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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY MMM ... BEER!

It’s the most wonderful time of the year; the Utah Beer Festival is here! Cover illustration by Robin Banks robinbanks.bigcartel.com

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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 14 A&E 20 CINEMA 23 BOU BALLOT 49 TRUE TV 50 DINE 56 MUSIC 69 COMMUNITY

MIKE RIEDEL

All over this issue Given this week’s theme, it’s no surprise our resident beer guru gets the spotlight. His favorite thing about craft beer? “There are no limits to what you can create. That being said, the trend on using field vegetables like cucumber, beets and yams really gets me scratching my head.”

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THEATER

We’d like to share with you the most amazing play. facebook.com/slcweekly

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

MORE BEER

Check out cityweekly.net’s archives for past beer issues.

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Pay us a visit to swap your Utah Beer Festival ticket for a wristband so you can enter through the Fast Lane. Swaps available Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at City Weekly HQ (248 S. Main) until Friday, Aug. 18. You can also join us at Epic Brewing on Wednesday, Aug. 16, from 4-7 p.m., to swap out your ticket and get a free Epic pint glass. Details at utahbeerfestival.com.


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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, July 27, “Monumental Disaster”

I have heard Sean’s beard smells of freedom and eagle talon.

illegal comedians needed work.

Via cityweekly.net

Give them shelter?

KOLBY KAY

Why is the Antiquities Act not the “best mechanism for protecting the antiquities”? The Wilderness Act would do the job, too, if our politicians were not opposed to wilderness designations. The national monument designation could result in better management of the Bears Ears area and its irreplaceable prehistoric sites.

The Straight Dope, July 27, “How have most human beings died throughout history?”

I am going with my first guess of diarrhea. With a smaller population and less urbanization, I don’t think that viral illness that lead lower respiratory illness would be as prevalent.

RICHARD WARNICK Via cityweekly.net

BECKY ROBB Via Facebook

Our legislators suck. Can’t see the forest for the trees—big mistake. We want to go down in history as the last holdout for coal on the planet and some of the most unbreathable air in our country. They hold their heads high and we keep electing them.

Great journalism!

TIM GLASS

Via cityweekly.net

A&E, July 27, “Fringe Kiss”

Thanks, City Weekly, for supporting local art in SLC.

JANET VIGIL

@SACKERSONCO

Via Facebook Love the photo of the (smiling) Governor Herbert—LOL! So much shame.

JIM WHEELER Via Facebook

News, July 27, “The Diversity Issue”

Well, maybe we should quit having elections and have a diversity czar. WTF.

@JTHURM2

The Ocho, July 27, “Eight critical analyses of Utah’s 3rd Congressional District candidates running to replace Jason Chaffetz”

My beard and I have an arrangement. I will break the machine and save America, and the beard will tame itself. It’s a harmonious and beautiful agreement.

SEAN WHALEN

Via Twitter

Free Will Astrology, July 27, “Panache and Ingenuity” Where is the “lame” button?

NIKA JONES Via Facebook

New material

I think Mr. Trump is totally justified convening the Presidential Advisory Commission on election integrity; six million

Via cityweekly.net

Via Twitter

@SACKERSONCO Via Twitter

I’m here in Salt Lake City for the BMW Rally at the fairgrounds. In the course of looking for Caputo’s Market, I ran across the “streets of Calcutta”-like scene around The Road Home. I looked up Stephen Dark’s excellent article “Shelter War” [cover story, June 29] to read about it. We don’t have a zoo-like scene in Colorado Springs where I live, but there is an ongoing discussion about helping the homeless. I can’t help but notice, both here in Salt Lake and in my hometown, there is a total absence of talking about helping vs. enabling. Other than a couple of [consultant] Robert Marbut’s comments, there seems to be the same lack of looking at what enabling does to promote a problem you are trying to minimize. Things like a very small work requirement before availing oneself of the community’s largesse, talking to a case manager to receive the handouts, and attaching consequences to bad behavior (à la Mr. Marbut). We won’t leave you out in the cold but you will sleep on cement if you present drunk. When you start behaving like a healthy family does toward its errant adult children and cut out the enabling, you might discover that there are fewer of those folks than you have now. Of course, by now you have a large cadre of CEOs, vice-presidents, directors and supervisors—all pulling in decent salaries in homeless dollars. Think there might be somewhat of an investment in the status quo? Does the CEO of The Road Home really pull in $108,000 a year? Good luck, SLC!

MATTHEW PARKHOUSE, Colorado Springs, Colo.

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns REX MAGANA, JULIA VILLAR Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, RYAN BRADFORD, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, DARBY DOYLE, JORDAN FLOYD, BILL FROST, SPENCER HOLT, MARYANN JOHANSON, MIKE RIEDEL, TED SCHEFFLER, ERIC D. SNIDER, BRIAN STAKER, JEFF TERICH, LEE ZIMMERMAN

Production

Business/Office

Circulation

Marketing

Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Circulation Manager LARRY CARTER

Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS

Marketing & Events Coordinator SAMANTHA SMITH Street Team ALEXANDRO ALVAREZKINNY, BEN BALDRIDGE, AARON ERSHLER, JAZMIN GALLEGOS, ANNA KASER, ADAM LANE, AMELIA PAHL, SYDNEY PHILLIPS, XANDER PRISKOS, LAUREN TAGGE, STEVEN VARGO

Sales

Director of Advertising, Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF

Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives LISA DORELLI, PAULINA JEDLICA KNUDSON, ALEX MARKHAM, JEREMIAH SMITH Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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AUGUST 10, 2017 | 5


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PRIVATE EY Beer Kissery

When I was young , kids raced cars, cruised State Street, hung out at burger joints and played kissy face when no one was looking. It was Happy Days every weekend and most nights in between. Our burger joint was the Arctic Circle where a ranch burger, fries and a Coke cost only 45 cents. Most of us couldn’t afford it. Our kissy-facing often took place at the Ute or Redwood drive-in theaters where, often as not, we’d sneak another couple in via our car trunk, and the hanky panky would commence as soon as the cartoons ended. Let’s just say, as far as I know, The Reivers and Play Misty for Me have alternate endings. Just as often we’d kissy-face on the dry farms that filled the valley before subdivisions did. The South Jordan LDS temple does indeed look down upon hallowed ground. For the kids who weren’t afraid of the dark, there was always Butterfield Canyon to go smooch in. Even all these years later, with all the new people moving into the south and west parts of the valley, the canyon remains unknown to most Salt Lake County residents. It’s really pretty with a little brook, lots of places to picnic (or hide) and if you keep driving, you’ll end up on the other side of the Oquirrh Mountains in Tooele. At the crest, you can drive even higher to the top of Sunshine Peak. Now, there’s a view to beat all. When we weren’t in Butterfield Canyon making out, we were just as likely to be up there for a kegger. Everyone knew where to find the well-known bars in town that sold kegs togo and they were equally well-known for selling to minors. A couple of our friends became quite skilled at “tapping” the keg, and were called upon to do so because they could avoid it foaming up and not wasting too much beer. They also often bought the keg themselves. That meant they stood to profit

B Y J O H N S A LTA S @johnsaltas

from the kegger since everyone had to chip in to partake. Making a profit from beer—now there’s a novel idea that harkens back to, well, forever. Salt Lake City’s first breweries date back to 1850 and the suds have flowed ever since, with some of Utah’s hallmark pioneer families full-frontal in the beer business. They even built some notoriety over a Mormon-produced brew called Valley Tan, enjoyed by Mark Twain himself. Breweries dotted the landscape, often in mining or railroad camps, and Provo even had its own brewery. Yeah, Provo. It was about 150 years after the good folks in Utah County began imbibing that I bought my first keg. That was in 2010 when City Weekly held its first-ever Utah Beer Festival in Washington Square and we bought lots and lots of them. The event was a hit, so we did it again. Then again. This year marks our eighth annual fest. What began as a celebration in support of the blossoming craft beer industry and Local First Utah, has grown into a major beer event, one of the largest in the West. After iterations at Washington Square, Library Square and Gallivan Plaza, we moved it to the Utah State Fairpark last year. Upping the ante, this year’s event will be a two-day affair—from Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 19-20. As with nearly all beer festivals, ours carries a benefactor component. Over the years, the festival has raised more than $75,000 for local charities, including Local First, Best Friends Animal Society and our current partner, the Humane Society of Utah. So, not only is this a chance to sample some of the 200-plus beers on site, but it’s also a giving opportunity. The Humane Society helps us recruit the nearly 600 volunteers needed to run such an event, plus they bring a number of animals to the fairpark for adoption. The past two years, all of

them have found new homes. It’s a great partnership. To be sure, the festival has become a revenue source for City Weekly as well. It didn’t begin that way, but our industry has changed. News organizations everywhere are deepdiving into new avenues to find and replace the revenue that has been lost to the digital and internet age. It’s a damned irony, but it’s true that we now sell beer so our reporters can produce the award-winning stories we’ve all grown accustomed to. No beer festival would mean less funding for our paper. Oh, we might be here, just not doing news. Our industry is changing—we’re print, we’re online, we’re mobile, we’re digital; we’re everywhere and ads alone don’t cut it. Readers must change as well, because we’re all learning the hard way that journalism is not a business model—supporting it is. Readers must accept that their favorite journals and authors may go away, and those who appreciate the truth, investigative news and alternate viewpoints, who appreciate that City Weekly has always fought for the little guy, must step up to the plate (as at pressbackers.com). This year, the Utah Beer Festival falls under the umbrella of the newly minted Galena Fund, a 501(c)3 with the mission of supporting not only local charities with fundraising events, but also to raise funds to financially support local journalism. If journalism matters to you, have a beer with us to help make sure it thrives. If you don’t drink beer, you can still contribute and say you did it for the animals. And if you see me, just ask for a kiss. It’s a long way from Butterfield Canyon, but I think I still remember how. It’s just City Weekly saying thank you. Kiss you there. CW

MAKING A PROFIT FROM BEER—NOW THERE’S A NOVEL IDEA THAT HARKENS BACK TO, WELL, FOREVER.

Send feedback to: comments@cityweekly.net


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AUGUST 10, 2017 | 7


BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Hot Air

It’s summer and the livin’ is easy. But avoid going outdoors and, oh, try not to drive so much. That’s Salt Lake City’s airquality report in a nutshell. It’s not January, so there are no choking inversions, but summer is ozone time, when, as The Salt Lake Tribune’s Emma Penrod reported, the sun is to blame. Sort of. It beats down on the chemicals from auto emissions and “other forms of combustion,” and voilà—you get ozone. It’s unhealthy, especially for older people. And yet the continual harping on individuals to do the right thing hasn’t worked. The EPA suggests avoiding excessive idling, and the Legislature has refused to address the issue. The American Lung Association wants government to revise the ozone air quality standard—but that, too, requires taking a stand. There’s more pollution than political will.

Mind the Gap

You’ve got to love the way the world runs on “belief” instead of fact—like the gender wage gap. Statewide polls from The Salt Lake Tribune showed that 67 percent of men generally don’t believe women are paid less, and 56 percent of women do. According to recent research by Susan Madsen, a business professor at Utah Valley University, Utah women are paid about 71 cents on the dollar compared to men. The national average is 80 cents. And the Economic Policy Institute reported that black women have an even tougher time at 67 cents on the dollar. Part of the gap comes from different types of work, but also from expectations of women themselves. Perhaps when everyone believes in equal pay for the same work, we’ll get it.

A for Effort

Clearly, Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams wasn’t in it for a good time. For three days and two nights, he posed as a homeless person on the streets and at The Road Home shelter in March. He came clean with The Salt Lake Tribune and Deseret News last week, saying he was on a fact-finding mission. He—like the city mayor and council—face increasing public backlash on relocating the downtown shelter. McAdams particularly faced the political fire—but not because the need isn’t known. Now he knows first-hand how bad the situation is. How to impart that to the greater constituency is the issue. The two articles made clear the problems of drugs, mental health, physical stress and a lack of resources. It’s crucial to make those known to the public— and not through closed-door processes. Without understanding, assurances of safety and personal buy-in, the effort is destined to create more public anger.

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

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HITS&MISSES

Want to talk beer? Just belly up to the bar at downtown Salt Lake City’s Beerhive Pub, and chat with affable owner Del Vance. The aficionado and expert has even written a 356-page book about Utah’s long and rich history with suds: Beer in the Beehive—a History of Brewing in Utah (Dream Garden Press). In its beer heyday, the state was home to no less than 15 breweries, Vance says. After all, something had to quench the thirst of early-day moiling miners … and it wasn’t Diet Pepsi.

Pioneers entered the valley in 1847. When did beer?

Beer arrived with the Mormons. The pioneers bootlegged beer on their way to Utah, picking it up in the states along the way. Kind of like today!

Was SLC ever a “Little Milwaukee”?

Salt Lake City never achieved Milwaukee status. However, it was one of the largest producers of beer in the Mountain West.

What was the LDS church’s initial attitude toward suds?

The Mormon church was fairly liberal when it came to beer consumption in the new territory. Brigham Young understood that to fund his new oasis in the desert, he’d need a steady flow of tax money—most of which could come from alcohol.

When did the state become involved in regulating beer sales?

The state took over total control of alcohol sales after Prohibition. The 21st Amendment gave all states the right to regulate alcohol as they pleased. Utah really took this opportunity to the extreme.

What’s the origin of 3.2 beer?

A big misconception about alcohol is the way it’s measured. 3.2 beer is measured by weight. The world standard, including the U.S., is to measure by volume, which makes Utah beer 4 percent. This low-alcohol beer came about at the end of Prohibition. At first, it was a federal requirement for all states.

Any predictions about the future of brewing in Utah?

The future for local, Utah beer is bright. Over 90 percent of the beer sold in the state still is brewed by the big commercial brewers, so there’s plenty of room for craft-beer growth. The key is getting beer drinkers to appreciate the local brewers—and the exciting taste of freshly brewed beer.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


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AUGUST 10, 2017 | 9


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10 | AUGUST 10, 2017

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Star SEALs Why are Navy SEALs currently the “it” special forces? Why was SEAL Team 6 called upon to assault the bin Laden house, and not another SEAL team, or the Rangers or Green Berets? —David Well, if there’s some quarter in which SEAL Team 6 isn’t perceived as the “it” special-ops team, it’s not for lack of trying on their part. I draw your attention to a 2011 Washington Post piece in which an anonymous member of ST6 describes his cadre as follows: “We’re the dark matter. We’re the force that orders the universe but can’t been seen.” Nothing alarming about that, of course, nor the fact that our faceless frogman is characterized in that article only as “strapping.” Whatever aura currently surrounds the SEALs, I’d suggest, can be traced to the kind of identity cultivation on display here, this macho-mystique thing that American audiences love reading about and reporters seem to love perpetuating. And for a group of closed-mouthed toughs, ST6 members can display an impressive capacity for self-promotion. One former SEAL who wrote a book about the bin Laden raid, for instance, wound up having to forfeit $6.8 million in royalties and appearance fees because he forgot to ask his supervisors for prepublication approval. The story the WaPo was reporting, meanwhile, is the bigger deal here: how specialoperations forces like the SEALs are increasingly relied on to fight America’s wars. In places like Iraq and Afghanistan, what we’re up against aren’t traditional armies but extremist ideologies, represented by decentralized bands of non-state actors who aren’t exactly wild about the Geneva Agreements. A lot of the work special-ops teams do is kept under wraps, not least because of their own potentially tricky relationship to Geneva; The New York Times called ST6 “one of the nation’s most mythologized, most secretive and least scrutinized military organizations.” Though Team 6 might get the marquee coverage, there are in fact, as you suggest, a bunch of special-ops forces in the field today, from all branches of the military—the Army’s Special Forces regiment, aka the Green Berets, helped Afghans topple the Taliban, for instance. Special-ops forces gained a foothold in the U.S. military in the mid-20th century, as leaders realized that increasingly unconventional wars—think Korea and Vietnam—would require unconventional techniques, not standard armies-on-abattlefield stuff. The Berets were organized in 1952; the SEALs—named and trained for effectiveness on sea, air and land—were established in ’62. Special-ops assignments fall into two main categories: direct action, including behind-the-lines combat, manhunts, hostage rescues, etc.; and indirect action, which covers (e.g.) coaching foreign forces on fighting their own wars. Through the ’70s, the various units carrying out these assignments constituted a sort of loosely organized mosaic, each accountable to its own chain of command.

Two events help explain what’s changed since then. First was the failed attempt to rescue the U.S. embassy hostages in Tehran during the Carter administration—for the military, an unthinkable black eye. Its response was to gather all the special forces under one operational umbrella, the U.S. Special Operations Command, or SOCOM, to better coordinate complex jobs like the one bollixed in the Iranian desert. And under that umbrella you’ll find the Joint Special Operations Command, or JSOC— these guys love their acronyms—which includes elite groups like SEAL Team 6, its Army counterpart Delta Force, and the Air Force’s 24th Special Tactics Squadron. The second event was 9/11, and the military’s reorientation toward terrorism that followed. The budget for special-ops forces has quintupled since 2001, and the troop count at JSOC’s disposal has ballooned from around 1,800 to more than 25,000. As we got into Afghanistan, Donald Rumsfeld basically gave JSOC a carte blanche, pre-approving them for a laundry list of operations in 15 countries. Barack Obama relied heavily on special forces; like drone assassinations, they jibed with his preference for keeping military action small and containable (and free from meaningful oversight, not to mention legally questionable and morally troublesome). However, the intellectual seeds of this shift were planted back in the Clinton administration. At some point following the U.S. embassy bombings of 1998 the president was heard (as later documented by the 9/11 Commission) to speculate, “You know, it would scare the shit out of al-Qaeda if suddenly a bunch of black ninjas rappelled out of helicopters into the middle of their camp.” Cue the SEALs. Created after the 1980 hostage debacle, Team 6 wasn’t the sixth SEAL outfit to suit up, just the third; the nickname was chosen to psych the Soviets into thinking we had more specialized forces than we really did. The team was conceived as an agile, fast-moving counterterrorism unit— ninjas who rappelled out of helicopters, basically—and with the war on terror, their moment had clearly arrived. That moment hasn’t been without some complication; various news accounts have raised alarm over alleged extrajudicial killings, unaccountability, abuse of authority, etc. But the omelette-egg ratio, apparently, is one the U.S. government can live with. n Send questions via straightdope.com or write c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

7. Transf*****s: D*** Side of the Moon

6. Sausage P****

3. Mad Max: F*** Road

(801)

935-4605

HOW THE WEST WAS GROWN

The west side of Salt Lake City has a vibrant and storied history, but it just doesn’t get a lot of respect. The Westside Forward! Festival rolls out the city’s development plan for the Glendale and Poplar Grove neighborhoods amid food and festivities. These are some of Salt Lake City’s most extraordinary neighborhoods, but they have been stunted by narrow-minded perceptions and, of course, a lack of funding for enhancements. Don’t miss the opening ceremony for the 9-Line Bike Park, which the community calls a one-of-a-kind destination on the west side of town. Riders of all ability levels can test their skills on a pump track or try new dirt jumps. Local food truck fare is available along with music, bicycle drawings and a host of city services. 905 S. 700 West, 801-535-7907, Saturday, Aug. 12, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., free, bit.ly/2upGsIz

SIERRA CLUB JAMBOREE

Imagine a weekend in the High Uinta wilderness, working side-by-side with U.S. Forest Service personnel and learning about the real state of public lands first-hand. The second annual Utah Sierra Club Jamboree promises a weekend “to explore, enjoy and learn to protect Utah.” You can choose from presentations on environmental justice, the state’s national monuments defense or the history of grazing in Southern Utah. Choose your own adventure or art project, like making posters for the #KeepItPublic campaign. Sleep in a cabin or under the stars. YMCA Camp Roger, Soapstone Basin off Mirror Lake Highway, 801467-9294, Ext. 101, starts Friday, Aug. 18, 3 p.m.; ends Sunday, Aug. 20, 12:30 p.m., adults, $35; children, $20, utah.sierraclub.org

—KATHARINE BIELE

Justice

1. S***** and Soldiers

605 n 300 w, slc •

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

AUGUST 10, 2017 | 11

2. Batman v. Superman: D*** of

If you want to meet other like-minded women—you know, ones who are sick and tired of living like second-class citizens—then you should head out to network with the Ladies Who Empower Social Club. The kickoff party, Raise Your Vibration Meet-and-Greet, is all about empowering, embracing, loving and enjoying the company of other females. They’re inviting you to join the movement. New Pathways Wellness Center, 435 W. 400 South, 801-4147592, Friday, Aug. 11, 7-9 p.m., free, bit.ly/2wcA AEy

new hours • fri-mon 10am-6pm

saturdaycycles.com

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4. Fifty S****** of Grey

MEET-AND-GREET FOR WOMEN

5. The Purge: E******* Year

CHANGE THE WORLD

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8. Paul Blart: Mall C**

In a week, you can

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Eight most popular movies currently available through VidAngel:

CITIZEN REVOLT


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NEWS

ENVIRONMENT

Wild Things With habitats shrinking, local wildlife call urban areas home. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

DW HARRIS

Z

uni, who had lived at my parents’ home since she was a kitten, was murdered by a raccoon several years ago. That’s what the clues suggest, anyhow. My mom told me that the culprit had left a bloody paw print resembling a raccoon’s next to Zuni’s mangled corpse. I spied a raccoon while I was living at home. I believe it is the same one. Growing up in Spring Lake—a tiny farming community snuggling the mountain between Payson and Santaquin in Utah County—I learned the buffer that divides wildlife from civilization is thin. Once, a cat (maybe Zuni, though with six felines it’s difficult to remember for sure) held a bleating weasel in its maw until my dad cornered the pet and, with a gloved hand, wrested the rodent free and then released it into the tall, yellowing grasses behind our home. On another night, up too late, I looked out the large front room window and saw a furry creature scavenging for cat food on the long wooden porch. It was a coon. He looked back at me with his coal-dark eyes, then sniffed around for some morsels. Smart enough to know that the solid pane separating us was security enough, he didn’t concern himself with the human on the other side. He, I suspect now, killed Zuni. In spite of the family cat’s fate, it’s hard not to marvel at wild animals—to appreciate their hard-wired instincts and nimble adaptability. When a creature trespasses our roads and barns and fences, it’s because those structures encroached on their natural habitat. After all, Spring Lake once belonged to the raccoons, owls, mule deer, rabbits and toads. The intersection of human and animal is an inevitable tango in rural America, perhaps. But this mingling of species occurs in Utah’s capital city, as well, where wildlife hides in our parks and on our perches, rummaging in garbage bins or slinking down from the untrammeled foothills looking for food. Or, perhaps, to find a new home, as likely was the case when a mountain lion prowled through a Salt Lake City neighborhood early in the morning on Aug. 1. Around the age of 2, male cougars leave their mothers and seek out independent territory, says Riley Peck,

A red fox (Vulpes vulpes) rests peacefully among the gravestones at Salt Lake City Cemetery. wildlife program manager for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources. “It’s not uncommon for them to end up in a location that is not ideal,” he adds. This mountain lion had come within 6 feet of a city police officer before two bullets stopped it in its tracks, according to reports. Peck doubts the cougar was charging the police (“It’s unlikely at any age,” he says), but instead suspects it was trying to find a seam through which to escape. But he doesn’t fault the cops for erring on the side of safety. Most animals move to the city from the foothills in a less dramatic fashion. As I was strolling through an Avenues cemetery one evening in May, an animal trotted across my path between oblong headstones. It was a red fox. I stopped and stared, and the fox stared back—fixed, cautious, it appeared, and not anxious to flee. She’s got a baby, I thought. The next evening, I encountered a fox again. This time, her silhouette growled down at me from a small ridge. Her kit was near, around a bend. I watched it scamper away a few paces later. Mark Smith, Salt Lake City Cemetery sexton, says the critters have roamed the cemetery off and on since he started work there in 1999. “This year, we’ve got a number of foxes running around,” he says, adding, “The deer are in here. During the winter, they’re here more, but recently, these last few weeks, we’ve had a mother and a couple of fawns. We haven’t had a moose in a couple of years, but on occasion, we’ve had moose.” Coyote have been known to frequent the cemetery, as well. When they do,

Smith notes, the foxes vanish. Probably, he says, because they compete for the same food, and the larger coyotes bully them away. Foxes dine on squirrels, chipmunks, mice and other small rodents and birds, which the cemetery has in spades. Peck says they refrain from preying on cats or dogs, but qualified his statement with a caveat: “Wildlife are unpredictable, so to say they would never, ever take a domestic animal would be misspeaking.” In a term biologists use, wildlife seek out “niche habitat,” Peck explains, which is to say, a spot where all their needs are met: food, water, shelter, space and a sense of security. “The cemetery provides all of that,” he says. It allows the wildlife their autonomy. Smith says the wild fauna are welcomed by staff and visitors alike, and it’s easy to see why the animals find solace among the dead. “We’re open space,” he says. “We’re 150 acres of green, open space—of undeveloped space that they can come and basically settle in.” Smith and Peck aren’t worried that greater exposure will lead to an influx of eager wildlife viewers, who could disturb the canines. “Nobody could hunt them or trap them in that area,” Pack says. “And people know they’re there.” It turns out, something else might be more deleterious than hordes of gawkers, anyway. Recently, a friend and I laid out a blanket on a grassy patch to monitor the vixen. Before long, a dark-pelted animal crested up through a grove of trees less than 15 feet away.

A raccoon, I instantly but incorrectly thought. Low to the ground, the animal waddled leisurely away and then descended a dirt slope. It was a badger. With its big claws, it dug methodically into the ground and then backed down into the cavern it had just created. My friend saw a second badger moments later. There were no foxes that evening. I wondered whether the badgers had scared them off. In 2015, videographer Judy Lehmberg uploaded to YouTube footage shot in Yellowstone National Park of a clash between a badger and two adult foxes with a couple young kits. On film, the foxes’ den is ransacked by a hostile badger. Try as she might, the mother wasn’t able to keep the badger at bay while her mate was out hunting—and the intruder killed the pair of adolescent foxes. Lehmberg says via email, however, that in more than 40 years of observing wildlife, this was the only time she’d witnessed a badger kill foxes. Smith wasn’t aware of the badgers in his cemetery, but he doesn’t expect their presence spells doom for the foxes. And Peck says foxes and badgers are often observed sharing the same ecosystem. “They’re a part of the cemetery, and I hope they stay a part of the cemetery,” Smith says. The day after facing a badger, I made one more trip to the cemetery, walking up and down the old roads before stopping to rest. There, in an open grassy plot, a fox lay down 100 feet away. For five minutes, he sat content in the sun before skittering away past a bicyclist. CW


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Audiences who associate the idea of ballet with classical music face a challenge to their expectations in Salt Lake City’s Municipal Ballet Co. Their previous productions have included a spin on The Nutcracker accompanied by Pixie and the Partygrass Boys, and Metatransit in collaboration with Conquer Monster. For company founder Sarah Longoria, such team-ups with Utah bands are part of the unique identity Municipal Ballet is carving out for itself. “By collaborating with local musicians, I believe we’re able to make something that’s truly by and for the people of Salt Lake City,” Longoria says via email. “Using different genres of music, composed and played by locals, allows us to present ballet that is of our time and place, even though it is a centuries-old art form.” The company’s new production, Wilder, continues that notion with a world-premiere work set to the music of “pianobike” player Eric Rich (pictured) and bassist Parker Childs. Continuing another Municipal Ballet tradition—playing in nontraditional venues—the performances are in the picturesque outdoor locations of Storm Mountain Amphitheater and the Jordan River Trail, with 50 percent of donations taken at the free shows going to Save our Canyons and the Utah Rivers Council. Though Longoria is reluctant to discuss too much what she believes the choreography indicates, “I’ll probably put this quote by Walt Whitman on our programs: ‘These immense meadows—these interminable rivers—you are immense and interminable as they’ … It’s just an appreciation for our open lands, and that we are a part of them.” (Scott Renshaw) Municipal Ballet Co.: Wilder @ Storm Mountain Amphitheater, Big Cottonwood Canyon, Aug. 11, 7 p.m.; Bend in the River, Jordan River Trail, Aug. 12, 7 p.m., free, donations accepted, municipalballet.com

If it’s the second weekend in August, it must be time for Salt Lakers to get crafty. In its ninth year, the Craft Lake City DIY Festival runs the gamut from vendors of vintage items to DIY engineers creating sometimes quite futuristic devices. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) has become the buzzword in education, and the Google Fiber STEM Building houses examples of just about everything you could imagine under that roof, from robots to video games to recycling. New wrinkles at this year’s fest include workshops sponsored by home goods store West Elm on DIY décor, including brush lettering, gold leafing and macramé. Demonstrations include chainsaw carving, and a lesson from Skyler Chubak on chalkboard calligraphy. On Saturday from noon-4 p.m., Kid Row showcases a mini maker’s market for children under 14. The kids area is space-themed this year, and the parenting lounge is a new space for those tending to infants, young children or children with special needs. Live performers on two stages evidence the musical expertise of the event’s sister organization, SLUG Magazine, and its history of supporting the local music scene. DIY was originally a big part of the punk-rock scene, so it makes sense that the festival spun out of the publication. DIY—and Craft Lake City itself—have grown far beyond that, and with the wide range of people united by their passion for making things, the festival has become a celebration of local community. (Brian Staker) Craft Lake City DIY Festival @ Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Aug. 11, 5-10 p.m.; Aug. 12, noon-10 p.m.; Aug. 13, noon-7 p.m., $5, craftlakecity.com

Debra Hurst, director of the Salt Lake City Pagan Pride Festival, knows what you probably think when you hear the word “pagan”—and that’s a huge part of why she thinks the festival is important. “We get a lot of people who think we’re devil-worshippers or we do things in the nude,” Hurst says. “I just kind of have to laugh at that. We’re kind, loving, everyday people.” Educating the community is a huge part of this event’s mission, even as it provides a gathering opportunity for those who have already embraced a pagan identity—a term which can incorporate a wide range of earth- or nature-centered spiritualities. Having outgrown its original Murray Park home and moved to Liberty Park last year, Pagan Pride features vendors, workshops, rituals and demonstrations, representing that wide spectrum of practices that can fall under the umbrella of paganism. That includes ways to inform the curious, like the 1 p.m. discussion “What is a pagan anyways?” presentation. For those who might be questioning their spiritual direction, it’s a chance to explore a new path. Hurst herself identifies with that journey. Raised in the LDS church, she remembers having many questions about religion before exploring pagan beliefs. “When I found this community, it opened not just a door, but the whole shebang,” she says. “It was a struggle in the beginning, as far as people accepting me. You hear, ‘Why would you want to do that?’ My answer is, ‘Don’t you want to know more? Don’t you want to understand everything around you?’ Those who don’t understand that are the ones still in the closet.” (SR) Pagan Pride Festival @ Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, Aug. 12, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., free, saltlakecitypaganpride.org

Trying to establish a career in the male-dominated world of stand-up comedy isn’t easy for any woman. It might be even harder when the stage persona you adopt is aggressive, abrasive and potentially offensive—an identity you can tell Lampanelli doesn’t shy away from, when the domain name for her official website is insultcomic.com. That includes her take on playing in a red state like Utah, as she says via email: “Since most conservatives are secretly repressed homosexuals, they end up loving my show. Just kidding, kind of. Seriously, I find that all audiences in my shows are alike in the fact that they can take a joke, they don’t take themselves seriously and they like a good belly laugh. And that’s all I need from them. Other than that, they can shut their freaking mouths.” Lampanelli has given audiences plenty to belly-laugh about in a 20-plus-year career that has seen her become a fixture on the stand-up circuit, plying her unique talent for barbs on televised celebrity roasts and even creating the play Stuffed, a semi-autobiographical take on food and body image. She even did a season of Celebrity Apprentice, which gives her at least one personal insight into our current president. “I learned that I am not the president’s type,” Lampanelli says. “I am deeply offended that he did not hit on me once during my entire time on Celebrity Apprentice. And back then, I had enormous boobs. Oh, well—his loss! I hope he’s very happy with his current wife, Insert Name Here.” (SR) Lisa Lampanelli @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 14, 7 & 9:30 p.m., $35, 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

Municipal Ballet Co.: Wilder

Craft Lake City DIY Festival

Pagan Pride Festival

Lisa Lampanelli


Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort, Snowbird Oktoberfest Oktoberfest is a free event! No charge for spectators. Competitors’ tickets will be $20 if you pay in advance, and $25 at the door.

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rom grabbing your favorite local beer off the shelf to responsibly disposing the bottle in a recycling bin, you might not give much conscious attention to the images on your bottle of suds. But the process for creating the look of a beer’s label presents a particular challenge combining the talents of artists with the savvy of business marketing. According to Jeremy Ragonese, chief marketing officer for Uinta Brewing Co., that process involves a combination of maintaining a certain consistency in the style of the company’s products, while also attempting to identify for consumers what makes a new product unique. “Ultimately, Uinta has a distinctive style that we’ve used visually to identify our beers on the shelf,” Ragonese says. “We try to remain as consistent as we can, so Uinta beer stands out to a Uinta consumer. But ultimately that visual style is an element of storytelling. We’re trying to hone in on … helping the consumer identify what the taste profile might be; we may be picking something that is inspired by a particular region or location.” The target end result can take a variety of different forms depending on the type of product that’s being launched. For the core line of products, Ragonese says, much of the work is done by an in-house design team,

creating a general concept that might then be sent to an outside agency for fine-tuning. Sometimes the graphic design can be simple typeface, as in the case of Uinta’s 801 pilsner. Then there are cases like annual smallbatch brews, where the company allows artists the opportunity to introduce a bit more of their own distinctive style. In 2016, Uinta introduced the Belgian-style Brett Tripel ale as one of these specialty brews. According to Jake Hill, part of the Uinta graphic design team, “We have a list of Salt Lake local artists, respected in the community, whose work we enjoy. When we come up with a new beer, we might approach them with something in mind that kind of fits their art style, then pair it up.” For the Brett Tripel Ale, that artist choice was Robin Banks, whose style—a Disneylike style of cartoon illustration—offered the kind of playfulness Uinta was looking for. “I think they were kind of sitting on me until they came to a character-driven thing,” Banks, this issue’s own cover artist, says. “They came up with the idea of the drunk Belgian monks, and thought that I could make it funny but also classy.” Not surprisingly, the process of an artist working with a business presents some unique dynamics. While Banks had a lot of experience doing commissioned work involving, for example, record covers, “there’s a lot of back-and-forth with a larger company like Uinta,” they say. “They’ve got to be specific about what fits their image. There’s an adjustment period where you’ve got to go back and change some things. It was all pretty laid-back, but at the end of the day, has to work for them.” In the case of the Brett Tripel label, Banks received some general guidelines to shape the design, based on a “mood board” created by the in-house Uinta design team. The company said that there could be one and three monks in the illustration; “I thought

Left: Artist Robin Banks’ final label design. Right: The “mood board” for Uinta’s Belgian Tripel ale

three worked best for the ‘Tripel,’” Banks says. Ultimately, the artist presented a few concepts, and Uinta ultimately went with the one that was Banks’ favorite. “From there it didn’t change much,” Banks says. “I think in the end, the most real tweaking I had to do was on the colors.” The result is a work as vibrant and singular as any piece of art hanging on a gallery wall—and according to Ragonese, Uinta customers treat it that way. The company sold signed and numbered limited edition prints of the label art from its recent Birthday Suit series, and often gets requests from visitors to the retail location about how to get representations of the label art. “People are always clamoring for either shirts or signage, or glassware,” Ragonese says. “We know there’s a great response to the Uinta visual identity.” That visual identity is always a goal for a company trying to make its products stand out in a crowded marketplace—and that’s part of what makes creating a product label such an artistic task. While it might not be enjoyed on a gallery wall by visitors who linger over its details, works like Banks’ Tripel label still makes an impression. “We only get a couple of seconds for a consumer to decide if they find a package attractive or persuasive on the retail shelf,” Ragonese says, “and we have to say a lot in a very short time frame. People are attracted to something that is not only visually appealing, but is going to convey the flavor profile of that particular beer, and hopefully earn that opportunity for people to sample us.” It’s not every work of art that has to make you want to crack open and try what’s inside. CW


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moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Oregon-based artist Nathaniel Praska displays work addressing gentrification and its impact on urban communities in Progress and Development at Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts (631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, facebook.com/mestizoarts) through Sept. 8.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

The 3 Amigos Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug. 19, times vary, desertstar.biz Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day SilverLake Amphitheatre, 7920 N. SilverLake Parkway, Eagle Mountain, 801-7896603, Aug. 12 & 14, 8 p.m., westsidetheatreco.org As You Like It Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 7, times vary, bard.org The Book of Mormon Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801355-2787, through Aug. 20, times vary, artsaltlake.org Broadway Bound Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-267-0194, through Aug. 12, times vary, simonfest.org The Dinner Party Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-267-0194, through Aug. 11, times vary, simonfest.org Guys and Dolls Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 1, times vary, bard.org Honk Jr. Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, through Aug. 12, Friday-Saturday 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., empresstheatre.com In the Heights Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, 801-917-4969, Aug. 11-21, ThursdaySaturday & Monday, 8 p.m., goodcotheatre.com Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, through Aug. 12, times vary, hct.org A Midsummer Night’s Dream Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 453-5867878, through Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org Peter and the Starcatcher The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through Sept. 2, times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com Pillow Talk Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Sept. 23, times vary, haletheater.org Romeo and Juliet Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 9, times vary, bard.org Saturday’s Voyeur SLAC, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Aug. 27, times vary,

saltlakeactingcompany.org Seussical the Musical Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, through Aug. 26, times vary, drapertheatre.org Shakespeare in Love Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435-5867878, through Sept. 8, times vary, bard.org Treasure Island Randall L. Jones Theatre 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 2, times vary, bard.org Under Construction: The Blue Collar Musical Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-2670194, through Aug. 12, times vary, simonfest.org Utahoma Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Aug. 11-Sept. 16, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org William Shakespeare’s Long-Lost First Play Eileen and Allen Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org

DANCE

Municipal Ballet Co.: Wilder Storm Mountain Amphitheater, Big Cottonwood Canyon, Friday, Aug. 11, 7 p.m.; Bend in the River, Jordan River Trail, Saturday, Aug. 12, 7 p.m., 805-450-8505, free, municipalballet.com (see p. 14)

COMEDY & IMPROV

Keith Stubbs Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801-622-5588, Aug. 11 & 12, 8 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Kellen Erskine Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 11 & 12, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com Lisa Lampanelli Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 14, 7 & 9:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 14) Raymond Orta Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Aug. 13, 7:30 p.m., 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Larry Correia Barnes & Noble, 1780 North Woodland Park Drive, Layton, 801-773-9973, August 10, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com


moreESSENTIALS Scott E. Tarbet: Dragon Moon Millcreek Library, 2266 E. Evergreen Ave., 801-943-4636, Aug. 10, 7 p.m., slcolibrary.org Ann Garvin: I Like You Just Fine When You’re Not Around The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Aug. 11, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Dustin Hansen: Tiny-Raptor Pack Attack The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, Aug. 12, 1 p.m., kingsenglish.com Helen Burton: Shakespeare’s True Love Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Aug. 12, 2 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Robert Neubecker: Fall Is for School The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, Aug. 12, 11 a.m., kingsenglish.com Kathryn Purdie: Crystal Blade Provo City Library, 550 N. University Ave., 801-484-9100, Aug. 15, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Craft Lake City DIY Festival Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, Aug. 11-13, craftlakecity.com (see p. 14) Pagan Pride Festival Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 South, Aug. 12, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., free, saltlakecitypaganpride.org (see p. 14) PRCA Rodeo Summit County Fairgrounds, 202 E. Park Road, Coalville, Aug. 11 & 12, 8 p.m., summitcountyfair.org Warbirds Over Utah Bountiful Skypark Airport, 1887 S. 1800 West, Woods Cross, 503-569-4387, Aug. 12 & 13, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., vintageaviationmuseum.com

RACING

Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Nov. 18; artist reception, Aug. 25, 6-9 p.m., utahmoca.org Amy Fairchild: Color My World SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Sept. 15, slcpl.org

AUGUST 10, 2017 | 19

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Mini MX Summer Race Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, West Valley City, 385-352-3991, Aug. 10, 5-9 p.m., rmrracing.com Midnight Drags Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, West Valley City, 385-352-3991, Aug. 11, 7 p.m., rmrracing.com Maverik Clash of the Titans Monster Truck Show Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, West Valley, 385-352-3991, Aug. 12-13, 6 p.m., rmrracing.com

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Art, Politics & Alternative Realities Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284, through Sept. 8, phillips-gallery.com Eight O’Clock in the Morning Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande, 801-230-0820, through Sept. 3; artist reception, Aug. 18, 6-9 p.m., urbanartsgallery.org Face of Utah Sculpture XIII Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-9655100, through Aug. 30, culturalcelebration.org Jaime Salvador Castillo & Michael Anthony Garcia: whereABOUTS UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, Aug. 12-Dec. 9; artist reception Aug. 25, 7-9 p.m., utahmoca.org Janiece Murray Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Aug. 11-Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Joseph Bishop: Smoke Signals Anderson Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Sept. 14, slcpl.org Joy Nunn: Journey Back Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, Aug. 14-Sept. 9; artist reception Aug. 18, 6-9 p.m., artatthemain.com Laura Sharp Wilson Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, Aug. 11-Sept. 22, saltlakearts.org Luke Watson: Anthropocene Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Aug. 24, slcpl.org Masterworks of Western American Art David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, 801-583-8143, through Aug. 31, daviddeefinearts.com Michael Ryan Handley: Sublimation UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 9, utahmoca.org Milton Cacho: Camera Collection Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, Aug. 14-Sept. 16, slcpl.org Multiple Inspirations: MS + Art Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Aug. 11, accessart.org Naomi Marine: Sleepwalking Sprague Branch Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through Aug. 26, slcpl.org Naomi S. Adams: Structural Language Salt Lake Community College South City, 1575 S. State, 801-957-4111, through Sept. 7, slcc.edu Nathaniel Praska: Progress and Development Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through Sept. 8, facebook.com/mestizoarts (see p. 18) Native Voices: Contemporary Trading Post Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-3553383, through Aug. 21, modernwestfineart.com Richard Serra: Prints Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-649-8882, through Aug. 20, kimballartcenter.org Sabrina Squires: Natural Kaleidoscope Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, Aug. 5Sept. 15; artist reception Aug. 5, 4 p.m., slcpl.org Spy Hop: Safe and Sound Utah Museum of Cultural Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 23, utahmoca.org A Study of Multiple Exposure Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through Aug. 20, slcpl.org Sticks Laid In Patterns and Other Mundane Oracles Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801236-7555, through Sept. 8, heritage.utah.gov Things Lost to Time Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, Aug. 14-Sept. 30, slcpl.org Under the Influence: Eight Local Artists Influenced by Animation Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, through Sept. 1, heritage.utah.gov

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9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 28, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Tuesday Harvest Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 31, Tuesdays, 4 p.m.-dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org South Jordan Farmers Market 1600 Towne Center Drive, South Jordan, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., sjc.utah.gov Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, through Oct. 25, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


Beer (Film) Festival

CINEMA

Seven sudsy films to get you pumped for the 2017 Utah Beer Festival. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

C

inema has the power to immerse us in an infinite number of worlds—and the world of beer is certainly one of them. From goofy comedies to serious documentaries, the foamy elixir has played a key role in many filmmakers’ works. In honor of the City Weekly Utah Beer Festival, here’s a roundup of beer-themed movies— some of them likely familiar, others not so much—to get you in the appropriate mood. Strange Brew (1983): You know what you’re in for when it opens with the iconic MGM lion burping, then takes Dave Thomas’ and Rick Moranis’ bumbling, beer-obsessed SCTV characters Bob and Doug McKenzie into a plot by a villainous brewmaster (Max von Sydow) to put a mind-control drug into Canadian beer. Aside from showing that one-joke sketches probably shouldn’t be stretched to feature length, the film includes a climax where Moranis puts out a fire with his pee after drinking 6,000 gallons of beer, and a flying dog saving the day. Take off, eh, indeed. The Saddest Music in the World (2003): Off-beat Canadian filmmaker Guy Maddin delivered a typically out-there narrative set during the Great Depression in Winnipeg, where a beer baroness (Isabella Rossellini) creates a competition to find … well, what the title says. Anyone familiar with Maddin won’t be shocked at the unique, grainy black-and-white visual style, or the deadpan sense of humor crossed with the trappings of silent-cinema melodrama. But this is also a movie that finds some pretty unique places to put its beer, from the brew-filled prosthetic glass legs of Rossellini’s character to the giant tubs where the winners of each musical showdown take a celebratory dip. Beerfest (2006): Like Saddest Music, it’s about an international competition, but otherwise these two beery comedies couldn’t be more different. The Broken Lizard comedy troupe tells the tale of five Americans who train to compete in a secret underground Olympiad of drinking games to beat the nasty German team (including Will Forte and Nat Faxon). An “if you try this at home, you would be dead” warning kicks off the movie, so the mass consumption of beer on display is clearly over-the-

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WATCH LIST

top satire. Expect the same level of broad, often crude humor from the rest of the story, though it’s not every day that you find a comedy that can pull off both a sly Das Boot reference and jokes about masturbating frogs. How Beer Saved the World (2011): “This is the story of the greatest invention of all time” begins the narration in this lively Discovery Channel documentary positing the role of beer in some of the landmark moments in human civilization. Agriculture? Inspired by the need to grow barley for brewing. The Egyptian pyramids? Beer was the unit of payment of laborers. Germ theory and antibiotics? Developed thanks to experiments on beer. The American Revolution? Born in a Boston tavern full of tipsy patriots. It might just be a fun collection of historical trivia turning beer into the liquid equivalent of Forrest Gump, but you’ll have great stories to share at the bar. Drinking Buddies (2013): Chicago’s popular real-life Revolution Brewing Co. provides the backdrop for this comedydrama from writer/director Joe Swanberg about a complicated romantic square: the brewery’s marketing and events coordinator, Kate (Olivia Wilde), and her friendship with co-worker/brewer Luke (Jake Johnson) bumping up against their relationships with respective significant others (Ron Livingston and Anna Kendrick). The chummy chemistry between Wilde and Johnson gives a kick to Swanberg’s semi-improvisational style, making for an engaging tale of people trying to figure out whether they belong together. Also, if sheer volume of beer consumed on camera were real, everyone involved would be dead.

The Irish Pub (2013)

The Irish Pub (2013): Maybe it’s not about beer per se, but a pint of Guinness might as well get first billing in Alex Fegan’s documentary about the significance of the local pub as an Irish institution. More than a dozen locations are featured, making it occasionally frustrating that we can’t spend more time with the most colorful characters. Yet this gentle portrait is both history lesson—including the role of pubs as places for making wedding matches— and sociology lesson about how important it is to have places where people can gather, talk to one another and be part of a community. “No television, no music, just conversation,” one owner says about her place, taking pride in the value of folks bending an elbow at the bar together. Crafting a Nation (2013): Director Thomas Kolicko takes a somewhat meandering look at the boom in American craft brewing, traveling from coast to coast to explore how these small enterprises become part of their communities, including supporting local agriculture. The wide net of subjects—combined with Kolicko’s fondness for magichour landscape shots—makes for a movie that doesn’t always feel focused, but there’s a compelling center in the story of brothers Branden and Chad Miller attempting to launch their Black Shirt Brewing Co. in Denver. There’s nothing romanticized about this portrait of entrepreneurs trying to bring a dream to life; it might give you more appreciation of the long hours and anxiety that went into that craft brew you love. CW


CINEMA CLIPS NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. 13 MINUTES BB.5 The last time director Oliver Hirschbiegel ventured into a story about Nazi Germany, the meme-sterpiece Downfall was born; this fact-based story approaches the era from different angle. It’s the story of Georg Elser (Christian Friedel), a German carpenter behind a failed November 1939 attempt to assassinate Adolph Hitler in Munich. The timeline alternates between a Nazi official (Burghart Klaussner) interrogating Elser, and the previous seven years, including his relationship with a married woman (Katharina Schüttler). Hirschbiegel doesn’t back off on the scenes of Elser undergoing torture—warning to the squeamish—by officials convinced he couldn’t have acted alone, but the 1939 section is by far the least interesting. Much more compelling is watching Elser’s hometown gradually fall under the control of the Nazis throughout the 1930s, with the libertine Elser growing increasingly convinced that Hitler’s Germany is going too far. The central love story might feel incidental to the focus on Elser’s political awakening, but Friesel’s performance at least anchors a story about a passionate man, which also provides an interesting origin story for how radicalism is born. Opens Aug. 11 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—Scott Renshaw

THE GLASS CASTLE [not yet reviewed] Adaptation of Jeannette Walls’ memoir about her peripatetic childhood with her vagabond parents (Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts). Opens Aug. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) LETTERS FROM BAGHDAD BBBB If there was any justice, Lawrence of Arabia would be known as “the male Gertrude Bell,” instead of the other way around. Decades before Lawrence’s now-legendary exploits, Bell journeyed from England to the Middle East, gathered political and geographical intelligence on the landscape and earned the enormous respect of the Arab tribes. Later, she advised the Western leaders who, after World War I, divvied up the region into the nations we know now. More than anyone else, male or female, Bell helped shaped the modern Middle East, and hence the modern world. This stunning film, one of the most cinematically beautiful documentaries ever made, combines marvelous archival footage and photos— including many taken by Bell herself—with an in-their-own-words recounting of Bell’s life and work told entirely through firsthand sources: letters, diaries, secret dispatches and other documents. The insights, wisdom, intelligence and humor of this adventurer, diplomat and spy are enrapturing. This is a phenomenal portrait of a spirited, independent woman in an era when such qualities were not appreciated in women, and of a moment in political history that continues to reverberate today. (NR)—MAJ THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE [not yet reviewed] The animal pals from the original film try to save their home from demolition. Opens Aug. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AMÉLIE At Tower Theatre, Aug. 11-12, 11 p.m.; Aug. 13, noon. (PG-13) MEET THE PATELS At Main Library, Aug. 15, 7 p.m. (NR) WAYNE’S WORLD At Park City Library, Aug. 10, 7 p.m. (PG-13)

THE DARK TOWER BB.5 This bland, benign mediocrity probably seems significantly worse if you’ve read the Stephen King novels it’s based on; personally, I don’t know what level of violence has been done to the source material by director Nikolaj Arcel and the unremarkable 87-minute screenplay. On the screen, it’s the story of Jake Chambers (Tom Taylor), an adolescent New Yorker with psychic powers, including vivid dreams of a planet where a cool Gunslinger (Idris Elba) seeks revenge against the Man in Black (Matthew McConaughey), a Satan-y magician trying to destroy the Tower in the clouds that protects the universe from extra-dimensional monsters. Elba’s stoic Gunslinger is aces; McConaughey is a sonorous, low-key ham; the kid is fine. Though there are bumpy patches in the portal-jumping, fantasy-Western narrative, it mostly avoids being ludicrous, remaining a few steps above a made-for-SyFy series pilot. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider DETROIT BBBB As much as director Kathryn Bigelow’s film recounts the brutal specifics from a grim American moment—involving the summer 1967 Detroit race riots—this is more immersive war movie than historical drama. The story eventually focuses on events at the Algiers Motel, where a racist cop (Will Poulter), believing sniper fire came from the location, leads hours of physical and psychological torture on the mostly black “suspects.” That centerpiece sequence is one of the year’s most devastating pieces of filmmaking, and Detroit takes a structural risk by ending not with the resolution of the actual siege at the Algiers, but with police on trial for murder. Yet the combination of literal brutality and institutional denial of justice turns the film into a particularly damning war story, reminding us how often war is about insuring that those in power retain it. (R)—Scott Renshaw DUNKIRK BBB Christopher Nolan is an extraordinarily talented filmmaker, and also his movies are sometimes just plain exhausting. Here he tackles the 1940 evacuation of 400,000 British troops from France, intertwining three narratives: a British private (Fionn Whitehead) trying to find transport home; a civilian (Mark Rylance) bringing his private boat across the Channel to aid in the evacuation; and a British pilot (Tom Hardy) providing air support. Nolan dives into his harrowing scenario without loading his characters with backstory, trusting the situations to inspire the needed emotional connection. But the complete absence of narrative downtime also creates an experience that has viewers on high alert for 106 minutes. The heroic stories effectively convey a resilience that turned defeat into a defining moment of British national character; it might have been nice to have a bit more breathing room to appreciate it. (PG-13)—SR

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SUNDANCE SHORTS 2017 [not yet reviewed] Selected short-film highlights from this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Opens Aug. 11 at Tower Theatre. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

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ANNABELLE: CREATION B Forget possessed dolls and demons that want your soul. The most unbelievable thing about Annabelle: Creation is its suggestion that the titular doll, that ghoul-faced monstrosity with the sunken eyes and sallow skin that we first encountered in 2013’s The Conjuring, was something lovingly created back in the 1940s by a kindly dollmaker, and—even more implausible still—that customers positively clamored for them. Only slightly less plausible is that the dollmaker (Anthony LaPaglia) and his wife (Miranda Otto) would open their home to a bunch of orphan girls when they know that there’s been a demon hanging around. Now, everything is endless creaking floors, creepy scarecrows and, of course, the freaky doll in what is little more than a collection of funhouse spooks that are telegraphed a mile out. This is so forgettably obvious and rote a “horror” movie that you have forgotten the boos even before they strike. The only disturbing thing about the film is the genre-ritual terrorization of female characters—their fear played as titillating—who in this case are so young that it feels like a kind of perversion. Pedo-fear-lia? Opens Aug. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

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Best of Utah 2017 Readers Poll

2017

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Beer tastes vary, sure, but next time you find yourself reaching for that Blue Moon, try a local white instead. We’ve got the skinny on national vs. homegrown suds (p. 33), plus the perfect soundtrack to imbibe ’em to (p. 45). Ever wonder about a beer bottle’s journey from glass to bar? Check out our sweet photo essay (p. 46). And, of course, no Beer Issue worth its hops could do without a brewer fashion review (p. 28). From the days of ol’ Brigham (the original homebrewer) in the 1800s to The Beer Nut opening its State Street doors in the 1990s, SLC’s beer roots run deep. Whip out the coasters and join us on this journey as we uncap the Beer-hive’s best brews and the admirable souls who make them. —Enrique Limón

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B

eer, glorious beer! As anxiety over the few remaining days of summer rises, so do temperatures (thank you, China), and the need for a tall frosty one—or eight. Lucky for you, this year’s Utah Beer Festival delivers double the pleasure and double the suds over two days, Aug. 19 and 20. To celebrate, we put together this ode to all things local beer—from tasting-room tales (p. 26) to an exposé on the recent #FakeBeer movement (p. 43) and a folklorist’s take on alternative drinking methods that’s sure to make your sphincter clinch (p. 48). Are you more of an IPA or a stout kinda guy? We tip our glasstoboth(p.34&39).What’sthat?You’renotaguy?Well, you’re in good company, as the fairer sex is kicking some major ass in Utah’s brewing scene (p. 30).

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Accounting for Taste We chat with tasting-room employees at SLC breweries. STORY + PHOTOS BY RANDY HARWARD

S

omewhat surprisingly, the craft beer choices in Utah are vast, and the selection can be difficult to navigate. Do you go with a reliable favorite or try something new? That’s something you can settle in the tasting room. Not all microbreweries have them, but many at least offer the option to buy tiny tasters, so you and their highly trained staff can help determine the brew for you. Already seasoned beer drinkers, City Weekly decided to sample the people behind the samplers. E. Robert Skloss, Ph.D. Shades of Pale Brewing Born and raised in San Antonio, Texas, Skloss, 82, excelled in high school, and was offered scholarships to Texas A&M and Texas University, and a baseball contract with the St. Louis Browns. He rejected all three. Instead, he told his father, “I’m gonna become a monk.” As a Marianist, Skloss obtained his teaching degree from St. Mary’s University in the early ’60s. He then went to East St. Louis, Mo., to teach high school math and coach baseball and football. After a couple of years, he accepted a scholarship to Notre Dame, earning a master’s degree in mathematics. The school asked him to write an algebra textbook and help write another on geometry. His reward was a four-year fellowship to Harvard—he declined that, too. Instead, he spent most of his fellowship at the University of California at Berkeley, then returned to St. Louis University to write his dissertation. He finished three months early, so the head of the math department asked Skloss to help McDonnell Douglas on a project that was giving them trouble—Project Gemini, the second human spaceflight program. Skloss helped solve the problem in less than 30 days, saving billions of dollars. The gratitude of NASA and the U.S. Air Force translated to interesting and lucrative offers from companies working on Project Apollo. Skloss chose Aerojet General in Azusa, Calif., where he was in charge of the return-flight engine and helped define the path to the Moon. Oh, yeah—beer. After 25 years, Aerojet offered Skloss full retirement, 10 years early. Skloss continued to consult in the aerospace industry, then worked in academia as an adjunct professor. In 2006, he landed in Park City with his wife Maggie, and they met Shades of Pale founder Trent Fargher. Skloss helped him formulate a business plan, and Fargher named him CEO. Skloss pitches in everywhere, including working the bar and bottling beer Mondays through Thursdays. Occasionally, patrons who discover his priestly past want to confess. He tells them he’s no longer a monk, but is happy to listen. His advice to one troubled woman was, “Right or wrong is you—in your head, using your intelligence. No minister, no religion, no political group can tell you what’s right and what’s wrong. It’s you! That’s where the religions have gone terribly, terribly wrong. ... They’re supposed to help people to decide what’s right and wrong, not tell ’em.” Get it while it’s hot: The octogenarian overachiever has plenty more to say, but it’s probably best if you just visit him at SoP and hear it over a beer. Hurry up, though, ’cause Skloss jokes that at his age, “I don’t even buy any green bananas, lemme tell ya.”

Ivy Augusta Smith Epic Brewing Co. Inside Epic’s combination store and brewery is the smallest restaurant in Salt Lake City. It seats six: four at the main bar and two at the shorter end. On duty one hot, dry July evening is Ivy Augusta Smith—a former City Weekly intern. Smith, whose blue hair and deadpan demeanor make her a dead ringer for Ramona Flowers in Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, has since switched majors—to music. Her Zildjian hat notwithstanding, Smith’s not a drummer. She plays bass, and recently recording a guest turn on the new album by local band Creature Double Feature. As the only employee, she does everything from cook to dishwashing to minor security. “I have to follow about a thousand rules,” she says. For instance, she can’t allow you to drink unless you’re seated. And, of course, you have to order food, like the artisan meat-and-cheese board ($9). Otherwise, you don’t get your suds. As the empty room starts to fill up during a recent visit, Smith is friendly and chats easily with everyone. Most of the clientele is from out of town, she says, and “locals usually come in, buy beer and leave.” Soon every seat is taken, and Smith gets busy, working diligently while maintaining and enjoying conversations. “I always came to Epic because you can buy beer here on Sundays—full strength,” she says. “I always had a good time when I came in here, so I just applied, and figured, ‘Why not?’” Noob!: During the first month that she worked at Epic, people would ask about the namesake of Capt’n Crompton’s Pale Ale. “I just told them it was a funny name,” she says. “And it’s, like, our brewmaster. I had no idea.”

Amanda Young The West Side Tavern & Cold Beer Store Bright-eyed Young leads us past kegs and boxes of Squatters and Wasatch merch toward her office. On the way, she checks her freezer—it’s sprung a leak. As general manager of the Utah Brewers Cooperative’s tavern and store, she’s got to get that handled. Before moving here from Colorado, Young worked at Avery Brewing Co. “I got to try all different kinds of beer from all over the world, and I really got into the craft beer industry, and I loved it,” she says. Wanting to stay in it, she started as a server at Squatters in Park City, then graduated to manager at Wasatch Brew Pub in Sugar House before taking this job three months ago. She tried her hand at home-brewing but, “was never very good at it.” When she brought some of her first batch to the UBC brewers to try, the response was immediate: She needed to go back to the brewing board. It was way too hoppy, sure, but Young drank the whole batch anyway, confirming the taste did, in fact, improve proportionally to the quantity consumed. What she enjoys most about her work—aside from the beer itself—is talking about it with customers and co-workers. Her eyes twinkling, she says, “I love it when someone says, ‘No, I hate that style of beer; I don’t want to try that,’ but I convince them to try it anyway and they say, ‘Wow, I really like that!’ Seeing people’s excitement about it is the best part.” Teaching advice: Young says it’s easy to get carried away when chatting up beer science. “You really have to read your crowd, because sometimes they get this glazed look on their faces when you get way to into it.”


Laura Jones Proper Brewing Co. On a Monday evening at Proper’s Main Street location, shift-lead bartender Laura Jones seems to notice I’ve been out in the hot summer sun (maybe due to the sweatcascade on my forehead) and steers me toward the brewery’s Guava Skittlebraü. “It’s pretty refreshing,” she says, smiling. Raised in Taylorsville, Jones, 40, left an office job 17 years ago to try bartending because, she says, “I like being surrounded by people.” She’s been with Proper for 18 months, since the Main Street location opened. “I love it,” she says. “I wouldn’t change it for anything.” In order to guide patrons through Proper’s offerings, all employees undergo 16 weeks of beer training, monthly meetings to learn about new brews and have to obtain first-level cicerone beer-server certifications. Some customers taste until they find a winner; others just wanna run the gamut. Occasionally, she’ll tease the latter group, suggesting they order a “big-boy beer.” Not that she’d ever deprive someone of experiencing beer however they like. She remembers telling a couple from Connecticut a pint would last longer, “or you can keep drinkin’ these and pretend you’re giants.” Supertasters: One time, a party of three ordered enough to fill their entire table with empty taster glasses in a half-hour period. “I was, like, really?,” Jones says. “Alright. I’ll go clear off [another] table.”

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Gina Varni Mountain West Cider Next to Red Rock Brewing Co. at 425 N. 400 West sits Mountain West Cider, the first and only cider-only establishment in Utah. Inside the cidery, it’s silent. It’s not unusual, says tasting room manager Gina Varni. Customers come to MWC in a random ebb-and-flow, and don’t stay too long. That’s because, Varni explains, by law, “You can only get five ounces in a 24-hour period.” That’s a marked difference from the twoat-a-time taster policies at most other breweries. The state regards MWC as a winery instead of a brewery, and Utah law is different for vino—and, by classification, hard cider. You can distribute those five ounces among the four types of cider offered here (there’s one more, but it’s seasonal) and try 1.25 ounces of each or, if you have a favorite, five ounces of that. They also don’t have to serve food here, so you can stop by, lay down a fiver, sip your cider and split. So on most days, Varni, 30, gets to hang out in the cool, quiet, modern decorated tasting room, serving the ephemeral clientele. The Bay Area native got into the cider business from knowing co-owner Jennifer Carleton, and she’s been with Mountain West since it opened in 2015. The gig teaching folks about cider is similar to her other, seasonal job as a golf pro at Bonneville Golf Course. It makes for a well-rounded, indoor-outdoor lifestyle. “I have two jobs that I love, and would like to do both for a very long time,” she says. Loopholes: Varni says she sees plenty of randoms and regulars at MWC, and one group in particular—construction workers—come in “three or four times a day, grab [a bottle of cider] and then leave, and come back in an hour-and-a-half and get another one.” CW


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Suds & Duds

Not known for their cutting-edge fashion, these brewers are leading the brew couture pack. STORY + PHOTOS BY MIKE RIEDEL

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hen delving into the many historical styles of beer, brewers occasionally look for inspiration wherever it can be found. I was granted rare access to a seldom-seen corner of Utah’s secret brewing society—the Brewer’s Wardrobe. Here is tiny glimpse of what helps stimulate your favorite brewer’s creative juices.

Always on the go, Fisher Brewing Co.’s Colby Frazier is everywhere and nowhere all at once. No need for him to roll up his sleeves in this chic utilitarian life preserver by Steve Zissou. Frazier will only be drowning in paperwork as this occasional, nonOSHA approved vestment inspires his ever evolving portfolio of beers while keeping his head above water ... err, beer. Land ho!

Squatters’ Head Brewer, Jason Stock is shown here channeling his inner monk, seeking a revelation for his next creation. Stock is wearing this regular Thursday look, a stylish monk robe from the GUI (gwee) collection by Mr. Bernardo. This chic yet functional robe is designed for maximum breathability (no burlap chafing here) and protection from scalding water or the random demon asshole. C’est magnifique!

This ’80s-inspired Freddie Mercury with hints of Cyndi Lauper ensemble screams Barbarella with tones of Rosie the Riveter. When crafting award-winning, feminineinfluenced beers at Roosters Brewing Co., Brewer Jacquie King looks to sci-fi heroine and designer Caroline Munro for a look that’s much cleaner than a hippie, but a little more polished than Tank Girl. Set phasers to fabulous!


It’s Henry Kissinger meets Maximus Decimus Meridius in this stylish yet avant-garde alpen peasant frock worn by the RoHa Brewing Project’s Head Brewer/Co-owner, Chris Haas. The beers from the Old World are always energized when this cotton dream hits the brew deck. “It lets everything breathe,” Haas says. The bike is a mere metaphor for a restless brewing spirit, plus it really helps when delivering beer. Feel the gentle breeze.

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Bohemia n Brewer y ’s Head Brewer Brian Ericksen always keeps his leatherstrapped bundhosen close by to keep his mind and spirit tied to Munich and Pilsen when crafting his superior German and Czech lagers. Mr. Jürgen of Dresden has been Brian’s faithful couturier since the 1940s, inspiring countless beers made the old way in both Utah and Wyoming. The rubber boots, he says, add a touch of flair and can effortlessly go from day to night. Ja wohl! CW


Bow down to Utah’s first ladies of beer. BY DARBY DOYLE

DARBY DOYLE

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rchaeologists theorize that beer-brewing started out in early hunter-gatherer societies under the watchful eyes and discerning palates of those primarily in charge of day-to-day food production: women. University of Pennsylvania biomolecular archaeologist Patrick McGovern notes that in addition to evidence of home- and hearth-based booze production, ancient cultures revered goddesses of beer such as Ninkasi, the Sumerian head brewer to the gods (and the mythical recorder of the earliest known beer recipe as a gift to humans). As both urban populations grew and centers of production became consolidated, brewing became commercialized and the field dominated by men. The Pink Boots Society—that’d be the organization for women in beer professions— historian Tara Nurin points to purity laws like the German Reinheitsgebot for further institutionalizing the no-girls-allowed clubhouse. “Undoubtedly [it] kept at least a few drinkers from dying. But they also put higher-cost resources such as hops out of [women brewers’] reach,” Nurin says. “With hops also came longer-lasting beer. Men reacted by building production breweries and forming international trade guilds. Law and custom kept women out of both.” That bro-centric turn was pretty ironic, agrees Ogden’s Roosters Brewing Co. Brewer Jacquie King. As she says, “Women are beer” through much of world history, especially as home-brewers. Super-fast-forward to the craft beer renaissance of the late 1980s, when a few women beer-lovers right here in Utah started a wave of brewing badassery that is still gaining momentum. Of particular local pride, Park City home-brewer Mellie Pullman helped launch Wasatch Brewery in 1986. Nurin notes, “It took [Pullman] a while to realize that she’d become the first female brewmaster in modern American history,” though she left Wasatch after a few years. A key player in Utah beer, Jennifer Talley spent 20 years brewing at Squatters, most of them as head brewer. In 1997, Talley’s Vienna Lager won a Gold Medal at Denver’s Great American Beer Festival, the first of many accolades during her award-winning career. “Both Jennifer [Talley] and Erika Palmer are very respected in the field,” RoHa Brewing Project Operations Manager Jamie Burnham says. “Their work at Squatters and Wasatch really broke ground for women” in the beer business (Talley moved to Washington’s Redhook Brewery in 2011). Roosters’ King thinks the industry, especially in the Beehive, has come a long way since the first female home-brewers were recorded in the state way back in the 19th century. A home-brewer for over a dozen years, King says that since she started seriously studying commercial brewing and eventually took over as Roosters’ head brewer in 2016. “The confidence the owners have shown in me to change up the seasonal beers has been terrific.” Citing continued strong sales of both their core four standard beers and seasonal offerings, she’s justifiably proud of the immediate success of the original strong beer she developed at Roosters, Femination American Ale, a badass brew bottled at 7.5 percent ABV. It’s a strong beer celebrating our nation’s kickass female brewing heritage. But the profession has been far from smooth sipping for female brewers, as in the 1990s women continued to break through barriers in the international beer industry. In Venezuela, Tanael Escartin (currently brewmaster at Uinta) finished her degree in chemical engineering in 1999 and secured an administrative job at the country’s largest beer producer, Polar Brewery, which she describes as “the Anheuser-Busch of Venezuela” with 85 percent of the country’s market share. Fascinated by the science of beer-making, Escartin worked her way up the ranks of the company, eventually becoming Venezuela’s first woman brewer. She moved to Germany to study brewing, and after four years earned a master’s of biotechnology engineering with a focus on brewing science from the Technical University of Berlin. She eventually became Polar’s cellar superintendent (that’s the right hand of the brewing manager). In 2015, Escartin moved to the U.S., first working in Fort Collins, Colo., and then as director of brewing at Palmetto Brewing Co., South Carolina’s oldest brewery. The Utah beer community is lucky to have Escartin now heading up operations at Uinta Brewing, along with a growing cadre of women along the Wasatch Front, like fellow Uinta brewer Marissa Linback. “I love to share the knowledge of what I’ve learned about brewing over the years and how to maintain a clean environment,” Escartin says of her favorite part of her job. But, she adds with a grin, “I think every brewer’s favorite thing to do is create new styles. Having the idea in

TANAEL ESCARTIN

DARBY DOYLE

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Utah’s Queen Bees of Brewing

JAMIE BURNHAM

your head and tasting in it your imagination long before you actually drink it is a fun process.” Currently, most Utah breweries have women on staff from brewmasters to cellarmen to certified cicerones heading up sales and beer education programs (cicerone = beer sommelier). However, King over at Roosters and Escartin at Uinta are the only women currently holding the title of brewmaster, to our knowledge. Some national industry reports put the number of female brewers at less than 5 percent of the profession as recently as 2014, although 20 percent of breweries had women founders, CEOs and owners, like Ginger Bowden of Vernal Brewing Co. Recently, Aubrey Palfreyman and Julia Shuler (brewery assistants and part-time cellarmen) of Strap Tank Brewing in Springville started Utah’s inaugural Pink Boots Society chapter. “We have each other’s backs,” Palfreyman says of the local female brewing culture. “Everyone wants everyone else to succeed.” RoHa’s Jamie Burnham credits Utah’s consistently supportive cadre of women brewers—at both the home-brew and professional levels—for increasing beer expertise in general statewide and beyond. Formerly at The Beer Nut, Burnham was one of the key people involved in changing Utah’s holdout state legislation to legalize home-brewing in 2009. In 2013, Burnham and a handful of women home-brewers founded the Hop Bombshells Homebrew Club (hopbombshells.com), “and those ladies are killing it,” Burnham says of their consistently award-winning brews in national competition. Curious about the club? They’ll be pouring in the VIP room at City Weekly’s Utah Beer Festival, or hit up their monthly meeting the second Thursday of each month (7 p.m. at Shades of Pale Brewery, 154 W. Utopia Ave., Salt Lake City).


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Utah’s beer-loving women have also brought a big chunk of the social media and online attention to the region from all over the globe. Based in Utah County, Mikenzie Hardman (bitchesnbrews.com) preaches the gospel of all-grain home-brewing and wild fermentation using pretty basic equipment she rigged up herself. “It’s not a big scary process,” she admits. “If you can cook, you can brew” and do so in very creative and delicious ways. Similarly, the Crafty Beer Girls community (craftybeergirls.com) run by Lauren Lerch and Jenni Shafer with support from Red Rock Brewing Co. keeps an ongoing community of online beer-lovers motivated to learn more about beer and brewing. Now a bit of a Jill-of-all-trades at Red Rock—from sales to cellaring—Lerch cannot say enough great things about certified cicerone education training to increase beer knowledge across the board; “It’s the best way to get started if you want to be involved” in the beer industry and understand style guidelines. Rebecca Link at Proper Brewing agrees, and with four minted experts on staff, they’re backing up their beer expertise with certification cred. “There’s still sometimes the assumption that women aren’t expected to like beer or know much about it,” Link says, but the cicerone training levels that playing field, especially for women. “You definitely know what you’re talking about,” she adds. “It’s pretty intensive.” Cheers to that, ladies! CW

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Drink This, Not That Championing local beers over national brands.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 11

BY MIKE RIEDEL

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The bottom line: Breweries that produce beer on huge scales like some of the above can’t be as generous in terms of ingredients because they have to keep their massive budgets in check. While some smaller craft breweries are not immune to budget constraints, they have more free rein to be creative while also injecting resources back into our community. Food for thought the next time you’re at the state liquor store scratching your head as to what to fill the cooler with. CW

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Blue Moon Belgian White vs. Wasatch White Label These beers are both pretenders! They take their recipes from famed brewer Pierre Celis, who reinvigorated the all-but-dead witbier style 40 years ago. But who gets bragging rights? Damn straight it’s White Label. Coors’ Blue Moon’s mass-produced quantities can’t touch quality of ingredients that our own Wasatch Brewery brings forth. Taste for yourself; it’s like night and day.

Anchor Steam vs. Moab Rocket Bike Our final matchup is the Master vs. Apprentice. Many consider Anchor to be the original “steam beer,” while Rocket Bike is just another padawan upstart. The student must become the teacher at some point— and that time is now. When Moab Brewery’s Rocket Bike goes in the competition dojo with Anchor Steam, the former often prevails—including four national medals in as many years in the steam beer (California common) category. You are powerful as the emperor has foreseen, RB.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12

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Sierra Nevada Bigfoot vs. Uinta Anniversary Barley Wine Next up, we have two barley wines that predate many similar brews in the U.S. Both date back to the early- to mid-’90s and draw upon generous amounts of cascade hops to drive their intense malt sweetness. But the K.O. in this round comes from Uinta Brewing’s original heavyweight. Produced seasonally and in limited quantities, this crafty beast’s quaffability is unmatched when it’s fresh from the bottle or years-old in your cellar.

Budweiser vs. Bohemian 1842 Czech Pilsner Oddly enough, these beers have similar histories. Both were started by European immigrants who hailed from two of the best lagering cities in the world. First up, we have the inconceivably large Budweiser against our regional Bohemian Brewery. One brewery makes so much beer that they have to add adjuncts like rice and corn to save costs on malted barley, while the other has never used anything but the real deal. The taste discrepancy is almost mind boggling. In the immortal words of Howard Cosell, “Down goes Frazier!” Bud, you never had a chance.

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Guinness vs. Red Rock’s Oatmeal Stout In one corner, we have the juggernaut stout that helped define true Irish beer. In the other, one of Utah’s longest continually produced stouts. Though Guinness is beloved, it’s produced halfway around the world and its freshness is debatable once it makes it to your neighborhood pub. A keg of Red Rock Brewing Co.’s Oatmeal Stout packaged on the same day is generally emptied and filled again before the first Irish keg arrives in SLC. Not to mention that it’s crafted on a small scale for better body and taste. Boing!

DEAD COUNTRY GENTLEMEN MIKE RIEDEL

efore we get started, I think it’s important to state that there’s nothing wrong with nationally recognized beers—so lift your glass to some of the most respected and notable brands from around the globe. The intent here is for you to get to know—or at the very least, get re-aquainted with—some of the phenomenal beers that your friends and neighbors are brewing right in your own community. Ready to pop some bottle caps?


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IPA Is A-OK BY MIKE RIEDEL

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y first experience with India pale ales was a gazillion years ago in the early ’90s. Back then, IPAs were for the most part a heavy-handed, overly hopped pale ale that was bone dry and riddled with pine and herbal bitterness. This was a time when brewers were just starting to get their shit together on this newly re-emerging beer style. The history books taught them IPAs were made overly hopped and extra boozy to survive the long unrefrigerated journeys across the seas. While those beers were made out of necessity, these new American IPAs were being made for luxury and they needed to taste like it. So, American brewers chased new hop varietals to see what kind of flavors they could create. New hop strains coming out of the Pacific Northwest were very promising, creating bitters that were more akin to citrus than flowers. This changed the IPA game not only stateside, but around the world. IPAs could now be more than bitter bombs; they would now have a hop-driven fruitiness that would change the global beer industry forever. How are Utah’s brewers utilizing these new hops? I’m glad you asked.

2 Row Brewing’s Tastes Like Citrus This beer basically looks like orange juice. The nose is a tropical fruit explosion, full of orange, mango and lime. The taste starts with creamy tangerine, orange and grapefruit and is followed by mango and malt. You even get the pith of the fruits as well. Thing is, there are zero fruits in this beer; it’s all malt and hops. Make sure you dredge up all of the goodness in the bottom of the bottle before drinking. RoHa Brewing Project’s Thursday IPA Amber and gold in color old. The nose is bright and airy with citrus peel and bready malts. The taste takes its cues from there with bread, caramel and some honey notes. The peel with light pine slides in next with a lingering bitterness that is clean without being drying. Finishes semisweet with a hint of alcohol. It’s a fine textbook example of an American IPA. Proper Brewing Co.’s Hop vs. Hop This beer’s hop profile changes periodically. This version pours an amber/orange hue with a nose that’s full of orange peel, spices and pine. The taste is a well-balanced mixture of floral and citrus hops with caramel/biscuit malt. Some pine resins make themselves known toward the end. No face crushing bitterness here— which is fine with me. Talisman Brewing Co.’s The Dagda A nice-looking golden/amber color is happening here. The nose has caramel malts and piney hops with a touch of grapefruit rind. The flavor follows the nose with pine notes in sweet caramel malts swirled around bitter grapefruit rind and earthy hops. This is one of the more approachable IPAs in the market due to its nice balance and its semi-warm finish.

MIKE RIEDEL

The rise and rise of hoppy beers.

Park City Brewery’s India Pale Ale This has a very nice, clear copper/orange color with a musty nose from the hops, along with floral and citrus peel. There’s a decent amount of caramel aroma, as well. The taste starts with pine and citrus, which give way to biscuit and graham crackers. This is an extremely well-balanced IPA with wonderful dank floral, pine and citrus qualities. It’s easy drinking and still leaves the hop-head happy. You’d think these are all pretty similar, but they’re not. All five have unique qualities that set them apart. A couple of sips in, you’ll know what I mean. CW


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BALLAST POINT

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B24

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F-12

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C5

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RICKY

Ted and Faith Scheffler adopter (was named Ricky), adopted at 2016 Beer Festival For a couple years my wife, Faith, had been trying to sell me on the idea of getting a "sibling" for our black lab, Beau, to play with. I was against the idea since I work from home, saying, "Who's going to train the dog? ME! Who's going to walk the dog? ME!” And so on. Well, last August I found myself at the City Weekly Utah Beer Festival. And let me make this perfectly clear: I had only had a couple small samples of beer. I was not tipsy! Anyway, I walked into a building to use the restroom and made the mistake of wandering over to the Utah Humane Society adoption area where I came across Ricky. I put my hand in his cage and he immediately began licking it. Well, the next thing you know, I was on my phone to my wife at work, texting her pictures of Ricky and asking how she'd like to have another dog. She was ecstatic, and before you can say "shelter dog," I had adopted Ricky and we were on our way to his new home. From the back seat of my car, he licked my ear most of the ride home. We think Ricky must have been in shelters for most or all of his life. He was 9 months old when I adopted him and he seemed to have never maneuvered stairs before and even puddles of water on walks were a new curiosity to him—not to mention cats! To this day, he can't resist trying to make cats his friend. Ricky is the sweetest, most gentle and loving dog my wife and I have ever met. He'd never bite anyone, but he might lick them to death. He loves strangers and makes friends with everyone immediately. He’s a true blessing in our lives. We get so much joy from him. And to think I didn't want another dog ...

PEPPER

Heather Hans adopter (was named Baller), adopted at 2016 Beer Festival Pepper has been part of our family for nearly a year now. He fits in so well. He's slightly grumpy, loves his toys and doesn't care for sharing and is a little quirky—like the rest of us. Pepper loves to snuggle in bed and has a weird habit of climbing under your skirt if you're in one. He loves to burrow, be warm and snuggle. I'm constantly stealing the covers back from him and he from me. It's really an endless game of tug-of-war. Speaking of tug, Peps loves it! He loves to get his squeaky toy (one of the few he hasn't chewed the 'brains' out of) and shake it around like he's a dog much bigger than his eight pounds. He's a champ at chasing squirrels, alerting his family to the mailman and growling at cats. He's not above the occasional chase but has never even come close to catching squirrels or cats, although he knows both words and perks up into his “squirrel-getting” stance when he hears it. His other favorite words are: “Walk” “Puppy food” “Puppy treats” "Where's Michael?" (my brother). I am so glad I went to the Beer Fest and found Pepper. He was a grown dog when I got him and he fits our family so well. Pepper has a sibling, another Humane Society adoption, Patty. She's a three-legged love and thinks of Pepper as her annoying kid brother, probably Pepper's sister/ frenemy who he loves to snuggle and bother and tease. Just like any family.

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SOUND WAREHOUSE

Catching up with last year’s adoptions.

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CHARLIE BARLEY

Rebecca Fetterman adopter (was named Pretzel), adopted at 2016 Beer Festival (HSU note: yes they named him Charlie Barley because of Beer=Barley) We didn't plan on bringing a dog home when we ventured to Beerfest in 2016. But when we saw him, and learned that the parents and sibling he came to the shelter with were all adopted and he was left alone, it was game over. Charlie instantly blended in with our dogs and found a best bud in our 2-year-old Pug named Gus. Their high energy, goofiness and playfulness were the perfect match! Charlie is absolutely spoiled. He enjoys road trips, boating, camping, hiking, chasing lizards and insects, and most importantly LASER! He is either running at 1,000 percent or fast asleep cuddled under a blanket. He was the first dog we ever rescued, but he definitely won't be the last. He has truly changed our lives, and he shows gratitude to us every day through his wackiness and unconditional love. The Humane Society is an incredible cause and this event, Beer Fest has not only become a tradition, but will hold a special place in our hearts because of Pretzel, aka Charlie Barley! Thanks for the opportunity to share our story!

VINNIE

Anna Hunt adopter (was named Chappo), adopted at 2016 Beer Festival My sweet little Vinnie boy—there are so many things that I can say about my sweet baby boy. In no way was I looking to get another dog when little Vinnie came into my life, considering I already had two, plus a kitty. I had gone to Beer Fest with my best friend, we were waiting in a long line and it was so hot out. A lady walked up and told us about the shorter lines in one of the buildings, and added that The Humane Society of Utah was doing dog adoptions. That was that: In no time flat, we were in there literally crying because of all the sweet babies needing good homes. As I am walking around, I’d pet a pup here and there, but I never took one out of their kennel until I came across Chappo (that was his name when I adopted him). He was scraggly, stinky, dirty and incredibly malnourished. The HSU employee told me that a group of pups had just come in from California, and he was in sorry shape. I took this pathetic looking dog out of his kennel and he was trembling uncontrollably, he would cower to the ground when you would go to pet him on his head. He wouldn’t even walk he was so afraid. I took this sweet baby in my arms and he melted into me, that’s how I knew he was the dog for me. He smiles now when you hold and pet him, his human sister Bridger gives him tons of loves and kisses, he cuddles with his big GSD brother, be wrestles around with his Chihuahua sister, and runs like the wind from his feline sister. This dog has more personality than I could of ever imagined. I could not see my life without him and I wouldn’t want to. I want to thank The Humane Society of Utah, Beer Fest and City Weekly for giving my sweet baby boy Vinnie the spotlight, he deserves it for the life he had before he found me and chose me to be his mommy.

DRINK. HERE. NOW!

STELLA

Keltie Sherwood adopter (was named Chaos), adopted at 2016 Beer Festival This was Chaos, we changed her name to Stella because A. my favorite beer is Stella and B. we didn't quite want her to live up to the name chaos. I was not looking for another pet but they were kept in the air-conditioned building and it was hot outside. We were overwhelmed by all the cute adorable dogs inside and started visiting with them. I was drawn to the yappy little ones and my husband wandered off. When I found him, he was by a bigger dog than what I would ever consider (we have a pug and a chihuahua). But she was calm. She wasn't aggressive or noisy. She just looked longingly at me. A staff member handed me a leash and said, "Would you like to walk her around?" I hesitantly said yes. OK, we walk around and I visit with the other dogs on walks. She was OK. Nothing overly excited. Was good on a leash. I sat down on a grassy patch and that's when I received it: the Stella hug. She was so gentle but so happy to be on my lap. Then she went to everyone's lap for some puppy loves and that's when we fell in love with her. I used the "this will be my running buddy" excuse to my husband but he didn't need convincing. We went through the adoption process and the staff members recommended ways on how to introduce her to our dogs at home and keep her healthy. We left her indoors so we could enjoy the rest of the festival and when we went outside, I looked at my husband and said, "Do you even want to walk around?" He replied with, "No, can we just go hang out with our dog?" So when people ask me how I liked Beer Fest, I tell them I don't even remember there being beer there haha! Stella completes our family and although she doesn't like running as much as I do, Stella still gives the best hugs!

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An ode to the dark side of Utah beer. BY MIKE RIEDEL

IPAs

might rule the bree roost right now. This is a beer style that’s come a long way in a short amount of time. Stout beers, however, have a long pedigree dating back to the early 1700s. Stouts were born from English porters that evolved to fit cultural and dietary needs. This widely popular beverage has given birth to dozens of progeny that range from the massive Russian imperial stout to the light and silky oatmeal varietal. The term “stout” tends to scare people off a bit, causing them to believe that they’re extremely filling and only meant for the cold-weather months. Threehundred years after its debut, those misconceptions are finally falling by the wayside as brewers continue to recraft stouts into beers that are as light as a wheat beer and can be enjoyed any time of the year. The recipes of old are now being enhanced in ways the original makers could have never imagined. Creative brewers are continuously experimenting with new ingredients to modify time-tested recipes while staying true to the style’s roots. Compounds like coffee, fruit, whiskey and even oysters are finding their way into our glasses on a daily basis. Utah’s craft brewers are no slouches in the stout department, especially when it comes to innovation or merely recreating the beers we’ve come to know and love. Here are five local examples of some truly great stouts:

Epic Brewing Co.’s Big Bad Baptist Opaque black in color with a thick, tan head, its nose has big aromas of cocoa, coffee and molasses, with bourbon also present. It’s silky on the tongue with cocoa and espresso immediately punching out. The molasses and bourbon soon take over, providing a sweet bed for the more bitter components. The ABV here clocks in at around 12 percent, but it’s well hidden. There’s a reason many consider this to be Utah’s most-acclaimed beer. Desert Edge Brewery’s Latter Day Stout It’s pitch black with a thick and dense foamy nitrogen cap. The nose has cocoa and a hint of coffee, and the taste follows suit as vanilla, chocolate and caramel meld together in a balanced partnership that never overpowers the stout’s character. I love the amount of flavor that Desert Edge managed to pack in this near-flawless 4-percent beer. Roosters Brewing Co.’s Junction City Chocolate Stout Blackish brown with a light tan head, this stout’s nose has a touch of chocolate and a dash of smoke, and flavor aided by subtle dark cocoa with cola-and-coffee notes follows. It finishes semidry with pine bitterness. If you’re not into stouts, this 4-percenter could be the one to ease you in. Bonneville Brewery’s Sir Malcolm’s Stout Ebony in color with a large, dense, foamy beige nitro head, its nose has roasted malts, oats, cocoa and coffee. The taste starts with a hearty roasted malt, toasted oats and coffee followed by chocolate, providing a good balance. At 4 percent ABV, it’s a tasty and not too filling textbook example of an oatmeal stout.

MIKE RIEDEL

When in Stout

2 Row Brewing’s Dark Alley Imperial Stout It appears nearly jet black and opaque with ruby highlights. The nose has big roasted coffee notes along with dark fruits, baker’s chocolate and sweet roasted malts (plus a touch of booziness). There’s intense chocolate, espresso and coffee off the bat. Luscious plum, raisins and dates round out the more bitter qualities. The finish is a bit boozy with some drying hops. This 13.4 percent ABV beer is a double-black-diamond, aka not for the timid stout drinker. Most of these can be found year-round at local grocery and liquor stores along the Wasatch Front. Don’t be afraid to veer from the usual, and take a walk on the dark side. CW

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Just the Tips

H

BY ENRIQUE LIMÓN

ead cheese washed down with a stout? A McRib coupled with a lager? As beer ethos swells, so does every satellite aspect around it, including food culture. The original plan was to tap a local beer expert and ask for his take on what grub pairs with what sud. After several unreturned messages, I decided to take matters into my own hands aided solely by City Weekly’s spotty Wi-Fi, the pressure of deadline and sheer fury. Behold the perfect beer pairings!

ALE

Epicurious suggests burgers, chicken wings, Mexican food, Asian food, pizza, fried food, spicy food and nutty food. Also anything with cheddar, Romano or Parmesan cheese. So pretty much any food ever made. Lesson learned. Don’t fuck with the ale lobby.

BROWN ALE

Calling it a “symphony of toffee, nuts and toast,” seriouseats.com suggests you pair it with autumn and winter eats—aged gouda; rare, grilled steaks; and ovenroasted acorn squash. Pinkies down. This is the Ron Swanson of beers.

HEFEWEIZEN

Poured into into a traditional Weizen glass, beeradvocate.com, calls this German wheat brew “one sexy looking beer.” With hints of banana, spicy clove and bubblegum, pairing suggestions include smoked ham, pork shoulder and Bavarian sausage (all aphrodisiacs in my book).

INDIA PALE ALE

Per the Boulder, Colo.-based Brewers Association, you should opt for strong, spicy food (it’s “classic with curry!” they beam), milder blues like gorgonzola and persimmon rice pudding. Oh, and beards.

PORTER

Specialty site matchingfoodandwine.com recommends steak pie, venison stew, ox cheeks, barbecue ribs, smoked brisket and darkchocolate cake. A couple Lipitor thrown into the mix couldn’t hurt, either.

PILSNER

Dubbed by seriouseats.com as “the perfect beer,” reach for some Jamaican-jerk chicken, bruschetta, sushi, poundcake and dubious burritos, as apparently, “This beer has the cutting power to get through even the pastiest refried beans.”

NORTHEAST-STYLE IPA

This hazy, new kid on the block shines alongside anything “house-emulsified” or “smallbatch foraged.” Also, wirerimmed glasses, a carefully curated Instagram feed and a monologue about how everything is better in Portland.

LAGER

According to an entry on michelob.com: Brie, fish tacos and grilled golden trout are an ambrosia match. “Served with bacon and spinach, this flavorful, salmon-colored meat emphasizes Michelob’s subtle caramel and toffee malt flavors, and reinforces its spiciness,” it says of the latter.

SAISON

According to Fortune—Fortune!— this is the ultimate Thanksgiving beer, as it “walk[s] the line between bitter and sweet and will certainly compliment the turkey.” Throw in contempt, a hearty dose of side-eye and a telenovela-style revelation or two (the refried beans are pasty! You have a German sausage fetish!) into the mix for an authentic feel. CW


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Almost Ales

City Weekly gets into the #FakeBeer biz with these extra hoppy, extra fruity, extra Biskupsky-y brews. BY RYAN BRADFORD, JEFF TERICH AND ENRIQUE LIMÓN* ART BY CAROLYN RAMOS & DEREK CARLISLE

Definitely Not an IPA Pilsner Huh? What is this? It sorta tastes like beer, and it’s getting you drunk, but where’s the dankness? Here’s the secret, homeboy: It’s not an IPA. But don’t fret! It’s still beer. If you don’t say anything, we won’t either—nobody will know that you strayed. [winky emoji]

Piña Colada Passion Fruit Watermelon Cantaloupe Ale Grapefruit beer is pretty good. Watermelon? Sure. But why stop there?! This extra fruity, sweet and fragrant ale has just a hint of beer, and actually does the trick when you’ve had a long day of brewing and forgot to pick up a bar of Irish Spring.

Beer Bro Bro Beard Hazy IPA Notice your beard has gotten a pungent, hoppy aroma after all those IPAs? Well, how about reinvesting those hop-hairs into a special brew? This beer has actually been prebearded for an extra hazy, hairy mouthfeel. Hold on … there’s something on my tongue.

Pretty Much Just Hops Triple IPA Sometimes you want your beer to not only punch you in the face, but also knock you the fuck out, leave you bleeding on the floor, rob you of your money, steal your wife, start a religious cult and encourage mass suicide via hoppy zeal—because life’s too short for weak shit, bro.

Brigham’s Brew Just canned water. CW

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*Yes, it really took three people to come up with this.

AUGUST 10, 2017 | 43

Jeff Sessions’ Session IPA When you’re sitting through long confirmation hearings, you don’t want to get too tipsy too early. This extremely white … er, light, session ale is just what you need when you’ve gotta chill in Congress for a while. Recuse yourself from high ABVs! Time for a leak.

Biskupski Brewski This politically bodied blonde with a fizzy top is sure to give you shelter (or four). Not getting enough of a buzz from its secret recipe 3.2 percent ABV? Demand your barkeep’s resignation letter.


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Musical Home-brew

A little sumpin’ sumpin’ to drown out the sloshing in your belly. BY RANDY HARWARD

I

t’s only right and natural that songs about sin will proliferate in an oppressive conservative state. “They” say drinking beer is a sin; we say beer is proof that God loves us and wants us all to be happy. Those are two good reasons to write songs about that fizzy, frothy goodness, and several of our best local acts have done just that. Here are seven jams guaranteed to put you in the Utah Beer Festival mood:

Thunderfist

“PBR” from Live at Burt’s (store.cdbaby.com/artist/thunderfist, 2004) The initials, for you teetotalers, stand for Pabst Blue Ribbon, the domestic (right down to its red-white-and-blue can) pisswater the group lionizes in this song. The track was on every T-fist album until they decided tradition isn’t important. The tune distills the ritual of obtaining, drinking, sharing and procuring more of the king of cheap beers in less than 90 seconds and has classic lines like “I can’t even fuckin’ taste it” and “that shit’ll get you wasted.” It is—and, for all time will be—the definitive local song about beer. Beer Pairing: Asked to choose a brew that goes nicely with the tune, singer-guitarist Jeremy Cardenas sang a line from the chorus: “PBR!”

Colt.46

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Insatiable

“GPC’s” from Can’t Get Enough (I-Man, 1994) For some folks, generic brand cigarettes are an essential accessory to frosty barley pop—and you can get both at a convenience store. This song by these local ska legends is from the perspective of a 7-Eleven clerk and how he deals with the demanding “connoisseurs” who not only need a pack of smokes now, but also change for a $100 bill. “Gimme a pack o’ those GPC’s/ in a sack/ do you got any Coors quarts in the back?” Beer Pairing: Singer/keyboard monkey Jeff Evans recommends Epic’s Double Skull or Pinstripe Red from Ska Brewing in Durango, Colo., which isn’t available in Utah, though it’s “awesome and appropriate.”

Voodoo Swing

“Beer Goggle Boogie” from Well, Okay Then! (Rockhouse, 1995) The intro line to this greasy rockabilly number, “Come on baby/ let’s go drinkin’ and drivin’/ tonight” sucks— but the rest of the song is about what you think it’s about: Drinking enough beer that everybody looks sexy. Well, an awkward morning is certainly preferable to ensuring you or an innocent never sees another sunrise. So here’s the PSA for the column, folks: If you drink and flirt, well, look both ways before crossing that street. And designated drivers and Lyfts are your friend. Beer Pairing: Which brew gives you the best goggle-vision? Bass player and SLUG Magazine founder J.R. Ruppel says, “probably longneck Budweisers.”

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36 mon, aug. 14 | the depot

mew

$

27 wed, aug. 16 | the state room

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$

15 sat, aug. 12 | metro music hall

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Spörk

$

13 sun, aug. 13 | kilby court

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AUGUST 10, 2017 | 45

“You Bring the Coors, Jesus Will Bring the Light” from Spork 2.0 (sporkslc.bandcamp.com, 2014) The two-headed, flatulent beast Spörk puts out some bitchin’ noise. And since the band is fronted by City Weekly perennial contributor Bill Frost, the lyrics aren’t too shabby, either. He doesn’t recall exactly what he wrote about in “Coors/Jesus,” but it seems to be about forced morality. You know, how government tries to run your life in the name of the Lord. Even if it’s not, “Choose your own misadventure tonight/ you bring the Coors/ Jesus will bring the light” sounds killer over Frost’s monolithic, Sabbath-inspired riffs. Beer Pairing: “Certainly not Coors,” Bill says. “Wasatch Evolution, because even Jesus believes in it.” CW

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“King of Beers” from Cereal Killers (Giant, 1991) These alt-rock party animals get honorary local status, since singer Tim Quirk married an ex-Mormon. It’s also the song I learned to party to, thanks to three skiers from Baltimore who helped a shy, sheltered 20-year-old loosen up before (sniff) going back home like three drunken E.T.s. “Gonna feel like hell tomorrow/ so I won’t go to sleep tonight,” Quirk sings at the song’s outset, leading to the chorus: “I am invincible/ I have no fear/ I am benevolent/ I am the king of beers.” The raucous, semiacoustic tune describes those nights when we love/hate our friends, question our character and choices, pine for the beauty across the room, and say stoopid things we’ll forget by Monday. Dave, Doug, Mark—I miss you. And thanks. Beer Pairing: Quirk recommends, “Budweiser, for historical accuracy; Sierra Nevada, for taste.”

“Beer” from Round One (imgrum.me/user/whiskeyfish801/, 2009) If you were at the 2015 Utah Beer Festival—or at one of the band’s frequent gigs at A Bar Named Sue, you heard Whiskey Fish’s shitkickin’ version of this tune by ska octet Reel Big Fish. It translates from ska to country rather well (credit the titular beverage and the lyrics about pondering a fresh breakup over one beer, and then another, and another). Beer Pairing: Singer-guitarist Brandon Anderson suggests “lukewarm Coors Banquet. Or Odell’s 90 Shilling—because we’re all about the money.”

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“You Owe Me a Beer” from Hang Fire (colt46.com/music, 2015) The Ogden band’s buoyant country tune is about a road trip where frontman Dale Condie randomly ran into an old friend in a bar 2,000 miles away from home. “Hallelujah and amen, sonofabitch, how have you been?/ Well, I’ve been all over hell/ just to see you here.” He bought the guy a round, telling him he can reciprocate whenever they chance to meet again. “Yeah, this one here’s on me/ but the next time that we meet/ you owe me a beer.” Beer Pairing: Whenever Condie went “north of the ‘border,’” he brought back Fat Tire for the boys back home.

Whiskey Fish


Grain to Glass

Following the path of craft beer at Red Rock Brewing. BY SARAH ARNOFF

W

hile the craft-beer community in Utah is experiencing new (and welcome) growth, one of the state's originals is still going strong after more than two decades. Red Rock Brewing's hands-on attitude toward its brewing process and emphasis on people who power its assembly lines might be the secrets to its longevity. Employee loyalty abounds at the brewery and pub locations. From grinding grain to packing boxes and even helping stock state liquor store shelves, the person who is stacking pallets in the morning might be behind the bar to pour you a tall one when 5 p.m. rolls around. We followed the production of one of Red Rock's most popular brews, the 20th Anniversary IPA, tracing the steps of what it takes to make great craft beer.

4. Boiling the wort

7. Fermentation tanks

2. Brewmaster Kevin Templin sifts through grain imported to Red Rock from Germany.

5. Brewer Andrew Rinaldo prepares yeast to be added to the fermentation tank.

8. Pristine bottles waiting to be filled

3. Templin pulls some mash from the boil.

6. The boiling wort is temperature controlled and cooled significantly before it’s transferred to the fermentation tank.

9. Dave Haley grabs a few bottles.

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1. Red Rock Brewery on bottling day


14. Giles moves newly labeled bottles to be filled and capped.

11. Greg Giles and Haley work the bottling process.

15. Alisha Telles and Brandon Smith assemble and label boxes.

12. Labels ready to go

16. Haley and Ron Jones pack and seal boxes.

13. Freshly labeled bottle

17. Brewer Lauren Lerch stacks boxes awaiting transport to fridge storage.

18. Smith moves pallets from cold storage to a semi ready to ship.

19. Lerch snags a few bottles to serve at the Downtown Red Rock Brewery location.

20. The final step: Lerch pours the 20th Anniversary IPA to quench the thirst of a parched patron.

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10. Adding bottles to the conveyor

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EBBA BESKRIVER

Alt-Drinking

An ode to keg stands, lawn flamingos and butt-chugging. BY JORDAN FLOYD

O

f the myriad ways to drink beer that do not include the relatively puritanical from-the-glass or the bottle method, perhaps the most insane, why-the-fuckwould-anyone-do-that way to down a cold one is the fabled butt-chug. When yr. corresp. began college in the fall of 2013, talk— and just that, talk—of drinking beer via the anus was en vogue. Superficially, the hallmark butt-chugging story, though it was only alleged to have happened, of the University of Tennessee Pike (Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity) was advertised on many quasi-news sites, such as the morally questionable Total Frat Move, as a laugh-and-a-half worthy happening. Groups of late-teens and 20-somethings who were molded by the likes of MTV’s Jackass were sold on the grotesque humor. I mean, come on, drinking beer through your ass—it’s so ridiculous that the only thinkable reaction might be a laugh. The cold-hard butt-chugging facts, however, indicate that consuming alcohol in such a way is as dangerous and idiotic as it sounds. Sans medical jargon, butt-chugging gets the consuming party drunk extremely fast because the alcohol enters directly into their bloodstream. In the case of the Tennessee Pike, if our hero was indeed guilty of butt-chugging, he was taken to the hospital with a nearfatal blood alcohol level of .47. Whether the alleged incident happened or didn’t, the fact the concept exists is something of a phenomenon. (Note: In Thrasher magazine’s current season of King of the Road, professional skateboarder Dave Gravette is filmed butt-chugging a beer atop of skateboarding quarter-pipe, displaying at least some cultural significance of the buttchug and a confirmed instance of it happening.) Why it exists, and why other crazier, though less dangerous, ways of drinking beer like the beer bong or the Flabongo (same

idea as the beer bong, but done through the body of a lawn flamingo), and games that encourage drinking en masse like beer pong or rage cage, according to Utah State University’s Dr. Lynne McNeill, can best be explained by the study of folklore. As an area of academic study, folklore encompasses exactly what its name would imply: the lore of the folk. McNeill says anything that is “an element of culture that’s consistently brought up on an informal level” qualifies as folklore. Most importantly, folklore’s defining quality is that it is passed on from one community member to the next. Many are probably familiar with stories of lone babysitters hearing a raspy voice ask, “Did you check the children?” over the phone, or alligators making a home in a metropolis’ sewer system. These types of stories are indeed the star players on the folklore field, but folklore encompasses so much more—including imbibing. Historians have been studying the ways people drink beer and what each says about the drinker and their culture for quite some time. In his 1959 book American Folklore, folklorist Richard Dorson spends a fair amount of time examining drinking games. In his estimation, drinking games “mark off the men from the boys and the coeds from the bobby-soxers.” Additionally, one’s prowess in the area of “chug-a-lug-ing,” both a game in itself and a penalty for losing in manifold other games, Dorson explains, expresses an individual’s maturity and stature—hence differentiating coeds from bobby-soxers. Just as well, muscling through two 40s of Miller HighLife and thus freeing yourself from your Tim Burton-esque, duct-taped bounds, McNeill says, can work as a way to teach individuals how a culture works. In the case of drinking games or crazy ways of consuming beer, this means teaching newcomers the ol’ wax-on, wax-off of alcohol. McNeill describes the process of prospective drinkers learning to drink as a pendulum. Most people, she says, spend a lot of time on the side that says drinking is bad. When an individual makes the decision to drink, whether pre- or post-21, they then have to swing to the other side, and doing so requires an itinerary for traveling to the other side and what to do while there. “I think for our society—and I’m talking about the U.S. very generally—we make such a stink about alcohol being forbidden,” McNeill says. “Alcohol is not neutral from a young age, but all of the sudden at 21 it’s supposed to be OK. You can see why we would need cultural forms to help us

swing the other way.” Understandably, learning to drink by way of watching a friend do a kegstand with the sturdiness of an Olympic gymnast can be problematic. These cultural forms, as McNeill calls them, don’t singularly teach people how to drink, but can just as readily teach individuals how not to drink, or at least show over time that such drinking practices are unsustainable. “I am in my late 30s, and while we did our fair share of drinking in our younger days, and still do, I think that at some point you learn to pace yourself,” Joan Williams of Ogden’s Talisman Brewing Co. says, responding by email to an inquiry about her experience with crazy drinking games and methods. “I absolutely hate when I overdo it and wake up feeling lousy the next day. When I drink, it is more about the flavor and complexity of what I am drinking—and less about getting smashed.” So what about the butt-chug? McNeill says that even dangerous means of consuming alcohol can have some value to an individual, even at the expense of their health. “At that point we’re getting into individual psychology rather than social,” she says. “There’s sort of this drive to stand out in a culture that’s already defined by being crazy. You want to be the person who stands out the most.” But drinking games and shotgunning and its ilk aren’t so much in fashion or practical in Utah’s craft-dominated beer scene. Like Shades of Pale’s Trent Fargher says, “The craft beer crowd doesn’t really do this … most people take their time enjoying what we put in a glass.” But they are still a staple of culture, even if it’s lay or folk culture, and somewhat of a rite of passage (McNeill notes that she herself felt she had “achieved a marker of American collegiate identity” when she played beer pong for the first time at 35 with a Ph.D. under her belt). All of humanity who through their teen years and 20s must weather the pains of being young and different degrees of dumb. Perhaps, items of beer drinking folklore are something that can unite beer drinkers, especially in a state like ours where drinking is worn as a subversive banner. Sure, letting a whole can of Natty Ice waterfall across a piece of pizza and into your mouth might not be something anyone would be particularly proud of, but it could be something at which to shake your head and laugh about with your friends. So, whether you partake in a modest pint sip or a seriously stupid anal spectacular, this chug’s for you. CW


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Warm Buzz

TV

10 shows you slept on this summer.

S

Blood Drive (Syfy) Andrea Savage’s first all-about-me vehicle doesn’t care to differentiate itself from other Comics as Themselves But Not Really half-hours—it’s all about the jokes. I’m Sorry, referring to mom/comedy writer “Andrea’s” tendency to say the most hilariously wrong things, is a white wine spritzer of a sitcom: not too heavy, not too sweet, perfect for summer. Decker: Unsealed/Mindwipe (Adult Swim): The shootfirst-think-never action hero ’Merica needs returned in Season 2 of Decker: Unsealed, Tim Heidecker’s … tribute? to Tom Clancy novels, Steven Seagal movies and the comedic power of incompetent, but patriotic, production. Then Decker segued into Mindwipe, because who cares? Heidecker could probably upsell this to InfoWars as a documentary. CW Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

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Jones smolder, but she’s ultimately a goofball, pushing Wynonna Earp closer to Buffy the Vampire Slayer territory. As Wynonna, Melanie Scrofano bites into an impressive array of emotional flavors when the show gets serious; when it’s not, Earp is Syfy’s funniest series after Blood Drive. Odd Mom Out (Bravo): It’s Season 3—does Bravo even know this is still on? Odd Mom Out, an adaptation of author Jill Kargman’s Momzillas (and starring herself; Kargman’s also an adept comedic actress), is everything the Real Housewives are not: smart, self-aware and funny. In particular, SNL cast-off Abby Elliott shines as a Manhattanite so dim and self-absorbed that she’s practically a black hole. Wrecked (TBS): Much improved from its first season, which apparently didn’t map out anything past “Let’s mash-up Gilligan’s Island and Lost,” Wrecked found its groove in Season 2 by adding outside conflict (pirates!) and internal lust (hot—well, weird—castaway-on-castaway action!). Watching pampered idiots struggle to survive on an island is better when Jeff Probst isn’t calling the action. I’m Sorry (TruTV): Longtime comedic side-player

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ummer 2017, like summers of Peak TV before it, has been overloaded with buzzy hot-weather series like GLOW, Preacher, Twin Peaks, Rick and Morty, Orphan Black and, of course, Game of Thrones, to name just a few. Fortunately, there weren’t any other, below-the-radar shows that you’ll absolutely need to add to your catch-up cue once you’ve had enough of the sun and the outdoors and whatever the hell else life away from the screen offers, right? Wrong—here are 10 you probably missed: The Jim Jefferies Show (Comedy Central): The overworked late-night talkers have done an admirable, if repetitive, job of taking the piss out of our Made for TV president. None have done it with the glee and zero-fucks-given swagger of Australian comedian Jim Jefferies, who backs up his barbs with cold facts, on-location bits and “weatherman” Brad Pitt consistently predicting climate doomsday. Blood Drive (Syfy): In the “distant future of 1999,” environmentally ravaged America’s favorite new spectator sport is the Blood Drive, wherein the cars run on human blood! The jarringly perverse and stoopid series is just Death Race 2000 with a cartoon-grindhouse twist (real Syfy complaint line: 1-325-400-DGAF), but emcee Julian Slink (Colin Cunningham) is a delicious villain for the ages. Claws (TNT): Women chew Florida scenery and buff cuticles in this nail-salon crime thriller, led commandingly by Niecy Nash, drawing upon her comedy and drama backgrounds equally. Somehow, Claws’ colorful characters (like Dean Norris as Uncle Daddy, “a Dixie Mafia crime boss who’s deeply Catholic and actively bisexual”) never overwhelm the tense drugs-and-money-laundering narrative. The Strain (FX): Eternal darkness has fallen, and a totalitarian regime that rules though fear and intimidation has taken over. Relax, it’s only Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s vampire-apocalypse epic The Strain, now in its fourth and final season. Interest has waned (ratings are down to half of Season 1’s), but The Strain is still bigly more compelling and creepy than The Walking Dead. Queen of the South (USA): Teresa’s (Alice Braga) path to becoming a future drug queenpin got even more tangled than her hair in Season 2—surely, she can afford a brush by now—upping the stakes and the body count along the way. Also, the woman she’ll eventually replace, Camilla (Adriana Barraza), transformed from an icy caricature into a fleshedout, almost sympathetic character. But only almost. Wynonna Earp (Syfy): The demon-hunting great-greatgranddaughter of Wyatt Earp might have a bit of that Jessica

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M-Sat 8-7 Sun 10-5 • 9275 S 1300 W 801-562-5496 • glovernursery.com


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Highlighting some of my favorite local food-and-beer pairings. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

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The classic burger, topped with cheddar cheese and bourbon-garlic caramelized onions, is among the many menu items at Squatters.

Contemporary Japanese Dining LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

n ever-increasing numbers, craft beer aficionados are following a trail initially broken by their wine-loving brethren: Oenophiles know that wine is almost always better and more interesting when paired with food. Over the past couple years, I’ve seen more and more food-andbeer pairing dinners advertised, as well as more articles and blogs devoted to pairing beer with food (see p.40 for more). With the upcoming Utah Beer Festival in mind, here are a handful of my recommended marriages of pub grub and suds from some of our great local breweries. There are few brews I enjoy more than Latter Day Stout on the nitro tap at Desert Edge Pub & Brewery (551 S. 600 East, Trolley Square, SLC, 801-521-8917, desertedgebrewery.com). The beer is a classic Irish stout with chocolate malts, roasted barley and nugget hops. Maybe you don’t typically think of drinking beer with dessert, but you should. The chocolatey goodness of Latter Day Stout, along with its coffee-like flavors, is a slam-dunk when sipped alongside Desert Edge’s rich, flourless Chocolate Decadence. At Red Rock Brewery (multiple locations, redrockbrewing.com), I’ve developed quite a fondness for their Juice Almighty. It’s what the Red Rock brewers call a New England IPA—a hoppy, bitter (in the best way), hazy brew with herbal notes. The crisp acidity of an IPA makes it a good partner for spicy dishes such as Red Rock’s seafood linguini puttanesca, which incorporates tangy green olives, capers and chili flakes. I’d also try Juice Almighty with the sriracha-spiked chili-glazed-shrimp salad.

Greg Schirf’s Wasatch Brew Pub (250 Main, Park City, 435-649-0900; 2110 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-783-1127, wasatchbeers.com) was Utah’s first, and is still one of the best. For the past few years, my go-to Wasatch brew has been their Jalapeño Cream Ale. Imagine enjoying a HudepohlSchoenling Little Kings Cream Ale subtly infused with jalapeño. It’s a refreshing and tantalizing summertime sipper that pairs especially well their loaded mac-and-cheese, which is also barbed with the chiles. The creaminess of the cheese cuts through the beer’s hot-pepper heat like a warm knife through butter. In Proper Brewing Co.’s (857 S. Main, SLC, 801-953-1707, properbrewingco.com) LeisureBrau India Vienna Lager, slightly sweet Munich and Vienna malts contrast with American IPA-style hoppiness to create a very provocative, cold-lagered hybrid brew. It’s a versatile beer that would pair with a range of foods, but I particularly like the idea of sipping it next to Proper’s Johnny Utah burger, with American cheese, housesmoked pastrami, Russian dressing, coleslaw and zucchini pickles. The rarebit fries are also a good match: large-cut fries with beer-and-cheese rarebit sauce, red onion, tomato and bacon. Whenever I visit Squatters (multiple locations, squatters.com), the expertly crafted Vienna Marzen Lager inevitably calls out to me. Sweet caramel malts characterize this luscious, lightly hopped beer, which sort of screams for schnitzel and spaetzle. Since those Austrian standbys aren’t on the menu, I opt for a different type of pork dish to pair with it: carnitas. The Mexican-style carnitas at Squatters are made with high-quality, slow-roasted Niman Ranch pork and served with warm corn tortillas, queso fresco, fresh cilantro, salsa, guacamole, refried beans, rice and pico de gallo. This pairing presents a delicious example of Old World meets New. If you’re not quite up for that much food, the Marzen is also the perfect foil for Squatters’ pub pretzel with three-cheese sauce and Full Suspension Pale Ale mustard. Now that you’re salivating: Got your Beer Fest tickets yet? CW


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FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW

VINCE CORAK

@scottrenshaw

BBQ, Blues & Brews at Brian Head

Summer flavors are outdoor flavors, and nothing has more outdoor flavor than barbecue. Grill and barbecue chefs from throughout the Intermountain West congregate at Brian Head Resort (329 S. Highway 143, Brian Head, 435677-2035) for the third annual BBQ, Blues & Brews event Saturday, Aug. 12, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Entertainment includes family activities and live music throughout the day, but the star attraction is the chance to taste—and be part of the “People’s Choice” judging— of succulent offerings in chicken, brisket and ribs categories. Visit brianhead. com for additional info.

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

Wasatch International Food Festival

If you want to warm up your taste buds for the City Weekly Utah Beer Festival happening Aug. 19-20, you might have time—and stomach room—for more made-in-Utah deliciousness. The Utah Cultural Celebration Center hosts the second annual Wasatch International Food Festival on Friday, Aug. 18 (510 p.m.) and Saturday, Aug. 19 (noon-8 p.m.), with a full lineup of music, including Soul Research Foundation, Smiling Souls and Lo-Fi Riot. But the real headliner, of course, is the food, coming from a cross-section of local food trucks (Jamaica’s Kitchen, Bandera Brisket, Falafel Tree, Hawaiian Vilo Vilo Chicken and more) plus booths representing other offerings like Spudnik stuffed baked potatoes, Papito Moe’s Puerto Rican Grub and Mama Africa. Attendees also get a chance to experience live chef demonstrations. General admission is $5; children 12 and under get in for free. Visit foodfestutah. org for more information.

Park City Culinary Comes to SLC

The Park City Culinary Institute isn’t just in the mountains anymore; aspiring chefs can now study in the valley. The next four-week Cuisine Certification course begins Aug. 21 at the Salt Lake City campus (1484 S. State) Monday-Thursday. Evening Pastry Certificate classes begin Sept. 6. Visit culinaryschoolutah.com for more details on dates and tuition. Quote of the Week: “Beer. Now there’s a temporary solution.” —Homer Simpson

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Greek Souvlaki

A perennial City Weekly Best of Utah winner, Greek Souvlaki was developing a following long before the inception of the awards. The doors to the first location were opened in 1972 by Lee and Mary Paulos, and they served just three items: gyros, souvlaki and beefteki. The business has since expanded to five locations and has stayed true to the Paulos’ vision of serving high-quality Greek cuisine to Salt Lake. Multiple locations, greeksouvlaki.com

Sawadee

Squatters

italianvillageslc.com

Tulie Bakery

MON-THU 11a-11p FRI-SAT 11a-12a / SUN 3p-10p

801.266.4182

It’s “beervana” at The Bayou—with a seemingly never-ending selection of brews. Can’t decide which one to try? Download The Bayou App, which randomly selects 10 beers from the beer list. They don’t just serve the Devil’s nectar, though. Bayou also has an amazing dining selection, such as the Cajun chicken sandwich, served with spicy chicken, chipotle aioli, provolone and onions. 645 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-961-8400, utahbayou.com

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“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

AUGUST 10, 2017 | 53

5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT

The Bayou

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

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Get your Italian on.

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM-

Owner/self-taught pastry czar Leslie Seggar knows exactly what’s she’s doing on every level—from croissants to hot-pressed sandwiches. Seggar’s gourmet pastries feature only the finest ingredients, and the treats are enhanced by the store’s layout, right down to communal tables that create a warm and contemporary environment. The sticky buns are out of this world. 863 E. 700 South, 801-883-9741, tuliebakery.com

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

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Italian Village

Squatters has been the go-to brewpub for Salt Lakers since its 1989 inception. But the beer- and burgerlovers’ refuge has much more to offer patrons: Its diverse menu ranges from an insanely tasty Thai yellow curry to grilled salmon drizzled with wasabi aioli. After all these years, it’s still among the best in town. Another perk: You can pick up a six-pack of full-strength beer to take home, even after the liquor stores are closed. Multiple locations, squatters.com

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

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Named after its owner, Sawadee specializes in wholesome, family-style Thai cuisine served in an über-friendly atmosphere. Standards include pad thai and spring rolls, but something more exotic, try honey-ginger duck or a Thai curry puff. Spicy dishes include the curries, which can be made to your specification. Tofu can be substituted in any meat dish, and an extensive vegetarian selection will thrill non-carnivores. There’s a great wine list, too. 754 E. South Temple, 801-328-8424, sawadee1.com


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REVIEW BITES

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Lamb rogan josh Royal India

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third friday jam with pockit

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grey on blue

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here... Summer is

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2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

AUG 12TH

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This younger sibling to the original Sandy location offers the same bright and bold Indian flavors in a smaller space with not quite as much ambience. I always begin my meal with an order of papadum ($2.95)—a generous serving of four crispy lentil wafers, seasoned with tart spices such as cumin and coriander. My go-to curry dish has always been the exquisite chicken vindaloo ($12.95), a tangy mélange of boneless chicken morsels, potatoes, onions and tomatoes in a tart vinegar-based curry sauce. The lamb rogan josh ($15.95) features boneless chunks of tender, lean lamb bathed in a silky, spicy sauce made with tomatoes and cream, accented with bay leaves, cumin, ginger and other sensational spices. I always order a side of multi-layered paratha ($2.95)—whole wheat bread baked in a clay tandoor oven—to help with soaking up all of that sauce. For a milder experience—but just as layered, complex and rich—I recommend shrimp saag ($15.95), a creamy, greens-based dish (spinach, in this case) cooked with onions, spices and tomatoes. All menu items are generously portioned and shareable, tending to leave plenty of leftovers for a next-day lunch or snack. Reviewed July 13. 55 N. Main, Bountiful, 801-292-1835, royalindiautah.com

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Tony Holiday drops a new EP of homegrown blues magic.

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n addition to the blues, Tony Holiday’s got jet lag. It’s 9:30 p.m. and his plane from Chicago landed only a few minutes ago. But the blues ain’t such a bad thing to have, especially when you can let it out onstage in front of a throng of people who’ve come to purge their problems to the sound of your music. Holiday was in the Windy City to perform at the Merchant Street Music Festival. “There were probably, like, 20,000 people,” he says. The festival features a ton of blues acts, but isn’t dedicated to a single genre. In fact, Holiday opened for Color Me Badd. “I wanna sex you up!” Holiday sings into the phone. It’s been a busy weekend. “I haven’t showered in a couple days; I’m funky,” he says. He flew out on Saturday morning, took Amtrak to the festival in the suburbs of Kankakee, performed there, then returned to Chicago to play a set at Lizards Liquid Lounge. As if that wasn’t enough, Holiday and guitarist Landon Stone then went to Buddy Guy’s Legends for his birthday. “We drank beers with Buddy Guy’s daughter Shawnna,” he says. “We were drinking Sierra Nevadas by the dozen. Then we did the whole Chicago night scene with the Guy family.” These trips get more common for Holiday every year. “We’re on the blues circuit now, and it’s taken me a long time to get there— seven years,” he says. Since he struck out on his own in 2009 following a successful run with jam band Marinade—which featured one Talia Keys on drums—he’s built quite the following. Even esteemed music critic Fred Mills, my old boss from Harp and Blurt, had already heard of him. In City Weekly’s Local Music Issue (March 2, 2017), Mills said of the bluesman: “Every city with a club scene has the proverbial journeyman blues band that perennially tops annual best-of awards but remains unknown nationally. But I come pre-sold on this harp-powered outfit, having already heard of its rep for sinewy, tuneful chops and full-tilt appreciation of the form.” Holiday’s music is that good, and it gets better all the time. His new EP, Tony Holiday (facebook.com/tonyholidaymusic), while deeply rooted in the blues, is imbued with elements of funk, but never feels like one of those forced blues hybrids that tries vainly to update the sound. In some ways, the funkiness is simply attitude—much like how music journos toss around the word “punk” when describing blues guitarist Popa Chubby. But when you listen to Holiday or Chubby, it’s hard to hear anything but the deep, righteous blues. Recorded piecemeal over the past year at noted blues guitarist Kid Andersen’s (Charlie Musselwhite, Rick Estrin & the Night Cats) Greaseland Studios in San Jose, Calif., the six-track set features originals and covers. “Barefoot Blue,” an intersection of raw blues and Blaxploitation-era funk written by guitarist Stone, features the band’s new three-piece horn section—Michael Bigelow on tenor sax, Eric Devey on trumpet and Mason Peterson on sax. “Mean Ass Woman” is a close cousin to that tune. Songs like “Weep and Moan” and incendiary takes on Sonny Boy Williamson II’s “Cross My Heart” and Brandon Santini’s “You Ruined Poor Me” are pure

Left to right: Landon Stone, Tony Holiday and Gordon Greenwood blues magic, where Holiday’s dusky voice and jaunty harp are in top form. “New Groove” splits the difference between both approaches. That Holiday and his music are homegrown should be a point of pride for Utahns. The tunes sound as though they could’ve come from sweet home Chicago. He says that wherever the band goes, people ask, “We love your music; where are you from?” When they say Utah, “they’re surprised. But if we play in Chicago, they might think we’re from Chicago.” This could be vexing, but Holiday says he and the Velvetones take it as a compliment—and motivation. “It’s like we have something to prove.” As he insinuates, it’s not such a bad thing. It’s good to stay motivated. It gets you through those long weekends of work and play, and keeps the music flowing. But Tony Holiday & the Velvetones have already proven their mettle. When they release Tony Holiday at The State Room, they’ll be joined by blues legend and fellow harmonica master James Harman—plus another local genre luminary, Jordan Matthew Young and his band. Holiday chooses to remain humble about it all. In fact, he’s letting Harman have the headlining slot. “James is a blues legend,” he says. “We’re more than thrilled to have him out. He’s the real deal. We might be co-headlining the night, but as far as I’m concerned, yeah—he’s the man.” CW

JAMES HARMAN

w/ Tony Holiday & the Velvetones, Jordan Matthew Young Friday, Aug. 11, 9 p.m. The State Room 638 S. State 801-596-3560 $15 21+ thestateroom.com


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AUGUST 10, 2017 | 57


When City Weekly announced the Twilight Concert Series lineup in April, I wrote that Solange’s music is miles better than that of her sister, Beyoncé. “In fact, Solange’s A Seat at the Table (Saint/Columbia, 2016) is eminently listenable—just so, so good— without indulging in pop tropes like bling, boasting and vocal showboating. It’s mood music as much as club music, meaning you can dance to it while hammered or kick back on a Sunday afternoon in a La-Z-Boy with headphones and find it equally enjoyable.” I’m even more enthused about her now; her sister’s Lemonade album has people drooling, but Solange is more authentic, gritty and compelling. In that Twilight teaser, I also said Haitian/Canadian DJ Kaytranada does his thing just as well, “puttin’ out some headphone phodda of his own on 99.9% (XL/HW&W, 2016).” He’s another one who gets better with each listen, so my conclusion from April is the same: Tonight, you can hear Kaytranada get the crowd worked up before Solange lays it down. (Randy Harward) Pioneer Park, 350 S. 300 West, 7 p.m., $7.50 advance/$10 day of show, all ages, twilightconcerts.com

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 8/11-12

The 11th Annual Women’s Redrock Music Festival, feat. Emily Saliers, Holly Near, Daphne Willis, Mary Tebbs, Kate MacLeod and more

Founded in 2007, the Womens’ Redrock Music Festival is in the 11th year of its mission to, as the fest’s literature says, “empower and support independent

Emily Saliers

CARLOTTA GUERRERO

Solange, Kaytranada, Choice

women musicians from around the U.S. and the world by providing a beautiful and intimate venue to bring their music to the public.” This year is notable for Indigo Girls’ Emily Saliers releasing her first solo album, co-headlining the festival with feminist hero Holly Near, who will also conduct a songwriting workshop. Other national acts address vital issues: Daphne Willis’ lyrics convey the vulnerabilities of mental illness; queer folk-pop singer Heather Mae gives a voice to body-positivity; and Namoli Brennet is a transgender activist who has self-produced a number of profound, inspiring releases. Local acts include Mary Tebbs, Mama J, Kate MacLeod and DeeDee Darby-Duffin. It’s a unique festival in an exceptional setting, and the press release says organizers aim to keep it “getting better rather than bigger.” (Brian Staker) Robber’s Roost Bookstore, 185 W. Main, Torrey, Saturday, 5-10 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $40-$90, womensredrockmusicfest.com

Solange Juxtaposed with entrancing synthesizers are lyrics evoking a grounded sense of self-awareness. Their second album, What Now (Loma Vista), released in April of this year, reflects on growing up in modern chaos—particularly, “the idea of translating your humanity through a machine in the hopes of connecting with someone on the other side,” Meath said in an interview on NPR’s All Songs Considered blog. Above all, it asks, “Where do we go from here?” Flock of Dimes—the dreamy, poppy solo project of Wye Oak’s singer/guitarist Jenn Wasner—opens. If you don’t have tickets, find some. (Andrea Harvey) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., sold out, all ages, depotslc.com

Sylvan Esso

SATURDAY 8/12

JEREMY COWART

Sylvan Esso, Flock of Dimes

Confession: I hate genres, and have never truly made an effort to understand them. For me, the best music is hard to categorize. So I hesitate to label Sylvan Esso simply as “indie pop”; they’re so much more than that. Since 2013, the incomparable duo hailing from North Carolina has earned a loyal global fanbase owed to their blend of singer Amelia Meath’s lusciously raw melodies and Nick Sanborn’s hypnotic electronics. The result is poetic:

SHERVIN LAINEZ

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BY ANDREA HARVEY, RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 8/10

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7.27 @ TWILIGHT CONCERT SERIES KAMASI WASHINGTON

SUNDAY 8/13 Willie Nelson & Family, Kacey Musgraves

UPCOMING EVENTS

Béla Fleck & the Flecktones

WEDNESDAY 8/16

The Chick Corea Elektric Band, Béla Fleck & the Flecktones

After embarking in the ‘60s playing Latin jazz with some of the greats, it wasn’t long before Chick Corea released solo records showcasing his distinctive, lyrical keyboard style. He replaced fellow Red Butte 2017 performer Herbie Hancock in Miles Davis’ combo—the one that recorded the epochal albums In a Silent Way (1969) and Bitches Brew (1970, both on Columbia). He added the dissonance of free-jazz experimentation and the dynamics of rock music, including funk rhythms. In the ‘70s, Corea’s band Return to Forever created some of the key releases of jazz-rock fusion, and he later worked in chamber jazz settings. His remarkable bridging of avant-garde stylings with a fervent romanticism is completely singular in jazz, and always bracing. Co-headliners Béla Fleck & the Flecktones are known as a pack of ace players whose virtuosity terrifies lesser musicians. The foursome blends jazz and Americana in innovative ways many acts have never even considered. (BS) Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 7 p.m., $55-$62, all ages, redbuttegarden.org

UTAH BEER FESTIVAL TICKET SWAP PARTY

AUGUST 10, 2017

4:00PM - 7:00PM

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JIM MCGUIRE

60 | AUGUST 10, 2017

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At 84, Willie Nelson would certainly be forgiven if he chose to rest comfortably on his laurels and do nothing more than smoke his herb (Willie’s Reserve— yes, it’s real) and play golf. Indeed, given his remarkable musical career, boasting some 60 studio albums and any number of hits compilations, collaborations and live albums—on top of his contributions to film, books, touring and activism—it’s rather astounding that he still retains his ambition, inspiration and constant desire to be back on the road again. “As we get older, it gets easier to say, ‘not today,’” Willie remarks in “It Gets Easier,” a song from his new album God’s Problem Child (Legacy), which describes the complacency that often confronts seniors. Obviously, that’s not a problem Willie has. Country chanteuse Kacey Musgraves opens the show. (Lee Zimmerman) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. Upper Ridge Road (6055 West), 7:30 p.m., $34$70, all ages, usana-amp.com

Willie Nelson


SATURDAY 8/12

CONCERTS

ANTHONY MARCHITIELLO

Rancid, Dropkick Murphys, The Selecter, Kevin Seconds

THURSDAY 8/10 LIVE MUSIC

DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Drew & South (Tavernacle)

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 8/11 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin) Blackberry Smoke + The Cadillac Three (The Complex) The Buttertones + Mad Max & the Wild Ones + Beachmen (Kilby Court) Dead Country Gentlemen (Piper Down Pub) The Dirt Nappers (Brewskis) Hearts of Steele (Outlaw Saloon)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Brisk (Downstairs) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Jules & Drew (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 8/12 LIVE MUSIC

Alex Napping + Marny Lion Proudfit +

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DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

James Harman + Tony Holiday + Jordan Matthew Young (The State Room) see p. 56 John Mayall (Egyptian Theatre) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Mark McKay (The Spur) Mark Owens (The Westerner) Michelle Moonshine (Garage on Beck) Natural Causes (Club 90) Old 97’s + The Vandoliers (Urban Lounge) Raven Black + Dezecration + Sugar Bone (Club X) SALTY feat. Drewnicorn + Gia Bianca Stephens + Lisa Dank + Mae Daye + Nadia Nice + Trynity Starr + Feral Ann Wilde (Metro Music Hall) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) TGTG + Lost in Bourbon (The Ice Haüs) Wayne Hoskins Band (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Women’s Redrock Music Festival, feat. Trishes + Daphne Willis + Karyn Ann + Kate MacLeod (Robber’s Roost) see p. 58

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Alan Michael (Garage on Beck) D-Strong + Dusk + Poet + Calhoon Popadopolis + IVIE + DJ SamEyeAm + DJ Intimin8 (Urban Lounge) Gregory Alan Isakov + Blind Pilot (Red Butte Garden) John Mayall (Egyptian Theatre) Pinegrove + Stephen Steinbrink (Kilby Court) Reggae Thursday (The Royal) Twilight Concert Series feat. Solange + Kaytranada + CHOiCE (Pioneer Park) see p. 58

Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (’80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays (Sky)

The punk rock played by Rancid and Dropkick Murphys—and The Clash, Dead Kennedys, NOFX, et al.—is just loud folk music. If that’s hard to picture, just imagine Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” at 110 decibels and 150 beats per minute with distorted guitars, and Guthrie’s puffy mop in a Mohawk. Both Rancid and Dropkick Murphys have a political bent. If you take, say, “Bovver Rock and Roll” from the former’s new jaunt Trouble Maker (Epitaph) and “Rebels With a Cause” from the latter’s latest, 11 Short Stories of Pain & Glory (Born & Bred), and rendered them in the dulcet tones of Guthrie’s fascist-killin’ acoustic guitar and gentlemanly twang, you might believe they were his original compositions. Naturally, the volume and the shout-y gang choruses of the punk songs is more energizing for some of us. But standing in the crowd, adding your voice to the din, is the punk version of peacefully singing along to Guthrie or Joan Baez at a protest. With likewise socially conscious ska/2 Tone revivalists The Selecter and Kevin Seconds (of 7 Seconds), on the bill, this is the show for going to vent your Trump-related stress. And you can do it even more intensely during the joint Rancid-Dropkick Murphys encore. Finally, we can’t write about Rancid without giving the drummer some love: Let’s hear it for local boy Branden Steineckert, Rancid’s skin-thumper and host of X96’s 801PUNX. Woot! (Randy Harward) The Great Saltair, 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 5:30 p.m. (doors), $37.50-$40, all ages, thesaltair.com

D-STRONG, DUSK, POET, CALHOON POPADOPOLIS, DJ SAMEYEAM, DJ INIMIN8

FRI 8.11• OLD 97’S THE VANDOLIERS

SAT 8.12• FEHRPLAY TUE 8.15 • CUPIDCOME

RUBY FRAY, SECRET ABILITIES, VALERIE ROSE STERRETT

THUR 8.10 •GLASSES MALONE & WICKED BABYDOLL 8/19: OFF THE WALL PARTY 8/20: PELICAN & INTER ARMA 8/21: YEAR OF THE COBRA 8/22: POMPEYA 8/23: THE LONG RUN - THE EAGLES TRIBUTE BAND 8/24: PICKWICK

ORTEGA OMEGA, MANDY CANDY

FRI 8.11 • SALTY PARTY

DREWNICORN, GIABIANCA STEPHENS, LISA DANK, MAE DAYE & MORE

SAT 8.12 • DAVID J (OF BAUHAUS / LOVE & ROCKETS) DJ SET TO SPEAK OF WOLVES, BREAUX, CHARLATAN

SUN 8.13 • F*$K THE ITINERARY

WED 8.16 • SLUG LOCALIZED

THE NODS, LORD VOX, FACE EATERS, DJ BOBBY BELIEVER

THURS 8.17 • MELVINS

TOXICDOSE

FRI 8.18 • 80’S DANCE PARTY

WESTER SETTINGS, RIVA REBELS, HIFI MURDER

MADGE, PEACH DREAM, DREAM SLUT

8/19: LUCKYSINNERS 80S PARTY 8/20: THE DELTA BOMBERS 8/24: THE ARTIFACTS 8/25: LARUSSO 8/26: NOISE POLLUTION (AC/DC TRIBUTE) 8/30: TWILLO

WED 8.16 • RUBY THE HATCHET

MARTIAN CULT, CIVIL LUST, DJ FLASH & FLARE

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

FRI 8.18 • HIP-HOP ROOTS

BURNELL WASHBURN, IVIE, MALEV DA SHINOBI, MAIKON & MORE

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AUGUST 10, 2017 | 61

THURS 8.17 • SWINGIN’ UTTERS

SPOTLIGHTS

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THUR 8.10 • TWILIGHT AFTER PARTY


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62 | AUGUST 10, 2017

CONCERTS & CLUBS Head Portals (Kilby Court) Après Ski (The Cabin) The Battlefield (O.P. Rockwell) Bruce Music (Park City Mountain PayDay Pad) Cory Mon (Garage on Beck) David J. of Bauhaus (DJ set) + L&R + Telepanther + Human Leather (Metro Music Hall) Doctor Barber (Alleged) Equinox (Pat’s BBQ) Fehrplay (Urban Lounge) Hearts of Steele (Outlaw Saloon) Herban Empire (Pioneer Park) John Mayall (Egyptian Theatre) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Khaotika + Ruines Ov Abaddon + Wormreich + Hisingen + Unceremonial (The Loading Dock) Live Bands (Johnny’s on Second) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Live Trio (The Red Door) Mark Owens (The Westerner) Michelle Moonshine (Piper Down Pub) Natural Causes (Club 90) Parsonsfield + Laney Jones and the Spirits + Jeffrey Foucault (Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater) The Proper Way (The Ice Haüs) Rage Against the Supremes (The Spur) Rancid + Dropkick Murphys + The Selecter + Kevin Seconds (The Great Saltair) see p. 61 Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Sylvan Esso + Flock of Dimes (The Depot) see p. 58 Triggers & Slips + K Phillips (Park City Mountains Canyons Village Stage) Women’s Redrock Music Festival, feat. Emily Saliers + Holly Near + Mary Tebbs + more (Robber’s Roost) see p. 58

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. South & JD (Tavernacle) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Juggy (Funk ‘n’ Dive) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) DJ Spider (Downstairs) Sky Saturdays (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-RAD (Club 90)

SUNDAY 8/13 LIVE MUSIC

Après Ski (The Cabin) Daphne Willis + Cade Walker (Kilby Court) Deadset Society + Telepathiq + A Dead Desire (Club X) The Head and the Heart + Matt Hopper

LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE (THURS) PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS

DIAMOND POOL TABLES LEAGUES AND TOURNAMENTS

DART SUPPLIES PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Tues & Fri: 3pm-1am Saturday: 11am-1am Sunday: 11am-9pm Closed Monday


SATURDAY 8/12

BAR FLY

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 8/14 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Priests + Lithics (Kilby Court) Rodrigo y Gabriela + Joseph Arthur (The Depot)

JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

TUESDAY 8/15 LIVE MUSIC

American Acoustic: Punch Brothers + I’m With Her + Julian Lage (Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater) The Bookends (Piper Down Pub) The Decemberists + Olivia Chaney (Red Butte Garden) Miniature Planets + Mother Lights + Widow Case (Kilby Court) Purple Reign (Sandy Amphitheater) Riley McDonald (The Spur) Ruby Fray + Cupidcome + Secret Abilities + Valerie Rose Sterrett (Urban Lounge)

DJ,OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin)

Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU)

WEDNESDAY 8/16 LIVE MUSIC

The Band Ice Cream + Lovely Noughts + Hard Times (Kilby Court) The Chick Corea Elektric Band + Béla Fleck & The Flecktones (Red Butte Garden) see p. 60 Frisson (Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater) High Valley (Sandy Amphitheater) JT Draper (Twist) Live Jazz (Club 90) Madge + Peach Dream + Dream Slut (Urban Lounge) Mew + MONAKR (The State Room) Ruby the Hatchet + Toxicdose (Metro Music Hall) Simply B (Hog Wallow Pub) Tony Holiday (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51) see above

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Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Before you turn 18 and can get into Area 51, it seems like some towering, mysterious gothic castle of chaos. My goth assistant manager at Arctic Circle and her friends would tell tales of occultism, sexual (often sadomasochistic) debauchery, wannabe vampires and bands whose performances were allegedly like the live sex shows in Hell’s French Quarter. The mystery was greater before the internet blew it away with, you know, access to information. Thanks, Al Gore—I mean, Obama. Now we know that some of that other stuff happens, but more than likely offsite, and that Area 51’s main activity is mostly dancing. And concerts. Sure, both activities still skew toward the fringe crowd, but that’s why the place is still standing after more than three decades. As the headquarters of the Dark Arts Festival and the Fetish Ball, it’s the official home of Utah’s non-conformists, the folks for whom vanilla culture is as repellent as daylight and garlic—and anyone who wants to dance to something besides Top 40 and mainstream EDM. To that end, Area 51, with its abundance of space, offers a dance night for everyone with two to three different themed dance rooms running Wednesday through Saturday. Mistress Nancy’s goth/ industrial night, Temple; Thursday is the ’80s night, The New Wave with DJ Radar; Friday is DJ Vision’s all-request goth/industrial/EBM/dark wave night and DJ Twitch’s all-request Friday Fun Night. There’s even a Top 40 night: Radio Play, with DJ Jeremiah. Wait, what? I suppose the mystery endures. (Randy Harward) Area 51, 451 S. 400 West, 18+/21+ (depending on the room), cover charge varies, area51slc.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

& The Roman Candles (Red Butte Garden) The Labb Dogs (Garage on Beck) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Live Music on the Plaza Deck (Snowbird) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Vesperteen (The Loading Dock) Willie Nelson & Family + Kacey Musgraves (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 60

Dancing at Area 51

Next to Himalayan Kitchen

The

Chakra Lounge and Bar

Weekend Music

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night small plate menu

AUGUST 10, 2017 | 63

Friday 8/11 - FSHTNK Saturday 8/12 - J Godina & Caviar Club DJ’s Wednesday 8/16 - Live Jazz

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Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen


SHOTS OF SUMMER

BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Portugal. The Man

@scheuerman7

Red Butte /redbutte facebook.com

Andrea Wogamon, Jeremy Worrell

Mckenna Petty, The Aces

All age venue with a view

Tara & Johnathan Greene

Eleanor, Sammi Ross, Alex Grant

Cristal Ramirez, The Aces

64 | AUGUST 10, 2017

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LUMPY’S ON HIGHLAND 3000 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-484-5597 THE MADISON 295 W. Center St., Provo, 801-375-9000, live music & DJs MAXWELL’S EAST COAST EATERY 357 Main, SLC, 801-328-0304, poker Tuesday; DJs Friday & Saturday METRO MUSIC HALL 615 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-520-6067, DJs THE MOOSE LOUNGE 180 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-900-7499, DJs NO NAME SALOON 447 Main, Park City, 435-649-6667 O.P. ROCKWELL 268 Main, Park City, 435-615-7000, live music PARK CITY LIVE 427 Main, Park City, 435-649-9123, live music PAT’S BBQ 155 W. Commonwealth Ave., SLC, 801-484-5963, live music ThursdaySaturday, all ages PIPER DOWN 1492 S. State, SLC, 801-468-1492, poker Monday, acoustic Tuesday, trivia Wednesday, bingo Thursday POPLAR STREET PUB 242 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-532-2715, live music Thursday-Saturday THE RED DOOR 57 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-363-6030, DJs Friday, live jazz Saturday THE ROYAL 4760 S. 900 East, SLC, 801-590-9940, live music SCALLYWAGS 3040 S. State, SLC, 801-604-0869 SKY 149 W. Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714, live music THE SPUR BAR & GRILL 352 Main, Park City, 435-615-1618, live music THE STATE ROOM 638 S. State, SLC, 800-501-2885, live music THE STEREO ROOM 521 N. 1200 West, Orem, 714-345-8163, live music, All ages SUGAR HOUSE PUB 1992 S. 1100 East, SLC, 801-413-2857 THE SUN TRAPP 102 S. 600 West, SLC, 385-235-6786 TAVERNACLE 201 E. 300 South, SLC, 801-519-8900, dueling pianos WednesdaySaturday; karaoke Sunday-Tuesday TIN ANGEL CAFÉ 365 W. 400 South, SLC, 801-328-4155, live music URBAN LOUNGE 241 S. 500 East, SLC, 801-746-0557, live music TWIST 32 Exchange Place, SLC, 801-322-3200, live music VELOUR 135 N. University Ave., Provo, 801-818-2263, live music, all ages WASTED SPACE 342 S. State, SLC, 801-531-2107, DJs Thursday-Saturday THE WESTERNER 3360 S. Redwood Road, West Valley City, 801-972-5447, live music WILLIE’S LOUNGE 1716 S. Main, SLC, 760-828-7351, trivia Wednesday; karaoke Friday-Sunday; live music ZEST KITCHEN & BAR 275 S. 200 West, SLC, 801-433-0589, DJs

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THE FILLING STATION 8987 W. 2810 South, Magna, 801-981-8937, karaoke Thursday FLANAGAN’S ON MAIN 438 Main, Park City, 435-649-8600, trivia Tuesday; live music Friday & Saturday FOX HOLE PUB & GRILL 7078 S. Redwood Road, West Jordan, 801-566-4653, karaoke & live music FUNK ’N’ DIVE BAR 2550 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-621-3483, live music & karaoke THE GARAGE 1199 Beck St., SLC, 801-521-3904, live music GRACIE’S 326 S. West Temple, SLC, 801-819-7565, live music & DJs THE GREAT SALTAIR 12408 W. Saltair Drive, Magna, 801-250-6205, live music THE GREEN PIG PUB 31 E. 400 South, SLC, 801-532-7441, live music ThursdaySaturday HABITS 832 E. 3900 South, SLC, 801-268-2228, poker Monday; ladies night Tuesday; ’80s night Wednesday; karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday THE HIDEOUT 3424 S. State, SLC, 801-466-2683, karaoke Thursday; DJs & live music Friday & Saturday HIGHLANDER 6194 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-277-8251, karaoke THE HOG WALLOW PUB 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, SLC, 801-733-5567, live music THE HOTEL/CLUB ELEVATE 149 W. 200 South, SLC, 801-478-4310, DJs HUKA BAR & GRILL 151 E. 6100 South, Murray, 801-281-4852, reggae Tuesday, DJs Friday & Saturday ICE HAÜS 7 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-266-2127 IN THE VENUE/CLUB SOUND 219 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-359-3219, live music & DJs JACKALOPE LOUNGE 372 S. State, SLC, 801-359-8054, DJs CLUB JAM 751 N. Panther Way, SLC, 801382-8567, karaoke Tuesday, Wednesday & Sunday; DJs Thursday-Saturday JOHNNY’S ON SECOND 165 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-3334, DJs Tuesday & Friday; karaoke Wednesday; live music Saturday KARAMBA 1051 E. 2100 South, SLC, 801-696-0639, DJs KEYS ON MAIN 242 S. Main, SLC, 801-363-3638, karaoke Tuesday & Wednesday; dueling pianos Thursday-Saturday KILBY COURT 741 S. Kilby Court (330 West), SLC, 801-364-3538, live music, all ages THE LEPRECHAUN INN 4700 S. 900 East, Murray, 801-268-3294 LIQUID JOE’S 1249 E. 3300 South, SLC, 801-467-5637, live music Tuesday-Saturday THE LOADING DOCK 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 385-229-4493, live music, all ages LUCKY 13 135 W. 1300 South, SLC, 801-487-4418, trivia Wednesday LUMPY’S DOWNTOWN 145 Pierpont Ave., SLC, 801-883-8714

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A BAR NAMED SUE 3928 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-274-5578, trivia Tuesday, DJ Wednesday, karaoke Thursday A BAR NAMED SUE ON STATE 8136 S. State, SLC, 801-566-3222, karaoke Tuesday ABG’S LIBATION EMPORIUM 190 W. Center St., Provo, 801-373-1200, live music ALLEGED 205 25th St., Ogden, 801-990-0692 AREA 51 451 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-534-0819, karaoke Wednesday, ‘80s Thursday, DJs Friday & Saturday BAR-X 155 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-355-2287 BARBARY COAST 4242 S. State, Murray, 801-265-9889 BIG WILLIE’S 1717 S. Main, SLC, 801-463-4996, karaoke Tuesday, live music Saturday THE BAYOU 645 S. State, SLC, 801-961-8400, live music Friday & Saturday BOURBON HOUSE 19 E. 200 South, SLC, 801-746-1005, local jazz jam Tuesday, karaoke Thursday, live music Saturday, funk & soul night Sunday BREWSKIS 244 25th St., Ogden, 801-394-1713, live music CHEERS TO YOU 315 S. Main, SLC, 801-575-6400, karaoke Friday-Sunday CHEERS TO YOU MIDVALE 7642 S. State, 801-566-0871, karaoke Saturday CHUCKLE’S LOUNGE 221 W. 900 South, SLC, 801-532-1721 CIRCLE LOUNGE 328 S. State, SLC, 801-531-5400, DJs CISERO’S 306 Main, Park City, 435-6496800, live music & DJs; karaoke Thursday CLUB 48 16 E. 4800 South, Murray, 801-262-7555 CLUB 90 9065 S. Monroe St., Sandy, 801-566-3254, trivia Monday, poker Thursday, live music Friday-Sunday CLUB TRY-ANGLES 251 W. Harvey Milk Blvd., SLC, 801-364-3203, karaoke Thursday; DJs Friday & Saturday CLUB X 445 S. 400 West, SLC, 801-935-4267, live music & DJs THE COMPLEX 536 W. 100 South, SLC, 801-528-9197, live music CRUZRS SALOON 3943 S. Highland Drive, SLC, 801-272-1903, free pool Wednesday & Thursday; karaoke Friday & Saturday DAWG POUND 3350 S. State, SLC, 801-261-2337, live music THE DEPOT 400 W. South Temple, SLC, 801-355-5522, live music DONKEY TAILS CANTINA 136 E. 12300 South, Draper, 801-571-8134, karaoke Wednesday; live music Tuesday, Thursday & Friday; DJ Saturday DOWNSTAIRS 625 Main, Park City, 435-615-7200, live music & DJs ELIXIR LOUNGE 6405 S. 3000 East, Holladay, 801-943-1696 THE FALLOUT 625 S. 600 West, SLC, 801-953-6374, live music


© 2017

ADJUSTABLE

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

1. “Shop ____ you drop” 2. Have a mortgage, e.g. 3. Cry at a card table 4. Kind of instincts 5. Parts of some diamonds 6. Picnic pastime 7. Dye that makes blue jeans blue 8. “That hurts!” 9. Elizabeth II, to Elizabeth I 10. Winter ailments

55. Altar area 56. Penne ____ vodka 57. There are four in a gallon: Abbr. 58. Steve Martin’s “King ____” 59. Suffix with Manhattan or Brooklyn 62. DiFranco who created Righteous Babe Records 63. “Star Wars” villain Kylo ____ 64. Identify (as)

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

DOWN

11. Filmmaker Jean-____ Godard 12. They’re game 13. Dr. Jekyll creator’s monogram 21. Dog sound 22. Noggin 23. Airport up the coast from LAX 24. Sun blocker 25. Saying “somethin’,” e.g. 27. Prepare to shoot 28. Zoe of “Avatar” 29. Santa ____ winds 31. “____ coffee?” 33. It may have a ring to it 36. 1969 #1 album for 11 weeks 39. Highway sign abbr. 40. Welcomes at the door, say 41. It’s yellow and crusty 42. Org. for many residents 45. Squad cmdr. 47. Gather dust 49. ____-appropriate 50. Boats with a double-bladed paddles 53. 1983 film debut of Bill Maher

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. “Spartacus” attire 5. “Now ____ me down to sleep” 9. Buc or Bronco 14. “Victory!” 15. Small iPod 16. Experience ____ in the conversation 17. Filmmaker Riefenstahl 18. Just my opinion, in a tweet 19. Goos 20. They’re not the roads less traveled 23. Like many martini olives 26. Canon camera named for a goddess 27. LAX patrollers 30. Bomb, as a joke 32. 1942 Philippine battle site 34. “Either you do it ____ will!” 35. Actress de Matteo of “The Sopranos” 37. Ollie’s partner on old children’s TV 38. One seen in each of this grid’s groupings of circled letters 42. Running shoe brand 43. Drink with a lizard logo 44. Smallish batteries 46. Trimester threesome 48. Shaping once more 51. “Solve for x” subj. 52. Muslim holiday commemorated on 2016 U.S. postage stamps 54. Something to meditate on 55. Actor who played a friend to “Ralphie boy” 57. You can stick them in your ear 60. Western sound effect 61. 50 or more people? 65. Rwandan people 66. Jai ____ 67. Patella site 68. 17th-century Dutch painter Jan 69. Wished 70. Serenade

SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Each of us comes to know the truth in our own way, astrologer Antero Alli says. “For some it is wild and unfettered,” he writes. “For others it is like a cozy domesticated cat, while others find truth through their senses alone.” Whatever your usual style of knowing the truth might be, Leo, I suspect you’ll benefit from trying out a different method in the next two weeks. Here are some possibilities: trusting your most positive feelings, tuning in to the clues and cues your body provides, performing ceremonies in which you request the help of ancestral spirits, slipping into an altered state by laughing nonstop for five minutes.

pope being struck by a meteorite, which sold for $886,000 in 2001. If there were ever going to be a time when you could launch your personal version of his story, Aquarius, it would be in the next 10 months. That doesn’t necessarily mean you should go barreling ahead with such a radical act of faith, however. Following your bliss rarely leads to instant success. It might take years (16 in Cattelan’s case). Are you willing to accept that?

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CANCER (June 21-July 22) Liz, my girlfriend when I was young, went to extreme lengths to cultivate her physical attractiveness. “Beauty must suffer,” her mother had told her while growing up, and Liz heeded that advice. To make her long blonde hair as wavy as possible, for example, she wrapped strands of it around six empty metal cans before bed, applied a noxious spray, and then slept all night with a stinky, clanking mass of metal affixed to her head. While you might not do anything so literal, Cancerian, you do sometimes act as if suffering helps keep you strong and attractive—as if AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In 1985, Maurizio Cattelan quit his gig at a mortuary in Padua, feeling hurt is a viable way to energize your quest for what you Italy, and resolved to make a living as an artist. He started creat- want. But if you’d like to transform that approach, the coming ing furniture, and ultimately evolved into a sculptor who special- weeks will be a good time. Step One: Have a long, compassionized in satirical work. In 1999, he produced a piece depicting the ate talk with your inner saboteur.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Tally up your physical aches, psychic bruises and chronic worries. Take inventory of your troubling memories, half-repressed disappointments and existential nausea. Do it, Pisces! Be strong. If you bravely examine and deeply feel the difficult feelings, VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Would you scoff if I said that you’ll soon be blessed with super- then the cures for those feelings will magically begin streaming natural assistance? Would you smirk and roll your eyes if I advised in your direction. You’ll see what you need to do to escape at you to find clues to your next big move by analyzing your irrational least some of your suffering. So name your griefs and losses, fantasies? Would you tell me to stop spouting nonsense if I hint- my dear. Remember your near-misses and total fiascos. As your ed that a guardian angel is conspiring to blast a tunnel through reward, you’ll be soothed and relieved and forgiven. A Great the mountain you created out of a molehill? It’s OK if you ignore Healing will come. my predictions, Virgo. They’ll come true even if you’re a staunch ARIES (March 21-April 19) realist who doesn’t believe in woo-woo, juju or mojo. I hope you’re making wise use of the surging fertility that has been coursing through you. Maybe you’ve been reinventing a LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) This is the Season of Enlightenment for you. That doesn’t necessar- long-term relationship that needed creative tinkering. Perhaps ily mean you will achieve an ultimate state of divine grace. It’s not a you have been hammering together an innovative business deal guarantee that you’ll be freestyling in satori, samadhi or nirvana. But or generating new material for your artistic practice. It’s posone thing is certain: Life will conspire to bring you the excited joy that sible you have discovered how to express feelings and ideas that comes with deep insight into the nature of reality. If you decide to take have been half-mute or inaccessible for a long time. If for some advantage of the opportunity, please keep in mind these thoughts weird reason you are not yet having experiences like these, get to from designer Elissa Giles: “Enlightenment is not an asexual, dis- work! There’s still time to tap into the fecundity. passionate, head-in-the-clouds, nails-in-the-palms disappearance from the game of life. It’s a volcanic, kick-ass, erotic commitment to TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano defines “idiot memory” as love in action, coupled with hard-headed practical grist.” the kind of remembrances that keep us attached to our old selfimages, and trapped by them. “Lively memory,” on the other SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Some zoos sell the urine of lions and tigers to gardeners who hand, is a feisty approach to our old stories. It impels us to gradsprinkle it in their gardens. Apparently the stuff scares off wan- uate from who we used to be. “We are the sum of our efforts to dering house cats that might be tempted to relieve themselves change who we are,” Galeano writes. “Identity is no museum in vegetable patches. I nominate this scenario to be a provoca- piece sitting stock-still in a display case.” Here’s another clue tive metaphor for you in the coming weeks. Might you tap into to your current assignment, Taurus, from psychotherapist Dick the power of your inner wild animal to protect your inner crops? Olney: “The goal of a good therapist is to help someone wake up Could you build up your warrior energy to prevent run-ins with from the dream that they are their self-image.” pesky irritants? Can you call on helpful spirits to ensure that GEMINI (May 21-June 20) what’s growing in your life will continue to thrive? Sometimes, Gemini, loving you is a sacred honor for me— equivalent to getting a poem on my birthday from the Dalai SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The fates have conspired to make it right and proper for you to Lama. On other occasions, loving you is more like trying to lap be influenced by Sagittarian author Mark Twain. There are five up a delicious milkshake that has spilled on the sidewalk, or specific bits of his wisdom that will serve as benevolent tweaks slow-dancing with a giant robot teddy bear that accidentally to your attitude. I hope you will also aspire to express some of his knocks me down when it suffers a glitch. I don’t take it personexpansive snappiness. Now here’s Twain: 1. “You cannot depend ally when I encounter the more challenging sides of you, since on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.” 2. “Education you are always an interesting place to visit. But could you maybe consists mainly in what we have unlearned.” 3. “It is curious that show more mercy to the people in your life who are not just visiphysical courage should be so common in the world and moral tors? Remind your dear allies of the obvious secret—that you’re courage so rare.” 4. “When in doubt, tell the truth.” 5. “Thunder is composed of several different selves, each of whom craves difgood, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.” ferent thrills. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) “My grandfather used to tell me that if you stir muddy water it will only get darker,” wrote I. G. Edmonds in his book Trickster Tales. “But if you let the muddy water stand still, the mud will settle and the water will become clearer,” he concluded. I hope this message reaches you in time, Capricorn. I hope you will then resist any temptation you might have to agitate, churn, spill wine into, wash your face in, drink or splash around in the muddy water.

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Say No to the Squat-and-Go

My wife just spent a week being violently ill due to a viral bug. It was so bad, that after three days of dehydration, she woke me at 5 a.m. and said, “I’ve got to go the hospital.” InstaCare was closed, so we ended up visiting the emergency room and the friendly women on the early morning crew at LDS Hospital. After two bags of saline and another bag of magical nauseacalming medicine, she was stabilized and back home in bed. “No more high-fives for me—only fist bumps!” is her new motto, along with washing her hands profusely. According to the World Health Organization, more than one million people die from intestinal bugs around the world every year. It’s one of the leading causes of death in India and Africa. Many developing nations don’t always have toilets like ours. More people around the world use the squat method with no water. And now that Utah is becoming an even more popular place to visit, we’re getting news reports that public toilets are being broken by visitors who are unfamiliar with them. The state Capitol’s restrooms and our five national parks have been constantly replacing toilet seats because visitors climb on them and break them when attempting to do their business. And this isn’t just a Utah problem— Lloyds Bank in London, the train cars running to Lake Lucerne in Switzerland, and tourist sites in New York all find broken toilets due to squatting. Sadly, not everyone is great at aiming for the target, so cleaning up the mess has become burdensome. Some countries don’t provide toilet paper, so instead you have to wipe with one hand and then turn on the faucet with the other to wash your hands. Signs are now going up at Utah’s Capitol and parks that depict a person squatting over an American-style toilet with a big red X over the graphic, and another person sitting on a toilet with a big green check mark. We have zillions of foreign tourists bringing their browns to the bowls around our state, and we’ve got to let them know that the “squat-and-go” is a no-no. There are no words on those signs—just visuals that all foreign visitors can easily understand. Funny thing is, the squatting method is much better for releasing human waste. But I don’t foresee the New Yorker restaurant taking out the tanks, removing the toilet paper and asking patrons to face the wall and aim properly any time soon. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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The Threatened American Worker A local chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees in Battle Creek, Mich., is butting heads with Western Michigan University this summer after the school brought in a goat crew to clean up an overgrown woodlot on campus, leaving union workers without jobs. The AFSCME’s grievance cites a collective bargaining agreement with WMU, but university officials counter that “the area is rife with poison ivy and other invasive species,” which are difficult for humans to remove. The 20-goat crew, rented from Munchers on Hooves in Coldwater, Mich., is ahead of schedule in clearing a 15-acre area.

WEIRD

With Friends Like These … Robert Kanoff, 49, celebrated Independence Day in an unusual way: High on drugs, he was dropped off in his birthday suit at a Tempe, Ariz., Walmart by two people who thought it would be “funny to see him naked,” police said. There, he walked around the store wearing only shoes and carrying methamphetamines. Maricopa County sheriff’s officers caught up with him around 10 p.m. across the street from the store. The Entrepreneurial Spirit First bikes, then cars … now umbrellas. Maybe. Sharing E Umbrella hit the streets of 11 Chinese cities in April with more than 300,000 umbrellas for rent from subway and bus stations. Unfortunately, the company’s founder, Zhao Shuping, didn’t provide instructions about returning the rentals after use, and most of the umbrellas have disappeared. Zhao noted his mistake, saying, “Umbrellas are different from bicycles. … With an umbrella you need railings or a fence to hang it on.” He plans to replenish his stock with 30 million umbrellas nationwide by the end of the year.

Lacking a Filter Baseball fans at the Los Angeles Dodgers-Kansas City Royals game in Dodger Stadium on July 8 were treated to some righteous

From Bad to Worse Two women in Arlington, Texas, called police for help on July 10 as a mentally ill man doused himself with gasoline in preparation to commit suicide. When responding officers began talking with the distraught man, he poured more gasoline on himself and appeared to be holding a lighter in his hand. Hoping to subdue him, one of the officers used his Taser on the man and the gasoline ignited, engulfing him in flames. Officers wrapped him in blankets and removed him from the house. His family reports he was severely burned, and at press time he was in critical condition.

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Now You Have Our Attention On July 6, IRS workers in Ogden, Utah, received a fake bomb from Normand Lariviere, 68, of Olympia, Wash. The U.S. Navy veteran and former civilian defense contractor has been disgruntled with the Department of Defense since his dismissal in the 1990s and has a history of mailing disturbing objects to the IRS to protest paying taxes. In 2016, Lariviere sent one of his fingers, a bullet and a marijuana joint to tax collectors. “Many things I could do,” he threatened. “I’m not going to tip my hand.” n Drivers speeding down Bedford Street in Lakeville, Mass., might touch the brakes when they spot a parked police cruiser at the side of the road. But the vehicle—a plywood and aluminum sign painted to look like a Crown Victoria black-and-white—is a ruse perpetrated by resident Kelly Tufts to get drivers to slow down. Tufts parks the “car” in his driveway, especially on weekends, to protect dogs and kids from speeding traffic. “We’ve had some people give us the one finger,” Tufts said. “If it was their neighborhood, they’d enjoy it.”

Awesome! A mathematician in Bucharest, Romania, scored a 44,900 euro profit when he made an exciting discovery at a flea market there: a rare World War II Enigma machine, used by the Nazis for encrypting messages. After paying the unwitting seller just 100 euros ($114 U.S.) for it, he took it into his care, cleaning and repairing it and learning how it worked. On July 11, a Bucharest auction house sold the machine for 45,000 euros ($51,500 U.S.) to an unnamed bidder. Bright Ideas Why hire moving professionals for just one appliance? A man in Brisbane, Australia, gamely tried transporting his full-sized refrigerator on a Queensland Rail car in April. He first rolled the fridge, strapped to a handcart, onto an elevator to the train platform. Shortly after guiding it into the train carriage, the man and his icebox were removed from the car by transit officers, who wrote him a $252 ticket. Apparently, his item would not fit under a seat, in an overhead rack or in a designated storage area, as Queensland Rail rules specify. Update Zimbabwe’s “sperm bandits” have reportedly struck again. An unnamed 39-year-old male teacher from Macheke was abducted as he waited for a bus on July 2, drugged and gang-raped by a gang of three women. Since 2011, the “semen harvesters” have struck several times, sexually assaulting their victims and collecting semen in condoms to sell later for “good luck.” The latest victim told The Standard newspaper that for two days he was held against his will and subjected to further abuse under threat of being shot. Finally, his abductors dumped him by the side of the road. Send your weird news items to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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n Police in Swansea, Ill., suspect the heir to a brewery fortune has graduated from driving drunk to flying high. August Adolphus Busch IV, 53, landed his helicopter around noon on July 10 in an office complex parking lot outside St. Louis. Police and FAA investigators were still trying to determine why he had landed there and whether any aviation laws had been broken around 8 p.m. when they were called back to the parking lot, where Busch, appearing to be intoxicated, was trying unsuccessfully to take off. Swansea police reported that Busch failed field sobriety tests but passed a breathalizer test, and after they secured a warrant, Busch was taken to a local hospital for blood tests. Also found in the helicopter: four loaded guns, several prescription pill bottles and eight dogs. At press time, no charges had been filed.

Hippies

moves on the dance cam by “Rally Granny,” an older fan who capped her performance by flashing her bra at the 40,000-plus spectators. “You don’t see that much at a baseball stadium,” deadpanned Dodgers first baseman Cody Bellinger (who actually missed the spectacle).

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Under the Influence Police in Slidell, La., stopped a “car full of drunks” on July 8 and arrested the driver for driving while intoxicated. The car’s passengers rode home in a taxi, but one of the women then drove back to the police station to bail out the driver. Slidell officers arrested the woman for DWI, and she joined her friend in jail. “Lesson of the day,” Slidell officers posted on their Facebook page. “Don’t drive drunk to a police station in order to bail out your drunk friend!”

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Questionable Judgments The Do Son Buffalo Fighting Festival, in which water buffalo are pitted against each other, has been a tradition in Hai Phong, Vietnam, since the 18th century. But on July 1, buffalo trainer Dinh Xuan Huong, 46, met his doom when his own bull turned on him. The buffalo first knocked Dinh to the ground, then flipped him over its head, goring Dinh’s leg with its horn. Dinh later died at the Vietnam-Czech Friendship Hospital. Buffalo fighting was stopped in the country during the Vietnam War, but the fights resumed in 1990.

BY THE EDITORS AT ANDRE WS M C MEEL


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