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COVER STORY HARD TO BEAR

Can the Beehive bounce back from this latest public lands debacle? Cover photo by Sarah Arnoff saraharnoff.com

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CWCONTENTS

TH

0 T 1 9 TH - 2

GO TO UTAHBEERFESTIVAL.COM TO SIGN UP

JOHN DOUGHERTY

Cover package, p. 14 The award-winning reporter and documentarian’s work has appeared in outlets like Phoenix New Times, The Washington Post and The New York Times. When not covering environmental, political and economic news, he spends his free time kayaking, swimming and traveling the backroads of the American West and Baja.

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

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NEWS

Efforts underway to help SLC sex workers. facebook.com/slcweekly

MORE NEWS

Utah makes the list of most fiscally healthy states.

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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Cover story, July 13, “Into the Wild”

While walking across America I stopped at this zoo. It may not be the biggest zoo out there, but the people that work their take care of the animals are very passionate about what they do. If you’re in the area, it’s definitely worth a stop!

SKYLER ROBERTS Via cityweekly.net

Thank you for sharing more about our zoo. Troy, Barb and Zach do amazing work every day! I’ve been volunteering and training the parrots there at the zoo for three-anda-half years and I’ve never seen anyone pick up on training birds the way Zach did and I’ve trained a lot of people because we get a lot of interns at the zoo. Every interaction with a bird is a training session, so it’s important to work with the birds properly even when feeding them. I’m grateful for all the good work that goes on when I’m not there. And yes, there are about 350 bluethroat macaws in the wild in Uruguay and about 1,100 in captivity. Blu is my favorite bird I train. Thanks to a great staff who all work so hard to keep it going.

LAURA BEEK

Via cityweekly.net

A&E Essentials, July 13, Under the Influence: Local Artists Influenced by Animation

Upsetting to see Brian Staker left talented women artists Athena Splett and Heather Mahler out of the City Weekly article on our show. These two artists work harder and produce better work than anyone and they deserve to get recognition. It’s sad because it was almost a good article. Now I won’t be showing it to anyone but to say who got left out.

@NONCHILLAUNT Via Twitter

SLC art scene has always felt like a boys club, so I’m sadly used to it.

@HEATHERLIME Via Twitter

MEAGAN ROACH

The Ocho, July 13, “Eight ways Gordon Hayward leaving the Utah Jazz will affect your life”

The only way it has impacted my life, is having to see all the whiny butthurt posts about him leaving. Via Facebook Real lazy writing.

JEREMY MAX Via Facebook

Hits & Misses, July 13, “Down With History”

Is it such a bad idea that there are more jobs and a big corporation in SLC? I am all for preserving National Parks But not useless buildings.

@UROOSATWEETS Via Twitter

Via Facebook Multifaceted issue here. While this seems like a rational act and probably will deter some people from their illegal activities in the area, it’s still a far cry from addressing​that the people are not going away. Their actions might not be allowed in this area in the near future, but they aren’t going anywhere. As [another commenter] suggested, where will these women go? Where will the addicts go? Where will the homeless who cannot always afford a room go? Not necessarily a sweep under the rug, but essentially we are just sweeping the mess into another corner of the city. Via Facebook I lived two blocks west of Piper Down for about five years. We should find ways to empower property owners—the people who actually make concerted efforts to invest in the improvement of their neighborhoods. I frequently confronted people. Police should make more of an effort to get to know the people that live here. They could get out of their cars and take walks down the neighborhood streets. I think citizens would appreciate it, and it could precipitate useful dialogue for both parties.

CHRIS ELROD

You know it’s edgy because he said “sportsball man.”

Via cityweekly.net

TYLER MEARS

LOGAN SORENSON

MIKE SARGENT

Way to go, Zach! You have always cared so much about the animals at the zoo. And you have a wonderful gift; I can’t wait to see where it takes you in life. Keep pursuing this path!

people far away from our children.

ELLIOTT ZGRAGGEN Via Facebook

Blog, July 14, “Life for no-tell motels is about to get tougher”

These places are located next to elementary school and homes where children live. I live near one of these places and I have a baby. I am a liberal guy, but let’s keep those

Via Facebook Thanks for staying on this issue. Optimistic about what this ordinance might accomplish for SLC and some of its most vulnerable populations.

@AMYJHAWKINS Via Twitter

Pioneer Daze

Each year, a group of hearty Mormons dress in the clothing of the mid-1800s and walk,

push handcarts or ride in wagons to honor all the LDS pioneers who made the long trip to the Salt Lake Valley. Perhaps there is another way to view these people rather than as brave. They were religious fanatics. Many of these people walked away from good-producing farms or successful businesses. People left families and longtime friends. In some ways these people were like other fanatics down through the ages who followed men who they believed were prophets because these “prophets” told them so—according to some Bible scholars. The fascinating story of the Jews’ migration from Egypt was just a myth—the Jews had steady jobs, adequate schools clothing and food. What Jew in his or her right mind would go out in the desert for 40 years? Then, more recently, Jim Jones convinced his followers to leave San Francisco and follow him into the hot jungles of Guyana where almost the entire congregation was wiped out by drinking poisoned Kool-Aid. Any time a self-proclaimed man of the cloth tells you to give up most your worldly goods, your friends and family, check your own mental health. If people are gullible enough to go on these trips, their heirs would be mortified to realize that some of their ancestors were so gullible and stupid.

TED OTTINGER, Taylorsville

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OPINION

What Climate Change?

climate change is not about a scientific intellectual discussion. He sees rising sea levels at Navy ports and shipyards as becoming compromising to defense within 25 years, and this means we are facing military vulnerability that will cost billions in tax dollars to address. But sea rise mitigation for our military defense might elude us at any cost. Climate change—whether man-made or natural—looks like it’ll cost taxpayers a heck of a lot more than any war in Iraq (in my own humble opinion). Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., in his new best seller, Al Franken, Giant of the Senate says, “The Pentagon considers global warming ‘an urgent and growing threat to our national security.’” There was a bit of a dust-up at the EPA a few months ago when it temporarily took down its webpage dealing with climate change. Fortune magazine and USA Today ran stories from an EPA press release that said the agency was updating its site to “reflect EPA’s priorities under the leadership of President Trump and Administrator [Scott] Pruitt.” There was quite a lot of pushback, and the site is now back to stating, “Rising global average temperature is associated with widespread changes in weather patterns. Scientific studies indicate that extreme weather events such as heat waves and large storms are likely to become more frequent or more intense with human-induced climate change. This … focuses on observed changes in temperature, precipitation, storms, floods and droughts.” Remember, that statement is from the EPA after it updated its position to “reflect EPA’s priorities” under the current leadership. Beyond scientific studies, it might be helpful to look at real estate insurance and property values for fellow Americans. Earlier this month, National Geographic published an

article reporting that “more than 90 coastal communities in the United States are battling chronic flooding, meaning the kind of flooding that’s so unmanageable it prompts people to move away. That number is expected to roughly double to more than 170 communities in less than 20 years.” Did you get that? Ninety communities needing FEMA aid today and 170 communities will be lost before your toddler has her own first child. Across the pond, our British friends are finding coastal city destruction a lot more immediate. The Daily Mail reported that an “entire Welsh village is being ‘decommissioned’ and its population forced to move after government warns it will be lost to the sea.” The article went on, “People living in picturesque Fairbourne in Cardigan Bay are digging in for a bitter legal battle against plans to decommission their village and flood their streets with sea water.” In case you’re wondering how little, or large, this is, Fairbourne is a community with 500 homes. For those looking to relocate, you can still get a really good deal there. So where are we? The world is not just getting warmer, but cities and towns across America and around the world are facing extinction due to sea levels rising. Our military is concerned that the cost of defending coastal facilities might prove untenable and states like Utah that depend on winter recreational tourism are facing economic jeopardy. So why am I so positive about America’s future? Because I hope that, as Sen. Franken wrote, scores of U.S. Fortune 500 companies see big bucks in alternative energy technology and they won’t be left out of the profitable climatechange business no matter what the current administration says. I hope. CW

CLIMATE CHANGE ... LOOKS LIKE IT’LL COST TAXPAYERS A HECK OF A LOT MORE THAN ANY WAR IN IRAQ.

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In my last piece [Opinion, July 13, “Better Times Ahead”], I channeled Karl Rove’s historical report that America always recovers. Rove pointed to history’s example that we often are in this boat, but that eventually loyal Americans figure out how to come together and right this ship of state. I felt good writing about my Pollyanna perspective. But then I started receiving emails with links to worldwide news stories of devastation to coastal towns and cities due to global warming while our government denies it’s a problem. These left-leaners are pretty worked up about America boycotting solutions to a global problem while other countries, including China and India, are using the Paris Accord to build job-creating economies that could overtake us economically, militarily and ethically. I have a conservative friend in Park City who is a retired government scientist and who has side with climate deniers. The last time we spoke about this, his point was that climate has been changing for millennia and that there’s no proof it’s human caused. He’s a really smart guy, but I think he’s more closely aligned with the Republican Party than with the facts facing most of us locally. Just 11 years ago, I moved here chasing “the greatest snow on Earth.” Since then, every major Utah ski area has invested hundreds of thousands of dollars in snowmaking equipment, along with the technicians, water and electricity that goes into making the greatest artificial snow on Earth. But climate economics is more than a Utah issue. It’s a national one. Rear Admiral Jonathan White, Chief Oceanographer of the U.S. Navy, recently told Rolling Stone magazine that

B Y S TA N R O S E N W E I G

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We need lots of it! We need workers in the construction and manufacturing industries. If you need work, extra work, or a different job come see us! Check out our web site to see what we do www.alltradestemp.com. Apply at:

All Trades Temporary Services 321 East 2100 South | SLC, UT 84115| 801-313-1234 All Trades Staffing 205 East 26th St #14 | Ogden, UT 84401| 801-399-1234

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

Rio Grande War

We didn’t learn much from the bitter backlash to the onceproposed Sugar House homeless facility. Remember how the 150-bed shelter was sprung on neighborhood residents because of all the secrecy surrounding the decision? Well, it could be déjà vu all over again—but on a much larger scale. Utah House Speaker Greg Hughes is all about fixing the problematic Rio Grande area, and he’s set up a “war room” overlooking the area because, of course, he doesn’t live there. While his motivation might be purely altruistic, he must see himself as a messiah, of sorts, swooping in like Jared Kushner to solve the Middle East problem. While The Salt Lake Tribune noted that he is working with civil-rights proponents, the Deseret News made it clear that Hughes and his operation might not be “overly forthcoming” with the plan. The excuse is law enforcement. That presupposes a “war” on the homeless, and pretty much eliminates transparency.

ANGUS SUNG

HELP WANTED

Private vs. Public

Why all the secrecy? Of course, officials would prefer that the public they represent not hear contentious discourse. That’s why the Kobach Commission has been playing fast and loose with the idea of open meetings. While the commission delves into your private voting history, it doesn’t want you to know too much. An NPR report made it clear, though, that among other problems, live-streaming a meeting doesn’t make it public. In a separate issue, the Utah Education Association is suing the state Board of Education to keep teacher disciplinary records private. But BYU journalism professor Joel Campbell reminded them, in a letter to The Salt Lake Tribune, that the law says past and present disciplinary actions of government employees are public. Hiding your dirty laundry will not win trust.

Ballot Initiatives

Utah is swimming in ballot initiatives sparked by legislative inaction on issues the public holds dear— school funding, medical marijuana, primary elections and redistricting. Bob Bernick of Utah Policy encourages everyone to sign petitions. “If you are smart enough to pick your own officeholders, pick your religion, pick your spouse, pick your daily work,” he wrote, “you are smart enough (and adult enough) to make wise choices on a petition ballot.” Redistricting has long been controversial. Should you pick your reps or should they pick you? A federal judge just ruled that San Juan County had to redraw its districts because of racial gerrymandering. In Caucasian Utah, it’s mostly a partisan issue, which the U.S. Supreme Court is considering now in a Wisconsin case. But Utah voters might get there first, if only to advise lawmakers.

Stephen Clancy, 25, is among the 120-plus riders competing in the 13th annual Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah bicycle race July 31-Aug. 6 in northern Utah. But Clancy—and all the members of his Novo Nordisk team—race with a companion: diabetes. We caught up with the Irish racer after a training ride to ask him about competing with the world’s first all-diabetic professional cycling squad.

When did you discover you had diabetes?

I’d been an amateur cyclist in Ireland for a number of years. When I was 19, my cycling career was going quite well, but I began having symptoms: frequent urination, increased thirst, weight loss and muscle cramping. At first, I blamed it all on hard training. But diabetes showed up in routine blood tests.

And how did you react to the diagnosis?

Shock and surprise, that’s for sure. At first, I thought it was kind of unfair. I thought, ‘Did I do something to cause this?’ Thankfully, those emotions lasted only 24 hours. The doctors told me I could cycle a mile … but today I just got back from a 100-mile ride, so they were obviously quite wrong.

How do you manage your diabetes during a race?

It’s just one of those things with a learning curve. Over time, you learn what impact racing has on your body. Throughout the race, we have access to a glucose monitor we carry in our pocket. If our sugar levels are low, we eat; if they’re high, we take our insulin. It’s a balancing act … just one extra thing to think about.

How does the Tour of Utah compare with other races?

My first time here was last year. It’s certainly quite a hard race and just getting through it is an achievement. What stands out is the high altitude. I grew up in Ireland and now live most of the time in Spain—at sea level. These massive mountains are very different from what I grew up with.

Do you have plans when your professional cycling career is over?

Really, nothing specific. When I was diagnosed, I was in university in Ireland training to be a teacher in physical education and math. Potentially, I could go back and finish that. My girlfriend teaches English as a foreign language in Spain—and that’s a possibility, too. Nothing is set in stone.

I hear you love music. Did you bring along your guitar?

I constantly listen to music. I’m still at a very basic level of playing. I already travel around the world with a bike or two … and a guitar would just be too much.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


Historically, what has been the leading cause of death for humans? Imagine a chart of all causes of death for every human who has ever died. Will it be prehistoric causes of death due to the tens of thousands of years they had to accumulate, or will it be more modern causes due to the population explosion that came with civilization? —Mr. Kobayashi

Simply the Best New 2017 Categories

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2017

Total: 108 billion. In other words, nearly 90 percent of people who have ever lived were born prior to 1850. The world’s population today, roughly 7.5 billion, accounts for about 7 percent of all people who have ever lived. PRB concedes that plenty of guesswork went into these numbers. But let’s assume they’re right. We can reasonably take 1850 as the point at which industrialization and urbanization began to get traction in parts of the world. Prior to then, the vast majority of humanity lived in rural settings without modern sanitation, got by on minimal calories, had no access to health care worthy of the name and died young—in large part because many children died before age 5 and many women died during childbirth. (The latter two problems didn’t recede in the U.S. until the 20th century.) We can thus rule out as candidates for leading cause of death what we might call diseases of modernity: heart disease, cancer, stroke, Alzheimer’s, etc. These are what you succumb to if you survive the scourges of antiquity. Let’s talk about those scourges. Disease, famine and war are obvious candidates; mother/child mortality must also be included. Famine and war are episodic and in terms of quantity, year over year, surely

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n 50,000 B.C. to 8,000 B.C.—about 1 billion; n 8,000 B.C. to 1 A.D.—about 46 billion; n 1 to 1850 A.D.—about 47 billion; n 1850 to present—about 14 billion.

trail disease. We’ve already excluded noncommunicable diseases common in the developed world; what remains might be broadly categorized as infectious disease, which overlaps to some extent with mother/child deaths. Some would be content to let it go at that, but surely we can fine things down a bit. Let’s push on. Our task is complicated by the fact that mortality statistics prior to 1900 are hopelessly inadequate. On the internet we find lots of theories based on fragmentary or anecdotal data. Malaria is popular—some claim it’s caused half of all human deaths. Tuberculosis has its adherents. Limit the time period or geographical range and you can make a case for smallpox or the Black Death. We can do better than that. We don’t have good data for most of history, but we have OK data for most of the world now. One of the best-known collectors is the World Health Organization, which publishes Top 10 causes-of-death lists for different “economy income groups.” These lists differ sharply. For highincome economies, the leading cause of death is heart disease, followed by stroke and Alzheimer’s. For the other end of the scale, here’s a quote from WHO: “More than half (52 percent) of all deaths in low-income countries in 2015 were caused by the so-called ‘Group I’ conditions, which include communicable diseases, maternal causes, conditions arising during pregnancy and childbirth and nutritional diseases.” Sounds to me like what you’d have expected worldwide prior to 1850. The leading CoD? Lower-respiratory infection (chiefly pneumonia, bronchitis and influenza), followed by diarrheal disease (dysentery, cholera, etc.), stroke and heart disease. Tuberculosis and malaria are No. 6 and No. 7, preterm birth complications and birth asphyxiation are 8 and 9. The list doesn’t precisely replicate what you’d have found in antiquity. The No. 5 cause of death in poor countries now is HIV/ AIDS, and No. 10 is road injury, both modern problems. Even in low-income economies, modern medicine has likely pushed TB and malaria lower on the list than they’d have been in centuries past. But I’d say the WHO ranking is pretty close. n

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This is going to involve some guesswork, Mr. K. OK, a lot of guesswork. But it needn’t be just a shot in the dark. What we need is a defensible method. Let’s see what we can figure out. As you rightly intuit, the answer depends on how many people were alive during the successive epochs of history, since the leading causes of death have shifted over time. Here we have the benefit of work done by others. In the 1970s, when fears about the population explosion were at their peak, the story arose that 75 percent (or some other large fraction) of all people who’d ever been born were then alive—the idea being that we’d reached the hockey-stick inflection point on the growth curve and population was increasing exponentially. Though durable, this tale had no basis in reality. We know this thanks to the Population Reference Bureau, a D.C.-based nonprofit that’s been tracking global population statistics since 1929. The PRB came up with estimates for the number of people born per era, as summarized below (I’ve tweaked the numbers to bring things up to date):

BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Death Rap


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THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

Eight critical analyses of Utah’s 3rd Congressional District candidates running to replace Jason Chaffetz:

8. Tanner Ainge, Pros: White,

Republican, Mormon. Cons: Named “Tanner”; appears to be 15.

7. John Curtis, Pros: White,

Republican, Mormon. Cons: Past alliances with Satanism (i.e. the Democratic Party).

6. Chris Herrod, Pros: White,

Republican, Mormon. Cons: Too uncharismatic for future Fox News job.

5. Kathie Allen, Pros: Female.

Democrat. Empathetic. Cons: See Pros.

4. Joe Buchman, Pros: Liber-

tarian. Academic. Cons: Preaches self-governance, non-violence and other crazy shit.

3. Sean Whalen, Pros: Independent. Entrepreneur. Cons: Could potentially spend most time in office managing luxurious beard.

2

. Jason Christensen, Pros: Independent American. Aggressively Christian asshole. Cons: Has apologized for being an aggressively Christian asshole.

1. Jim Bennett, Pros: United

Utah Party. Son of Bob. Cons: Might be running illegally; looming danger of wig becoming sentient.

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

QUESTIVAL

Looking for something—maybe an experience, an adventure, a friendship? That’s what Questival is all about, all around the country and in Utah. It’s a quest for something, but only you discover it during this experience. The 24-hour adventure race promises to push you out of your comfort zone. “Anyone can do it, but only the slightly neurotic thrive,” the organizers say. “Teams rack up points by submitting challenges in the app. Prizes will be awarded to the top teams and winners of the prize challenges.” Just to keep you guessing, you won’t get a challenge list until 24 hours before the race. And you don’t have to be a great athlete. “Think ‘scavenger hunt on steroids’ or ‘Amazing Race’ or ‘choose your own adventure.’” And each racer gets a $40 Cotopaxi Luzon backpack and other swag just for participating. More info on p. 26. Big Cottonwood Park, 4300 S. 1300 East, Millcreek, Friday, July 28, 6 p.m., through Saturday, July 29, 7 p.m., $48, cotopaxi.com

QTALKS

If you find it hard to sit through long, boring presentations, experience a new energy at Equality Utah’s QTalks. The promise is for a high-speed, high-impact lecture series on issues that matter to Utah’s LGBTQ community. Four speakers give 15-minute power talks, and this month features Jacob Tobia, a leading voice and educator on “genderqueer and non-binary topics,” and poet Tanesha Nicole Tyler. Salt Lake City Public Library, 210 E. 400 South, Wednesday, Aug. 2, 7-8:30 p.m., free, equalityutah.org

HUNGER OUTREACH

Never mind what “officials” say about giving to the homeless—food is kind of a necessity of life. So, don’t consider it a handout. Each month, local volunteer group Legacy Initiative’s Feed the Streets Outreach makes up to 900 burritos to distribute. They also give out other necessities like chapstick and sunscreen, as well as hygiene kits, granola bars and water. You can help in the kitchen, distribute on the streets or simply donate items or money to this critical cause. If you’re interested in participating in the outreach program, email outreach@legacyinitiative.org. 423 S. 300 West, 801-899-9682, Sat., Aug. 5, 1-3 p.m., free, legacyinitiative.org

—KATHARINE BIELE

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NEWS

DEMOGRAPHICS

The Diversity Issue Community leaders, scholars recognize lack of it in city council. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

DW HARRIS

T

Councilman Stan Penfold is vocal about the city’s changing demographics.

| CITY WEEKLY |

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ing issues is what does the west side get versus what does the east side get,” Burbank says. “That reflects socioeconomic status but also ethnicity and the composition of the people on the west side broadly and the composition of the people on the east side broadly. Obviously that touches on a whole range of issues from where the police patrol to basic city services, but also things like golf courses.” Utah Coalition of La Raza is a local Latino advocacy organization. President Richard Jaramillo says it’s nearly impossible to boil down the reasons why there’s a paucity of Latino representation on city council but a lack of qualified candidates is not one of them. In 2015, Nate Salazar lost in District 4 by only 171 votes to winner Derek Kitchen in an election with more than 4,800 ballots. Salazar went on to work in Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski’s office as a community liaison. Several communities have successfully elected Latinos or Latinas to represent them in the State Legislature, he notes. Districts 1 and 2 are on the west side, where there is a higher concentration of the city’s Latino population. Although Jaramillo says electing a Latino to city council is important, he doesn’t disparage the council members from those neighborhoods. “Yes, it is a concern, and yes we would like to see a person of color on the council since the city is nearly a quarter Latino,” he says. “That said, I think that we can look at a lot of the different council members and see in some areas good work they’ve done on behalf of the communities they serve.” CW

teristics, things like race, gender and age group—but, importantly, those attributes are typically not the deciding factor. “Generally, what studies have suggested is that kind of representation matters to people in a basic, emotional fashion, but it does not tend to override partisanship, ideology and policy positions,” he says. The Salt Lake City council is nonpartisan but also a body that drives policy. It stands to reasons, then, that issue-voters are paying acute attention to candidates’ ideas on obstacles like homelessness reform. Penfold and Adams both recognize the similarities among council members, but age isn’t the most pressing. Rather, they’d like to see more ethnic diversity—because right now, the monochromatic city council is enough to make you blanch. And although the Beehive State is notorious for its whiteness, the capital city has a sizable nonwhite population. You says about 65.6 percent of the city identifies as “non-Hispanic white.” And the latest census in 2010 indicated more than 22 percent of Salt Lakers are Latino. Yet no one on the city council is Hispanic or Latino. Historically, that’s also been the case, though Lee Martinez was appointed to serve out the term of a vacated seat in 1997. Burbank notes that governing bodies often find more support from their constituents when the decisions they make are informed by unique viewpoints. For that alone, it makes sense why Penfold and Adams desire a diverse council. “In Salt Lake City, one of the endur-

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sition or the makeup of the population has changed.” Yu theorizes that in the past 10 years, Salt Lake City’s vibrancy has attracted young professionals—at the same time, rising housing prices make renting a more practical option—and the city offers an array of rental units beyond those found in towns and suburbs. Much like Penfold’s street, the board he’s served on for nearly a decade could be getting younger, too. In the coming months, its two eldest members, Penfold and Lisa Ramsey Adams, 59, have elected not to run for their seats again. The average age of the next council, of course, hinges on the ages of the victors come November, when four races will be decided (in two—Districts 1 and 5—the incumbents, both in their 30s, are seeking reelection). Even with that uncertainty, at least one district will be invariably younger. The six hopefuls vying for Adams’ seat in District 7 will range in age from 25-45 by the time her term ends in December. Citywide, the average age of the 19 candidates running for a council seat this year is around 43. To break it down by decade: Two of the candidates were born in the 1990s, five were born in the ’80s, six in the ’70s, four in the ’60s, one in the ’50s and one in the ’40s. Does a candidate’s age matter to voters? So happens, it does a little, University of Utah political science professor Matthew Burbank says. According to him, age is one of a few “descriptive characteristics” to which voters pay attention. Burbank says the proclivity of voters is to side with candidates with whom they share those descriptive charac-

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rickling through the doors of an Avenues café, the a.m. customers are noticeably younger than ranking City Councilman Stan Penfold, who’s at a table sipping iced coffee out of a mason jar. Penfold, 60, has called Salt Lake City home for more than three decades and been at his place in the lower Avenues for about 12 years. When he moved from Northern California for work, he didn’t expect to grow older with this city. Yet Salt Lake City—as it sometimes tends to do—charmed him into staying a little longer. Before long his roots were fixed. So, he’s seen this town’s transformation. And the neighborhood, as Penfold has observed, isn’t growing old with him so much as churning over into a younger version of itself. “It feels like the demographics of the city, and certainly my district, is changing,” he says. “Over the eight years that I’ve been on city council, the neighborhood is growing younger. … Eight years ago, maybe there were two families with kids, and now there’s kids everywhere.” Penfold believes the burgeoning restaurant, bar and art scenes downtown, coupled with alluring mountains, have drawn more young job-seekers than in years past. “Younger people, in general, want to be in urban settings,” he says. “The housing crisis and cost has influenced that a little bit. It’s really challenging for young couples to buy a house, so they’re more apartment dwellers.” Zhou Yu, a demography professor at the University of Utah, however, says on the surface, data suggests that Salt Lake City is getting slightly older with a median age of 31.5 in 2015 compared with about 30 in 2000. But, as Yu explains, that’s likely because people continue to live longer, driving up the average. His own study and perception comport with Penfold’s. “Young people are coming in and older folks are moving away,” Yu says. “You see this population turnover even though the total number has not increased in a dramatic way, the compo-


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Monumental Disaster Can Utah bounce back from its latest public lands debacle? By Dylan Woolf Harris dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

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Utahns came out in droves to the State Capitol on May 6 to support Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Monuments.

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Lake Tribune and other media outlets, depict two sides cordially explaining their positions—but never quite finding common ground. REI president and CEO Jerry Stritzke commented during the call that pristine public lands are recognized as a cornerstone to American life in the West, and monuments that “courageous leaders” have fought to preserve. “Frankly, it’s just puzzling why Utah—with the great legacy that the state has, and even the great legacy that you have, governor—suddenly finds itself in a historic position of being the sole outlier against it, to attack public lands,” he said. “It gives us very little options.” Herbert ended the call forlornly, recognizing that he hadn’t been able to convince the outdoor reps to continue coming back to Salt Lake City. “If you’re asking me to say that we’re going to rescind the resolution, I can’t do that even if I wanted to,” he said. Shortly afterward, organizers pulled the show. Salt Lake City’s final Outdoor Retailer show is this month; Denver successfully bid to host future conventions. Asked to comment on whether data showing widespread support might sway the governor’s position, Herbert’s deputy chief-of-staff and spokesperson Paul Edward stated: “Utahns are to be commended for engaging in the public process. It’s not surprising so many Utahns appreciate the extraordinary beauty represented by much of our public lands. We appreciate that Secretary Zinke has opened up the process to this kind of public comment. Our concern is not about whether these lands should be protected. It is what is the best mechanism for protecting the antiquities and providing meaningful representation of the affected Indian Tribes, while protecting against federal overreach.” Weiss says he didn’t try to break down the data further into respondents who live in, say, San Juan County, because the sample size is too small and would leave too much variance that could skew the data. Anecdotally, he says, many comments from folks who lived near Bears Ears supported it. “There’s lots of support [in that region], but I wouldn’t want to put a number on it,” he says. CW

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SARAH ARNOFF

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nterior Secretary Ryan Zinke listened to gripes surrounding Bears Ears National Moment, but will he read the rave reviews? While the deadline to voice opinions on Bears Ears has passed, the Utah Diné Bikéyah advocate group is “cautiously optimistic” that Zinke will abandon his preliminary suggestion of shrinking the 1.35-million-acre monument, based on the outpouring of positive comments sent to the Department of the Interior. To further inform his decision, Zinke embarked on a fourday listening tour of the region earlier this summer, and his office opened a 15-day window to collect input online. The Interior secretary then reopened the comment period, which ended July 10, and is expected to make a final recommendation at the end of August. The Interior Department is processing more than 1.4 million comments, from which one group’s statistical analysis shows more than 98 percent prefer national monuments the way they are. Furthermore, 88 percent of the respondents who self-identified as Utahns favor Bears Ears or Grand StaircaseEscalante national monuments. These numbers provide a positive glimmer to groups like Utah Diné Bikéyah. “We’re always hopeful,” says Braiden Weeks, Utah Diné Bikéyah communications director. “Especially with the broad public support, we hope Secretary Zinke in his final recommendation, and Trump, will support the public and support the monument.” The group alone gathered more than 24,000 unique comments during the initial 15-day period and the extension, Weeks says; they then held community outreach forums, set up at farmers markets and directed comments through their website. The organization that conducted the statistical analysis, Center for Western Priorities, is pro-Bears Ears. But its media director, Aaron Weiss, who is also the author of the study, says the numbers are sound. Weiss offers to share the data and spreadsheet with anyone who might question the results or methodology. Statistics, he responds, is “not rocket science,” and he encourages naysayers to run a sample and see what their numbers say. “We don’t have our fingers on the scale here,” he asserts. The comment form did not require respondents to reveal their residency, so the Center for Western Priorities scanned the comments for words such as “Utah,” “Blanding” and “Salt Lake City,” and found around 5,000 who mentioned that they lived in Utah. Then the center randomly selected about 1,000 from that pool and evaluated whether those commenters favored, opposed or were neutral on Bears Ears National Monument. The result was nearly 9-to-1 supporting it. Gov. Gary Herbert, who championed the House Concurrent Resolution 11 last session, asking Trump to completely rescind the monument, often says support is split and the closer one travels to the monument, the more opposition one will hear. On Feb. 2, San Juan County Commissioner Bruce Adams testified at a Utah Senate Natural Resources, Agriculture and Environmental Standing Committee meeting in support of the resolution. As rumors about Bears Ears began to swell last year, he said, the commission gathered thoughts from its constituents, hosted open houses and sent out questionnaires. “I would say, without a doubt, that the majority of people in San Juan County told us that they did not want the monument,” Adams said. A day later, the nonbinding resolution sailed through the Legislature and was signed by Herbert. It was one of the earliest pieces of legislation passed last session. But for a resolution with “no teeth,” as Herbert describes it, the cut is deep. Salt Lake City had been for 20 years home to the Outdoor Retailer trade shows, now biannually, but association members threatened to pull their convention—taking with it the estimated $45 million it generates—unless state lawmakers changed their tune. The governor hosted a conference call mid-February with influential outdoor industry heads, including those from Patagonia and The North Face. The audio, posted by The Salt


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By John Dougherty comments@cityweekly.net @johndoughertyUS

America’s much-talked-about newest national monument was also the first ever proposed by Native American tribes.

T

he first national monument approved by President Theodore Roosevelt after the passage of the 1906 Antiquities Act was Wyoming’s Devils Tower—made famous to a generation of 1970s moviegoers by Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Roosevelt’s proclamation said that the isolated, dramatic rock outcropping, whose sweeping vertical lines jut 867 feet out of the ground, is “an extraordinary example of the effect of erosion ... a natural wonder and object of historic and great scientific interest.” Devils Tower set the stage for Roosevelt to create Grand Canyon National Monument in 1908, when he set aside 818,000 acres for protection and signaled that designating largescale national monuments were part of the president’s prerogative. But as important as the Grand Canyon is to the nation’s environmental and cultural heritage, historical records reveal that the primary reason the Antiquities Act was passed was to preserve ancient culture—to stop the widespread looting of Native American ruins scattered across the Four Corners region of the Southwest. For more than 20 years before the passage of the Antiquities Act, a debate had raged in academia and on Capitol Hill about how to stop the pillage of archaeological treasures. Newly arrived settlers were looting ruins, ceremonial structures and burial grounds scattered across vast canyons, mesas and washes, including the land that’s now part of the new—and, under President Donald Trump, hotly contested—Bears Ears National Monument. It took 110 more years than Devils Tower to put the 1.35-million-acre Bears Ears monument in place, but it finally happened this past December with President Barack Obama’s signature. But in July, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke confirmed that the Trump administration will follow through on its long-threatened plans to shrink the monument—a move that brought instant condemnation from the coalition of five Southwestern tribes that first proposed Bears Ears for protection. “Any attempt to eliminate or reduce the boundaries of this monument would be wrong on every count,” the Bears Ears Inter-tribal Coalition said in a statement. “Such action would be illegal, beyond the reach of presidential authority.” Largely lost in the debate over Bears Ears and other sites is this: The monument in southeast Utah was the first-ever driven by tribal interests wanting to see this place protected for its deep cultural and ecological significance. And attempts to roll it back are provoking bitter reactions among tribal leaders who worked most of this decade to research and document the significance of Bears Ears. “It’s an attack—an attack on tribal nations,” says James Adaki, Navajo Nation Oljato Chapter president and a Bears Ears commissioner. Obama’s proclamation created the Bears Ears Commission, which includes representatives from the five Southwest tribes that proposed the monument. Established this past March, the commission will work now collaboratively with the U.S. Forest Service and the Department of the Interior to develop a management plan.

Adaki and other members of the Bears Ears Commission interviewed during a recent joint management meeting with federal officials in Bluff said that opposition to the monument and Trump’s review of Bears Ears in particular is rooted in distrust, lack of knowledge, disrespect of tribal governments and, in some instances, racism. Despite the monument’s uncertain future, federal officials and the commission engaged in day-long discussion on May 16 about developing a management plan. Even as they moved forward, federal officials said no money would be spent to purchase and install Bears Ears National Monument signs until the completion of Trump’s review process. The good-faith discussions during the management meeting don’t defuse the strained relationship between the tribes and monument opponents, which became further inflamed by a statement last month by Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, who said the tribes were “manipulated” into supporting Bears Ears National Monument. “The Indians,” Hatch said, “they don’t fully understand that a lot of the things they currently take for granted on those lands, they won’t be able to do it if it’s made clearly into a monument or a wilderness. Once you put a monument there, you do restrict a lot of things that could be done, and that includes use of the land. … Just take my word for it.” Adaki says Hatch’s comment was “an insult against tribes, because we know what we are doing.” Davis Filfred, the Navajo Nation’s spokesman for the seven Utah chapters and a Bears Ears commissioner, says the monument opponents want the designation rescinded so they can exploit natural resources. “They want to go after coal. They want to go after petroleum, uranium, potash. They want to clear all the timber,” he says during a break in a commission meeting held in Bluff at a Utah State University auxiliary building beneath sweeping cottonwood trees. Filfred, a former Navajo law-enforcement officer, is particularly concerned about protecting the extraordinary biodiversity at Bears Ears. “This is habitat for a lot of species. We have big trophy elk, trophy mule deer, antelope, bobcat, mountain lions, bears—you name it. Not only that; we have vegetation. They just want to clear that and make it a parking lot and just terrorize it,” he says. “And we’re saying no,” he says emphatically. “That’s sacred ground.” Just beneath the heated debate over Bears Ears, Filfred says, lies the unmistakable odor of racism against Native Americans, which he says is “absolutely” a force driving the opposition. “That’s what it is, plain and simple,” he says. “It’s very obvious.”

Bears Ears: A History of Exploitation

People have been profiting off Bears Ears and similar sites for more than 150 years. Starting in the mid-to-late 1800s, artifact hunters routinely plundered burial grounds and tore down walls of irreplaceable stone-and-masonry structures in search of treasures buried beneath the ancestral Puebloan ruins across the Southwest. Pottery, baskets, human remains, tools, weapons and other artifacts disappeared into


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ON LET CAR E KATY B OW

A Long-Delayed Designation

Starting in 1906, the Antiquities Act gave presidents sweeping authority and the sole authorization to create national monuments—without prior congressional approval or the need for consultation with local communities. The law states, in part, that the president “could declare by public proclamation, historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other areas of historic and scientific interest, that are situated upon lands owned and controlled by the government of the United States to be national monuments.”

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the private market. Major museums, including the American Museum of Natural History in New York, sponsored expeditions to excavate ruins and extract tens of thousands of artifacts for their collections. Southwestern tribes, many of whom had cultural and historical ties to the ancient sites, lacked any substantial influence to stop the exploitation. Hoping to reverse this trend, renowned archeologist and anthropologist Edgar L. Hewett identified the Bears Ears region, which he then called the Bluff district, in 1904 as one of the top four areas in the Southwest in need of immediate protection. “No scientific man is true to the ideals of science who does not protest against this outrageous traffic, and it will be a lasting reproach upon our government if it does not use its power to restrain it,” Hewett wrote in a Sept. 3, 1904, memorandum on preserving the “historic and prehistoric” ruins of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah. Hewett, believed by historians to have closely worked with Progressive Era leaders in Roosevelt’s Interior Department, also wrote the language for the Antiquities Act, which passed the House and the Senate without a single word changed. Roosevelt signed it into law on June 8, 1906. “There seems little doubt the impetus for the law that would eventually become the Antiquities Act was the desire to protect aboriginal objects and artifacts,” legal scholar Mark Squillace wrote in his 2003 treatise, The Monumental Legacy of the Antiquities Act of 1906. The destruction of antiquities on Bears Ears has continued unabated for the past century. Local San Juan County residents have a long history of pilfering the ruins, which has led to high-profile federal police raids in Blanding that increased bitterness between the mostly white Mormon community and nearby tribes. “In southeastern Utah, there are generations of families who have looted cultural sites and removed precious archeological resources from public land,” according to the Bureau of Land Management’s Office of Law Enforcement and Security report included in an October 2016 San Juan County-commissioned legal analysis arguing against designating Bears Ears a national monument. “For many of these individuals, these activities were part of a typical weekend outing,” the report reads.

ES JAM I K A DA


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The law placed no restrictions on the size of monuments, a major difference from previous bills that had been introduced in the years leading up to passage of the Antiquities Act that limited monuments to about 640 acres. President Jimmy Carter set aside 56 million acres for various national monuments in Alaska in December 1978, the most for a land-based national monument at one time. Like Obama, Carter was severely criticized by Republican leaders for an allegedly dictatorial action they saw as an infringement of their rights. But Carter’s designation was never overturned. President Roosevelt swiftly made use of the Antiquities Act power, and the first two areas on Hewett’s most endangered ancient cultural sites list soon found themselves protected. The third was protected in 1916 by President Woodrow Wilson. Roosevelt created Mesa Verde National Park, which includes more than 600 cliff dwellings in southwest Colorado, just three weeks after he signed the Antiquities Act. In 1907 he proclaimed Chaco Canyon National Monument, in northwest New Mexico. Wilson designated Bandelier National Monument north of Santa Fe, N.M., nine years later. Cultural areas that Hewett ranked as of lower importance also quickly gained protection. In 1906, Roosevelt designated the 60,000-acre Petrified Forest National Monument near Holbrook, Ariz.; Montezuma Castle National Monument near Camp Verde, Ariz.; and El Moro National Monument near Ramah, N.M. He added the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument near Silver City, N.M., in 1907. Despite several efforts over the past 80 years, more than a century would pass before the vast number of priceless antiquities remaining within Hewett’s Bluff district would be designated Bears Ears National Monument. “With more than 100,000 archeological sites, there is just no place that is more deserving of protection, particularly given its importance in the passage of the Antiquities Act,” says Josh Ewing, executive director of Friends of Cedar Mesa, a Bluff environmental group working to protect Bears Ears. Obama’s Bears Ears proclamation came after numerous public meetings over the course of five years, held by proponents and opponents of the monument. The public meetings culminated with a contentious field hearing held by former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell in Bluff in July 2016. Obama’s proclamation begins with the following passage: “Rising from the center of the southeastern Utah landscape and visible from every direction are twin buttes so distinctive that in each of the native languages of the region their name is the same: Hoon’Naqvut, Shash Jáa, Kwiyagatu Nukavachi, Ansh An Lashokdiwe, or ‘Bears Ears.’

“For hundreds of generations, native peoples lived in the surrounding deep sandstone canyons, desert mesas and meadow mountaintops, which constitute one of the densest and most significant cultural landscapes in the United States. “Abundant rock art, ancient cliff dwellings, ceremonial sites and countless other artifacts provide an extraordinary archaeological and cultural record that is important to us all, but most notably the land is profoundly sacred to many Native American tribes, including the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, Navajo Nation, Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah Ouray, Hopi Nation and Zuni Tribe.”

Setting Aside a Bitter Past

The willingness of these five tribes to set aside longstanding disputes over land, cultural differences and development priorities and instead work together by forming the Bears Ears Inter-tribal Coalition in July 2015 ultimately led to the creation of the monument. “The coalition was formed to be able to address the federal government on federal public lands at a governmentto-government level,” says Carleton Bowekaty, a Zuni tribal council member and co-chairman of the Bears Ears Commission. “We believe that was the missing component in the grassroots efforts.” The coalition used years of research and documentation collected by the Salt Lake City-based nonprofit Utah Diné Bikéyah to prepare the formal Bears Ears National Monument proposal. The proposal, which requested 1.9 million acres be included in the new monument, was presented to Obama in October 2015. Bowekaty says the Bears Ears collaborative management plan “will promote tribal interests” and serves as a model that can help resolve conflicts over land use that “will prevent other situations, such as the Dakota Access Pipeline protests, from occurring.” He adds, “When you look at the language of the proclamation, it specifically states that traditional cultural knowledge is a scientific object worthy of value. Now that we are the ones determining the value, we are not letting that go.”

State Leaders Oppose Bears Ears

Filfred says repeated efforts during the tribal coalition’s development of the monument proposal to meet with state and local officials went nowhere, as tribal overtures to hold discussions were met with silence. “The whole Utah delegation is against us and they have been for many years,” he says. That has continued. The Utah Congressional delegation, state Legislature, governor and commissioners in San Juan County, where Bears Ears is located, all came out against the monument and lobbied President Trump to rescind Obama’s proclamation.

SHEALAH CRAIGHEAD

Why is this guy smiling?

In response, Trump issued an April 26 executive order requiring Zinke to review any 100,000-acre or larger national monument created in the past 21 years. The Bears Ears review was to be completed within 45 days, with the rest of the reviews due in 120 days. Trump’s executive order expands the criteria that should be used to designate national monuments beyond the act’s original language by including “public outreach and proper coordination with state, tribal and local officials” and the need to take into consideration “achieving energy independence” and restrictions on public access that could curtail “economic growth.” “Designations should be made,” the order states, “in accordance with the requirements and original objectives of the act and appropriately balance the protection of landmarks, structures and objects against the appropriate use of federal lands and the effects on surrounding lands and communities.” Trump’s order adds a balancing requirement to the Antiquities Act, which is not part of the law, to provide justification for rescinding or curtailing the size of national monuments. But legal scholars say he doesn’t have the power to change previously established monuments. “The president lacks the legal authority to abolish or diminish national monuments,” concludes a June 9 Virginia Law Review article written by four prominent environmental and land-use professors, including Squillace. “Instead, these powers are reserved to Congress,” the authors write.

Moving Forward

Shaun Chapoose, the Uintah and Ouray Ute representative on the Bears Ears Commission, says the commission is going to continue working with the federal land agencies to develop a collaborative management plan for Bears Ears until something tangible changes. “We need to manage exactly how the proclamation is stated until that is either reaffirmed or changed,” Chapoose says. “So, as far as I’m concerned, the monument is designated.” History has already been made, he adds. “It has to be emphasized that this is the first time that actual sovereign tribes, elected tribal leaders, engaged in a process that they had never done before and through their effort they were able to get the monument designated,” Chapoose says. Chapoose is taking a wait-and-see attitude over the political and legal firestorms surrounding Bears Ears. “I think the legal standing that protects Bears Ears is untested,” Chapoose says. “A lot of the rhetoric you hear is that it has never been challenged but it could be challenged. Well, I guess we’re going to find out.” CW A version of this article originally appeared in The Revelator.


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A race used to be a straightforward concept: A bunch of people start at one point, and the first one to reach the other point wins. These days, a race can mean just about anything, from eating 72 hotdogs in 10 minutes to running a half-kilometer in high heels. The possibilities are endless. Local adventure gear company Cotopaxi’s Questival is essentially a 24-hour race, but instead of dashing or consuming your way to the finish, teams of two to six people compete to complete the most challenges in the allotted time. You can choose from hundreds of tasks— generally based around getting outside, trying new things or serving the local community—each worth points based on difficulty. In previous years, challenges have included everything from eating at a street vendor to driving to Mexico and back in a day. This year’s Utah-specific checklist includes taking a picture of buffalo on Antelope Island, and visiting Capitol Reef National Park. Video or photo evidence will be uploaded to the official app to prove completion, and the team with the most points after 24 hours is the winner. While everyone who participates is sure to leave with some unforgettable memories, it is still a competition with sweet prizes for the winners. Gift packages might contain items like airline gift cards, duffel bags or Bluetooth speakers. Even if you’re not into outdoor adventures, participating in Questival is beneficial to your local and global community. Last year, participants planted more than 300 trees and donated almost 1,000 boxes of clothing. (David Miller) Cotopaxi Questival @ Big Cottonwood Regional Park, 4300 S. 1300 East, Millcreek, July 28, 6 p.m., through July 29, 7 p.m., $48, cotopaxi.com

Asian-American actor/comedian Bobby Lee faced several challenges early on. His parents disowned him after he disobeyed their wishes, choosing comedy over the family business. After battling substance abuse, he eventually found success as a stand-up comedian, opening for the likes of Pauly Shore and Carlos Mencia before landing featured roles on Mad TV, the original Netflix series Love and roles in such cult classic films as Pineapple Express and The Dictator. “My drug addiction almost destroyed any chance of making it in the business,” Lee says via email. “Sobriety obviously changed my life, and it’s been helpful. I don’t think it makes me more creative, but it does force me to be present, as in showing up for auditions and comedy gigs.” If his routines feed into popular stereotypes, it’s only because he embraces his heritage without hesitation. That was especially evident when he participated in the 2005 comedy tour “Kims of Comedy” with fellow Korean-American comics Steve Byrne, Ken Jeong and Kevin Shea. Lee’s stand-up might touch on fetishized interracial dating, as it did in a 2013 interview at the Laugh Factory with Kevin Nealon: “I’ll meet a white girl, and I’ll be, like, ‘Oh, my God. She likes me.’ Then you go to her house and there’s a Bruce Lee poster on the wall.” “The Asian thang has always helped me, especially since there weren’t people who looked like me in the late ’90s when I started,” he explains. “My comedy material is generally based on personal events in my life … and since I kinda hate myself, I tell a lot of self-deprecating jokes.” (Lee Zimmerman) Bobby Lee @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, July 28-29, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., $20, 21+, wiseguyscomedy.com

Like many Americans, Utah artist Grant Fuhst found himself shocked and distraught in the aftermath of the November 2016 presidential election. “I just kind of moped around for several days,” he recalls, “then thought, if I was going to deal with this, I needed to do something about it.” In this case, that meant not just creating his own art, but organizing a show—the title comes from the Ray Nelson short story that inspired the film They Live—allowing multiple artists to express their post-election hopes and fears. Fuhst reached out to Urban Arts Gallery, which in turn put out a call to many of the gallery’s house artists. “I wanted to make a statement about how many people, including artists, were opposed to what was going to happen,” Fuhst says. “This was about getting as large and diverse a group of artists as possible.” That group includes photographer Cat Palmer, political cartoonist Pat Bagley, painter Jordan Brun (his “Garish: Murka” is pictured) and sculptor Elmer Presslee, who will turn his new work into a puppet show for the Aug. 18 artist reception. Fuhst believes that, as easy as it would be to preach to the choir with obvious stabs at the new president, the participants approached the subject inventively. “A lot of people are writing about holding this administration accountable, talking about issues from a very literal standpoint,” he says. “For the most part, I think artists like approaching things from a metaphorical point of view, and they’re good at it.” (Scott Renshaw) Eight O’Clock in the Morning @ Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-2300820, Aug. 1-Sept. 3; artist reception Aug. 18, 6-9 p.m., urbanartsgallery.org

South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone have poked fun at—and poked holes in—the LDS church for nearly 25 years. It started with the 1993 film Cannibal! The Musical, based on the story of Alferd Packer, who in 1874 led an expedition from Utah to Colorado, where he and other expedition members resorted to cannibalism to survive being trapped in the snowy Rocky Mountains. Since then, the pair famously spoofed Mormons in the South Park episode “All About Mormons,” which called LDS doctrine “dumbdumb-dumb-dumb-dumb” and highlighted the stereotype that Mormons are unfailingly nice and well-intentioned. The Book of Mormon continued that fair and balanced approach. This accuracy with respect to church culture and doctrine has been lauded by Mos and gentiles alike, with the general consensus being that it’s funny because it’s true. Now, not all of the religion’s adherents can laugh at themselves and their sincerely held beliefs, so the show has its detractors who lament that the production goes too far, is too vulgar or just plain exists. But from Cannibal through South Park and films like their 1997 missionary/porn-star/superhero flick Orgazmo, critics have heaped praise upon Parker and Stone for their sharp satirical eye and songwriting acumen—with earworm tunes like “Hello,” “I Believe,” “Turn It Off” and “Baptize Me.” The applause only got louder since The Book of Mormon debuted in 2011 and subsequently won nine Tony Awards. So, expect to laugh—even if some of the jokes eat at you. (Randy Harward) The Book of Mormon @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, Aug. 1-20, dates and showtimes vary, $30-$185, artsaltlake.org

Cotopaxi Questival

Bobby Lee

Eight O’Clock in the Morning

The Book of Mormon


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Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival offers a unique incubator for innovative theater. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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n January 2015, Alex Ungerman was trying to launch a theater company—and launching a theater company isn’t easy. Finding space to produce shows isn’t easy; getting local theater audiences acquainted with your name and your mission isn’t easy. Coincidentally—and fortunately for Ungerman’s fledgling Sackerson Theatre Co.—early 2015 was also when Westminster College theater faculty members Michael and Nina Vought were launching the Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival. Inspired in part by the Edinburgh Fringe Festival—which celebrates its 70th anniversary in 2017— the Voughts looked to create a place where Utah artists could gather and experiment with their craft. For Ungerman, who had experience attending and participating in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, it was perfect timing. “It gave us a great opportunity to kick off our first production,” Ungerman says of that 2015 Fringe Festival show, Morag Shepherd’s Poppy’s in the Sand. “It took place in what used to be a loading bay of an old Deseret Industries building. That particular room was pretty small and intimate, and allowed us to bring 300 pounds of beach sand, which is something a lot of theater spaces wouldn’t have been happy with.” Ungerman and Sackerson return in 2017 for the third annual Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival with another play by Shepherd, Do You Want to See Me Naked?, one of 50 productions that will fill both traditional and makeshift spaces at Westminster College, Sprague Library and, yes, that old DI building. The opportunity to do unconventional things—even if they don’t require hundreds of pounds of sand—is only part of the appeal for the artists who will stage plays, monologues, musicals and more over the 10-day event. “People who are trying to develop new work often don’t have access to space,” says Jay Perry, a local actor working on public relations for the festival. “Space can be a big challenge. There are a lot of really talented people here who have lots of great ideas, but haven’t had a place to launch those ideas.” It’s a particularly good place for artists like Sadie Bowman and Ricky Coates, who relocated their Matheatre company— which creates shows built around scientific concepts for high school and college audiences—to Salt Lake City last fall. “The first thing we did,” Bowman says, “was find out

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whether there was a Fringe Festival here, because we’ve toured to other Fringes. … ‘Do they have a Fringe Festival? Awesome!’” Bowman’s and Coates’ new show, which premieres at the Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival, is Curie Me Away, a musical based on the life of pioneering scientist Marie Curie. Any new show is a risk, and a venue like this is a way to help mitigate that risk. “It’s a very cost-effective way to do it,” Coates says, “because to go out and rent a theater, hire technicians, that’s a lot of money getting sunk into that. Especially for touring companies, the Fringe Festival has the efficiency of facilities, you have the infrastructure there.” “Plus,” Bowman adds, “as the new kid in town, you can ask other people, ‘Does anybody know where I can get some plastic radishes? I’m new here.’” Perhaps even more important, however, is the opportunity simply to find an audience—one that is generally open to something new and innovative. “We want feedback,” Bowman says, “because this show is a baby. It takes a lot of performances, a lot of iterations, to figure out what works, what can be cut, what can be improved. You can’t get that without an audience. For me, that’s the main thing. Fringe audiences, in my experience, are really approachable. The wall between audiences and artists dissolves.” That doesn’t necessarily mean there’s time for actors to chat with attendees from the stage after the show. Like all of the Fringe artists, Bowman and Coates are working within tight logistical parameters: a 60-minutes-or-less show, with 15 minutes

Elizabeth Golden in Sackerson’s Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival production Do You Want to See Me Naked?

to load on before and 15 minutes to strike the set after. Those efficiencies of scale mean packing a lot of art into the available spaces in a limited amount of time. For audiences, that means a chance to sample a tremendous range of work, operating outside any predictable parameters, and getting a chance to interact with the artists in more informal ways. “The word of mouth at a festival, when the energy is good, audiences talk to each other,” Bowman says. “The potential for energy at a festival like this is something you just don’t have in a regular theater season.” Of the festival works, Perry says, “There are really no rules, and anyone who is performing is not necessarily beholden to subscribers, or one particular aesthetic. It just allows people to do whatever they want to do, and see what sticks. “It’s un-adjudicated, unrestricted, and when you put those two things together, it allows people to really explore.” CW

GREAT SALT LAKE FRINGE FESTIVAL

The Fringe Factory (2234 S. Highland Drive) Westminster College (1840 S. 1300 East) Sprague Library (2131 S. 1100 East) July 28-Aug. 6 Dates and times vary $10 per show; $25-$70 packages greatsaltlakefringe.org


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COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

University of Utah graduate Rachel Johanna Glaittli explores layers of human emotion through layered photography in the exhibition A Study of Multiple Exposure at Day-Riverside Library (1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, slcpl.org) through Aug. 20.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

The 3 Amigos Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug. 19, times vary, desertstar.biz As You Like It Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 7, times vary, bard.org Blackbird Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, through July 30, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; 3 p.m. matinee Sunday, July 30, utahrep.org The Book of Mormon Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, through Aug. 20, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Broadway Bound Neil Simon Festival, Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435267-0194, through Aug. 12, dates and times vary, simonfest.org The Dinner Party Neil Simon Festival, Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435267-0194, through Aug. 11, dates and times vary, simonfest.org Disney’s The Lion King Jr. Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, 801-226-8600, through July 28, 10 a.m. & 1 p.m., haletheater.org Disney’s Tarzan Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Aug. 5, Monday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; various matinees Friday-Saturday, haletheater.org Great Salt Lake Fringe Festival Fringe Factory, 2234 Highland Drive; Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East; Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, July 28-Aug. 6, Thursday-Sunday, times vary, greatsaltlakefringe.org (see p. 20) Guys and Dolls Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 1, times vary, bard.org Honk Jr. Empress Theatre, 9104 W. 2700 South, Magna, July 28-Aug. 12, Friday-Saturday 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee 2 p.m.; Monday, Aug. 7, 7:30 p.m., empresstheatre.com Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, through Aug. 12, times vary, hct.org Madama Butterfly Ellen Eccles Theater, 43 S.

Main, Logan, 800-262-0074, through Aug. 8, artsaltlake.org Mamma Mia Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3200, through Oct. 21, tuacahn.org A Midsummer Night’s Dream Randall L. Jones Theatre, 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 453-5867878, through Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org A Night at the Imperial Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through July 29, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org Noises Off Neil Simon Festival, Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 West, Cedar City, 435-2670194, through Aug. 9, dates and times vary, simonfest.org Rex Utah Theater, 18 W. Center St., Logan, 800262-0074, through Aug. 7, artsaltlake.org Romeo and Juliet Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435586-7878, through Sept. 9, times vary, bard.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Aug. 27, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Seussical The Musical Utah Theatre, 18 W. Center St., Logan, 801-355-2787, through Aug. 7, dates and times vary, artsaltlake.org Shakespeare in Love Engelstad Shakespeare Theatre, 200 W. College Ave., Cedar City, 435586-7878, through Sept. 8, times vary, bard.org Shrek: The Musical Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3200, through Oct. 21, tuacahn.org Treasure Island Randall L. Jones Theatre 300 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, through Sept. 2, times vary, bard.org Under Construction: The Blue Collar Musical Neil Simon Festival, Heritage Center Theater, 105 N. 100 East, Cedar City, 435-267-0194, through Aug. 12, dates and times vary, simonfest.org William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play Eileen and Allen Anes Studio Theatre, 195 W. Center St., Cedar City, 435-586-7878, July 28-Oct. 21, times vary, bard.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Disney in Concert: A Dream is a Wish Snow Park Amphitheatre, 2250 Deer Valley Drive, Park City, 801-355-2787, July 28, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org


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moreESSENTIALS Utah Symphony: John Williams’ Film Music Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-5850556, Aug. 2, 8 p.m., redbuttegarden.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Bobby Lee Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, July 28-29, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 18) Eddie Ifft Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801532-5233, July 27, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com ImprovBroadway ImprovBroadway, 496 N. 900 East, Provo, 909-260-2509, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., improvbroadway.com Open-Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Steve Soelberg Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801-622-5588, July 28-29, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com new hours • fri-mon 10am-6pm

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LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

Jim Ure: Seized by the Sun The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, July 29, 2-4 p.m., kingsenglish.com Fernanda Santos: The Fire Line The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, July 31, kingsenglish.com Allison K. Hymas: Under Locker and Key Orem Library, 58 N. State, Orem, Aug. 1, 2 p.m., oremlibrary.org Jared Hickman: Black Prometheus: Race and Radicalism in the Age of Atlantic Slavery Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, 801-3282586, Aug. 1., 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 West, through Oct. 29, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, through Oct. 28, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Sugar House Farmers Market Fairmont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, through Oct. 25, Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m., sugarhousefarmersmarket.org

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Cotopaxi Questival Big Cottonwood Park, 4300 S. 1300 East, July 28, 6 p.m., through July 29, 8 p.m., cotopaxi.com (see p. 18) Salt Lake County Fair County Fairgrounds, 2100 W. 11400 South, South Jordan, Aug. 2-5, slcfair.com Utah Pacific Island Heritage Month Kickoff Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, July 29, 5-10 p.m., facebook.com/utpihm

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

Al Ahad: The Hijab Project UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, July 21-Nov. 18; artist reception, Aug. 25, 6-9 p.m., $5 donation suggested, utahmoca.org All-State Utah High School Art Show Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through July 29, slcpl.org Annual Summer Group Show & Artifacts: Art, Politics & Alternative Realities Phillips Gallery, 444 E. 200 South, 801-364-8284,

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through Sept. 8, phillips-gallery.com Avenues Open Studies: Works by Local Artists Corinne and Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Aug. 19, slcpl.org Corinne Humphrey: Tao of Rudy—Essential Dog-ma for Everyday Joy SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Aug. 7, slcpl.org Eight O’Clock in the Morning Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande, 801-230-0820, Aug. 2-Sept. 3; artist reception Aug. 18, 6-9 p.m., urbanartsgallery.org (see p. 18) Face of Utah Sculpture XIII Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, 801-9655100, through Aug. 30, culturalcelebration.org INK Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande, 801230-0820, through July 30, urbanartsgallery.org Joseph Cipro: Cosmic Musings Gallery 814, 814 E. 100 South, 801-533-0204, through July 31 Kaustubh Thapa: Shadows and Colors Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, 801-328-0703, through Aug. 11, accessart.org Linnie Brown: Maps of Insufficient Clarity Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-5965000, through Aug. 4, saltlakearts.org Luke Watson: Anthropocene Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Aug. 24, slcpl.org Masterworks of Western American Art David Dee Fine Arts, 1709 E. 1300 South, 801-583-8143, through Aug. 31, daviddeefinearts.com Matt Page: Page on the Arts: Mormon Pop Art Brigham Young University, Harold B. Lee Library Special Collections Room, 2060 Lee Lane, Provo, 801-422-2927, through July 31, sites.lib.byu.edu Michael Ryan Handley: Sublimation UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 9, utahmoca.org Multiple Inspirations: MS + Art Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Salt Lake City, 801-3280703, through Aug. 11, times vary, accessart.org Naomi Marine: Sleepwalking Sprague Branch Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through Aug. 26, slcpl.org Naomi S. Adams: Structural Language Salt Lake Community College South City, 1575 S. State, 801-957-4111, through Sept. 7, slcc.edu Native Voices: Contemporary Trading Post Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-3553383, through Aug. 21, modernwestfineart.com Richard Serra: Prints Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., 435-649-8882, through Aug. 20, kimballartcenter.org Robert Barett: Figurative Tradition Visual Art Institute, 2901 S. Highland Drive, 801-474-3796, through Aug. 4, visualartinstitute.org Scott Filipiak Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through Aug. 4, saltlakearts.org Spy Hop: Safe and Sound Utah Museum of Cultural Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 23, utahmoca.org A Study of Multiple Exposure Day-Riverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through Aug. 20, slcpl.org (see p. 22) Summer Shades J Go Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, 435-649-1006, through July 28, jgogallery.com Under the Influence: Eight Local Artists Influenced by Animation Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., 801-245-7272, through Sept. 1, heritage.utah.gov Woodine DeMille: Vibrant Nature: A Kaleidoscope of Color Old Dome Meeting Hall, 1452 W. 12600 South, Riverton, 801-254-0704, through Aug. 16, rivertoncity.com


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DINE TED SCHEFFLER

RESTAURANT REVIEW

Midday Munchies

HSL opens for lunch and brunch. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @Critic1

C

onsidering the fact that I make a living dining and writing about food and restaurants, eating out for lunch (fast food doesn’t count) is, for me, a surprisingly rare treat. That’s probably because I work from home, and it’s easier to snag lunch from the fridge or pantry than it is to drive somewhere to eat. So I genuinely relish the rare restaurant lunch respite. “I’m in,” I thought, when I heard that HSL restaurant was now serving lunch Monday through Friday and brunch on weekends. I’ve long been a fan of the dinner menus at chef/owner Briar Handly’s Park City restaurant Handle, and his newer Salt Lake outpost, HSL (Handle Salt Lake). Now I’d get a chance to enjoy Handly’s cuisine midday. Although the flavors and food presentations at HSL are refined, portions skew über-generous. The grilled halibut tostada ($11) can easily satisfy four people as a starter. Gorgeous, white chunks of grilled halibut—the current menu, updated since my visit, uses tuna rather than halibut— adorn a complex salad of spinach, radicchio, fresh fennel, radish and mesclun with fried shallot “rings,” and a luscious coriander aioli. The crunchy housemade tostada is the perfect tool for scraping the last drops of aioli from the plate. I was lured to the “Hearty” section of the lunch menu by the bavette steak sandwich ($17), which is served on ciabatta with arugula, fennel, Rockhill gruyère and a side selection of kale, couscous, curried lentils or french fries. Thinking I should go a little lighter at lunch, I instead opted for the slightly less decadent fried chicken chop salad ($16). This, like the tostada, was a ginormous dish; I wound up taking half of it home with me. Mixed greens are peppered with chunks of housemade HSL bacon,

Smoked trout salad at HSL slivers of hard-cooked duck egg, minced chives and an exquisite buttermilk and bleu d’Auvergne dressing. Perched atop the lovely salad were crispy, tender morsels of deep-fried boneless white chicken. Handly first brines his chicken in buttermilk and Frank’s Red Hot before breading and frying it. The result is chicken that you could dissect with a plastic spoon, in a truly sensational salad. From being greeted warmly at the door to fond farewells upon leaving, service at HSL is second to none. I appreciated a wine recommendation of Bouvet Brut Rosé from France as an accompaniment to the halibut tostada, and attentiveness throughout lunch was thorough but never overbearing. The bartenders are also affable and outgoing; sipping cocktails, beer, wine, cider or mocktails at the bar is always a good choice. I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention one of my favorite HSL dishes, the beef tartare ($12). Top-quality minced beef is prepared with Chinese mustard, micro greens, duck egg yolk emulsion and crisp lavosh—it’s a beautiful thing. Alongside the tartare (or any other dish, really), be sure to order the French fries ($6). These are proper, twice-cooked fries served with dijonnaise on the side. The preparation is top-drawer to begin with, but Handly kicks them up a notch with a dusting of malt vinegar power, which gives the fries a tart, vinegary snap without the sogginess that actual malt vinegar causes. Another excellent light lunchtime offering is the smoked trout salad ($15), which my wife kindly let me nibble on. It would be as satisfying in winter just as in summer: a hearty plate of mixed greens, roasted fingerling potatoes, chopped chives, carrots, blistered peppers and grilled asparagus on a whole grain mustard dressing base. This item is a meal itself, but you could do worse than accompanying it what has to be HSL’s most popular side dish—the scrumptious General Tso’s-style cauliflower ($10) with pickled Fresno peppers and sriracha vinaigrette. It turned me into a cauliflower lover. If, like for me, lunching out is a luxury, I recommend you do it at HSL. CW

HSL RESTAURANT

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135 W. 1300 S. | 801.487.4418 | LUCKY13SLC.COM


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FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW @scottrenshaw

Oceans Till 11

Are you for a unique new environment in which to enjoy your food and drink? Even if you’ve exhausted every outdoor patio and mountain view, you might not have supped while sharks swim around you. On Aug. 4, the Loveland Living Planet Aquarium (12033 Lone Peak Parkway, Draper, 801-355-3474), presents its inaugural Sips Under the Sea event. Guests will enjoy an after-hours opportunity to stroll through the aquarium’s rooms for this 21-and-over event enjoying hors d’oeuvres, cheeses and chocolates, with wine pairings or your own favorite beer or cocktail. Tickets are $39.95 per person, and can be reserved at thelivingplanet.com/sipsunderthesea.

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

I Love the ’90s

Nostalgia: It seems impossible for us to resist, especially as we look at certain elements of our present and wonder what the hell went wrong. If you look back fondly on the era of grunge, Furbies, slap bracelets and a Clinton who won the presidency, consider joining the Salt Lake City ’90s Bar Crawl. Gracie’s, Johnny’s on Second and Bodega 331 are among the participating venues where you can get a “welcome beer” upon arrival and enjoy era-appropriate music. Tickets ($30-$40 per person depending on registration date) also get participants a signature cup to remember the occasion. Whether you’re lamenting lost youth or celebrating days gone by, visit 90sbarcrawl.com for more details.

Preserve and Protect

The summer growing season historically meant packing away produce to be used throughout the winter—and while modern food distribution doesn’t make it necessary, that doesn’t mean it can’t be fun, and a useful way to get the most out of your garden’s bounty. Utah State University extensions in Weber, Davis and Utah County offer food preservation classes introducing the basics of freezing, dehydrating, canning and creating jams and jellies. Classes continue through September; visit extension.usu. edu for specific class topics, dates and locations. Quote of the week: “Old people shouldn’t eat health foods. They need all the preservatives they can get.” —Robert Orben Send tips to: comments@cityweekly.net

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Feeling a Little Melon-choly? These berry special fruit beers are much better than my puns. BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

I

t’s fair to say most beer-drinkers have a love-hate relationship to fruit beers. I imagine it stems from the 1990s when all fruit beers in America were basically wheat beers that were dosed with fruit. That is definitely not the case today, so doldrums be gone. Currently, fruited beers are far more adventurous, taking their cues from popular styles like IPAs and golden strong ales. This new batch uses the fruit to accent, not overwhelm. If you’ve been away from the fruity side, I have some solid local examples that just might bring you back to the orchard:

BEER NERD Epic Brewing Co.’s Brainless on Peaches

The peach is evident right off the bat as the skin-toned/golden-hued liquid looks as peachy as if it had come straight from the tree—the nose shows peach and chardonnay immediately and apple and pear from the yeast linger beneath, with notes of wood and white pepper. Taste wise, the peach deliver a pleasant tannic and acidic sweetness. Caramel malts come next, creating a ghostly cobbler-ish taste that is pleasant and familiar. The end is all vinous wine and wood notes from the barrel, adding some acidic balance to the malts. The finish is dry and prickly. Verdict: Epic’s wine-barrel-aged peach beer relies on the orchard fruit and winelike character to carry it. Some of the yeast’s spicy character gets a little lost behind the peach and chardonnay, but it doesn’t detract from the enjoyment. For an 11 percent fruit beer, it’s surprisingly light and summer-like.

Gineva by Red Rock Brewing Uinta Brewing Co.’s Hop Nosh Tangerine

Pours a golden yellow color with a slight bit of haze. The nose starts on the malty side along with a dose of peppery yeast; some juniper and wood aroma is also noticeable along with a slight earthy hoppiness. The taste reveals much of the same, with subtle malts that have an almost pistachio-like quality. The juniper now begins to make itself known. The berry isn’t overly pervasive, but fruit essence lingers on the sides of the tongue, rounding out the flavors from the grains. Some tartness from the juniper becomes more apparent as the palate adjusts to fruit transition. As far as the end goes, it’s fruity and peppery and finishes semi-dry. Verdict: Clocking in at 5.5 percent ABV, the addition of fruit rounds out the Belgian-ale base and creates and old world flavor that reminds me of a time before hops. If you’re a fan of the style, it’ll definitely work for you. However, the lack of hop character won’t exactly endure itself to the IPA crowd.

This American IPA pours out an orange amber color with a nice bubbly white head. The nose is rich with citrus peel and hops that echo the same. The taste begins with a smack of tangerine and hops. It makes way for some smooth earthy grains that are on the verge of sweet. The fruit purée here adds more than just tangerine. You really get the pith as well as the peel, too. It finishes bitter and dry. Verdict: There is a lot happening in this fruity IPA. The base beer has a masterfully balanced blend of malt and hops. The tangerine picks up its cues from there, and never overpowers. The 7.3 percent ABV keeps it all in check providing a nice medium body.

The bottom line: Fruited beers are huge right now and summer is the perfect time to get to know these and other local enhanced ales and lagers, so don’t be afraid to walk on the fruity side. As always, cheers! CW


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Featuring dining destinations from buffets and rooms with a view to mom-and-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves.

Coffee Garden

Coffee Garden treats their regulars like family, and both Salt Lake City locations have become irreplaceable in their respective communities by providing high-quality coffee with great customer service. Each has a distinct personality: Downtown’s (inside Eborn Books) is literary and intimate; 9th & 9th (next to Tower Theatre) is cinematic and expansive. 878 E. 900 South, 801-355-3425; 254 S. Main, 801-364-0768

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Mi Lindo

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If you love ceviche, you’ll love this Peruvian restaurant. Try the ceviche de mero, made with tender grouper, mussels, octopus, calamari and more, served with sweet corn and onions that complement the zesty spices. Portions are generous, and plates seem designed to be shared, so don’t keep that lomo saltado (strips of beef marinated in soy sauce, vinegar and spices, stir-fried with onions and tomatoes and served with steamed rice and french fries) to yourself. The restaurant is clean and airy, with an open kitchen where you can see your meal being prepared. 310 W. Bugatti Ave., 801-467-2890

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There’s a pint-sized dining area at this Millcreek restaurant, but most people prefer the take-out option. The inexpensive Chinese eatery prides itself on authenticity and fast delivery service, which is available until 10 p.m. daily except Sunday. Start off with the cream cheese wontons before you make your way to the dinner favorite, Dragon and Phoenix—a heaping combo plate of General Tao’s chicken and hot-and-spicy shrimp. 1331 E. 3900 South, 801-272-9333, thedragondiner.com

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Pizza Nono’s Rocket Man

Pizza Nono

A great Neapolitan pizza is a surprisingly simple thing—made with just a handful of ingredients—which is why it’s so hard to get right. At the 9th & 9th’s Pizza Nono (nono means “ninth” in Italian) owner/chef Will McMaster has conquered the art of Neapolitan pizza. His Margherita ($10) is as good as any I’ve ever tasted—and I’ve sampled hundreds. It’s all about quality control, and Nono’s simple and straightforward menu helps keep quality high. The menu consists of four mainstays, plus a pizza-of-the-week. A couple of simple salads are offered—kale Caesar and an arugula—along with a seasonal side such as broccolini. That’s it. Aside from the outstanding Margherita, I’d also recommend the Rocket Man ($12), topped with fresh mozzarella, fontina, prosciutto di Parma, Grana Padano and arugula. For a more contemporary take, the Beehive ($11) has tomato, fresh mozzarella, calabrese, pickled jalapeño and honey. Reviewed June 22. 925 E. 900 South, SLC, 385-444-3530, pizzanono-slc.com


FILM REVIEW

Sheet Happens

CINEMA

A Ghost Story turns a simple image into a meditation on attachment and mortality. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

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Casey Affleck (under the sheet) in A Ghost Story. turmoil to moments as potentially mundane as listening to a piece of music or eating a pie—and she’s actually got the easier job. Affleck is left to bring a soul to that cotton-draped apparition, moving with resignation that only occasionally bursts into poltergeist-like rage. The slow stride of that ghost has to carry us through a kind of existential horror connected to wondering if there’s ever a time when you can be at rest. If A Ghost Story ever comes close to stumbling, it’s when a scene at a party focuses on one guest (Will Oldham) who begins expounding on human attempts to cheat death through creating art. The monologue comes perilously close to feeling like an “in case you missed it, here’s our thesis statement” capitulation, but it also captures something about how we attempt to intellectualize fear of death. Lowery embraces every possible facet of that fear in A Ghost Story, and the result is absolutely haunting—and not just because of the person in the sheet with two eyeholes. CW

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Daniel Hart’s creepy-triumphant score— brings a majestically Zen sensibility to the notion of attachment to places, the inability to move on from tragedy and how we try to find purpose in anything in the face of our own mortality. Them’s some heady ideas, and the fact that it’s mostly dead serious—save for a couple of hilariously terse exchanges when ghosts encounter one another—is bound to leave some viewers reaching for what it all means, or if it’s all just a big ponderous joke. But this is one of those achievements that reminds you of the unique power film can have to move through time and space, as Lowery employs brilliantly concise edits to convey the passage of days and years; one sequence of exactly six cuts carries us over a span of decades with magnificent efficiency. One moment A Ghost Story might have us occupying a Blade Runner-esque near-future cityscape, and the next it might find us with a family of homesteaders in the 1800s. Lowery traps all of these images in a vintage 1.33:1 aspect ratio, even curving the corners so it further resembles something that might have been emerging from a 1960s-era television. As epic as its scope might be, A Ghost Story never stops reminding you that this is also a story about being constrained and limited by the confines of a single place. It’s not easy for wordless, even faceless performances to capture these feelings, but A Ghost Story finds room for uniquely evocative performances. Mara brings

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t is, of course, perfectly ridiculous to think that a person in a sheet with two eyeholes could represent something transcendently mournful about humanity. The iconography calls to mind It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown more than it evokes mystery and wonder, and it doesn’t suggest that much would be possible in the way of nuanced performance—what with, you know, no visible face and also no spoken dialogue. Yeah, no one would blame you if you shook your head at the whole concept of A Ghost Story and chuckled at the mere sight of one of its publicity photos. The ease with which writer/director David Lowery disintegrates every one of those assumptions is only part of what makes A Ghost Story such a stunning achievement. It’s high art overlapping with high concept, careening through past, present and future in a way that’s both head-spinning and mind-blowing. Here you find a masterpiece of shifting scale, a narrative that somehow manages to be both deeply personal and truly cosmic— and all of it guided by a person in a sheet with two eyeholes. It’s best to go in mostly blind regarding plot details. Suffice it to say that a married couple—Lowery’s Ain’t Them Bodies Saints protagonists Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara, here identified only as “C” and “M,” respectively—is involved, living in a rented house subject to the occasional unexplained bump, bang or discordant sound of something banging on the piano. They seem blissfully in love—until a linens-clad spectre intrudes into their lives in a more unsettling fashion. What follows isn’t easy to unpack without telling too much of the story. The mostly dialogue-free narrative—augmented by


CINEMA CLIPS

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NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. ATOMIC BLONDE [not yet reviewed] Cold War-era thriller about an undercover agent (Charlize Theron) on assignment in Berlin. Opens July 28 at theaters valleywide. (R)

34 | JULY 27, 2017

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CITY OF GHOSTS BBBB For years, the only news out of the ISIS-occupied Syrian city of Raqqa has come via a small group of incredibly daring citizen journalists known as “Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently” (RBSS). Anonymous reporters—armed with little more than digital cameras and unreliable internet connections—send their footage out to partners in Turkey and Germany, who then redistribute it to the web, where it eventually finds its way into the mainstream media. Theirs is a heartbreaking chronicle of innocents murdered and the attempted erasure of happy, modern living in favor of medieval brutality. Documentarian Matthew Heineman paints a deeply upsetting yet hugely inspiring portrait of RBSS through intimate access to those hiding in Europe. They are ordinary Syrians driven to extraordinary action by love of their city, their country and plain human decency. One RBSS member explains how tyranical ISIS came to power, by preying on the vulnerability of downtrodden people, and promising prosperity to those who have none. That is not a situation unique to the Middle East. Pay close attention to City of Ghosts: It could well provide lessons necessary for our own future. Opens July 28 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)—MaryAnn Johanson THE EMOJI MOVIE [not yet reviewed] Animated journey inside the world of cell phone symbols. Opens July 28 at theaters valleywide. (PG) A GHOST STORY BBBB See review on p. 33. Opens July 28 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ALIVE INSIDE At Main Library, Aug. 1, 7 p.m. (NR)

ernment agents Valerian (Dane DeHaan) and Laureline (Cara Delevingne) investigate a mysterious threat to a metropolis space station. Besson makes clunky attempts to manufacture a romance between his protagonists, and rarely exploits the complexities of his interstellar melting-pot setting. But it’s also hard to resist eye-candy charms like a planet with orangeand-blue clouds, or weird conceits like a chase that takes place across multiple dimensions. This is a 137-minute-long movie that stops dead for a full-length dance performance by a shape-shifting alien, which might be Besson in a nutshell: You wonder what the hell he’s thinking, even as you’re grinning a little more than you’re comfortable admitting. (PG-13)—SR

NEWSIES At Park City Library, July 27, 7 p.m. (PG) WEEKEND AT DUMBLEDORE’S At Tower Theatre, July 28-30. (PG & PG-13)

CURRENT RELEASES DUNKIRK BBB Christopher Nolan is an extraordinarily talented filmmaker, and also his movies are sometimes just plain exhausting. Here he tackles the 1940 evacuation of 400,000 British troops from France, intertwining three narratives: a British private (Fionn Whitehead) trying to find transport home; a civilian (Mark Rylance) bringing his private boat across the Channel to aid in the evacuation; and a British pilot (Tom Hardy) providing air support. Nolan dives into his harrowing scenario without loading his characters with backstory, trusting the situations to inspire the needed emotional connection. But the complete absence of narrative downtime also creates an experience that has viewers on high alert for 106 minutes. The heroic stories effectively convey a resilience that turned defeat into a defining moment of British national character; it might have been nice to have a bit more breathing room to appreciate it. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES BBB.5 This saga has become one of popular culture’s most fascinating explorations of humanity at its worst—and, occasionally, its best. Chimpanzee Caesar (Andy Serkis) still leads the intelligent ape troop in a world where a plague wiped out most of the human race, now facing a violent warlord (Woody Harrelson) whose actions inspire Caesar to seek revenge. Serkis’ remarkable motion-capture performance as Caesar continues to be the anchor of these movies, and it’s particularly unsettling watching him wrestle with his own worst impulses. Yet these movies are never tedious philosophical exercises, though director Matt Reeves’ tone is often dark aside from the comic relief of Bad Ape (Steve Zahn). This might not be typical light-hearted summer movie fare, but there’s a richer payoff than beating the bad guy: finding the strength to recognize the bad guy in ourselves. (PG-13)—SR

MAUDIE BBB Folk-art buffs and extremely patriotic Canadians might already know the story of Maud Lewis (the wonderful Sally Hawkins), an arthritic Nova Scotian who sold simple, charming paintings out of the house she shared with her husband Everett (Ethan Hawke) in the middle decades of the 20th century. For the rest of us, there’s this gentle biopic, which isn’t exactly a Pollocklevel dissection of a tortured artist—but, hey, Maud wasn’t exactly Pollock. Director Aisling Walsh presents Maud’s life as a love story of sorts, with Everett’s initial indifference and occasional disdain toward Maud growing into affection. The film shows no interest in the details of Maud’s health, and isn’t really about her art, either. It’s a nice, unassuming movie you might take your mother to, with a warmth that compensates for its lack of insight. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

WISH UPON B.5 On the surface, this lazy teen horror story is basically Edge of Seventeen meets The Monkey’s Paw: Unhappy high-school student Clare (Joey King) starts to improve her status, thanks to a strange Chinese “wishing box,” only to learn her wishes come with a cost. This might have been an interesting way to explore teen angst and learning to accept the pitfalls of life, with director John R. Leonetti employing a few tensionbuilding fake-outs before his comedically over-the-top death scenes. But the “rules” of the mystical wish-granting make no sense, and the backstory of Clare’s dead mother remains frustratingly unexplored. Most depressing of all, Wish Upon abandons its chance to be a genuine cautionary tale in favor of a cheap shock. If you’re not going to be scary, coherent or thematically interesting, you’re just wasting 90 minutes of everyone’s time. (PG-13)—SR

VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS BBB Luc Besson has made a career out of deeply dumb movies that are often cool-looking enough to be engaging. Here he adapts a graphic novel series set 500 years in the future, where gov-

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Motel Hell

The Duplass Brothers check into Room 104; Sinner shows Jessica Biel’s dark side.

T

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the primetime gods, it’s the bajillion-dollar property known as CBS. While star and all-around garbage person Abby Lee Miller is currently serving time in prison for bankruptcy fraud, Dance Moms (Season 7 premiere, Tuesday, Aug. 1, Lifetime) continues—the judicial system has failed us. On July 25, Lifetime aired the sympathy-baiting Dance Moms: Abby Tells All, a manipulative hour that I really hope they saw at the Victorville Federal Correctional Institution after Miller arrived. Oh, and what gutless design committee came up with the new Lifetime logo? A sans-serif font inside an opaque circle? Just like every other damned network on TV?! Anyway: In Season 7 of Dance Moms … just more of the same shit, and hopefully the last anyone will see of Miller. Despite what rock nerds might subconsciously fool themselves into believing, the Baroness Von Sketch Show (series debut, Wednesday, Aug. 2, IFC) is not a moonlighting comedy series from acclaimed prog-metal band Baroness—but wouldn’t it be great if it was? Four burly, humorless metalheads awkwardly performing wacky comedy bits between brutal musical interludes? I’d watch the hell out of that. Baroness Von Sketch Show, in reality, is a Canadian comedy series produced, written, directed by and starring women, because anything goes up there in the Great White North, what with their pale beer, free healthcare and good-lookin,’ non-idiot leader. Funny show, but not very metal. Previously, Jessica Biel’s best TV work was not on 7th Heaven, but as herself on BoJack Horseman—and, as far as films go, she never topped Blade: Trinity. Sinner (series debut, Wednesday, Aug. 2, USA) is a compelling showcase for Biel’s dark side, playing a dull suburban wife and mom who suddenly snaps during a day at the beach and stabs a stranger to death … but was he really a stranger? Enter the real star of Sinner, Bill Pullman, as a detective working backward to uncover a killer’s motives that are unknown to even her. In tone and length (only eight episodes), the show is veddy British, akin to Broadchurch and The Fall—which probably won’t work on USA, but will eventually blow up on Netflix. It’s science. CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

he Duplass Brothers have created some intriguing—if not always watchable—shows for HBO (Togetherness and Animals, only one of which is still a thing), and Room 104 (series debut, Friday, July 28, HBO) could be their best yet. A time-spanning anthology series, Room 104 follows various occupants of a single motel room; the premiere episode, about a babysitter and a strange boy, is a mini horror film, while the others range from mysterious (a maid looking for clues) to visceral (a pair of female MMA fighters sparring) to sexy (a pizza-delivery guy invited into a twisted threesome) to awkward (two Mormon missionaries questioning their faith, among other things). Verdict: watchable! It’s finally here! Rick & Morty (Season 3 premiere, Sunday, July 30, Adult Swim) dropped the first episode of its third season on April Fool’s Day (how delightfully schwifty) and then made us wait three more months because creators Dan Harmon and Justin Roiland can’t get it together. Then again, there was a lot to process from that episode: Earth had been taken over by alien tourists and Jerry and Beth finally split, not to mention Rick becoming addicted to McDonald’s Szechuan sauce and straightup threatening poor Morty. As for the rest of the R&M season, Harmon says Earth life will both return to (relative) normal and feature a Mad Max tribute episode. Don’t ever change, you crazy bastard. CBS News is so committed to serious journalism that they’re dedicating four whole weeks in the dead of summer to it. CBSN: On Assignment (series debut, Monday, July 31, CBS) is noble in theory, a primetime hour featuring multiple news reports from younger correspondents (i.e., not the usual 60 Minutes coots in suits) on topics from inner-city gun violence to outside terrorism threats, but then what? Back to Kevin Can Wait and Superior Donuts reruns, that’s what, and neither advances the intelligence or awareness of the country. If any broadcast network can afford to sacrifice an hour a week—every week—to

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Local trio Kapix pumps you up with Prom Queen.

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reat rock ’n’ roll gets you pumped. In the July 3 installment of the City Weekly music blog, I wrote about rolling out of bed and cranking up Prom Queen, the new EP by local trio Kapix (pronounced CAP-icks). Despite the conventional wisdom that loud music is counterintuitive for first thing on a Monday morning, it just felt like the right thing to do. “From the opening bars of ‘Are You Coming or Not,’ it was clearly a good move,” I wrote. “I was instantly awake, my mind alive with references from Motörhead to AC/DC to New Wave of British Heavy Metal to Supagroup, playing air guitar and already dreading the end of the eight-track set. … I’m now on a third playthrough and still stoked. Goddamn, it’s hot.” On the way to meet drummer/spokesdude Lance Emmers for an interview, I listened again. The band’s great, driving music is also great driving music, the kind that gives you a lead foot. It’s a minor miracle that, on a drive long enough to get five tunes deep into the eight-song EP, the rearview mirror never reflected red-and-blue flashers. It’s very possible that the vehicle swerved, since the steering wheel was by turns a guitar and drum kit. As we settle onto our barstools, Emmers admits to something many musicians won’t. En route to our meeting at The Leprechaun, he says, “I was listening to tracks from the album to get pumped for the interview.” Musicians have good reasons for not listening to their own work. It appears vain, even masturbatory. It’s hard to enjoy something you’re so close to, because you hear all the mistakes. Between writing, recording and performing the songs countless times, it’s also work; you need a break from it. But Emmers’ confession is refreshing. Rock ’n’ roll—the good stuff—is masturbatory. Bands are exhibitionists, coaxing eruptions from phallic symbols at high volume and cheers from people who paid to watch. It’s obviously fun, which must eclipse any anxiety over perceived flaws in the recordings, or live flubs, or the notion that it could be drudgery. The whole concert experience is about getting off and letting off energy. As fans, we want the band to be into the music, because this rock ’n’ roll thing only works when both sides are invested. Of course, it’s not always a rock ’n’ roll fantasy. It’s only logical that Emmers and his bandmates—Avery Ghaderi (vocals, bass, guitars) and Hagen Kearney (vocals, guitars, bass)—experience both the good and bad. Emmers says the writing and recording stages are initially exciting. “It’s rad, you’re writing something new and fun, you’re on a ride, and you don’t want the ride to stop,” he says. Stress eventually settles upon you—it just goes with the territory, but there’s a moment when it lifts. That epiphany came for this recording when Emmers and Kearney took a motorcycle ride to the Causey Reservoir and Prom Queen’s 6:47 epic “Freeway” played through Emmers’ headphones. Over the sound of himself riding his hi-hat, Kearney’s guitars rev, the chords sustain for full measures. The intervals between chords tighten; Emmers, the engine, start to piston, hitting harder on the

KARENA ANGELL

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36 | JULY 27, 2017

CONCERT PREVIEW

Avery Ghaderi, Lance Emmers and Hagen Kearney twos and fours. The song rockets up the on ramp to outer space, and becomes a manic, fantastic ride that merges “Born to Be Wild” with Heavy Metal. “It was pretty fuckin’ awesome,” the drummer says. That’s about the size of it. Produced by Mike Sasich at Man vs. Music, Prom Queen is an energizing, thrilling jolt of rock packed with meaty riffs, wild solos, huge drums and anthemic choruses. As I wrote in the blog, it’s such a good time that you really do dread the inevitable end. Interestingly, it’s quite a divergence from Kapix’s self-titled debut EP, which was recorded after the band’s first couple of shows and featured a different lineup (Chris Burch in place of Kearney) and a much different sound—more indie or alternative rock. The balls-out sound came when Hagen stepped in after Burch departed. “The first song we jammed on was ‘Paranoid’ by Black Sabbath,” Emmers says. “And the first song we wrote together was ‘Are You Coming or Not.’” The chemistry was so immediate and natural that Kapix decided to shift gears. That included shelving their old material, pulling all the copies of that debut EP and starting fresh. Their live shows also evolved, with all three members trading off on guitar, bass and drums (Kearney and Ghaderi share vocal duties). Emmers attributes the ease of the transition to keeping things basic, just rocking out and having fun. “We’re not trying to reinvent the wheel,” he says, sipping his beer. Maybe not. But they’re definitely keepin’ it rollin’. CW

ROYAL BLISS

w/ Kapix, Andrew W. Boss The Royal 4760 S. 900 East 801-590-9940 Friday, Aug. 4, 8 p.m. $15 All ages theroyalslc.com


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WED

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SUN &

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STATE live music

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JULY 27, 2017 | 37

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!


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LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD & BRIAN STAKER

THURSDAY 7/27

In the beginning (aka the ’80s), there was Idiot Flesh. In the minuscule but flamboyant arena of avant-garde theatrical music groups—with all their bizarre costumes, puppet shows and household objects used as musical instruments—this Bay Area conglomerate was arguably the prototype. Every performance made you feel like you were standing outside a tent of hippie circus sideshow freaks at Burning Man. Idiot Flesh begat Sleepytime Gorilla Museum in 1999, and Sleepytime Gorilla Museum in 2013 begat Free Salamander Exhibit. Singer/ multi-instrumentalist Nils Frykdahl—the de facto leader of all three experimental/art rock groups—is also known for his collaboration with partner Dawn McCarthy in her indie folk outfit Faun Fables, as well as other projects. FSE is his most recent creation, and four of five members of SGM came along for the ride for their debut album Undestroyed (Web of Mimicry, 2016). Local openers are 2-Headed Whale, Red Bennies and The Moths. (Brian Staker) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $8 presale, $10 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Kurt Vile and the Violators, Whitney, 90s Television

Indie singer/guitar-slinger Kurt Vile is probably so popular among the cognoscenti because his genuineness is magnetic. There are no musical or lyrical shortcuts on his releases, and the honesty of his songwriting is refreshing in an age of recycled retro music and canned mashups. Special guest Whitney features the songwriting duo guitarist Max Kakacek and singer/drummer Julien Ehrlich from the defunct but beloved Smith Westerns. The Chicago group’s debut,

90s Television

LARA MIRANDA

Free Salamander Exhibit, 2-Headed Whale, Red Bennies, The Moths

Light Upon the Lake (Secretly Canadian), released in June, is already garnering critical plaudits for its songwriting depth and instrumental proficiency. Local 90s Television provide the perfect complement to the bill. Armed with well-smithed songs variously inspired by the Beatles, skinny-tie power pop and Tall Dwarfs-esque indie rock, their own silly but genuine act—replete with props and set dressing that live up to the band’s name—will set a fun tone for a night full of incredible tunes. (BS) Pioneer Park, 350 S. 300 West, 7 p.m., $7.50 presale, $10 day of show, all ages, twilightconcerts.com

THURSDAY & FRIDAY 7/27-28 Lucinda Williams, Buick 6

There’s a reason these two performances are sold out. No matter which Lucinda Williams album you start with, whether it’s her 1979 debut Ramblin’ (Folkways), her 1998 classic Car Wheels on a Gravel Road (Mercury) or last year’s The Ghosts of Highway 20 (on her own

Free Salamander Exhibit Highway 20 label), you will sit with it from beginning to end—and ride the emotional roller coaster therein. The singer-songwriter has a way of getting to the very core of the human condition, such that she seems to know the ghosts within us better than we do. So listening to her cinematic country balladry is an exercise in commiseration and renewal where we wallow, purge and start anew. If you’ve seen her live, as some of us did at Kingsbury Hall roughly a decade ago, you know how powerful this effect is when Williams is in the room, singin’ to us in that wearily sincere mumble of hers. She makes us own those low-lows, and know we’re not alone, and that’s worth big bucks. Buick 6 performs an opening set each night before backing Williams. (Randy Harward) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., sold out (tickets possibly available via Lyte), 21+, thestateroom.com

Lucinda Williams

DAVID MCCLISTER

JEREMY DEVINE

38 | JULY 27, 2017

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


SOLEDAD ESPERANZA

LIVE

SATURDAY 7/29 Camila

The Fixx

U.K. new wave quintet The Fixx is no one-hitter, but of all their hits—like “Red Skies,” “Stand or Fall,” “Saved by Zero”

The Fixx

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

MONDAY 7/31

or “Are We Ourselves?”—the slick, funky “One Thing Leads to Another” is their signature song. But true to its title, the lead track from their sophomore album Reach the Beach (MCA, 1983) leads you to these other hits and more. The Fixx’s discography, you see, bleeds killer deep cuts, especially songs recorded for film soundtracks, like “Deeper and Deeper” (featured in the 1984 film Streets of Fire and subsequently tacked onto the reissue of Beach) and “Letter to Both Sides” (from the 1985 film Fletch). Technically, there’s another one, if we count a collaboration featuring Fixx vocalist Cy Curnin and the band’s producer, Rupert Hine: “With One Look,” from the 1985 cult film Better Off Dead. Naturally, with Curnin’s familiar vox and Hine’s production, it sounds just like a Fixx tune—brooding, mysterious and subtly optimistic. Although these tracks are a digression away from the group’s main canon, they ultimately lead you back to their studio albums, where you’ll find many more hidden gems. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $24.50 presale, $29.50 day of show, 21+, thecomplexslc.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

We’ve been enjoying an influx of awesome Mexican bands lately, with shows by some of our neighboring country’s biggest acts—including Cuca and Molotov—not to mention a ton of local bands like Cenizas Ajenas, Leyenda Oculta, La Calavera and De Despedida. So of course, when there’s a market for music, it will attract all kinds—including polished pop acts, which sums up the duo Camila. Call ’em Maroon Cinco—commercial and proud. Although that’s not my personal cup of horchata, it bodes well for rock en español in Salt Lake City, because if there’s enough of an audience for the pop acts to start showin’ up, then we’ll see a lot more of the indie acts. So bienvenidos, Camila. (RH) The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, 7 p.m., $24.50 presale, $29.50 day of show, 21+, thecomplexslc.com

Camila

JULY 27, 2017 | 39

LIZ LINDER

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Jason Ricci

BEATE GRAMS/BLUESBEA.DE

Enjoy the Best Patio in SLC INTRODUCING! ‘APPY HOUR!

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40 | JULY 27, 2017

SATURDAY 7/29

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Modern blues is littered with superior harp players, so credit Jason Ricci for carving out a distinctive niche not only through his versatility across a wide array of genres, but also in establishing a cult of personality that encompasses both the personal and the professional. Aside from being a musician, he’s a proud gay man, a skateboard enthusiast and a former punk practitioner who boasts a lengthy rap sheet for various felony convictions. Legend has it that he originally took his nom de plume, Moon Cat, to avoid the authorities. It’s little surprise then that Ricci’s music combines a hint of stealth with a sneer. That’s evident both on his own and through his efforts with others—most notably, his contribution to the late Johnny Winter’s Grammy-winning record Step Back (Megaforce, 2014). A multiple Blues Award nominee and 2010 winner (Best Harmonica Player), Ricci also counts Zac Brown, Tom Morello, Junior Kimbrough, R.L. Burnside, Nick Curran and Walter Trout among his many collaborators. Granted, Ricci’s rough-and-tumble image might seem somewhat intimidating, but as a teacher and activist for LGBTQ rights, mental health and substance abuse care, his sentiments are sincere. Ricci rocks, but he’s righteous as well. (Lee Zimmerman) The Garage on Beck, 1199 Beck St., 9 p.m., $10, 21+, garageonbeck.com

THURSDAY 7/27 LIVE MUSIC

Absence of Despair + The Acoustic Fools (The Loading Dock) Andrea Miller + Chasing Time Trio (Twist) Free Salamander Exhibit + 2-Headed Whale + Red Bennies + The Moths (Urban Lounge) see p. 38 Graves + Shields (Club Elevate) Los Hellcaminos + DJ Elliott Estes (Gracie’s) Lucinda Williams and Buick 6 (The State Room) see p. 38 Mary Wilson of the Supremes (Egyptian Theatre) Melissa Etheridge (Snow Park Amphitheater) Reggae Thursday feat. Red Sage + Vocal Reasoning (The Royal) The Anchorage + The Makeways + Scheming Thieves (Kilby Court) Twilight Concert Series feat. Kurt Vile and the Violators + Whitney + 90s Television (Pioneer Park) see p. 38 Vinyl Williams, Gloe, Primitive Programme (Metro Music Hall) Voodoo Orchestra + Little Big Band (Gallivan Center) Wisebird (Hog Wallow Pub)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565

DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Troy & South (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Mark Chaney and the Garage All Stars (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (‘80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Lost Kings (Sky)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 7/28 LIVE MUSIC

Aldous Harding + Officer Jenny + Opaline (Kilby Court) Colt.46 (Outlaw Saloon) The Crystal Method + Loki (Metro Music Hall) Emissary Echo + LSAN + AZIZ + Moose Knuckle (Liquid Joe’s) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) John Louviere (Garage on Beck) Lucinda Williams and Buick 6 (The State Room) see p. 38 Mary Wilson of the Supremes (Egyptian Theatre) Metal Dogs (The Spur) Mountains of Mirrors (Alleged) Murphy and the Giant (Piper Down Pub) N-U-ENDO (Club 90) Pixie & the Partygrass Boys (Hog Wallow Pub) Red Shot Pony (Brewskis) Salt Lake City Jazz Festival (Gallivan Center) Scary Uncle Steve + Dummy Up + Version Two (Funk ‘n’ Dive) The Sword + Big Jesus (Urban Lounge) Whistling Rufus (Sugar House Coffee) Whitewater Ramble (O.P. Rockwell) X96 Toyota BASH Concert Series feat. AFI + Circa Survive (The Great Saltair)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist)


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET DJ Brisk (Downstairs) DJ Elliott Estes (Gracie’s) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Savoy (Sky)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 7/29 LIVE MUSIC

HOME OF THE

4 SA HBOETE &R

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SATURDAY, JULY 22

thursday, july 27

NICK PASSEY friday, july 28

TERRENCE HANSEN TRIO saturday, july 29

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JULY 27, 2017 | 41

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC

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F R I D AY S

CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

WEDNESDAYS

5.99 lunch special

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$1,850 POT!

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen

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Adventurer + Dwellings + Dream Collage + A Lost Asylum (The Loading Dock) Camila (The Complex) see p. 39 Colt.46 (Outlaw Saloon) Cool Air Concert Series feat. Judd Warrick + The Sweet Lillies (Snowbird Resort) Cory Mon + Bigfoot and the Dogmen (The Ice Haüs)

Crook and the Bluff (Hog Wallow Pub) Deer Valley Music Festival feat. The Utah Symphony + Ben Folds (Snow Park Amphitheater) Dirt First Takeover + Mr. Vandal + Hecka + Yung Beard Lord and more (Urban Lounge) Fox Brothers Band (The Westerner) Heritage + Funk & Gonzo (The Royal) Jason Ricci (The Garage) see p. 40 Joey Fatts + Gyyps (In the Venue) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Luke Bell + Sarahanne DeGraw (O.P. Rockwell) Mary Wilson of the Supremes (Egyptian Theatre) Nate Robinson Duo (Park City Mountain PayDay Pad) Nick Nash (farmers market/Pioneer Park) Nick Nash + Daniel Young (Urban Lounge) Night on Broadway (Holladay City Hall Park) N-U-ENDO (Club 90) Opal Hill Drive (Piper Down Pub) PATWA (Park City Mountain Canyons Village Stage) Pixie and the Partygrass Boys (The Spur)


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42 | JULY 27, 2017

best. damn. Patio.

period. *MISTED AND SHADED

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.7

MICHAEL DALLIN SWANTOURAGE TRIGGERS AND SLIPS OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION

8.9 8.10 8.11 8.12

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3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

THUR 7.27 • FREE SALAMANDER EXHIBIT 2-HEADED WHALE, RED BENNIES, THE MOTHS

FRI 7.28• THE SWORD BIG JESUS

SAT 7.29 • NICK NASH DANIEL YOUNG 6 PM DOORS

SAT 7.29 • DIRT FIRST TAKEOVER

MR VANDAL HECKA, YUNG BEARD LORD, AZA, SWELL MERCHANTS, VINNIE CASSIUS 9 PM DOORS

RANDY HARWARD

BAR FLY

WEDNESDAYS Reading at The Ruin

Early on a Wednesday evening in Sugar House, The Ruin is cool and quiet. It’s not always like this; I know from recent visits that some nights here start slow, but the occupancy and conversation buzz swell slowly but surely. Sometimes there is even My view from The Ruin’s darkest corner live music on the weekends. But the stage is incognito, standing maybe 6 inches higher than the main floor, and cleverly disguised as a reading room, with high-back leather chairs, couches, loveseats and end tables. The bartender says many people come here just for a quiet place to read, and that Ruin might start a book club. That might be crazy enough to work. I order an ice-cold pint, retreat to a loveseat and tiny table tucked into the darkest corner of the stage, and ponder it further. Plenty of bars and clubs have events geared toward extroverts. Why not cater, at least a little, to introverts? It’s not like you can brown-bag an adult beverage into your nearest library branch. At home, it’s too easy to fall asleep in your La-Z-Boy after three fingers of Scotch. If you fall asleep at a bar, you’ll get kicked out, so you’ll probably finish that book a lot faster. Also, you’ve got a chance to meet someone special—you know, a gal or guy drawn to quiet, bookish types, peacocking like they do, sitting in the darkest corner of the bar with a hefty David Foster Wallace or Don DeLillo tome or some heady nonfiction, absently pushing up their super-sexy prescription spectacles. Whooo, it’s gettin’ hot in here. Time for another beer, and maybe a quick trip to the library. (Randy Harward) The Ruin, 1215 E. Wilmington Ave., Ste. 120, ruinslc.com Salt Lake City Jazz Festival (Gallivan Center) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Strange Familia (Kilby Court) Swans of Never + Second Hat + Paul Godbout (The Ice Haüs)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) DJ ChaseOne2 (Gracie’s) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Linus Stubbs (Funk ‘n’ Dive) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Sky Saturdays w/ Shaun Frank (Sky)

SUNDAY 7/30 LIVE MUSIC

Ex-Cult + The Nods + Brain Bagz + DJ Nix Beat (The Loading Dock) King Strange and the Stranglers (Gracie’s) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) Sleepy Sun + Crook and the Bluff + Sarah Anne DeGraw (Urban Lounge) Slothrust + The Arvos + New Limbo (Kilby Court) Sunday Sessions Concert Series feat. Hywired (Snowbird Resort)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE >>>

THUR 7.27 • VINYL WILLIAMS 8/4: BURLESQUE & BLUES 8/4: TOLCHOCK TRIO 8/5: KIDNAP KID 8/6: FRUIT BATS 8/8: THE WHISTLES AND THE BELLS 8/9: SCENIC BYWAY

SAT 7.30 • SLEEPY SUN

CROOK & THE BLUFF, SARAH ANNE DEGRAW

WED 8.02 • SHOW ME ISLAND

THE AVENUES, SCARY UNCLE STEVE, MAGIC CHILD, AND THE GLASS REGIME

• THEURBANLOUNGESLC.COM •

GLOE, PRIMITIVE PROGRAMME

FRI 7.28 • THE CRYSTAL METHOD LOKI

SAT 7.29 • HALLOWEEN IN JULY

DJ/DC, INDIGO PLATEAU PLAYS INTERPOL, TURTLECOCK

SUN 7.30 • EX-CULT

THE NODS, BRAIN BAGZ, DJ NIX BEAT

8/8: HE IS LEGEND 8/9: TURNPIKE TROUBADORS 8/10: GLASSES MALONE & WICKED BABYDOLL 8/11: SALTY 8/12: DAVID J. OF BAUHAUS / LOVE OF ROCKETS 8/16: RUBY THE HATCHET

WED 8.2 • ADELITAS WAY

POON HAMMER, LOSS OF EXISTENCE, AFTERHAND

THUR 8.3 • BAGLADY

LIGHTSPEED BUS, GOODBYE CLOCKS, JEFFREY STECK

• METROMUSICHALL.COM •


CONCERTS & CLUBS COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke Church w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 7/31 LIVE MUSIC

Alicia Stockman (The Spur) The Fixx (The Complex) see p. 39 Jeff Rosenstock + Laura Stevenson + Wicked Bears (Kilby Court)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Poplar Street Pub) Karaoke Bingo (Tavernacle) Karaoke with DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue)

Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU)

WEDNESDAY 8/2 LIVE MUSIC

Adelitas Way + Poon Hammer (Metro Music Hall) JT Draper (Twist) Live Jazz (Club 90) Pacificana + Vann Moon + Jill Johnson (Kilby Court) Shannon & Elizabeth (The Spur) Show Me Island + The Avenues + Scary Uncle Steve + Magic Child and the Glass Regime (Urban Lounge) Steve Miller Band + Peter Frampton (USANA Amphitheatre)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Birdman (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub) Open Mic (The Cabin)

LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

American Coast + Opaline + Gallow Humor (Kilby Court) Invent, Animate + Hollow Crown + InDimensions (The Loading Dock) Lillie Lemon (Piper Down Pub) Riley McDonald (The Spur) Wheels of Soul 2017 feat. Tedeschi Trucks Band + The Wood Brothers + Hot Tuna (Red Butte Garden)

LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE (THURS)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO

FRIDAY, JULY 28

DART SUPPLIES

SATURDAY, JULY 29

PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Tues & Fri: 3pm-1am Saturday: 11am-1am Sunday: 11am-9pm Closed Monday

JULY 27, 2017 | 43

LEAGUES AND TOURNAMENTS

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DIAMOND POOL TABLES

LIVE MUSIC

PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS

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TUESDAY 8/1

THE PEDESTRIANS THE ELDERS

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE at

21+

GREAT

FOOD & DRINK

SPECIALS


© 2017

BINGE

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

48. Long-legged wading birds 49. Night before a big day 50. Livestock attachment 51. Attracted 52. Neighbor of an Iraqi 56. “____ go bragh!” 57. Let out 58. Spa wear 59. City on a lake of the same name 60. Gosling of “La La Land” 61. “Singin’ in the Rain” dance style 62. Muff 63. “King Kong” studio

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

7. Setting for the beginning of “The Book of Mormon” 8. Warm-blooded animal 9. Harvard Law professor Lawrence who briefly ran as a 2016 candidate for U.S. president 10. Promise 11. Airport screening org. 12. Religious sch. 13. Mountain on which you might yodel 21. “Good” cholesterol, briefly 22. Sharpton and Roker 25. Sci-fi film with a 2010 sequel 26. Vogue competitor 27. Defects and all 29. Grads-to-be: Abbr. 30. Whole lot 31. Veiled promise? 32. Zellweger of “Chicago” 33. Facebook had one in 2012, for short 36. Many a New Year’s Day game 37. Has debts DOWN 38. Must have 1. Eggnog spice 39. ____ of the line 2. Giorgio of fashion 40. Roush of the Baseball Hall of Fame 3. Answer with a salute 41. Sibling nickname 4. Clock radio toggle switch 42. Texter’s “Oh, yeah ...” 5. ____ Spencer, co-anchor of ABC’s “Good 46. Jumped Morning America” 47. Tiny 6. Frat boy types

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

1. Opposing vote 4. Picture book 9. “____ luck!” 14. Suffix with press or script 15. Atlanta train system 16. Stand on three legs? 17. They often accompany logos: Abbr. 18. Many a benefit tourney 19. Forever ____ 20. “Here I am, just pounding these potatoes ...” (or a binge-watching session of a 1972-83 TV series) 23. It’s an OK city 24. Boxer who said “I’m so mean I make medicine sick” 25. Pekoe, for one 28. “Get a hold of yourselves, young ladies ...” (or a binge-watching session of a 201217 TV series) 34. Was a passenger 35. ____ sci 36. “I thought I ordered this fish filleted ...” (or a binge-watching session of a 2005-17 TV series) 43. Wilson of “Midnight in Paris” 44. Make some changes to 45. “A gardener’s chores are never done ...” (or a binge-watching session of a 2005-12 TV series) 53. Acid 54. Identify (as) 55. “Results may ____” 56. “Um, uh, what I wanted to say was, uh ...” (or a binge-watching session of a 19942009 TV series) 61. ____ cotta 64. Atlanta university 65. ____-night doubleheader 66. “Little Miss Sunshine” Oscar winner Alan 67. Knee-ankle connector 68. ____ snail’s pace 69. Phone charger feature 70. 17th-century Dutch painter Jan 71. Suffix with penta-

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Do you really have to be the flashy king or charismatic queen of all you survey? Must all your subjects put on kneepads and prostrate themselves as they bask in your glory? Isn’t it enough for you to simply be the master of your own emotions, and the boss of your own time, and the lord of your own destiny? I’m not trying to stifle your ambition or cramp your enthusiasm; I just want to make sure you don’t dilute your willpower by trying to wield command over too wide a swath. The most important task, after all, is to manage your own life with panache and ingenuity. But I will concede this: The coming weeks will be a time when you can also probably get away with being extra worshiped and adored.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Aquarian novelist James Joyce had a pessimistic view about intimate connection. Here’s what he wrote: “Love (understood as the desire of good for another) is in fact so unnatural a phenomenon that it can scarcely repeat itself, the soul being unable to become virgin again and not having energy enough to cast itself out again into the ocean of another’s soul.” My challenge to you, Aquarius—in accordance with the astrological omens—is to prove Joyce wrong. Figure out how to make your soul virgin again so it can cast itself out into the ocean of another’s soul. The next eight weeks will be prime time to achieve that glorious feat.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Years after he had begun his work as a poet, Rainer Maria Rilke confessed that he was still finding out what it took to do his job. “I am learning to see,” he wrote. “I don’t know why it is, but everything enters me more deeply and doesn’t stop where it once used to.” Given the current astrological omens, you have a similar opportunity, Pisces: to learn more about how to see. It won’t happen like magic. You can’t just sit back passively and wait for the universe to accomplish it for you. But if you decide you really would like to be more perceptive—if you resolve to LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) If extraterrestrial beings land their space ship on my street and say receive and register more of the raw life data that’s flowing they want to meet the creatures who best represent our planet, I toward you—you will expand and deepen your ability to see. will volunteer you Libras. Right now, at least, you’re nobler than the rest of us, and more sparkly, too. You’re dealing smartly with ARIES (March 21-April 19) your personal share of the world’s suffering, and your day-to-day Are you feeling as daring about romance as I suspect? If so, I’ve decisions are based more on love than fear. You’re not taking things composed a provocative note for you to give to anyone you have too personally or too seriously, and you seem better equipped than good reason to believe will be glad to receive it. Feel free to copy everyone else to laugh at the craziness that surrounds us. And even it word-for-word or edit it to suit your needs. Here it is: “I want if aliens don’t appear, I bet you will serve as an inspiring influence to be your open-hearted explorer. Want to be mine? We can for more human beings than you realize. Does being a role model be in foolishly cool drooling devotion to each other’s mighty sound boring? I hope not. if you regard it as an interesting gift, it will love power. We can be in elegant solid-gold allegiance to each other’s genius. Wouldn’t it be fun to see how much liberation we empower you to wield more clout than you’re used to. can whip up together? We can play off our mutual respect as we banish the fearful shticks in our bags of tricks. We can inspire SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) During the four years he worked on painting the Sistine Chapel, each other to reach unexpected heights of brazen intelligence.” Michelangelo never took a bath. Was he too preoccupied with his masterpiece? Modern artist Pae White has a different rela- TAURUS (April 20-May 20) tionship with obsession. To create her fabric art pieces, she You still have a wound that never formed a proper scar. (We’re has spent years collecting more than 3,500 scarves designed speaking metaphorically here.) It’s chronically irritated. Never by her favorite scarf-maker. Then there’s filmmaker James quite right. Always stealing bits of your attention. Would you Cameron, who hired an expert in linguistics to create an entire like to do something to reduce the distracting power of that new language from scratch for the aliens in his movie Avatar. In annoying affliction? The next 25 days will be a favorable time accordance with the astrological omens, Scorpio, I approve of to seek such a miracle. All the forces of nature and spirit will you summoning this level of devotion—as long as it’s not in ser- conspire in your behalf if you formulate a clear intention to get vice to a transitory desire, but rather to a labor of love that has the healing you need and deserve. the potential to change your life for the better for a long time. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) In his poem “The Initiate,” Charles Simic speaks of “someone SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) “The purpose of art is to lay bare the questions that have been who solved life’s riddles in a voice of an ancient Sumerian queen.” hidden by the answers,” wrote author James Baldwin. Even if I hope you’re not focused on seeking help and revelations from you’re not an artist, I encourage you to make that your purpose noble and grandiose sources like that, Gemini. If you are, you in the coming weeks. Definitive answers will at best be irrelevant might miss the useful cues and clues that come your way via more and at worst useless. Vigorous doubt and inquiry, on the other modest informants. So please be alert for the blessings of the hand, will be exciting and invigorating. They will mobilize you ordinary. As you work on solving your quandaries, give special to rebel against any status quos that have been tempting you to attention to serendipitous interventions and accidental luck. settle for mediocrity. CANCER (June 21-July 22) For many years, the Tobe Zoological Park in China housed a CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You’re in a phase of your cycle when the most useful prophecies “praying panther” named Ato. The large black feline periare more lyrical than logical. So here you go: three enigmatic odically rose up on her hind legs and put her paws together as predictions to help stir up the creative ingenuity you’ll need to if petitioning a higher power for blessings. I suggest we make excel on your upcoming tests. 1. A darling but stale old hope her your spirit ally in the coming weeks. I hope she’ll inspire you must shrivel and wane so that a spiky, electric new hope can be to get your restless mind out of the way as you seek to quench born. 2. An openness to the potential value of a metaphorical your primal needs. With the praying panther as your muse, you death will be one of your sweetest assets. 3. The best way to should be able to summon previously untapped reserves of your cross a border is not to sneak across bearing secrets but to stride animal intelligence and cultivate an instinctual knack for knowing where to find raw, pristine satisfaction. across in full glory with nothing to hide. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Dear Hard Worker: Our records indicate that you have been neglecting to allot yourself sufficient time to rest and recharge. In case you had forgotten, you are expected to take regular extended breaks, during which time it is mandatory to treat yourself with meticulous care and extreme tenderness. Please grant yourself an immediate dispensation. Expose yourself to intensely relaxing encounters with play, fun and pleasure—or else! No excuses will be accepted.

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Ups and Downs

Now that you’ve put your parade chairs back into the garage from the Days of ’47 events and/or recovered from Pie and Beer Day, you might have noticed some changes happening in the Salt Lake Valley. For example, the new 10,000-seat outdoor arena at the Utah State Fair Park that was finished up just in time for the rodeo. The $17-million facility was financed mostly by the county and state, with some donations from the LDS church and private donors. You might hate rodeos and be an ardent PETA supporter, but don’t worry, the stadium will be used for more than roping and riding events. There will be a loud future of demo derbies, monster truck shows, X Games and, of course, concerts. This is really great news because an outside venue of this size has been sorely needed in SLC, especially one that is located on a Trax rail line. Check it out during the Utah State Fair from Sept. 7-17. Although this year’s fair entertainment schedule hasn’t been announced yet, I’ll be watching to see if they’ve pumped up the volume and added bigger and better shows. I saw Weird Al there a few years back, and that was definitely one of the best concert experiences I’ve ever had. What you might have noticed coming down is the historic Granite High School in South Salt Lake. Memory-seekers were invited last week to get a free brick from the construction site of the school, which opened back in 1907. Did you know the state’s first LDS seminary opened across the street there in 1912? The high school with the farmer mascot closed in 2009 as a result of declining enrollment. After years of development proposals (including one from Walmart that didn’t fly), Wasatch Developments and Garbett Homes purchased the land with a mixed-use development plan including a line of 76 single-family homes and some commercial properties that have not yet been decided on. The property that was formerly home to Granite High is 27 acres, and 16 of them will be dedicated to housing. Garbett’s last project in the area was in the “affordable housing” price range and featured geothermally heated homes that sold out almost instantly. Ed Catmull (president of Pixar) and Leigh Harline (who won an Academy Award for the song “When You Wish Upon a Star”) are a couple famous alumni of that humble little school, and LaVell Edwards coached the football team in the ’50s and ’60s. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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Digital Cocktail If you visit Dawson City in Canada’s Yukon Territory, you can’t skip one of its famous traditions: sipping on a Sourtoe Cocktail at the Sourdough Saloon. The drink, conceived in 1973, comprises the cocktail of your choice garnished with a pickled amputated human toe. “You can drink it fast, you can drink it slow, but your lips have gotta touch the toe,” says “toe master” Terry Lee. On June 18, one of the saloon’s toes went missing when a patron, who identified himself as a “drunken fool,” took the digit (specifically, a second toe). Although the thief mailed the toe back with an apology, Travel Yukon has launched a campaign for an “insurance toe,” saying, “Our toe was returned, but we can always use backups!”

WEIRD

The Continuing Crisis Demit Strato of New York took to Facebook on June 26 from his throne room to excoriate his local Starbucks for making his venti iced coffee with regular milk instead of soy milk, as he ordered it. “I’ve pooped 11 times since the a.m. My bottom hurts from all the wiping. Do you think I enjoy soy milk? … I don’t order soy milk because I’m bored and want my drink order to sound fancy. I order soy milk so that my bottom doesn’t blast fire for four hours.” For its part, Starbucks sent Strato a $50 gift card, and he told BuzzFeed that “many women are trying to go out on a date after this, too.” People Different From Us A China Southern Airlines flight between Shanghai and Guangzhou was delayed for five hours on June 27 after an 80-year-old passenger, identified only as Qiu, was spotted tossing coins into the engine as she boarded “to pray for a safe flight.” Passengers already onboard were asked to deplane while crews searched inside the engine and around the area, ultimately finding nine coins totaling the equivalent of about 25 cents. Local news outlets estimated the cost of the delay and the search at $140,000.

n A serial underwear thief in Tokyo was finally snagged July 4 when he was caught on surveillance video stealing nine women’s undergarments that had been hung out to dry. Yasushi Kobayashi, 61, told police that he’d been lifting lingerie for 20 years because he enjoys wearing them. Police found more than 1,000 pieces during a search of his home.

n A determined pregnant woman in Asheville, N.C., was charged June 28 with misdemeanor assault with a deadly weapon after she ran over the man who had been caught rifling through her SUV. Christine Braswell, 26, confronted Robert Raines, 34, in a Walmart parking lot, but when he ran, she couldn’t run after him. “Me being five months pregnant, I chased a little ways, then come back, jumped in the car, threw it in gear and come across the curb and ran him over. I was not going to let him get away with it,” Braswell said. Raines sustained minor injuries.

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n A hopeful driver, pulled over by Dakota County, Minn., Deputy Mike Vai in June, produced a “get out of jail free” card from a Monopoly game in an effort to escape charges on a controlled substance warrant. The amused officer shared the incident on his department’s Facebook page, but took the unidentified man into custody nonetheless.

Odd Hobbies The Wall Street Journal reported in June on a small group of enthusiasts who participate in the esoteric sport of container spotting—discovering and documenting unusual shipping containers. Spotting a distinctive box is “analogous to the satisfaction that bird-watchers get from spotting a very rare breed of bird,” noted Matt Hannes, who maintains The Intermodal Container web page. Unusual boxes, known as unicorns, include those with outdated names or logos, or sporting discontinued colors, and those from very small shipping companies. Charles Fox of Indianapolis might be an extreme hobbyist: On his honeymoon, he spent two 12-hour days taking photos of a variety of boxes in Belgium. Mrs. Fox was not amused. What We’ll Do for Love Brandon Thompson, 35, had just one request before Muskogee, Okla., police officers took him into custody on July 4: “I asked the officer if I could propose.” Officers Bob Lynch and Lincoln Anderson agreed and moved Thompson’s handcuffs from his back to his front so he could put the ring on Leandria Keith’s finger. Thompson had six felony bench warrants out for his arrest, but he told CNN he has been “doing a lot to turn his life around.” Keith apparently agrees, as she said yes. Government in Action Rabbit Hash, Ky., elected a 2-year-old mayor in November—a dog named Brynneth Pawltro, who won the race by a landslide 1,000 votes. She’s the small town’s fourth canine mayor, having beaten her chicken, donkey and cat opponents, along with other dogs. Running on a platform of peace, love and understanding, Brynn is very outgoing, according to Bobbi Kayser of the Rabbit Hash Historical Society: “There’s always inappropriate licking going on.” n Natwaina Clark, 33, of Gainesville, Fla., was fired and charged March 28 with larceny and scheming to defraud after it was discovered that she had used city credit cards to steal more than $93,000 from the parks, recreation and cultural affairs department between November 2015 and March 2017. Most notably, Clark spent $8,500 of her take on a Brazilian butt lift procedure.

Send your weird news items to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Great Art! Police in St. Petersburg, Fla., were hunting in late June for the artist tagging buildings with butt cheeks. At least 20 downtown fanny paintings, sporting from two to seven buttocks, have been reported. “It’s not very creative,” sniffed one office worker. “The bottom line is, whoever is doing this is destroying property,” Assistant Police Chief Jim Previtera said. Property

Police Reports A SWAT team from the Sumter County, Fla., Sheriff’s department raided The Villages retirement community on June 21, uncovering what they believe is a golf cart chop-shop operation, along with illegal drugs, in the sprawling complex near Ocala. Souped-up golf carts are a popular way to get around in the community, which is home to more than 150,000 people. Windshields, seat cushions, wheels and tires were found in the garage, along with drugs “in plain sight” in the home, Deputy Gary Brannen said. Five people, ranging in age from 38 to 63, were arrested.

WHITE WALKERS

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n A California man’s 2,000th visit to Disneyland in Anaheim on June 22 made him a celebrity in the park. Jeff Reitz began visiting Disneyland every day after receiving an annual pass as a gift in 2012. At the time, he was unemployed, but he continued his habit even after finding a job, using the $1,049 Disney Signature Plus Passport. “Until today, cast members would think I looked familiar, but now they know who I am,” Reitz said. “It’s been positive, it’s been a motivator, it’s been my workout gym. This past year I’ve lost about 40 pounds.”

owners are wiping the butts away as fast as they appear, but police say the vandal, when caught, will have to pay for cleanup.

We sell homes and loans to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

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Compulsions Could it have been overconsumption of caffeine that provoked Londoner Kit Lovelace to scan all 236 episodes of Friends to chronicle how much coffee each character drank? Lovelace told the Huffington Post in June he was disappointed that no one had ever collected data about the characters’ coffee habits, so he meticulously studied how much they drank, how their consumption changed over the years and how much they spent on coffee. (Spoiler alert: Phoebe drank the most coffee, and collectively the group spent more than $2,000 on joe over the course of the 10-season series.)

BY THE EDITORS AT ANDRE WS M C MEEL


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Poets Corner

I’m a contained explosion, Invisible from without, A raging fire, That refuses to be put out.

But there’s a fathomless Chasm of sadness, That I wish would just swallow The madness. Because this dichotomy trapped within, Is threatening to win, and skin Me alive, there’s nowhere to hide, Not when I myself am the sin.

Candace Garner Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@ cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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City Weekly July 27, 2017  

Monumental Disaster!

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Monumental Disaster!