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Dancing with Pacific Islander community seeks to both promote their differences and celebrate similarities.

BY STEPHEN DARK


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY ‘WE’RE ALL PAINTED WITH ONE STROKE’

Members of local Pacific Islander community reflect on cultural differences, while celebrating similarities. Cover photo by Sarah Arnoff saraharnoff.com

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BAYNARD WOODS

News, p. 12 “It was truly horrifying,” Woods says of the scene at Charlottesville’s Emancipation Park. “As a white man, I was disgusted in my own skin,” he continues. “The terrorist attack on the anti-fascist counter-protesters broke something in me and, I fear, in America.”

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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Cover story, Aug. 3, “New Shade of Blue”

Nice coverage. Norm Stamper, author of To Protect and Serve, opines that one way to improve American policing is to hire more female police officers. He writes that female officers are better at nonviolent crisis prevention because their verbal abilities to deescalate potentially dangerous situations outweigh those of their male counterparts. All the best to Officer Novoa. May she have a safe and distinguished career.

DENNIS VOGEL, Midvale

Opinion, Aug. 3, “On Letters”

Nice City Weekly piece on the lost art of letter writing. Sharing via Twitter; no offense intended.

@TIMHARAN Via Twitter

Lady and the stamp

Love your paper and look forward to its release every Thursday, so thank you for that. I especially loved the Guest Opinion page titled “On Letters” in the Aug. 3 edition, and can totally relate to what the author is saying about the power of writing letters and of words. There is nothing like holding a hand-written letter delivered by the post office. I, too, am a passionate letter-writer and, when inspired by stories or actions, have written to complete strangers expressing gratitude or admiration. And I have been surprised (and thrilled) to receive occasional responses, just as Lance S. Gudmundsen has from Queen Elizabeth’s lady-in-waiting and others. Thank you for your interesting spin on current events and numerous other items of value and importance. Can’t wait to run to Smith’s today to pick up the [current] issue.

SUSAN BOCKMEYER, Roy

Opinion, July 27, “What Climate Change?”

If more water is “planted” up the hill, like the beavers do, then there will be less of it filling up the oceans. The Gobi is a drain-hole that fills the aquifer that the Yellow River (if I remember correctly) is sourced from. “Plant the water” is a concept from a dude who toured and gave a talk here a few years ago pertaining to turning deserts green. Humans can bootstrap the ecosystems that beavers then maintain. Trees bring the rain, rain brings the trees. Treewakers are needed to make that happen, and that’s what “homo sapiens” are for—that’s our niche in the ecosystem. We are both an umbrella and keystone species. There are also some dudes from Holland who are working on “saltwater greenhouses” where they use something like a swamp cooler with pumped saltwater that cools the air around saplings growing, plus puts water vapor into the air that can recon-

dense, hopefully, into a Groaisis Waterboxx that nurses the new trees downwind. Obviously, there are a lot of areas on this continent that need the love and assistance of treewakers, as well.

KARL HEGBLOOM, Salt Lake City

Stan Rosenzweig writes in CW, “Just 11 years ago, I moved here chasing ‘the greatest snow on Earth.’ Since then, every major Utah ski area has invested hundreds of thousands of dollars in snowmaking equipment.” Snowmaking began in Utah at least 35 years ago when Snowbird opened up, just before a couple of years of record snow. You can count on October ski snow like you can count on windmills for electricity. And Rosenzweig has apparently never seen a sea-level graph; if he had, he would know what rubbish is the hype he parrots. The truth is, there is not a competent scientist on the planet who takes this sea-level scare seriously—or the climate scare anymore, for that matter. So what defines a “competent scientist”? One who demands data—who insists on quantification. A competent scientist instinctively asks, how fast is the sea level rising? And those who can actually give you the numbers know what ridiculous propaganda is being dished out by the climate alarmists. The reason you don’t know how fast the sea level is rising is because you have been brainwashed—not educated, and the last thing a climate propagandist wants is for you to get educated on the subject. A rear admiral sees ports and bases in danger of flooding? Due to climate change? Sheer nonsense. How fast is the sea rising? Villages disappearing? Forty years ago, the CIA was warning Nixon and Ford that the U.S. and the world were in danger of widespread drought and famine due to global cooling. The sea level has been rising for [decades] fairly steadily, with no evidence of humans causing it. ... Here’s the sort of thing you hear from competent scientists: “I don’t see a whole lot of difference between the consensus on climate change and the consensus on witches. At the witch trials in Salem, the judges were educated at Harvard. This was supposedly 100 percent science. The one or two people who said there were no witches were immediately hung. Not much has changed,” says Princeton Professor Emeritus of Physics William Happer. He translates Pushkin’s sonnet to describe the government apparatchiks and other useful idiots who chant the climate catechism: “And muses will to me their tribute bring, Free genius will enslave itself to me, And virtue, yes, and, sleepless labor, too, With humble mien will wait for my reward. I’ve but to whistle, and obedient, timid, Blood-spattered villainy will crawl to me, And lick my hand, and gaze into my eyes, To read in them the sign of my desire.” Happer himself was a casualty of Al

Gore’s purge of capable scientists at the EPA when Clinton took office. What was scaremonger John Holdren (Obama’s science advisor) saying in 1971? “The effects of a new ice age on agriculture and the supportability of large human populations scarcely need elaboration here.” What do the scaremongers say now? There never was a cold scare. What were the “Merchants of Doubt” (libelous fiction of Naomi Oreskes and NASA historian Erik Conway) saying during the cold scare? Here’s one of them, Fred Singer, in 1975 while advocating increased funding for climate monitoring in view of rising CO2 emissions: “One might be tempted to make light of those who decry a warming of the climate, while others worry about bringing back the ice ages.” So while perennial scaremonger Holdren warned of global cooling, Singer (and Frederick Seitz and William Nierenberg—Oreskes’ and Conway’s other libeled villains) were concerned about warming. What happened to change the villains’ minds? Nothing. The globe didn’t warm to any extent that could be called out of the ordinary. The rest is propaganda.

A.G. FOSTER

Via cityweekly.net I don’t know A.G. Foster or his background, but he sounds much more like an ideologue than a scientist. His rhetoric drowns out the validity of his reasoning, some of which I agree with. His words are designed to convince the uneducated with bombast rather than science. My credentials are as follows: I am a social scientist, not a physical scientist. So like both Stan and Mr. Foster, I am not qualified to speak on the validity of climate change. But I do have a Ph.D. in philosophy with a concentration of statistics and economics. As an “expert” in statistics, I feel confident that the issue of climate change is subject to legitimate debate, as are the issues of monetary policy (on which I am an expert). There are thoughtful experts on both sides of the issue. The main reason that the issue is unsettled is that, as Mr. Foster indicates, there are huge, significant, non-human-related phenomena that have, for billions of years, affected climate, resulting in both secular and cyclical changes. Thus it is very difficult to “tease out” the human impact. But that is not the same as concluding that it does not exist. Having acknowledged the legitimacy of the debate, there is an agreed-upon body of knowledge about many human impacts on weather. We simply cannot separate the aforementioned non-human effects from the human effect with a degree of certainty that brings an end to the debate. However, that should not stop us from dealing with the human impacts in a positive way. Moreover, as Stan suggests, corporations have a profit incentive to deal with such effects. Whether or not the observed change is human- or non-human-related, their incentive should be aligned in a way

to improve our situation. This can only be accomplished if there is a partnership with government that represents the interest of the people. (By the way, Stan, I don’t think, as you suggest, that those who argue in favor of the conclusion that human-caused climate change is significant are all “leftleaning.” There are many thoughtful conservatives that argue that humans have made a significant impact on climate.) Unfortunately, there is perhaps a bigger issue than climate change these days. The divisiveness exacerbated by emotionally driven rhetoric, like that of Mr. Foster or those on the far-right and- left, has led us into a gridlock that prevents us from dealing effectively with important physical and social problems, regardless of their cause. Shame on you, Mr. Foster. Let’s work this out intelligently rather than denigrating those with whom you disagree.

DAVID HORNER

Via cityweekly.net

Five Spot, Aug. 3, Flossie Kehr

Never talking about religion and politics in Utah—where the two are one and the same—is a real challenge. JADE JD LEBLANC Via Facebook Ahh, how privileged.

@SMOKEDPAPRIKAA Via Twitter

The Straight Dope, Aug. 3, “Cosmic Will”

It’s true. The universe as a collective whole contains every bit of intelligence ever created. If you want proof, just enter a perfect wormhole.

MICHAEL VALENTINE Via Facebook

[This] article made my jaw drop.

JANET VIGIL Via Facebook

Music, Aug. 3, “Old-Fashioned and Proud”

Just saw [Hectic Hobo] at Canyon Jam up in Logan. Great band! Check them out.

CORINNA SOMMERFELDT KNOWLES Via Facebook


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OPINION

Nazi News!

Many millennials don’t know shit about the “Greatest Generation” of Americans who gave everything to defeat Nazi evil. Sen. Orrin Hatch does. Responding to POTUS’ insufficient response to the cowardly white-supremacist attack by James Alex Fields Jr. in Charlottesville, Va., the senator tweeted: “We should call evil by its name. My brother didn’t give his life fighting Hitler for Nazi ideas to go unchallenged here at home.” Mormons are well-versed in the history of running from persecution. Hate has dogged them since the early 1800s and still does, but has been hidden since it became less socially acceptable to hate minorities. Jews, Catholics and LGBTQ people were killed during Hitler’s regime in the 1930s and ’40s and remained in danger thereafter—same as Mormons had been in America—proving that, historically, white supremacists don’t stand for all white people. Southern nationalist groups are, in fact, a bunch of neoConfederate ignoramuses who don’t even realize that the Confederate flag they so proudly wave is the un-American battle flag that was used to replace the American Flag and the United States of America, if they had succeeded. The Civil War was lost. One-hundred and fifty-two years later, they still carry around their losing rebel flag of defeat and humiliation. In a way, it’s pretty pathetic. Some of these misguided DIY historians have added the swastika, not because it has any meaning to them, but because they are too ignorant to know these all are symbols of defeat. Far-right “supremacists” should learn that the Nazi symbol they conflate with the American flag was actually the symbol of the deadliest war in history. We bandy around the very big and horrific number of Jews killed during the Holocaust—more than 8 million. But it wasn’t just Jews. As many as 85 million died, including some 25

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G million Russians and more than 4 million German citizens. That’s what swastika-carrying, Confederate flag-waving Southern nationalists represent: death, destruction and, ultimately, loss. It reminds me of when I was in school and young ignoramuses of that time wore T-shirts with silhouettes of South American communist revolutionary Che Guevara and hammer-and-sickle logos. These dummies were what we might today call far-left. They wore symbols of defiance at the time, which turned out to be symbols of defeat. KKK members were the original street gangstas with their own “hoodies,” who intimidated and killed people in unfair fights. Like the South American splinter of the MS-13 in Southern California. Like Nazi brownshirt youths who felt invincible because Nazi culture and government officials stood with them, turning a blind eye as they violated everyone who did not pass their blond-hair, blue-eye purity test. They all ended up as losers. When bullies have an unfair advantage to escape justice—like former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who is seeking a presidential pardon after being convicted for violating a judge’s order to not inflict upon people’s constitutional rights—evil flourishes. But you, I and the rest of the world eventually wake up. In Germany, it’s a crime to use the Nazi salute. In Virginia, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas, Confederate symbols are no longer seen as historic, but as signs of criminal, bullying inhumanity. Many cities are acting quickly to remove Civil War monuments before more confrontations arise. Taking a play from the tearing down of Saddam Hussein’s statue in Baghdad, a crowd of anti-fascists in Durham, N.C., recently beat the government to the punch when they pulled down a Confederate statue in response to the white nationalists in Charlottesville. CEOs of Merck, Intel, Under Armour, Disney and Tesla so far (every week there are others) have now rejected presidential hatred by resigning from several White House muckety-muck councils.

Evil comes in many forms, like serial killer Son of Sam, KKK lynch mobs and murderous gangsters and dictators. A lesser-known evil occured by ordinary citizens who saw Mormons persecuted and looked the other way; who saw Jews and Catholics rounded up by Nazis and thought it wasn’t their concern; who do nothing when white nationals march in Charlottesville and mow down young people marching in protest for civility; by presidents who know hatred is wrong but hesitate to acknowledge it so as not to alienate their base; by all of us who fail to address grievances against humanity. White nationalists in Charlottesville were caught on cell phone cameras and are subjects of public shaming on Twitter and Facebook, causing family humiliation and, in many cases, job loss. Go Daddy, Google and other web hosts are removing hate-filled white nationalist websites in the interest of public safety (not to mention common decency). In 1919, the Supreme Court held that First Amendment freedom of speech does not give us the freedom to yell “fire!” in a crowded theater. Nor can we set fire to a church whose beliefs we disagree with or use other malicious acts of mayhem and terrorism to express ourselves. American right-wing terrorist Timothy McVeigh found that out. So will Charlottesville murderer James Alex Fields Jr. Terror comes too often from hatred and ignorance. But the world wakes up. Now the internet and social media are helping to fight the righteous fight. In Utah, Republicans and Democrats place American values above party politics and see this cowardly bullying crime as plain evil that, left unchecked, is poised to destroy all that we have sacrificed to protect. Last week there was a gathering of Republican and Democrat lawmakers on the State Capitol steps to speak out against racism and fascism. Beyond the noise, there is still a lot of decency in America. For that, we give thanks. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

JAIME USRY

HITS&MISSES @kathybiele

Last-Ditch Effort

As if our country wasn’t militarized enough, Salt Lake City’s homeless area now has helicopters overhead and police boots on the ground in a cross-jurisdictional plan called Operation Rio Grande. That’s not to say there isn’t a problem. The drug trade has corrupted any hope that the homeless population had in the city. While Mayor Jackie Biskupski says the effort will be ongoing for two years, any hyped-up police forces are doomed if fleeting or misdirected. Community activist Michael Clara notes that many of the homeless are already relocating farther west. KSL reports that three previous sweeps netted a lot of addicts, 70 percent of whom opted for treatment over jail. And yet the problems persisted. This attempt is supposed to be more systemic, with both jail beds and treatment beds available. If only the smaller, targeted shelters were ready now—and communities willing to accept them—a solution might be at hand.

Unanswered Questions

Jails are one thing, prisons another. Remember when the decision was made to move the state prison? The promise to a reluctant Salt Lake City was more focus on treatment and cutting down on recidivism. The Deseret News took a look back at the Justice Reinvestment Initiative and concluded that no one’s really sure if it’s working. For instance, what happens if you decriminalize drugs? Without treatment options, would the problem escalate and end up in the criminal system again? These are unanswered questions, but ones that could be better answered if Utah had agreed to full Medicaid expansion. The system is missing those resources, and is unlikely to be getting them soon. It’s also missing good data to drive decisions, which aren’t being made while the new prison is being built.

State Statues

It’s great that a white, male legislator is drafting a bill to put a statue of a woman there, specifically a plural wife who went on to become a state senator. Women particularly love her because she beat her husband in an election. Still, it’s a little unsettling that they want to boot old Philo Farnsworth from the hall. Is there just not enough room? Deseret News columnist Don Gale noted that even U.S. Rep. Rob Bishop—a former American history teacher—got the history wrong, saying Farnsworth is holding a sausage instead of the TV mechanism he was famous for. The argument for trashing Farnsworth is that no one knows who he is. But whether it’s him or Martha Hughes Cannon, shouldn’t everyone at the Capitol know who they are and why they’re famous?

Craft brews and fur babies—it’s a match made in heaven. Or actually, a match made at the Utah Beer Festival in 2014, thanks to the Humane Society of Utah. When HSU’s Director of Development Jamie Usry (pictured above, left, alongside wife Dijana Ukmar and dog Monty) tasked her volunteer coordinator with recruiting 350 volunteers that year, she was met with a look of terror. That number has since jumped to 1,000. “Salt Lake City just keeps giving,” Usry says.

How did you first get involved with the Humane Society of Utah?

I started as the volunteer coordinator nearly seven years ago. I quickly moved into fundraising at the HSU and became the development director to pursue fundraising, events, partnerships and community opportunities to benefit the shelter. … I came to the HSU because of my love of animals. Our development, special events and volunteer team loves the opportunity to hold such a huge fundraiser with City Weekly every year.

What do you love about your job?

Well, of course, the animals. We are here because we are passionate about the furry creatures that make our lives complete. But a close second is the people. People that love animals and are willing to give their time without any compensation, without any reason but to give back and save lives. And people that will give their money to keep our programs running. As a charity, donated time and donated money are what keep our doors open.

Why is it so important to team up on community events like this?

Fundraising is the key element of events like the Beer Festival—50 percent of the HSU’s revenue is through fundraising, sponsorships and events. We can’t save lives without community events like this. Additionally, the people that support us through volunteering and those who attend the festival are all potential adopters and donors in the future for us. It’s all about community and partnerships for nonprofits like us, and we are proud to receive so much support from an amazing local company like City Weekly.

Going into your fourth year of working at Beer Fest, what would you say has been the best part of the experience for volunteers?

Volunteers have told us year after year that knowing their hard work is saving animals in need is incredibly important to them. Even the volunteers that signed up for the festival because of their love of beer end up leaving feeling like they did something good for our furry friends.

Any crazy stories you have from past festivals?

Probably not something you want to use, but one time a lady stole an HSU employee badge and then pretended to be our marketing director. She was kicked out because she was so drunk. It was weird.

What’s your favorite local beer?

Proper Brewing Co.’s Patersbier. New Utah breweries are awesome and this one was a great addition to SLC.

—ANDREA HARVEY aharvey@cityweekly.net


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I was wondering if you could settle a dispute I’m having with a charming young lady. She insists that men, on average, think about sex every six seconds. Thinking about sex 10 times every minute just seems a bit much to me. Dubious, no? —Luke Robertson, Massachusetts Six seconds, seven, 11—some version of the “Men think about sex every X seconds” claim has been kicking around forever. The intended takeaway, clearly, is that human males are just naturally hornier than the females, but nobody knows where the alleged stat came from, and anyway, all evidence suggests it’s bunk. The most recent wisdom we have on this subject comes via a 2012 paper from Ohio State University, where researchers equipped 163 male and female students with golf counters—you know, the kind where you click a button to advance the number display—and asked them to tally how often they thought about nooky. (These devices are also known as “stroke counters,” a point that for some unimaginable reason the authors left out of their paper.) The most prolific sex-thinker in the group, a male subject, recorded an average of 388 amorous musings a day over the course of a week. Assuming this guy ever managed to get any sleep, that’s something like one sex thought every 2.5 minutes, and he’s at the very top of the reported range. I think we can call this dispute settled. How often did everyone else think about sex, though? First let’s slow down a little and consider some conceptual and methodological factors here. For starters, what do we mean by men and women? The OSU researchers reported that all in all (i.e., including control groups; see below) their subjects included 43 female and 120 male students, 96.1 percent of whom self-identified as heterosexual. Were any of them transgender? The authors don’t say. But you could argue that the very existence of people who identify as something other than the gender they were assigned at birth would seem to complicate any firm binary pronouncements about what “men” and “women” think about. Then there’s the issue of how you get people to monitor their own thoughts without inherently skewing the numbers. On this topic, I refer you to Fyodor Dostoevsky, who wrote, “Try to pose for yourself this task: not to think of a polar bear, and you will see that the cursed thing will come to mind every minute.” This is actually a methodological problem in psychology, named after Dostoevsky’s challenge—the “white bear problem,” also called “ironic process theory.” Strictly, the concept applies to thoughts you’re trying to avoid, but the OSU authors acknowledged that simply toting a golf counter around might have effectively reminded the subjects to think about sex more often than they otherwise might. In short, I suspect the actual answer, to the extent there is one, might be the least

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Dirty Minded?

interesting part of the how-often question. In the interest of keeping the customer satisfied, though, here’s what the study found: The women reported rates of 1-140 sexual thoughts per day, with an average of 18.6. The men, meanwhile, showed both higher numbers and greater variability—their rates ranged between 1 and (as mentioned) 388 thoughts a day, with an average of 34.2. For men, that’s a sex thought every waking half hour, roughly, compared to once every 55 minutes for women. We might note that 163 college kids with clickers isn’t many—a far smaller sample than (e.g.) a survey conducted in 1973 where 4,420 people were asked whether they’d thought about sex in the previous five minutes. (Results? For respondents age 25 and under, 52 percent of men and 29 percent of women answered in the affirmative.) Rather than rely on subjects’ notoriously unreliable memory, though, OSU researchers thought real-time recording might improve accuracy. They also had control groups count their thoughts about food and sleep, to make sure men weren’t just generally more in touch with their various physical needs. Anyway, their findings tracked with earlier work insofar as it identified a difference in the regularity with which men and women think about getting horizontal. What might account for that? There’s the possibility, for instance, of research subjects complying with cultural stereotypes about sex-thought-frequency, or that men might simply feel more comfortable than women in discussing sexual cogitation—an idea that won’t sound crazy to any woman who’s ever walked past a construction site. (But again, that’s the apparent point of the every-X-seconds claim under review: providing scientific-sounding cover for guys’ gross behavior.) However, in the control groups counting food and sleep thoughts, the men scored higher, too. The researchers suggested these recurring splits could indicate men and women are conceptualizing thoughts differently: “Perhaps men have a lower threshold for the labeling or recognition of cognition.” Yep, we’re down to thinking about how people think about thoughts, which brings to mind someone who once questioned what the definition of “is” is. Bill Clinton, man—now there’s a guy who could skew a study like this. n Send questions via straightdope.com or wr ite c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

Eight things to know before watching the solar eclipse on Monday:

8. Shooting your gun at the 7. The solar eclipse will not

affect your astrological sign, as astrology is still bullshit.

panels you eco-freaks installed will fail and you’ll die instantly, just as Rocky Mountain Power warned.

5. The government recommends observing the solar eclipse through chemtrails. Don’t ask why.

4. The “protective” glasses you bought at Ed’s Eclipse Shades & Fireworks stand aren’t certified.

2. The eclipse is no more a

1. The solar eclipse is not God’s wrath against the gays—your bishop will let you know when that’s coming.

SUICIDE PREVENTION WORKSHOP

Suicide is not cool, but the idea is often romanticized—until the horrific end. If you are over 15 years old, you can learn to help people cope with the pain that might lead them to want to end their lives. Join SafeTalk, a half-day training session, to become a suicide-alert helper. You don’t need prior experience. The SafeTalk training can help you recognize signs of depression and suicidal behavior. “Through their words and actions, they invite help to stay alive,” organizers say. “SafeTalk-trained helpers can recognize these invitations and take action by connecting them with life-saving intervention resources, such as caregivers trained in ASIST [Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training].” Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, Saturday, Aug. 19, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2uwQNaq

LGBTQ PICNIC

Summer is winding down, and it’s time to stand together and remind the community that everyone matters. The LGBTQ Annual Family Picnic—sponsored by the Human Rights Campaign, Utah Pride Center, Equality Utah and the Utah AIDS Foundation— is an opportunity to bring families together in celebration of the strides being made toward equality. Expect food and games in a beautiful park setting. Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, 801-972-7860, Saturday, Aug. 19, 1-6 p.m., donations encouraged, bit.ly/2vUo5Qt

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 11

danger to pregnant women than simply existing in modern ’Merica.

No, there isn’t just one group interested in breathing these days. And you don’t have to wait on the state government to enact its anemic approach to the problem. SLC Air Protectors is a Native American group inspired to action by the protests at Standing Rock. Their Public Action Assembly includes a Native-led ceremony and unites activists and families with local experts to talk strategy for future generations. “We have identified our common cause as the ongoing air pollution crisis, and are striking back with a platform to organize ourselves and our communities to be effective in cleaning the air,” the Facebook event description reads. Jenkstar Center for Arts and Sustainable Living, 93 W. 2100 South, Ste. 2B, Thursday, Aug. 17, 6:30-9 p.m., free, bit.ly/2wMWZrI

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Eclipse” playlist includes Bonnie Tyler’s “Total Eclipse of the Heart” but not Iron Maiden’s “Total Eclipse,” you’re doing it wrong.

CLEAN AIR ACTION

3. If your Spotify “Solar

CHANGE THE WORLD

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6. During the eclipse, the solar

In a week, you can

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eclipse won’t stop it, but it’s your damned right as an American to do it! #MakeEclipsesGreatAgain

CITIZEN REVOLT


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NEWS Are We Great Again Yet? On Charlottesville and the shattering of America. STORY + PHOTOS BY BAYNARD WOODS comments@cityweekly.net @baynardwoods

T

wo middle-aged men—one black and one white—are walking up a street in downtown Charlottesville, Va., yelling at each other. It was a moment of relative normalcy in a day otherwise defined by mayhem. Both men use the phrase “born and bred” to define their relationship to the smallish Southern college town, nestled in the hills of the politically contested state. The white man, Ed Knight, wears a Confederate flag-emblazoned bandana around his head. “You, with that stupid Confederate flag, talking about history,” says the black man, George Steppe. “You don’t know nothing about no history. Only thing you know is hate.” “This is our history and it should not be destroyed,” Knight replies, referring to the statue of Robert E. Lee in Emancipation Park, where Unite the Right, a far-right rally was scheduled. Knight supported the rally that attracted a horde of armed demonstrators to his home city on Saturday, Aug. 12. It also brought hundreds of anti-fascists—some of them armed with sticks and shields— pledging to defend the city from right-wing terror. Now, after hours of bloody battle during which they remained largely passive, riot police were breaking the melee up, pushing Steppe back, inching forward behind their shields. Knight walked alongside with a sign reading, “Make C-Ville Great Again.” The chaos started the night before, as Nazis and other racists gathered for the 21st-century version of a Klan rally—a Klanclave of khaki and tiki torches. At one point, a group of the white supremacists surrounded a group of counter protesters, throwing punches and torches. The scene started to brew earlier that morning. White supremacists in helmets—some German World War II-era—white polos, sticks, an assortment of flags and homemade shields with the insignia of the racist group Vanguard America chanted at a smaller crowd of counter protesters. “You can’t run, you can’t hide, you get helicopter rides,” they said, a reference to far-right governments in Argentina and Chile in the ’70s and ’80s that threw leftists from helicopters to “disappear” them.

CIVIL UNREST

As they began to march forward, antiracists attempted to block them. After a swirl of violence and swinging sticks, three of the counter protesters were left with bloody faces. The racists—who also took some heavy blows—seemed to target women’s faces with their sticks. They ran away as the cops finally rolled in and began setting up a barricade. Over the next several hours, this same pattern continued to play out: Another fight broke out every few minutes as a new faction of the right marched in its crazed Tom Sawyer armor toward the park. The space was filled with every variety of racist you can imagine, from the Nazi biker to the fashy computer programmer. They were almost exclusively white and male. The anti-fascist activists who packed the streets were also predominantly white, but there were far more women and people of color opposing the Nazis. Otherwise, the two opposing armies seemed to be of roughly equal size. The fights were swift, chaotic and brutal. The two sides launched bottles and tear-gas canisters back and forth as state troopers, slack-jawed, stood and watched. At one point, as a few bottles whizzed by him in quick succession, a trooper perked up enough to pull out his phone and record some of the mayhem. When the police declared the assembly illegal before it even began and told everyone to leave, it forced these groups together. Right-wing militia types wielding assault rifles and wearing MAGA patches on paramilitary uniforms roamed through the crowd. Guys armed with pistols seemed to keep their hands on them, ready to draw at any moment. It felt like something horrible was about to happen. Then, as the various groups became separated, it seemed like the rumble had largely ended. “I’m glad no serious gunshots rang out. I was threatened with a gun, though. Police wasn’t around when a guy pulled up his gun up on me, though,” Steppe said around 12:30 p.m. Steppe and Knight both seemed to think that it was the end of the day. The racists, who had not been able to hold their rally, were trying to regroup at another neighboring downtown park. Eventually, as a state of emergency was declared, they decided to leave—some of them even suggested hiding in the woods. Antifa burned right-wing flags in a park and then marched through the city; two groups converged on Water Street at around 1:35 p.m. It felt triumphant. They had driven the racists out of town—or at least those from out of town. Five minutes later, as they marched through the streets, it sounded like a bomb exploded: A muscle car, which police say was driven by 20-year-old far-right member James Alex Fields, sped down the street and plowed through the march and into other cars. Fields then threw the wea-

ponized car into reverse, fleeing from the scene of terror. Bodies were strewn through the road. Street medics delivered first aid while waiting on ambulances to arrive. Activists held Antifa banners to block camera views of the injured. The far-righters were nowhere to be found. Trump meandered through a speech in New Jersey in which which he condemned violence on “many sides.” He did not use the words white supremacy or terrorism. He did not mention the name of Heather Heyer, the woman who was killed in the terror attack. He did not offer support to the 19 others who were hospitalized or “thoughts and prayers” for those who were still in critical condition. Fields, who was photographed earlier in the day with the same Vanguard America

shield I saw when I first arrived in town, was arrested and charged with suspicion of second-degree murder. I am writing this later the same night as the attack and I won’t to pretend to know what it means for our country. Racism is not new. The argument Steppe and Knight were having in their hometown could have happened any time in the last 50 years. But the way the battle over white supremacy was being waged around them was new, and Charlottesville was not ready for it. None of us were. When Fields’ Dodge Challenger slammed into those people, it shattered a part of America, or at least the illusion of it. I don’t know what that means yet, because it shattered something in me, too. CW Additional reporting by Brandon Soderberg


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Best of Utah 2017 Readers Poll

2017

The original. The best. readers choice MEDIA + POLITICS

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 AT NOON MDT

(Entered online, postmarked or dropped off in person)

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WRITE-IN Best thing we forgot and where to find it:

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BY STEPHEN DARK | SDARK@CITYWEEKLY.NET | @STEPHENPDARK PHOTOGRAPHY BY SARAH ARNOFF | @SARAHARNOFFPHOTOS

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AUGUST 17, 2017 | 17

can be brutally uninformed, within the Pacific Island communities—particularly when it comes to youth—there can also be a profound disconnect with their own cultural heritage. Feltch-Malohifo’ou expresses concern for her community’s youngsters, many of whom “don’t understand who they are. That they are reacting to how people treat them.” While Feltch-Malohifo’ou notes that the Disney movie Moana elevated the presence of her community nationwide, prior to its release, “there were some very negative connotations about being Pacific Islander and being Polynesian, especially in this city.” Polynesians are the largest subcategory of Pacific Islanders, with Samoans, Tongans and New Zealand Maoris among their ranks. Ask what negative connotations she’s thinking of and she, and a dozen other Pacific Islanders attending an organizing committee meeting last month for the fifth annual Utah Pacific Island Heritage Festival, reel off a list. Firstly, that they’re all gang members. That is closely followed by

S

usi Feltch-Malohifo’ou was in the grocery store with her husband when she was reminded how stereotypes define the way some see her. “The chitlins are on sale,” a woman told her, adding that her African-American neighbor had informed her it was a “good sale.” She is Tongan and her husband is Fijian-Tongan. He is darker skinned than his wife. “Ma’am, that’s not our culture,” Feltch-Malohifo’ou replied. “I’m Polynesian.” Nevertheless, the woman, trying to be helpful, Feltch-Malohifo’ou says, continued to push the offer on pig intestines, regardless of her mistake. “I’ve never lived where ethnic groups is such a big deal,” Feltch-Malohifo’ou says. “It seems very segmented here.” The local Pacific Islander community encompasses myriad of oceanic communities—including from Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, Hawaii, New Zealand, Melanesia and Micronesia. If the perceptions of other Utahn cultures of Pacific Islanders

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Pacific Islander community seeks to both promote their differences and celebrate similarities.

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Dancing with


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18 | AUGUST 17, 2017

Haviar Hafoka

Siale Pulu

Nia Haunga

Susi Feltch-Malohifo’ou

Pacific Islanders being reduced to caricatures of physical prowess, particularly when it comes to high school and college football. Then there’s the belief that Tongans and Samoans hate each other, and that Pacific Islanders are all the same. “We’re all painted with one stroke,” Weber State University counselor Eveni Tafiti says. Feltch-Malohifo’ou is executive director of nonprofit Pacific Island Knowledge 2 Action Resources, which seeks to address issues within the diverse communities. Haviar Hafoka, a youth corrections officer who’s also part of Malialole, a Polynesian dance group created by his mother, Vida Tuitama, admires her. “Susi is like a mother to a lot of us,” he says. For the committee members gathered that evening at the Sorenson Multicultural Center, the festival is far more than simply fairs and food trucks. It is both a foundation on which to build cultural and social visibility in Utah, and also an opportunity to celebrate the identity, cultures and heritages of the 40,000 Utahns who self-identify as having their roots in the Pacific Islands. Feltch-Malohifo’ou says the annual festival, which takes place each August, a month declared by Gov. Gary Herbert in 2012 as Utah Pacific Island Heritage Month, addresses the differences, as well as the similarities, between the many island communities that make up the Pacific Island population in Utah. “I started realizing people really don’t know our differences. Unless people know that about each one of our cultures, they really don’t know us. So we just kind of blend altogether in one big melting pot.” The festival provides a platform for community members to say, “I’m Tongan, this is different about me, I’m Hawaiian, this is what’s different about me,” she says. “Together, we’re one with similarities.” Perhaps most important of all, Feltch-Malohifo’ou says she hopes to at least see some of the Pacific Islander cultural heritage handed down to younger generations through the festival. “If we can teach some of those things and hand those down through this yearly festival, then at least [at the festival] our youth can get the dose from somewhere,” she says. Talk to Pacific Islanders about their involvement in the August events and what quickly becomes apparent is how central dance is for many Pacific Islanders. They say it’s a way to connect them to their spiritual history and build community in a world where particularly Pacific Islander youth can feel lost. Other cultures, Hafoka says, “look at the aesthetics of it; they don’t look at the importance to us.” Every Polynesian dance, he says, “is a message. Unlike other cultures, we use lyrical dancing to keep our history alive and tell stories about ourselves.” Whether at weddings, birthdays, ceremonies or any celebration, dance is about “showing respect,” he says. “It’s like a peace pipe, if you will.” As a people, Hafoka says, “I know we are either really happy or really angry. I describe us as the nicest, meanest people—which is how we are.” In a landlocked, desert state like Utah, he says that dance plays a crucial role in his community’s identity.

“Where do we find our spirituality when we are so connected to each other, to the ocean, to the land? Dance and music help with that in a big way. In our Tongan community, when a gift is given, the family gives it as a dance. That dance represents where we are from. Dance is very expressive and shows your whole soul.” Even, he adds, for those who might prefer the darker side of the street. “I have seen the most gangsta people, when our country’s music plays, they become the spirit of Polynesia.”

UNDER THE RUG

On July 29, Utah Pacific Island Heritage Month kicked off at the Sorenson Multicultural Center with performances by local groups from different Pacific Islander communities while attendees milled around booths displaying artifacts. Events throughout August include a Job and Resource Fair focusing on employment for young Pacific Islanders on Saturday in West Valley City, and the fourth annual National Pacific Islander Violence Prevention Conference to be held in Lehi on Aug. 25. Caught between the Pacific Islander commitment to a clan-based society and the pressures of American culture to idealize the individual, Pacific Island communities have found themselves beset by many issues that once might have been addressed through familial support, if they had occurred at all. Their community’s political and social marginalization, reinforced by poverty for many, only underscores the lack of dedicated resources, state or federal, that reach those in need. Feltch-Malohifo’ou says she was surprised by how many homeless Pacific Islander women have ended up at the downtown shelter, something she only became aware of when they sought help from a women’s support group she is part of, asking for everything from housing assistance and detox services, to food and medical care. “We thought the community takes care of each other. That’s how it used to be, but things have changed as we get assimilated into American culture,” she says. “We come from a very clan society. America is an individualized society—‘Be all you can be.’ And so instead of ‘my clan, my village,’ we shift to, ‘It’s all about me.’” Health issues, particularly obesity and mental-health concerns, are often connected with the poverty many struggle with, Hafoka says. Siale Pulu is a 16-year-old Granger High School student who teaches dance at the school’s People of the Pacific Club. “The way I look at my parents, I want to change that with my generation, that we live a healthy lifestyle. Lots of it has to do with diabetes, and gout is a big one, along with obesity. Seeing how our parents are in that condition, that’s a big task for our generation, so we won’t have to see our parents die faster and younger.” Single mother Nia Haunga, who dances in Hafoka’s group, says the most pressing issue she faces, she says, is depression. “I think it’s starting to be a big thing in the Polynesian community.” When her peers want to talk about it, she says parents prefer to ignore it.


“There is such a deep cultural connection to dance, but it’s looked down upon and kids in general are encouraged not to pursue the arts. Minorities of all creeds, I feel, have a hard time pursuing the arts.” —Shaun Carley

TOO SHY TO TAKE PART

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AUGUST 17, 2017 | 19

Pulu’s POP was one of eight groups performing at the July 29 kickoff. His fellow student dancers draw on familial heritages from Samoa, Tonga, Micronesia and Hawaii. “Having the opportunity to come and represent at this festival is so important,” particularly when it comes to tackling the lack of knowledge within his own communities about “our traditions and cultures, our customs,” he says. “Even though we live in America, how we’re all Westernized, we should still know who we are.” But male dancers in his club still face stereotyping as gang members or “bad boys,” he says, or they’re defined only as football players. “These mindsets are another thing bringing us down, limiting us from kind of expanding.” If Pacific Islanders struggle to be heard in Utah, some within their own ranks complain of similar issues internally. One community that is, to some degree, silent within the Pacific Island panoply of communities is the thousands of islands of Micronesia, which share a cultural history with neighboring regions Polynesia and Melanesia. Micronesia-born Melishna Folau is quick to correct someone who identifies her as Polynesian. “With all respect, I’m not Polynesian. Call me what I am.” Folau married a Tongan, and when she moved to Utah, she found that events described as Pacific Islander were actually Polynesian. Despite attending numerous Pacific Islander committees, she only found inclusion a few years ago attending a group led by Feltch-Malohifo’ou. “She wants to see everybody’s point of view, not just Polynesians,” she says. Folau hopes Pacific Island Heritage Month will elevate Pacific Islanders to the point they register on legislators’ radars. That said, Micronesians themselves seem to need to gain greater recognition within their community. While the kickoff festival was largely Polynesian-driven, she says that Micronesians have been invited to participate. “Right now, a lot of our community are too shy to jump on these opportunities,” she says.

Dance plays a complicated, multifaceted role in Pacific Island culture. “Even in the islands, dancing is used ceremonially still and politically,” Hafoka says. He explains its political role in terms of a pese o le aso, which he translates as “song of the day.” Villagers go to their parliament and sing in a mocking manner about, for example, how they’ve asked their politicians to fix deteriorating roads and nothing has happened. “The dance is respectful, but they do it in the most demeaning way,” mocking parliamentarians by asking in song, “Why are you up there?” Hafoka has taken part in a pese o le aso in Glendale, where the performers mocked local youth about the humorous elements of being American, while at the same time suggesting they’re not tough enough to be Samoan. Despite the mocking tone, the central message Hafoka says, is constructive, “telling them to hold on to their culture.” Granger student and dance teacher Pulu says his parents came from Tonga. He recognizes the impact Westernized life has on him, while also drawing on his cultural roots. The Tongan word fatongia, he says, means duty or obligation. “Mine is to understand my place in society and how I play my role as a Tongan.” Dance is fundamental to his self-identity. “It’s a natural thing; it’s in our blood. We hear a beat or a rhythm—it’s all important, who we are as Polynesian people. Rhythms and songs, our attitudes and personalities all evolve from our dance.” Local dance group Nu Tribe Dance Crew offers a modern take on Polynesian dance, says 29-year-old member Shaun Carley. Nu Tribe seeks to bridge the gap between hip-hop and modern songs and Polynesian choreography. While the also DJ acknowledges that the conflict between Pacific Islander emphasis on the familial unit and the American emphasis on individuality can lead to a lack of self-identity, he sees Pacific Islander community members struggling to accept dance, despite the positive role it can play. “It’s a weird situation where there is such a deep cultural connection to dance, but it’s looked down upon and kids in general are encouraged not to pursue the arts. Minorities of all creeds, I feel, have a hard time pursuing the arts,” he says. “It’s this weird dichotomy of having such a rich cultural heritage, being told we should be proud of it, yet told not to do them, either because it’s too effeminate or there’s no future in them.” Hafoka argues that criticism of effeminacy in dance is not an issue, pointing to how

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DANCE = IDENTITY

Pacific Island culture reveres third-gender people. They are called fa’afafine, young males raised as girls who display both male and female traits. Carley says that’s true, that the fa’afafine “oftentimes perpetuate the culture—they remember the dances and the family trees.” But acceptance is one thing, embracing the right of a loved one to act on being LGBTQ something else. His boyfriend felt accepted as being gay when he came out to his immediate family, but when he and Carley started to appear publicly together, the boyfriend’s mother was upset about how it would reflect on their family. Much like with the LDS church and its attitude toward LGBTQ members, his boyfriend could be gay, “just don’t live the lifestyle.” Carley says, adding that such attitudes have significantly softened in recent years in the Polynesian community, as more and more youth have come out.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Hafoka agrees that depression and mental health issues are still taboo in their community. “Culturally, we don’t talk about that. It’s embarrassing, we just ignore it, we call them ma’i [sick]. People brush it under the rug.” Like Haunga, Hafoka says he’s struggled with depression, too. “A lot of it is to do with drugs; a lot of it to do with identity crisis.” Dancing, he continues, and the attendant spirituality, “helps out a lot.”


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TOUGH LOVE

One statistic that worries Feltch-Malohifo’ou is that, while Pacific Islanders make up only 1 percent of Utah’s population, they comprise 2 percent of the prison’s. Which is why she likes to have Haviar Hafoka tell his story at public events, if only to challenge stereotypes. When the 30-year-old, with his long dreadlocks and tattoos, talks about how he’s a youth corrections officer currently working at a juvenile detention facility, FeltchMalohifo’ou knows that some Utahns will have their preconceptions shifted. But Hafoka’s story perhaps tells as much, if not more, about the life-changing value of dance in his community as it does about the school-to prison-pipeline that some Pacific Islander youth are tragically funneled through. Hafoka grew up in Kansas City, Mo. It’s home to a significant Polynesian Mormon community who believe they reside in Zion where “the last days” will occur. His mother is Samoan, his father from Tonga. He was “wild,” in his youth, he says, using hard drugs and running with a fast crowd. Nevertheless, his family and, in particular, his aunt insisted he take part in dances. “I hated it growing up,” he says. He was expected to take part at cultural events where families with a social position had to do certain dances. “We were forced to perform,” he says, relatives employing “tough love” in the form of physical coercion if need be. He recalls how he gave “a lot of attitude to my aunt,” who would tell him that one day he would be in her place trying to pass on their traditions and culture to a younger generation. Hafoka’s aunt died when he was 20. He calls her death his “turning point.” Shortly after, he followed his mother and siblings to Utah, his father having been deported, “just as many other Tongans have.” His mother had set up a dance group in Glendale named after her first grandchild, Malialole. When he saw the group dancing, it struck him deeply. “It made me emotional and I didn’t know why.” He realized that

the innate spirit within the dance connected with him. While he had brought his “wild ways,” with him to Utah, the more he became involved with Malialole, the more “it mattered to me when people were displaying [dances] wrong. It makes you want to do it more right. You want to prove yourself. This is how we are; this is who we are.” He worked at local junior high schools assisting with local youth, and saw how Polynesian peers were working as “trackers,” attempting to keep Pacific Island youth on the right track educationally. That led him to youth corrections and employment at a detention facility. He says that he recognizes how the youth are lost in the way he was at their age. That sense of disconnection, he points out, “is because there’s not a spiritual connection.” Perched on a stool in his family’s dance studio at the back of Glendale Plaza on the city’s west side, Hafoka’s commitment to dance, he says, was driven by his desire to ensure that his nieces and his nephews growing up stateside didn’t lose their identity. His success was apparent, at least with one nephew, when he graduated from Horizonte High School and did a dance called the taualuga at the reception party at a Salt Lake City dance studio. The taualuga can open or close a celebration. Hafoka describes a scene where as the youth, draped in leis, dances to a mix of screams and clapping, money is thrown at him from all directions. “What looks like chaos is a lot of family love and support. I felt a lot of connectivity between me and my nephew standing and dancing. When you start dancing, you start feeling the mana, [spiritual energy]. You feel it—it’s something innate that couldn’t be given to anybody else.” Hafoka hopes August brings for Utah’s Pacific Islanders, if nothing else, greater visibility for communities of any generation that still struggle with where they live. He says Pacific Islanders “are out of our element, in a desert, in the middle of someone’s country—a country stolen from someone else. I hope that this month raises awareness of our existence. It helps us understand within our community that we are valid and we are important and we can be us.” CW


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In the 2016 documentary Asperger’s Are Us—a profile of a Massachusetts-based comedy troupe whose four members have all been diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome—group member Jack Hanke says of his childhood, “The only way I could be liked was being funny. … It’s how I learned to cross the bridge between myself and the rest of the world, by telling jokes.” The Asperger’s Are Us members—Hanke, New Michael Ingemi, Ethan Finlan and Noah Britton—met in 2010 at a summer camp for kids on the autism spectrum, but the troupe wasn’t launched as a feel-good public service announcement. “We still get a lot of people who come to our shows expecting education or pity or anything relating to autism,” Britton says via email, “so we always emphasize that our shows are just absurdist comedy performed by Aspies with Aspie senses of humor: Wordplay, occasional satire and dark absurdism.” The unique brand of comedy that percolates through these unique brains—influenced, according to Britton, by The Kids in the Hall, Steven Wright and the Zucker-AbrahamsZucker movie parodies like Airplane!—might feature the president of the United States holding a press conference explaining why he married a train, or the most literal manifestation of an “observational comic.” Though the documentary revolves around planning for the troupe’s farewell performance ahead of Hanke studying for a year at Oxford— spoiler alert!—the quartet reunited and is touring with all-new material. Let them introduce themselves to you, as they often do in their performances, with what they want done with their corpses when they die. (SR) Asperger’s Are Us @ Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, Aug. 23, 7 p.m., $10 general admission, thesugarspace.com

Asperger’s Are Us

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 22

It isn’t hard to see why hot air balloons are so appealing. They conjure images of a bygone era when air travel didn’t require increasingly intimate encounters with TSA agents. Or maybe we never stop loving brightly colored balloons. Whatever the reason, you’ll have plenty of time to admire these colorful behemoths at the Ogden Valley Balloon Festival. Marking the end of the Ogden festival summer season, this three-day event typically draws more than 13,000 people. Terry Murphy, chairperson for the festival, says the event is so popular because of the favorable wind currents in the valley, and because of the spectacular views. “You see the balloons hovering over the lake, or you see the balloons’ reflections over the water,” Murphy says. “It’s just a beautiful space.” The weekend offers more than balloons; it stands as a showcase for the best of Ogden Valley. In addition to providing a platform for the Ogden Rescue Mission—a homeless shelter and rehab program—to promote its cause, there are live performances, an array of food vendors and a revamped children’s section that includes attractions like a giant walk-through heart and a reptile-inspired obstacle course. Organizers recommend bringing cash, as most vendors do not accept credit cards. Balloon rides average $500 per couple. Parking is located at Snowcrest Junior High (2755 N. Highway 162), the Powder Mountain shuttle stop and Valley Elementary (5821 E. 1900 North). Attendees can purchase a $10 half-day pass to park near the venue. (Kylee Ehmann) Ogden Valley Balloon Festival @ Eden Park, 5522 E. 2200 North, Eden, Aug. 18, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.; Aug. 19, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.; Aug 20, 7 a.m.-noon, free, ogdenvalleyballoonfestival.com

Bright-eyed star-gazers from far and wide have been planning for months to catch the 70-milewide shadow of the moon that cuts across America on Monday. Although Salt Lake City won’t get the full eclipse, we can still expect 91-92 percent solar coverage, and venues including Clark Planetarium, Wheeler Historic Farm, Discovery Gateway and libraries across the Salt Lake Valley plan on helping folks make the best of it. The solar eclipse begins at 10:13 a.m., peaks in coverage at 11:33 and ends at 12:59 p.m. Throughout that time, Clark Planetarium offers easy access to eye protection as well as activities for “citizen scientists,” ranging from simple smartphone photography of eclipse phases to testing general relativity with the help of starlight deflection. Especially for kids, Discovery Gateway staff will be inside and outside at Gateway Plaza fountains providing activities like hopscotching across a chalk-drawn solar system, recreating lunar phases with Oreos and taking photos with space-themed backgrounds and props. As an alternative, Salt Lake County Library Services hosts several viewing parties at branches from Millcreek to Riverton. The Salt Lake City Main Library also hosts a rooftop viewing party for the first 200 people, including a limited number of free viewing glasses. Outside of planetarium-sponsored events, the King’s English Bookshop hosts a reading of space-themed stories, and guides on making pinhole cameras. If you’re seeking a setting to match the view, Snowbasin has you covered; Needles Gondola runs from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Visit cityweekly.net listings for several other viewing locations. (Rex Magana) Solar Eclipse @ Clark Planetarium, 110 S. 400 West, Aug. 21, 10 a.m., slco.org; Discovery Gateway, 444 W. 100 South, discoverygateway.org; Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, slcpl.org

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WEDNESDAY 8/23

Solar Eclipse Viewing

MONDAY 8/21

Ogden Balloon & Arts Festival

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Last week, City Weekly whetted your appetite with a full issue of brew-tiful content to make sure the Utah Beer Festival was on your radar. This week, it’s time to make your plans to attend. There’s even less excuse not to attend now, as the event expands to two days, taking over the Utah State Fairpark for the full weekend just on the off-chance that your Saturday is already booked. Whether you come Saturday or Sunday—or preferably both—just to make sure you don’t miss out on any of the fun, as you’ll get a chance to enjoy more than 200 beers by local, regional and national brewers. Sampling is easier than ever, thanks to an RFID wristband that you can tap to get beers on tap, and reload with additional credit as needed. All those wonderful lagers, pilsners, IPAs, ales, stouts, double bocks and more can wash down the treats available from food vendors like Even Stevens, Pat’s BBQ, Lucky Slice Pizza and Jamaica’s Kitchen. VIP attendees even get a chance to enjoy special foodand-beer pairing events hosted by The Beer Professor. What if you’re teetotalling, or perhaps serving as designated driver for friends? Discount tickets are available for those who won’t be drinking beer, and you can still enjoy the full slate of performances by local bands including Folk Hogan and Natural Roots. You’ll also get the satisfaction of knowing that a portion of the proceeds goes to support the Humane Society of Utah. We can all drink the beverage of our choice to that. (Scott Renshaw) City Weekly’s Utah Beer Festival @ Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, Aug. 19, 2-8 p.m.; Aug. 20, 1-7 p.m., $15-$75, utahbeerfestival.com

SATURDAY 8/19

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Utah Beer Festival

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

BILL SINGLETON

JOSH SCHUERMAN

SATURDAY 8/19

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, AUG. 17-23, 2017

DUPLASS BROTHERS PRODUCTIONS

ESSENTIALS

the


Point Blank

Those With Wings interprets a unique memoir through movement. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

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he process of creating art almost always begins with blankness: a clean canvas, a bare stage, a blinking cursor on an empty screen. But when an artist begins the process of adapting an already-existing work to a new medium, you’d expect there to be more of a starting point for filling in that blankness. Perhaps that’s why Terry Tempest Williams’ When Women Were Birds makes for such intriguing source material for loveDANCEmore’s new production Those With Wings—since the fascinating core of the work is the mystery of its own blank pages. Williams’ 2012 memoir When Women Were Birds revolves around the author learning that her terminally ill mother has several volumes of journals—journals Williams never previously knew existed, and which her mother makes her promise not to read until after she dies. When Williams finally opens them, she finds that each one is blank. The book becomes a journey of attempting to understand what story Williams’ mother was telling through those empty pages, and how that absence of any written words might have been connected to her role as a woman, a Mormon, a mother. Liz Izkovich—one of the three codirectors of Those With Wings, along with Ashley Anderson and Alysia Ramos— initially discovered the book, and brought it to her collaborators for all of them to read. Thier conversations led them to wonder how they might interpret When Women Were Birds as a movement piece— how they could take, according to Izkovich, “ideas that were speaking to all of us … and imagine that in the context of our own art-making.” The adaptation was less of a leap of faith than it might seem at first glance. “What’s really interesting about the book is, it’s also a visual piece of art,” Izkovich says. “When she talks about her mother passing, and finds [the blank journals], at that point, all the pages in the book are blank. In the hard copy, there’s also a bird that starts to fly across the pages. So there’s this visual element of it as well.” Though Izkovich, Anderson and Ramos initially reached out to Williams regarding their plans, the author ultimately was not directly involved in the process of creating Those With Wings. She did, however, give the project her blessing, according to

PETE VORDENBERG

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Izkovich, “and encouraged us to take any and all creative liberties with it. … It’s a very non-literal adaptation, but we still capture the essence of what we took from the book, using snippets from the text and re-imagining it through the body.” Those With Wings also serves as the culmination of a three-production Summer Series created by loveDANCEmore in collaboration with Seven Canyons Trust, celebrating the Jordan River. The venue for the performance is the Bend in the River Park on the Jordan River Trail, providing a unique outdoor component—and an ideal one for adapting a work by an author as closely identified with Utah’s natural beauty as Williams. “It’s such a complicated space,” Izkovich says of the venue, “used by so many different kinds of people. And there are beavers, and birds, this really amazing cross-section of wildness and urban life. There are these built elements that are a little bit falling apart at this point, then efforts to restore native plants. And I always love that about Terry’s work: Combining wildness and social life together, not as separate.” The performance is also unique in using the intimate space for an interactive performance where audience size will be limited to 25 for each of the six scheduled performances. According to Izkovich, audience members will have opportunities to make choices regarding what they want to see and experience, and the performers will interact with them along the way. The lack of conventional seating also means people requiring ability accommodations

Alysia Ramos and Ching-I Chang Bigelow in Those With Wings should contact the company through its website. “This is part of all of our own creative journey. What is the kind of work we wanted to see?” Izkovich says. “It’s where we could have that intimate experience with the audience, where you could be connecting. The smaller the audience, the more we feel we can offer people that intimate experience.” Key to that experience, however, is capturing the emotions inspired by Williams’ book as it explores what it means to have a voice, and to try to understand the inner life of a loved one. “It’s thinking about silence and emptiness,” Izkovich says of When Women Were Birds, “what’s public and what’s private. Dance is about relationships, about how you create that energy between audience and performers, and between the performers and the space, so that there’s some kind of emotional resonance. … This is the human story of us, as women, and what happens to our voices.” CW

LOVEDANCEMORE: THOSE WITH WINGS

Bend in the River Park 1030 W. Fremont Ave. Aug. 17-19 6:30 p.m. & 8 p.m. nightly $15 lovedancemore.org


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Artist Yidan Guo—an adjunct faculty member at Southern Utah University’s art department—shows examples of her traditional Chinese-style portrait painting (“The Blue Shawl” is pictured) in Watercolor: East vs. West at Finch Lane Gallery (54 Finch Lane, 801-5965000, saltlakearts.org) through Sept. 22.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Utah Summer Dance Festival Viridian Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, Aug. 19, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., utahsummerdancefestival.com Those With Wings Bend in The River Park, 1049 W. Fremont Ave., Aug 17-19, 6:30 & 8 p.m., lovedancemore.org (see p. 23)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Darren & Rowan Lamb: The Worst Buddhist The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East,

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 24

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

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LITERATURE

Alex Velluto Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 17, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Asperger’s Are Us Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S. 800 West, Aug. 23, 7 p.m., thesugarspace.com (see p. 21) Jeff & Larry’s Backyard BBQ Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. Upper Ridge Road, West Valley City, 801-417-5343, Aug. 18, 5 p.m., usana-amp.com Jimmy Pardo Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 18-19, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Open-Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801-622-5588, Aug. 18-19, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

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DANCE

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The 3 Amigos Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug. 19, times vary, desertstar.biz As You Like It Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 7, times vary, bard.org The Book of Mormon Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801355-2787, through Aug. 20, times vary, artsaltlake.org Broadway Bound Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, through Aug. 19, 8 p.m.; Aug. 20, 6 p.m., egyptiantheatrecompany.org Guys and Dolls Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 1, times vary, bard.org In the Heights Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, 801-917-4969, through Aug. 21, Thursday-Saturday & Monday, 8 p.m., goodcotheatre.com Mamma Mia Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3200, through Oct. 21, times and dates vary tuacahn.org A Midsummer Night’s Dream Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 453-5867878, through Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org Peter and the Starcatcher The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through Sept. 2, times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com Pillow Talk Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Sept. 23, times vary, haletheater.org Romeo and Juliet Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 9, times vary, bard.org Saturday’s Voyeur SLAC, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Aug. 27, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Seussical the Musical Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, through Aug. 26, times vary, drapertheatre.org Shakespeare in Love Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435-5867878, through Sept. 8, times vary, bard.org Thoroughly Modern Millie Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Washington,

435-251-8000, through Sept. 23, ThursdaySaturday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee 2 p.m., brighamsplayhouse.com Treasure Island Randall L. Jones Theatre 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 2, times vary, bard.org Utahoma Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through Sept. 16, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org William Shakespeare’s Long-Lost First Play Eileen and Allen Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org


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801-484-9100, Aug. 19, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Raymond D. Christensen: A Few More Words Barnes & Noble, 7157 Plaza Center Drive, West Jordan, 801-282-1324, Aug. 19, 1 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Carolyn Campbell: The Ins and Outs of Adoption Hunter Library, 4740 W. 4100 South, 801-943-4636, Aug. 22, 7 p.m., slcolibrary.org Kyra Leigh: Reaper Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., 801-852-6650, Aug. 22, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Balloon & Arts Festival Eden Park, 5522 E. 2200 North, Ogden, Aug 18-20, ogdenvalleyballoonfestival.com (see p. 21) Eighth Annual Utah Beer Festival Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, Aug. 19, 2-8 p.m.; Aug. 20, 1-7 p.m., utahbeerfestival.com (see p. 21) Great Salt Lake Truck Show Thanksgiving Point Electric Park, 3003 N. Thanksgiving Way, Lehi, Aug. 18-19, saltlaketruckshow.com Magna Main Street Arts Festival Magna, 801328-4201, Aug. 19, 10 a.m.-8 p.m., magnautah.org Solar Eclipse Clark Planetarium, 110 S. 400 West, Aug. 21, 10 a.m., slco.org (see p. 21) Wasatch International Food Festival Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, Aug. 18, 5-10 p.m.; Aug. 19, noon-8 p.m., culturalcelebration.org

RACING

Summit ET Series Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, West Valley City, 385-3523991, Aug. 18, 4:30 p.m., rmrracing.com Quarter Midget Racing Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, West Valley City, 385-352-3991, Aug. 18, 6 p.m., rmrracing.com Kids Night Out Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, West Valley, 385-352-3991, Aug. 19, 4 p.m., rmrracing.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Nov. 18; artist reception, Aug. 25, 6-9 p.m., utahmoca.org Andrea Henkels Heidinger: Shared Artifacts Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-5948680, Aug. 21-Sept. 29, artist reception Aug. 26, 4 p.m., slcpl.org Art, Politics & Alternative Realities Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, through Sept. 8, phillips-gallery.com Avenues Open Studies: Works By Local

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Artists Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Aug. 19, slcpl.org Eight O’Clock in the Morning Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande, 801-230-0820, through Sept. 3; artist reception, Aug. 18, 6-9 p.m., urbanartsgallery.org Face of Utah Sculpture XIII Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-9655100, through Aug. 30, culturalcelebration.org Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony García: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Dec. 9; artist reception Aug. 25, 7-9 p.m., utahmoca.org Janiece Murray Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Joseph Bishop: Smoke Signals Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Sept. 14, slcpl.org Joy Nunn: Journey Back Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through Sept. 9; artist reception Aug. 18, 6-9 p.m., artatthemain.com Laura Sharp Wilson Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Luke Watson: Anthropocene Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Aug. 24, slcpl.org Masterworks of Western American Art David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, 801-583-8143, through Aug. 31, daviddeefinearts.com Michael Ryan Handley: Sublimation UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 9, utahmoca.org Milton Cacho: Camera Collection Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 16, slcpl.org Naomi Marine: Sleepwalking Sprague Branch Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through Aug. 26, slcpl.org Naomi S. Adams: Structural Language SLCC South City, 1575 S. State, 801-957-4111, through Sept. 7, slcc.edu Nathaniel Praska: Progress and Development Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, 631 W. North Temple, through Sept. 8, facebook.com/mestizoarts Native Voices: Contemporary Trading Post Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-3553383, through Aug. 21, modernwestfineart.com Yidan Gou Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org (see p. 24) Ryan Rue Allen: Flowing Imagination and Changes Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, Aug. 23-Sept. 30, artist reception Aug. 30, 6 p.m., slcpl.org

25 | AUGUST 17, 2017

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 8:00PM | INCLUDES A FREE CD DOWNLOAD WITH EVERY TICKET

FOR TICKETS & MORE INFORMATION VISIT DRAPERAMPHITHEATER.COM 801-576-6570 I 944 E. VESTRY RD. DRAPER


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2017 UTAH BEER FESTIVAL DIRECTORY THE BREWERS: 2 Row Brewing

Family-owned brewery in Midvale bottling nothing short of perfect brews.

Anchor Brewing

Born during the ’49 gold rush, this is America’s oldest craft brewery.

Angry Orchard

Making hard cider with attitude from the best apples the Hudson Valley has to offer.

Ballast Point

Champions of brewing art and craft on California’s sunny, southern coast.

Blue Moon Brewing Company

Makers of the classic Belgian White and a host of other beers with flavorful twists.

Bohemian

Boneyard’s Bloody Brew

Laughing Dog Brewing’s award winning Cream Ale infused with Boneyard’s Bloody Blend. 12oz Cans will be coming soon to stores near you.

Bonneville Brewing Boulevard Brewing

The product of John McDonald’s beer fantasy, and the mid-west’s largest craftbrewery,

Deschutes Brewery

Oregon’s craft brew heavyweights, with a mission to help people enjoy time spent together.

Desert Edge

Brewing aggressive yet balanced beers in Salt Lake City’s Trolley Square.

Small Town Brewery

Fisher Beer Co.

Proper Brewing Company

Squatters

RPM Brewing

St. Killians

Radeberger

Stone Brewing

Triumphantly returning to Utah’s beer scene with excellent brews and food trucks to boot.

Green Flash

Phenomenal brews akin to the oceanic phenomena for which it’s named.

Henry's Hard Soda

Makers of alcoholic sodas fit for your night of raising “a little heck.”

Hoppers Grill and Brewing

A Classic Salt Lake City locale for all your beer cravings.

Lagunitas

Craft brew giant with roots across the whole U.S.

Laughing Dog Brewing

Makers of craft brews who draw inspiration from a Yellow Lab

Leinenkugels

Beer brewed with pride and tradition for six generations and counting.

Mike's Hard Lemonade

Fresh, fruity flavors abound for your grown-up needs.

Moab Brewing

Beer great enough to be brewed next to Utah’s most famous natural landmarks.

Mountain West Cider

Hard ciders made from the best ingredients found in Utah.

Oskar Blues

Funky brewmasters who originated the idea of craft beer in a can.

Crafting perfect beers for all outdoor occasions. Makers of beer that is Utah through and through. Draper’s only brewery, and fans of all that can be found in a car garage. Legendary brewers, producing the finest German pilsner.

Red Rock Brewing

An atypical brewery crafting atypical, flavored brews. A staple brewery and figure in Utah’s beer scene and community. Importers of beer providing the U.S. with a variety of foreign brews. One of the largest craft brewers in the U.S. with small beginnings and a dedication to quality.

Crafting classic, award winning beers in Utah since 1994.

Strap Tank Brewery

Redd's Brewing Company

Talisman

Ritual Brewing Co

Uinta

Roha Brewing

Unibroue

Roosters Brewing

Upslope Brewing

Rogue

Vermont Hard Cider

Combining fruit and beer to make delicious brews. New to the craft scene and armed with a number of good, local brews. 10 years in the making and gracing Salt Lake City with great beers. Exceptional craft brewers hailing from Ogden’s 25th Street. A tough, revolutionary brewery hailing from Ashland, Ore.

SKA Brewing

Beer with as much character as its musical namesake.

Sam Adams

Beer with a spirit as strong as our nation’s founders.

Sapporo

The oldest and most excellent Japanese beer.

Utah County’s detail-oriented craft brewers. Celtic-inspired brews from Ogden’s distinctive underground. Utah’s own trailblazing beer that embodies the Beehive’s essence. A world-class brewery hailing from Montréal, Quebec making unique beers. Making the perfect brews for every ski-bum and powder hound. Masters of hard ciders from Middlebury, Vt.

Wasatch

Utah’s most clever and raucous brewers since 1986.

Wing Nutz

A paradise for lovers of craft beer and wings.

Zion Brewing

Crafting fabulous brews on the doorstep of Zion Canyon National Park. Compiled by Jordan Floyd

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Crafting classic ales and lagers on the shores of the Great Salt Lake.

Park City Brewing

Supplying beer lovers with exclusively high alcohol content beers since 2008.

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Utah’s old-school, lagering brewery since 2001.

Epic Brewing

CASH FOR YOUR CLOTHES ▪ BUY - SELL - TRADE

PIB S E XC H A N G E .C O M

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 27

1147 EAST ASHTON AVE, SLC • 801.484.7996 MON- SAT 11-9PM • SUN 1-5PM

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Photo Credit: Nina Tekwani


BLUE MOON BREWING CO.

B13

BOHEMIAN BREWERY

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BONNEVILLE BREWING BONEYARD’S BLOODY BREW

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EPIC BREWING CO.

LAGUNITAS

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FOOD CIRCLE & PICNIC AREA

F-5

WATER BALLONS, KICKBALL AND MORE

MAIN STAGE

SHADE TENT

RED ROCK DRAFT

TOP GOLF

RADEBERGER

F-4

RED ROCK HIGH-POINT

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RITUAL BREWING CO. ROHA BREWING

F-2

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B30

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SHYLO’S MOBILE CAFE

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MARK MILLER

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VISIT SALT LAKE

LUCKY SLICE PIZZA

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PAT’S BBQ

B-25 B-24 B-23 B-22 B-21

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GRAND

Saturday

2:00 -3:00 3:00 - 4:00 4:30 - 5:30 6:00 - 7:00 7:15-8:00

BREEZWAY FOLK HOGAN DALLAS MCFADDEN NATURAL ROOTS CONCISE KILGORE (DJ) CONCISE KILGORE (DJ) BREEZWAY GINGER AND THE GENTS PIXIE AND THE PARTY BOYS WILL BAXTER UNDERGROUND CASH

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UTAH COALITION AGAINST SEXUAL ASSAULT

BUILDING

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UPSTAIRS

M11

PHOTO COLLECTIVE

FAST LANE ENTRANCE WRISTBAND HOLDERS ONLY!

MORE

Games by Beehive Sports FREE UTA with your ticket!

INSIDE GRAND BUILDING The Radisson Karaoke Stage Pet Adoptions Merch Mall Cider House Photo-Booth

DOWNSTAIRS

HUMANE SOCIETY PET ADOPTIONS & MERCHANDISE MALL

NORTH TEMPLE

THE SPONSORS: CITY WEEKLY MARK MILLER SUBARU VISIT SALT LAKE BONEYARD’S BLOODY BEER EVEN STEVEN’S RADISSON THE GATEWAY TOP GOLF SOUND WAREHOUSE SPILT INK NICHOLAS AND CO.

C1

REDD’S BREWING CO.

C2

ANGRY ORCHARD

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VERMONT HARD CIDER

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HENRY’S HARD SODA

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SMALL TOWN BREWERY

The Utah Beer Festival is a 501-C3 nonprofit. Raising funds for the Humane Society of Utah and other charitable causes. Your attendance helps to support the Humane Society of Utah and the free press.

DUDLEY

When we went to the Beer Fest last year, our intention was to “look at options” for the available dogs for adoption. The absolute moment I saw the scrawny, timid and scared little puppy named Moose, I knew he was coming home with us. I didn’t have to say a word to my boyfriend—he knew my mind was made up. The adoption process was great. I was comforted in the fact that he was evaluated, given shots and even neutered upon arriving at the Humane Society of Utah. We were interviewed to ensure we were going to be great dog parents and that he was going to a good home. Today, at a healthy 85 pounds, he towers over most dogs but thinks he’s the size of a chihuahua. He has a big sister dog, Pixie the Dingo, who he absolutely adores. They are the very best of friends and cannot be apart. He is always checking on her and giving her kisses, especially after he accidentally runs her over with his long legs. Dudley has the biggest heart. He requires constant love and affection, which we have no problem giving him, and he gives right back. He loves to cuddle with us and use his big ol’ Moose legs to push us off the couch when he stretches. He’ll bring you all of his toys, but not without a chase. From time to time, he will find a long tree branch in the backyard and spend a good 10 minutes trying to get it through the doggy door before giving up to chase a bug. Dudley is extremely curious and loves to explore new places and things. From mountain hikes to the scary new garbage can in the kitchen, every day brings a new learning experience. Right now, he’s learning how to swim in the river. I could go on for days about Dudley and what happiness he brings us. I cannot imagine our lives without him. He’s one big cuddly goofball who constantly makes us laugh. We want to extend our sincerest

thanks to HSU for providing the opportunity for dogs like Dudley to get a second chance at life. The services and care provided to the dogs are wonderful.

LOUIE

— Cassie Wilson

We had been talking about getting another dog for a while but wanted to wait another year. We were planning on getting a large breed to counterbalance our 5-pound Chihuahua, George. My husband, Seth, had always purchased dogs from breeders (shelties) and wanted to look at getting a specific breed. I’ve always been a fan of adopting; my childhood dog was a border collie we got as a puppy from our local shelter. We knew that HSU was at the Utah Beer Fest last year, which was an added bonus—beer plus dogs! Of course, we couldn’t resist looking at the dogs available for adoption while we were there. I think we made it about two hours until we found ourselves asking to take Louie outside. After spending a half-hour with him, we couldn’t give him back; we had to adopt him. Instead of waiting and getting a large breed, we ended up with a 15-pound Maltipoo. The adoption process was straightforward and easy, and the HSU staff was great. They answered our questions and offered recommendations. Once we got home, we did have a moment of “Uh-oh, what have done?” and the first two weeks were an adjustment. But we quickly grew attached to Louie. He is a very sweet and affectionate dog. He just wants to be with his people, and he is quite the cuddle-bug. He is also a great trail dog with a lot of energy and will charge through any obstacle, but also sticks by us and is very obedient. We were surprised that we didn’t have to do any real training with recall; he has always come when called and responds quickly. It took a very short time for him to learn basic commands— he’s eager to please. I can’t imagine our family without our goofy Louie, and

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 29

Sunday

12:00 -1:00 1:00 -2:00 2:00 -3:00 3:00 - 4:00 4:00 - 5:00 6:00 - 7:00

SHADE LOUNGE

BOX OFFICE

THE MUSIC

HUGS & SMUDGE PROOF KISSES

B-4

SPONSORS

F8

M2

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Banh Mi Time Chile Verde Cluck's Food Truck Even Stevens Hydro Pure Jamaica's Kitchen King Kone Pizza Lucky Slice Pizza Normal Ice Cream Pat's BBQ Raclette Machine Shylo's Mobile Cafe T's Grill Taco Cartel

B-3

CIDER HOUSE • RADISSON KARAOKE STAGE

JAMAICA’S KITCHEN

RENEWEL BY ANDERSON

B-2

Heritage Building

F1

M1

THE FOOD

B-1

Pioneer Building

FOOD VENDORS

GRAND

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RPM BREWING

SOUND WAREHOUSE

Catching up with last year’s adoptions.

KEY

1000 WEST

ROGUE

B28

F-1

South Plaza Pavilion

N

BUILDING

B-28 B-27 B-26

PROPER BREWING COMPANY

B22

B14

F-10

TOKEN TOP-UP STATION

B6 B23

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BONEYARD

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MARK MILLER

HOPPERS GRILL AND BREWING

VISIT SALT LAKE

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PAVILION SEATING

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✚ FIRST AID

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B36

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DEVOUR UTAH VIP LOUNGE

F-13

X COMM MORMON

B3

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M

B1

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BALLAST POINT

B21

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B33

Stories of Humanity

SWAP STATIONS GET YOUR WRISTBANDS

1000 WEST

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ANCHOR BREWING

Smoking Area

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MAIN ENTRANCE

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Police

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Stage

28 | AUGUST 17, 2017

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30 | AUGUST 17, 2017

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Eklektik Avenue

Pull up a chair (and buy it!) at funky new eatery.

T

THE EKLEKTIK

60 E. 800 South, SLC 385-528-3675 theeklektik.com

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 31

Contemporary Japanese Dining

| CITY WEEKLY |

aficionado. Virtually everything in their unique restaurant is recycled, repurposed, sustainable and environmentally friendly. Glassware (not to mention ceiling lighting) is made from upcycled lamps and bottles. With a menu that captures the couple’s love of dishes from around the world, and sometimes from “Grandma’s traditional recipes,” their motto is, “Cooking with love provides food for the soul.” Well said. From the “First Things First” section of the menu, I particularly enjoyed the chicken salad tostadas ($10). The trio of lightly fried corn tortillas is topped with pulled boneless chicken breast tossed with a delicate house chile-mayo, lettuce and corn. Each tostada comes with a different garnish: sliced avocado, pineapple and pico de gallo alongside a scrumptious and mildly hot sauce. At first glance, the Barcelona shrimp cazuela ($19) looked a tad skimpy. I was wrong; there are plentiful shrimp buried beneath eight slices of toasted baguette and garlicky sauce. It’s a Spanish-style one-pot dish—cazuela means “pot” in Spanish—of about 18-20 small shrimp bathed in a sassy garlic and guajillo chile sauce with extra virgin olive oil and some chile de árbol thrown in to add a little zing. The generous serving of bread ensures that you won’t have to let any of that sensational sauce go to waste. Tilapia Rodrigo ($13) isn’t what I expected—it’s even better. Rather than a boring filet, the tilapia is minced and served in a terrine with a mélange of jalapeños, scallions, cilantro, lime juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, avocado slices and five fresh corn tortillas on the side. It’s simply delicious. In response to my begging off dessert, Croudo responded, “I didn’t ask if you were full—I asked if you like dessert.” He didn’t know who I was, but insisted on serving us (gratis) a memorable, citrusy tiramisu ($7) before we left. I’ll never turn down dessert at The Eklektik again. CW

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

he Eklektik, that’s just a few months old, might be the most appropriately named business in town. Its full name is The Eklektik Soul Kitchen, Brews and Store, and it’s not immediately apparent as you walk up to the place that you’re even anywhere near a restaurant. It looks more like a consignment shop and art space—which it partly is. Most of the seating is toward the rear of the colorful space, past a slightly raised area with an array of items for sale, ranging from clothing and jewelry to local art and just about anything else you could imagine. In fact, there’s not much in the place that isn’t for sale. According to the owners, every chair and table in the eatery was once “someone’s throwaway,” which was restored and is now up for grabs. If you really like the table and chairs you’re using here, you can take them home with you. And that goes for just about everything else, except probably the kitchen sink. The menu, like the restaurant’s visual style—with legs and upper bodies of mannequins jutting out from the walls—is whimsical. It fishtails with the logic of a Dalí painting, and offers dishes like traditional French onion soup ($7), Spanishstyle patatas bravas ($12), lump crab macaroni-and-cheese ($14) and a Caprese salad with goat cheese in the place of traditional mozzarella ($10). The eclecticism is a natural byproduct of the owners’ unique personalities and tastes. Aliza Levy Sidi is a former Mexico City TV producer, cook, artist, restaurateur and self-described “fashionista.” Her husband, Sion Croudo, operated restaurants in Mexico City’s Zona Rosa and in San Diego. He’s also a die-hard music

Barcelona shrimp cazuela at The Eklektik

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BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

TED SCHEFFLER

DINE


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32 | AUGUST 17, 2017

FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW

NIKI CHAN

@scottrenshaw

Local Farmer Microgrants

As part of an ongoing effort to support local food-growers, Salt Lake City—in partnership with Urban Food Connections of Utah—now offers a second round of microgrants to area farmers looking to expand operations in a sustainable manner. In February’s first round, 33 applicants submitted requests for more than $130,000 in microgrant funding; recipients include BUG Farms, Earth First Organix, Blue Spring Farms and Pyne Farms. The deadline for the second round of funding is Aug. 25, and grants will be awarded by Sept. 30. Visit slcfarmersmarket.org for the application and additional info.

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

Stanza and Fisher Beer Join Forces

Jonathan LeBlanc, the new executive chef at Stanza Italian Bistro & Wine Bar, gets a special chance to show off some of his new dishes as part of a beerpairing dinner with Fisher Brewing Co. on Thursday, Aug. 17. The four-course menu includes braised pork belly with Yukon potato purée, Fuji apple butter and parsnip chips; gulf shrimp and tasso ham with okra, pickled red onion and crystal red hot sauce beurre blanc; pomegranate lacquered duck breast with foie gras ravioli, sweet potato butter and duck fat potato crisp; and butter pecan pound cake with toasted coconut gelato and praline brittle. Fisher brewers will be on-hand to discuss the qualities of the paired beers that make them the right match for each of the dishes. Dinner begins at 7 p.m.; cost is $85 per person, including beer pairings. Call 801-746-4441 for reservations or visit stanzaslc.com.

Dinner and Jazz

Jazz fans longing for a new venue, your wish has finally been granted—along with a chance to dine while listening. Avant Groove Jazz Club and Martini Bar opened on Aug. 10 at 122 Pierpont Ave. in downtown SLC, with Elastic Jazz Quintet—featuring club owner and saxophonist John Vecchi—serving as one of the house bands. In addition, the location features an extensive menu of new American, Italian and seafood including small plates, salads and flatbread pizzas. Visit avantgroove.com for more details. Quote of the Week: “Blues is to jazz what yeast is to bread. Without it, it’s flat.” —Carmen McRae Send tips to: comments@cityweekly.net

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181


AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD & Fresh Nayarit Style Seafood

Mi Lindo 145 E. 1300 S.

Nayarit 

#303

801.908.5727

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Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

-CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

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“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

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AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

-Cincinnati Enquirer

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 33

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM


The community that brews together stays together. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

’m not a small business owner, but I have a basic understanding of how the American business model is implemented and how it operates. It’s simple, really: You generate revenue by selling a product at a set rate that is calculated from the cost of making said product. You then take a percentage of those profits and invest them back into the operation, and thus the business wheel revolves. As it turns out, there are others out there who are selling the same or similar products to the very same people that you are vying for. How your business model performs against your competitors dictates its success.

34 | AUGUST 17, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

now serving breakfast

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

AUG 18TH

third friday jam with pockit

AUG 19TH

grey on blues

AUG 26TH

keith taylor

us. It’s about the greater good.” Haas has been part of the Beehive’s brewing scene for more than 15 years, tracing his origins to Desert Edge where he served as head brewer. He has a unique perspective and understands the small-brewery mentality. “We are trying to promote other small breweries like ourselves,” he says, adding, “The better other small breweries do, the better we all do.” That philosophy comes from a place of familiarity. Local breweries all operate within a pretty unique set of restrictions that no other brewery in any other state could easily wrap their head around. Across town, the guys at A. Fisher Brewing Co.—another one of Salt Lake City’s brand-spankin’ new breweries—are embracing this same novel ideology. After debuting with an explosive opening earlier this year, it was clear their 12-plus tap handles would be more than enough to keep their customers happy. Still, they chose to offer their rivals’ beer in house. “We’re not the only ones making good beer out there,” Tim Dwyer says. Dwyer coowns the brewery alongside a ragtag team that includes former City Weekly writer

MIKE RIEDEL

Sharing is Caring

By now you’re asking, “Why am I getting a shitty vocation lesson in City Weekly’s beer column?” It’s important to note that model because a new one is taking place in our local craft-beer industry and it’s going against the grain of how traditional businesses and their competitors interact. To get a better idea of the glitch, you have to understand that living in Utah presents its own special set of challenges for those choosing to make a living in the state’s alcohol-manufacturing industry. Beer, in particular, is faced with an even more aggressive set of obstacles, often being relegated to the lowest rung on the alcohol ladder by our lawmakers. For a brewery to get ahead in Utah, it needs more than just good beer. It needs a good community—one that’s willing to unite to the point where deciding to sell a competitor’s beer is becoming more the norm than the exception. Case in point: RoHa Brewing Project. Months after going online, two of the brewery’s tap handles became available to their local competitors. This week, it features beers from Hoppers Grill & Brewing and Desert Edge Brewery. Chris Haas, RoHa head brewer and co-owner, is the main proponent of sharing his valued tap space. “Why not have guest taps?” Haas asks. “As the beer community grows, it helps all of

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BEER NERD

Colby Frazier. “There’s a lot of complementary stuff that enhances the beer that we offer, while providing the customers with options that we may not currently have,” he continues. There’s a good dose of warm and fuzzies in our market when it comes to breweries banding together. What better time than Utah Beer Festival weekend to bring it up? The trend is noble and helpful to the beer drinker, sure, but sometimes there is a much more practical reason for selling beer from other breweries—which is to keep the market competitive and cohesive. Consider this a good omen as Utah enters its new, exciting craft-beer renaissance. As always, cheers! CW


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italianvillageslc.com

36 | AUGUST 17, 2017

REVIEW BITES

CARL JIGGINS

Bröst!

A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

The Frenchy at Fat Jack’s

Get your Italian on.

BEST RUEBEN

5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT MON-THU 11a-11p FRI-SAT 11a-12a / SUN 3p-10p

801.266.4182

20 W. 200 S. SLC

(801) 355-3891 • siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz

Fat Jack’s Burger Emporium & Tap House

Beer lovers flock to this emporium to make hay with the vast array of suds. There are 16 on tap, and more than 80 by the bottle. As for the burgers, you have to love the philosophy: Use as many local products as possible to support area farmers and artisan food producers. Think Niman Ranch beef and Heber Valley Artisan Cheese, while buns are baked at Vosen’s Bread Paradise. It takes extra effort and higher costs to produce such top-quality fare, so it was a pleasant surprise to find that the offerings here are $10 or less. A basic burger (called the Classic) is $7.59, and includes a wide array of free fixings. The beef patty—served on a perfectly sized, glistening bun—was too thin to be called juicy, but it was very flavorful—enhanced with nothing more in my case than red onion, lettuce and cheddar. You can choose from 11 burger options, including the pastrami ($9.29), the Angry Bleu ($9.29) and the Seoul with kimchi and sriracha ($8.29). If you’re a fan of twice-cooked french fries, they are superb here, especially with a cold brew to wash it down. Reviewed July 20. 206 S. West Temple, 801-890-5155, fatjacksut.com

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FILM REVIEW

Don’t Call It a Comeback

CINEMA

Steven Soderbergh returns to the big screen with slick heist caper. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

Bleecker Street Media

S

Adam Driver, Daniel Craig and Channing Tatum in Logan Lucky. process how TV’s Game of Thrones has moved past George R.R. Martin’s books. But mostly there’s the clicking engine of the heist itself, which delivers all the near misses, ingenious planning and backtracking twists that you could hope for. It’s a delight watching Craig’s drawling Joe Bang try to diagram the chemistry behind his improvised explosive, or feeling the pieces fall into place when a seemingly random bit of background business reveals itself to be part of the scheme. Like in Ocean’s Eleven, the plan here is a series of small smiles all building to the goofy grin as Soderbergh’s crisp editing pulls everything together. It feels like a structural miscalculation that Logan Lucky spends a lot of post-robbery time on the FBI investigation—led by an agent played by Hilary Swank—including a coda that serves as an unexpected downer. Fortunately, there’s plenty of goodwill built up by the previous 100 minutes, showcasing the work of a filmmaker who understands how to please an audience—and is willing to come out of “retirement” to do it. CW

Let us Deliver Spring to you

LOGAN LUCKY

| CITY WEEKLY |

BBB Channing Tatum Daniel Craig Adam Driver PG-13

TRY THESE Side Effects (2013) Rooney Mara Channing Tatum R

The Knick (2014) Clive Owen André Holland NR

Magic Mike XXL (2015) Channing Tatum Joe Manganiello R

M-SAT 8-6 • 9275 S 1300 W 801-562-5496 GLOVERNURSERY.COM

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 37

Ocean’s Eleven (2001) George Clooney Brad Pitt PG-13

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(Adam Driver) and his sister, Mellie (Riley Keough)—and possibly explosives-expert Joe Bang (Daniel Craig), if they can break him out of prison—Jimmy hatches a plan to rob the speedway of its cash deposits. “Efficiently” doesn’t necessarily equal “effectively,” and if there’s anything missing from Logan Lucky, it’s a strong enough anchor in Jimmy’s relationship with Sadie. While that connection serves as an analog from a plot-driving standpoint to the Danny/Tess relationship in Ocean’s Eleven, it feels more perfunctory, even as it builds up to a big moment when Jimmy tries to make it to Sadie’s performance at a youth pageant. The frequently repeated idea that the Logan family is cursed— including Clyde having lost a hand while serving in the military—should make the family connections even deeper; instead, there’s rarely a sense that the movie is as interested in rich characters as it is in superficial pleasures. Those pleasures, however, are plentiful. Soderbergh bathes Logan Lucky in its West Virginia and North Carolina settings, from community gatherings like an Easter fair to the feeling of defeat that clings to a onetime big fish in the small pond like Jimmy who didn’t live up to his potential. He’s confident enough to take a detour to focus on the strained relationship between a NASCAR driver (Sebastian Stan) and his cocky sponsor (Seth MacFarlane, radiating entitled doucheiness), or build a diversion at the prison around the inmates’ seeming inability to

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

teven Soderbergh never went anywhere; let’s get that out of the way right off the bat. Though he famously announced in 2013 that his thriller Side Effects would be his last theatrical feature, Soderbergh was working harder during his fouryear “retirement” than many filmmakers do in an entire career. He directed 20 episodes of his Cinemax series The Knick; he served as cinematographer and editor on 2015’s Magic Mike XXL, the sequel to his own celebration of washboard abs; and he executiveproduced three other TV series, including the adaptation of his feature The Girlfriend Experience. Despite any gripes Soderbergh might have had—and might still have—with the state of mainstream theatrical filmmaking, he wasn’t exactly getting rusty. His return to the big screen finds him slipping into a comfortable genre—the same kind of frisky heist caper where he had his greatest commercial success with the Ocean’s trilogy—but that doesn’t mean Logan Lucky is a case of Soderbergh on autopilot. Whatever dust he needed to shake off before delivering a barrel of fun with loads of tiny, delightful details, he left on the ground somewhere long before he got to the set. The setup for the centerpiece crime is dispatched efficiently in the script credited to newcomer Rebecca Blunt. Jimmy Logan (Channing Tatum) is a one-time pro football prospect who blew out his knee and now survives by picking up odd jobs like working on a construction project at the Charlotte Motor Speedway. When his ex-wife (Katie Holmes) says she and her new husband are planning to move away, taking Jimmy’s daughter Sadie (Farrah Mackenzie) with them, Jimmy realizes he needs money either to fight in court or relocate. So with the help of his brother, Clyde


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET stays within mainstream limits, adeptly satirizing our modern SPECIAL SCREENINGS definition of fame with an ending that satirizes our modern BORN INTO BROTHELS At Main Library, Aug. 22, 7 p.m. (NR)

BRIGSBY BEAR BB.5 It’s possible that this filmed-in-Utah oddball comedy has something insightful to say about the unhealthy pull of nostalgia and kitsch; it feels equally possible that it celebrates those things. That’s the maddening inscrutability surrounding a great premise: 20-something James (Kyle Mooney, who also co-wrote), after living his entire life in a desert home, discovers that his “parents” (Mark Hamill and Jane Adams) kidnapped him as an infant, and that the kiddie fantasy show Brigsby Bear he’s always loved was created by his captors specifically for him. Mooney’s performance—as James tries to adjust to the outside world—manages the tightrope walk between the fanciful satire of Being There and the earnest drama of the similarly plotted Stockholm, Pennsylvania, while the script gets great mileage from the faux show’s absurd plots and tailor-made-for-James lessons (e.g. how frequently it’s appropriate to masturbate). But as Brigsby Bear videos become a viral sensation and James sets out to make a DIY Brigsby movie, the story somehow celebrates this device for manipulating him. Like The Brigsby Bear Show, the narrative here is goofy, surreal, awkwardly constructed and full of messages of questionable value. Opens Aug. 18 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw

LOGAN LUCKY BBB See review on p. 37. Opens Aug. 18 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

PAINT YOUR WAGON At Main Library, Aug. 23, 2 p.m. (NR)

STEP BBB.5 Witness the Platonic form of the crowd-pleasing Sundance documentary: part “underdog sports movie,” part “inspirational teacher movie,” part “seemingly-hopeless-people-get-a-shotat-success movie.” That might make for some narrative sprawl, but there’s still a satisfying payoff. Director Amanda Lipitz spends a year following the step-dancing team at Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women, a charter school focused on sending every one of its African-American female students to college. The focus is on the senior year of three of the team’s founding members, and Lipitz observes as they contend with the circumstances of their home lives while still trying to excel academically. Naturally, there’s a big performance at the end, one this team has never won before, and the percussive step routines are energetic and edited with a satisfying zip. It’s never entirely clear to what extent the experience of starting and participating on this team improves— or even occasionally distracts from—their chances of succeeding as students, but when it builds up to a slow-mo hero walk that you know these girls have earned, it’s hard to nit-pick. Opens Aug. 18 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG)—SR

STREET FIGHTING MEN At Rose Wagner Center, Aug. 21, 7 p.m. (NR)

THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD [not yet reviewed] A special protection agent (Ryan Reynolds) escorts a notorious assassin (Samuel L. Jackson) scheduled to testify at the International Court of Justice. Opens Aug. 18 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) INGRID GOES WEST BBB In this cautionary comedy about social-media fame, Aubrey Plaza plays an unstable woman named Ingrid, fresh out of the mental ward, who heads to California to stalk and befriend a minor Instagram celebrity, Taylor Sloane (Elizabeth Olsen), whose lifestyle looks appealing. Directed by first-timer Matt Spicer from a screenplay he co-wrote with David Branson Smith, the film plays Ingrid’s social awkwardness and Single White Female behavior for dark laughs, but it has a 21st-century twist, too. Taylor is a shallow L.A. phony who calls everything “amazing” and “the best”; her husband, Ezra (Wyatt Russell), calls her “exhausting.” Plaza shows range as she and Olsen give their characters more layers than expected, and O’Shea Jackson Jr. (Ice Cube’s son, last seen playing his dad in Straight Outta Compton) offers a pleasant counter-balance as Ingrid’s easy-going, Batman-obsessed landlord. Though the story turns grim (how could it not?), it

38 | AUGUST 17, 2017

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idea of happiness. Opens Aug. 18 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Eric D. Snider

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Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change.

WELCOME TO THE DOLLHOUSE At Tower Theatre, Aug. 18-19, 11 p.m.; Aug. 20, noon. (R) YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN At Park City Library, Aug. 17, 7 p.m. (PG)

CURRENT RELEASES

ANNABELLE: CREATION B The most unbelievable thing here is the suggestion that the creepy titular doll—first encountered in 2013’s The Conjuring— was created in the 1940s by a kindly dollmaker (Anthony LaPaglia), and that customers positively clamored for them. Only slightly less plausible is that the dollmaker and his wife (Miranda Otto) would open their home to a bunch of orphan girls when they know a demon has been hanging around. Now, everything is endless creaking floors, creepy scarecrows and, of course, the freaky doll in this collection of funhouse spooks telegraphed a mile out. This is so forgettably rote a “horror” movie that you’ll forget the scares even before they strike, and the most disturbing thing is the genre-ritual terrorization of female characters, who in this case are so young that it feels like a kind of perversion. Pedo-fear-lia? (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

WIND RIVER BBB..5 Here is one of those rare thrillers that doesn’t kill its characters for kicks; it kills them to remind us that when people die, they’re dead, and their loved ones are forever haunted. So begins this moody, violent film as Natalie (Kelsey Asbille), a young Native American woman, runs through the snow, barefoot and scared out of her mind. The next morning, Cory Lambert (Jeremy Renner), a U.S. Fish and Wildlife agent, discovers Natalie’s frozen body while tracking a mountain lion. Because the body is found on the Wind River reservation, homicide investigation belongs to the federal government, and the police chief (Graham Greene) calls the FBI. In pops Jane Banner (Elizabeth Olsen), straight from Las Vegas, ill-prepared for the deadly cold weather but pretty smart about everything else. Jane and Cory form a quick bond, and he’s soon helping Jane with her investigation. The whodunit goes in unexpected directions, with unexpected villains and at a refreshingly quick pace. Writer-director Taylor Sheridan (Hell or High Water) coaxes superb performances from the entire cast, especially Gil Birmingham as Natalie’s father. Don’t miss one of the best movies of the year. Opens Aug. 18 at theaters valleywide. (R)—David Riedel

THE GLASS CASTLE BBB It’s not hard to find gritty drama in dysfunctional childhood; it’s harder to tease out the complexity in a family dynamic that, while unhealthy, can’t be oversimplified. Director/co-writer Destin Daniel Cretton adapts Jeanette Walls’ memoir about her childhood with itinerant parents (Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts), and its psychological fallout on her life as an adult (Brie Larson). The narrative weaves effectively back and forth between its two time-frames, at times drifting into melodrama as Jeanette wrestles with her family legacy. But the flashback segments pack real emotional punch, finding the tangled interplay between her alcoholic father’s irresponsibility and the force of his visionary personality. Harrelson’s charismatic performance captures both sides of this troubled man in a story that understands how the people in your life can be bad for you and good for you at the same time. (PG-13)—SR

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TV

Offenders Assemble!

Marvel’s Defenders delivers the goods; Halt and Catch Fire powers down.

@bill_frost

Marvel’s Defenders (Netflix)

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AUGUST 17, 2017 | 39

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv

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Problem is, Capt. Chandler (Eric Dane) has gone AWOL, fight-clubbing his way through Greece and generally embracing gone-rogue clichés. Season 5 is already a go. The stars of Friends have experienced varying success in their post-Central Perk careers, but only Lisa Kudrow (The Comeback, Web Therapy) and Matt LeBlanc have dared to get truly weird—and he didn’t even have to stretch. Episodes (Season 5 premiere, Sunday, Aug. 20, Showtime), LeBlanc’s hilariously wrong series wherein he plays a version of Hollywood star “Matt LeBlanc,” is ending with Season 5 so he can concentrate on lesser television (CBS’ Man With a Plan, the kind of hacky shit Episodes would parody). Besides LeBlanc’s misadventures, Episodes also features the painful showbiz tribulations of writers Sean (Stephen Mangan) and Beverly (Tamsin Greig); the show should just continue with them. Expectations were low for Dice (Season 2 premiere, Sunday, Aug. 20, Showtime) last year … way, way low. The initial episodes made no case for Andrew “Dice” Clay deserving to join the Curb Your Enthusiasm/ Louie club of semi-autobiographical comiccoms, but it did get better as it progressed— no thanks to the Diceman himself. Co-stars Natasha Leggero (as Dice’s unlikely girlfriend Carmen) and Kevin Corrigan (as his gloriously strange bud “Milkshake”) picked up the funny slack nicely, as did guest Adrien Brody in a hysterical turn playing “Adrien Brody” shadowing Dice to play “Dice” for a character role. It’s not essential, but Dice is at least the second-best comedy on Showtime right now. If you’ve watched President Cheeto’s Real News Facebook show and thought to yourself, “That was cool, but where can I go for even more Red State propaganda?! Why won’t the media libtards let the golden waves of conservatism wash over me like Russian hooker piss?!” You got it: The One America News Network has been lurking in the bottom rungs of your cable since 2013, reporting mostly straight news and featuring two opinion shows, The Daily Ledger with Graham Ledger and The Tipping Point with Liz Wheeler (weeknights), both dedicated to the Gospel of Trump. Ledger is just Bill O’Reilly minus the charm, and Wheeler is Megyn Kelly weaponized with acidic snark—MAGA! CW

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B

e careful what you whine for: Marvel’s Defenders (series debut, Friday, Aug. 18, Netflix) is only eight episodes long, maybe partially in response to complaints that previous Marvel/Netflix series Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage and Iron Fist felt stretched thin at 13 apiece. The story that finally brings them all together as the Defenders arguably could have used more, but the no filler/mostly killer approach works well here, leaning heavily on franchise favorite Jones (Krysten Ritter) while somewhat redeeming the maligned Iron Fist (Finn Jones) and introducing a subtle-but-menacing new villain (Sigourney Weaver). Marvel’s Defenders delivers on the built-up hype and promise, just at a brisker pace. Everyone presumed it dead after Season 1, but Halt and Catch Fire (Season 4 premiere, Saturday, Aug. 19, AMC) just kept coming back—but this time, it really is the end. The series that dramatized the rise of 1980s personal computing comes to a close in Season 4, now at the early ’90s dawn of the internet. The core gang of entangled business/romantic partners (Lee Pace, Mackenzie Davis, Scoot McNairy and Kerry Bishé) are as driven—and damaged—as ever, just with different hair and a new mission: Connecting regular folk to this new thing called the World Wide Web (they’re creating America Online, essentially—Wiki it). Halt and Catch Fire logs off as one of AMC’s best, if overlooked, dramas—Netflix it. Also from the “Is That Still On?” file comes another round of The Last Ship (Season 4 premiere, Sunday, Aug. 20, TNT), the greatest naval TV drama since … C.P.O. Sharkey? Since those NCIS clowns rarely get near water, let’s go with that. The global pandemic that killed 80 percent of the world’s population might be over, but the crew of the U.S.S. Nathan James can’t rest yet, as the virus that affected humans is now in the planet’s crops and food supply! Can’t we just subsist on Brawndo and Extra Big-Ass Tacos?

BY BILL FROST


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Strength

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on his documentary about The Alarm’s Mike Peters. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

“T

he first time I heard The Alarm? Probably 1983,” filmmaker Russ Kendall says. He was a freshman at Las Vegas High and his parents had just divorced. He sought refuge in music, losing himself in the college radio station, KUNV. “It’s that crazy time when you’re just tryin’ to figure out who you are and what’s goin’ on, and your life’s disrupted—and I heard this song,” he recalls. It was “Sixty-Eight Guns,” one of the Welsh punk/new wave band’s many fighting anthems. The lyrics spoke to him: “And now they are trying to take my life away/ forever young I cannot stay.” Suddenly he knew, “There’s somebody there. I don’t know who this is, but they get it, and I felt less alienated.” The same week, while watching MTV, Kendall saw images of the band for the first time in the music video for “The Stand.” It was another highly charged, inspirational song. The memory of the spiky-haired band performing and spray-painting the lyrics on the wall was indelible. “I was, like, ‘Yeah! I get that. They get me.’” All music fans have stories of the first time they understood music as catharsis, and there are no bigger music fans than musicians themselves. Serendipitously, in 2011, BYUtv hired Kendall and his partners at Provo-based Kaleidoscope Pictures to produce the series The Song That Changed My Life, in which he’d travel the world making half-hour documentary profiles where musicians discuss a pivotal song from their lives. It got him thinking about the songs that were the most transformative for him. Although he wasn’t a fan of the band’s later work and had lost track of them, “Sixty-Eight Guns” still made the list. Kendall commenced digging and realized, “Wow, there’s quite a story here.” He contacted The Alarm vocalist Mike Peters and arranged to tell his tale, flying to Wales in 2012. At the time, the singer was fronting Scottish band Big Country, whose original vocalist, Stuart Adamson, had passed away; Peters named the group’s signature hit as his “song that changed my life.” “Mike Peters: In a Big Country” aired as the second season’s second episode. Peters’ story sang to Kendall, who told the musician, “This needs to be a full documentary.” As it happened, Stash Slionski was working on a similar project. They joined forces—Kendall as director/producer, Slionski as director of photography/producer/ field director, along with cancer survivor and filmmaker James Chippendale as producer—and the result is The Man in the Camo Jacket. The film chronicles The Alarm’s meteoric rise through Peters’ solo career and health problems, employing archival clips, Peters’ home videos, extant and new footage shot in Wales and Tibet, and interviews with Peters’ former bandmates, along with The Cult’s Billy Duffy, The Damned’s Captain Sensible, Smashing Pumpkins’ Billy Corgan and MTV VJ Martha Quinn. The film’s 20-minute first act covers the band’s 1977 genesis as punk rockers The Toilets, which morphed into the mod/powerpop group Seventeen the following year. In 1981, they became The Alarm and subsequently caught fire. By 1982, U2 agent Ian Wilson was their manager, they had a deal with I.R.S. Records and they were touring with U2. Through the ensuing eight years, the band amassed a devout fanbase, releasing five studio albums, but ultimately succumbed to creative differences. On June 30, 1991, at Brixton Academy, Peters shocked the world—bandmates included—by announcing that the set’s final track, “Blaze of

Left to right: Sound mixer Aaron Merrill, Russ Kendall, Mike Peters and boom operator Charity Dinkins at Rhuddlan Castle, Wales. Glory,” would be his final moment with The Alarm. The rest of the doc confronts the aftermath. Peters continued to make music on his own and with various side projects—even through his 1995 diagnosis with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. He achieved complete remission in 1996 and soldiered on, reviving The Alarm with new bandmates in 2000 to some success, releasing new music and touring. Then, in 2005, Peters learned he’d developed leukemia. Once more, he continued to perform while in treatment, emerging victorious—and he did it all over again in 2014. The stirring, award-winning film takes its title from Peters’ decision to suit up in camouflage attire daily for motivation during all three battles for his life. Throughout his journey, he refused to quit performing; he even climbed Mt. Everest, staging a performance there. In 2007, he founded Love Hope Strength, named for lyrics from The Alarm’s impassioned 1985 hit, “Strength.” The charity sets up booths at concerts by supportive artists like Robert Plant, Mumford & Sons and Paul Weller, educating the public about bonemarrow donations and signing them up for the donor registry. To date, the foundation has added upward of 150,000 names to the list, resulting in more than 3,000 matches and $3 million raised. For Kendall, it reaffirms his appreciation for Peters’ work, and the understanding that music can get you through the tough times. He has a new favorite Alarm tune: “Unsafe Building,” the band’s first recorded single, released as a 7-inch in 1981. Kendall says he’s taken on the song’s message as kind of a personal philosophy. “When everything’s stacked against you, sometimes you’ve just got to tear everything down and start over,” he muses. “That’s what Mike’s been doing throughout his career; throughout his life.” CW

MAN IN THE CAMO JACKET SCREENING

w/ solo acoustic performance by Mike Peters Monday, Aug. 21, 6 p.m. Broadway Centre Cinemas, 111 E. 300 South 801-321-0310 $15 (proceeds benefit Love Hope Strength) maninthecamojacket.com THE ALARM

w/ New Shack Monday, Aug. 21, 8 p.m. The State Room, 638 S. State 801-596-3560 Sold out, 21+ thestateroom.com


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AUGUST 17, 2017 | 41


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LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER

THURSDAY 8/17 Chan Marshall, going by her nom-de-tune Cat Power, is an indie singer-songwriter whose sound is marked by sparse instrumentation, yet profound depth of emotion and subject matter. Her recorded output, while not exactly what you would call prolific—nine albums spanning a career of more than 20 years—has evolved to smooth out the rough edges of her early releases through a more soulful mode of her middle-period album You Are Free (Matador, 2003). In the solo-performer identity she came to be known for, which we’ll enjoy at the Twilight Concert Series, her voice can, by itself, both soar and explore the depths. Only a few years out of high school, special guest Phoebe Bridgers is an emerging folksinger whose initial 7-inch was released on Ryan Adams’ label Pax-Am label last year. (Brian Staker) Pioneer Park, 350 S. 300 West, 7 p.m., $7.50 advance/$10 day of show, all ages, twilightconcerts.com

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, St. Paul & the Broken Bones

At the ripe old age of 31, Trombone Shorty (born Troy Andrews in New Orleans) isn’t limited to the ’bone but is also fluent on trumpet, drums, organ and tuba. Adding some jazz and hip-hop rhythms to the mix, his outfit—Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue—brings some Louisiana-flavored R&B to the Red Butte Garden concert experience. His latest recording, Parking Lot Symphony (Blue Note, 2017) has a festive feeling, with originals as well as covers of The Meters and Allen Toussaint,

Trombone Shorty

LEAH PRITCHARD VIA FLICKR

Cat Power, Phoebe Bridgers

and is a notable addition to the lauded jazz label’s roster. Openers St. Paul & the Broken Bones, from Birmingham, Ala., is a six-piece soul combo that occasionally adds a trombone to the ensemble, with hot instrumental breaks aplenty. (BS) Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7 p.m., sold out, all ages, redbuttegarden.org

FRIDAY 8/18

Smash Mouth, Cracker, The Romantics

Maybe I was unfair to Smash Mouth when, during their last visit to Utah, I said all their songs sound like Sunny D jingles. There’s some goodness to be found early in their discography, before the ubiquitous-to-thepoint-of-yuck “All Star” and its various late-period attempted call-backs. They’re an odd headliner, though, over Cracker—one of the coolest bands to ever grace a stage, with gentleman, scholar and ace tunesmith David Lowery out front with his old friend and writing partner Johnny Hickman on lead guitar. Every album and every show is

Cat Power a feast of great songs—“Low,” “Eurotrash Girl” and “Teen Angst,” and plenty of deep cuts and new jams. (Sadly, recent setlists have not included “Ain’t Gonna Suck Itself,” one of the greatest major-label fuck-yous ever written.) The Romantics often get unfairly slotted into the one-hit-wonder column—but they have three tracks you oughta know: the dreamy “Talking in Your Sleep,” “One in a Million” and perhaps their biggest hit, “What I Like About You.” All three are solid power-pop gems—and speaking of deep cuts, these cats have plenty. Both bands definitely warrant a thorough dig on Spotify or YouTube or wherever you stream. (Randy Harward) Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater, 2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Park City, 5:30 p.m. (doors), $44-$79, all ages, deervalley.com

Cracker

BRADFORD JONES

DEREK BRIDGES VIA FLICKR

42 | AUGUST 17, 2017

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SUNDAY 8/20

Diamond Head, Visigoth, Truce in Blood, Riddled With, Seventking

Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich’s incessant gushing helped raise awareness about the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement, which encompassed so many truly great but largely unsung bands. English riff machine Diamond Head was full of promise, but made too many missteps—including hiring inexperienced managers like original vocalist Sean Harris’ mom. They might owe their career to Metallica, who covered three Diamond Head tunes—including a legendary take on “Am I Evil.” Other than some 10 years of downtime split over two breaks, DH has remained active, releasing seven albums. Harris left in 2003, but the group continued with guitarist and founder Brian Tatler at the helm. Harris’ second replacement, Australian Rasmus Bom Andersen, took over the mic in 2014 and sounds absolutely bitchin’ on DH’s latest, eponymous album (Back on Black, 2016). With Metal Blade recording artists (and local boys!) Visigoth, Truce in Blood, Riddled With and Seventking as support, it might get loud tonight. (RH) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 7 p.m., $15 presale, $20 day of show, 21+, liquidjoes.net

Diamond Head

rat-tailed flattop, smokes and tats like the cover of a circa-1985 junior-high notebook. Tiny, squeaky-voiced Visser—well, she’s more heroin-chic-meets-kinderwhorekewpie-doll-meets-Philip K. Dick. And God goes shirtless with a bucktoothed mask (whatever that’s about). Their sound, however, separates them from the stereotype. Their music is a hallucinogenic blend of hip-hop, dubstep and J-pop with brains— and when you see the real-life couple up there stalking (Ninja) and floating (Visser) around while God drops beats, they’re a force. Their trashy-cool aesthetic is likewise something to behold—a different kind of freakshow, if you will. Catch ‘em now, because their upcoming album The Book of Zef (Zef) will be their last. They’re not breaking up, but they’ve always promised to stop at their fifth joint and make movies instead. (RH) The Great Saltair, 12408 W. Saltair Drive, 8 p.m., $32.50$35, all ages, thesaltair.com

Die Antwoord

TUESDAY 8/22 Die Antwoord

In our Best Summer Concerts issue (June 15, 2017), I wrote that “zef”—the word Die Antwoord uses to describe their music—was the South African equivalent of “redneck.” While technically true, zef is Afrikaans slang for “gross” or “trashy.” It can also mean “uncool.” The alternative hip-hop/EDM trio composed of Ninja, Yolandi Visser and God (formerly DJ Hi-Tek) definitely look like trailer trash— especially Ninja (aka Watkin Tudor Jones), rail thin and angry with his gilded teef,

AMANDA DEMME

FRI SAT

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HIGHLAND live music WHISKEYFISH


Sunday Brunch Party It’s Not Just Another Brunch, it’s Sunday “FRUNCH” DJ MC spinning from 11am-3pm

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AUGUST 17, 2017 | 45


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46 | AUGUST 17, 2017

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THURSDAY 8/17

HOME OF THE

4 SA HBOETE &R

$

SATURDAY, AUGUST 19

AND THE VELEVETONS

9:00PM | NO COVER SUNDAYS • THURSDAYS • SATURDAYS

WASATCH POKER TOUR @ 8PM BONUS: SAT @ 2PM

LIVE MUSIC

Crescent Super Band (Gallivan Center) The Drunken Hearts (Newpark Amphitheater) Final Drive + Shawshank Redeemed + Shine Bright + No Company + Always 2 Late (Club X) Hogan & Moss (Hog Wallow Pub) Joe Pug (The State Room) Melvins + Spotlights (Urban Lounge) Reggae Thursday (The Royal) Swingin’ Utters + Western Settings + Riva Rebels + Hi-Fi Murder (Metro Music Hall) Talking Dreads (O.P. Rockwell) Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue + St. Paul & The Broken Bones (Red Butte Garden) see p. 42 Twilight Concert Series feat. Cat Power + Phoebe Bridgers (Pioneer Park) see p. 42

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

M O N DAYS

STARTS @ 9PM

FREE TO PLAY

DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Matty Mo (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (The Spur)

YOU CAN’T WIN, IF YOU DON’T PLAY CASH

American Hitmen + Ginger and the Gents + LHAW (The Royal) Après Ski (The Cabin) Band of Shadows (Hog Wallow Pub) Das Energi Festival (The Great Saltair) Hectic Hobo + Harold Henry (Garage on Beck) Josh Ritter + The Hollering Pines (The State Room) Lamb of God + Behemoth + Arsenic Addiction (The Complex) Le Voir (Piper Down Pub) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) LOL (Club 90)

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From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen

Chakra Lounge

KARAOKE

FRIDAY 8/18

Indian Style Tapas

$2,000 POT! TUESDAYS

Dueling Pianos: Troy & Dave (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (’80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays (Sky)

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RANDY'S RECORD SHOP HOT SUMMER $2 VINYL SALE

FRIDAY, AUG. 18TH & SATURDAY, AUG. 19TH Most LP's valued @ $2 - $7, some $8 - $10 Over 1200 LP's added on both Fri & Sat @ 10:00 AM “UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413


WEDNESDAY 8/23

CONCERTS & CLUBS

ANTON CORBIJN

Depeche Mode, Warpaint

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist)

SATURDAY 8/19 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin) Band on the Moon (Brewskis) Colombia Jones (Pioneer Park) Das Energi Festival (The Great Saltair) Dave Brogan & Friends (Hog Wallow Pub) Dead Floyd (The State Room) Elizabeth and Aaron (Snowbird Resort) Eminence Ensemble (O.P. Rockwell) Gunnar and the Grizzly Boys + Art

Mulcahy + Dealin’ In Dirt (The Royal) Hard Times + Oceans Within + Lantern by the Sea + Abz (Kilby Court) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Little Black Dress Affair (The Moose Lounge) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Live Trio (The Red Door) LOL (Club 90) Motherlode Canyon Band (Park City Mountain Canyons Village Stage) Nate Robinson Duo (Park City Mountain PayDay Pad) Night Marcher + Andrew Goldring (Garage on Beck) Opal Hill Drive + SoundingStone (The Ice Haüs) Rail Town (The Westerner) The Rocket Summer (In the Venue) The Rock Pack, feat. The Music of Journey w/ Steve Augeri + Foreigner

w/ Lou Gramm & Asia w/ John Payne (Sandy Amphitheater) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Telluride Meltdown (The Spur) Tony Holiday & The Velvetones (Johnny’s on Second) Wyatt Pike + Flagship Romance (Miner’s Plaza)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Sky Saturdays w/ Bangarang (Sky)

SUNDAY 8/20 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin)

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Brisk & Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Jules (Tavernacle) DJ Battleship (Brewskis) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Lavelle Dupree (Downstairs)

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Martian Cult + Civil Lust + Flash & Flare (Urban Lounge) Motherlode Canyon Band (The Spur) My Man Friday + The Anchorage (Velour) The Outer Vibe + Brother (Alleged) Pockit (Feldman’s Deli) Rail Town (The Westerner) Sage Junction (Outlaw Saloon) Scary Uncle Steve + Version Two + The Mindless + LSDO (Funk ’n’ Dive) Scenic Byway + The Americants (Club X) Shannon Runyon (Snowbird Resort) Smash Mouth + Cracker + The Romantics (Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater) see p. 42 The Stratmores + Lantern by the Sea + Vann Moon (The Ice Haüs)

So many great memories of synth-pop giants Depeche Mode: Selling overpriced pinup posters from Star Hits magazine to classmates in junior high as locker décor, all the time puzzling over the fuss they made about these wispy English electronic musicians; watching their spellbinding D.A. Pennebakerdirected concert film/documentary 101 at the Tower Theatre; blasting the Black Celebration album during Arctic Circle closing shifts; camping out for tickets to the World Violation tour at Smith’s on 900 East and 4500 South, playing wiffleball in the parking lot in the wee hours; going to said show up at Park West or the Canyons or whatever it was called back then, using a quilt to shelter from the rain, then sliding ass-first down the mountain when it got too muddy, then learning the show had been called off. The horrible letdown made the miracle next-day reschedule at the Salt Palace that much better. Which is saying a lot, because a Depeche Mode show evokes so many emotions—pleasure, pain, joy, numbness, anger, sorrow—over synthetic sounds that feel organic. The songs challenged us: “Blasphemous Rumours” and “Personal Jesus” dared us to doubt. “People Are People” encouraged acceptance and diversity 30 years before social justice warriors made a mockery of it. “Master and Servant” was sex-positive before sex-positive was a thing. “Somebody” was a paraprosdokian joke, making us all think it was a deep and abiding jones for someone special—until the punchline verse revealed it as an indictment of cloying co-dependency; a plea for a rational relationship with someone whom we can make and share memories with, and who will also challenge us to be better people. OMG—I think I’m in love with Depeche Mode. (Randy Harward) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. Upper Ridge Road (6055 West), 7:30 p.m., $35-$140, all ages, usana-amp.com

THURS 8.17 • SWINGIN’ UTTERS

SPOTLIGHTS

FRI 8.18 • 80’S DANCE PARTY MARTIAN CULT, CIVIL LUST, DJ FLASH & FLARE

SAT 8.19• OFF THE WALL - GRAFFITI DISCO PARTY SUN 8.20 • PELICAN INTER ARMA, GLOE

8/24: PICKWICK 8/25: LAETITIA SADIER SOURCE ENSEMBLE 8/26: FREE KITTENS COMEDY SHOW 8/26: TRASH BASH 8/31: CRUCIALFEST AFTER DARK W/ EARTHLESS 9/1: CRUCIALFEST AFTER DARK W/ LOOM

WESTER SETTINGS, RIVA REBELS, HIFI MURDER

FRI 8.18 • HIP-HOP ROOTS

BURNELL WASHBURN, IVIE, MALEV DA SHINOBI, MAIKON & MORE

SAT 8.19 • LUCKY SINNERS 4TH ANNUAL 80S PARTY THUR 8.24 • THE ARTIFACTS BUKUE ONE, D STRONG, OCELOT, DJ ENEE ONE, DJ INTIMIN8

MON 8.21 • YEAR OF THE COBRA

FRI 8.25 • LARUSSO

TUE 8.22 • POMPEYA

SAT 8.26 • NOISE POLLUTION - AC/DC TRIBUTE WED 8.30 • TWILLO

MAGDA VEGA, MOON OF DELIRIUM

WED 8.23 • THE LONG RUN - EAGLES TRIBUTE BAND • THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

GHOST OF A GIANT, THE SIGNAL SOUND, BRICKSON

WICKED NOTIONS, POWERHAND

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 47

STRANGE FAMILIA, PHAT JESTER

9/1: CRUCIALFEST AFTER DARK W/ ONE MORE TIME 9/2: CRUCIALFEST AFTER DARK W/ LASERFANG 9/3: CRUCIALFEST AFTER DARK W/ DOUG MARSTCH 9/5: AL1CE 9/6: PERTURBATOR 9/8: EXODUS

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THURS 8.17 • MELVINS


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48 | AUGUST 17, 2017

EVERY DAY

BAR FLY

RANDY HARWARD

Cheap Drinks and Good Vibes at Bongo Lounge

Regular Bongo Lounge customers, Quiet Oaks band members knock back some brews.

With a name like Bongo Lounge, you know it’s gonna be a dive—but what kind? Is it the extra-filthy, nasty GG Allin home-away-from-home, where a dirty glass is an enchanted chalice and a mucky bathroom is a love nest? Or is it a cozy spot to hole up and slow down while reality races by outside? That’s Bongo, where you can feel at home without puttin’ on special clothes, and everybody knows your name (which might explain why it’s cash-only). There are plenty of regulars, but the clientele isn’t exclusive to a particular demographic. Hell, even ultra-classy, someday-famous local musicians like the cats from Quiet Oaks hang out here—and not just because they dwell in Bongo-adjacent housing. I mean, they used to live nearby, but they still show up often. “We started going there because it was easy, and we quickly fell in love with it,” drummer Spencer Sayer says. “The bar with the cool lights around it is just so vibey.” Indeed. The lights cause the entire place to take on a red cast, which makes it feel a bit mysterious and seedy, especially when you enter through the back door and pretend it’s your own secret speakeasy. Sayer says he and the band most enjoy the communal vibe, which is absent at some cliquish local dives; “It’s like everyone is there together.” This is true. And when everyone is your friend, it helps that Bongo is known for its cheap drinks. Set ’em up, barkeep! (Randy Harward) Bongo Lounge, 2965 S. Highland Drive, 801-466-1577

Enjoy the Best Patio in SLC INTRODUCING! ‘APPY HOUR!

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8.23 JOHN DAVIS 8.24 PROPER WAY 8.25 LAKE EFFECT

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565


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LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE (THURS) PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS

DIAMOND POOL TABLES LEAGUES AND TOURNAMENTS

DART SUPPLIES PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Tues & Fri: 3pm-1am Saturday: 11am-1am Sunday: 11am-9pm Closed Monday

S ON U W O FOLL TAGRAM INS

KLY

WEE C L S @

The Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash (Garage on Beck) Bill N Diane (Park Silly Sunday Market) Bone Pile (Park Silly Sunday Market) Diamond Head + Visigoth + Truce in Blood + Riddled With + Seventking (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 44 Eminence Ensemble (Quarry Village) Herbie Hancock (Red Butte Garden) Impurities + Man the Tank + Rue the Day + Dysfunction + Conflagration (The Loading Dock) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Mama J (Park Silly Sunday Market) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Pelican + Inter Arma + Gloe (Urban Lounge) Wyatt Pike (Park Silly Sunday Market)

Open Mic (The Cabin)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

WEDNESDAY 8/23

Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

MONDAY 8/21 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Lake Street Dive + Cuddle Magic (Red Butte Garden) The Alarm + New Shack (The State Room) see p. 40 Washed Out (The Depot) Year of the Cobra + Magda-Vega + Moon of Delirium (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub)

TUESDAY 8/22 LIVE MUSIC

2 Chainz + Young Dolph (The Depot) Bill N Diane (Piper Down Pub) Die Antwoord (The Great Saltair) see p. 44 Get Busy Living + Stories Through Storms + Rejoin the Team + Moonwave + Strawberry Tongue (The Loading Dock) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Pompeya + Strange Familia + Phat Jester (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU)

LIVE MUSIC

Benefit for Refugee Students feat. Magic Mint + Midway Iceland (Kilby Court) Cory Mon (Snowbird Resort) Depeche Mode + Warpaint (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 47 John Davis (Hog Wallow Pub) Khalid (The Complex) Kingdom of Giants + Afterlife + Currents + Kriminals + Artwork + I Am Haunted (The Loading Dock) Live Jazz (Club 90) The Long Run (Urban Lounge) Pig Eon (Twist) Tony Holiday (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Birdman (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

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© 2017

BELOW ZERO

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. “We ____ to please!” 2. NNW’s opposite

51. Ornate 52. Waikiki welcome 53. Spacey of “House of Cards” 55. Actress Sophia 58. Something frowned upon 60. Kans. neighbor 64. Petting ____ 65. Otolaryngology doc

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

3. Bill who hit a home run to end the 1960 World Series (Brr! This one features three 37-Down!) 4. Basics 5. Harvests 6. Never-before-seen 7. Instruments played at theaters during silent films (Brr! This one features five 37-Down!) 8. Where billions live 9. Man of La Mancha 10. “The Producers” actor (Brr! This one features six 37-Down!) 11. Cuban name in 2000 news 12. Top-flight 13. Likely to talk back 22. 1997 Nicolas Cage thriller 23. Islamic decree 24. TV’s “Let’s Make ____” 26. Harold’s love interest, in film 29. Music genre for Skid Row or Mötley Crüe (Brr! This one features two 37-Down!) 33. Far from klutzy 35. It’s debatable 37. Really, really cold 38. Publicist’s concern 39. Sexologist’s subject 47. New Balance competitor 49. Fundraising option

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Capital of Eritrea 7. “Do ____ Diddy Diddy” (1964 #1 hit) 10. Pieces of pizza? 14. Chilean author Allende 15. Military entertainment grp. 16. “____ and Basie!” (1963 jazz album) 17. Unlike tequila, it often comes with a worm in its bottle 18. Volcano feature 19. Muckraker Jacob who pushed for “model tenements” 20. Home of “Monday Night Football” 21. Attire for scientists 23. Distant 25. Final Four game 27. 2012 newsmaker 28. Flaps 30. Angkor ____ (Cambodian temple) 31. Brian who wrote “Heroes” with David Bowie 32. Inventor Nikola 34. Piece in the Middle East? 36. Equally large 40. Faced a new day 41. ____ Moines 42. Agenda makeup 43. “Are you calling me ____?” 44. Some TV drama locales, for short 45. Pass again at Daytona 46. Animal group suffix 48. Dickens’ “____ Mutual Friend” 50. Apple’s apple, e.g. 51. One might get past a bouncer 54. Bona fide 56. Freshly painted 57. Emulating Paul Revere 59. “Hey-y-y-y!” sayer of sitcomdom, with “the” 61. Porto-____ (capital of Benin) 62. ____ good deed 63. “Stop right there!” 66. In vogue 67. Beach Boys’ “Barbara ____” 68. James whose Twitter handle is @ KingJames 69. Jerk hard 70. “Hel-l-lp!” 71. Implant deeply

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “If you love someone, set them free,” New Age author Richard Bach said. “If they come back, they’re yours; if they don’t, they never were.” By using my well-educated intellect to transmute this hippy-dippy thought into practical advice, I came up with a wise strategy for you to consider as you re-evaluate your relationships with allies. Try this: Temporarily suspend any compulsion you might have to change or fix these people; do your best to like them and even love them exactly as they are. Ironically, granting them this freedom to be themselves might motivate them to modify, or at least tone down, the very behavior in themselves that you’re semi-allergic to.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In 43 cartoon stories, the coyote named Wile E. has tried to kill and devour the swift-running flightless bird known as the Road Runner. Every single time, Wile E. has failed to achieve his goal. It’s apparent to astute observers that his lack of success is partly due to the fact that he doesn’t rely on his natural predatory instincts. Instead, he concocts elaborate, overly complicated schemes. In one episode, he camouflages himself as a cactus, buys artificial lightning bolts and tries to shoot himself from a bow as if he were an arrow. All these plans end badly. The moral of the story, as far as you’re concerned: To reach your next goal, trust your instincts.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In 1892, workers began building the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York. But as of August 2017, it is still under construction. Renovation has been and continues to be extensive. At one point in its history, designers even changed its architectural style from Neo-Byzantine and Neo-Romanesque to Gothic Revival. I hope this serves as a pep talk in the coming weeks, which will be an excellent time to evaluate your own progress, Virgo. As you keep toiling away in behalf of your dreams, there’s no rush. In fact, my sense is that you’re proceeding at precisely the right rate.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You temporarily have cosmic permission to loiter and goof off and shirk your duties. To be a lazy bum and meander aimlessly and avoid tough decisions. To sing off-key and draw stick figures and write bad poems. To run slowly and flirt awkwardly and dress like a slob. Take advantage of this opportunity, because it’s only available for a limited time. It’s equivalent to pushing the reset button. It’s meant to re-establish your default settings. But don’t worry about that now. Simply enjoy the break in the action. ARIES (March 21-April 19) “To disobey in order to take action is the byword of all creative spirits,” philosopher Gaston Bachelard said. This mischievous advice is perfect for your use right now, Aries. I believe you’ll thrive through the practice of ingenious rebellion—never in service to your pride, but always to feed your soul’s lust for deeper, wilder life. Here’s more from Bachelard: “Autonomy comes through many small disobediences, at once clever, well thought-out, and patiently pursued, so subtle at times as to avoid punishment entirely.”

DRIVERS WANTED City Weekly is looking for a Driver for the Bountiful, Davis, and Utah County. Drivers must use their own vehicle, be available Wed. & Thur. Those interested please contact

Larry Carter: 801-575-7003

AUGUST 17, 2017 | 53

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) How many countries has the United States bombed since the end of World War II? Twenty-five, to be exact. But if America’s intention has been to prod these nations into forming more free and egalitarian governments, the efforts have been mostly fruitless. Few of the attacked nations have become substantially more democratic. I suggest you regard this as a valuable lesson to apply to your own life in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Metaphorical bombing campaigns wouldn’t accomplish even 10 percent of your goals, and would also be expensive in more ways than one. So I recommend using the “killing with kindness” approach. Be wily GEMINI (May 21-June 20) and generous. Cloak your coaxing in compassion. The coming days would an excellent time to celebrate (even brag about) the amusing idiosyncrasies and endearing quirks that SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You know about the 10 Commandments, a code of ethics and behav- make you lovable. To get you inspired, read this testimony from ior that’s central to Christianity and Judaism. You might not be famil- my triple Gemini friend Alyssa: “I have beauty marks that form iar with my 10 Suggestions, which begin with “Thou Shall Not Bore the constellation Pegasus on my belly. I own my own ant farm. God” and “Thou Shall Not Bore Thyself.” Then there are the 10 I’m a champion laugher. I teach sign language to squirrels. Late Indian Commandments proposed by the Bird Clan of East Central at night when I’m horny and overtired I might channel the spirit Alabama. They include “Give assistance and kindness whenever of a lion goddess named Sekhmet. I can whistle the national needed” and “Look after the well-being of your mind and body.” I anthems of eight different countries. I collect spoons from the bring these to your attention, Sagittarius, because now is an excellent future. I can play the piano with my nose and my toes. I have time to formally formulate and declare your own covenant with life. forever banished the green-eyed monster to my closet.” What are the essential principles that guide you to the highest good? CANCER (June 21-July 22) Your education might take unusual forms during the coming CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Here’s a definition of “fantasizing” as articulated by writer Jon weeks. For example, you could receive crunchy lessons from velCarroll. It’s “a sort of ‘in-brain’ television, where individuals vety sources, or tender instructions from exacting challenges. create their own ‘shows’—imaginary narratives that may or Your curiosity might expand to enormous proportions in the may not include real people.” As you Capricorns enter the High face of a noble and elegant tease. And chances are good that Fantasy Season, you might enjoy this amusing way of describing you’ll find a new teacher in an unlikely setting, or be prodded the activity that you should cultivate and intensify. Would you and tricked into asking crucial questions you’ve been neglecting consider cutting back on your consumption of movies and TV to ask. Even if you haven’t been particularly street smart up until shows? That might inspire you to devote more time and energy now, Cancerian, I bet your ability to learn from uncategorizable experiences will blossom. to watching the stories you can generate in your mind’s eye.

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Congratulations! I expect that during the next three weeks, you will be immune to what psychoanalyst Joan Chodorow calls “the void of sadness, the abyss of fear, the chaos of anger, and the alienation of contempt and shame.” I realize that what I just said might sound like an exaggeration. Aren’t all of us subject to regular encounters with those states? How could you possibly go so long without brushing up against them? I stand by my prediction, and push even further. For at least the next three weeks, I suspect you will also be available for an inordinate amount of what Chodorow calls “the light of focused insight” and “the playful, blissful, all-embracing experience of joy.”

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) In accordance with the astrological omens, I hereby declare the next two weeks to be your own personal Amnesty Holiday. To celebrate, ask for and dole out forgiveness. Purge and flush away any non-essential guilt and remorse that are festering inside you. If there truly are hurtful sins that you still haven’t atoned for, make a grand effort to atone for them—with gifts and heart-felt messages if necessary. At the same time, I urge you to identify accusations that others have wrongly projected onto you and that you have carried around as a burden even though they are not accurate or fair. Expunge them.


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The Solar Days of August I just sold a small commercial property in Millcreek that had a net-zero solar system that produced more electricity than the two buildings used each month. The solar panels were only noticeable from the sky or workers/residents of buildings more than three stories high in the near vicinity. To me, this is a far cry from the huge and bulky panels on homes and buildings I’ve sold in the past that had remnants of the original systems that came out in the ’80s. Those reminded me of the Volkswagen-Beetlesized satellite dishes that people used to have in their backyards—which have since shrunk to roughly the size of large serving plates. Many folks want solar panels these days to generate electricity and avoid depending on local companies like Rocky Mountain Power— not to mention a desire to help save our planet. Luckily, the installation prices have come way down. I worked on a new townhome development two years ago that had solar upgrades for $15,000 per unit, which this year have come down to $12,000. The installation cost is almost equal to the cost of the panels themselves. Competition has also grown tremendously, which helps bring prices down. You might have read in your local news feed about the kerfuffle between our power giant and local solar users and advocates. Basically, Rocky Mountain Power is recommending a three-part rate for residential net-metered customers, a method similar to the one used now by commercial customers with self-generation. Tacked onto a $15 fixed charge would be $9.02 per kilowatt for peak-period demand and 3.81 cents per kilowatt-hour for the amount of energy used. The power company conducted a study in 2016 that found a typical rooftop solar customer “underpays their actual cost of service by about $400 per year,” which they forecast will cost the company $78 million annually in lost revenue. Their website states there were 1,548 private solar customers here in 2012, and 17,230 in 2016. If you’re producing your own power, why do you care about the big corporation losing money? Because you do want to sell the excess power back to them, and RMP says on their website, “Net metered customers still rely on the grid 23.99 hours of each day.” State regulators will be holding hearings throughout the week to help work out a plan between public and private producers. I’m not lucky enough to live in a progressive building that wants to buy solar panels, but my company does purchase service from Rocky Mountain Power that is purchased from solar producers. Let’s work this out, people. We need solar energy to sustain our planet. n

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Inexplicable Odessa, Texas, resident Ernesto Baeza Acosta, 34, has legally changed his name to Ernesto Trump and declared himself the son of President Trump. His NSFW Facebook page features photographs of Ernesto wearing a Trump-like wig and asks viewers to “Please share this so that my dad, your president, can see this and spend time with me.” Ernesto is a fan of President Trump, but his immigrant mother is unamused about his name change.

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Mich., in the shooting death of her husband, Martin Duram, 46. The investigation of the 2015 shooting dragged on for a year before Martin’s first wife, who inherited the parrot, shared with a local TV station a videotape of Bud imitating two people having an argument, including the words “Don’t [expletive] shoot.” Three weeks later, Glenna Duram was arrested and charged with first-degree murder, and on July 19, she was found guilty.

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Bright Ideas Alana Nicole Donahue, 27, of Springfield, Ore., just wanted to entertain her children and nephew with a joy ride around the neighborhood. But on July 12, as she pulled the kids (ages 2, 4 and 8) behind her Ford Taurus in a plastic red wagon, she was arrested for reckless endangerment. Donahue told police she was just “showing the kids a good time.” However, horrified witnesses saw the car going about 30 mph as the wagon went up on two wheels going around a busy traffic circle at rush hour. Unclear on the Concept David Blackmon identified himself as a drug dealer when he called the Okaloosa, Fla., County Sheriff’s Office on July 16 to report that $50 in cash and a quarter-ounce of cocaine had been stolen from his car. When officers investigated, they found a baggie with “suspected cocaine,” a crack pipe and a crack rock in the car. Blackmon was charged with possession of cocaine and drug paraphernalia.

Least Competent Criminals The Pink Panther he ain’t. Police in Wayne County, N.C., are looking for a careless cat burglar who keeps waking people up as he robs them. At least one victim awakened by the slender white man in early July has seen him wearing a pink polka-dot beach towel around his head. Police aren’t sure if he’s actually gotten away with any loot.

The Animal Kingdom An African grey parrot named Bud might have been the key witness in convicting 49-year-old Glenna Duram of White Cloud,

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Government in Action Adi Astl, 73, took it upon himself to solve a safety problem in Tom Riley Park in the Etobicoke area of Toronto, Ontario. Accessing the park meant navigating a steep hill, and Astl felt it was dangerous. The city balked at building a staircase, citing a cost between $65,000 and $150,000. So Astl, a retired mechanic, built it himself, with the help of a homeless man— for $550. Responding to the resulting media storm, the city now plans to build a regulation staircase costing $10,000. “Bureaucrats, bureaucrats, bureaucrats,” Astl concluded. n Meanwhile, in British Columbia’s New Westminster, the city has constructed, at a cost of $200,000, an unfinished stairway to nowhere. The structure was originally intended to replace a required fire escape on a building, but was left incomplete and unattached to the building when concerns arose about wires overhead. “I thought it was an artwork, but I don’t think it makes that much sense,” passerby Lawrence Kong said.

New World Order Move over, Mace. Women in China are buying “anti-pervert flamethrowers” that can be carried discreetly in a handbag and launch a scorching rebuff up to 50 centimeters (about 20 inches) when needed. Chinese police have warned that the devices are illegal, but one vendor called them a “legal, non-lethal tool.” n Also in China, the Global Harbour mall in Shanghai has introduced husband storage facilities for bored men who have accompanied their wives shopping. The glass pods include a chair, monitor, computer and game pad where parked husbands can play vintage video games while their wives shop. Reaction from pod dwellers has been mixed, with one man saying the lack of ventilation left him “drenched in sweat.”

Law and Order About a week after police in Minneapolis killed unarmed Justine Ruszczyk after she called to report an assault, orange signs began popping up on streetside poles depicting a jumping police officer with a gun in each hand and the warning, “Twin Cities Police Officers Easily Startled.” Minneapolis police department spokeswoman Sgt. Catherine Michal said on July 24 that public works employees were removing the signs, which were made of metal and resembled traffic signs. People Different From Us Barbara Rogers, 42, of Coolbaugh Township, Pa., said she was just following directions when she shot her boyfriend, Steven Mineo, 32, in the forehead on July 15. Rogers said Mineo asked her to kill him because he thought a cult they belonged to was led by a reptilian pretending to be a human. Rogers called 911 to report the shooting, after which she was charged with criminal homicide. Send your weird news items to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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n Three heads are apparently not better than one, as three China Grove, N.C., masterminds demonstrated on July 12. Rex Allen Farmer, his son Rex Carlo Farmer and the younger man’s girlfriend, Kayla Nicole Price, cooked up a scheme to rob the Mooresville gas station where the elder Farmer worked. Surveillance video showed Carlo, disguised in a woman’s dress and wig, emptying the cash register as his father, the clerk on duty, stood by. Carlo then ran outside and removed the dress and wig, setting them on fire next to the building. However, the fire spread to a meter on the building and a privacy fence, thus summoning authorities. Police soon caught up to all three and arrested them.

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Technology Run Amok A security robot named Steve suffered a soggy fatal error on July 17 when it tumbled down several steps and into a fountain in Washington, D.C. New to the job, the robot had been patrolling the Washington Harbour area of Georgetown, mapping out its features in an effort to prevent just such an accident. “He looked so happy and healthy,” an area mourner tweeted after the incident. Another observer was less sympathetic. “Robots: 0; humans: 1,” he tweeted.

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Compelling Explanations Everett Lee Compton Jr., 49, told Siloam Springs, Ark., police that marijuana “makes him do sick things” after they apprehended him for abusing female donkeys. The donkeys’ owners, Emert and Joyce Whitaker, had set up a surveillance camera and recorded Compton on three occasions putting a bag over a donkey’s head and placing his pelvis against its rear end. “It just made me sick to my stomach,” Joyce Whitaker said, “to know that she couldn’t tell nobody and that she was having to go through this.”

Anger Management Two AT&T utility workers apparently didn’t work fast enough on lines outside the home of Jorge Jove, 64, of Hialeah, Fla., on July 19. After confronting the workers, Jove went back into his house, came out carrying a gun and began shooting at the AT&T trucks, deflating the tires. Jove reloaded twice and shot at the trucks’ engines before aiming at Gilberto Ramos, a service worker who was up on a utility pole. Jove was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon.

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Poets Corner

A FACT

You still haven’t seen, half as much, of this century, as you did, of the last. I wish you the joy, the strength and the song, to change that. Live well. Live long. Happy birthday, Dad!

Love Shannon

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Dancing with Spirits