free to use it any way they see fit. In the coming weeks, however, I’m making an exception to my rule. According to my reading of the omens, now is a time to be specific and forceful about the way you’d like your gifts to be used. As an example of how not to proceed, consider the venture capitalist who donated $25,000 to the University of Colorado. All he got in return was a restroom in a campus building named after him. If you give away $25,000, Scorpio, make sure you at least get a whole building named after you.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) I’m always rooting for you to cultivate a robust relationship with your primal longings. But I’ll be rooting extra hard during the next 11 months. I hope you will dig deep to identify your primal longings, and will revere them as the wellspring of your life energy. Further, I hope you will figure out all the tricks and strategies you will need to fulfill them. Here’s a hint about how to achieve the best results as you do this noble work: Define your primal longings with as much precision as you can, so that you will never pursue passing fancies that bear just a superficial resemblance to the real things.


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Growing Old in No. 1

To practice your Utah accent, repeat after me: “Lard, Darris, wat a garjus arnj farmal yur wearun!” (Translation: “Lord, Doris, what a gorgeous orange formal you’re wearing!”) Good job! Sister Dottie S. Dixon would be proud. Guess what? Utahr is sa speshul that we’re now the bestest playce ta git old! Call your folks, grab your grandmother’s dentures and your grandaddy’s reeking old Skechers and have them make Utah the last eternal place to live because caring.com just voted us the best state in which to grow old. This data collector found that the elderly in our state have great access to highquality care that costs far below the national median. They report that our seniors pay about $35,000 annually for assisted living and about $48,000 for an in-home health aide. In reading the study, it looks like Utah shoves the Bengay up the butts of all other states by having excellent nursing-home costs, senior communities and more. Iowa came in second, followed by South Carolina, Washington and Nebraska. Many folks in the capital city whom I know through work want to retire here or elsewhere in Utah. Torrey and Escalante are beautiful places but they aren’t near health facilities. Moab is swell, but good luck finding housing there. And you’d have to love the temperature of hell if you want to live in St. George during the summer. As a native Utahn might say: Lard, Darris, it’s sa hot down ta St. Gearge that you gots to eats hot chiles jus to cool yer mouth off. Ya gotta put ice in yur water bed! And the chickins lay the hard bowled eggs! The study found we are great in caring for our seniors but I’m not so sure it focused much on senior housing other than care centers. There aren’t many senior-only apartments or condos available along the Wasatch Front. It’s also extremely hard to find onelevel housing. Legacy Village of Sugar House opened its doors last month and made a dent in our dire needs for elder care. The six-level senior housing complex offers 286 luxury residential units, along with dining, meeting and activity rooms and a theater mixed in with main-floor retail and office space. Even though the state’s average age is under 30, we have a ton of baby boomers who are getting long in the tooth (like me) and feeling the housing crunch. Darris, it’s jus swell ta have all them hospitals for us, but if ya ain’t got no place to live but Pioneer Park, they ain’t no use! It might be time to offer housing incentives to builders focusing on seniors—since we are now the No. 1 place to grow old. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner

CHRYSAN THEMUMS THE WORD FOR ASH I told you that you had a face like a love letter, and you laughed, asking, “boy, what does that even mean?” You make my day turn sunny side up over easy like Sunday morning with your love like.... whoa. You will know your name on my face before I say a word.

Daniel Oglivie Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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S NEofW the

BY THE EDITORS AT ANDRE WS M C MEEL

Eclipsing Weird A California man with European heritage “strong and pure” placed an ad on Craigslist in advance of the solar eclipse on Aug. 21, seeking a “worthy female” to have sex with him in Oregon and “conceive a child that will be on the next level of human evolution.” The ad—which has since been deleted—continued, “Everything will be aligned in the local universe. Both of our cosmic orgasmic energy will be aligned with the planets.” He had only one specific caveat: “You must like cats.”

New World Order In Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec, near Plattsburgh, N.Y., the Canadian military is building a refugee camp to house asylumseekers coming from the United States, where recent migrants fear the current administration’s immigration crackdown. Montreal has already turned its Olympic Stadium into a shelter for refugees. The new camp would house 500 people in heated tents while they wait for refugee applications to be processed. More than 3,300 people crossed into Quebec from the U.S. between January and June 2017.

Rise of the Machines When Louise Kennedy, an equine veterinarian from Ireland who has worked in Australia for the past two years on a skilledworker visa, decided to stay in the country, she had to take the Pearson Test of English as part of her requirements for permanent residency. Imagine her surprise when, as a native English speaker with two university degrees, she flunked the oral component of the computer-based test. “There’s obviously a flaw in their computer software when a person with perfect oral fluency cannot get enough points,” she said. For its part, Pearson has denied any problems with its test or scoring “engine.” Kennedy will pursue a spouse visa so she can remain with her Australian husband.

Bold Move Edward Kendrick McCarty, 38, of North Huntingdon, Pa., came away with more than good tips after deejaying a wedding reception. The morning after the wedding, bride Ashley Karasek of Turkeytown noticed that her box of wedding cards was mostly empty. McCarty had been in charge of the box during the reception, and Karasek noticed people handing him cards to put in it throughout the evening. But when she and her new husband looked in the box, only 12 cards remained. McCarty confessed to taking the cards “because of financial struggles” and said he got about $600.

We sell homes and loans to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

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WEIRD

Model Parents A school resource officer at Lexington Middle School in Lee County, Fla., caught a glimpse of something alarming on Aug. 15 as he looked out a second-floor window toward the parent pickup lane. Christina Hester, 39, of Fort Myers was using her iPhone— to cut and snort cocaine. After seeing Hester use a straw to inhale the substance, the SRO asked her to come inside the school. He retrieved her purse and found .5 gram of cocaine inside, and she was charged with possession of cocaine and drug paraphernalia. Twelve-year-old Spencer Yeager commented: “That’s crazy. That’s just so irresponsible and they shouldn’t be doing that.”

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Ewwww! Swiss grocery chain Coop announced on Aug. 17 that it will start selling burger patties made from mealworms as an alternative to beef. Essento’s Insect Burgers and meatball-like Insect Balls also contain rice, carrots and spices. “Insects are the perfect complement to a modern diet,” said Christian Bartsch, co-founder of Essento. “They have a high culinary potential, their production saves resources and their nutritional profile is high-quality.” Ironies In Florida, Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority CEO Brad Miller and board chair Darden Rice helped Barbara Rygiel celebrate her 103rd birthday on Aug. 15 by presenting her with a lifetime bus pass. Rygiel rides the bus to church about four times a week and said the pass will help with the costs. “Look at how much I can save,” she beamed. n Stephen DeWitt, 57, of Aptos, Calif., was “quite intoxicated,” according to an arresting officer, on Aug. 16 when he mowed down a Highway 1 road sign reading: “REPORT DRUNK DRIVERS. CALL 911.” His Jeep continued up an embankment and flipped, leaving DeWitt with serious injuries—and a DUI charge.

Weird Science The Maharashtra Pollution Control Board is investigating in Navi Mumbai, India, after stray dogs started turning blue. An animal protection group there contends that dyes being dumped into the Kasadi River by nearby factories are causing the dogs’ fur to turn a bright shade of blue. Drive-Thru Rage Michael Delhomme couldn’t abide a Delray Beach, Fla., McDonald’s having run out of ice cream on Aug. 15. So while he and his friend, Jerry Henry, 19, waited in the drive-thru line, Delhomme asked Henry to get the “stick” out of the trunk. A McDonald’s employee watched on surveillance video as Henry went to the trunk and removed a replica AR-15 airsoft rifle, then got back in the car. The workers couldn’t tell that the weapon was not authentic and called 911. Henry was charged with improper exhibition of a firearm. Oh, Canada In the wake of violent protests in Charlottesville, Va., a plaque commemorating Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate States from 1861 to 1865, was removed on Aug. 15 from the wall of a Hudson’s Bay department store in downtown Montreal. Apparently, Davis had lived in a house that formerly stood on that property in 1867, and the Daughters of the Confederacy placed the plaque there in 1967. Davis moved to Canada after getting out of prison following the Civil War. Send your weird news items to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Ow! Ow! Ow! On June 25, Doug Bergeson of Peshtigo, Wis., was framing the fireplace of a home he was building when his nail gun slipped from his grasp and shot a 3 ½-inch nail into his heart. Bergeson said it stung, but when he saw the nail “moving with my heart,” he realized he wasn’t going to get any more work done. So he washed up and drove himself to the hospital 12 miles away, where he alerted a security guard that he had a nail in his heart and said, “It’d be great if you can find somebody to help me out here.” Bergeson underwent surgery to remove the nail, which his doctors said barely missed a main artery.

Selling homes for 33 years in the Land of Zion

Julie “Bella” Hall

| COMMUNITY |

Picky, Picky The Ford Motor Co. has hired smell-testers for its research labs in China, where consumers don’t like the “new-car” smell that many Americans seek out. Ford calls the testers its “golden noses,” who sniff materials such as upholstery, steering wheels and carpet. Testers are subjected to a stringent selection process and must not smoke or drink alcohol. “In North America,” Andy Pan, supervisor for material engineering at a Ford facility in China, said, “people want a new-car smell and will even buy a ‘new-car’ spray to make older cars feel new and fresh. In China, it’s the opposite.”

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Bright Idea U.S. Border Patrol Agent Robert Rocheleau and Alburgh, Vt., resident Mark Johnson, 53, exchanged tense words on Aug. 3 when Johnson climbed down from his tractor and demanded to know why Rocheleau wasn’t doing more to apprehend illegal immigrants. Johnson said people working in the U.S. illegally were damaging his livelihood. (Alburgh is just south of the border with Canada.) After the exchange, Johnson got back in his tractor and, as Rocheleau reported, “While passing by my vehicle, Mr. Johnson … engaged the PTO shaft to his trailer and covered my vehicle in cow manure.” Johnson pleaded not guilty in Vermont Superior Court in North Hero, saying he didn’t know the car was nearby when he turned on his manure spreader.

Babs De Lay


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

48 | SEPTEMBER 7, 2017

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City Weekly September 7, 2017  

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