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C I T Y W E E K LY. N E T M AY 1 8 , 2 0 1 7 | V O L . 3 3 N 0 . 5 2 B

Summer Movie Preview 2017 by David Riedel


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CWCONTENTS COVER STORY SUMMER MOVIE PREVIEW

The season’s blockbusters bring familiar themes and familiar themes. Cover illustration by John de Campos ghostbatart.com

12

CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 16 A&E 22 DINE 32 CINEMA 34 TRUE TV 35 MUSIC 45 COMMUNITY

DAVID RIEDEL

Cover story Behold the film critic extraordinaire in his natural state (though usually he’s screaming at a movie screen). When not writing, chasing around a toddler or spending late-nights watching ASMR YouTube videos, Riedel co-hosts Spoilerpiece Theater, which focuses on new-release reviews “with zero spoiler warnings to get in the way.”

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Blog, May 10, “Strike! ‘Classic’ bowling pin again adorns State St. skyline” Childhood

@MICHAELKMCHENRY Via Instagram Oh, yes! I thought they just took it down.

@ERICAONELOVE

serve their kind here,” and more specifically, “your kids. They’ll have to wait outside; we don’t want ’em in here.”

BRYAN ASKMI LEITR Via Facebook

Everybody is missing the point. Christians have a right to know what they are getting into. Nobody is saying you can’t drink a beer.

MICHAEL VALENTINE Via Facebook

Via Instagram Sad the bowling alley is gone and more housing going up. All the fun places I used to go to as a kid are gone and our children don’t get to have the same experiences as us.

TIFFANY O’NEAL Via Facebook

Will they have to put up a sign? This is an APARTMENT NOT A BOWLING ALLEY.

@CHUCKBRIAN Via Twitter

Opinion, May 4, “Shadow Men: What’s the protocol for unwanted dick pics?”

Send them to the offenders, Mom, bishop, boss, sex crimes unit—pick one.

@VIRGILGLASS Via Twitter

Sometimes a woman just wants a beer and not to be bothered. This article hits close to home.

MEGHAN HARTMAN Via Facebook

The Ocho, May 4, “Eight ways to tell if you’re in a Utah bar, not a restaurant”

Everybody knows bars are wretched hives of scum and villainy. Bartenders are required to inform patrons that “we don’t

Please don’t change Utah. We are weird for a reason.

EARTH STORM JACOBS Via Facebook

Straight Dope, May 4, “Veto Protocol”

There was no doubt in my mind Reagan was suffering from early stages of dementia. I lived through it with my father. Reagan showed obvious signs of it before the second election. I told people to vote for Reagan’s aides if they thought the aides could handle the job, but the Reagan that won the first election no longer existed.

EDWARD CHEADLE Via cityweekly.net

A&E, May 4, “Their Big Moment”

Eden Buxton is an amazing curator and I’m sure she worked tirelessly to make sure this event will be a hit. Looking forward to attending to see her artists, as well as the work of the other artists!

JAKE MCMAHON Via cityweekly.net

Cinema, May 4, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Some of [author MaryAnn Johanson’s] points are valid, but I feel like her review is a misrepresentation of what this movie is. It’s a comic action movie, a summer blockbuster. If you want Academy-worthy movies, you’re looking for them in the wrong place. Yes, the story is different from the com-

ics, as most of the Marvel Cinematic Universe films are. Making a direct translation from the comic to the screen sometimes just doesn’t work. There is so much material and stories in the comics that fitting all of it in a two-hour film just won’t make any sense; that’s why a lot of the plot and themes are explained by the characters throughout the adventure. You can’t just expect that the core comicbook fans that will always go see these movies are the only people that watch them. The studio has to break down the complex background and stories from the comics to make sense in the screen so people who have never heard of the Guardians can understand it. As a filmmaker and huge comic-book fan, I liked this film. It definitely doesn’t compare to the first one, but, it achieves what it supposed to do, which is to entertain us and continue the overall story within all of the MCU’s films.

NANO FABIAN LARA Via Facebook

Desperately Seeking Hurling

Having just relocated (two weeks ago) from Virginia, I’m acclimating to all things Utah. The stellar views and the many pews. The extra light beer and driving without fear. One of the passions that I have left back East is the sport of hurling. No, it is not what college kids do after consuming too many drinks, and no, curling is that other sport from Canada that is played on ice with broomsticks. Having just completed the downtown Irish bar circuit and several Guinnesses later, I have come to find out that their is

no hurling in SLC? What? This is the fastest game played on grass; sorry, lacrosse and soccer. Hurling is a 3,000-year-old Gallic sport and the national pastime in Ireland. It is a combination of hockey, lacrosse, rugby and second-degree homicide. After 3,000 years, they just introduced helmets into the game, although I highly recommend adding a cup to protect all the parts. Add in a stick and ball and you are ready to hurl. Although professional hurling players are primarily men, ladies also play a form of hurling called camogie. Most pub leagues and the GA A (Gaelic Athletic Association) sanction mixed play and leagues so it is inclusive for all. All you need is an open field and goals, along with a stick (hurley), a ball (sliotar) and a passion to learn a new and fun sport that is played globally. So here I sit in Sandy, staring at my hurley and sliotar, wondering when I can puck-in and start to hurl again.

SCOTTY FURASH, Sandy

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns SULAIMAN ALFADHLI, DAVID MILLER Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, KYLEE EHMANN, BILL FROST, BILL KOPP, KATHERINE PIOLI, DAVID RIEDEL, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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Weiler’s Words

After reading my shout-out in last month’s Opinion piece (“Sex Ed,” April 13), Utah State Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, tweeted me, “Nice article, except the parts where you completely misrepresent SB 185 and Utah’s current sex ed curriculum.” It turns out he didn’t agree with some of my positions. He is personable, sure. He’s been an on-air guest of Chelsea Handler and laughed off a ribbing from Stephen Colbert. He chairs or is on several Senate committees, and sponsors dozens of bills a year favoring things like fair housing, retirement, low-income tax credits and, notably, pornography and sex education. We cover these last two items in the following conversation: Weiler: Regarding Bill 185 that just passed, I’m not trying to put any porn companies out of business. Bill 185 creates a cause of action that if a minor has been harmed by pornography, they, or their parents, could sue. It’s like if your kid goes to McDonald’s and orders Chicken McNuggets and finds there is glass inside. We’re saying if the kid was harmed by a product and can prove the harm, then they can get damages. It’s product liability 101. The second part of the bill creates a safe harbor, asking porn distributors to: 1. Make a good-faith attempt to verify the age of their consumers, and we already do this on vaping websites.

6 | MAY 18, 2017

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G 2. Make a simple warning that pornography may be harmful to minors. If the pornography company does those two things, then they are immune from suit in Utah. Me: My column was about moving sex ed into classrooms, not leave it to kids to find this information from magazines and online. Weiler: There’s a lot of misinformation about Utah’s sex ed program. There are only 18 states that have comprehensive sex ed. The other 32 states, like Utah, don’t. The main difference between comprehensive sex ed and abstinence-based—which is what the majority of states have—is that we do offer some information about STDs, but we don’t go into a lot of information about birth control, condoms, etc. There is no data that shows that kids are looking at less porn if they have comprehensive sex ed. So that’s the first part of my tweet. I grew up in Illinois, and there are a lot of mixed feelings around the country about whether this is the government’s responsibility, or parents responsibility, to teach kids about sex and how much information you provide. I mean, this is a concern all over the country. At the Legislature, we painfully reflect on the various opinions that are held in this state, and if we can throw the barn door open. If it’s taught in schools, we might see thousands more parents pull their kids out of public education and I don’t know if that’s a good thing. It’s kind of a delicate balance.

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Me: A lot of the parents already selfselect that anyway. Weiler: A lot of parents self-select early grades and then they send their kids to HS. I’m concerned that, especially in a HS setting, kids may be missing out on things like science, math and other topics that are more difficult to master at home. But you have to ask if this is the proper role of government to say, ‘If you don’t like it, well, too bad, we’re going to do it anyway.’ Who’s responsible for these kids, the school or the parent? I think personal rights are paramount. I think the school should be assisting and that’s why you will see some programs that are opt-in and opt-out and, that includes sex ed. The school should be working in partnership with the parents and one of these areas we know that parents are very concerned about, is what amount of information is being shared about sex ed. Me: So is there a point where Legislature is only respecting the wishes of parents who are against sex education in schools and not respecting the wishes of parents who are in favor of sex education in schools? Weiler: I think parents can tell a child whatever they want. With sex ed, if that information is shared against the parents’ wishes, you can’t ever put that toothpaste back in the tube. And so, while I respect your question, I think there’s a difference there, because there is nothing preventing parents who want their child to have more information to

provide that information themselves. Me: Respecting the wishes of some parents because you can’t put the toothpaste back in the tube applies to co-educational sports, whether the earth is 5,000 years old or several billion. There are a lot of areas where there are cultural, or social or religious beliefs, or that we’re teaching things that are different, whether it’s global warming, dirty air or if Darwin was right. At some point you can make that argument against teaching just about everything. So, what do you believe are the tenets of public education? Weiler: At the Legislature, we don’t set curriculum, even in sex ed. We’re not picking subjects. All of that’s done by the state and local school boards. We do have a few local school districts that have decided to teach abstinence-only. But that’s a local decision and I do believe in local control. And so, to answer your question, I think that is a local school board’s decision as to where to draw the lines. Most of the lines are drawn at the local level. Right now the state law would prohibit teaching more than abstinence-based, but they can provide less if they choose to. In the 18 states where they teach about birth control, there is no data that shows there is less use of pornography than the teenagers in the states that don’t have comprehensive sex ed. Me: I stand by last month’s column. CW Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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8 | MAY 18, 2017

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HITS&MISSES BY KATHARINE BIELE

FIVE SPOT

RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

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No More City Secrets

How sad is it that the only champion of transparency in city government is a failed Republican candidate? Oh, let’s not forget a Salt Lake Tribune editorial that pointed out just about everyone’s errors except its own. The Trib didn’t join community activist George Chapman to appeal Salt Lake City’s decision to keep its records on potential homeless shelter sites secret. It was up to Chapman—whose GOP bona fides in a Democratic city doomed his campaigns to unseat state Sen. Jim Dabakis and later to replace Mayor Ralph Becker. The State Records Committee was pretty gutless in its refusal to release the documents, saying Chapman should have challenged the closed meeting itself— but said they knew they weren’t doing the “right” thing. The law favors shielding real estate discussions, but this was more than that. Including the community should be a no-brainer. Now Chapman’s off to the Legislature to clarify the records law. Let’s hope it doesn’t backfire.

Senators in the Spotlight

There are no surprises coming from the mouth of U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch these days. For instance, he dissed the 135,000 Utahns who are covered under Obamacare as “on the dole,” a Utah Policy story said. And ThinkProgress quoted him calling the Native Americans around Bears Ears “Indians” who don’t understand how their lands would be affected. Just trust him, he said. But in the old days, Hatch used to be a man of compromise and collaboration. Not that Sen. Mike Lee is a champion of the little man, but it’s beginning to look like he’s the senator to watch. Lee recently called for Judge Merrick Garland to be appointed FBI director. He’s questioned Donald Trump’s Afghanistan build-up, and isn’t totally in lockstep with the GOP’s blind love affair with its newfound power. Maybe he’s just more politically secure than Hatch.

Banning Bags

There’s an interesting interactive map on the Mother Nature Network that shows where in the world plastic bags have been banned. Places like Pakistan and Nigeria have banned the bags, on which retailers spend about $4 billion a year. The map also shows many places where bans have failed—most of them in the United States. But Utah can raise a weak cheer that Park City has now passed the first such ban in the state, according to KCPW. This is great because only about 8 percent of those bags are recycled. A U.N. program estimates that 46,000 pieces of plastic litter are floating in every square-mile of the ocean. Plastic bags end up in trees, in sea animal stomachs and, of course, in landfills. Park City wants to stop that.

ENRIQUE LIMÒN

CONSTRUCTION

Guy Wheatley is head projectionist and co-event coordinator for the Salt Lake Film Society, where he has been working since 2012. He spoke to City Weekly about the theatrical movie experience in the 21st century.

How has the job of projectionist changed since you’ve been doing it?

I was part of the last generations of projectionists to be trained with film. The Broadway and Tower were still laggards around winter 2013/2014 in terms of converting to digital, so I got to see a year or two of that before the transition. Now it involves ingesting the content digitally, either downloaded over a high-speed digital network, or shipped on hard drives, or external drives sent by smaller distributors, plus the key [codes], which allow us to actually show the films.

Does the experience of watching movies in a theater remain special?

One of the things I like about the cinema experience is that it’s one of the few times we can revert to a childlike state of awe, just kind of be subsumed by the experience. Working on the technical end of it does take a little bit off that magic, but I still very much enjoy that reaction of people who are wowed by cinematography, or profound acting, or a great director.

Do you watch people watching movies, perhaps to wait for reactions to a particular moment you know is coming?

It was during Lars von Trier’s Melancholia when it was coming into theaters. In that final reel, when that rogue planet is entering Earth’s orbit, and the whole movie has been leading up to it, [the characters are] having that impromptu picnic … waiting for the inevitable end. [The planet] Melancholia just emerges bigger and bigger into the screen, flames engulf the screen, then blackness. And you could hear a pin drop in that theater. It was a different sort of climax from a typical blockbuster film. That was a moment in which the entire audience was just rapt. I would take time to duck into the end of that movie.

Does the idea of ‘summer movie season’ inspire a particular reaction in you, for better or worse?

It’s quite a positive reaction, because I can remember countless weekends and late summer nights as a teenager in the ’90s, and it was kind of what you did. The options—either financially or in terms of where you could go—were limited, and that was what you did with your friends. You want to stay up for relief from hot days, and you’re staying up late all the time, or at least I was. So there was a feeling of camaraderie of going into a packed movie theater on a hot summer night, losing yourself in the movie, then talking about it after at the diner du jour or somebody’s house or apartment. And we definitely still participate in that tradition with our Summer Late Nights at the Tower. I think we can combine that youthful summer experience with a little bit of an art-house sensibility and get the best of both worlds.

— SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net


STRAIGHT DOPE Singing English

BY CECIL ADAMS

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MAY 18, 2017 | 9

Send questions via straightdope.com or snail mail c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

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power needed to compete with the volume of an electrified band—the aforementioned American t, for instance, doesn’t restrict the passage of air the way the British version does. On the other hand, a rhotic r (i.e., the undropped kind) is harder to sing than a non-rhotic one, so the early Beatles weren’t doing themselves any favors there. But the phonetic demands of singing might generally tend to eradicate accents. As the British linguist David Crystal has pointed out, the melody and lyrics of a song impose their own cadence on the singer, replacing qualities like speech rhythm, intonation and vowel length that would ordinarily distinguish the singer’s natural speaking accent. Supplying evidence for this idea, a Canadian grad student in cognitive science reported in her master’s thesis last year that non-native English speakers’ accents were harder for listeners to detect when they sang “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” than when they read aloud from a book. And a pair of Polish Ph.D. candidates, Kamil Malarski and Mateusz Jekiel, argued in a 2016 paper that rock singing might effectively be a dialect of its own. They picked six well-documented lead singers—three British, three American—and analyzed both their singing and speaking voices for rhoticity—again, the tendency to pronounce r rather than drop it. Results? The Brits exhibited no rhoticity in recorded interviews, but in performance they articulated nearly a quarter of the r’s they’d ordinarily have dropped; meanwhile, the Americans, who all scored at 100 percent rhotic in ordinary speech, managed only 41 percent rhoticity with a microphone in their hands. So maybe it’s not that U.K. singers sound American so much as that many U.K. and U.S. singers have adopted a common accent—“Singing English,” as the authors put it. It’s also true, though, that the Americanized British vocal style has become less prevalent since the heyday of Led Zeppelin. Punk-rockers of the ’70s, new-wavers of the ’80s and Brit-pop bands of the ’90s all made a point of singing with their native accents on proud display. Perhaps once the sun began to set on the American century, our accent seemed less cool and contemporary. Current events certainly suggest some reasons why this might continue to be the case. n

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You’re not the only one wondering, Bruce. The phenomenon of British singers adopting what’s perceived as Americanstyle pronunciation has attracted inquiry at linguistics departments around the world. Generally, the experts agree that what we’re hearing is in part a stylistic choice by the singer (as one might assume), but the mechanics of singing appear to play a role, too. It might be that some effort is required to sing with any kind of identifiable accent, including one’s own. We might think of Brits’ singing like Yanks as a development of the rock era, but Swiss linguist Franz Andres Morrissey has traced this tendency back to jazz singers in the 1950s and earlier. To sound American in the years following World War II was to sound cool and contemporary, and this remained true in the ’60s, when young Britons were styling their performances after American rock ’n’ roll artists like Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley or, as in the case of groups including The Rolling Stones and The Animals, blues singers like Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. As John Lennon commented long after the fact, “Any major star in England had to change his voice. They do it too in America to get on TV and radio.” Once your pop combo becomes the biggest deal on the planet, of course, you might figure you can write your own ticket accent-wise. Earlier this year in a Brazilian linguistics journal, researchers Mariana Backes Nunes and Júlia Nunes Azzi compared the vocals on the 1963 album With the Beatles to those on 1967’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, focusing on how the Fab Four sounded two key consonants: r, which in the standard U.K. dialect known as Received Pronunciation gets dropped when following a vowel, but is pronounced in General American English; and t, which is more fully articulated by most British speakers than by Americans, who often render it closer to a d—“liddle” rather than “lit-tle.” What the authors found was that The Beatles always tended to mix and match U.K. and U.S. consonants—in the Sgt. Pepper’s song “Getting Better,” Paul McCartney repeatedly uses the U.S. t in “getting,” then the British t in “better”— but in 1963 they were using more American sounds, whereas in ’67 they were sounding more predominantly English. Having conquered the musical world for Britain, the authors propose, The Beatles no longer felt the need to imitate anyone. Forget trying to sound like your artistic forebears—is it just easier to sing rock music in an American accent? Prof. Morrissey suggests that certain sounds associated with the General American dialect are more conducive to mustering the vocal

SLUG SIGNORINO

Why do English singers seem to lose their accent when they sing? —Bruce Koch


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10 | MAY 18, 2017

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net!

CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND

Eight college commencement speeches you probably won’t hear:

8. “Follow Your Passion …

Unless Your Passion is Newspapers … Maybe Find Another Passion.”

7. “The Better Your Stripper

Name, the Quicker You’ll Pay Off Those Student Loans.”

6.

“The World is Yours … or China’s … or North Korea’s … or Russia’s. Let’s Check Twitter.”

5. “Don’t Limit the Size of Your Dreams—Ask Your Parents for the Big Room in the Basement.”

4.

“So, Just in Case Your Podcast Doesn’t Take Off …”

3. “For the Love of God, Do Not Send Me a LinkedIn Request After This.”

2.

“Are You Familiar With The Handmaid’s Tale? Ladies, We Need to Talk.”

1. “Someday, You Could

Be President. Seriously, It’s a Shitshow Free-For-All Now. Go for It. Whatever.”

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

TAXES NOW—OR NEVER

The Utah Taxpayers Association (yes, it’s kind of stodgy and conservative) holds its annual Utah Taxes Now conference this week. If you’re concerned about that federal tax reform nonsense, you really should go. You can learn about reforming the state’s tax structure, what Utah’s plan should be for education, whether Truth-in-Taxation works “too well” and how transparency fits in. These are not dry subjects if you consider that the president hasn’t released his tax returns and both Utah and the feds have designs on your tax dollars. U.S. Senate Finance Committee majority staff director, Chris Campbell plans to speak, as well as representatives from the governor’s office, the Utah House of Representatives and Senate and the Utah Tax Commission. Grand America Hotel, 555 S. Main, 801-972-8814, Thursday, May 18, 8 a.m.-1:30 p.m., $100 for members; $130 for non-members, bit.ly/2qAzuTC

WHERE ARE WOMEN GOING?

If you’re a woman or care about one, you’ll want to hear what Pam Perlich has to say. She’s the director of demographic research at the Kem C. Gardner Policy Institute, and offers some depressing and hopeful facts regarding The Trajectory of Women in Utah by 2020. Hosted by the Women’s Giving Circle, the event aims to help you discover where you can and must make a real impact as you look toward the future of Utah. You know, that’s when the population is supposed to be burgeoning—as if it isn’t already. Former Congresswoman Karen Shepherd will be there, too. Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-559-3005, Tuesday, May 23, 6-8 p.m., free for members, $10 for non-members, bit.ly/2r8gtUL

REVOLUTION CONCERT

You might as well enjoy the revolution and get pumped up for the end of the world. Better yet, find a new way to make a difference. Our Utah launches the first of its “Revolution Concert Series” to draw awareness and call you to action. Partnering with several social justice organizations, the campaign Know Your Rights focuses on civil rights in police situations. Maybe you can just start singing “Give Peace a Chance” if you’re confronted by the cops. Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 877-435-9849, Thursday May 25, 7:30 p.m., $5, 21+, ticketf.ly/2r8HwPE

—KATHARINE BIELE

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A cowboy boot-wearing Rep. Stewart offers ‘nebulous’ answers during town hall. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @dylantheharris

R

NEWS

Rep. Chris Stewart at his town hall meeting in Richfield last Friday.

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er Republicans quoted in last week’s cover story, said progressives want lawmakers to carve out a Democratic district, which would be gerrymandering. Stewart began the Richfield meeting by talking about the threat posed by North Korea if it were to develop a nuclear missile that could reach the U.S. As he walked off the stage, several people shouted that they still had concerns that went unanswered. CW

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ep. Chris Stewart’s town hall meeting on Friday, May 12, in Richfield was subdued compared to the raucous crowd that confronted him in Salt Lake City last March. Stewart, one of the few members of Congress to hold town halls, spoke to a couple hundred people at a high school in a small Sevier County community. He answered questions for some 40 minutes. Unlike his event in Salt Lake City, here the majority of the crowd supported the Republican, who wore a pair of cowboy boots that weren’t purchased in New York City, he assured the audience. The room, however, was not without opponents or outbursts. One of the first to call out Stewart was Mark Bailey from Torrey, Utah. He told City Weekly afterward that he thought Stewart was lying about provisions in a new health care bill, and he had a visceral response that he couldn’t contain. Stacy Stanford, who traveled down from Salt Lake City, also challenged Stewart’s explanation of the GOP health care plan that was narrowly approved by the House and is awaiting Senate action.

aisle,” Stewart said, echoing what’s become the standard GOP response. Another man, who said he recently moved to Utah and was laid off from his job at a coal mine, asked Stewart about the “war on coal.” Stewart said he wants to protect the environment, but the country isn’t at the point where it can switch over to renewable energy. “If the market kills coal, there’s not a thing in the world I can do about that,” he added. “What I don’t want is for the government to kill coal.” A rancher and former helicopter pilot in the military asked why Congress was trying to repeal the Affordable Care Act instead of improve it. Stewart said the new bill includes ACA provisions, such as the part that allows young people to stay on their parents’ insurance through age 26. A registered Republican from Cedar City wanted some assurance that policy would be based on scientific data. She also asked about Trump’s proposed budget that would gut the Environmental Protection Agency. Stewart responded that, because EPA decisions are made thousands of miles away, there is less accountability. He wants some of the agency responsibilities to be transferred to Congress. “At the end of the day, if you guys don’t like me, you can vote me out of office every two years. I have to come back and justify the things I’ve done to you,” he said. “EPA administrators don’t. They don’t have to come here and justify what they’ve done. We have too many people sitting in cubicles in Washington, D.C., who have never set foot in Utah and will never set foot in Utah and are making decisions.” Aagard lamented the long drive to Richfield, and said it was unfortunate that his congressional district swallowed up disparate parts of the state. Stewart, like oth-

DW HARRIS

‘This Isn’t Salt Lake!’

“He needed to be held accountable for a vote that could kill people, and he wasn’t,” she said. Critics of the bill say it will leave millions of Americans uninsured, shrink Medicaid and price out folks with preexisting medical problems. As people started to boo, they were shouted down by supporters, who yelled things like, “This isn’t Salt Lake!” and “Let him speak!” The meeting was disruptionfree from there on out. After the event, Bailey engaged in friendly chitchat with C.R. Wood, a local wearing a large cowboy hat. Wood drove 7 miles into town “to act as the counterbalance against the highly vocal minority who would not allow him to speak” at the Salt Lake City town hall, he said. Although Wood supports Stewart, he was a little disappointed with the audience’s questions. He said too many were “nebulous” and didn’t touch on specific policy decisions. The last questioner, Nancy Schmidt, for example, stated that she supported President Trump and hoped the Republican Party would find a way to unite. “I think President Trump will surprise us at the end of four years with what a great president he turns out to be,” Stewart responded. Wood believed the “most cogent question of the night” was asked by Tyrell Aagard, a young Democrat from Salt Lake City, who asked about Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey. “Would you support the appointment of an independent prosecutor?” Aagard asked. Stewart, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said he’s open to suggestions, but added that, along with investigations by the House and Senate, an independent prosecutor might be redundant. “As for Mr. Comey, I think he’s lost the confidence of people on both sides of the


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12 | MAY 18, 2017

Summer flicks bring familiar themes and familiar themes.

L

ast year, I was inspired by the summer’s bumper crop of sequels, prequels and bologna. This year, I’m already tired. That’s because I saw Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 a few weeks ago and it’s only OK (at best). That really bummed me out. It’s not that I expected it to be gangbusters. The first film is tons of fun, even if it doesn’t hold up as well at a home viewing like it does in a big, crowded theater with a ginned-up audience. But writer-director James Gunn has made some nifty and gross subversive stuff (Slither, Super). Throw those flicks together with his first Guardians and I had high-ish hopes for GotGV2. Unfortunately, Starlord (Chris Pratt) and crew’s second adventure feels like a movie in search of a story, with plot points cribbed from Star Trek V: The Final Frontier and mashed together with the armchair psychology of the Fast & Furious series. Sure, there are plenty of gags and some good killin’, but the whole affair made me shrug. Who cares whether Starlord finds his father? So, when I revisited the list of upcoming summer movies and saw all the sequels, prequels and bologna listed, my heart sank. Not in a “Holy shit, bloated gasbag Donald Trump is president” kind of way, but it sunk nonetheless. What happened to me? Last year I happily strolled

By David Riedel c o m m e n t s @ c i t y w e e k ly. n e t @davidmriedel

down amnesia lane to 1983 and my first big-screen viewing of Return of the Jedi. Here’s what happened: I grew up, suffered from student-loan payments, lowerback pain and way too many mediocre-to-poor sequels, prequels and bologna. “Yeah, yeah,” you say. “Boo hoo. You get to write about movies for a living. Tough life.” You’re correct in your disdain, imaginary reader. It’s not like I’m reporting on human rights violations. It’s a privilege to write about movies, and it’s usually pretty fun. However. For the first time since I’ve had this job, I’m deeply dismayed. Forget that there are billions of crummylooking sequels coming this summer, including a sequel to a prequel (Alien: Covenant Please God Make It Stop). But take a look at some of the rest of this shit. There’s a film called Emoji Movie: Express Yourself being released in August. There’s a fifth—fifth!—Pirates of the Caribbean movie coming. And Demetri Martin has a movie coming out that he wrote and directed. This is when I have to come right out and say it: Go to hell, movie business. You’re a rotten, festering pustule on the ass of humanity. Movies have the power to transport us. Movies can make us forget all the brouhaha going on in our

sad, pathetic lives for a couple hours at a time, or that the president fired the FBI chief. Movies can make us want to be better people (see: Casablanca). But when I look at the movies coming out this summer and see that someone’s best idea for spending $40 million is The House, starring Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler as parents who open an illegal casino to earn enough money to send their daughter to college, I’m simultaneously heartened and dismayed. I’m heartened because it’s rare for comedies to address a problem regular people deal with. I’m dismayed because I’ve seen this plot in myriad different iterations: Fun with Dick & Jane (original and remake), the Going in Style remake. Even so-so dramas such as Boiler Room feature illegal casinos as a major plot point and the classic Dog Day Afternoon features a bank robbery at its center as a means to fund a major life event. Man, I’m a buzzkill. But The House is the best ya got, Hollywood, goddamnit? Now that we all feel terrible, I’m going to strap on my boots, climb dick mountain and spin gold from the lead that is the upcoming summer movie season. No joke, kids: I’m trying extra hard to find the puppy dogs and rainbows amid all the turds. So here’s what you can expect, helpfully broken up into categories inspired by a great movie by a longdead filmmaker.


BAD

GOOD

THE

THE

(Maybe)

Alien: Covenant

Everything, Everything

My Cousin Rachel

This latest adaption of the Daphne du Maurier novel stars Rachel Weisz. And the record for du Maurier adaptations is tops (Don’t Look Now, Rebecca, Jamaica Inn). Director Roger Michell has missed (Le Week-End, Hyde Park on Hudson, Enduring Love, Venus) more often than he’s hit (Notting Hill, Changing Lanes), but the source material and cast are strong. (Opens June 9)

All Eyez On Me

The Book of Henry

Director Colin Trevorrow’s big-budget appeal is lost on me (see: Jurassic World), but I’ll de-

I’m no Stephen King fan, but I love Westerns and Idris Elba, and I’m warming on Matthew McConaughey. The Dark Tower film is years in the making and it’s been dogged by delays and casting gripes (some fans are irked because they assumed The Gunslinger is white—eff those people). I’m just glad Elba is finally in a live-action film that isn’t a Marvel movie. (Opens Aug. 4)

Detroit

Kathryn Bigelow is back! And so is Mark Boal, who wrote Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker and Zero Dark Thirty. This flick takes place in Detroit during the 1967 riots, but was largely shot in Massachusetts (tax breaks!). John Boyega (yay!) stars. (Opens Aug. 4)

Logan Lucky

It’s not another Wolverine movie, but a Steven Soderbergh film, proving that some people like to work in retirement. Anyway, Channing Tatum stars and he’s done good work with Soderbergh before (Magic Mike, Side Effects and the Soderbergh-shot Magic Mike XXL). Adam Driver is the co-star and, Girls aside, I’m a fan. Also stars Hilary Swank (yay!), Daniel Craig (yay!), Elvis Presley’s granddaughter and Seth MacFarlane (barf). Could be fun. Maybe. (Opens Aug. 18)

It

I’m not sure how you turn a 1,138-page book into one movie, plus I’m not sure I want to see a movie in which a little boy’s arm is ripped off in the prologue. But I’m intrigued, mostly because I think clowns are stupid, not scary, and I’m still waiting for a Stephen King adaptation to be good. (Opens Sept. 8)

DC is 0-for-2 in the let’s-build-a-decent-franchise game, but I’m mildly encouraged by the notion that Wonder Woman cannot possibly be worse than either the anemic Man of Steel or the absolutely wretched Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice. I also dig that the big studio brains hired Patty Jenkins to direct—who when she last helmed a feature, convinced the world that Charlize Theron was terrifying real-life serial killer Aileen Wuornos. Plus, Gal Gadot and Chris Pine look great. Here’s to blind hope. (Opens June 2)

Cars 3

Cars is terrible. Cars 2 is even worse. Even Pixar makes bad movies (Monsters University, the Planes series) and it’s rare the third film in a trilogy is the best. (Opens June 16)

Rough Night

I don’t know whether you’ve seen the trailer for Rough Night, but it looks as if it has exactly the same plot as Very Bad Things, which is a very bad movie that could have been a very good one, given its cast and pedigree. As for Rough Night, I’m suspicious of any movie in which non-entity Zoë Kravitz has a starring role. (Opens June 16)

Amityville: The Awakening

You only star in Amityville movies if you’re trying to become a movie star (Amityvilles past stars include the likes of Ryan Reynolds and Meg Ryan; and in this flick, Bella Thorne), or you’re long past being a movie star (Jennifer Jason Leigh, this flick). Don’t go in the house, goddamnit. (Opens June 30)

The House

See my rant above. Hopefully Jason Mantzoukas can breathe life into this premise. (Opens June 30)

Spider-Man: Homecoming

Please, please, please let me get what I want, which is for Sony to stop rebooting this g.d. franchise. Tom Holland dons the tights this time around. (Opens July 7)

War for the Planet of the Apes

Keep your hands off Pierre Boulle’s source material, you damn dirty studio executives! Woody Harrelson shows up in this one to take on Caesar et al. (Opens July 14)

Annabelle: Creation

The thing the Annabelle franchise doesn’t seem to understand is that no one would buy a doll that looks so creepy. Jesus, Annabelle looks like the kind of doll just waiting to be possessed, so why on Earth would any consumer take that chance? But this is a prequel (gah!) to Annabelle, so maybe it finally explains why anyone would purchase a doll that looks like she’s gonna cut your throat in the night. (Opens Aug. 11)

Emoji Movie: Express Yourself (Opens July 28)

Fun Mom Dinner

Any movie with a title this lazy has to be awful. See also: Bad Teacher, Bad Moms, Horrible Bosses, Sex Tape. I’m kinda surprised Toni Collette would go in for this, but maybe I shouldn’t judge movies by their titles. Wait, who am I kidding? Of course I should! Written by Julie Rudd (who’s married to Paul Rudd) and directed by Alethea Jones. (Opens Aug. 4)

MAY 18, 2017 | 13

It’s the Tupac biopic! No jokes, I’m in. (Opens Friday, June 16, what would have been Shakur’s 46th birthday)

The Dark Tower

Wonder Woman

As much as I enjoyed the first and second installations, I can’t imagine what they’ll do here that they haven’t done before. Trey Parker plays the bad guy. Huh. (Opens June 30)

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Salma Hayek is a massage therapist and John Lithgow is a billionaire asshole. They have a run-in at a dinner party. If you think this sounds like a rumination on Mexicans and Trump, you’re probably not wrong. Miguel Arteta directs, Mike White writes, and they’ve made two good movies together (Chuck & Buck, The Good Girl). Note to studios: Cast Hayek more. (Opens June 9)

Charlize Theron in another action flick that isn’t Fate of the Furious? As Gregory Hines (R.I.P.) would say, “Yeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees!” Theron is a Brit spy at the end of the Cold War. Stunt vet David Leitch directs. Sold, sold, sold. (Opens July 28)

I expect nothing from movies except to entertain me. Everything else is gold, Jerry. But the Pirates franchise hasn’t done that since 2003 and PotC: At World’s End did the unforgivable: It made Keith Richards boring. And this tale, like all the preceding tales, is longer than two hours. WHY? Javier Bardem can only do so much and Johnny Depp can’t do enough. (Opens May 26)

Despicable Me 3

Beatriz at Dinner

Atomic Blonde

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales

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Nicola Yoon’s well received YA novel gets the big-screen treatment; and adapting YA novels is dicey. For each Hunger Games series, you get at least one The 5th Wave with a Divergent on top of it. Still, if you can get past the fact that Everything, Everything sounds like a retread of The Boy in the Plastic Bubble, it has an attractive cast in Amandla Stenberg and Nick Robinson, as well as a director who comes from indies (Stella Meghie) and a nifty plot twist. Fingers crossed. (Opens May 19)

fend his feature debut, Safety Not Guaranteed. The Book of Henry feels a little more indie, as an 11-year-old genius and his mother (Naomi Watts) try to rescue the girl next door from a maybe-abusive stepfather. Sarah Silverman is in this, too. (Opens June 16)

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Director Ridley Scott returned in 2012 to the Alien franchise and gave us Prometheus, a prequel that sorta kinda relates to the Alien mythology. Five years later, I’m still not sure what the point was (besides money), but Alien: Covenant, the aforementioned sequel to a prequel, seems like an attempt to marry Prometheus to Alien. Will it work? I dunno. But it can’t be worse than Alien 3 or Alien: Resurrection. (Opens May 19)

(probably)


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14 | MAY 18, 2017

wtf THE

THE

ART FLICKS

(Your guess is as good as mine!)

(Definitely)

Baywatch

If you asked me which TV series of yore should never, ever, ever ever be made into a movie, I’d have said 21 Jump Street. But it and its goofily named sequel (22 Jump Street) benefit from smart writing, top-notch acting and not sticking in tone to the source material. Baywatch looks to be made with similar intentions (larfs and earning potential) and The Rock and Zac Efron both know from comedy. But does the movie know from crap? Director Seth Gordon is responsible for Horrible Bosses, after all. We’ll find out, and if the hard-R is any indication, leave the kids with the grandparents for the evening. (Opens May 26)

The Exception

Dunkirk

Christopher Nolan moves away from wonky, emotionless space movies (Interstellar) and wonky, emotionless superhero movies (The Dark Knight franchise), to tackle a subject that deals in human emotion and carnage, the 1940 Battle of Dunkirk. One of the guys from One Direction is in this, along with Cillian Murphy (yay!), Kenneth Branagh (yay!), Tom Hardy (yay?) and Mark Rylance (yay!). Who knows what to expect, other than a gargantuan running time. (Opens July 21)

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

I’ve really had enough of movies in which a Nazi (Jai Courtney) is supposed to earn our sympathy. But here a Nazi soldier falls in love with a Jew (Lily James) while he’s keeping tabs on exiled Kaiser Wilhelm II (Christopher Plummer). Hasn’t Courtney blown enough chances at being a movie star? (Opens June 2)

Luc Besson directs this adaptation of a beloved French comic, and it’s his first time directing sci-fi since The Fifth Element. I remember next to nothing about that movie, except for a wacky Chris Tucker and a blue Maïwenn. But I’m scratching my head, especially at casting Dane DeHaan as the lead. Herbie Hancock is in this, tho. Maybe “Rockit” served as inspiration. (Opens July 21)

The Mummy

Ingrid Goes West

A mummy terrorizes the planet and Tom Cruise has to stop it. It’s written by Jon Spaihts (Prometheus, barf; and Passengers, double barf), Christopher McQuarrie (Jack Reacher, Edge of Tomorrow, double yay!; and Jack the Giant Slayer, triple barf!) and directed by Alex Kurtzman (People Like Us, eh). Oh, and Russell Crowe plays Dr. Henry Jekyll. Just what the hell is going on around here? (Opens June 9)

Baby Driver

Baby (Ansel Elgort, a $24 name if there ever was one) is a getaway driver. It also stars Kevin Spacey, Jamie Foxx, Lily James and Jon Hamm. But it’s directed by Edgar Wright, who, if he’s known for anything, it’s subverting genres. Whether his movies work (Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz) or don’t (Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, The World’s End), they’re usually worth watching. (Opens June 28)

Inconceivable

“Deception hits home,” reads the poster. And there’s Nicolas Cage! Gina Gershon (yay!) plays his wife and there’s a new mom in town she doesn’t trust. Spooky? Cage’s hairline alone gives me shivers. (Opens June 30)

Aubrey Plaza plays a nutjob—which is what she specializes in—and becomes obsessed with Elizabeth Olsen’s celebrity. Also stars O’Shea Jackson Jr. (Ice Cube’s kid) and Wyatt Russell (Kurt Russell and Goldie Hawn’s kid, who looks like an exact 50/50 copy of each of them, right down to Kurt’s teeth). (Opens Aug. 11)

The Hitman’s Bodyguard

The last time Samuel L. Jackson starred in a parody, we got National Lampoon’s Loaded Weapon 1, which had exactly one laugh (Emilio Estevez: “You came!” Samuel L. Jackson: “That’s personal, but what’s important is that I’m here.”). But the trailer doesn’t look like the parody the poster is (of the Whitney Houston/Kevin Costner flick The Bodyguard), so I’m not sure what to expect. Probably nothing good. (Opens Aug. 18)

Bushwick

Brittany Snow is a long way from Pitch Perfect and any movie starring Dave Bautista not directed by James Gunn will feature Bautista’s rougher acting. But the premise—that these two people are running for their lives in the Brooklyn neighborhood after some assholes in Texas start a second Civil War—has pricked up my ears (so to speak). It’s also supposed to be one long take, which of course, it ain’t. It’ll just look like it is. (Opens Aug. 18)

Buena Vista Social Club: Adios

This is a follow-up by Lucy Walker to Wim Wenders’ 1999 documentary. Definitely worth a look-see. (Opens May 26)

Long Strange Trip

I only include Amir Bar-Lev’s four-hour Grateful Dead (alt name: The Appreciate Deceased) documentary as an opportunity to proclaim publicly, “Fuck the Grateful Dead. They suck.” The only way I’d ever see this noodle-fest is if I had the world’s best LSD and a hammer to bash my brains in. (Opens May 26)

Dean

This is the Demetri Martin movie I maligned in the introduction. Good news: At least one critic I trust and respect has seen it and enjoyed it. The story, about Dean (Martin), an illustrator who falls in love while dealing with his father in the wake of his mother’s death, sounds a little too Zach Braff for me, but I was once a young, sensitive person before life beat me into the dirt. I’ll try to remember that when I watch it sans popcorn or soda (because my doctor told me I’m too old to eat and drink that shit). (Opens June 2)

Band Aid

Zoe Lister-Jones and Adam Pally star as a couple that starts a band to heal their broken relationship. The premise sounds absurd, but Lister-Jones is smart and she’s the director. Plus, Pally was frequently the best thing about ABC’s gone-too-soon Happy Endings. I’m open-minded about this one. I think. (Opens June 2)

It Comes at Night But it drives an Uber during the day, so how scary can it be? (I made that up.) This movie is written and directed by Trey Edward Shults, whose Krisha had superb moments and indie studio A24 is releasing it. They do good work and star Joel Edgerton knows creepy (The Gift). This could be good. (Opens June 9)

The Hero

Sam Elliott is a great actor, beloved in many character roles, but he hasn’t had the opportunity to carry a movie. In this film, he stars as a washed-up actor who’s diagnosed with cancer. Laura Prepon (eh) is his love interest. Krysten Ritter (yay!) is his daughter. Nick Offerman and Elliott’s real-life spouse Katharine Ross costar. (Limited release June 9; expands July 4)

The Bad Batch

Desert cannibals? Ugh. But this weirdo dystopian flick is directed by Ana Lily Amirpour, who made vampires palatable (ha) in A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night. Suki Waterhouse is the star, and Jason Momoa, Giovanni Ribisi and Keanu Reeves pop up. One thing’s for sure: It ain’t gonna be boring. (Opens June 23)

The Beguiled

Clint Eastwood and Don Siegel made Coogan’s Bluff, Dirty Harry, Two Mules for Sister Sara and then The Beguiled, which is as odd and as creepy as any other film either made. It’ll make your skin crawl (partly because it reeks of chauvinism). And this remake by Sofia Coppola— whose name alone makes my skin crawl—has potential. Angourie Rice (the best part of The Nice Guys), Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning torture Colin Farrell during the Civil War. You’ve been warned. (Opens June 23)

The Big Sick

One of the big-deal movies to emerge from Sundance, this film stars Kumail Nanjiani (who wrote with his wife, Emily V. Gordon) as a Chicago comedian who falls in love with graduate student Zoe Kazan. But then she falls into a coma. Directed by Michael Showalter, a veteran of The State and director of Hello, My Name Is Doris. (Opens June 23)


Local LOCAL special

stuff

A Ghost Story

Landline

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power

I’m sticking this in the WTF section because I can’t believe we’re still arguing over climate change in 2017. (I mean … it’s a hoax, right? Ha, just kidding! We’re all doomed.) Directors Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk follow Al Gore in what’s probably the most depressing sequel ever, not including Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. (Opens July 28)

Tulip Fever

MAY 18, 2017 | 15

It’s the 17th century. Alicia Vikander (eh) is unhappily married to Christoph Waltz (yay!) and has an affair with painter Dane DeHaan (him again?). They invest in the tulip market together and found Holland, Mich. Or maybe they just enter the tulip market. I think someone is fucking with me regarding this plot. (Opens Aug. 25)

Family flicks are back on Fridays on the Snowbird Center Plaza Deck at dusk. Showing this year are the Wasatch Film Festival (June 23); The Secret Life of Pets (June 30); Zootopia (July 7); Sing (July 14); Moana (July 21); The Sandlot (June 28); Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (Aug. 4). For details, visit snowbird.com/events/family-flicks. And coming soon to the Salt Lake Film Society are the following (all of which would probably fall under the “Art Flicks” section above), listed by opening dates. Check the website for locations: May 19: The Lovers, starring Debra Winger (ugh … and yes, I’m in the minority) and playwright and sometime-actor Tracy Letts; Norman, in which Richard Gere plays a smalltimer who befriends a politician who goes

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First Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon went to England, then Italy and now Spain. The Trip and The Trip to Italy are enormous fun and hopefully this one is, too. Michael Winterbottom returns to direct. (Opens Aug. 11)

The Trip to Spain

big-time (I’m enjoying late-period Richard Gere, I must say); and Obit, a documentary about The New York Times’ staff obituary writers. May 26: My Entire High School Sinking Into The Sea. Just what it sounds like. Animated; and Chuck, a biopic of Chuck Wepner, who inspired Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky, starring Live Schreiber, Naomi Watts and Elisabeth Moss. June 2: Wakefield, in which Bryan Cranston leaves his wife and lives in the attic. Written and directed by Robin Swicord, who has written some good movies (Little Women, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button) and some bad movies (Memoirs of a Geisha, The Promise); and Chasing Trane, a documentary about John Coltrane, with Denzel Washington providing his voice. June 9: Ken Loach’s latest sadness, I, Daniel Blake, is about a man who suffers a heart attack and has to wade through the U.K.’s bureaucracy as he returns to work and files a claim to receive the equivalent of disability payments. A big, big hit in the United Kingdom, where it won Best British Film earlier this year; and My Cousin Rachel (see above). June 16: Written and directed by the Coppola family matriarch, Eleanor Coppola, and starring Diane Lane (ugh) is Paris Can Wait, about a woman who rediscovers what the French would call “the joy of life” while road tripping with her husband’s colleague; and Monterey Pop, D.A. Pennebaker’s 1968 documentary. July 7: The Journey is a fictional look at the friendship between protestant loyalist Ian Paisley (Timothy Spall) and Sinn Féin’s Martin McGuinness (Colm Meaney). July 21: Maudie, or Ethan Hawke Goes to Canada, with Sally Hawkins as that rascal Maudie. Note: Times are subject to change because of what the French would call “acts of God,” such as inclement weather or a national brie shortage. And if you survive this year’s storm of bunk (and, admittedly, some goodies), I’ll see you next summer to commiserate. If we live that long. C W

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I’m told this re-pairing of director Gillian Robespierre and star Jenny Slate is nothing like their last film, Obvious Child. So if you loved Obvious Child, be warned. If you hated it, maybe you’ll like this one. (Opens July 21)

F

Pets; July 21: Beauty and the Beast (animated); July 28: Disney’s Hercules; Aug. 4: Zootopia; Sept. 8: Grease (it’s a sing-a-long). For locations, visit sandy.utah.gov/departments/ community-events/movies-in-the-parks. Park Pavilion Movies at KOPFC begins on June 9 with Sing. June 23: Rogue One; June 30: The Lego Batman Movie; July 14: Moana; July 28: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them; Aug. 4: The Secret Life of Pets. Info: kopfc. com/friday-night-flicks Under the Stars at the Amphitheater in Draper features two movies this summer. On Friday, June 16, it’s Sing and on Friday, July 13, it’s Moana. Concessions are available, movies are free. Entertainment begins at 8 p.m., movies start at 9:15. Show up early for good seats. For information visit draper.ut.us/566/movienights.

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This David Lowery flick starring Rooney Mara and Casey Affleck had tongues wagging at Sundance. But be warned: These three made Ain’t Them Bodies Saints together years ago, and that movie deserves to have its negative burned. But Mara and Affleck are coming off huge performances (in Carol and Manchester by the Sea, respectively) and Lowery’s Pete’s Dragon is better than it has any right to be, given its source material. Keep an eye out for this one. (Opens July 7)

inally, we can have some fun strictly at the local level. The Utah Film Center once again presents the LGBTQ film festival Damn These Heels, which runs from July 14-16. At press time, the program hadn’t been announced, but this is an event you don’t want to miss. Each film screens at Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center (50 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City) and there are plenty of viewing options to choose from, some of which get ya the VIP treatment. Visit utahfilmcenter.org/dth2017 for more information. Friday Night Flicks returns to SLC this year and the theme is 1980s and ’90s family favorites. These screenings are outdoors and popcorn is free while it lasts (check website for locations). Here are the flicks: June 2: Ghostbusters; June 9: Hook (note: this film is not a classic, but kids may like it); June 16: E.T.; June 23: The Karate Kid; June 30: Jumanji; July 7: Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (I recently re-watched this and realized that John Hughes was a Republican); July 14: Toy Story. Springville Movies in the Park begins Monday, June 5, with Moana. On June 9, there’s Rogue One. The rest of the films screen on Mondays. June 19: Sing; June 26: The Secret Life of Pets; July 10: Finding Dory; July 17: The BFG. Screenings take place at Spring Acres Park (700 S. 1300 East). Gates open at 7 p.m., movies start at dusk. No booze, dogs or nuclear weapons allowed. There will be food trucks! There’s more information at springville.org/recreation/movies-in-thepark. South Jordan’s Sights and Sounds of Summer includes movies! June 2: The Secret Life of Pets; June 24: Star Wars: The Force Awakens; July 14: Moana; July 29: Finding Dory; Aug. 11: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (for my money, the beast is Eddie Redmayne’s performance). For locations, visit sjc.utah.gov/ upcoming-events. More free movies in the park! This time in Sandy: June 9: Moana; June 17: Wasatch Mountain Film Festival; June 23: Hook; June 30: Field of Dreams; July 14: The Secret Life of


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16 | MAY 18, 2017

Salty Cricket: Three’s Company

Salty Cricket Composers Collective continues its quest to bring modern classical music into the heart of downtown Salt Lake City with the performance Three’s Company. The focus of the concert—and the inspiration for its title—is on two trumpets and one trombone playing modern music pieces (trombonist Matthew Driscoll is pictured). Most notable is the debut of the first piece written entirely by a Salty Cricket composer and performed by students from the Salty Cricket Educational Initiative. Also on the bill is artist-in-residence Noriko Kishi performing audience-favorite solo cello commissions. Salty Cricket Executive Director Victoria PetroEschler says, while many different chamber music groups call Salt Lake City home, no one else is focusing on modern classical music or primarily championing music by composers living and working in Utah. “It’s basically like having the Beethovens of our day, live, right now,” she says. Each concert is unique, featuring pieces that haven’t been performed before and focusing on new composers, musical styles and compositional voices. To match this dynamic mission, Salty Cricket has made its performing home in the Urban Arts Gallery, which also prominently features local modern art. “It’s a really great visual space that we enjoy creating music in because the energy and the excitement are similar and they feed off each other,” Petro-Eschler says. The concert is dedicated to the memory of the late Monty Megargel, who died in April. He was husband to Salty composer Esther Megargel and all-around champion of the initiative. (Kylee Ehmann) Salty Cricket: Three’s Company @ Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-652-0737, May 18, 7:30 p.m., $7.50-$20, saltycricket.org

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

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DAVID VOGEL

KURTIS YOUNG

THURSDAY 5/18

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, MAY 18-24, 2017

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

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FRIDAY 5/19

FRIDAY 5/19

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For 32 years, the Living Traditions Festival has celebrated the many ethnic communities that have contributed to Salt Lake City’s remarkably rich cultural tapestry. Nurtured and developed through the sponsorship and support of the Salt Lake City Arts Council, it offers three days of free festivities that incorporate entertainment, education and enlightenment. Music, dance, art, food, crafts and exhibits—representing people and cultures that settled here from places as far-flung as West Africa, Hawaii, Switzerland, Scotland, China and Eastern Europe—are shared and displayed, offering opportunities to embrace the diversity that makes our city so extraordinary. “The festival is a very important part of the local ethnic and arts communities because it provides a platform and opportunity to share their traditions,” Jesse Schaefer, Salt Lake City Arts Council performing arts program manager, says. “As we move forward, the goal is always to find more opportunities for new groups to be represented and give them the opportunity to share their heritage.” This year’s festival features 17 varieties of food, 35 craft artists and 80 musical acts on three stages (details on p. 35), including internationally renowned Syrian singer/songwriter Omar Souleyman. “The scope of the festival hasn’t changed a lot since its inception,” Schaefer says. “However, we have definitely incorporated more artists and ethnic communities. It’s a unique experience to connect with such a diverse group of cultures.” (Lee Zimmerman) Living Traditions Festival @ Salt Lake City & County Building and Liberty Square, 450 S. 200 East, May 19, 5 p.m.-10 p.m.; May 20, noon-10 p.m.; May 21, noon-7 p.m, free, livingtraditionsfestival.com

In its previous incarnation, the gallery known as Nox Contemporary hosted a series called “Alternative Genres” featuring video installations and performance art from some of the most avant-garde artists in the area. Owner John Sproul has recently reopened Nox in a downsized version at the same space and is gearing up for a new series. Tatiana Svrckova Larsen, currently 8 months pregnant, will feed the audience milk and milk products for her performance-art installation Liquid Gold. The Slovakia-born artist—who’s an adjunct art faculty member at the University of Utah, Weber State University and The Art Institute of Salt Lake City—has used food in other video and performance pieces before, and here turns motherhood into a metaphor for the creative act. An artist, mother, teacher and wife, Larsen takes a multiplicity of roles borne by contemporary women and attempts to associate them in her work. In Liquid Gold, she compels us to re-examine the feminine, as well as our roles as viewers/consumers of art, in a visceral way. What food item could be more symbolic than milk? The title of the performance implies a commentary on the commodification of nourishment, as well as the high premium we place on what mother’s milk represents culturally. The performance is one-night-only in conjunction with the Salt Lake Gallery Stroll, but other works by Larsen—including remnants of the May 19 performance—will be on display throughout the month. (Brian Staker) Tatiana Larsen: Liquid Gold @ Nox Contemporary, 440 S. 400 West, Ste. H, 801-289-6269, May 19, 6-9 p.m.; by appointment through May 31

Before the Downtown Yoga Festival, it was a chore seeking out all the various types of yoga and instructors scattered throughout the city. Now, if you’re looking to branch out into a different technique, or just want to explore what else is out there, the festival can give you that opportunity for a relatively small cost. Over the course of two days, the festival brings dozens of workshops and classes to Westminster College. You can learn arm balance poses from Bailey Swingle, try your hand at paddle-board yoga with Tiffany Harrison, hatha from Santosh Maknikar, belly dancing from Meg Hinds, kundalini from Natalie Buchi—and that’s just the first day. But yoga isn’t simply about the exercise; it’s about living healthy through practice and lifestyle changes. There are classes where you can learn about the psychology of yoga, the proper diet when starting out or incorporating it into your daily routine, even breathing and meditation courses that can make you more energized and alert—all of which you can learn during the twoday event. “Let your inner bliss shine while dancing and enjoying the live music of our talented musicians,” Manikar says via email. “This festival will unite the community in a celebration of life through unique programs with experienced yoga instructors, musicians, chefs and local businesses.” Scheduled guest speakers include Ekat Petrova and Egemen Sanli from San Francisco, Taylor Ring from Washington, Kiran Wadivkar from India and Pia Das from Houston. (Gavin Sheehan) Downtown Yoga Festival @ Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, May 20-21, 9 a.m.6 p.m., $34-$55, downtownyogafest.com

Living Traditions Festival

Tatiana Larsen: Liquid Gold

Downtown Yoga Festival


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National Movement

Ballet West brings local audiences the variety of a National Choreographic Festival. BY KATHERINE PIOLI comments@cityweekly.net

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hen Artistic Director Adam Sklute took the helm at Ballet West in 2007, one of the first and most daring ideas he implemented was a new program in the company’s annual lineup: Innovations, a showcase for new ballet choreography created exclusively by members of Ballet West. The program looked to the future of the classical dance form, giving audiences a taste of contemporary work and offering creative opportunities to the company’s dancers, making space for a new generation of art makers. Each season since that first year, Innovations has been the season finale for Ballet West—until now. Instead, the company concludes its season with a brand new endeavor called the National Choreographic Festival. Innovations still exists but on a smaller scale; this year, it was performed in Park City, and not as part of the regular season. Though this is the National Choreographic Festival’s first season for audiences, it has been a long six years in the making for Sklute, and a lot might hinge on the extent of its early success. If everything goes as planned, Sklute says the event could become Utah’s next Sundance Festival, but for dance, presenting exclusive world premieres—something that would place Salt Lake City decisively at the vanguard. “As we move along,” he says, “I see this festival developing fringe fest offshoots, modern dance showcases and competitions.” During this inaugural season, the National Choreographic Festival runs for two consecutive weekends, hosting four visiting professional dance companies— Sarasota Ballet and Pennsylvania Ballet on opening weekend; Pacific Northwest Ballet and Oregon Ballet Theater on closing weekend. It also features new works by seven internationally renowned choreographers: Richardo Graziano, Trey McIntyre and Nicolo Fonte on the first weekend; and Helen Pickett, Annabelle Lopez, Val Caniparoli and Oliver Oguma on the second. Ballet West company members still get their hour on the stage, performing three of the seven works—those by Caniparoli, Oguma and Fonte—but the participation of other accomplished groups from across the county is, according to Sklute, an essential part of this new project.

ANGELA STERLING

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DANCE

It’s not that Ballet West couldn’t take a piece from any of these great choreographers and do it justice. Our local group has proved itself more than capable of tackling some of ballet’s most explorative, modern works. In 2015, Ballet West was invited to perform at New York City’s Joyce Theater after catching the eye of its executive director. There, Ballet West premiered Pickett’s Games. The choreographer and educator’s newest piece, Terra, is included in this inaugural festival. Games, a sexually charged piece about a love triangle, was a risky choice for Utah audiences, but when the company took the performance on tour, the dancers were praised by New York critics. When Terra comes to the Eccles, it will be performed by dancers from the Oregon Ballet Theater, for whom the piece was commissioned. Sklute, for one, is excited to see how Pickett’s choreography fits with other performers. “Choreography looks so different when created on different dancers,” he says. “Each company has their own unique style and look.” Seeing these variances of style—not just between choreographers, but among the companies—is part of what makes this festival such an amazing opportunity. Of course, the one work that Sklute is most excited for audiences to see is that of Ballet West’s resident choreographer, Fonte. “I adore his work, obviously,” says Sklute, who hired him in 2012. “But I really think this is shaping up to be his best.” Fonte’s Fox on the Doorstep tells a personal story: Not long ago while working in Aspen, Colo., the choreographer opened the back door of his mountain cottage to find a rare

Pacific Northwest Ballet dancers Angelica Generosa and Raphael Bouchard

white fox staring back at him. The animal calmly studied him, then turned into the woods. Hours later, Fonte received word that his father had passed away. “This piece is his way of working through that whole experience,” Sklute says. “It’s really moving, melodic and emotionally powerful. The dancers are diving into this with their bodies, heart and soul.” What Sklute has managed to pull off for this first National Choreographic Festival is nothing short of amazing. After years of reaching out to other organizations—being thwarted by busy touring schedules or the beginning of other companies’ summer breaks—it is no small feat to have rounded up four in-demand companies for this Salt Lake City engagement. But this might not be as big as it ultimately gets. “I want to get to point where we are able to invite every company in America, big and small, so the public can really see what’s out there,” Sklute says. CW

BALLET WEST NATIONAL CHOREOGRAPHIC FESTIVAL

Eccles Theater 131 S. Main 801-355-2787 May 19-20 & 26-27 7:30 p.m. Saturday matinees, 2 p.m. $50 arttix.artsaltlake.org


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Utah artist Willow Skye-Biggs presents her inaugural exhibition Tastes Like Mandy, a multimedia exploration of queer themes and challenges of accepting one’s own identity, at Utah Museum of Contemporary Art Codec Gallery (20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4101, utahmoca.org) May 19-Aug. 12.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

David Lee and Nancy Takacs Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, 801-521-3818, May 18, 7 p.m., kensandersrarebooks.com Sara Jarman: Elephants on the Rampage: The Eclipse of American Conservatism Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, May 24, 7 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Shannon Hale: Real Friends The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, May 20, 5 p.m., kingsenglish.com Spencer McBride: Pulpit and Nation The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, May 18, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

MAY 18, 2017 | 19

Utah Symphony All Star Evening: Dvorák’s Violin Concerto Abravanel Hall, 123 W.

LITERATURE

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CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

ImprovBroadway ImprovBroadway, 496 N. 900 East, Provo, 909-260-2509, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., improvbroadway.com Marcus & Guy Siedel 194 S. 400 West, 801-5325233, May 18, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Open-Mic Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Shawn Paulsen Wiseguys, 269 25th St., 801-622-5588, Ogden, May 19-20, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Steve O Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801532-5233, May 18-21, Friday & Saturday, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m.; Sunday, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

Ballet West: National Choreographic Festival Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through May 27, Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday 2 & 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org (see p. 18) Belly Dance Super Hero Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, May 19, 7p.m., artsaltlake.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

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Betty Blue Eyes Hale Center Theatre, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through May 27, 11 a.m., 3 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., haletheater.org Disney’s Beauty and the Beast The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855944-2787, through May 20, theziegfeldtheater.com Don Giovanni Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, May 19, 7:30 p.m.; May 21, 2 p.m., utahopera.org Captain AmericanFORK Desert Star Theatre, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-266-2600, through June 3, times vary, desertstar.biz Hairspray The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3300, through June 3, ThursdaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee 2 p.m., grandtheatrecompany.com The Mountaintop Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, through May 21, FridaySaturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m.; Saturday matinee, May 20, 4 p.m., goodcotheatre.com Pirates of The Carabeener Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, through June 10, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org To Kill a Mockingbird Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801984-9000, through May 22; 12:30 p.m., 4 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., hct.org The Will Rogers Follies: A Life in Revue Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through May 21, TuesdayThursday, 7 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Sunday, 2 p.m., pioneertheatre.org

South Temple, 801-355-2787, May 23, 7 p.m., artsaltlake.org Salty Cricket: Three’s Company Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., May 18, 7:30 p.m., saltycricket.org (see p. 16) American West Symphony: Pictures at an Exhibition Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Salt Lake City, 801-523-7084, May 22, 7:30p.m., americanwestsymphony.com Sonic Nature Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 877-425-1537, May 20, 7:30p.m., saltlakesymphony.org


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SPECIAL EVENTS FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Great Salt Lake Bird Festival Davis County Legacy Event Center, 151 S. 1100 West, Farmington, 801-451-3286, May 18-22, daviscountyutah.gov Celebrate Your Pet South Utah Valley Animal Shelter, 582 W. 3000 North, Spanish Fork, May 20, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., suvas.org Downtown Yoga Festival Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, May 20-21, 9 a.m., downtownyogafest.com (see p. 16) Festival of Roses Skaggs Catholic Center Campus, 18000 S. 300 East, Draper, May 19-21, sjb-parish.org Living Traditions Festival Washington Square, 450 S. 200 East, May 19-21, livingtraditionsfestival.com (see p. 16) South Weber Model Railroad Club Free Public Run Day Canyon Meadows Park, 631 E. Petersen Parkway, South Weber, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., swmrrc.org Sugar House Pub Crawl, Sugar House, 2100 S. Highland Drive, 801-328-2329, May 20, noon-4 p.m., sugarhousechamber.org/shpubcrawl

TALKS & LECTURES

2020: The Trajectory of Women in Utah Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, May 23, 6 p.m., utahwomensgivingcircle.com 1 Million Cups Impact Hub, 150 S. State, Ste. 1, 385-202-6008, Mondays through June 14, 9 a.m., hubsaltlake.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

All of Us Beasts Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through July 7. Artist reception May 19, 6-9 p.m. Art at the Main Spring Show 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through June 10, artatthemain.com Barbara Ellard Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through June 9, saltlakearts.org Bill Lee Gallery at Library Square, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through June 9, slcpl.org Brad Teare Pioneer Memorial Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through May 20, pioneertheatre.org/loge-gallery Gemma Joon Bae: When I Called You by Name You Came to Me and Became a Flower Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801594-8611, through May 25, slcpl.org

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Jeff Juhlin: Shifting Ground A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through June 3, agallery.com Joseph Cipro: Cosmic Musings Gallery 814, 814 E. 100 South, 801-533-0204, through July 31 Kelly O’Neill: rend/er UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through June 3, utahmoca.org Laura Hope Mason: Abstract Landscapes Art Barn/Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through June 9, saltlakearts.org Mapping & Unpacking: Mixed Media and Sculpture by Bret Hanson Gallery at Library Square, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through June 9, slcpl.org May the Fourth: Heroes and Villains Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-2300820, through June 4, urbanartsgallery.org Michael Ryan Handley: Sublimation UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Sept. 9, utahmoca.org Petecia Le Fawnhawk: Desert Elements Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801-355338, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Rona Pondick & Robert Feintuch: Heads, Hands, Feet; Sleeping, Holding, Dreaming, Dying UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, 801-3284201, through July 15, utahmoca.org Rosalie Winard Art Barn/Finch Lane Galleries, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-596-5000, through June 9, saltlakearts.org Stephanie Espinoza and Alexis Hansen: Unnatural Landscapes Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, through May 31. Artist reception, May 19, 6-9 p.m., bit.ly/2pVwvlA Tatiana Larsen: Liquid Gold Nox Contemporary, 440 S. 400 West, through May 31. Artist reception, May 19, 6-9 p.m. (see p. 16) Utah Watercolor Society Spring Exhibition Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, 801-965-5100, through June 28, culturalcelebration.org Wild America: Process and Preservation Modern West Fine Art, 177 E 200 South, 801-3553383, through June 10, modernwestfineart.com Willow Skye-Biggs: Tastes Like Mandy Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, May 19-Aug. 12, utahmoca.org (see p. 19) Whitney Horrocks: Personae Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through May 26, slcpl.org Woman/Women The Leonardo, 209 E. 500 South, 801-531-9800, through Aug. 31, theleonardo.org

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Riverhorse Rising

An inviting mix of old and new at Riverhorse, Provisions and Imperial House. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @Critic1

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891 Open Mon-Wed: 9am-6pm Thu-Sat: 9am-9pm

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ne of my more hyperbolic food writer colleagues recently proclaimed, concerning Park City’s Riverhorse on Main, that “nothing has changed there in decades”—and he didn’t say it meaning that consistency or classicism could be good things. It’s true that the restaurant opened in 1987, but it’s outrageous to claim that nothing has changed there in the ensuing 30 years. For starters, Executive Chef Seth Adams and business partner Dave Spence purchased the restaurant in 2011 and did a complete overhaul—with particular attention to décor and ambiance, as well as the menu. Sure, Riverhorse isn’t a cutting-edge eatery, which Adams freely admits; longtime customers would mutiny if the macadamia nut-crusted halibut were ever removed from the menu. But something keeps folks coming back to this iconic Main Street eatery. So far, according to Adams, business has been better than ever this year. I got to see Riverhorse up close and personal a couple of weeks ago when I was there to help judge Chef Wars, a charity event to benefit the Park City-based pet adoption and rescue organization, Nuzzles & Co. During that time, I dined at both the flagship restaurant and their new café and general store called Provisions, and also got a good look at Spence’s and Adams’ new Imperial House Hotel. To think this crew has been resting in its laurels is ludicrous. Despite the density of restaurants per square-foot in Park City, it’s surprisingly difficult to find places—especially on Main Street—to enjoy breakfast, brunch or a simple lunch. Stocking your fridge or pantry is even harder. The recently opened Riverhorse Provisions provides quick bites, beverages, grocery items, picnic lunches and even in-home chef services. During a morning visit to Provisions to pick up a Mountain English muffin ($7), I ran into Chef Jerry Garcia. You might remember him as co-owner and chef of Park City’s beloved (and dearly missed) Chez Betty restaurant, but he’s now part of the Riverhorse team. Oh, and that sandwich? It’s not your daddy’s egg McMuffin. It’s high-quality, freshly baked and stuffed sky-high with soft, fluffy scrambled eggs with a layer of smoky artisan bacon on the bottom, topped with gooey

JOHN TAYLOR

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DINE

This Spring, Try Our PARK CITY EATS

Beehive Promontory cheddar. It’s one of the best breakfast sandwiches I’ve ever gotten my lips around. Other breakfast menu items include quiche of the day ($8), polenta French toast sticks ($6), fresh buttermilk biscuits and gravy ($8), strawberry fritters ($6) and steel-cut oats ($6). There’s a downstairs café at Provisions, as well as some patio seating overlooking Main Street, where customers can enjoy their food and drink—including wine and beer—or take it to-go. The lunch menu includes an array of sandwiches, wraps and burgers, as well as salads, soups and the house specialty: poutine. There are three versions: classic ($12), veggie ($13) and the Wild One ($14), which includes elk and buffalo, scallions, sweet peppers, sour cream, cheese curds and brown gravy. For dessert, don’t miss the churro bowl ($6) with vanilla ice cream, caramel and chocolate sauce. They also sell a wide range of items such as artisan cheeses and meats, breads from Red Bicycle, deli items, imported pastas and sauces, olive oils and vinegars, even highend shampoo at not very high-end prices. As for Riverhorse on Main, anyone who thinks the menu is outdated ought to consider appetizers like the ahi tuna tartare trio ($19). The raw ahi tuna is prepared three ways: tossed with jalapeño and passion fruit (my favorite); poke-style with a light soy-ginger treatment; or with blood orange and fennel. The plate comes with accoutrements like crispy wontons, rice crackers, lotus root and pickled papaya. Another stunning starter was a new spring/summer menu addition: shrimp and lobster scampi ($21). Butter is the magical ingredient in this dish, as tender morsels of lobster tail and shrimp are bathed in a lovely, light, buttery sauce with limoncello, fresh fava beans, chanterelle mushrooms and aioli. It’s served with toasted baguette slices for sopping up all that savory sauce. The hand-cut buffalo tartare ($16) with egg yolk, dijonnaise, fresh horseradish and capers also is outstanding. From longtime managers and servers, to newer staffers, service here is way above par. While it might seem old-fashioned to some,

Macadamia nut-crusted halibut at Riverhorse on Main. I also enjoy the live music during dinner hours, which seems especially appropriate in a ski town, no matter the time of year. As I enjoyed a ridiculously tender braised buffalo shank, a piano-singer duo performed a soft rendition of The Beatles’ “Come Together,” something I’d have to say I’ve never heard during suppertime before, but it was quite entertaining. The braised buffalo short rib with gremolata was stupendous itself, but the entire dish was made even more delectable with grilled asparagus, cheddar grits and wild mushroom cream sauce. Should you be enticed by the above into considering a Park City getaway, I’d point you in the direction of the Riverhorse’s Imperial House, where guest accommodations are, as the kids say, sick. These aren’t typical guest rooms, but rather a sprawling guest residence that includes four or five (I lost count) bathrooms, four bedrooms, a kitchen that’s larger than my living room, reading nooks, a terrace and much more, all spread out over multiple floors. The eye-popping design—mostly created by Adams’ wife, Casey—is modern, but comfortable and inviting; paintings on the walls are original works of art, some for sale. So, if you’re in the market for a little Park City luxury, Riverhorse is a great place to start. CW

RIVERHORSE ON MAIN

540 Main, Park City 435-649-3536 riverhorseparkcity.com RIVERHORSE PROVISIONS

221 Main, Park City 435-649-0799 riverhorseprovisions.com IMPERIAL HOUSE

221 Main, Park City 435-649-0799 imperialparkcity.com


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5370 S. 900 E. / 801.266.4182

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433

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AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER @Critic1

“In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s” -CityWeekly

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Zucca Underground

Bye-Bye, Ikigai

I hate it when this happens. Contrary to what many believe, I don’t know a single restaurant critic who relishes the misery of restaurateurs or celebrates the shuttering of eateries—even the terrible ones. It pains me to see any restaurant go out of business and its staff sent packing. But it’s especially sad when an excellent restaurant closes, as is the case with Ikigai, which locked its doors permanently last week. I, and many others, will miss it as we did its predecessors, Naked Fish and Mikado, and hope that owner Johnny Kwon will be back in business with another outstanding eatery soon. Before closing the doors, Kwon invited a few guests, along with some former and current chefs, for one final celebratory dinner. “We’re going out with our heads up high and celebrating the amazing memories created with our restaurant,” he says.

STORE 2991 E. 3300 S. | 385.528.0181

★★★★★

Gateway Gospel

There are lots of Sunday brunches to enjoy at many restaurants around town, but I know of only one gospel brunch. On various Sundays, from 10 a.m.-1 p.m., The Gateway hosts a Gospel Brunch at the Grand Hall (18 N. Rio Grande St., SLC). The brunch features a bloody mary bar sponsored by Tito’s Handmade Vodka and music by the Debra Bonner Unity Gospel Choir. Local favorite Cubby’s Chicago Beef offers its new spicy-beef and garden-fresh breakfast items, with beverages provided by 3 Cups Coffee. Brunch tickets are $19 per person, plus $6 (optional) for two beverages at the bloody mary bar. Upcoming dates include May 21 (benefiting SLC Presents) and June 11 (benefiting the Utah Pride Center). Additional drink tickets are $3 apiece. Visit bit.ly/gospelbrunchgateway for dates and ticket info.

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Zucca Goes Underground

Ogden’s Zucca Trattoria (225 25th St., 801-475-7077, myzucca.com) has launched a posh speakeasy called, aptly, The Underground. The new hot spot features a full bar, overstuffed chairs, buffet-style dining and live music from performers like the talented Brooke Mackintosh. It’s also available as a private event space. Quote of the week: “Cooking breakfast and brunch professionally really kind of ruined breakfast service for me.” —Anthony Bourdain Send tips to: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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The Chachas Effect Lake Effect is SLC’s bold new bar. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @Critic1

D

engine that motors Lake Effect, and he has created a watering hole that you could easily mistake for one in New York City, San Francisco or Paris, for that matter. I don’t think anyone ever used the word “gorgeous” to describe The Hotel or Shaggy’s, but Lake Effect is just that, as Chachas has totally overhauled the space. Since I’m no interior designer, I risk doing injustice to the décor makeover. Quite simply, it’s stunning—from tufted highback chairs in Louis XIV hues, padded leather booths and a floor-to-ceiling wine display, to the bar’s clever incorporation of both natural and industrial design elements (motorcycle engine chains made into chandeliers, for instance). Even the restrooms are memorable: The women’s is wallpapered and feminine (so I’m told), while the men’s is dark and decorated with erotic photography. There is, however, a kink or two. On my first visit, my party had to wait at least 10 minutes while a hostess attempted to scan patrons’ IDs with an iPhone. Once seated, it still took quite some time to quench that thirst, as it was a busy Friday evening and cocktail service was slow. However, Lake Effect had just opened, so hopefully those sorts of glitches have been remedied. You know you’re going to be faced with a bevy of beverage choices when your server hands you a spiral-bound drink menu—

which lists original and classic cocktails, as well as liquors, beers and wines. Hunkered into a lengthy booth, we very much enjoyed a round of Bee’s Knees cocktails made with lemon, acacia honey syrup, bitters and Hendrick’s gin swapped out for the Tanqueray used at Lake Effect. The bartender didn’t complain about our gin choice and was more than happy to accommodate. I was pleasantly surprised by the food selection; it certainly isn’t a typical bar menu. There are definite Mexican and Spanish influences, with dishes and tapas like paella, octopus and chorizo, tacos, churro funnel cake, carnitas and even the Mexican burger with garlic shrimp, avocado, pickled onion and jalapeño cream cheese. The slow-roasted cochinito with four housemade tortillas made me very happy. If you’re looking for other flavors, there are also items like a Cubano sandwich, wagyu steak, cinnamon pancakes and a BLT—something for everyone. The beer and wine selections are uncommonly expansive, especially for a place focusing on craft cocktails. There are 25 wines available by the glass, dozens more

The Bee’s Knees by the bottle, and some 130 beers that run the gamut from Bud Light to Wasatch Jalapeño Cream Ale, Unibroue Belgian Tripel or Lindemans Framboise Raspberry Lambic. Again, there’s something for everybody. CW

LAKE EFFECT

155 W. 200 South 801-532-2068 lakeeffectslc.com

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espite the state of Utah’s increasing insensitivity and seemingly downright distain for consumers and sellers of alcohol and those who enjoy imbibing, we’ve still seen a recent boom in cocktail bars. Just in the past few months, Water Witch, Purgatory, Prohibition and Tinwell opened to hurrahs all-around, joining the ranks of Murphy’s, Whiskey Street, Bourbon House, BTG—you name it. One of the newest spots for bellying up to the bar is Lake Effect, an expansive space on 200 South that most recently was The Hotel, and some will remember as Shaggy’s. Longtime SLC bar vet Nick Chachas— who once worked at Shaggy’s, as well as Gracie’s and other adult fun zones—is the

DRINK

DEREK CARLISLE

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

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TED SCHEFFLER

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

La Oaxaqueña’s tlayudas La Oaxaqueña

Until recently, I’d never found tlayudas—a tostada-like regional Oaxacan treat—in a Utah restaurant. This small, inexpensive eatery serves up not only tlayudas, but other specialties from southern Mexico. Grilled carne asada steak comes with rice, refried beans, salad and two housemade tortillas—and those tortillas are other-worldly, among the best I’ve ever eaten. House specials include a cheese-covered cactus dish called nopal Zapoteco and Oaxacan-style tamales. The restaurant also serves breakfast, with dishes like chilaquiles, entomatadas, eggs with ham, chorizo or sausage, and enfrijoladas—a type of enchilada smothered in creamy black bean sauce and queso fresco. The eatery offers five classic takes on moles, and they’re as delectable as you’ll find anywhere; the mole negro in particular is an incredibly complex and layered taste experience. Beverages range from Mexican Coca-Cola to milkshakes, sweet corn with milk (atole de elote), horchata and fruit drinks with flavors like guava, passion fruit, mango and tamarind. Mexican foodstuffs and imported goods are also for sale—everything from huaraches and serving vessels to cheese-bread and toys. Reviewed May 4. 499 E. 2700 South, 801-484-6584

now serving breakfast

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GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net Spitz

You’d be nuts not to try Spitz’ street-cart döner, which is available as a sandwich with focaccia or as a lavash wrap, with a choice of beef and lamb, chicken, falafel, mixed meats or veggies. The restaurant’s beef and lamb shawarma-style mixture is outstanding: perfectly spiced and generously portioned. Ditto the falafel. It’s a popular destination no matter the time of day, so when you visit, order from the excellent selection of craft cocktails, sangria, wine or beer right off the bat, because you might be there a while. But the service is very friendly, and the vibe is funky and fun, with eclectic music. Multiple locations, spitzslc.com

Now Open

Hector’s serves up some of the tastiest south-ofthe-border fare in all of the Salt Lake Valley. Popular combo plates include carne asada, machaca, chorizo, chimichangas and chile relleno plates. The fresh guacamole and housemade picante sauce are stars here. You also can’t go wrong with one of the Mexican sandwiches called tortas—especially the delicious carnitas one. 2901 E. 3300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-487-3850

Robin’s Nest

MON-WED:11-9PM THURS-SAT:11-11PM 60 EAST 800 SOUTH SLC, UT 84111 (385) 528-3675 THEEKLEKTIK.COM

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD & Fresh Nayarit Style Seafood

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801.908.5727

Chakra Lounge and Bar

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City Open 5 - 1am Mon-Thurs • 10am - 1am Fri-Sun Offering full bar, with innovative elixers, late night menu & weekend brunch

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Nayarit

The

Mi Lindo

Next to Himalayan Kitchen

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Robin’s Nest was founded on a passion for an allAmerican favorite: the sandwich. All of the sauces and dressings are housemade, and everything is prepared fresh daily. The menu offers soups, salads and more than 25 sandwiches that are all unique to the restaurant. Try options like the Aloha Oink, with Black Forest ham, provolone and pineapple salsa on ciabatta; or the Rooster Call, with chicken salad, red onion, provolone and sweet honey Dijon. All sandwiches come with orzo pasta or housemade chips, which can be enjoyed inside or outside, right on downtown’s Main Street. 311 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-466-6378, robinsnestslc.com

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen

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AMAZING FOOD, LIBATIONS, ART & MUSIC!

145 E. 1300 S.

Indian Style Tapas

Hector’s Mexican Food

MAY 18, 2017 | 31


FILM REVIEW

Gods and Monsters

Alien: Covenant can’t decide whether to get philosophical or homicidal. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

I

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CINEMA

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f you find yourself befuddled by what the Alien movie franchise has become, the line forms behind me. What began nearly 40 years ago as a creepy extraterrestrial slasher movie with a memorable tag-line (“In space, no one can hear you scream”) and an even more memorable double-jawed, acid-blooded antagonist kept finding new incarnations in subsequent installments. James Cameron turned it into the shoot’em-up action of Aliens, Joss Whedon wrote a weird farewell to Sigourney Weaver’s Ripley in Alien Resurrection, and the whole thing degenerated into unapologetic genre cash-grab with two Alien vs. Predator movies. By the time 2012’s Prometheus rolled around—which played coy at the outset as to whether it existed in that same universe—it was worth asking whether being part of the Alien franchise told an audience anything any more about what they could expect. O Xenomorph, where art thou? Alien: Covenant finds director Ridley Scott returning to many of the Big Ideas that were swirling around in Prometheus, but it grows increasingly confusing as to why he’s packaging those ideas in this particular cinematic world. While this might in many ways be more instantly recognizable as an Alien movie than Prometheus was, its themes clang against the delivery system so discordantly that it can be heard even in the vacuum of space. Set in 2105, Covenant serves as more or less a direct 10-years-later follow-up to Prometheus, beginning with a vessel on a multi-year journey to colonize a distant planet. But, in the fine tradition of the original Alien, the crew of the Covenant is awakened early to deal with a crisis, and then they discover a previously unknown planet with an Earth-like atmosphere nearby. When they investigate, they find … well, let’s just say that

it doesn’t take long before things are bursting out of people in particularly vivid ways. It should come as no spoiler that these events are linked to the fate of the ship seen heading off into the unknown at the end of Prometheus. A prologue reunites the “synthetic” David (Michael Fassbender) with his inventor, Peter Weyland (Guy Pearce), discussing creators and their creations many years before the Prometheus events. Indeed, Covenant continues the existential musings of Prometheus, delving into the impulse to be godlike both through creation and destruction. Even the title of this new film hints at the theological shift from Prometheus, turning the ship into a kind of Noah’s Ark with paired-off crew members, and addressing the co-existing responsibilities of creator and created: What do we owe to God, and what does God owe to us? That’s heady material. But the script— credited to veteran John Logan and firsttime screenwriter Dante Harper—doesn’t feel nearly as serious as Prometheus did. Indeed, of all the post-1979 Alien installments, this feels like the one most determined to mimic its formula even beyond the premature awakening of the crew: landing party, face-huggers, questions of quarantine procedure, tough female protagonist (Katherine Waterston as secondin-command Daniels), ineffectual captain (Billy Crudup) and an enigmatic android (Fassbender turning in a typically superb performance). Scott gets creatively grotesque as his various aliens emerge, show-

Katherine Waterston in Alien: Covenant. ing genuinely terrified people trying to comprehend the horror of their situation. Then, for the finale, Scott shifts hard toward Aliens, as two solid action sequences find Daniels and the Covenant’s pilot (Danny McBride) fighting off a Xenomorph, including using a big mechanical claw. If there was some uneasiness about Prometheus feeling at all like the Alien movies people loved first and best, there’s no such confusion here. Instead, the confusion rests in why the Big Ideas are jammed uncomfortably into this movie. It feels almost like a trick—an attempt by Scott to reflect on mortality and hubris but sneak it past an audience by wrapping it in a familiar franchise package. Ambitious though it may be, the elements never pull together in Covenant, leaving only reminders that the original served up its own fascinating ideas—about dehumanization and domination—without ever underlining them. Like the monster at its center, this franchise keeps changing shape, but like most mutations, that doesn’t mean it’s an improvement. CW

ALIEN: COVENANT

BB.5 Michael Fassbender Katherine Waterston Danny McBride Rated R

TRY THESE Alien (1979) Sigourney Weaver Tom Skerritt Rated R

Aliens (1986) Sigourney Weaver Michael Biehn Rated R

Alien Resurrection (1997) Sigourney Weaver Winona Ryder Rated R

Prometheus (2012) Noomi Rapace Michael Fassbender Rated R


NEW THIS WEEK

Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. ALIEN: COVENANT BB.5 See review on p. 32. Opens May 19 at theaters valleywide. (R) DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL [not yet reviewed] The latest misadventures of the harried middle-schooler from Jeff Kinney’s popular books. Opens May 19 at theaters valleywide. (PG) EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING [not yet reviewed] A teenager (Amandla Stenberg) forced by illness never to leave her house struggles with first love. Opens May 19 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

FILMEXICO TOUR At Broadway Centre Cinemas, May 19-25. (NR) FRANTZ At Park City Film Series, May 19-20, 8 p.m. & May 21, 6 p.m. (NR) LAST MEN IN ALEPPO At Main Library, May 23, 7 p.m. (NR) MARCH OF THE PENGUINS At Main Library, May 24, 2 p.m. (G) SON OF THE SHEIKH At Edison Street Events, May 18-19, 7:30 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES 3 GENERATIONS BB.5 How did a movie with a killer cast and a timely subject become a castoff with a changed title (from About Ray) released 18 months after premiering? The story deals with 16-year-old Ray (Elle Fanning) already beginning female-to-male transition, and living with his single mother Maggie (Naomi Watts) and lesbian grandmother (Susan Sarandon). At the heart of the narrative is an idea anchored in an unconventional family of artsy intellectuals: What happens when theoretical open-mindedness collides with the reality of your child’s life? It would have been risky to make the film entirely about the family coping with Ray’s transition, but it would have been a better than low-key drama that pulls Maggie’s point of view from the forefront. It was never really entirely about Ray, and maybe still ends up being too much about Ray. (R)—SR KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD BBB Director Guy Ritchie turns his attention from Sherlock Holmes

CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

SNATCHED BB It’s rare to think about a Hollywood comedy: “That movie wasn’t long enough.” Amy Schumer plays Emily, an underachieving slacker whose vacation to Ecuador with her mom (Goldie Hawn) is interrupted by being kidnapped for ransom. Schumer’s in her wheelhouse as a self-absorbed mess, and she’s challenged for movie MVP status by Ike Barinholtz as her coddled brother. But it’s also a movie that wastes both Hawn’s return to the screen after a long absence and Joan Cusack. More significantly, the jokes are often blunted by a script that seems to have lost huge chunks of material. The amusing stuff here doesn’t build to bigger laughs; almost nothing gets a chance to build at all. Somewhere, there’s a middle ground between a comedy unwilling to cut any punchline, and one that doesn’t know how to set one up. (R)—SR THE WALL BBB Some concepts should be virtually impossible to screw up; this one comes precariously close. In 2007 Iraq, Army Rangers Matthews (John Cena) and Isaac (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) investigate a construction site where a sniper has taken out multiple people, only to find that they, too, have become targets. The script pins the soldiers down with seemingly no hope of rescue, and director Doug Liman builds terrific tension out of the scenario and the resourcefulness required for survival. The trouble starts when Isaac begins communicating with the sniper (Laith Nakli) by radio, turning the antagonist into something like a James Bond super-villain. Throw in a seemingly obligatory redemption angle and you’ve got a psychologically overstuffed script that only avoids collapse thanks to a couple of stellar set pieces and an idea that shouldn’t require saying: Sniper, trapped soldiers, whaddaya need, a road map? (R)—SR

MONDAY 22ND

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MAY 18, 2017 | 33

SOUTH BOUND (2015)

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FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: MAY 19TH - MAY 25TH

more than just movies at brewvies

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OBIT BBB If there’s one thing that should be even less cinematic than writing about dead people, it’s people talking about the act of writing about dead people. Nevertheless, director Vanessa Gould finds a compelling documentary subject in The New York Times staff obituary writers tasked with summarizing the lives of the famous, important and often underappreciated. She covers a variety of individually interesting topics—from the embarrassment of getting facts wrong to decisions regarding who warrants major coverage—while hooking the story to a specific assignment, as writer Bruce Weber researches the life of a pioneering media consultant. Mostly, however, it becomes a unique combination of celebrating the art of nuts-and-bolts journalism and recognizing

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

to a famous Brit hero who probably actually existed. This telling revamps the familiar story so that the title sword-puller (Charlie Hunnam) is a streetwise orphan who reluctantly accepts his role as savior of his people. Their opponent is Vortigern (a coldly sniveling Jude Law), the usurping king who’s using dark magic—including a deal with an octopus-witch—to amass power. The story details, pulled from Arthurian legends and the writers’ own butts, are just bizarre enough to be intriguing, resulting in a sort of amiable insanity. Ritchie has an annoying fondness for skipping past a scene only to hop back later and fill us in on the details, but he also has a knack for breezy, anachronistic sarcasm and un-chaotic action scenes. Excessive? Yes—just the right amount. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

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NORMAN: THE MODERATE RISE AND TRAGIC FALL OF A NEW YORK FIXER BBB The subtle shift in the character of Norman Oppenheimer (Richard Gere) makes for a surprisingly fascinating story of addiction that’s not actually to power. That seems to be the direction Joseph Cedar’s narrative will take, as wheeler-dealer Norman befriends on-the-rise Israeli politician Micha Eshel (Lior Ashkenazi), who eventually becomes prime minister. But while Norman’s motivation initially appears to be money and power he can accrue through connections, Gere’s performance turns this story—beginning from a terrifically directed sequence at Eshel’s inauguration— into a cautionary tale about the rush a lonely man experiences when people listen to him because he makes things happen. Cedar remains perhaps a bit too coy about Norman’s backstory, and leaves Eshel’s ambition under-developed. Through several slick montage sequences, however—showcasing a sensational supporting cast including Charlotte Gainsbourg, Steve Buscemi and Michael Sheen—Norman paints a sad and sympathetic portrait of how being needed can turn into a substitute for being loved. Opens May 19 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

the many fascinating details that can make a single human life noteworthy. It might inevitably get pokey in its reliance on talking heads and archival footage, but it’s always fascinating learning about people and the things that make their lives unique—and that applies both to these writers’ subjects and the writers themselves. Opens May 19 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR


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4 | MAY 18, 2017

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

They Alive!

TV

Heyump! Noonie. Naw.

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt is back, as are Twin Peaks and Neon Joe. Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Friday, May 19 (Netflix)

Season Premiere: Where will the perkiest TV character ever created (cartoons included) go in Season 3? Now that she has her post-doomsday-cult-imprisonment GED, Kimmy (Ellie Kemper) is entering higher education: “After high school, most white girls go to college,” Kimmy’s landlady, Lillian (Carol Kane), explains. Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt also welcomes back everybody’s favorite cult leader and No. 1 draft pick for his own spinoff series, Richard Wayne Gary Wayne (Jon Hamm), as well as guest stars like Ray Liotta, Laura Dern, Jinx killer Robert Durst (actually, Fred Armisen) and Beyoncé (actually, Tituss Burgess). We’ll also learn that Jaqueline (Jane Krakowski) attended Trump University, which makes sooo much sense. Still full of heart, Kimmy is as weird, warm and hilarious as ever.

12 Monkeys Friday, May 19 (Syfy)

Season Premiere: Before the 2016-17 TV season’s onslaught of time-travel shows (Timeless, Time After Time, Making History, two of which have been canceled), there was Syfy’s 12 Monkeys. There was also Doctor Who, but there’s always been Doctor Who. Anyway: 12 Monkeys, based on the 1995 movie of the same name, doesn’t so much replicate the Bruce Willis/Brad Pitt classic as warp the hell out of it, with Cole (Aaron Stanford) expanding on Willis’ stopthe-apocalypse tenacity while Goines (show-stealer Emily Hampshire) takes Pitt’s mental patient to giddy new levels. Season 3 is the final chapter for 12 Monkeys, and Syfy is blowing out all 10 episodes over three nights—I’d suggest a Hulu binge of the first two seasons before sending off the TV Time Travel Trend. Except Doctor Who, because, Doctor Who.

Twin Peaks Sunday, May 21 (Showtime)

Return: Sure, it seems like you’ve been reading/ignoring this TV column forever, but it didn’t even exist during the original 1990-91 run of Twin Peaks—no, really! David

Lynch’s long-long-long-awaited Showtime revival takes place 25 years later, consists of 18 episodes, features 200 characters, and … that’s about all anyone knows. The new Twin Peaks hasn’t been shown to critics, and Lynch and co-creator Mark Frost have been tight with details beyond name-dropping guest stars (Laura Dern, Ashley Judd, Tim Roth, Naomi Watts and Robert Forster among them). This Pacific Northwest bizarre-noir was too much for ’90s television to handle and, even after dozens of subsequent ripoffs (sorry, “homages”), no one should doubt Lynch’s ability to push the envelope on Showtime. Now, where’s the pie?

Neon Joe: Werewolf Hunter Monday, May 22 (Adult Swim)

Season Premiere: Now that Neon Joe (Jon Glaser) has exacted revenge upon his father, defeated the evil Cybots and retired from the werewolf-hunting game (see how much you missed in Season 1?), he can finally realize his lifelong dream: Opening his own tiki bar, Oahu Joe’s. But, before you can say “Heyup!” Joe’s pulled back into supernatural danger to take on a rival werewolf hunter, billionaire playboy Plaid Jeff (Godfrey, Steven Universe). Glaser’s eyepatched mercenary with an incomprehensible Cajun accent might be one of the most ridiculous Adult Swim characters ever, but at least he’s concise: Neon Joe’s second season is only five episodes long, running nightly and wrapping up on Friday. Jason Sudeikis (R.I.P., Son of Zorn) shows up in the premiere, not that you needed to be sold harder.

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (Netflix)

The Fox News Specialists Weekdays (Fox News)

New Series: Weird times at Fox News: Bill O’Reilly’s out; Tucker Carlson keeps failing upward; Jesse Watters somehow still has a job after dropping an Ivanka Trump blowjob joke; on and on. And now there’s The Fox News Specialists, a new weekday talker hosted by personality-free stalk of celery Eric Bolling, Eboni Williams (who’s too smart for any room but especially this one), and my personal favorite Fox News floater, National Review reporter Katherine Timpf (also a regular on The Greg Gutfeld Show, the best thing to happen to Saturday nights since blackout bingeing). The trio are joined daily by two “specialists” on … something … making five—but not The Five, which is a different Fox News show. It all adds up to an even more pointless waste of airtime than Fox & Friends, bringing less to the news cycle than a water-skiing squirrel. Just lock down Tomi Lahren and Milo Yiannopoulos and launch Live! With Tomi & Milo!, already.

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.


FESTIVAL PREVIEW

A World of Music

MUSIC 4760 S 900 E, SLC 801-590-9940 | facebook.com/theroyalslc

www.theroyalslc.com

The 32nd Living Traditions Festival delivers music of the world to our doorstep.

 Bar | Nightclub | Music | Sports 

CHECK OUT OUR GREAT menu

KARAOKE & pick-a-prize bingo

wednesday 5/17

BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

karaoke @ 9:00 i bingo @ 9:30, 10:30, 11:30 Thursday 5/18

C

Reggae

at the Royal

•vocal reasoning •Herban Empire

$

5

amfs & long islands 1/2 off nachos & Free pool

GOTHENBURG

friDAY 5/19

Omar Souleyman

Live Music

eagle fan jam

mo pitney

w/ the wayne hoskins band Tuesday 5/23

open mic night

YOU Never KNow WHO WILL SHOW UP TO PERFORM

Coming soon 6/3

salt lake metalfest

6/9

fuel

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with royal bliss i wayland american hitmen and more! ALL SHOW TICKETS AVAILABLE AT SMITHSTIX OR AT THE ROYAL

MAY 18, 2017 | 35

2nd annual royal fest

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Friday-Sunday, May 19-21 Washington Square 451 S. Washington Square 801-596-5000 Free All ages livingtraditionsfestival.com

saturday 5/20

LIVING TRADITIONS FESTIVAL FEAT. OMAR SOULEYMAN, CHRIS DOKOS BAND, CHASKIS AND MORE

andrew boss cd release

w/ 5280 mystic & playing ghosts

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Enigma-esque beats, techno, world music, country and jazz—or just the flute, which is captivating all by itself. Saturday, 3:30 p.m., East Stage. Chaskis: To the untrained ear, almost any Spanish-language music sounds the same. That’s a drag, because the music of the verdant, terraced Andes blends Spanish, African and ancient Native American music into a mellower, more nuanced version of the banda or mariachi music you likely imagine. It’s most recognizable by the panpipes and flutes, but there’s also the distinctive percussion of the cajón (translate to “big-ass box”) and the actual Peruvian national instrument, a 10-string mini-guitar called the charango. If you like these guys, check out chicha music, which combines traditional Peruvian music—mainly cumbia rhythms— with garage and surf rock. I recommend the compilation album The Roots of Chicha: Psychedelic Cumbias from Peru (Barbés, 2007). Saturday, 5 p.m. East Stage Chris Dokos Band: Sometime over the past 30 years, you might have caught Chris Dokos and his band at Living Traditions or, more obviously, at the annual Greek Festival, playing everything from the old standards to something that, like chicha, is more akin to surf rock. Only it’s much, much harder not to get pulled into the jubilant dancing the music almost always provokes. Sunday, 4:30 p.m., East Stage CW

Live Music

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ulture is good, they said when we were kids. You’ll love this [insert foreign dish or foreign music]—it’s so exotic! “They” always felt like an enemy whenever they approached us with something to put in our mouths or ears. Something we wouldn’t like, no way, no how. If it was food, it automatically smelled awful, had a grotesque texture or was too spicy. If it was music, we reacted to vaguely eerie Eastern melodies or the hypnotic rubbery twang of a sitar or the hellaciously loud screech of bagpipes the same way our old Mormon neighbor did when he heard us play AC/DC: We covered our ears and ran inside, lest we become possessed by whatever demon made such a dreadful cacophony. And then, somewhere, we grew up. We realized it ain’t so bad to add culinary and musical spice to our lives—culture is good. That’s the thrust of the annual Living Traditions Festival, a free, weekend-long horse-dose of multiculturalism put on by the Salt Lake City Arts Council for our edification and enjoyment. Here’s a taste of the abundant musical goodies you can sample this weekend. For the full schedule, which includes music from more than a dozen countries, as well as information on the art, dance and culinary offerings, visit the festival’s website. Omar Souleyman: As the 2017 festival headliner, Syrian electronic musician and Björk/Four Tet collaborator Souleyman is a timely selection. His upcoming album—To Syria, With Love (Mad Decent, June 2)—is a love letter to his homeland, where his countrymen are being subjected to unconscionable suffering. “It’s been six years I’ve been away, and I’m tired of looking for home and asking about my loved ones. My soul is wounded and it’s like having dust in my eyes,” Souleyman sings in Arabic on the album. It’s something non-speakers would completely miss in his spastic, trippy dance music (which is somewhat less booty-quaking than his previous outings). It’s also interesting, and heartbreaking, how a song can sound both joyous and sorrowful. But the theme here is a longing for peace, and audiences as diverse as the ones at Bonnaroo, Moogfest, Roskilde and Glastonbury—not to mention the one at the Nobel Peace Prize Concert in Norway— understand that there’s no reason you can’t move to that message. Friday, 9 p.m., North Stage German Chorus Harmonie: There’s more to Germany than the krautrock of Kraftwerk, or the heavy metal sting of the Scorpions. For more than 50 years, this local choir has lifted their voices to preserve traditional German music in Salt Lake City. But one wonders if the day will come when they perform an arrangement of “The Robots” or “Rock You Like a Hurricane” because, in the future, Kraftwerk and the Scorps could, technically, qualify as traditional. Saturday, 1 p.m., South Stage. Nino Reyos: The mysterious, soothing howl and moan of the Native American flute over a bed of atmospheric synthesizer is practically its own genre. Reyos, however, doesn’t stick exclusively to the tried, true formula: His albums incorporate


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Free ticket Tuesday at Rye! 1 entree = 1 ticket at Urban Lounge (while supplies last) www.ryeslc.com

MAY 18: MONO SUBROSA

8PM DOORS

MAY 19: DIRT FIRST TAKEOVER HECKA MR. VANDAL GRAVY.TRON OTTR

9PM DOORS LATE SHOW

MAY 20: THE HONEYPOT BENEFIT SHOW THE CHICHARONES

8PM DOORS

MAY 22: PALLBEARER GATECREEPER VENEMOUS MAXIMUS

8PM DOORS

MAY 23: OFFICER JENNY BATTY BLUE SELFMYTH PEACH DREAM

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

MAY 24: JAY CITRUS

BIG C LK*JA CEELOS V.O. SENSEI & THE CLAN

8PM DOORS FREE SHOW

MAY 25: NICOLA CRUZ TYPEFUNK AUDIOFLO

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MAY 26: MATTHEW LOGAN VASQUEZ QUIET OAKS THE HOUND MYSTIC

8PM DOORS

MAY 27: FREE KITTENS COMEDY ANDY FARNSWORTH MAC ARTHUR TORRIS FAILY

6PM DOORS FREE EARLY SHOW

MAY 27: AL CARDENA’S BIRTHDAY PARTY 8PM DOORS FREE LATE SHOW

DEVAREAUX TYPEFUNK MOHI

COMING SOON May 28: Teebs May 29: JT Bevy May 30: Whores

May 31: Cash’d Out Jun 01: Face to Face Jun 02: The Girl Girl Party

MUSIC

After 50 years, Ian Anderson still aims to give Jethro Tull fans a real experience. BY BILL KOPP comments@cityweekly.net @the_musoscribe

T

he legendary British rock ’n’ roll band Jethro Tull has existed in one form or another for a half-century. From their beginnings in Luton, England, the group’s mainstay has been Ian Anderson. As songwriter, singer and multi-instrumentalist, Anderson cuts a distinctive and flashy figure—his trademark one-legged flute solos accenting the band’s reliably high-energy performances of folk- and blues-inspired progressive rock. Today, at 69, he still leads a version of the group, billed as “Jethro Tull by Ian Anderson,” performing new solo and classic Tull material. He has always aimed to provide audiences with high value for their concert-going dollar, rather than “just straight-ahead walking on the stage and playing the music,” Anderson says in a telephone interview. Nowadays, that means adding an impressive multimedia component to the band’s performances—but supplementing, not supplanting, the experience. In an era where fans pay big bucks and are lucky to see the band in miniature from a distance, Anderson is mindful that a live performance means seeing the artist in the flesh, not digitally rendered images on XXL LCD screens. He believes audiences are increasingly tired of this and “expect something more than just a bunch of distant bodies on the horizon wearing T-shirts and jeans,” he says. Multimedia isn’t that new. Bands like Tull have employed flash pots, lasers and

Enjoy the Best Patio in SLC

MARTIN WEBB

New Expanded Hours for Rye: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm Friday and Sunday from 6pm-11pm

Minstrel in the Gallery

video for decades. But technology should be an enhancement used, as Anderson puts it, “to express visually an accompaniment to the music.” Sometimes that’s achieved through creative lighting controlled by an off-stage director who works with the artist to ensure the impact is, ideally, “quite abstract and gentle.” That way, the band—and their songs, like “Aqualung” and “Locomotive Breath,” remain the focus. On this tour, there are also living, breathing embellishments, such as guest performers who play characters in a lyrical fashion, adding further life and dimension. “In a couple of places I have a guest vocalist who pops up and sings a few lines in a song,” Anderson says. Interestingly, bigscreen video projection does find its way into the performance at key moments, but in tasteful doses. He stresses that any extras are “benign illustration. It’s not as if somehow we are accompanying a video; we try to keep it the other way around. A video is just an additional visual effect.” He strives to avoid the popular practice of projecting close-up shots of the musicians as they play—not only because it puts distance between artist and audience in a setting meant to bring them closer, but also because it presents a visual and auditory dissonance. “The time lag between the

Ian Anderson

camera recording the action on stage and it appearing on the screen can be half a second or even more,” he explains, recalling a recent experience at another well-known band’s concert where “system latency” presented quite a problem. The delay, he says, “actually had got so far out that it looked like it was in time again. It looked as if the drummer was playing on the off-beat.” With a wry chuckle, Anderson adds, “You won’t find that at our concerts.” At his shows, onscreen images are synchronized. “Our drummer, God bless him, is having to follow a time code, and we play with him.” After 50 years, he’s just happy to be able to put on good shows for paying fans. “It’s an opportunity, rather than some kind of penance to suffer.” CW

JETHRO TULL BY IAN ANDERSON

Tuesday, May 23, 7:30 p.m. Red Butte Garden 300 Wakara Way 801-585-0556 Sold out All ages redbuttegarden.org

INTRODUCING! ‘APPY HOUR! 1/2 off Appetizers* M o n - T h u rs 2 - 6 P M *Yes. Even our nachos.

Saturday Brunch 11-3 Sunday Brunch 10-3 Monday Jazz Sessions 7pm w/ David Halliday & the JVQ

326 S. West Temple • Open 11-2am, M-F 10-2am Sat & Sun • graciesslc.com • 801-819-7565


AMAZING $8 LUNCH EVERY WEEKDAY! New menu additions! Saturday & Sunday Brunch, Mimosa, and Mary EVERY THURSDAY:

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TWIST Jazz & Blues FRIDAY:

SATURDAY:

DJ ChaseOne2 @ 9:00

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HIGHLAND live music

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Sleep in! Brunch served ALL DAY!! Breaking Bingo @ 7:00 MONDAY: Micro Monday & Geeks Who Drink Trivia @ 7:00!

FRI SAT

TUESDAY:

Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck! @ 9:00 WEDNESDAY, MAY 24TH:

TONY HOLIDAY

AND THE VELVETONES

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MON & THURS

JT Draper @ 7:00 VJ Birdman and Menthol Blaque present A Whole Spectrum of Nonsense @ 9:00

KARAOKE

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32 Exchange Place • 801-322-3200 www.twistslc.com • 11:00am - 1:00am

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STARTS @ 7PM

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EAT AT SUE’S! YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD BAR · FREE GAME ROOM, AS ALWAYS!


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LIVE

BY RANDY HARWARD, BRIAN STAKER & LEE ZIMMERMAN

THURSDAY 5/18 Tokyo foursome Mono is difficult to pin down. Terms like “post-rock,” “shoegaze” and “orchestral rock” are tossed about like guitar picks, but the best term for their kaleidoscope of sound is “cinematic.” It’s an easy but fitting label for instrumental music, where lyrics can’t place even the sketch of a thought into your head—it’s all about sounds. Celluloidal sonics abound on the band’s current album, Requiem For Hell (Temporary Residence, 2016). Produced by the legendary Steve Albini and based on Dante’s Divine Comedy, the lush, atmospheric five-track set is music to dream by. Opening act, local experimetal doom band (with two violinists to boot!) SubRosa also puts visions in heads, courtesy of the literary pen of frontwoman/bookworm Rebecca Vernon, the bewitching dual-violin combo of Kim Pack and Sarah Pendleton, and the formidable battery of bass player Levi Hanna and drummer Andy Patterson. They’ve just returned from two well-received shows— one heavy, one subdued—at the Roadburn Festival in the Netherlands, promoting For This We Fought the Battle of Ages (Profound Lore, 2016), which dropped like a hammer last autumn. (Brian Staker) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $15 presale; $17 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Hot Tuna

MITJA KOBAL

Mono, SubRosa

THURSDAY-SATURDAY 5/18-20 Hot Tuna

Hot Tuna could be considered the last vestiges of San Francisco’s hallowed Summer of Love. Bassist Jack Casady and guitarist Jorma Kaukonen formed the group as a spinoff of Jefferson Airplane—a band essential to the soundtrack of the ’60s— but they quickly morphed into an entity all their own. Indeed, they’ve earned credit and credence for ushering modern blues into the new millennium. Other outfits championed the same cause, but it was Hot Tuna that tapped into tradition and repurposed it with a sound that was cool,

BARRY BERENSON

38 | MAY 18, 2017

Mono contemporary and favored by their tie-dyed legions. Each a virtuoso in his own right, Casady and Kaukonen have switched their template from acoustic to electric over the course of their more than four-decade career. And while there have been frequent breaks in the band’s trajectory and members who’ve come and gone, Casady and Kaukonen keep Hot Tuna swimming. (Lee Zimmerman) The Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $43-$85, all ages, egyptiantheatrecompany.org

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 5/19-20 Kristin Chenoweth

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THIS WEEK’S MUSIC PICKS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

Actress/singer Kristin Chenoweth garnered a Tony Award as Sally in the 1999 Broadway production of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown, and Playbill said she “set the gold standard” with her 2003 portrayal of Glinda the Good Witch in the musical Wicked. She’s also been noted for her roles as Annabeth Schott on The West Wing, Olive Snook on Pushing Daisies and Miracle Grohe on the adult animated series Sit Down, Shut Up—plus six albums, including The Art of Elegance (Concord, 2016). Something else to applaud: The self-described “non-judgmental, liberal Christian” also supports gay rights. With her wide-ranging repertoire, there’s bound to be something for everybody in her live performance as part of BYU’s BRAVO! Professional Performing Arts Season. (BS) de Jong Concert Hall, Franklin S. Harris Fine Arts Center @ BYU, Provo, 7:30 p.m., $39-$95, all ages, arts.byu.edu »


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MAY 18, 2017 | 39


HOME OF THE

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165 E 200 S SLC I 801.746.3334

SATURDAY 5/20 Crook & The Bluff

Last month, Crook & The Bluff, along with Pig Eon and Candy’s River House, performed a landmark sold-out show at The State Room. “Ménage à Trois” found all three bands on stage at once, alternating song-for-song. When one band was in the spotlight, the members of the other two reclined on a pair of couches and popped up for guest turns on each other’s tunes. Each band is led by singular talents—Kirk Dath, Sam Smith and Jordan Matthew Young, respectively—and “Ménage” wasn’t like watching three local bands, but rather a trio of esteemed, established talents. It was almost like seeing a supergroup like Cash-Jennings-Kristofferson-Nelson as The Highwaymen, but with a celebratory air like in Martin Scorsese’s concert film The Last Waltz, where The Band played a farewell show studded with guest stars like Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Muddy Waters and a dozen other musical luminaries. But it wasn’t just about the frontmen—the Bluff, Pig Eon and Candy’s are three of the best bands that Salt Lake City has ever seen.

Crook & The Bluff at Ménage à Trois

WEDNESDAYS

KARAOKE

NICHOLAS WILLIAMS

$

S ON U W FOLLO GRAM A T S IN

KLY

WEE C L S @

Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas

So “Ménage” was a supergroup of supergroups; a throng of musicians teamed up to put on a truly epic and thrilling event. Also, as with Waltz, it was also a bit sad, since the Bluff is headed to New York and Candy’s is moving to L.A. They’ll all rise to the top of any pond they inhabit, but losing even one of them is a terrible misfortune. So, see them while you can, SLC. Especially if “Ménage” mastermind Dath decides to stage a sequel. May I suggest a title? “Ménage à Trois Deux: The Troix Comes Again.” (Randy Harward) The Hog Wallow, 3200 E. Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, 9:30 p.m., $7, 21+, thehogwallow.com

WEDNESDAY 5/24 Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas

While the Trump administration and Congress peer suspiciously at the U.S.Mexico border and immigration, Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas prove that multiculturalism stirs America’s musical melting pot. Two new albums—Telephone and Teléfono—offer the opportunity to enjoy their music in both English and Spanish, allowing Hernandez herself to delve further into her own Cuban-Mexican heritage. They’re essentially the same album, but on the latter, she sings in Spanish, adding even more flavor to the band’s unlikely blend of goth, Latin rock, psychedelia, surf, cabaret and dance, and creating a sound that’s not only astonishingly bold and incisive but also remarkably original within the context of modern music. Equally expressive onstage, Hernandez and her band cultivate their crossover efforts with vigor on their U.S. tour. (LZ) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $15, 21+, thestateroomslc.com STEFAN POULOS

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LIVE


SATURDAY 5/20

CONCERTS & CLUBS

The Honeypot Festival Benefit Show feat. The Chicharones, The Outsiders, Malev Da Shinobi, Dumb Luck

Depending on the cleanliness of one’s mind, the word “honeypot” conjures either a tubby, bewildered bear with a sweet tooth or a … I forget the other image. Maybe some kinda flower? But I do recall it seemed to be more worthy of a fundraiser than some ursine klutz with a sticky addiction. Anyway, it turns out the festival’s full name is the Honeypot Glass Blowing Competition & Art Festival, which could be an even worthier cause. You see, blown glass is so much more than a way to keep smoke shops stocked with swirly carcinogen-and-good-feelings delivery devices; it’s art, dude. Just check out Dale Chihuly’s website (chihuly.com) or visit Abravanel Hall to see his wondrous Olympic Tower sculpture. Or my buddy Chuy’s selection of the aforementioned paraphernalia (by appointment only.) As far as I know, neither of them will be at the festival this year—its third—but there’s no shortage of incredible blown-glass artists in town, and you can see their work at honeypotglasscomp.com. The day-long festival itself sounds like a blast, with “live glass blowing, live music, food and art vendors, a marble land with trade, tournaments, games, other live art and fun,” according to a press release, while raising awareness of the art form. Saturday’s show is meant to raise prize money for the competition, and features the diversely inspired, ridiculously fun Portland hip-hop group The Chicharones headlining over some of Salt Lake City’s craftiest rappers. (Randy Harward) Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $10 presale, $15 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

LIVE MUSIC

ARIAN STEVENS

SATURDAY 5/20 LIVE MUSIC

Book On Tapeworm (Velour) The Honeypot Festival Benefit Show feat. The Chicharones + The Outsiders

saturday, may 20

DJ LATU

+ Malev da Shinobi + Dumb Luck (Urban Lounge) see above Cory Mon (Garage on Beck) Crook and the Bluff (Hog Wallow Pub) see p. 40 High Octane (The Spur Bar and Grill) Hot Tuna (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 38 Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Horse Brothers (Outlaw Saloon) Living Traditions Festival feat. German Chorus Harmonie + Nino Reyos + Chaskis and more (Washington Square) see p. 35 Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives + Sean McConnell (The State Room) Mo Pitney + The Wayne Hoskins Band (The Royal) Mooseknuckle (Barbary Coast) One Way Johnny (Club 90) Rail Town (The Westerner) Sounds Like Teen Spirit (Brewskis) Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Xandria + Kobra and the Lotus + Once Human (Metro Music Hall)

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SUNDAY 5/21 LIVE MUSIC

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Andrew Boss + 5280 Music + Playing Ghosts (The Royal) Blue Divide (The Spur Bar and Grill) Controlled Burn (Garage on Beck) Daisy Head + Fossil Youth + Sundressed + Sun Sleeper + Slow No (The Loading Dock) Dance Evolution + Party Hard (Metro Music Hall) Flaw + Righteous Vendetta + Perish Lane (Liquid Joe’s) Gorgeous Gourds + The Schematics

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos feat. Troy & Drew (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

LOS HELL CAMINOS

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FRIDAY 5/19

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

friday, may 19

DJ Juggy (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Mike & Dave (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + Guest DJ (The Red Door) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) The New Wave ’80s Night (Area 51) What So Not (Sky)

NATHAN SPENCER & RICHARD ROMERO

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Aethere + Bhujanga + Vexxx + Adamantium (The Loading Dock) The Bookends (Hog Wallow Pub) Flynt Flossy + Turquoise Jeep (Metro Music Hall) Hot Tuna (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 38 Mono + SubRosa (Urban Lounge) see p. 38 Porter Ray + Earthworm + Kolob (Kilby Court) Sam Outlaw (The State Room)

(The Ice Haüs) Hecka + Mr. Vandal + Gravytron + OTTR (The Urban Lounge) Horse Brothers (Outlaw Saloon) Hot Tuna (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 38 Le Voir (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar) Living Traditions Festival feat. Omar Souleyman + Ararat Band + Red Branch + more (Washington Square) see p. 35 Mokie (The State Room) One Way Johnny (Club 90) Paul Van Dyk + Simon Patterson + Alex M.O.R.P.H. + Heartbeat (The Complex) Penrose (Brewskis) Rail Town (The Westerner) Stonefed (Hog Wallow Pub) Strange Familia + Mojave Nomads (Kilby Court)

thursday, may 18

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THURSDAY 5/18

LIVE Music


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Topgolf

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Cassidy Houdeshel goes for a night drive at Topgolf.

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42 | MAY 18, 2017

EVERY DAY While the idea of combining golf clubs and alcohol might cause lesser establishments to crumble into anarchy, Midvale’s Topgolf turns the combo into a holein-one by taking elements of a sports bar and a bowling alley and applying a surprisingly tasteful amount of modern swank. Mostly, folks come here to take advantage of the huge driving range where, for $45 (or $25 before noon), you can book a golf cell that accommodates around six people. As the first two floors are typically occupied by giant families and mildly hyperactive teenagers, the top-floor bar area is the perfect place for adults to grab some signature cocktails and knock white, dimpled golf balls into the stratosphere. As my Mormon upbringing forbids the imbibing of strong drink, I set my sights on Topgolf’s menu. Bars tend to be sleeper hits for solid eats, and I was excited to get my feast on. The menu boasts items like chicken-and-waffle sliders and bacon mac-and-cheese spring rolls, which, like the establishment itself, successfully integrate a traditional vibe with a modernized presentation. My one gripe is that, even when you’re just ordering food, you have to open a bar tab, which led to a lengthy pursuit of my server once I had finished eating. For those who want to start with some tasty food and keep the libations flowing, the open tab isn’t a big deal—but for those of us who are just there for the grub, it’s a bit of a headache. (Alex Springer) Topgolf, 920 W. Jordan River Blvd., 801-208-2600, topgolf.com/us/salt-lake-city

Armed for Apocalypse + Freedom Before Dying + Toxic Dose + Pine (Metro Music Hall) Keychain + Rickshaw + Natas Lived + ImAlive + Always 2 Late (Club X) The Lazlos (Gracie’s) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Michelle Moonshine Band (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar) Living Traditions Festival feat. Chris Dokos Band + Venezuela Cantando + Lac Viet Band and more (Washington Square) see p. 35 Patrick Ryan (The Spur Bar and Grill) Tonight We Rise + The Coast Is Ours + Berlin Breaks + Dream Collage + Citizen Soldier + The Thrill Collective (The Loading Dock)

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TUESDAY 5/23 LIVE MUSIC

Andy T. Nixon (Hog Wallow Pub) Austin John Winkler (Club X)

The Family Crest + Trevor Sensor (Kilby Court) Jethro Tull by Ian Anderson (Red Butte Garden) see p. 36 JoJo (The Depot) Officer Jenny + Batty Blue + Self Myth + Peach Dream (The Urban Lounge) Scott Foster (The Spur Bar and Grill)

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WEDNESDAY 5/24 LIVE MUSIC

A Lot Like Birds + Household + Hearts Like Lions + Owel and Gloe (The Loading Dock) All Hail the Yeti + Invidia + Broken Rail + Adjacent To Nothing (Liquid Joe’s) Dylan Roe (Hog Wallow Pub) Jay Citrus + Big C + LK*JA + Ceelos + V.O. Sensei & the Clan (The Urban Lounge) Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas (The State Room) see p. 40 Jordan Matthew Young (The Spur Bar and Grill) Into the Storm (Club X) Lil Uzi Vert + Bibi Bourelly (The Complex) Live Jazz (Club 90) Rebel Rebel + Stop Karen + Fists In The Wind (Kilby Court) The Wake of Arsonist + Orma (Metro Music Hall)

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W W W. S O U N DWA R E H O U S E .C O M HOURS


© 2017

WESTWARD

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

49. Screams bloody murder 50. His Twitter handle is @SHAQ 51. Not bashful 52. Drunkard 53. Science suffix 57. Freak (out) 58. Calendario span 59. Charlotte of “The Facts of Life” 60. Phil and Oz, for two 61. Many a layover locale 63. Exist 64. Birth certificate info 65. Overhead expense?

Last week’s answers

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

10. Letters that follow “I want to love you” in a 1983 Michael Jackson hit 11. Sainted ninth-century pope 12. “With this ring ____ wed” 13. Scrub hard 19. ____-pitch softball 21. Ad-____ 23. Like some waves 24. “Gangnam Style” rapper 25. Expected hr. at the airport 26. “Why did I do that?!” 27. Laugh riot 28. It might make a nose wrinkle 29. “____ sure you know ...” 30. ____ fide 34. Billionaire NBA owner who is the author of the children’s book “Let’s Go, Mavs!” 35. Start of a challenge DOWN 36. Orange Pixar character 1. Something you may need to get off your chest 37. “____ Torino” (2008 Clint 2. Judge Goodman of “Dancing With the Stars” Eastwood film) 3. Muffin variety 39. Actress Skye of “Say Anything ...” 4. Narcissus falling in love with his own reflec40. Life lines? tion, e.g. 43. Biblical verb ending 5. Form tight curls in 44. Uno + due 6. Rihanna’s first #1 Billboard single 45. The NFL’s is in Canton, Oh. 7. “Survivor” construction 48. Paul’s character in the 1960 film 8. Volcano output “Exodus” 9. Stephen of “Interview With the Vampire”

UDOKU

1. WordPress or Tumblr page 5. D flat’s equivalent 11. Fleur-de-____ 14. Derrière 15. MMA star Ronda who hosted “Saturday Night Live” in 2016 16. And so on: Abbr. 17. Pony up, in poker 18. Tourist’s question regarding the neighborhood just north of Manhattan’s TriBeCa? 20. “A Nightmare on ____ Street” 22. Stead 23. Made a mistake by saying “Harding, Coolidge, Roosevelt, Truman” while reciting the U.S. presidents in chronological order? 29. WMD in ‘45 headlines 31. Rose 32. PlayStation maker 33. “Way to go, former 7’6” NBA star!”? 38. Ab ____ (from the start) 41. Wall Street employee 42. “Little Women” woman who’s actually hypermasculine? 46. “____ Lama Ding Dong” (1961 hit) 47. The “N” in TNT 48. Ohio city where Goodyear is headquartered 49. Give a unit of police officers a place to stay overnight? 54. ____ occasion (never) 55. Lucy of TV’s “Elementary” 56. Motto of an expansionist ... or something to notice while solving 18-, 23-, 33-, 42- and 49-Across 62. Verbally attack 66. “Well, ____-di-dah!” 67. Place to be snug as a bug, in a saying 68. Field 69. Like some winks and grins 70. Elapses 71. Almost up

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) My friend Allie works as a matchmaker. She has an instinctive skill at reading the potential chemistry between people. One of her key strategies is to urge her clients to write mission statements. “What would your ideal marriage look like?” she asks them. Once they have clarified what they want, the process of finding a mate seems to become easier and more fun. In accordance with the astrological omens, Scorpio, I suggest you try this exercise—even if you are already in a committed relationship. It’s an excellent time to get very specific about the inspired GEMINI (May 21-June 20) I invite you to try the following meditation: Picture yourself filling togetherness you’re willing to work hard to create. garbage bags with stuff that reminds you of what you used to be and don’t want to be any more. Add anything that feels like SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) decrepit emotional baggage or that serves as a worn-out psycho- In ancient Greek myth, Tiresias was a prophet who could draw logical crutch. When you’ve gathered up all the props and accesso- useful revelations by interpreting the singing of birds. Spirits ries that demoralize you, imagine yourself going to a beach where of the dead helped him devise his prognostications, too. He you build a big bonfire and hurl your mess into the flames. As you was in constant demand for revelations about the future. But dance around the conflagration, exorcise the voices in your head his greatest claim to fame was the fact that a goddess magically that tell you boring stories about yourself. Sing songs that have transformed him into a woman for seven years. After that, he as much power to relieve and release you as a spectacular orgasm. could speak with authority about how both genders experienced the world. This enhanced his wisdom immeasurably, adding to his oracular power. Are you interested in a less drastic but highly CANCER (June 21-July 22) In normal times, your guardian animal ally might be the turtle, educational lesson, Sagittarius? Would you like to see life from crab, seahorse or manta ray. But in the next three weeks, it’s a very different perspective from the one you’re accustomed to? the cockroach. This unfairly maligned creature is legendary for It’s available to you if you want it. its power to thrive in virtually any environment, and I think you will have a similar resourcefulness. Like the cockroach, you will CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) do more than merely cope with awkward adventures and com- “You remind me of the parts of myself that I will never have a plicated transitions; you will flourish. One caution: It’s possible chance to meet,” writes poet Mariah Gordon-Dyke, addressing that your adaptability might bother people who are less flexible a lover. Have you ever felt like saying that to a beloved ally, and enterprising than you. To keep that from being a problem, Capricorn? If so, I have good news: You now have an opportunity be empathetic as you help them adapt. (P.S. Your temporary to meet and greet parts of yourself that have previously been animal ally is exceptionally well-groomed. Cockroaches clean hidden from you—aspects of your deep soul that up until now you might only have caught glimpses of. Celebrate this homecoming! themselves as much as cats do.) TAURUS (April 20-May 20) My pregnant friend Myrna is determined to avoid giving birth via caesarean section. She believes that the best way for her son to enter the world is by him doing the hard work of squeezing through the narrow birth canal. That struggle will fortify his willpower and mobilize him to summon equally strenuous efforts in response to future challenges. It’s an interesting theory. I suggest you consider it as you contemplate how you’re going to get yourself reborn.

ARIES (March 21-April 19) “A 2-year-old kid is like using a blender, but you don’t have a top for it,” comedian Jerry Seinfeld said. Would you like to avoid a scenario like that, Aries? Would you prefer not to see what happens if your life has resemblances to turning on a topless blender that’s full of ingredients? Yes? Then please find the top and put it on! And if you can’t locate the proper top, use a dinner plate or newspaper or pizza box. OK? It’s not too late. Even if the blender is already spewing almond milk and banana fragments and protein powder all over the ceiling. Better late than never!

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Leonardo da Vinci wrote a bestiary, an odd little book in which he drew moral conclusions from the behavior of animals. One of his descriptions will be useful for you to contemplate in the near future. It was centered on what he called the “wild ass,” which we might refer to as an undomesticated donkey. Leonardo said that this beast, “going to the fountain to drink and finding the water muddy, is never too thirsty to wait until it becomes clear before satisfying himself.” That’s a useful fable to contemplate, Libra. Be patient as you go in search of what’s pure and clean and good for you. (The translation from the Italian is by Oliver Evans.)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Time out. It’s intermission. Give yourself permission to be spacious and slow. Then, when you’re sweetly empty—this could take a few days—seek out experiences that appeal primarily to your wild and tender heart as opposed to your wild and jumpy mind. Just forget about the theories you believe in and the ideas you regard as central to your philosophy of life. Instead, work on developing brisk new approaches to your relationship with your feelings. Like what? Become more conscious of them, for example. Express gratitude for what they teach you. Boost your trust for their power to reveal what your mind sometimes hides from you.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) While shopping at a funky yard sale, I found the torn-off cover of a book titled You’re a Genius and I Can Prove It. Sadly, the rest of the book was not available. Later I searched for it in online bookstores, and found it was out of print. That’s unfortunate, because now would be an excellent time for you to peruse a text like this. Why? Because you need specific, detailed evidence of how unique and compelling you are—concrete data that will provide an antidote to your habitual self-doubts and consecrate your growing sense of self-worth. Here’s what I suggest you do: Write an essay entitled, “I’m an Interesting Character and Here’s the Proof.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) I predict that you won’t be bitten by a dog or embarrassed by a stain or pounced on by a lawyer. Nor will you lose your keys or get yelled at by a friend or oversleep for a big appointment. On the contrary! I think you’ll be wise to expect the best. The following events are quite possible: You might be complimented by a person who’s in a position to help you. You could be invited into a place that had previously been off-limits. While eavesdropping, you might pick up a useful clue, and while daydreaming you could recover an important memory you’d lost. Good luck like this is even more likely to sweep into your life if you work on ripening the most immature part of your personality.

GROWING IN THE

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Lady Jane Grey was crowned Queen of England in July 1553, but she ruled for just nine days before being deposed. I invite you to think back to a time in your own past when victory was short-lived. Maybe you accomplished a gratifying feat after an arduous struggle, only to have it quickly eclipsed by a twist of fate. Perhaps you finally made it into the limelight but then lost your audience to a distracting brouhaha. But here’s the good news: Whatever it was (a temporary triumph? Incomplete success? Nullified conquest?), you will soon have a chance to find redemption for it.

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46 | MAY 18, 2017

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Point

Most of us know Draper as the home of the Utah State Prison and Point of the Mountain. This “point” is where a break in the Traverse Mountains separates the Salt Lake and Utah Vallies. It’s the area of Interstate 15 where commuters find heaven or hell, depending on which direction you’re traveling during morning or evening rush hour. To some, it’s one of the best places in the country for hangand paragliding—the views of each valley and surrounding mountains are breathtaking from the sky. Decades ago, the little town was an area of pig farms and polygamists, and a place to race motorcycles in the summer. It was a quiet suburb less than 20 miles from Temple Square. But in the 1990s, a housing boom began just east of the freeway and has continued to the top of Traverse Mountain with miles and miles of stucco homes surrounding a challenging golf course. Much of it was the brainchild of developer Terry Diehl, who has recently been in the news after facing federal bankruptcy fraud charges. Another huge housing development, SunCrest, was envisioned near South Mountain, but was lost to Zions Bank in the last economic crash. Draper City purchased what was left of the planned subdivision and has added the land to the fabulous Corner Canyon recreation area, making almost 6,000 acres of green space and trails for Draper residents and visitors. My friend Troy Walker is mayor of Draper. You might have seen him on the local news recently when he offered city land as a potential location for a new homeless facility that the state and county need so desperately. He said it was “the Christian thing to do,” but subsequently, he was verbally nailed to a public cross by his fellow Draperites for even suggesting the idea. When I saw him afterward, he told me that most of the backlash was about his Christian comment. He’s a fighter—the son of an amazing Vietnam vet who survived 18 helicopter crashes in the 1960s. He’s maintained the city as a great place to invest in and develop, with unique zoning laws that do not limit buildings’ height or density. He serves on the Point of the Mountain Development Commission with other mayors and politicos. They just completed a survey that found citizens see transportation as the area’s biggest challenge, followed by clean air. For now, he and his fair city have a lot on their plate as they plan for the future of the area surrounding the state-owned prison site, while traffic at The Point practically doubles before our eyes. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner GLASS

There but not there. Divides. Hides and shields. So dramatically yields. Sculpted into magnificence. Transparent as newborn innocence. Fragile like ice, sturdy like steel, Augmenting vision unreal. Deadly on edge, not necessarily broken, Tread ever so lightly on ceilings unspoken. Fantastic containers discarded in billions, Like hard-working people through time, Special ones always remembered, The rest served a purpose. Not mine. As you look in the mirror into your own eyes, Glass becomes magic and reflects truth and lies.

KEN CORBETT Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101or e-mail to poetscorner@ cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

#cwpoetscorner

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Sweet, Sweet Revenge It is legal in China to sell electric “building shakers” whose primary purpose apparently is to wreak aural havoc on apartment-dwellers’ unreasonably noisy neighbors. Models sell for the equivalent of $11-$58—each with a long pole to rest on the floor, extending ceiling height to an electric motor braced against the shared ceiling or wall and whose only function is to produce a continuous, thumping beat. Shanghaiist.com found one avenger in Shaanxi province who, frustrated by his miscreant neighbor, turned on his shaker and then departed for the weekend. It was unclear whether he faced legal or other repercussions.

WEIRD

Can’t Possibly Be True Mats Jarlstrom is a folk hero in Oregon for his extensive research critical of the short yellow light timed to the state’s red-light cameras, having taken his campaign to TV’s 60 Minutes and been invited to a transportation engineers’ convention. In January, Oregon’s agency that regulates engineers imposed a $500 fine on Jarlstrom for practicing engineering without a state license. The agency, in fact, wrote that simply using the phrase “I am an engineer” is illegal without a license, even though Jarlstrom has a degree in engineering and worked as an airplane camera mechanic. He is suing to overturn the fine. n Last year, surgeons at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), for only the second time in history, removed a tumor sitting on the peanut-sized heart of a fetus still inside the mother’s womb—in essence successfully operating on two patients simultaneously. The Uruguayan mother said her initial reaction upon referral to CHOP’s surgeons was to “start laughing, like, what, they do that?” The baby’s December birth revealed that the tumor had grown back and had to be removed again, except this time, through ordinary heart surgery.

Government in Action Thirty-four residents of State Street in Brooklyn, N.Y., pay a tax of more than $1,000 a year for the privilege of sitting on their front stoops (a pastime which, to the rest of New York City, seems an inalienable right). The property developer had made a side deal with the city to allow the tax in exchange for approving an architectural adjustment.

Finer Points of the Law “Oh, come on!” implored an exasperated Chief Justice Roberts in April when the Justice Department lawyer explained at oral argument that, indeed, a naturalized citizen could have his citizenship retroactively canceled just for breaking a single law, however minor—even if there was never an arrest for it. Appearing incredulous, Roberts hypothesized that if “I drove 60 miles an hour in a 55-mile-an-hour zone,” but was not caught, and then became a naturalized citizen, years later the government “can knock on my door and say, ‘Guess what? You’re not an American citizen after all’?” The government lawyer stood firm. The Supreme Court decision on the law’s constitutionality is expected in June.

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SEE VIRTUAL TOURS AT URBANUTAH.COM

Wait, What? Emily Piper and her husband went to court in January in Spokane, Wash., to file for a formal restraining order against a boy who is in kindergarten. Piper said the tyke had been relentlessly hassling their daughter (trying to kiss her) and that Balboa Elementary School officials seem unable to stop him. n A private plane crashed on take-off 150 feet from the runway at Williston, Fla., Municipal Airport on April 15, killing all four on board. But despite more than a dozen planes having flown out of the same airport later that day, no one noticed the crash site until it caught the eye of a pilot the next afternoon.

Least Competent Criminals Edwin Charge Jr., 20, and two accomplices allegedly attempted a theft at a Hood River, Ore., business on April 23, but fled as police arrived. The accomplices were apprehended, but Charge took off across Interstate 84 on foot, outrunning police until he fell off a cliff to his death. n Police said Tara Cranmer, 34, tried to elude them in a stolen truck on tiny Ocracoke Island, N.C., on April 22. Since it is an island, the road ends, and she was captured on the dunes after abandoning the truck.

Update Italian Surgeon Sergio Canavero—notorious as the world’s most optimistic advocate of human brain transplants—now forecasts that a cryogenically frozen brain will be “awakened” (thawed) and transplanted into a donor body by the year 2020. His Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group claimed success in 2016 in transplanting a monkey’s head, with blood vessels properly attached (though not the spinal cord). Canavero promised such a head transplant of humans by 2018, though problematic because, like the recipient monkey, the recipient human would not long survive. Of the subsequent brain transplant, one of the gentler critics of Canavero said the likelihood of success is “infinitestimal”—with harsher critics describing it in more colorful language. Thanks this week to Pete Randall, Liz Baer, Don Cole, Steve Dunn and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

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| COMMUNITY |

News You Can Use Earn $17,500 for two weeks’ “work” doing nothing at all! France’s space medicine facility near Toulouse is offering 24 openings, paying 16,000 euros each, for people simply to lie in bed continuously for two weeks so it can study the effects of virtual weightlessness. The institute is serious about merely lying there: All bodily functions must be accomplished while keeping at least one shoulder on the bed.

n The town of Conegliano, Italy, collects local taxes on “sidewalk shadows” that it applies to cafés or businesses with awnings, but also to stores with a single overhanging sign that very slightly blocks sun. Shop owners told reporters the tax felt like Mafia “protection” money.

All saints, sinners, sisterwives and...

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

n The word “ISIS” arrived in Western dialogue only after the 2003 invasion of Iraq, as an acronym for the Islamic State. The Swahili word “Harambe” was known to almost no one until May 2016 when the gorilla Harambe (named via a local contest) was put down by a Cincinnati zoo worker after it had dragged an adventurous 3-year-old boy away. In April, a Twitter user and the website Daily Dot happened upon a 19-year-old California restaurant hostess named Isis Harambe Spjut and verified with state offices that a driver’s license (likely backed by a birth certificate) had been issued to her. (“Spjut” is a Scandinavian name.)

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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48 | MAY 18, 2017

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City Weekly May 18, 2017  

Attack of the Killer Reboots!

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