Page 1

SALT L AKE

W

JUNE 15, 2017 VOL. 34 N0. 3

I

CIT Y WEEKLY

UTAH'S INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

2 | JUNE 15, 2017

CWCONTENTS COVER STORY SUMMER JAM FEST

Stock up on earplugs and bust out the Keens; music festival season is here, baby!

CRUCIAL FESTT

Cover image by Ryan Williamson pixelhatedesign.com

26

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 12 A&E 16 DINE 23 TRUE TV 34 CINEMA 36 MUSIC 46 COMMUNITY

RANDY HARWARD

Cover story, p. 26 Technically, our music editor went to a Led Zeppelin show in utero. His first concert outside the womb was Kiss in 1983 (after they took off the makeup). He didn’t see a single concert in 1989, the year this photo was taken, but he’s made up for it since. His most memorable one was The Proclaimers at Club DV8 in 1994 “because, reasons.”

.NET

CITYWEEKLY

Your online guide to more than 2,000 bars and restaurants • Up-to-the-minute articles and blogs at cityweekly.net

Chaffetz -O- Meter NEWS

We stack up the three indies on the Chaffetz-O-Meter. facebook.com/slcweekly

Local leaders react to Zinke’s Bears Ears recommendation.

Twitter: @cityweekly • Deals at cityweeklystore.com

ENTER TO WIN: Advance screening passes to Despicable Me 3. More info on p. 34 and at cityweekly.net/freestuff

MORE NEWS


M.E.S.A. MONEY

save $40

CREDIT CARD

READY

save $200

GET THE SOUND YOU DREAM OF

2 YEAR WARRANTY W/ DEALER INSTALLATION

soundwarehouse.com/financing

PLUS A FREE SIRIUS XM TUNER ($100 VALUE)

NO CD PLAYER

$8999

∙ 200 Watt x4 Power Rating ∙ 3 RCA, 4 Volt Pre-Outs ∙ USB ∙ DVD ∙ Back up camera ready

Reg. Price: $12000

AM/FM/CD/USB/AUX/DVD BLUETOOTH RECEIVER

ation

∙ 200 Watt x4 Power Rating ∙ 2 Video RCA Pre-Outs ∙ Back up camera ready

save $300

$149

99

List Price: $25000

∙ ∙ ∙ ∙

200 WATT X4 POWER RATING 3 RCA, 4 VOLT PRE-OUTS USB ∙ DVD BACK UP CAMERA READY

$349

99

Reg. Price: $40000

• 200 Watts (50x4) • 3 RCA Pre Outs • 7” DVD/CD receiver with internal amp • Built-in • Bluetooth & HD Radio • Detachable Face

$69999 List Price: $85000

these custom enclosed ported 12" boxes give a deep efficient sound!!! ∙ 500 Watt Mono Amp ∙ 12" Sub W/ Bass Enclosure ∙ Custom Carpeted Box

$31999

List Price: $47000 W W W. S OU N D WA R E H OUS E .C O M HOURS

SLC 2763 S. STATE: 485-0070

FREE LAYAWAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

Se Habla Español

• OGDEN 2822 WALL AVE: 621-0086

Se Habla Español

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

• OREM 1680 N. STATE: 226-6090

Se Habla Español

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 6/21/17

JUNE 15, 2017 | 3

10AM TO 7PM MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

| CITY WEEKLY |

save $150

AMP & SUB ENCLOSURE PACKAGE

save $50

INCLUDES A BACK UP CAMERA

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

REMOTE CONTROL INCLUDED

PLUS A $100 VISA CARD WITH MAIL IN REBATE

avig with n

2 YEAR WARRANTY W/ DEALER INSTALLATION

319

List Price: $52000

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

∙ 200 WATTS ∙ App Compatibility, MIX-TRAX ∙ Built-in Bluetooth and Color Customization

MSRP $520.00 99 $


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

4 | JUNE 15, 2017

SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover, June 1, “The Pride Issue”

Thanks for being a voice of diversity and love in this time of fear. #pride #realnews

@SOMETIMES_AESTHETIC Via Instagram

Five Spot, June 1, “Author J. Seth Anderson traces the origins of queer culture in SLC”

TFW a gay white man titles a book LGBT Salt Lake then goes on to prefer the term queer, then assimilate queerness with being weird? Facepalm.

LAURA JANE Via Facebook

News, June 1, “1984: Oh, what a year!”

The breadth of your non-Mormon advertising does that very well and I have no problem with the advertisers who obviously do not cater to Mormons. I do not want to read articles from writers who seem to have no morals as to content (bad language). Once an article contains one of these words, I just stop reading further in that article. This is counter-productive to the writer, who should want as many people to read it as possible. I doubt there is even one person who will not read an interesting article because it does not contain offensive words. Want to increase your readership (and therefore advertising revenue)? Stop turning off at least 50 percent of the local population. It is so easy to do and it also will not offend non-Mormons who also do not want to read that trashy language either. There are many of them. Hope this is of value to you.

Bingham was beautiful, too.

Salt Lake City

So what I’m reading is that Zinke is an asshole and the government is going to fuck over Native Americans again?

You’re absolutely right, City Weekly. Your die-hard readers really like you. Thanks for yet another great column (and trip down memory lane) in yet another great issue. Here’s to hoping for another 33 years.

WAYNE COLLINS,

Via cityweekly.net

Via Twitter

TERESA TATE

I’ve read Salt Lake City Weekly whenever I’ve seen it.

@KEVINSLC

Via Instagram

Beer Nerd, June 1, “SLC’s Sour Powers”

My first child: Feb. 1, 1984.

TEDD MILLS

We are glad to have you.

@WESTMINSTERMSC

KRIS RODRIGUEZ Via Facebook

[Y]ou talk about slowing advertising support. I have a really good suggestion for you. You are doing your level best to push away those of the Mormon faith. Your publication is filled with obscenity (words not used in polite company). I realize that you are trying to show that you are not connected to the Mormons, but using offensive language is not necessary.

Via Facebook It’s a shame.

@COREYCORBIN7 Via Twitter Such a lack of creativity, vision, possibility.

ANNE JENSEN Via Facebook

Can’t wait for Wally World.

TONY PEETERS Via Facebook

Blog post, June 12, “Zinke’s Bears Ears Recommend Released” @VIRGILGLASS

I’m sorry, but I don’t trust Utah state politicians to manage land in the best interests of all citizens of the U.S.

MICHAEL HOBART Via Facebook

Via Facebook

If deplorables had the ability to comprehend the laws that regulate federal lands (lands that never belonged to the states), they’d know that any changes to size or designation of monuments will never stand up in court.

JACKIE COWAN WEBB Via Facebook

R.J. DAVENPORT

Mmmmm.

Via Facebook

CHAD WINTER Via Facebook

Blog post, June 2, “It’s Curtains for Granite High”

So Herbert, if it’s not what you’d want, it’s not sound? I call baloney!

SHARON WENDT Via Facebook

Sad when your old school gets torn down.

He wants oil $, and bags of it.

@RANDYNORTHRUP2 Via Twitter

Via Twitter

I must at least try the sours.

They could be really yummy. Maybe?

Private Eye, June 1, “Reflection Pool”

DEANNA BISHOFF GARCIA

Say Ott?

The situation involving Salt Lake County Recorder Gary Ott is heartbreaking and needs to be dealt with sooner rather than later. Mr. Ott has served the citizens of Salt Lake County for many years, and I respect him for it. However, talk of his declining mental health has persisted and recent media reports suggest the problem is worsening. It’s also been alleged that he doesn’t live in the county anymore and comes into the office on only the rarest of occasions, all the while collecting $189,404 in salary and benefits. This is a crime against Salt Lake County voters and taxpayers. Gary Ott needs to resign immediately, plain and simple. It’s the right thing to do—for both Mr. Ott and Salt Lake County.

RYAN D. CURTIS, Salt Lake City

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofreaders SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns REX MAGANA, DAVID MILLER, JULIA VILLAR Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, JORDAN FLOYD, BILL FROST, MIKE RIEDEL, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, ANDREA WALL, ANDREW WRIGHT, LEE ZIMMERMAN

Production

Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Assistant Production Manager BRIAN PLUMMER Graphic Artists VAUGHN ROBISON, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

Business/Office

Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS

Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Developer BRYAN BALE Office Administrators DAVID ADAMSON, ANNA KASER

Marketing

Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS Street Team STEPHANIE ABBOTT, BEN BALDRIDGE, ADAM LANE, ANDY ROMERO, LAUREN TAGGE

Circulation

Circulation Manager LARRY CARTER

Sales

Director of Advertising, Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS

Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives LISA DORELLI, PAULINA JEDLICA KNUDSON, JEREMIAH SMITH Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales DANIEL COWAN, MIKEY SALTAS

Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866

All Contents © 2017

City Weekly is Registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

Phone 801-575-7003 Email comments@cityweekly.net 248 S. Main, Salt Lake City, UT 84101

Copperfield Publishing Inc. JOHN SALTAS City Weekly founder

PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 5


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

6 | JUNE 15, 2017

OPINION

Social Media in Salt Lake FLAGGERS NEEDED Lots of work available!! We need certified flaggers. Extra pay if you have own equipment and vehicle. See our website at www.alltradestemp.com. Apply in Salt Lake or Ogden between 8am and 1pm.

All Trades Temporary Services 321 East 2100 South | SLC, UT 84115| 801-313-1234 All Trades Staffing 205 East 26th St #14 | Ogden, UT 84401| 801-399-1234

My immediate family members avoid interacting on social media the way some farmers avoid city people. They hide their faces from iPhone-wielding selfie stalkers, and never post to Facebook nor click on any incoming emails that weren’t expected. I, on the other hand, have learned in the twilight of my life to embrace social media as awesome shortcuts to sharing knowledge that is much more entertaining than anything I can find on 160 cable television channels. I have been befriended by Utah’s elected officials who can’t seem to get enough of Twitter, and have been connected with opinionated people I neither know nor would recognize on the street, but who embrace Facebook to troll the world. Also, I note that many post as a political PTSD treatment to vehemently get things off their chests without resorting to their Second Amendment rights. For me, it all started quite innocently as a volunteer job at the American Red Cross back when social media were becoming the new tools du jour for communicating among first-responder organizations, the press and other agencies. My training/baptism came from an invitation from Susan Thomas, a longtime planner with the Utah Division of Emergency Management. She told me of a seminar based on a FEMA model to educate disasterresponse leadership throughout Utah on how to communicate efficiently with the public in times of trouble. So, eight years ago this month, Sue said: “There’s an extra space in the FEMA public-information officer class. Why don’t you join me?” “Sure,” I said. During the class, I created

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G my first Twitter account. Today, kids learn this on their own while still in grammar school. But this was in 2009 when most of us who had graduated from college still didn’t quite know what to make of the internet. Anyway, all of us adults in the room practiced with a mock exercise using what was on our minds that year: The Asian flu pandemic. As the exercise unfolded, one person led the Department of Health Information Distribution Command Center. Others filled in as contacts with local newspapers, TV stations, radio stations and online media. I got the slot for tweeting announcements from the Utah Department of Health. During training, I learned many ways to share information with everyone in the Salt Lake Valley, as long as we had internet and telephone service. It was very revealing, and is the basis, I believe, for much of Utah’s Division of Emergency Management information dissemination. Susan is a disasterresponse planning leader and has added the temporary position of communications director—a useful place to be when the Big Shake occurs, I presume. We never had that pandemic, but I learned that there are other useful and fun things you can do using social media. For instance, I’ve traveled a lot over the past eight years in various disaster-response positions for the Red Cross—deploying to floods, tsunamis and hurricanes—as many of my friends, relatives and acquaintances know. What’s been very useful is that I have been able to leave a virtual “paper trail” through Twitter and, more recently, Facebook. What’s surprising is how many people now follow me. I never provided my personal email list. So, other than a few close relatives and friends, scores have become part of my posse, including dozens of people from the Red Cross around the country,

local politicos and some folks it would take a scientist to explain. On Facebook, I have learned there are a lot of things you can learn about politicians and the Utah political process. Sen. Orrin Hatch and Rep. Jason Chaffetz, neither of whom will rise to the Twitter level of POTUS, are nevertheless hot to scoop the press on national, local and personal matters. Of course, Chaffetz will soon be only a distant memory to the non-Fox Twitterverse, but I am sure others will take his place. State Sens. Brian Shiozawa and Todd Weiler, both of whom I have mentioned before, are great at tweeting sources of inspiration for these columns. Weiler outdoes Shiozawa and tweets a lot just about every day on things of interest to him, including proposed legislation, snarky asides about Democrats and inspirational quotations I presume he gets from a book he bought at Barnes & Noble. State Rep. Steven Handy, also a Northern Utah Red Cross board member, posts awesome things from time to time, too. On the non-political front, I find that the best way to avoid weather-based travel catastrophes is often to see what others are tweeting when stuck in traffic, or, for instance, at the site of a Big Cottonwood Canyon slide off, or an I-80 truck jackknife. Of course, that requires adult behavior of pulling to the side of the road and not compounding traffic woes by becoming a distracted driver. I am easy to find on Facebook and Twitter because I use my real name. As soon as this column is published, I will post the link to it, as I always do, so relatives who would never think of posting stuff will be able to click on the link and read this. Social media might not be the way to go for a lot of folks, but it works for me. CW

FOR ME, IT ALL STARTED QUITE INNOCENTLY AS A VOLUNTEER JOB AT THE AMERICAN RED CROSS ...

Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 7


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

8 | JUNE 15, 2017

HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

@kathybiele

LIVE MUSIC

KARAOKE (THURS) PHOENIX SOFT TIP DARTS

DIAMOND POOL TABLES LEAGUES AND TOURNAMENTS

DART SUPPLIES PAINT NIGHT (THURS & SAT)

3425 S. State St. Suite D 385-528-2547 Mon-Thurs: 11am-11pm Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-10pm

FRANK CALIENDO CLEAN FAMILY FUN AND IMPRESSIONS JUNE 23, 8PM CELTIC CELEBRATION IRISH DANCING, MUSIC AND FUN FREE TO THE PUBLIC! MON. AUG. 7 8PM

MARVIN GOLDSTEIN AND VANESSA JOY WORLD RENOWNED CONCERT PIANIST WITH STUNNING VOCALS THURS. AUG. 24 8PM

FOR TICKETS/ MORE INFO VISIT:

DRAPERAMPHITHEATER.COM 944 E. VESTRY RD. DRAPER I 801-576-6570

Pul-eeze, people. Stop it with the “will of the people” business when you talk about a mentally unfit office-holder. Regarding news about poor old Gary Ott, Salt Lake County’s mentally compromised recorder: Really? All we can do is ask him to resign—despite a legislative effort by Rep. Rebecca Chavez-Houck to create a process. The Deseret News spent considerable personal capital following Ott’s sad path to dementia. It was one of those “everyone knows” things that no one, even the Legislature, is willing to tackle. Salt Lake County Council Chairman Steve DeBry made the absurd argument that a legal process would put an elected official’s privacy at constitutional risk—even though elected officials no longer are private citizens. Surely, the 22,000 people who voted for Ott would not expect him to continue in such diminished capacity. And they didn’t vote for his deputies, either.

Health Care Interest

Maybe everyone’s tired of hearing about marches by the, you know, non-Republicans. And health care—doesn’t everyone in Utah think it’s been just terrible under the Affordable Care Act? Repeal, repeal— that’s the mantra. Only a handful of news outlets felt it was important to cover the recent rally for health care. Deseret News ran an article saying “scores of people” participated, and KTVX Channel 4 ran a very brief item. Maybe the lack of media interest is because of the inevitability of the GOP effort. Salon did an in-depth report on “9 of the most staggeringly awful statements Republicans have made about health care just this year,” prominently featuring little Jason Chaffetz’ iPhone comment. Lawmakers can’t feel your pain if they have none themselves.

Stop the Lunch-Shaming

It’s a start, but not much. Lunch-shaming is definitely a thing, and not just in Utah. The State Board of Education is about to start an audit of school fees statewide, a Deseret News report said, and it will cover a lot more than lunch. This is an issue with philosophical, political and financial implications. The philosophical: What does a free, appropriate public education really entail? The political: The Trump administration proposed a 21-percent reduction to the USDA program. The financial: If parents don’t pay for lunches, uniforms and programs, who does? The New Mexico governor recently signed a Hunger-Free Students’ Bill of Rights Act, CNNMoney said. And a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House and Senate introduced the Anti-Lunch Shaming Act of 2017 to curb the worst of these practices. No matter what the audit comes up with, Utah needs to act.

DW HARRIS

Time to Tackle the Issue

Leave it to the storytellers to destigmatize sex. At least that’s one of the ideas behind a quarterly Tea Party: Sexy Storytelling event, according to founder Benjamin Holdaway. The night of intimate storytelling is meant to entertain, provide a safe venue where people can share their stories about love and sex and ultimately build a community. A cocktail hour for the next Tea Party begins at 7 p.m. Friday, June 16, at JenkStars Center for Arts & Sustainable Living (193 W. 2100 South). For ticket information, visit facebook.com/teapartyslc. All proceeds after costs go to supporting services for people living with HIV, as well as HIV and STI prevention and health care access programs.

The Tea Party, that’s a name people have different associations with. Tell me about the name.

It’s the ‘Tea Party: Sexy Storytelling.’ We chose that because we were referencing Paris Is Burning, which is a classic and iconic queer history film about the drag scene and the queer scene in New York City. For those familiar with Paris Is Burning or who watch RuPaul’s Drag Race now, you know that ‘spilling the tea’ means to tell the truth. So the Tea Party is about telling the truth about your life or your story. Sometimes I like to say, ‘All tea, no shade.’ Shade is when you talk shit on someone, basically; we want all tea, no shade.

Salt Lake, it turns out, is a good storytelling city. We have The Bee: True Stories From the Hive. How is your event different?

Our event is different because, every single time, it’s about sex. Before I did this, I met with Giuliana [Serena, The Bee co-founder,] and said, ‘I want to work together, I want to be collaborative, because I think there are so many stories to tell and so many audiences.’ But I think it’s important to talk about sex. That’s how we’re different. Every single time, we’ll be talking about sex.

Who are telling the stories?

The storytellers are the audience members. We don’t curate anything. You come, and if you want to tell a story, you put your name in the teapot. We draw out 10 names randomly throughout the night, and they tell a five-minute story. What matters to me is giving people an opportunity to take ownership over a story and put words to something that has happened in their sexual lives and put that out to an audience who listens without judgment. We have gay storytellers, we have bi storytellers and we have straight storytellers. And [at the inaugural event] we had winners in all categories.

Is it a competition?

We have ‘Brewmasters,’ who are our three favorite stories of the night that people vote for: Our sexiest story, our most honest story and our funniest story.

What was the idea behind the Tea Party?

How this came to be is I was working in public-health information, and people don’t want to come to a class on chlamydia. Or there will be a bunch of people who are public-health majors who talk about trends in epidemiology. That’s not who needs to hear those stories, I think.

—DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS comments@cityweekly.net


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 9


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

10 | JUNE 15, 2017

THE

CITIZEN REVOLT

OCHO

In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

MAKE WAVES ON JUNETEENTH

@Bill _ Frost

Americans have a lot to learn about their African-American history. The June 19, 1865, announcement of slavery abolition in Texas, and the emancipation of African-American slaves throughout the Confederate South was just the beginning. Weber State University is celebrating Juneteenth with two important events, starting with the State of Black Utah Town Hall Meeting. Weber State University Davis Campus, 2750 University Park Blvd., Layton, 801-6441402, Friday, June 16, 6:30-8:30 p.m., free, bit.ly/2sI76wA Later, join Betty Sawyer of Black Scholars United for a radical, up-to-theminute examination of race in America, using James Baldwin’s original words and rich archival material in I Am Not Your Negro. Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Wednesday, June 21, 7-9 p.m., free, projectsuccessinc.org

DO SOMETHING MEANINGFUL

Overwhelmed and exhausted by all the political noise? Just because it’s summer, don’t get lazy and let your enthusiasm wane. Action Utah makes it easier for you to get engaged by bringing you vetted information and meaningful actions you can take via their weekly emails and daily posts, including urgent calls to action, on their website, Facebook and Twitter. Follow some tips to create a sustainable civic engagement plan that keeps you involved in meaningful actions related to health care, poverty and homelessness, public lands, ethics (of course) and more. You can join an action committee, too. Action Utah, 745 E. 300 South, 801-977-8227, any time, free, actionutah.org

DAY OF DINNERS

Instead of screaming at each other, how about talking politics over dinner? Sign up now to host or attend the #DayofDinners as a unique way of building stronger communities. The Women’s March has partnered with Dream Defenders in an effort to bring people from all walks of life to their neighbors’ tables. It’s important to see one other in new ways and remind ourselves that there is hope if we work together. This is a potluck dinner and organizers ask that you bring a dish that means something to you. You probably won’t see a lot of mac and cheese, but anything’s possible. Yours or someone else’s home, or a public place, Sunday, June 25, dayofdinners.org

—KATHARINE BIELE

Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

Eight new Utah “modest fashion” shops opening just in time for summer:

8. As Above, So Below the Knees.

7. SaltyPits. 6. Potato Saks Fifth Avenue. 5. Oblique Chic Ltd. 4. Sweet Spirit Swim Smocks. 3. Flirty Anklez. 2.

Burning Bosom Elder Deflectors™.

1. Shame! Shame! Shame!


In Bloom

Iosepa comes alive for a weekend to celebrate exodus centennial. BY JORDAN FLOYD comments@cityweekly.net @JordanFloyd17

T

Beginning on Friday, droves of cars, some trailing campers and others packed with tents, rumbled away from state Route 196 on a dirt road to the town’s site. Only three things were on the agenda that night: “Kick back, talk stories and Kanikapila”—a style of Hawaiian jam music and dance. The rest of the weekend would include music and dances from a Hawaiian, New Zealand, Fijian, Samoan and Tahitian group; storytelling; a re-creation of the Polynesian pioneers leaving Iosepa; a luau; and a culminating LDS church service on Sunday. Come Saturday morning—the day which most of the weekend’s celebration took place—campers, tents and cars surrounded the town’s cemetery and the pavilion just to the east, creating the look and feel of a community, if just for the weekend. Slowly, a populace of morning weed-pullers migrated to the cemetery to Colorful leis go up on Iosepa’s Historical Memorial to commemorate the ghost town’s anniversary. clean it, wearing thick gardening and were part of the group who first probably freezing.” gloves and carrying garbage bags. settled the town and then returned Iosepa’s first inhabitants did, in fact, The sounds of strumming and singing back to Hawaii in the early 20th censtruggle initially with the conditions in sprang from the pavilion and beyond. tury. Like the ancestral pair, her own Utah’s west desert when they arrived in Nobody at the celebration, it turns out, journey to Skull Valley began in Hawaii 1889. The Polynesian pioneers battled a is a stranger. Conversation starts easwhen she met her husband in 1953 while new climate and especially diseases— ily: “What’s your connection? Do you he was stationed at Pearl Harbor. A year namely, pneumonia, smallpox, diphhave family buried here?” one attendee after meeting, the two married and theria and even a few cases of leprosy. asked. Tutu soon arrived in Utah. But, after only a few short years, the There are 79 individuals buried in She was wild and had a difficult time town was made up of “beautiful lawns, the Iosepa cemetery, and only a select adapting to the move at first, she said. gardens, flowers and trees,” one historfew bodies lie beneath an identifying She used to smoke and drink, and ical publication reports. By 1911, it was headstone. Almost all those buried here walked around town barefoot, shouldubbed Utah’s “most progressive city.” are honored and remembered by white, dering all the troubles that came with Locals thrived, which makes their rectangular blocks placed in a line on being a non-white woman in whitesudden departure even stranger. Osthe easternmost side of the cemetery bread, 1950s Utah. Though out of place, tensibly, the inhabitants returned to square. Splitting the line in half is a Tutu found solace in Iosepa, and has Hawaii at the hand of then-president of towering obelisk memorial, with a bust done the yearly pilgrimage, husband the LDS church, to help build the Laie of a Polynesian man in place of the usuand family in tow, since 1956. temple. The Polynesian pioneers, many al pyramidal point at the top. By mid“This is home,” she said, “for me and celebration-goers said, initially came morning, the bust wore leis around its my family.” to Utah to be near a temple, and once neck—some made from intricate braids One of the stranger moments over the intent to construct a temple in Haand others of a fuzzy material that the weekend came when a flock of waii was announced, many of Iosepa’s moved with the wind. The blocks on seagulls, seemingly appeared from nocitizens opted to leave. One report by either side were adorned by shell neckwhere, their flight trajectories weaving historian Ouida Blanthorn suggests, laces and purple orchids. a kind of blanket above the town. Anyhowever, that “growing homesickness Ashlyn Navarro Algee, whose greatone with at least a small knowledge of of some, and perhaps a certain disilgrandmother is buried there, ordered Mormon pioneer lore understands how lusionment with the segregation effecthe orchids from Hawaii and brought ripe a sudden flock of seagulls is with tively practiced by the [LDS] white mathem with her on her venture from Las significance. Sure, the birds’ appearjority” might have contributed to the Vegas, Nev., where she lives. Navarro ance could have been on account of people’s impulse to leave. said she first heard of Iosepa online and the celebration-goers’ food, the town’s Whatever the reason, the former inlater learned she had family buried in proximity to the Great Salt Lake, and habitants’ spirit and love for the town— its cemetery. With her husband in tow so on, but the serendipity for Tutu and the same report gives an anecdote of and proudly donning a tattoo on her others gazing at the birds with intrigue Iosepa women weeping while leaving, forearm of her great grandmother’s last was not lost. “uttering: ‘Goodbye, Iosepa, goodbye, name, Imaikalani, Navarro made her “I’ve never seen this before,” Tutu, Iosepa’”—is carried now by ancestors first ever visit to Iosepa that weekend. leaning out of her camper while placing and celebration-goers. Having never seen the desolate Skull her hand on her brow to quell the sun’s One of the most boisterous carriValley before, she was in awe that the glare, said. ers of the Polynesian pioneers’ spirit Polynesian pioneers survived—even The seagulls swirled and dived over is Vermine Haws, or, at her insistence, thrived—there. the cemetery alive with people. “Tutu,” meaning “grandmother” in “Jesus,” she said, “they stuck them “This is something special,” she Hawaiian. out here, in nowhere? They were mused. CW Tutu’s grandparents met in Iosepa

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 11

he definition of ghost town doesn’t quite fit the west desert’s Iosepa (pronounced “Yo-Sepa”). To start, there’s little left of the former town—the only remaining piece being a rusted fire hydrant embedded in a hulking, lava rock memorial. The rest has been torn down, demolished or buried in the years since its inhabitants made a trickling exodus from Skull Valley in 1917. Now, visitors will find a pavilion, multiple granite memorials and bathrooms that are not especially luxurious, though the toilets do, in fact, flush. As for the “ghost” part, it wrongfully implies something haunting and sinister. Sure, the town’s centerpiece is a cemetery, but those who frequent the “gem in the desert” know it’d be hard to find a more beautiful and inviting resting place for the dead than what the former settlement offers. Still, over a weekend in late May, an assorted group of lively people met in the desolate locale to celebrate the passing of 100 years since a majority of Iosepa’s inhabitants left the town en route to Hawaii. The celebration was organized by the Iosepa Historical Association, a group of individuals with both family ties and interest in the town’s forlorn history. The association works to preserve the memory of Iosepa’s first people, who— in a move orchestrated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the 1880s—settled on a roughly 2,000acre sect of land that was soon given the Hawaiian name for “Joseph,” Ioespa, after church president Joseph Fielding Smith. Just as well, the association has charged itself with celebrating the lives of those who called Iosepa home, and those who eventually left. Iosepa’s first celebrations were small, maybe consisting of one family or two visiting the town, but they were celebrations all the same. “It’s always an honor to come out here,” association president Patricia Kamai said. “We used to come out here to clean the graves and then just go home.” The daytrips gave way to weekend-long camping trips, then Polynesian luaus, fit with music (“Of course there was music,” she said), and finally the annual commemoration it is today.

HISTORY

JORDAN FLOYD

NEWS


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

12 | JUNE 15, 2017

ESSENTIALS

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, JUNE 15-21, 2017

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

JEN SISKA

MONIKA OTTEHENNING

MR. VIC’S PHOTOGRAPHY

COURTESY HEATHER ROMNEY

the

FRIDAY 6/16

SATURDAY 6/17

MONDAY 6/19

WEDNESDAY 6/21

When two artists come together to display vastly different work in the same space, the narrative created just by walking from one end of a gallery to the next is striking. It transports viewers from the world of one artist to the other, inviting them to draw ties between the two. This striking interplay can be found during the upcoming opening reception for illustrator Chris Bodily and photographer Heather Romney in the exhibition Strange News from Another Star. Bodily has been working under the title “hatrobot” for more than 15 years. His body of work features some of his original ink drawings. “It isn’t often that I show the originals, but I think the line is what makes my work unique,” he says via email. “It’s a body of my favorite pieces from the past three years.” Art is catharsis for Bodily—acting as a way for him to deal with his bipolar disorder. His pieces have a characteristic combination of striking beauty and intense darkness, making each one deeply compelling. Romney, who graduated with a BFA in photography in 2014, displays a similar darkness in her work (the exhibition’s title piece is pictured). “My photography deals with repressed and difficult emotions, like depression and anxiety,” she explains. “This whole project stemmed from Herman Hesse’s short story ‘Strange News from Another Star,’ about two different stars.” Her conceptual visual project deals with the juxtaposition of beauty and horror in the dream world. (Andrea Wall) Chris Bodily and Heather Romney: Strange News from Another Star @ Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, June 16, 6-9 p.m., downtownartistcollective.org

The history of Juneteenth is a history of justice coming late—the June 19, 1865, arrival in Texas of Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger to inform slaves there that they were free, nearly two-and-ahalf years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Today, it’s an opportunity for AfricanAmericans to celebrate their resilience in the face of ongoing obstacles to true equality. Utah’s Juneteenth celebration history goes back nearly 65 years, according to Betty Sawyer, director of the Juneteenth festival. Organized by the Project Success Coalition, the celebration has been centered in Ogden for many years. For 2017, however, the festivities extend over two days, with separate events in West Valley City and Ogden that both feature food and family activities. In West Valley City, at the Utah Cultural Celebration Center, the itinerary includes Atlantabased hip-hop artist Yung Joc, Burundi drummers, the Miss Juneteenth Pageant, storytelling and genealogy workshops. At the Ogden City Amphitheater, gospel recording artist Joshua Rogers and the George Brown Jazz Quintet are among the music performers, with additional poetry and storytelling presentations. During a turbulent political year, Sawyer sees Juneteenth activities—which also include the June 16 Black Town Hall Meeting—as a time of thoughtful action. “In light of numerous events of the past few years,” Sawyer says, “and those concerns being exacerbated by our current political climate, Juneteenth represents an opportunity to give voice to issues, challenges and opportunities, along with offering a time for healing and reconciliation.” (Scott Renshaw) Juneteenth Freedom & Heritage Festival @ Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, June 17, noon-9 p.m., free; after party feat. Yung Joc, June 17, 7 p.m., $10-$50; Ogden City Amphitheater, 343 E. 25th St., Ogden, June 18, noon-9 p.m., free, projectsuccessinc.org

Many images come to mind when one hears the word “opera.” It might be a soprano in a horned helmet, or fanciful period pieces with magic flutes. It’s less likely that you’d picture the crew of a starship exploring the galaxy in search of intelligent life, and responding to a signal from Planet CR-675. Provo-based Space Venture Coalition isn’t specifically out to re-define opera, however. According to Alex Vaughn, one of the project’s co-creators, it was simply an attempt to produce a live music experience that makes for an entertaining show. “[Composer Jared Clark Gay] essentially wanted to create a show that people could go to, whether you knew the music or not, and have a good time,” Vaughn says. “He found he could love an artist, then go to their show and not have a good time. He’s obsessed with space and music, so it naturally fell into this big production.” The show takes the form of a 60-minute, family-friendly performance, including elements of audience participation. “As soon as you get your ticket, it’s like you’re getting aboard the ship and you’re part of the crew,” Vaughn says. “When we’re fighting the bad guy, we have everyone pull out their kazoos.” This week’s performance at the Tower Theatre marks their Salt Lake City debut, and Space Venture Coalition has been selective about choosing its venues in order to provide the production value they want to deliver. Projected background animations also contribute to the immersive experience. Join the adventure; bring your kazoo. (SR) Space Venture Coalition @ Tower Theatre, 876 E. 900 South, June 19, 7 p.m., $10, wearethesvc.com

Mary Roach is an investigative connoisseur of the odd and overlooked. Despite her background in magazine writing for publications like Vogue, National Geographic and Wired, her focus has now centered on books. Her latest, Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War, is a close examination of the military’s lessdocumented difficulties ranging from penis reconstruction after bomb blasts, hearing loss caused by gunfire and even debilitating diarrhea during active duty. If you’ve ever watched Mike Rowe’s show Dirty Jobs, then Roach’s approach is recognizable: It’s obvious she is driven as much by raw curiosity as by her fondness for unfamiliar and exotic worlds. She provides a stunning level of research about each seemingly trivial subject that forms a picture enlivened by the individuals it impacts. Although Grunt’s subject matter is not as obviously humorous as her previous research topics—like death in Stiffs or sex researchers in Bonk—the book is just as enjoyable. Much of it comes from the contrast between Roach and her surroundings. “I’m an outsider to the world of the military, and my tone can be irreverent and cavalier,” she says via email. “There was a feeling of needing to tread carefully.” You can picture this running through her head as she somehow talks a lieutenant into sending a base-wide email request for “diarrhea stories.” If you’re interested in the military or the unusual, let Roach be your guide as she describes the duality of flies both as diseasespreading nuisances and helpful necrotic-skinmunching maggots. (Rex Magana) Mary Roach: Grunt @ Main Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, 801-5248200, June 21, 7 p.m., free but reservation recommended, wellerbookworks.com

Chris Bodily and Heather Romney: Strange News from Another Star

Juneteenth Celebration

Space Venture Coalition

Mary Roach: Grunt


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 13


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

14 | JUNE 15, 2017

In the Key of Sea

CLASSICAL MUSIC

Douglas Morton composes to the rhythms of an aquarium’s inhabitants. BY LEE ZIMMERMAN comments@cityweekly.net

MIKA MILLER

I

t would be tempting to say there’s something fairly fishy about Douglas Morton’s music. Or that his music goes over swimmingly with audiences. Then again, who would take that bait? OK, enough with the puns. Still, it’s hard to resist when it comes to describing Morton’s muse. An accomplished musician, composer and sound designer, he’s now turned his attention to making music intended for aquariums, taking his cue from the movements of their watery inhabitants and other creatures of the deep. A self-taught keyboard wiz, Morton began making music seemingly spontaneously as a child, hanging out in a local music store and dabbling on whatever instruments he could get his tiny hands on. Later, after resettling in Northern California, he became infatuated with digital sampling and music technology, helping usher in an advanced wave of computer-driven audio software that could be put to practical use. His efforts began with creating percussive samples for early drum machines, and then continued with the development of sounds for digital samplers and sampling hardware. In time, his efforts began attracting the attention of a high-profile musical clientele—Pink Floyd, U2, Prince, the Cure, Depeche Mode, Tangerine Dream and Peter Gabriel among them. “Christopher Franke from Tangerine Dream was my first customer,” Morton says in a phone interview, sharing his delight in meeting artists he admired. “I was already a fan of many of the bands that were now using my sounds. Sampling technology led me to artists that I never would have had heard of, as well.” It wasn’t long before Morton’s compositions and virtual instrument design began to show up on albums, television shows and feature films. Then, in the early ’90s, Morton found another source of inspiration during a scuba diving expedition off the coast of Southern California. Working with staff members from the Monterey Bay Aquarium with whom he had gone diving, he began creating soundtracks to accompany the aquarium’s various events and exhibitions. That pursuit eventually led him to Draper’s Loveland Living Planet Aquarium, which invited him to create music that could be played in sync with the movement of their

sea creatures. It introduced an auditory element that could ultimately enhance their visual displays and create a fuller sensory experience for guests. “It’s very similar to scoring [music for] dancers,” Morton says. “The ocean is full of interesting timbres, dynamics and colors. … There’s an entire orchestra under the surface. A school of fish is a section of flutes, a pinnacle is a low bass, the current is the tempo.” He calls the result “a truly revelatory experience.” It’s that sort of spectacle that Morton intends to share when he performs at the Living Planet Aquarium. The event includes Morton playing live in front of the Ocean Explorer Shark exhibit and the jellyfish one, in the first of three performances scheduled at the aquarium this summer. The program includes several of his earlier marine-inspired scores, as well as the composition of new soundtracks—accompanied by guitarist Terence Hansen and multi-instrumentalist Leraine Horstmanshoff. In addition to giving the audience opportunities to interact and ask questions during the performance, the music will be recorded throughout the day and posted on Soundcloud, allowing guests to listen to the final results and then leave their comments. Although his music has become part of the programming at the aquarium, Morton says he’s looking forward to performing it there live for the first time. Initially, he thought of doing a traditional concert, but later came up with the idea of doing a day-long, interactive event that allows him to compose spontaneously while drawing inspiration

Douglas Morton

from the movements of the aquarium’s creatures. “It’s very inspiring musically,” Morton says. “We’re so accustomed to experiencing the final results of films, concerts and exhibits that I thought it would be cool to show how it’s done live.” Morton credits what he calls “a terrific team of creatives” with helping bring the idea to fruition. He singles out artist Billy Hensler for the massive murals throughout the aquarium and Aryeh Robinson for designing the exhibits, while citing the aquarium’s staff members for creating an extraordinary immersive experience. He hopes the new music eventually works its way into soundtracks for various exhibits. Morton says he’s especially excited to see the audience’s reaction. “Hopefully, they’ll leave inspired and enriched,” he says. “I hope to offer the notion that you can convert what you see into musical ideas and sonic images.” CW

DOUGLAS MORTON

Loveland Living Planet Aquarium 12033 Lone Peak Parkway, Draper 801-355-3474 Saturday, June 17 10 a.m.-6 p.m. $14.95-$19.95, children 2 and under free thelivingplanet.com


moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

The Oola Guys: Oola for Women Barnes & Noble, 1104 E. 2100 South, June 18, 2 p.m, barnesandnoble.com

SPECIAL EVENTS TALKS & LECTURES

“It Starts With You” Speaker Series Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, June 15, 7:30 p.m. grandtheatrecompany.com

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Juneteenth Fest Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, June 17, 12-9 p.m.; Ogden City Amphitheater, 343 E. 25th St., June 18, 12-9 p.m., projectsuccessinc.org (see p. 12)

RACING

19th and 20th century works capturing the beauty and evolution of the Western United States by artists including Maynard Dixon, Frank Tenney Johnson and LeConte Stewart (his “5th South and West Temple, Salt Lake City” is pictured) in the exhibition Masterworks of Western American Art at David Dee Fine Arts (1709 E. 1300 South, 801-583-8143, daviddeefinearts) through Aug. 31.

PERFORMANCE

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Douglas Morton Living Planet Aquarium, 12033 Lone Peak Parkway, Draper, 801-355-3474, June 17, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., thelivingplanet.com (see p. 14)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

All of Us Beasts Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through July 7, heritage.utah.gov

COMEDY & IMPROV

Hot Jokes Tour Eccles Theatre, 131 Main, 385468-1010, June 18, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org Jacob Leigh Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., 801622-5588, June 16-17, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Michael Quu Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801532-5233, June 15, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Pablo Francisco Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, June 16-17, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 15

Christophe Husberg: Dark Immolation Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, June 20, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Dan Wells: Nothing Left to Lose The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, June 20, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Karma Brown: In This Moment The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, June 16, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Gary Ferguson: Land On Fire: The New Reality of Wildfire in the West The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, June 16, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com Hugo Haselhuhn Barnes and Noble, West Jordan, 7517 Plaza Center Drive, 801-282-1324, June 17, 1 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Julie Berry: The Emperor’s Ostrich The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-4849100, June 17, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Mary Roach: Grunt Salt Lake City Public Library Auditorium, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, June 21, 7-9 p.m., wellerbookworks.com (see p. 12)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

1776 Center Point Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, June 16-July 15, centerpointtheatre.org The 3 Amigos Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through Aug. 19, desertstar.biz Cabaret Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through June 24, FridaySaturday, 7:30 p.m., theziegfeldtheater.com Disney’s Tarzan Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Aug. 5, Monday-Saturday, times vary, haletheater.org The Importance of Being Earnest Westminster College Dumke Auditorium, 1840 S. 1300 East, June 15-July 1, times vary, pinnacleactingcompany.org (in)divisible Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through June 18, times vary, planbtheatre.org Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, through Aug. 12, times vary, hct.org Newsies Tuacahn Center for the Arts, 1100 Tuacahn Drive, Ivins, 435-652-3200, through Oct. 18, tuacahn.org The Rainmaker Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, through June 24, times vary, drapertheatre.org Shrek the Musical Tuacahn Amphitheatre, 1100 Tuacahn, Ivins, 435-652-3300, through Oct. 20, dates and times vary, tuacahn.org Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, June 21-Aug. 27, times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Space Venture Coalition Tower Theatre, 876 E. 900 South, June 19, 7 p.m., wearethesvc.com (see p. 12) West Side Story Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, June 19-22, 8 p.m., culturalcelebration.org The Whale The Hive Theatre Co., Sorensen Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, June 16-July 1, FridaySaturday, 8 p.m., hivetheatre.com

SB Dance: The Pushers Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through June 17, 8:30 p.m., sbdance.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THEATER

DANCE

Oval Racing Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, 385-352-3991, June 17, 4-10 p.m., rmrracing.com Quarter Midget Racing Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, 385-352-3991, June 16, 6-10 p.m., rmrracing.com RMR Junior Drag Racing Series Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, 385352-3991, June 17, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., rmrracing.com Summit ET Series Rocky Mountain Raceways, 6555 W. 2100 South, 385-352-3991, June 16, 4-10 p.m., rmrracing.com

Anthony Siciliano, Desarae Lee: Phenomenal Allegories Art Access, 230 S. 500 West, Salt Lake City, 801-328-0703, through July 14, accessart.org Chris Bodily and Heather Romney: Strange News from Another Star Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South; artist reception June 16, 6-9 p.m., downtownartistcollective.org (see p. 12) John Vehar-Evanoff Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355-3383, through July 15, modernwestfineart.com Linnie Brown and Kristin McDermaid Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, June 16-Aug. 4, saltlakearts.org Nathan Florence: In a Common Act of Magic Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-3553383, June 16-July 15, modernwestfineart.com RAW Artists: Verse The Complex, 536 W. 100 South, June 15, 7 p.m., rawartists.org/saltlakecity Richard Serra: Prints Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., 435-649-8882, through Aug. 20, kimballartcenter.org Scott Filipiak Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, June 16-Aug. 4, saltlakearts.org Scott Horsley: I learned it from Watching You UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 15, utahmoca.org Self Expressions Urban Arts Museum, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, through July 2, urbanartsgallery.org Utah Watercolor Society Spring Exhibition Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801-965-5100, through June 28, culturalcelebration.org Willow Skye-Biggs: Tastes Like Mandy UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Aug. 12, utahmoca.org


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

16 | JUNE 15, 2017

KEEP YOUR

OVEN OFF, EAT PIZZA! SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, AUGUST 19TH & 20TH (385) 415-2924 SLC

(385) 246-8444 Midvale

(801) 627-2229 Ogden/Layton

(801) 322-3790 SLC

TICKETS ON SALE NOW ATTENDANCE CAPPED EACH DAY LIMITED 2-DAY PASSES AVAILABLE

(801) 456-0075 SLC

THANK YOU TO THE ABOVE PIZZERIAS FOR SUPPORTING CITY WEEKLY AND THE B-BOY FEDERATION

OVER 200

BEERS

A BENEFIT FOR:

Secure early bird pricing ends in July! UTAHBEERFESTIVAL.COM

SPONSORED BY:


DEREK CARLISLE

DINE

Dine With Dad

Some eating and imbibing options for Father’s Day.

I

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 17

can’t think of a nicer spot to spend Father’s Day than on the sunny patio at Tuscany (2832 E. 6200 South, 801-2779919, tuscanyslc.com). Chef Adam Vickers and his team is hosting a Father’s Day brunch buffet from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. featuring items such as prime rib, waffles, huevos rancheros, housemade pastries and much more ($40 adults, $20 kids 12 and under). How about putting a South American spin on dad’s day? Rodizio Grill (Trolley Square, 600 S. 700 East, 801-220-0500, rodizio.com) offers its full Rodizio dinner menu for $29 per person all day, which includes the regular churrasco—an endless array of grilled meats—plus hot and cold buffets, and a special prime rib carving station, strip steak, boneless leg of lamb and choice of dessert. Each father dining that day also receives a special gift. Bring out Dad’s inner gaucho. For an eclectic dining experience, consider visiting Provisions (3364 S. 2300 East, 801-410-4046, slcprovisions.com). Chef Tyler Stokes’ eatery is now open for brunch on weekends, and Dad can select from a wide array of menu items ranging from “green eggs and ham” and slowroasted local pork shoulder to hamachi crudo, organic Mary’s fried chicken and waffles, an awesome cheeseburger and blueberry-ricotta pancakes with lemon curd and pure maple syrup. If your pop is a whiskey aficionado, Finca (327 W. 200 South, 801-487-0699, fincaslc.com) has a unique Father’s Day tasting menu with optional whiskey pairings. Choices include barbecued dishes like La Barba Coffee-rubbed pork loin and

pork ribs with root beer barbecue sauce ($45, plus $25 for whiskey). What could be more appropriate on Father’s Day than a surf-and-turf menu? You can find that (and more) at Kimi’s Chop & Oyster House (2155 S. Highland Drive, 801-946-2079, kimishouse.com). Kick off the holiday with a plate of fresh oysters on the half-shell, or heavenly blue crab meat salad wraps. Since Kimi’s cuisine has a Scandinavian spin, I’d recommend the Swedish pytt i panna—melt-in-your-mouth beef tenderloin cubes with salt-cured ham, diced yellow potato, sweet onion, fried egg and pickled beets. Chef Matt Anderson also makes a killer croque madame that Dad will devour. Wash it down with a jalapeñobacon-shrimp bloody mary. If he’s a dog lover, you might consider dining at Log Haven (6451 E. Millcreek Canyon Road, 801-272-8255, log-haven.com) during their Dog Days of Summer. The Fido-friendly restaurant serves both wellbehaved dogs and their humans outdoors during this event, and dads can enjoy specialty cocktails like the Salty Chihuahua or Melon-Collie Mojito. It’s a stereotype, of course, that all dads like to grill. Some of us are barbecue bumblers as much as we are poor plumbers. If so, consider treating yours to what he really wants for Father’s Day: meat. On June 17, the BBQ Pit Stop in Layton (1131 Highway 193, 801-341-7172, bbqpitstopclasses.com) offers a four-hour barbecue and grilling class by pitmaster Matt Train, who teaches how to make authentic barbecue. Dad can feast on samples throughout the class. The ultimate Father’s Day gift? Beer, of course. This year’s City Weekly Utah Beer Festival takes place during a two-day span, Aug. 19-20. Purchase early bird passes for him (and yourself) at utahbeerfest.com. In addition to beer, music, food and fun, the festival has raised tens of thousands of dollars for the Humane Society of Utah and other local charities in the past seven years. I adopted our dog Ricky at last year’s event. Drink tickets include UTA Trax, bus and FrontRunner passes and a commemorative sample mug. Happy Father’s Day! CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @Critic1

Oysters on the half shell at Kimi’s Chop & Oyster House.


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

18 | JUNE 15, 2017

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

FOOD MATTERS BY SCOTT RENSHAW @scottrenshaw

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

KEITH GILLY

-CREEKSIDE PATIO-87 YEARS AND GOING STRONG-BREAKFAST SERVED DAILY UNTIL 4PM-DELICIOUS MIMOSAS & BLOODY MARY’S-LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO-SCHEDULE AT RUTHSDINER.COM“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains” -Cincinnati Enquirer

4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD | 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

The Atrium at Snowbird

More Options for Pops

Beyond the options already mentioned in Dine (see p. 17), there are a couple of great ways to celebrate Father’s Day at local ski resorts. The Atrium at Snowbird (9320 Cliff Lodge Drive, 801-933-2140, snowbird.com) presents a special brunch from 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. including eggs Benedict, smoked St. Louis ribs, sushi rolls and more for $48 per adult, $30 for kids 6-12 and free for children 5 and under. Up at Snowbasin Resort (3925 E. Snowbasin Road, Huntsville, 888437-5488, snowbasin.com) from 11 a.m.-3 p.m., you and dad can get a free gondola ride to the restaurant for a barbecue buffet, with free music at the base before heading home. The cost is $36 per person, but only $26 for dads.

2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

Main Street Table

As previewed last week, Park City’s Main Street turns into the state’s biggest and most boisterous dinner party every summer, as tables stretch from end to end on Saturday, June 17 for Savor the Summit to serve you and a couple thousand of your soon-to-be-closest friends. Beginning at 6 p.m., more than 25 Park City restaurants participate in the unique al fresco dining experience, as the picturesque mountain thoroughfare gives way to delicious food and wine, plus live music in the High West Distillery Spirit Garden at Heber Avenue and Main Street. To join in the fun, just make a reservation at one of the participating restaurants—Buona Vita, Handle, Shabu, Reef’s Restaurant and more—at parkcityrestaurants.com. Menu prices vary, so inquire at your chosen venue for more details.

Co-op Rising

Wasatch Cooperative Market has reached a key milestone—450 members— which now sends the organization down the planning path for a 10,000-squarefoot, full-service brick-and-mortar store that can offer fresh, local products yearround. To learn how to be part of the next phase of this member-owned institution’s expansion, visit wasatch.coop.

Award Winning Donuts

Quote of the Week: “The oldest form of theater is the dinner table. It’s got five or six people, new show every night, same players. Good ensemble; the people have worked together a lot.” —Michael J. Fox Send tips to: comments@cityweekly.net

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


an american craft kitchen

Contemporary Japanese Dining 18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

Ope Now Open For Lunch And Saturday Brunch 3364 s 2300 e, SLC slcprovisions.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

Patino

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 19


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

20 | JUNE 15, 2017

Proper Brewing Co.: Patersbier (gold)

Sip on these award-winning Utah beers.

The taste has toasted grain and minor yeast spices and balancing herbal hops. This is a simple beer that’s executed very well. There were far more flavorful beers in this category, but this one beat them all.

BY MIKE RIEDEL comments@cityweekly.net @utahbeer

Proper Brewing Co.: Ragman IPA (gold)

A

couple weeks back, I had the pleasure of judging beers in the North American Brewers Association’s 2017 North American Beer Awards. More than 100 judges from all over the continent spent three days in Idaho Falls looking for the most outstanding beers from 2,000-plus entries. After this experience, I can truly say you owe it to yourself and to the men and women who brew in our communities, to visit or revisit some of their brilliantly made Utah suds. Here are some of your medal winners:

Bohemian Brewery: Cottonwood Common (silver)

The taste is flavor-forward with assertive biscuit toast and caramel. An herbal and grassy hay component rings in next from the hops, providing great balance. There’s also some light apple in the finish. It’s very easy drinking, yet complex enough to be enjoyed slowly.

Bohemian Brewery: Best of Show IPL (silver)

The taste here is almost sweet as it passes

BEER NERD

This Belgian-inspired IPA tastes bready and malty, with hints of citrus and clove. Some pine comes next, providing a dry, lingering finish. This one’s for the more adventurous palate.

Red Rock Brewing: Bobby Brown the Cat (bronze)

MIKE RIEDEL

Pedal to the Medals

over the tongue. The malts are honey-like, and the hop bitterness screams citrus. The finish is slightly bitter with a minor sodium bite. There’s very limited availability.

RoHa Brewing Project: Thursday India Pale Ale (bronze)

The taste starts with grapefruit peel hops. Next come enough caramel malts to balance out the hops. This is a nicely balanced IPA with no gimmicks.

Its nice, roasted, nutty flavor exhibits good balance with the abundant piny hop notes. There are hints of toffee and coffee in the end, as well. It’s very satisfying and drinkable with a soft, medium body and dry finish. Lift your pint glass for Red Rock’s most award-winning beer.

RoHa Brewing Project: Kensington Grand Saison (bronze)

Red Rock Brewing: Anniversary Ale (silver)

Roosters Brewing Co.: Honey Wheat (silver)

To me, it tastes like a muted Tootsie Roll. Some berry fruitiness appears and then transitions to big, dry grass and pine bitterness. It finishes dry with a bit of alcohol heat.

Red Rock Brewing: Viva la Hatu (bronze)

The nose has sweet malts, some corn and subtle grassiness. The taste is much like the nose, with sweet grains, cereal and hints of pear. It finishes with herbal grass-like hops.

Starting with biscuit and orange peel, some lemon and apple peel come next, with phenolic yeast spices rounding out the the finish. It’s more of a bière de garde than a saison.

The sweet malts here are accentuated by notes of honey and mild yeasty fruitiness. Next come apple and floral hops, then crackery toast flavors with a mild bitterness to balance it out. It finishes dry.

Shades of Pale Brewing: Misconception (bronze)

This is the second Utah beer to medal in the Belgian IPA category. Its taste starts with nice, spicy Belgian yeast that morphs to

Beehive wins big at North American Beer Awards. leafy citrus and tropical fruits. The Belgian yeast is subtle and not too overpowering.

Uinta Brewing: Uinta Pils (bronze)

Taste here begins with toasty crackers and some lemon and floral hops. A light malty sweetness comes next, followed by a spicy/ herbal bitterness toward the end. The finish is mostly dry with just a hint of sweetness.

Utah Brewers Cooperative: Squatters Outer Darkness (silver)

The taste starts with chocolate-covered raisins, followed by some underlying dark fruits. The sweetness gives way to big roasted coffee and cocoa, and finishes up with an enjoyable roasted vanilla malt. The alcohol is noticeable, but it doesn’t taste like a 10.5-percent beer.

Best part is, all of these beers are available now, fresh from their respective breweries. Cheers! CW


now serving breakfast

IT TAKES A

village TO CURB YOUR HUNGER!

@

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

JUNE 17TH JUNE 24TH JULY 1ST

soren green early successional nate grover

NOT AGE VILL DED U INCL

5370 S. 900 E. / 801.266.4182

M O N -T H U 11 a -11 p / F R I - SAT 11 a -12 a / S U N 3 p -10 p

AWARD WINNING INDIAN CUISINE

Patio

Burgers

INDIAPALACEUTAH.COM 1086 WEST SOUTH JORDAN PARKWAY (10500 S.) #111 | 801.302.0777

OPEN

Gourmet

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

Summer

Chef-inspired, Locally Sourced

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

italianvillageslc.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

206 S. West Temple 801.890.5155 fatjacksut.com

JUNE 15, 2017 | 21

Open 7 days a week. Sunday Brunch 10am - 3pm


AWARD WINNING INDIAN CUISINE since 1990

REVIEW BITES A sampler of our critic’s reviews

we've moved

801-965-9008 | 1771 W. 4700 S.

*for menu and Coupons go to hunanexpressut.com JOIN US FOR DINNER!!!

RESERVE OUR BANQUET HALL FOR YOUR EVENT!

7 days a week

Lunch Buffet mon-sat

ON W US M O L L O A F GR INSTA

JUST 3 MIN from Downtown! 1659 W. North Temple, Salt Lake City (inside the RAMADA INN) PLENTY OF FREE PARKING - 801-363-7555 - We Deliver!

STAROFINDIAONLINE.COM

vol.

2 no. 5 • July

2016 • Get

Fresh

KLY

The Big John at Grove Market

WEE @SLC

Hell’s Backbone Grill p. 18 Marvelous Mint p. 34 Absinthe Cocktails p. 42

It’s time to

FreGseth Floral Flav

Mmm... Are you ready to

ors p. 28 Devour

Utah • July

2016 1

Covering local food for every season. On stands now!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

22 | JUNE 15, 2017

SALT LAKES ORIGINAL!

JOHN TAYLOR

10% OFF FOR PICK UP ONLY

s a l e s @ D e v o u rU t a h . c o m

Grove Market

Size matters. If the size of your submarine sandwich is a deciding factor, prepare to do battle with Big John. That’s the name of the popular, oversized and underpriced deli sandwich at Grove Market. The Big John features seven deli meats—salami, ham, corned beef, pastrami, bologna, turkey and roast beef—piled 3 to 4 inches high, then topped with both Swiss and American cheese—plus mayo, mustard, lettuce, tomato, pickle and pepperoncini on a thick, airy ambassador roll (or on rye, French, sourdough or wheat bread). Trust me, there will be no room for dessert. Reviewed April 20. 1906 S. Main, 801-467-8860, grovemarketdeli.com

801 • 413 • 0929

This Spring, Try Our

Now Open

Stuffed Cabbage

& Fresh Nayarit Style Seafood

Mi Lindo 145 E. 1300 S.

AMAZING FOOD, LIBATIONS, ART & MUSIC! MON-WED:11-9PM THURS-SAT:11-11PM 60 EAST 800 SOUTH SLC, UT 84111 (385) 528-3675 THEEKLEKTIK.COM

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

Nayarit 

#303

801.908.5727


TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Cowboy B-Slop

TV

The Ranch and Turn are almost done; T.J. Miller gets Meticulously Ridiculous.

N

second look. I gave The Carmichael Show (Season 2, Wednesdays, NBC) a second chance after the Television Critic Intelligentsia unleashed another blizzard of accolades for the laugh-tracked sitcom and … I’m almost there. Comic Jerrod Carmichael and the show’s cast are solid (especially comedy vet David Allen Greer, seemingly channeling his performance from Aaron McGruder’s late, great The Boondocks), but the weekly hammering home of Very Important Issues is tiresome—come for the laughs, get a lecture. Sitcoms can tackle controversial topics, but The Carmichael Show currently falls between CBS’ Mom (which continues to surprise) and Superior Donuts (which continues to suck): It’s almost there, too. CW Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

| CITY WEEKLY |

News from the geeks.

The Ranch (Netflix)

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

T! O B O R Y N I H S BI G

exchange that sent Jones into a tizzy about how he’d been duped by a “sociopath” who was “not feminine … cold, robotic, dead” before he delivered the ultimate insult: “I felt zero attraction to Megyn Kelly.” Damn—float like a chemtrail and sting like a black helicopter, Al. Kelly could use a ratings-grabber like an exposé on America’s favorite conspiracy-slinger/paint-huffing uncle; so far, her muchhyped new show is an air ball in terms of presentation and ratings. Show ’em who’s a robot, Meg! Another mild disappointment, Wrecked (Season 2 premiere, Tuesday, June 20, TBS), is back for another round of Gilligan’s Island/Lost antics. The comedy about a planewrecked group of survivors stranded on a tropical island had a hit-and-miss debut season last year. But its likeable crew of characters (which includes Flight of the Conchords scene-stealer Rhys Darby) and knowing winks at Lost lore is undercut by aimless subplots and weak gags (Wrecked is the first production of a pair of Hollywood-outsider brothers from Kansas, so they should be afforded a little slack). It’s no People of Earth or The Detour, or even Angie Tribeca, but Wrecked is a risk-taking TBS comedy that deserves a

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

ow that Netflix is addressing the Too Many Shows epidemic and just canceling stuff for the sake of canceling stuff—buh-bye Sense8, The Get Down and Marco Polo—let’s get on with killing off The Ranch (Season 3 premiere, Friday, June 16, Netflix). This laugh-tracked cowpie’s initial novelty of reuniting That ’70s Show stars Ashton Kutcher and Danny Masterson wore off quickly, leaving just a hacky sitcom with painfully slumming costars (Sam Elliott and Debra Winger—WTF?). Much like Tim Allen’s recently deceased Last Man Standing, The Ranch is red-state bait that thinks it’s cleverly poking P.C. culture, but ultimately just comes off as lazy. F Is for Family does it better—try that. Was anyone aware that Turn: Washington’s Spies (Season 4 premiere, Saturday, June 17, AMC) was still a thing? Only me? The Revolutionary War drama’s fourth season is also its last, and we all know how it ends (’Merica wins, the British get revenge centuries later by sending us Piers Morgan, etc.). The final chapter finds Benedict Arnold (Owain Yeoman) looking to take down George Washington (Ian Kahn)—but there’s a new player in the mix! Abe Woodhull (Jamie Bell)! History-nerd boners are poppin’ now! Turn: Washington’s Spies has never been one of AMC’s sexiest properties, but it’s almost up there with John Adams in the RevWar TV canon, and certainly better than Fox’s Making History. You’ve probably heard by now that Erlich Bachman is done with Silicon Valley—but T.J. Miller: Meticulously Ridiculous (stand-up special, Saturday, June 17, HBO) is proof that the guy who plays him isn’t done with HBO. According to Miller, his schedule is getting too crowded to continue on the series (true), and he’d rather get out now than become a one-note TV character overstaying his welcome (potential to become very true). As an actor, he’s been in damn near everything; as a stand-up comic, Miller only has one previous special to his credit: 2011’s No Real Reason. Meticulously Ridiculous is even more energetic, prop-happy and, yes, ridiculous, as Miller exits the stratosphere of Fucks Given. Speaking of ridiculous, this weekend’s episode of Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly (Sundays, NBC) just might feature the un-Fox-ed anchor’s already-infamous interview with InfoWars’ Alex Jones, an initially friendly

what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

JUNE 15, 2017 | 23

exclusively on cityweekly.net


| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | JUNE 15, 2017

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 37


| SUMMER CONCERTS |

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

26 | JUNE 15, 2017

SO. MANY. SHOWS. HERE ARE CITY WEEKLY’S TOP PICKS YOU GOTTA SEE. BY RANDY HARWARD

S

o many summer concerts, so little cash. Every year it gets more daunting, trying to shoehorn all the shows you wanna see into your budget. Shelling out for a dud is a massive bummer; the summer concert experience, after all, isn’t just going to a show. The easy picks involve artists whose music holds a special significance for you, such that you’re prone to escaping into your headphones with them, hanging on every note. A few are just atmosphere, something to do. But when you’re planning your summer music consumption, you’re really soundtracking future memories, whether they entail reconnecting with the past, making the current scene or discovering the next big thing. It’s not an easy choice—so here’s help.

BILL EBBESEN VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

13

BETH DITTO

YORK WILSON

THE FLESHTONES

The Fleshtones, Penrose, The Weekenders

Guitar Wolf, Isaac Rother & The Phantoms

Typically, these free Snowbasin shows focus more on altcountry, singer-songwriter, blues, soul, jazz and jam acts. So an appearance by these garage legends from Queens rings odd, but also welcome, because we’ll rarely have the chance to see a hip, culty band like The Fleshtones play a free show in the beauteous mountains of Huntsville, adding the sound of fuzzy guitars, skronkin’ sax and manic organ to the fresh, smoky, sweet, spicy and maybe skunky air. With local blues-rockers The Weekenders in support, it’s really somethin’. Likewise local, pop-rockers Penrose are a puzzling inclusion, but they’ll be palatable to the fans who find The Fleshtones to be a bit fringe for their vanilla tastes.

Guitar Wolf reaches out and grabs you by the short ’n’ curlies, then puts a claw (or a headstock dagger) to your throat and demands your attention. How very extreme, you say? Well, that’s the Japanese for ya—they do things their way, and when it comes to rock ’n’ roll, they can be total beasts. Guitar Wolf turns 30 this year, and they’ve been guitterrorizing our ears with slashing Mosrite chords and howls the entire time, earning a ferociously devoted fan base while popping up in cult films like Tetsuo Takeuchi’s weird-ass zombie flick, Wild Zero. Don’t pass up the chance to see the band play Urban Lounge. You’ll remember it forever.

June 18; Blues, Brews & BBQ (Snowbasin) Free, all ages

Vans Warped Tour

June 24, Utah State Fairpark $29-$35 presale, $50 day of show

With the early- to mid-’90s pop-punk craze came the Warped Tour, which celebrated older and newer punk rock— not to mention country and hip-hop. Then it went corporate, booking execrable Hot-Topic “scene” bands that definitely aren’t punk. Now, Warped is going after that nostalgia money by booking classic acts and looking more like its old self. I’m talking about Jackass cohorts and unsung musical geniuses CKY (albeit sans co-founder, Deron Miller), O.G. “bubblegum” punks The Dickies, GWAR (still killin’ it after losing frontguy Dave Brokie, aka Oderus Urungus) and others. These guys have more punk in their piss than those kiddie bands do in their insipid “snakebite” piercings.

Zapp

June 25, Liquid Joe’s $25 presale, $30 day of show, all ages

There’s a serious lack of old-school funk shows in Utah, so this is a big deal. Cincinnati-bred Zapp, one-time protégés of George “Dr. Funkenstein” Clinton, were also known as Zapp & Roger, before where Roger Troutman—one of four brothers in the band, as well as the voice and focus, with his use of a talkbox, was gunned down by brother Larry in a business-related murder-suicide. Now led by Lester and Terry Troutman, along with original members Gregory Jackson and Bobby Glover, the band continues to deliver “More Bounce to the Ounce”—and they’re finally stopping in SLC for a rare, all-ages, outdoor afternoon show at Liquid Joe’s.

July 3, Urban Lounge $13 presale, $15 day of show

Iron Maiden, Ghost July 7, Usana Amphitheatre $34.50-$99.50

The U.K. heavy metal legends return to Usana after a long gap in visits that ended in 2012. Everyone knows Maiden shows pull out all the stops, with productions that are heavy on lights and pyro—and usually feature brand-new versions of their giant animatronic mascot, Eddie. Scandinavian band Ghost recently gave up the ghost regarding their anonymity shtick when main man Tobias Forge—formerly known as Papa Emeritus, the only named member of the band, got slapped with a lawsuit by ex-bandmates formerly known as Nameless Ghouls. It shouldn’t affect the band’s campy, creepy shows much, and they’ll be a nice complement to Maiden.

Beth Ditto

July 22, Metro Music Hall $17 presale, $20 day of show

Her instantly beloved band Gossip came out strong with a brand of dance music that reached back beyond the ubiquitous ’80s and into late-’70s disco. Now flying solo since her 2011 debut EP (preceding Gossip’s final bow, 2012’s Joyful Noise), Beth Ditto—with one of the punkest surnames, ever—is actually getting a bit mainstream-y on her latest single, “We Could Run,” but her songs still reverberate with the same, be-yourself liberation à la early Madonna. And when self-acceptance becomes mainstream, it’s a good thing. Those who’d miss her punk edge take heart: Expect about four or five Gossip tracks on her recent set lists. Because, of course, those songs originated with her.


Way back when, the nascent Drive-By Truckers would roll through SLC and Park City all the time. They had a reputation for outstanding albums and shows, but it was easy to believe they’d be like all the other really good independent bands that made a point to visit us frequently. Maybe they’d keep their regional following and continue to tour the states and occasionally abroad—but they wouldn’t get huge. The Truckers did, and deservedly so, after enough people heard those incredible, literary Southern-rock/alt-country tunes and witnessed their smokin’ live shows. Bands like this don’t come along often, so when they do, you gotta take advantage.

Die Antwoord

Aug. 22, The Great Saltair $32.50-$35, all ages

“Zef” is the South African equivalent of “redneck.” If you haven’t heard hip-hop trio Die Antwoord, that might elicit images of the most odious of music: hickhop, an unholy cultural misappropriation where popcountry meets mainstream hip-hop (see Cowboy Troy, Yelawolf). That’s a close cousin-daughter to Juggalo culture, and the two combined amount to an Idiocracy nightmare. Thankfully, it’s one from which you’ll awaken to discover that Die Antwoord—a golden-toothed, tatted man called Ninja, an adorably terrifying kewpie doll called Yolandi and a guy who changed his name from DJ Hi-Tek to God—is pretty cool. Granted, Ninja looks like a redneck crunk rapper from Alabammy, but that’s where the similarities to the horrorshow end. The music is like hip-hop, dubstep and J-pop on hallucinogens. This’ll be quite the spectacle.

Aug. 23, Usana Amphitheatre $35-$140

Remember when everybody in town was slobbering over Depeche Mode tickets? Back then, you might say that Utahns (read: Mormons because, of course, everyone here is LDS) loved synth-pop

Aug. 26, Usana Amphitheatre $29.95-$99.95

Classic rock is the de facto sound of summer. Despite frequently performing with zero original members, Foreigner is in good hands with vocalist Kelly Hansen, who’s proven to be a solid replacement for Lou Gramm, once thought irreplaceable. The meat in this classic rock sammich, though, is Cheap Trick, with guitarist Rick Nielsen’s bitchin’ licks and goofy antics, Robin Zander’s still-soaring voice and a catalog of expertly crafted tunes. Plus, you can’t beat the feeding frenzy when they toss a Kiss LP into the crowd and it gets shredded. As for Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience, he’s the son of original drummer John, and replaced him in some of those Zep reunionish gigs—so it’s not necessarily a tribute act, even though it is. But they sound great without trying to dress the part.

The Roots, Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires Aug. 31, Twilight Concert Series (Pioneer Park) $7.50-$10, all ages

This bill is the best of old and new, with two acts whose new music is rooted in the old school. Not only that, but The Roots’ lengthy career means it’s not all neo-this or post-that—they stretch back far enough to activate your good ol’ days sensor. And it’ll be great to see them onstage where they belong instead of playing Jimmy Fallon’s pet band. As for

DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS

Crucialfest 7

Aug. 31-Sept. 3, The Gateway, Urban Lounge, Metro Music Hall $45-$165

Jarom Bischoff’s Crucialfest started with the idea of promoting local music with a 50 percent local lineup. Through six festivals, he’s stuck to his guns. In doing so, our local bands have shared the stage with more and more name acts. Cfest’s offerings also have become increasingly diverse in its seventh year, achieving a perfectly tuned mix of credible, successful acts to complement a roster of our own comparable bands. Where else can you see stoner-doom bands like Red Fang and INVDRS alongside a geek-hop act like Aesop Rock? Or Built to Spill playing with loud, local nutjobs Turtleneck Wedding Dress? Indie darlings The Growlers with devil-worshipin’ metal babes Darklord? You get the point.

Lost ’80s Live

Sept. 7, Gallivan Center $35-$75, all ages

Last year’s Lost ’80s Live show at the Sandy Amphitheater was like watching those old revue-style concerts on TV, where the Four Tops or The Temptations and other soul acts came out and played quickie sets to delirious fans before the summer concert/state fair heritage circuit was a thing. As with those shows, the Lost ’80s package tour allows the acts enough stage time to play only their hits. Sometimes that meant two songs; sometimes it meant a half-dozen—but the delirium was the same. Wang Chung, Cutting Crew and Naked Eyes return this year, along with Berlin, The Flirts, Tony Hadley of Spandau Ballet, Tommy Tutone and a special guest TBA. A total time warp, this was easily one of my favorites from last year. CW

| SUMMER CONCERTS |

Depeche Mode, Warpaint

Foreigner, Cheap Trick, Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience

Charles Bradley, I stand behind what I wrote in our Twilight Concert Series lineup announcement: He’s “not only one of the greatest living soul singers, but a chill dude, himself. What’s cooler than a soul cover of a Black Sabbath song? Not bothering to lip-sync in the video for it, letting your emotion-lined face convey every broken-hearted lyric. This is the one, folks. Get your tickets fast.”

THE ROOTS

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 27

MARK SELIGER/NBC UNIVERSAL

Aug. 4, Red Butte Garden $38-$45

almost as much as shredded carrots and green Jell-O. Or maybe Depeche Mode is just that good. Anyone doubting it should locate a copy of D.A. Pennebaker’s concert film/documentary 101 and see how the English band’s danceable music isn’t just electronic pop. It’s influenced by everything from country to Elvis Costello; it has emotional range—shifting from perk to gloom with ease (albeit more the latter); and introduced—a quarter-century ago—now-fashionable concepts like keeping religion personal and accepting people for who they are.

DANNY CLINCH

Drive-By Truckers, Asleep at the Wheel


| SUMMER CONCERTS |

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

28 | JUNE 15, 2017

OUR ULTIMATE GUIDE TO 30 CAN’T-MISS SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVALS AND CONCERT SERIES

T BY RANDY HARWARD

Blues, Brews & BBQ

hough the Old Farmer’s Almanac might say otherwise, we’ll just call it and say summer is officially here. You know what that means: Long days, late nights, heatstroke, sunburns, watery $10 beers, long lines at the Honey Buckets, questionable decisions (like tossing one’s underthings onstage) and ill-advised hookups leading to awkward breakfasts. However, one thing makes it all worthwhile: the music, baby. After decades of being an iffy, mid-sized stop when artists plotted their tour routings, Salt Lake City now draws bigger and better acts each year. Attribute that to Utah’s busy-bee indus-

‘17

snowbasin.com Sundays through Sept. 24, Huntsville Free, all ages

Ogden Twilight

ogdentwilight.com Thursdays through June 29, Ogden Amphitheater $5-$25, all ages

redbuttegarden.org Through Sept. 14, Red Butte Garden Arboretum Prices vary

Must See: The Shins (June 22),

Side Attractions:

Dress Code: Same as SLC Twilight. Must See: North Mississippi Allstars & Anders Osborne, Beverage Pairing: New Lukas Nelson & Promise of the

Miike Snow (June 29).

Coke or Mad Dog 20/20.

Award-winning, locally brewed beer, street tacos, mountain views, kids’ activities.

Plus-One: O-Town booty call. Dance Move:

Vogue.

What to Flash: Dress Code:

Beer + BBQ sauce = disposable plastic poncho.

Beverage Pairing:

Wine, stoopid.

Plus-One:

It’s free—bring everybody.

Tramp stamps.

Real (July 14); Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, St. Paul & the Broken Bones (Aug. 17); ZZ Top (Aug. 31); Gov’t Mule (Sept. 14).

What to Throw on Stage:

Suggestions for how to create your own brand.

Dance Move: The What to Flash:

Dress Code: KRCL T-shirt.

Beverage Pairing: Wine,

with cheese.

Plus-One:

Spouse (obligatory).

What to Flash: If last year’s

Competitive eating chops.

Barenaked Ladies show was any indication, butt cracks.

Pickup Line: “Nice taters.” What to Throw on Stage: Wet naps.

Must See: Party Favor (June 21), Ying Yang Twins (June 28).

Side Attractions: Me, on a

soapbox, complaining about people who say, “ying-yang” and “orangutang.”

Pickup Line: (Point to KRCL shirt):

What to Sneak In: Salad.

16), Donny & Marie (July 11-12), Purple Reign—Prince Tribute (Aug. 15), The Drifters (Aug. 25), Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals (Sept. 16).

Side Attractions: Alta View Hospital, decent nachos.

Dance Move: For Donny & Marie, the Botox clothing your mom’s gotten you form the “urban” section at Robot. Kohl’s. What to Flash: For Little River Band, your yachtBeverage Pairing: Purple drank. rock captain’s cap. Plus-One: Lost Ying Yang triplet. Pickup Line: “Have you heard Dance Move: Daggering. about the lonesome loser? He’s What to Flash: Bling. trying to pick you up right now.” Dress Code: All those items of

Pickup Line: “(Something,

something …) shawtie.”

What to Throw on Stage: Orthotics.

What to Throw on Stage: Me and my

soapbox.

What to Sneak In: 10

you picked on the way in.

What to Sneak In: No need—they allow coolers.

Must See: Little River Band (June

Plus-One: For Purple Reign, Morris Day impersonator Enrique Limón.

What to Throw on Stage: The flowers Child and TroyBoi’s show (on Thursday, June 15).

sandyamp.com Through Sept. 16, Prices vary

Fountain drinks.

“I see you donated to Spring Radiothon—how much to take it off?”

What to Sneak In: Louis the

Sandy Amphitheater

Dress Code: Suburban casual. Beverage Pairing:

Comparing cooler contents.

Dance Move: Sit down so the rest of us can see.

Burnt End.

saltcitysounds.com Through June 28, Gallivan Center Free, all ages

Side Attractions:

Pickup Line:

“I’d offer to take you to O-town … but I see you’re already here.”

*Disclaimer: If you’re dumb enough to try any of the irresponsible, ethically and/or legally dicey things referenced in the satirical article below, you probably do stupid shit all the time, anyway. Don’t sue us; sue your parents for not using birth control. (And be sure to represent yourself, ‘cause it’s way cheaper than hiring an attorney.) Just in case you need it spelled out for you: City Weekly isn’t responsible for your bad/awesome decisions.

Red Butte Garden Salt City Sounds Summer Concert Series Concert Series

Must See:

The Fleshtones (June 18), Jelly Bread (June 25), Los Lobos (Sept. 3).

triousness: When the jams weren’t comin’ to us, we gave ‘em a reason to with an everexpanding shit-ton of burgeoning music festivals and concert series. With that in mind, we walk you through the summer fest and series calendar in this handy-dandy guide.*

What to Sneak In: Jurassic 5.

more decibels. Sure, it’s a suburban venue, but come on—it’s a concert.


Summer Nights with the Stars

davisarts.org/summer-concert-series Through Sept. 16, Kenley Amphitheater (Layton) Prices vary

Must See: Chris Isaak (July 25),

Utah Blues Festival utahbluesfest.org June 17, Gallivan Center $35-$88, all ages

Must See: Kenny Neal, Samantha

Fish, Harry Lee & the Back Alley Blues Band.

Side Attractions: Free harmonica

The Stray Cat, Lee Rocker (Aug. and bottleneck workshops, 12), Steep Canyon Rangers paid (limited) cigar box guitar (Aug. 28), Yes (Sept. 2). workshop.

KRCL Hidden Hollow Concert Series

krcl.org June 21-Aug. 23, Hidden Hollow Natural Area Free

Utah Arts Festival

Bonanza Campout

Must See: Shooter Jennings &

Must See: Nick Murphy (Chet Faker), Ms. Lauryn Hill, Odezsa.

uaf.org bonanzacampout.com June 22-25, Library Square, June 23-25, River’s Edge (Heber) Washington Square $70-$300 $6-$35 (children 12 and under, free)

Waymore’s Outlaws, Saliva Sisters, RJD2, Sauce Boss, The 12), Jordan Young and Dylan Roe Pedro Martinez Group. (July 19), Folk Hogan (Aug. 23). Side Attractions: Art, proly. Also

Must See: Bullets and Belles (July

food.

Side Attractions: Camping. Dress Code: “I Knew Nick When He Was Just Fakin’ It” shirt.

Beverage Pairing: One sealed bottled of water up to 1 liter. Plus-One: Eric “Hoss” Cartwright look-alike.

Side Attractions: Hot deals at Ed Kenley Ford.

Dress Code: Golf pants. Beverage Pairing:

Metamucil-spiked Diet Coke.

Plus-One: Home health

nurse.

Dance Move: Get Off My

Lawn shakey fist.

What to Flash: AARP card. Pickup Line: “I get a senior discount!”

Dress Code: Porkpie hat. Beverage Pairing: One bourbon,

Side Attractions: They say

Plus-One: Ol’ Scratch, so you can

Dress Code: Anything with lots of

one scotch, six beers.

hold hands when somebody covers “Me and the Devil Blues.”

Wicked Game board game to pitch to Isaak.

Everything and nothing.

What to Sneak In: There are no secrets in the Hollow.

mentioned hard liquor.

Beverage Pairing:

Yoo-hoo.

Plus-One:

Mom or Dad.

Dance Move:

The Edgelord.

What to Flash: Your new itty-bitty gauges.

Pickup Line:

(Screaming histrionically) “Fuck you, haters!”

What to Throw on Stage:

Pictures of ulcerated, noduleridden vocal cords.

What to Sneak In: More classics next

year.

Plus-One: Anyone but an art history major. Dance Move: The Chiaroscuro. What to Flash: Why flash when you can streak?

Dance Move: Collapsed Tent (Interpretive). What to Flash: Bug

Pickup Line: “Did

spray.

anyone ever tell you that you have the face of a Botticelli and the body of a Degas?” (Thanks, Robert Downey Jr.—I mean, James Toback!)

What to Throw on Stage: Napkin

portrait of Jennings as a Saliva Sister.

What to Sneak In:

Adult coloring book.

Pickup Line: “I can’t

find my campsite— can I sleep with you?”

What to Throw on Stage: IRS form

1040-A (Lauryn Hill only).

What to Sneak In:

See “prohibited Items” at bonanzacampout.com.

Park City Summer Concert Series

Beverage Pairing:

Coconut water.

Plus-One: Dr. Scholl. Dance Move: When

parkcitymountain.com June 24-Sept. 2, Canyons Village Free

Badfeather plays “Sweat,” the bone dance.

Must See: Badfeather (June 24), John

What to Flash: Season

Nemeth (July 1), VanLadyLove (July 22), Corey Harper (Sept. 2).

lift pass.

Pickup Line: “I’m a local.”

Side Attractions: Mountain scenery. Dress Code: Barefoot—”kick off your sandals,” says the website.

What to Throw on Stage: Headshot

of former local news personality Dave Nemeth and a Sharpie.

What to Sneak In: A hike.

JUNE 15, 2017 | 29

casual.

What to Flash:

Rinse-Water Cooler.

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

Dress Code: Hot Topic

Man (Stealth Mode).

Pickup Line: “Where’d you go?” What to Throw on Stage:

What to Sneak In: Afore-

Must See: “Classic” (read: quality)

on instruments, concert photography, songwriting, screenprinting, CKY Wheel of Wonders and—whew—safe spaces.

Dance Move: The Running Disappearing Act.

Your phone number, for Samantha Fish. Meow.

vanswarpedtour.com June 24, Utah State Fairpark $29-$35, $50 day of show

Side Attractions: Workshops

Man.

Pickup Line: “Damn

Vans Warped Tour

acts: CKY, The Dickies, GWAR, Municipal Waste, Adolescents, Valient Thorr, Strung Out.

Plus-One: The Invisible

Dress Code: Body paint. Beverage Pairing: Watercolor

| SUMMER CONCERTS |

What to Sneak In: Prototype of

Beverage Pairing: Crystal

Pepsi.

crossroads contract and vastly improved guitar skills.

What to Throw on Stage:

Rocker, feral cats.

hidden pockets.

Dance Move: Jukin’! What to Flash: Notarized

right, I got the blue balls.”

What to Throw on Stage: For Lee

there’s a passage to Narnia somewhere in Hidden Hollow.


| SUMMER CONCERTS |

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

30 | JUNE 15, 2017

Lunar Transit

lunartransit.com June 30-July 3, Eagle Point Resort (Beaver) $85 (camping passes separate)

Must See: Gardens of God, Shaded, Triceradrops.

Deer Valley Music Festival deervalleymusicfestival.org

July 1-Aug. 5, Deer Valley Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater and St. Mary’s Church Prices vary

Must See: Patti Austin sings

Side Attractions: Car and RV

camping, natural beauty, synthetic drugs (maybe).

Dress Code: Clothing

doesn’t matter—we see your soul.

Beverage Pairing:

Ella Fitzgerald, Ben Folds, The Beach Boys, Diana Krall (all appear with the Utah Symphony).

Side Attractions: Mountain scenery.

Stadium of Fire

freedomfestival.org July 1, LaVell Edwards Stadium (Provo) $29-$175, all ages (children 2 and older require a ticket)

Must See: Everything. These

Dress Code: MAGA

Side Attractions:

Brian Regan, Hunter Hayes.

hat, shitkickers, intellectual laziness.

Beverage Pairing:

Dress Code: Something

Beverage Pairing: Diet soda.

Oldest living relative.

Moon Juice.

facebook.com/diabolicalslc July 1, Diabolical Records Free, all ages

Must See: Fireworks. Side Attractions: Little Big Town,

Moscow Mule.

black, something backless, something uncomfortable.

Bandemonium at Diabolical Records

Plus-One:

superbands exist only during Bandemonium.

Record shopping.

Dress Code:

Diabolical T-shirt, Nobunny ears.

Dance Move:

Plus-One: High-school music

teacher.

Dance Move: Polite

What to Flash: Epilepsy

clap.

MedicAlert bracelet.

What to Flash:

Pickup Line: “What time do you

Metal sign. Horns up!

arrive in Beaver?”

Pickup Line: “What

Dance Move: Twerk yo’ front-butt. Beverage Pairing: Put liquors and What to Flash: John Birch Society mixers in hat, draw for combos. membership card and decoder ring.

Pickup Line: “They can have your

heart when they pry it from my cold, dead hand.”

What to Throw on Stage: Trump/ Putin 2016 stickers.

What to Sneak In: Contraband, silly.

What to Throw on Stage: Roses. What to Sneak In: Les Paul,

Marshall half-stack.

Plus-One: Keep it in theme and pick a stranger. Dance Move: Shake your B-side. What to Flash: Graywhale Killer Whale card.

Pickup Line: “How do you feel

about … And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead?”

do you think of Folds’ ‘Brick’ Symphony, first movement?”

dinosaurs.

Must See: Ryan Shupe & the

Rubberband, Winter Grain, Six Feet in the Pine, Muddy Boots and the Porch Pounders.

Side Attractions: Jam sessions,

workshops, camping, kids’ area.

Dress Code:

Portlandia “Dream of the 1890s” collection, with hipster barbershop punch card in hatband.

The Wayfaring Stranger.

Laptop.

What to Throw on Stage: Tiny plastic

wasatchmountainmusic.com July 14-16, Soldier Hollow (Midway) $27.50-$91, kids under 15 free with parent

Beverage Pairing:

Plus-One:

Random gyration of appendages.

Wasatch Mountain Music Festival

What to Throw on Stage:

Ironic requests for encores.

What to Sneak In:

What to Sneak In: Trump/Putin 2016 stickers.

Your car—into one of the few parking spaces on Edison St.

Plus-One: Friend

who looks like the love child of Mark Twain and Colonel Sanders.

Dance Move: Jesco White tap-

clogging.

What to Flash:

Clawhammer banjo technique.

Pickup Line: “I’ll bet that’s not the first time you shouted, ‘O Brother.’” What to Throw on Stage: Burlap bra. What to Sneak In: Kickass bedazzled clogs.


| SUMMER CONCERTS |

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 31


| SUMMER CONCERTS |

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

32 | JUNE 15, 2017

U92 Toyota Summer Jam

Beverage Pairing: Popeye Blackberry Bruiser Energy Drink.

u92slc.com July 15, Gallivan Center $49.50

twilightconcerts.com July 20-Aug. 31, Pioneer Park $7.50 presale, $10 gate

Why Would You Pay to See:

Violent rage-case Chris Brown?

Side Attraction:

Ruminating on what Americans will overlook in celebrities.

Twilight Concert Series

Dress Code: Uptown Cheapskate chic.

Beverage Pairing:

Overpriced beer.

Plus-One: Local person

TBA.

Dance Move:

Must See: Kurt Vile & the Plus-One: Bodyguard. Dance Move: Inner-

Rage Krump-Step.

What to Flash: “FU

CB” signs.

Violators, Whitney, local act TBA (July 27), Kamasi Washington, Antibalas, local act TBA (Aug. 3), The Roots, Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires (Aug. 31).

Pickup Line: “Real

Mouthguard, helmet, “Chris Brown alert” whistle.

What to Throw on Stage: Shade.

Mystic Hot Springs

mystichotspringsmusicfestival.com July 21-24, Mystic Hot Springs (Monroe) $60-$150, all ages

Must See: Jeff Austin Band,

Stonefed, Railsplitters, Wisebird, Talia Keys & the Love.

Pickup Line: “I’ll stand in the food truck line for you so you can watch the show.” (Works every time.) What to Throw on Stage:

men don’t hurt women.”

Dress Code:

Where’s the Honey Bucket? (aka the PeePee Dance).

Black Sabbath “Changes” single for Bradley to sign.

What to Sneak In: Big tub o’

Side Attractions: Food

trucks, Graywhale popup store.

Country Fan Fest

countryfanfest.com July 27-30, Deseret Peak (Tooele) $50-$300 (plus add-ons, camping fees)

Must See: Blackhawk, Old

Dominion, The Wayne Hoskins Band, Royal Bliss.

Side Attractions: Camping, Mud

Bog Racing, prepaid discount beer cards.

promo CDs to trade at Graywhale.

SLC Jazz Festival

slcjazzfestival.com July 28-29, Gallivan Center $10 each day

Must See: Lineup TBA. Side Attractions: Food. Dress Code: Classy, but that’s subjective.

Beverage Pairing: 21-year Glenfiddich.

Plus-One: Steve

Williams, host of KCPW’s Jazz Time.

Dance Move: Just make

something up.

Side Attractions: Parade, camping,

hot springs, fireworks, permaculture workshops, yoga, meditation, healthy foodstuffs.

Dress Code: Nekkid. Beverage Pairing:

Mushroom tea. Plus-One: Imaginary friend, when the tea kicks in.

Dress Code: Hat, crisply ironed

long-sleeve shirt, boots, jeans—72-inch 4K ultra-HD belt buckle showing Dukes of Hazzard reruns.

Beverage Pairing:

Dance Move: Drop Dead What to Flash: What’s Pickup Line: “I’m fully sustainable.”

What to Throw on Stage: In the absence of bras, probably magic beans.

What to Sneak In: Rapidly

multiplying illusory pals.

letter to the editor in Down Beat.

Pickup Line:

daysof47.com July 22, Washington Square Free

Plus-One: Make that plus-

eight.

a DJ.

Side Attractions: Games, inflatables, learning activities, prizes, sporting events, safety lessons, cheap snacks and frozen treats.

Dress Code:

Gingham.

Brown Bag Concert Series

Dance Move: The Twirl of Great Price. What to Flash: Temple recommend, garment cuffs. Pickup Line: “You’ve got a really sweet spirit— among other really special attributes.”

What to Throw on Stage: Gs. What to Sneak In: Apostates.

Craft Lake City DIY Festival

saltlakearts.org craftlakecity.com 12:15-1 p.m., Monday-Friday, July 31- Aug. 11-12, Gallivan Center Aug. 25, various downtown locations $5-$25 Free

Must See: Lineup TBA. Side Attractions: Minding the clock so you’re not late back to your desk.

Must See: Tons of great local

acts, including Sarah Anne DeGraw and the Odd Jobs, Quiet Oaks, Hectic Hobo, Primitive Programme.

Dress Code: Whatever Side Attractions: Handicrafts, you wear to work.

Beverage Pairing:

If you’re lucky, chocolate milk. If not? Stupid regular milk.

Plus-One: Least

annoying coworker.

Dance Move: The Running Man. What to Flash: Squishy note from mom/significant other.

workshops, craft food/beer/ cocktails.

Dress Code: DIY CLC T-shirt. Beverage Pairing: Craft beer.

Plus-One: Muse. Dance Move:

Choreograph your own.

What to Flash:

Individuality.

Pickup Line: “I get a humongous … discount at JoAnn.”

Pickup Line: “I’ll trade you a

Dance Move:

banana for your Twinkie.”

Square.

What to Flash:

What to Sneak In: Odds

Knuckle tats reading “MARL” and “BORO.”

Pickup Line:

Beverage Pairing: Fruit punch-and-Sprite mixer.

Must See: The only act is

Domestic light beer. “They Plus-One: The Nicole used to call me to your Keith. Daddy-O; now I’m Pop-Pop.”

Fred.

left to show?

What to Flash: Your

Days of ’47 Family Festival

“Yep. It’s a Chevy with a lift kit, KC lights, gun rack, mudflaps—where you goin’, girl?”

What to Throw on Stage: Novice vibraphone player who won’t shut up about his chops.

What to Throw on Stage: Marbles.

jazz cats love their ’nip.

What to Sneak In: A flask, ’cause

What to Throw on Stage: Unwanted baggie full of celery.

What to Sneak In: Takeout.

and ends you’ve bought on discount at Pier 1 to pass off as your own.


Women’s Redrock Music Festival

womensredrockmusicfest.com Aug. 11-12, Robber’s Roost (Torrey) $40-$90

Must See: Emily Saliers, Holly

Das Energi

dasenergifestival.com Aug. 18-19, The Great Saltair $65-$225

Must See: Zedd, Knife Party, Diplo, Adventure Club.

Reggae Rise Up

reggaeriseup.com Aug. 19-20, River’s Edge (Heber) $30-$150

Must See: Slightly Stoopid, Stick

Figure, Citizen Cope, Tribe of I, Herban Empire.

Near, Kate MacLeod, Trishes, Mary Tebbs.

Side Attractions: Look right, look

Side Attractions: Holly Near

Dress Code: Karma Chameleon

wistful, say “thank you.”

songwriting workshop, camping, hiking, motorcycle rides, after-party.

Western Legends Roundup

Crucialfest 7

westernlegendsroundup.com Aug. 21-26, various locations (Kanab) Prices vary

Must See: Bellamy Brothers, Roo Arcus.

Beverage Pairing:

Tang—it’s not just for astronauts.

Plus-One: Amy Ray. What to Flash: Your armpit

Side Attractions: Pretty colors. Dress Code:

Side Attractions: Western film

Anything UVreactive.

legends, wagon train tours, quilt show, raffle.

Beverage Pairing: Um,

water …

Dress Code:

Beverage Pairing: Rum.

stubble.

song for you.”

John Wayne cosplay.

Dance Move: Jacking, gloving,

“I’m With Her” stickers, pink beanies.

shuffling.

What to Sneak In:

somewhere unce before?”

What to Flash: Strobe necklaces. Pickup Line: “Haven’t we met

Pickup Line:

Pickup Line: “Let’s go home,

Big ol’ smile. outlaw you’ve gunned down.

“Mi love ya moah when ya do deh dutty wine.”

What to Sneak In: Electromagnetic

What to Sneak In: Chillum.

Local music fans reminisce about their first live concert experience.

“Bad” Brad Wheeler, radio personality/musician

Brew Lira, Darklord bassist

“It was Steppenwolf in Los Angeles. 1989, I believe. My mom took me; my mom’s a music addict. My biggest memory from there was everybody jumping around, having a great time, and all I could see was a bunch of butts. I was 7, and I remember thinking, ‘Oh, this is kinda fun.’ I could hear the concert and kinda see the stage, but I was really confused. Everybody’s jumping up and down, and the energy was there, but I couldn’t see the band.”

L’Amour paperbacks.

What to Sneak In: Five-minute set of your own cowboy poetry.

Mike Sasich, producer/musician

“My first three were Billy Joel, Styx and Van Halen in 1984, but the best story is the Van Halen one. My dad got free tickets on the floor at the Salt Palace, but my parents were out of town on that night, so they had our really Mormon neighbor—his name was Miles Romney— take us. He was a really good sport. It was loud as shit, David Lee Roth was jumpin’ around with a giant blow-up microphone that looked like a dick. It was fuckin’ hilarious. It was so loud that [Romney] was cutting the lining out of his jacket with his Swiss Army knife and stuffing it into his ears.”

Jesse Schaefer, Utah Arts Council’s performing arts program manager

“The first major concert I went to was the Grateful Dead at the Delta Center in ‘95. I know some that I probably attended with my parents—a couple of the Twilight shows in the early ’90s—tagging along. Actually, before that, I saw Nirvana up in the Ogden fairgrounds. I remember them commenting on playing a horse arena. It was one of Kurt’s final shows in ‘93, just before the tour ended. I wanna know how I spaced that. Nirvana is one of my all-time faves.”

Rebecca from SubRosa.”

What to Throw on Stage: For TWD’s set, jocks.

What to Sneak In: For 21+ shows, your underage ass if you can swing it.

And there you have it! Happy summer festival’in.

Angela Brown, publisher, SLUG Magazine

“I grew up in a really conservative household, so we were starved for [entertainment]. I was 9 or 10 … and my mom dropped me and a friend off at the Salt Palace to go to the Dickens Festival. Tina Turner was playing there the same night. We walked past and heard this loud, incredible music. We asked one of the security guys what was going on and he let us in for three or four songs. We were kinda far back, but we got to see her sing ‘Private Dancer.’ It was incredible. He gave us a program, too. We never made it to the Dickens Festival. And my parents still don’t know.”

Randy Stinson, owner, Randy’s Records

“I went to KCPX to see Bill Terry and I just lucked out. … I got to meet and shake hands with James Brown. After he left, [Terry] gave me two tickets. I was pretty excited; he was one of my very favorite artists. It was at the fairgrounds. Everybody was black except for us three or four. I went right up to the front; I wanted to be as close to him as I could. There were people pokin’ me in the back, wonderin’ what I was doin’ there. I said, ‘Look, I love James Brown. I came because he’s one of my favorite artists.’ Anyway, I was so happy. I’ve seen a whole bunch of people, and none of them ever compared to him, not even Elvis.” (RH) CW

JUNE 15, 2017 | 33

“It was at St. Joseph’s High School in the basement of the cafeteria. Jim Sullivan, Teddy Brewer and Jim Evans had a band called Ochopee Post Office. They were all older kids and I didn’t even know kids in high school had bands at that point. I remember them playing ‘Have You Ever Seen the Rain?’ and just being completely floored. I caught the bug. It was intoxicating, for sure.”

“Pretty sure it was The Ike and Tina Turner Revue, without Ike—because, you know, ‘reasons.’ I saw them in the early 1970s when my older brother was at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wis. I went with my family as part of a homecoming weekend or something. Tina was definitely shaking, and all of our family’s WASP-y senses were stirred. Plus, we stood near the back and the lighting guy had his own show going—dancing and rocking out.”

What to Throw on Stage: Louis

by abovementioned garment.

Pickup Line: “I’m friends with

| CITY WEEKLY.NET |

Y

ou remember the first one. The sea of cars in the parking lot. The ocean of fans on the floor. The wave of excitement when the lights go down, signaling the arrival of people you never thought you’d see in the flesh—the authors and performers of music that washed over you like a baptism. We talked to some local music-makers and fans about how the memory of that first concert experi- ence never goes out with the tide.

Dave “Gruber” Allen, actor/ comedian

Debbie.”

What to Flash: Anything concealed

| SUMMER CONCERTS |

bags o’… riddim.

Feels Like the First Time

Plus-One: Trusty sidekick. Dance Move: Deadwood Shuffle. What to Flash: Tattoos for every

What to Throw on Stage: Squire pulse generator.

dress.

What to Flash:

What to Throw on Stage: Little

Strat, Mel Bay guitar book.

Dance Move: Turtleneck wedding

wine.

Whomever is holding the ganj.

Beverage Pairing: Crucial Juice. Plus-One: Underage friends who

never get to see some of these great local bands (Gateway shows only).

Beverage Pairing: Cactus

Plus-One:

Closet cases, demo CDs.

Aesop Rock with Rob Sonic, The Nods, Built to Spill, INVDRS, Turtleneck Wedding Dress.

T-shirts, leather.

Pickup Line: “Yeah, I wrote this What to Throw on Stage:

Must See: Red Fang, SubRosa,

Side Attractions: TBA. Dress Code: Jeans,

colors—red, gold and green.

Dress Code: Cargo shorts, flannel, Keens.

crucialfest.com Aug. 31-Sept. 3, The Gateway, Urban Lounge, Metro Music Hall $45-$165 (some shows all ages)


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

34 | JUNE 15, 2017

CINEMA

FILM REVIEW

If You’re Going to San Francisco

Fifty years on, Monterey Pop captures something that was more than a musical moment. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

JANUS FILMS

D

irector D.A. Pennebaker launches into the documentary Monterey Pop by playing Scott McKenzie’s recording of the hippie anthem “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)” over images of people gathering for the landmark Monterey International Rock Festival—and with 50 years of distance from the event, it’s easy to look at that choice with a bit of cynicism. The song was written by John Phillips—frontman of The Mamas & The Papas, as well as one of Monterey Pop’s co-founders—specifically to help promote the three-day June 1967 festival. Pennebaker was recruited to chronicle it for a movie, a decision smacking of enough commercialism that it reportedly led to the Grateful Dead’s decision not to allow their performance in the documentary. Was the Summer of Love just an opportunity for savvy businessmen to capitalize on a demographic shift? As a film, Monterey Pop feels like a repudiation of that idea, even if there was no way for Pennebaker to know it might ever be considered. It feels like something of a minor miracle that it exists at all, given that Pennebaker and his crew essentially had to invent the synchronized 16 mm cameras that would allow them to capture the performances, with a new color film technology that made it possible to shoot the evening sets. It was groundbreaking in its you-are-here approach to a major live-music event, making possible later efforts like Woodstock and the Maysles brothers’ Gimme Shelter (Albert Maysles served as one of the cinematographers here). The performances themselves are certainly the centerpiece, and Pennebaker demonstrates a brilliant instinct for how to focus the audience’s attention. It might not take a genius to understand the charisma of Jimi Hendrix summoning forth flames from his guitar at the finale of his cover of “Wild Thing,” or to keep the camera

Jimi Hendrix in Monterey Pop. fixed on Janis Joplin as she tears into her ferocious rendition of “Ball and Chain” before cutting away to the reaction of an awestruck “Mama” Cass Elliot in a true game-recognize-game moment. Neither of them were stars before these performances, but they were also the characters at the center of the stage Pennebaker, however, watches the way a spectator in the crowd would likely perceive. He doesn’t keep his eye on lead singer Marty Balin of Jefferson Airplane—not when Grace Slick is right there to be the magnetic focus. The Who’s performance of “My Generation” isn’t all about singer Roger Daltrey or even the guitar-smashing Pete Townshend; Pennebaker spends more time watching the crazed drum-pounding of Keith Moon than the other two combined. As indelible as many of the individual images are, the magic more often comes from Pennebaker’s sense for knowing when to tell his viewers, “OK, but now take a look at this.” Beyond the music performances, of course, is the “happening” of the festival itself, which one blissed-out young woman describes at the outset as “like Easter and Christmas and New Year’s and your birthday all together.” Monterey Pop captures a cultural moment as much as it captures an artistic moment, and Pennebaker, even in that moment, seems to grasp that intuitively. He pokes his nose behind the scenes to show the logistics of police trying to

prepare for the thousands of attendees descending on Monterey without much infrastructure to support them, and the festival-goers living in makeshift tent cities or setting up tables to sell flowers. For much of the running time, it feels like even more of this background texture is needed. There’s something happening here, to quote Buffalo Springfield, and we want to understand what it is. Pennebaker ultimately nails it during the film’s improbable climax, where he devotes 17 minutes of a 78-minute feature to a single song by Indian sitar player Ravi Shankar. The music initially plays over images of festival-goers doing everything from praying to sleeping; Pennebaker waits eight minutes before even showing Shankar’s face. Yet it’s intoxicating watching a rapt festival crowd embrace these strange rhythms of a musician who was not a radio idol or a rock god. When the attendees erupt into a prolonged standing ovation at the end of Shankar’s song—even Micky Dolenz of The Monkees can be seen in the audience, losing his mind—the genuineness of the moment is impossible to ignore. Before it was a shorthand for Baby Boomer selfindulgence, this “love-in” was real. CW

MONTEREY POP

AAA.5 NR

more than just movies at brewvies FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: JUNE 16TH - JUNE 22ND

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500


CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. 47 METERS DOWN BBB While vacationing in Mexico, a pair of sisters (Mandy Moore and Claire Holt) try to chase away their romantic blues by climbing inside a rusty cage and getting up close and personal with some boxcar-sized great whites sharks. What could go wrong? Oh, many, many things. Director/co-writer Johannes Roberts’ Shark Week nightmare wastes little time in cranking up the worser-than-worse premise, delivering an increasingly tense mixture of well-staged shocks, panicky close-ups of diminishing air gauges and moments of no-choice heroism divvied up between the leads—both of whom are great, which is no small feat considering that the majority of their performances are delivered underwater. Unfortunately, the narrative might ultimately be a bit too clever for its own good, with a late plot development that, while logical, ends up derailing the

movie’s doomy, relentless momentum. Still, even if it falls short of the B-movie ingenuity of The Shallows, there are plenty of effective, primal screamy moments here. Whenever anybody begins shining their flashlight into the briny blue, be prepared to flinch. Opens June 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Andrew Wright ALL EYEZ ON ME [not yet reviewed] Biopic profile of Tupac Shakur (Demetrius Shipp Jr.). Opens June 16 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE BOOK OF HENRY [not yet reviewed] A brilliant young boy attempts to help his neighbor and classmate with a terrible dilemma. Opens June 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) CARS 3 [not yet reviewed] Lighting McQueen faces a career turning point. Opens June 16 at theaters valleywide. (G) MONTEREY POP BBB.5 See review on p. 33. Opens June 16 at Tower Theatre. (NR)

ABACUS: SMALL ENOUGH TO JAIL At Main Library, June 20, 7 p.m. (NR)

THE NEVERENDING STORY At Park City Library, June 15, 7 p.m. (PG)

JUNE 15, 2017 | 35

KUNG FU HUSTLE At Tower Theatre, June 16-17, 11 p.m. & June 11, noon. (R)

MY COUSIN RACHEL BBB.5 A tale based on swirling emotions demands a subtle degree of non-verbal acting—and the pleasant surprise here is that both lead actors are up to the task. Roger Michell adapts Daphne du Maurier’s novel about orphan Philip Ashley (Sam Claflin), raised by his wealthy landowner cousin Ambrose, who—after Ambrose’s death—finds himself alternately suspicious of and infatuated with Ambrose’s widow, Rachel (Rachel Weisz). Michell does a fine job setting a mysterious atmosphere, bolstered by Rael Smith’s ominously romantic score, and Weisz is unsurprisingly terrific as the enigmatic Rachel. It’s the previously unremarkable Claflin who’s the revelation, conveying Philip’s lack of sexual experience as a combination of rage and uncontrolled longing. Gorgeously staged scenes—like Philip’s candlelit approach to Rachel’s bed—help build the mystery that this story demands, anchored by performances up to the task of making uncertainty fascinating. (PG-13)—SR

| CITY WEEKLY |

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

THE MUMMY B.5 The primary objective of Universal’s latest reboot is to establish a “shared universe” with its other iconic monsters, but it’s also an experiment: Will audiences turn out for a Tom Cruise movie even when he’s miscast and the movie is a mess? Cruise plays Nick, a cocky looter of antiquities who disturbs the tomb of a cursed Egyptian princess (Sofia Boutella), who then wants him to become host body for the death-god Set. Annabelle Wallis plays the beautiful archeologist who scolds Nick for being reckless and ignorant; Jake Johnson plays the comic-relief sidekick who yells things like “We’re gonna die!”; Russell Crowe plays Dr. Henry Jekyll. Firsttime big-budget director Alex Kurtzman delivers a few entertaining action sequences in Cruise’s wheelhouse, but it’s generally charmless written-by-committee piffle with no character. Stake this idea in the heart before it gets too far. (PG-13)—EDS

THE WEDDING PLAN [not yet reviewed] An Orthodox Jew believes that God will provide a husband when her fiancé ends their engagement. Opens June 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG)

MEGAN LEAVEY BB.5 Somewhere on the road between “that’s nice” and truly inspirational lies this fact-based drama about a hard-edged young woman (Kate Mara) who joins the Marines and finds her calling as a handler for an explosives-sniffing dog named Rex. There’s the potential for rich character study in the story of two angry creatures who need one another, and director Gabriela Cowperthwaite handles the Iraq-set combat scenes with an effective handle on tension. But the human narrative rarely moves beyond matter-of-fact flatness, blunting any attempt to give Leavey’s story emotional impact. Mara’s prickly performance remains slightly distanced, making it hard for the story to retain momentum when the third-act focus becomes her stateside attempts to adopt Rex. The connection between Leavey and Rex feels more asserted than shown; one woman’s crusade leads you to nod politely rather than stand up and cheer. (PG-13)—SR

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

ROUGH NIGHT [not yet reviewed] A bachelorette party turns into a manic murder coverup when the stripper dies on the job. Opens June 16 at theaters valleywide. (R)

IT COMES AT NIGHT BBB.5 Writer/director Trey Edward Shults’ intense, unsettling psychological thriller—about a fatal, highly-contagious disease that has decimated the population—asks how drastically you can alter your lifestyle to prevent harm before the alterations become worse than the thing you’re afraid of. Paul (Joel Edgerton) tries to keep his family safe in a remote house in the woods, becoming indifferent and even cruel toward others—including another family they meet, which is in need of help. Everyone’s fear, whether awake or asleep, is that one of them will turn out to be infected, but Shults isn’t interested in the details of the epidemic, except in how the threat affects their minds. The question for us, as viewers, is whether love-thy-neighbor humanist still has a place in our world, or whether the times have become dire enough to require desperate measures. (R)—Eric D. Snider

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

PARIS CAN WAIT BB.5 As an exercise in understanding the power of movie music, imagine this same movie with sinister strings instead of playful woodwinds—and suddenly a light-hearted tale of a woman at a crossroads becomes an unnerving thriller about a woman stuck on a trip with a predator. Diane Lane plays Anne Lockwood, wife of a Hollywood producer (Alec Baldwin) who is forced by an earache to bow out of a flight from Cannes, and instead travels by car to Paris with her husband’s colleague, jovial Frenchman Jacques (Arnaud Viard). Writer/director Eleanor Coppola emphasizes Anne’s transitional life moment—recently empty nest, possible career change—and Lane finds subtle touches of melancholy in a character who could have come off as a woe-is-me rich white lady. But Viard’s character offers a strange counter-point, often coming off as stereotypically French in his chain-smoking, womanizing and celebration of wine and cheese. He’s certainly not an obvious choice for the guy a woman might find appealing if she’s pondering a midlife crisis affair; he’s also kind of creepy to a degree that undercuts the lightness Coppola often seems to be aiming for. Opens June 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

CURRENT RELEASES


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

36 | JUNE 15, 2017

Beast Mode Free ticket Tuesday at Rye! 1 entree = 1 ticket at Urban Lounge (while supplies last) www.ryeslc.com

JUN 15: SAINT WKND 8PM DOORS TYPEFUNK COBOL

JUN 16: BOOGARINS 6PM DOORS EARLY SHOW

THE SPIRAL JETTIES

JUN 16: COSMIC WOLF VINTAGE PRESENTS 9PM DOORS LATE SHOW

GIRLS IN THE GARAGE DJ DAWN AQUARIUS MILLIE & THE MOTHS EARLY SUCCESSIONAL BRAIN MAJIK ZORANA AND THE BROSALEIGHS

JUN 17: ZIMMER 8PM DOORS

TYPEFUNK DEVAREAUX

JUN 18: BIG BUSINESS 8PM DOORS

BABY GURL THE DITCH & THE DELTA

JUN 19: KRCL PRESENTS 8PM DOORS

HURRAY FOR THE RIFF RAFF THE PICTUREBOOKS STARMY

JUN 20: 90S TELEVISION 8PM DOORS

INDIGO KIDD MARTAIN CULT LIGHTSPEED BUS

JUN 21: ZANDER SCHLOSS 8PM DOORS TOM BENNETT MICHELLE MOONSHINE

JUN 22: RUNNIN’ ON EMCEES TOUR 8PM DOORS

NAMEK THA YNOE BONNIE BLUE RUGGED METHOD IVIE

COMING SOON Jun 23: Cowboy & Pirates Party Jun 24: Day Wave Jun 25: Reeve Carney

Jun 26: Alexander Ortega Jun 27: Plastic Pinks Jun 28: Hoofless

Salt Lake City psychshoegaze duo BYSTS charge out on their own.

BRYAN HOLBROOK & STEFANIE MARLOW

New Expanded Hours for Rye: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm Friday and Sunday from 6pm-11pm

MUSIC

BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

O

ffer Your Throat—the debut album from SLC’s darkest of psych-shoegaze duos, BYSTS (pronounced “beasts”)— is many things. It’s a prismatic filtration of howling, reverb-drenched guitars. It’s a dangerous sojourn into a sonic hurricane in search of the vocal harmonies within the storm’s eye. It’s also a testament to the DIY spirit that propels many indie rock bands of the digital age, as Bryan Holbrook (guitars/ vocals) and Stefanie Marlow (bass/vocals) performed, recorded and mixed the album in a makeshift studio that they built at home. “I would love to show people how we did it,” Holbrook says. “But at the same time, I would also not love to do that—some of the stuff we used was pretty low-tech.” Interviewed during a camping trip deep in the woods of American Fork Canyon, the pair say they met while playing in different bands around Utah, then decided to work together as BYSTS. Once they had defined their particular sound—it exists somewhere within the aural hybrid of The Jesus and Mary Chain and My Bloody Valentine— they shopped some demos around and eventually captured the attention of New York’s Echo Drug Recordings. BYSTS’ first few singles, including a feverish cover of The Cure’s “Killing an Arab,” were impressive enough to earn them a spot at Canadian Music Week 2016. “We hadn’t played live in forever, but it was a really fun experiment,” Holbrook says. Sharing the CMW stage with acts like Eagles of Death Metal and the Black Lips was the kind of jolt the duo needed to come alive as something more than a passion project. Armed with that and Holbrook’s seven years

of recording experience, BYSTS entered the studio hungry and focused, like a two-headed wolf. “One of the things we liked about recording was being able to do everything by ourselves,” Marlow adds. “We always wanted things to sound a certain way, but it was hard to communicate that to others.” Independence was sufficient motivation for Holbrook and Marlow to become experts in budget recording equipment. “The research ended up being the most important part of the process,” Marlow says. The majority of the equipment in BYSTS’ home studio was assembled on a tight budget. Holbrook points out that many professional operations need to have gear that enables them to record different types of music. “Since we were just recording ourselves, I tried to figure out the least amount of stuff that we needed to get by,” he says. That meant enduring snide comments from store clerks during his quest to find the right gear, but it was worth it. Filtering the chaotic swell of their music through a studio built from cobbled-together technology makes Offer Your Throat come frighteningly to life. Like Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Bram Stoker’s Dracula, BYSTS’ debut album rises—from an electrified platform, or from coffin dirt—and charges forth with revenous ferocity. The songs find Holbrook and Marlow trading off on vocals, and range from fuzzy, pumping squalls (“Need,” “Killer on the Road”) to hypnotic and perilously sensual mid-tempo numbers (“Night,” “Speed”). Each boils and bleeds into

Bryan Holbrook and Stefanie Marlow

the next, like a pulse-pounding night that won’t end. It’s an exhilarating listen. Victor Frankenstein and Vlad Dracul might have said you can’t argue with results—no matter how they’re achieved. It’s not just about having the tools, no matter how inexpensive or primitive, but the discipline and vision to see the project through to fruition. “You just have to keep at it,” Marlow says. “It’s very satisfying to know you have complete control,” Holbrook adds. “But it’s a lot of work at the same time.” Upon returning from their escape into nature, Holbrook and Marlow plan to work on their live performance. The first of several summer shows happens next Friday at The Garage on Beck, where BYSTS will share a bill with legendary psychedelic supergroup Spindrift, which includes members of The Brian Jonestown Massacre and The Warlocks. CW

BYSTS

w/ Spindrift Friday, June 23, 8 p.m. The Garage on Beck 1199 Beck St. 801-521-3904 $10 21+ garageonbeck.com

Now Enjoy Full Menu Til Midnight Mon. - Thur. ‘Appy Hour’ 2-6pm Saturday Brunch 11-3 Sunday Brunch 10-3 Monday Jazz Sessions 7pm w/ David Halliday & the JVQ

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565


FREE SHUTTLE TO ALL R S L HOME GAMES FROM SUE’S STATE LOCATION

NEXT HOME GAME - JUNE 17, 8:00 MINNESOTA VS. RSL JUNE 30, 7:30 ORLANDO VS. RSL WATCH ALL RSL AWAY GAMES AT A BAR NAMED SUE

HIGHLAND live music

FRI SAT

I.S.I. SHOW “TIME”

LIVE ARTISTS, SILENT AUCTION MUSIC BY DJ SAMEYEAM

WHISKEY FISH

MON & THURS

KARAOKE

HOME OF THE “SING O’ FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

SUN & THURS

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT STARTS @ 7PM

3928 HIGHLAND DR 801-274-5578

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FRI SAT

2014

DJ ELVIS FRESHLY 4TH ANNIVERSARY OF SUE! 9021YO! WILL BE PLAYING YOUR FAVORITE ‘90s JAMS. PRIZES, SCHWAG & B-DAY CAKE!

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $2,000 POT

WED

MON &

OLD WEST POKER TOURNAMENT

TUES

WED

HOME OF THE “SING OF FIRE” SALT LAKE’S HOTTEST KARAOKE COMPETITION

STARTS @ 7PM

8136 SO. STATE ST 801-566-3222

| CITY WEEKLY |

KARAOKE

SUN &

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

2013

STATE live music

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THURS

BREAKING BINGO AT THE SUE AT 8PM $1,950 POT

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

VISIT US AT: ABARNAMEDSUE.NET

11AM-1AM

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUE

FACEBOOK.COM/ABARNAMEDSUESTATE

JUNE 15, 2017 | 37

EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!


What happens when the bad kids in school—the spitball-throwing, rubber band-flipping, smokin’-in-the-boys’-room guys—start a band? Black Lips is what you get, as of 1999 in Dunwoody, Ga. At the time, the band was still so young that they needed someone to buy them beer (like Ian Saint Pé, who eventually joined on guitar from 2004-2014). But as part of the garage-rock revival that started in the early 2000s, they took rock ’n’ roll back to its greasy roots. After interviewing them at Pitchfork Festival in 2009 for Blurt, I described their sound as hippie punk— “hippie” meaning artsy and dark like The Velvet Underground, not flower-power; and “punk” in the guitar-smashing sense. Their particular grease, then, has been both refined and crude. Interestingly, their 18-track, Sean Lennon-produced concept album, Satan’s Graffiti or God’s Art (Vice, 2017), makes them seem more like the former, perhaps not as lowbrow and oily— especially when juxtaposed with extraslippery, hard-to-peg Detroit trio Timmy’s Organism, led by Timmy Vulgar. (Brian Staker) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $18 presale, $20 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com

Ron S.

LANCE LAURENCE

Black Lips, Timmy’s Organism

FRIDAY 6/16

Squarewave Sounds Presents The Anode Records Takeover, feat. Ron S., Brain Detergent

While synthesizers ebb and flow in their popularity, their role in the majority of today’s music is fairly supplementary. It’s rare to see musicians who dedicate themselves to mastering the art of the synth. Those who do tend to be the lone wolves of the music world, moving from venue to venue like wandering samurai. The Anode Records Takeover showcases two such performers, who record for the techno record label out of St. Louis. Ron S., current owner and operator of Anode, brings his retro brand of ‘90s underground club techno, and Salt Lake City’s own Brain Detergent performs consciousness-expanding synth patterns. Whether you’re longing for a bit of Gen X club nostalgia or just looking for some expertly crafted electronic algorithms, Squarewave and Anode Records have you covered. (Alex Springer) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 8 p.m., free, all ages, facebook.com/diabolicalslc

Black Lips most noteworthy blues acts, including Harry Lee & The Back Alley Blues Band, Better Off With the Blues and The Youth Blues Showcase. With an entire day devoted to spotlighting this integral part of America’s musical heritage, everyone’s encouraged to share in the celebration. You might also want to take part in some of the workshops—including free harmonica and bottleneck slide workshops, and a limited-space paid workshop where you can build your own cigar-box guitar. (Lee Zimmerman) Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 11:30 a.m-10 p.m., $35-$88 (under 12 free), all ages, utahbluesfest.org

Samantha Fish

SATURDAY 6/17

Utah Blues Festival, feat. Kenny Neal, Rod Piazza & the Mighty Flyers, Samantha Fish and more

CHRIS SAUPE

The Utah Blues Society advocates passionately for its titular concern, keeping the blues vital and relevant for aficionados and neophytes alike. In its third year, the Utah Blues Festival offers an impressive lineup of A-listers: acclaimed guitarist, harp player and singer/songwriter Kenny Neal; veteran singer/harp hound Rod Piazza and his band The Mighty Flyers; the exceptionally talented singer and guitarist Samantha Fish (pictured right), and powerhouse vocalist Annika Chambers. As always, they’re joined by some of Utah’s

BRIAN ROZMAN

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

38 | JUNE 15, 2017

BY RANDY HARWARD, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 6/15

| CITY WEEKLY |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

LIVE

THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET


AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! New menu additions! Saturday & Sunday Brunch, Mimosa, and Mary EVERY THURSDAY:

Jazz & Blues Jam

FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

DJ ChaseOne2 @ 9:00

DJ Sneeky Long @ 9:00 SUNDAY:

Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 7:00 MONDAY: Micro Monday & Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00! TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21ST:

JT Draper @7:00 followed by VJ Birdman on the Big Screen

AS ALWAYS, NO COVER!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

| CITY WEEKLY |

JUNE 15, 2017 | 39


SHOT & A BEER

SATURDAY, JUNE 17

801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & 6/19 pick-a-prize bingo MONDAY Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds

wednesday 6/14

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 6/15

Reggae

9PM NO COVER SUNDAYS • THURSDAYS • SATURDAYS

WASATCH POKER TOUR @ 8PM BONUS: SAT @ 2PM

at the Royal

something like seduction vocal reasoning

$

M O N DAYS

5

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

Live Music

friDAY 6/16

The vitals

YOU CAN’T WIN, IF YOU DON’T PLAY

$1,550! CASH POT!

skye

BE OUR NEXT WINNER!

saturday 6/17

TUESDAYS

&

new wave dance party

BRINGING YOU SLC’S LONGEST RUNNING EDM NIGHT WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE

featuring dj jason lowe Tuesday 6/20 Coming soon 6/28

DJ RUDE BOY BAD BOY BRIAN

DAYS REASONS

JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM

165 E 200 S SLC I 801.746.3334

adrenaline mob

News of this show stirred great joy in me—I immediately began planning a slobbery show pick and even entered it on the schedule as, “NICK FUCKING CAVE.” Because the multitalented Australian musician/filmmaker/author/ actor’s performance in classy Kingsbury Hall is going to be incredible. However, this recommendation comes with qualms. First, there’s no media ticket allotment. Yes, my panties are bunched up and riding high. That’s because we (admittedly selfappointed) hipster tastemakers certified Cave’s cred, so why make it difficult for us to enjoy and write about his work? Plus, this is the last dude you’d suspect of being about the money. That has to be the explanation. It’s certainly not, as other artists claim, to reserve tickets for fans (which many critics are), because Cave is selling $225 VIP tix that don’t even include a meet-and-greet. You get “one incredible top-priced reserved ticket” along with a signed, limited, tourexclusive, silkscreened poster. Oh, and a lanyard. Perhaps fans can use that for hands-free panhandling after paying a 324-percent markup for what amounts to overpriced merch that the dude couldn’t be arsed to sign in person. Change the song title to “Green Right Hand,” Nick. To the paying fans, sincerely: Enjoy the show. (Randy Harward) Kingsbury Hall, 1395 E. President’s Circle, 8 p.m., $39.50-$225, all ages, kingsburyhall.utah.edu

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds

WEDNESDAY 6/21

Poptone: Daniel Ash, Kevin Haskins, Diva Dompe

If there’s a goth-rock/post-punk godhead, it’s Bauhaus, Tones on Tail and Love and Rockets—three different bands, all featuring principal members Daniel Ash and Kevin Haskins. In Poptone, the pair— Ash on guitar and vocals, Haskins on drums—is joined by Haskins’ daughter Diva Dompe on bass, and they perform the music of all three bands. More accurately, since most Bauhaus songs feature Peter Murphy on vocals, Poptone’s sets focus on the other two bands’ catalogs, with only one Bauhaus tune—Ash’s vocal turn, “Slice of Life”—and covers of songs by David Bowie, Adam and the Ants and Elvis Presley. Also worth noting is the absence of the L&R hit “So Alive.” But it’s still an exciting show, especially since all three acts, aside from kicking much ass, were quite popular in Utah. The only thing better would be a full-on reunion of all three bands, with Murphy and David J. (Haskins’ brother, conspicuously missing) on board—and, as support, Provo’s IntraVenus & the Cosmonauts, whose bitchin’ album Forgotten Stars was produced by J. (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 8 p.m., $25 presale, $30 day of show, 21+, depotslc.com

Poptone

w/ the wild i hooga outside of society

F R I D AY S

7

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

STARTS @ 9PM

SAM BARKER

4

$

4760 S 900 E, SLC

7/2

metal night

product of hate ikillya 7/21

hemlock

w/ october rage poonhammer i lhaw ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

PAUL RAE & CLOAKING.US PROJECTIONS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

40 | JUNE 15, 2017

HOME OF THE


LIVE Music thursday, june 15

TAYLOR KROPP friday, june 16

TERENCE HANSEN TRIO saturday, june 17

DJ LATU

monday

OUR FAMOUS OPEN BLUES JAM WITH WEST TEMPLE TAILDRAGGERS

wednesday

THE TRIVIA FACTORY 7PM

Every sunday ADULT TRIVIA 7PM

Great food

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

tuesday

LOCAL NIGHTS OUT

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Weeknights

$

MONDAY - FRIDAY

10 brunch buffet

SATURDAYS FROM 11AM-2PM $

12 sunday funday brunch

| CITY WEEKLY |

$

5.99 lunch special

$3 BLOODY MARYS & $3 MIMOSAS FROM 10AM-2PM

801-532-7441 • HOURS: 11AM - 2AM

THEGREENPIGPUB.COM

JUNE 15, 2017 | 41

31 east 400 SOuth • SLC


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

42 | JUNE 15, 2017

MONDAY 6/19

CONCERTS & CLUBS

ANGRYAPATHY VIA WIKIMEDIA

Def Leppard, Poison, Tesla

Fifteen years ago, when the internet was still relatively young, I earned a fat bag of hate email from Def Leppard fans by being critical of the U.K. glam-rock band’s then-current album, X (Island, 2002). Until then, each new album found them doubling down on the cloying, overproduced sound of Hysteria (1987), which made them mega-platinum artists. On X, they started using outside songwriters, Scandinavian dreck-smiths responsible for all those gross Aerosmith ballads as well as tracks by Britney Spears and *NSYNC. These slick simpleton-songs made Def Lep sound like a boy band, and it sucked. Their eponymous 2015 album finds them still pouring sugar all over themselves while cannibalizing their catalog on tracks like “Let’s Go.” In spite of its recycled riffs and a gag-tacular Disney Channel intro (repeating “Do you really, really wanna do this now?”) they appear to be getting back to being one of the great cats and not fuckin’ Hello Kitty. As for Poison, Bret Michaels’ country-boy shtick is old and lame. They should feel free to go all cake-face and Aqua Net again instead of butching it up. But they still kill it onstage. As for Tesla? Just keep doin’ you, dudes. Blue jeans, Les Pauls and, as you said in the liner notes of your own classic albums, “NO MACHINES!” (Randy Harward) Usana Amphitheatre, 5150 S. Upper Ridge Road (6055 West), 7 p.m., $29.50-$125, all ages, usana-amp.com

THURSDAY 6/15 LIVE MUSIC

best. damn. Patio.

period. *MISTED AND SHADED

SPIRITS • FOOD • GOOD COMPANY 6.15 LE VOIR (ACOUSTIC) 6.16 BAND OF SHADOWS W/ GREEN RIVER BLUES 6.17 GORGEOUS GOURDS 6.19 OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY ROBBY’S BLUES EXPLOSION

6.21 6.22 6.23 6.24

KEVYN DERN MORGAN SNOW SON OF IAN THE POUR

3200 E BIG COTTONWOOD RD. | 801.733.5567 THEHOGWALLOW.COM

Black Lips + Timmy’s Organism (Metro Music Hall) see p. 38 Houses (Kilby Court) Louis the Child + Troyboi (Ogden Amphitheater) Marina City + At My Mercy + Tot + Uvlov (The Loading Dock) Michael Martin Murphey (Sandy Amphitheater) Saint WKND + Typefunk + Cobol (Urban Lounge) Verse (The Complex) The Watters (Newpark Amphitheater) You Knew Me When (Gracie’s)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (’80s Night) (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Bright Lights (Sky)

FRIDAY 6/16 LIVE MUSIC

The Anode Records Takeover, feat. Ron S. + Brain Detergent (Diabolical Records) see p. 38 Autograph (Liquid Joe’s) Boogarins + The Spiral Jetties (Urban Lounge) The Deltaz (The Cabin) DJ Dawn Aquarius + Millie and The Moths + Early Successional + Brain Magik + Zorana and the Brosaleighs (Urban Lounge) Hepatagua + Hexxus + Motherkilljoy (Club X)

Korn + Stone Sour + Yelawolf + Islander (Usana Amphitheatre) Little River Band (Sandy Amphitheater) Nathan Spencer Review (Garage on Beck) Natural Causes (Club 90) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Scoundrels (The State Room) Something Like Seduction (The Lighthouse Lounge) Standing in for Joe (The Spur) Tail Light Rebellion (Piper Down Pub) The Vitals + Skye + Piglets (The Royal) Wednesday 13 + Once Human + Gabriel and the Apocalypse (Metro Music Hall) XXXTentacion + Members Only + Ski Mask “The Slump God” + Craig Xen (The Complex) You Knew Me When (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE All-Request Gothic, Industrial, EBM and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Juggy & DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

SATURDAY 6/17 LIVE MUSIC

Bonanza Town (The Spur) Good Vibrations (SoDa Row) Hurricane Kings (Garage on Beck) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Tony Holiday & the Velvetones (Johnny’s on Second) Natural Causes (Club 90) Rail Town (Outlaw Saloon) Ron Gallo + Naked Giants (Kilby Court) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Surface (Infinity Event Center)


VICTOR RANGER PETERSON

BAR FLY WEDNESDAYS

Dealer “CD” wants to know if you’re gonna check, call or raise at Cruzrs’ Texas Hold’em Night. So what’s it gonna be, slim? Tragic Black + Jak Syn + Starbass (Club X) Utah Blues Festival feat. Kenny Neal + Rod Piazza & the Mighty Flyers + Samantha Fish + Annika Chambers + Harry Lee and the Back Alley Blues Band + more (Gallivan Center) see p. 38 The Wailing Souls (The State Room) Zimmer + Typefunk + Devereaux (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

SUNDAY 6/18 Big Business (Urban Lounge) Brooke Mackintosh (The Lighthouse Lounge) Fleshtones + Penrose + Night Marcher (Snowbasin Ski Resort) see p. 26 Dispatch + Guster + Jake Shimabukuro (Red Butte Garden) Hail the Sun + Capsize + Eidola + Limbs (Kilby Court) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Patrick Ryan (The Spur) The Watchers + The Politician + The Rock Princess (Club X)

MONDAY 6/19 LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

SATURDAY, JUNE 17TH

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub)

TUESDAY 6/20 LIVE MUSIC

90s Television + Indigo Kidd + Martian Cult + Lightspeed Bus (Urban Lounge) Riley McDonald (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Cabin Fever & Miss DJ Lux (The Cabin) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Open Mic (The Wall at BYU)

UNION BLUES 9PM | 21+

4242 S. STATE

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE at

GREAT

FOOD & DRINK

SPECIALS

801-265-9889

RANDY'S RECORD SHOP VINYL RECORDS NEW & USED CD’s, 45’s, Cassettes, Turntables & Speakers

Cash Paid for Resellable Vinyl, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

WEDNESDAY 6/21

“UTAH’S LONGEST RUNNING INDIE RECORD STORE” SINCE 1978

LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Brother + Uvluv + Goodbye Clocks + Baglady (Kilby Court) Live Jazz (Club 90) Poptone: Daniel Ash, Kevin Haskins and Diva Dompe (The Depot) see p. 40 Rebelution + Nahko and Medicine for the People + Collie Buddz and Hirie (The Complex) Summer Lights (Metro Music Hall) Zander Schloss + Tom Bennett + Michelle Moonshine Band (Urban Lounge)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Birdman (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Open Mic (Velour) Temple (Gothic and Industrial) w/ DJ Mistress Nancy (Area 51)

TUE – FRI 11AM TO 7PM • SAT 10AM TO 6PM • CLOSED SUN & MON LIKE US ON OR VISIT WWW.RANDYSRECORDS.COM • 801.532.4413

Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen Next to Himalayan Kitchen

The

Chakra Lounge and Bar

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City

Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night menu & weekend brunch

JUNE 15, 2017 | 43

Alecia Stockman (The Spur) Banquet + Love Gang + Heavy Dose (Kilby Court) Def Leppard + Poison + Tesla (Usana Amphitheatre) see p. 42

DARREN’S BIRTHDAY BASH 9PM | 21+

| CITY WEEKLY |

Dueling Pianos (The Spur Bar and Grill) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

FRIDAY, JUNE 16TH KITTY & THE CRUISERS

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Hurray for the Riff Raff + Making Movies (Urban Lounge) Kurt Travis + Amarionette + Andres + Rich Wagstaff (The Loading Dock) Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds (Kingsbury Hall) see p. 40

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

LIVE MUSIC

When you live in Utah, you have to find ways around goofy, puritanical laws. The local bar poker scene has been thriving for around a decade now. At first, it was by offering bar tabs or products instead of cash prizes. Now—just like in beer pong tournaments at A Bar Named Sue—the club puts up prize money and the players simply give the dealer a $5 tip. So technically, it’s free to play. “It’s a legal loophole,” says Jeff Dunn, who frequents these tournaments, like the one at Cruzrs each Wednesday night. The bars put up the money in order to get people into the joint, spending money on food and drinks while hoping to offset it with their winnings. The bar-tab prizes are still around at side tables for players who get knocked out of the main tournament early, he says, “but sometimes they play for cash, too.” (Same loophole applies.) At Cruzrs’ poker night, their three tables are generally full, with around 30 players. Some, like Dunn, are experienced—but not sharks. “There are definitely good players,” he says, “but also a lot of new ones.” It’s a great way to learn the game, he continues, because unlike online poker—for funsies or keepsies—”there aren’t so many donkeys.” (A donkey, for novices, is a player who stubbornly stays in when they should fold, often drawing lucky cards and pissing off experienced players.) Ultimately, it’s a fun night out where, Dunn says, overprotective lawmakers must realize by now, “you won’t lose all your money.” OK … but what if he’s bluffin’? (RH) Cruzrs, 3943 S. Highland Drive, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., free w/ $5 dealer tip, 21+, cruzrssaloon.com

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Sky Saturdays w/ DJ Turbulence (Sky)

Poker at Cruzrs


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

| CITY WEEKLY |

44 | JUNE 15, 2017

HOURS

FREE LAYAWAY

10AM TO 7PM

MONDAY– SATURDAY CLOSED SUNDAY

NO

CREDIT NEEDED

90 OPTION DAY PAYMENT

MODEL CLOSE-OUTS, DISCONTINUED ITEMS AND SOME SPECIALS ARE LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND AND MAY INCLUDE DEMOS. PRICES GUARANTEED THRU 6/21/17


CROSSWORD PUZZLE

© 2017

BELLYBUTTON

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

49. Little treasure 50. At the original speed, musically 53. Japanese camera 54. Many a map of Hawaii 56. “Not if ____ help it!” 59. School of thought 60. “____-Raq” (2015 Spike Lee film) 62. French quencher 63. “Good Will Hunting” sch. 64. Two-time Super Bowl MVP Manning 65. NNW’s opposite

JUNE 15, 2017 | 45

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

| CITY WEEKLY |

SUDOKU

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

Last week’s answers

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

9. Grade school subj. 10. It might be wild, dirty or sticky 11. Unconcerned with right and wrong 12. Greek philosophical group 13. Jab with a finger 19. ____ crab 21. Praiseful poem 23. Ernie who won the 2012 British Open 24. Fish eggs 25. Give an epidural, e.g. 26. Harvard, Yale, Brown, etc. 27. “____ Andronicus” 28. Dethrone 34. At this point 35. Lawyer’s org. 36. General refusal? 38. NHL legend Brian inducted into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame in 2008 39. Fallon predecessor DOWN 40. When repeated, Mork’s 1. “Don’t mind if ____” sign-off 2. Cornhusker State: Abbr. 43. Parks’ partner, familiarly 3. Rap group inducted into the Rock and Roll 44. Query Hall of Fame in 2016 45. Expense intended to 4. “____ shocked ... shocked!” increase traffic? 5. Golf pencil’s lack 46. Title six-year-old of 6. When some lunches end literature 7. Horse to be broken 47. Millennial’s parent 8. Baseballer Gehrig

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

1. Type of 37-Across ... or a two-word hint to 23- or 52-Across 6. Up to the job 10. Speak with a gravelly voice 14. Last name in Scotch 15. “____: Legacy” (2010 film sequel) 16. “If ____ believe ...” 17. Only president born outside the continental United States 18. Reality TV’s Gordon Ramsay, e.g.? 20. Planted 22. Spooky 23. Medical professional used by Bert’s roommate? 29. Signature 17-Across health measure, for short 30. Home to the Venus de Milo 31. Common suffix on chemical elements 32. D-Day vessel: Abbr. 33. Final Four game 34. Drives home, as runs 37. Yours may be a 1-Across or 71-Across 41. Perceived to be 42. Singer Bareilles 45. Something to hang your hat on 48. Record producer Brian 49. “A Lesson Before Dying” author Ernest J. ____ 51. Sierra Nevada, for one 52. Pickup used by a college-area local? 55. Greek column variety 57. “You’ve Got a Friend ____” 58. 509 hatchlings in ancient Rome? 61. Bits of viral web content 66. On the briny 67. Oxford, e.g. 68. Some beach toys 69. Laura of “Blue Velvet” 70. In perfect condition 71. Type of 37-Across ... or a two-word hint to 18- or 58-Across


We need lots of it! We need workers in the construction and manufacturing industries. If you need work, extra work, or a different job come see us! Check out our web site to see what we do www.alltradestemp.com. Apply at:

FANTASTIC FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B MASSAGE Hands down & Feel Great. Come & rejuvenate witH asian/ameriCan, Female massaGe tHerapists.

801-577-4944 3149 S State st.

lmt# 5832053-4701

BIG MONEY IN THE ENERGY BUSINESS! OWNER OPERATORS NEEDED

Gibson Energy is expanding and has dedicated runs hauling crude oil! If you own your own truck contact a recruiter today!

EXCEPTIONAL LONG

All Trades Temporary Services 321 East 2100 South | SLC, UT 84115| 801-313-1234 All Trades Staffing 205 East 26th St #14 | Ogden, UT 84401| 801-399-1234

TERM REVENUE!

All positions require a Class A CDL, two years experience, Doubles, Hazmat and Tanker endorsement.

Call a recruiter today! (888) 542-4971

www.driveforgibsons.com

EOE

B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Actress Marisa Berenson offers a line of anti-aging products that contain an elixir made from the seeds of a desert fruit known as prickly pear. The manufacturing process isn’t easy. To produce a quart of the potion requires 2,000 pounds of seeds. I see you as having a metaphorically similar challenge in the coming weeks, Gemini. To create a small amount of the precious stuff you want, I’m guessing you’ll have to gather a ton of raw materials. And there might be a desert-like phenomena to deal with, as well. CANCER (June 21-July 22) There are three kinds of habits: good, bad and neutral. Neutral habits are neither good nor bad but use up psychic energy that might be better directed into cultivating good habits. Here are some examples: A good habit is when you’re disciplined about eating healthy food; a bad habit is watching violent TV shows before going to bed, thereby disturbing your sleep; a neutral habit might be doing Sudoku puzzles. My challenge to you, Cancerian, is to dissolve one bad habit and one neutral habit by replacing them with two new good habits. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, cosmic forces will be on your side as you make this effort. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “Dear Dr. Astrology: Good fortune has been visiting me a lot lately. Many cool opportunities have come my way. Life is consistently interesting. I’ve also made two unwise moves that fortunately didn’t bring bad results. Things often work out better for me than I imagined they would! I’m grateful every day, but I feel like I should somehow show even more appreciation. Any ideas? -Lucky Leo.” Dear Lucky: The smartest response to the abundance you have enjoyed is to boost your generosity. Give out blessings. Dispense praise. Help people access their potentials. Intensify your efforts to share your wealth. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Years ago, a fan of my work named Paul emailed to ask me if I wanted to get together with him and his friend when I visited New York. “Maybe you know her?” he wrote. “She’s the artist Cindy Sherman.” Back then I had never heard of Cindy. But since Paul was smart and funny, I agreed to meet. The three of us convened in an elegant tea room for a boisterous conversation. A week later, when I was back home and mentioned the event to a colleague, her eyes got big and she shrieked, “You had tea with the Cindy Sherman.” She then educated me on how successful and influential Cindy’s photography has been. I predict you will soon have a comparable experience, Virgo: inadvertent contact with an intriguing presence. Hopefully, because I’ve given you a heads up, you’ll recognize what’s happening as it occurs, and take full advantage. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) You’ll never get access to the treasure that’s buried out under the cherry tree next to the ruined barn if you stay in your command center and keep staring at the map instead of venturing out to the barn. Likewise, a symbol of truth might be helpful in experiencing deeper meaning, but it’s not the same as communing with the raw truth, and might even become a distraction from it. Let’s consider one further variation on the theme: The pictures in your mind’s eye may or may not have any connection with the world outside your brain. It’s especially important that you monitor their accuracy in the coming days. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Maybe it wasn’t such a good idea to go gallivanting so heedlessly into the labyrinth. Or maybe it was. Who knows? It’s still too early to assess the value of your experiences in that maddening but fascinating tangle. You might not yet be fully able to distinguish the smoke and mirrors from the useful revelations. Which of the riddles you’ve gathered will ultimately bring frustration and which will lead you to wisdom? Here’s one thing I do know for sure: If you want to exit the labyrinth, an opportunity will soon appear.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Over the years I’ve read numerous news reports about people who have engaged in intimate relations with clunky inanimate objects. One had sex with a bicycle. Another seduced a sidewalk, and a third tried to make sweet love to a picnic table. I hope you won’t join their ranks in the coming weeks. Your longing is likely to be extra intense, innovative and even exotic, but I trust you will confine its expression to unions with adult human beings who know what they’re getting into and who have consented to play. Here’s an old English word you might want to add to your vocabulary: “blissom.” It means “to bleat with sexual desire.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Your life in the coming days should be low on lightweight diversions and high in top-quality content. Does that sound like fun? I hope so. I’d love to see you enjoy the hell out of yourself as you cut the fluff and focus on the pith … as you efficiently get to the hype-free heart of every matter and refuse to tolerate waffling or stalling. So strip away the glossy excesses, my dear Capricorn. Skip a few steps if that doesn’t cause any envy. Expose the pretty lies, but then just work around them; don’t get bogged down in indulging in negative emotions about them. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Inventor, architect and author Buckminster Fuller lived to the age of 87. For 63 of those years, he kept a detailed scrapbook diary that documented every day of his life. It included his reflections, correspondence, drawings, newspaper clippings, grocery bills and other evidence of his unique story. I would love to see you express yourself with that much disciplined ferocity during the next two weeks. According to my astrological analysis, you’re in a phase when you have maximum power to create your life with vigorous ingenuity and to show everyone exactly who you are. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) You have a cosmic license to enjoy almost too much sensual pleasure. In addition, you should feel free to do more of what you love to do than you normally allow yourself. Be unapologetic about surrounding yourself with flatterers and worshipers. Be sumptuously lazy. Ask others to pick up the slack for you. Got all that? It’s just the first part of your oracle. Here’s the rest: You have a cosmic license to explore the kind of spiritual growth that’s possible when you feel happy and fulfilled. As you go through each day, expect life to bring you exactly what you need to uplift you. Assume that the best service you can offer your fellow humans is to be relaxed and content. ARIES (March 21-April 19) You have to admit that salt looks like sugar and sugar resembles salt. This isn’t usually a major problem, though. Mistakenly sprinkling sugar on your food when you thought you were adding salt won’t hurt you, nor will putting salt in your coffee when you assumed you were using sugar. But errors like these are inconvenient, and they can wreck a meal. You might want to apply this lesson as a metaphor in the coming days, Aries. Be alert for things that outwardly seem to be alike but actually have different tastes and effects. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Here’s a possible plan for the next 10 days: Program your smartphone to sound an alarm once every hour during the entire time you’re awake. Each time the bell or buzzer goes off, you will vividly remember your life’s main purpose. You will ask yourself whether or not the activity you’re engaged in at that specific moment is somehow serving your life’s main purpose. If it is, literally pat yourself on the back and say to yourself, “Good job!” If it’s not, say the following words: “I am resolved to get into closer alignment with my soul’s code—the blueprint of my destiny.”

46 | JUNE 15, 2017

| COMMUNITY | | CITYWEEKLY.NET |

HELP WANTED

Your dog’s home away from home -overnight dog boarding-cageless dog daycare-dog washing stations801-683-3647 • www.utahdogpark.com Woods Cross: 596 W 1500 S (Woods Cross) | Airport Location: 1977 W. North Temple


Where we treat your pets like members of our family.

We sell homes and loans to all saints, sinners, sisterwives &

WONDER WOMEN Babs De Lay

Broker/Owner 801-201-8824 babs@urbanutah.com www.urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 32 years in the Land of Zion

Realtor 801-784-8618 bella@urbanutah.com

Selling homes for 3 years

SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

1221 East 3300 South • SLC T (801) 486-6007 • F (801) 466-8840 www.BrickyardKennels.com

happy independence Remember Your Loved Ones,

but Forget Your Old Apartment!

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

LIBERTY WELLS

LIBERTY PARK

Wonderful 2 bdrm four-plex! Hookups, covered parking, central air! $945

Perfect 2 bdrm. A/C, counter bar dining, track lighting, dishwasher! $785

U OF U

BRICKYARD

Unbelievable 1 bdrm. duplex! Hookups! MONTH TO MONTH LEASE! $785

Beautiful 2 bdrm w/ dishwasher, balcony, two tone paint, hookups! $875

| COMMUNITY |

HOME LOANS MADE BRIZZÉE DOWNTOWN Delightful Studio 1 bdrm. PLUS office! Skylight, central A/C, storage! $895

VIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT PARTLOWRENTS.COM VISIT OUR OFFICE LOCATION AT 440 S. 700 E. STE 203 801-484-4446

Julie Bri-ZAY, makes home buying ea-ZAY Loan officer NMLS#243253 Citywide Home Loans NMLS#67180

801-747-1206

JUNE 15, 2017 | 47

Software Engineer @ Autotrader.com, Inc. (South Jordan, UT). F/T. Work w/ team to maintain & enhnce existing applics as well as rsrch & dvlp new solutions for bus problems. Reqts: Bach’s deg in Comp Sci or rel + 5 yrs of exp in job offd or Cnsltnt, Softw Engg, Anlyst Prgrmr, Lead Anlyst or rel. Must have 5 yrs exp w/ iSeries ILE RPG exp incl Svc Prgrms, API calls, binder srce, RPG Open Access, XML, Javascript, HTML; ability to maintain enhnce & dvlp applics in RPGIV, ILE & CLLE; iSeries DB2 database, iSeries IFS, iSeries connectivity to PC & netwrks; & embedded SQL in RPGLE, prototypes & procs, svc prgrms, binding directives. *Empl will accept 3 yrs university-level studies + 2 yrs work exp in lieu of Bach’s deg. Emp will accpt any sutble combo of edu, training or exp. Mail resume to A. Davis & S. Chokshi, Autotrader.com, Inc., 6205 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd, Atlanta, GA 30328. Indicate job title & ref code: KA-UT. EOE.

Julie “Bella” Hall


The

Backstop

It may be on the BACK but readers stop here to see your ad FIRST! Call for rates 801-575-7028

FEEL BETTER TODAY!

IF U DON’T WANT TO PICK UP Your dog’s poop - - - I DO! $10/wk most yards Text 801.673.4372 DRUG PROBLEM? - WE CAN HELP.

Narcotics Anonymous 801- 252-5326 English 801-332-9832 Spanish WWW.UWANA.ORG

TREAT DAD

717 S 300 W #D • 801.486.5500 pridemassage.com

reviveslc.com

with a therapeutic massage! text of call 801-520-9135

CITY WEEKLY STORE Up to 70% off restaurants, nightlife, activities and more cityweeklystore.com

DIVORCE ONLY $297 Easy and Fast (48 hrs) www.callthedivorcefirm.com Free Consult 801-981-4478

UTAH BEER FESTIVAL August 19th -20th Tickets at utahbeerfest.kostizi.com

DUCES WILD IS FOR SALE! South Salt Lake SOB license Class D liquor license Call 801-918-3066 with best offer

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

| CITY WEEKLY • BACKSTOP |

48 | JUNE 15, 2017

WORDS

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

GOT WORDS?

sales@cityweekly.net or call 801-413-0947

Thai-CASH FOR JUNK CARS! • NO TITLE NEEDED!

NOW HIRING!

Poets Corner Intangible Unimaginable Happiness

Unscathed by solitude by loneliness by hatred Moving quickly towards dreams that seemed untouchable before No fear Nothing to hold back

652 S. REdwood 801-886-2345

WE PAY CASH

WE’LL EVEN PICK IT UP TEARAPART.COM

OGDEN 763 W. 12th St 801-564-6960

Barker Law Office, LLC | 2870 S. State

801-486-9636

NEW WINDSHIELDS Installed starting at $107.77 in shop.

I want to give you this feeling

They say it, we do it: No Bait n' Switch

KATHERINE RUPERT

WE WAIVE

Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@ cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

Sell Your Car Today With One PhOne Call

• We Make “House Calls” • Simple and Hassle Free • Paid For or Not • Quickly Sell Your Car, Truck or Van • Have a Check About 15 Minutes After We Arrive

“It’s Worth Your Time To Call”

Call or Text 24/6

801-560-9933 WWW.CARSOLDFORCASH.COM

AMERICAN MASSAGE.COM

N E W !!

Steam Room and Sauna Now Available

801.448.5954 | 801.835.5988 | 801.839.1960 Hablamos Espanol: 801.835.5988 Open 7 days | 9am-10pm | 1740 South Main Street | thai-americanmassage.com

SLC

WE SUE LAWYERS

$100 OF YOUR

INSURANCE DEDUCTIBLE.

801-414-4103

AWINDSHIELDREPLACEM ENT.COM

Certificates available in Looking For BOLD BEAUTIFUL BROWS

SPECIAL OFFER

$300 Before

$400

VALUE After

Call Today!

801-809-4482

388 W. Winchester St, Murray info@browbarbykathryn.com

ZERO DOWN D U I . ..

Free Consultation Easy Financing Available DUI Cases in any Utah Justice Court CALL 801-889-2560

AARON NIELSON LAW WWW.AARONNIELSONLAW.COM

City Weekly June 15, 2017  

Best Summer Concerts

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you