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C I T Y W E E K LY . N E T

MARCH 2, 2017 | VOL. 33

MIX TAPE

N0. 43

2017

MUSIC ISSUE


COVER STORY THE LOCAL MUSIC ISSUE

Get yer dancing shoes on! The most toe-tappingest issue of the year is here. Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

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CONTRIBUTOR

4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 21 A&E 25 DINE 31 CINEMA 33 TRUE TV 34 MUSIC 44 COMMUNITY

DAVID MILLER

Essentials, p. 21 Meet one of our new interns, an Idaho-bred communications major at the U. When he’s not writing or compiling our music listings, you’ll find him exploring the great outdoors—hiking, climbing, skiing or whitewater kayaking—or serving up killer döner kebabs at Spitz.

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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

@CITYWEEKLY

@SLCWEEKLY

Cover story, Feb. 16, “A Seagull Story”

If Blake has a JunkYard he wants to part with, let me know. My WhiteWater needs a friend.

I recently moved to Salt Lake City from Michigan and found myself very interested in Mormon culture. When I first heard about “The Miracle of the Gulls,” I was fascinated and somewhat skeptical at the same time. I heard many different versions of the story from Mormon and non-Mormon sources. However, your story in City Weekly was both entertaining and educational. The Simpsons analogy was a good one, nicely done. Looking forward to more.

BARRY TOLLEY, Salt Lake City

They’re full of plastic! Each one is like a piñata with secrets inside.

MICHAEL O’HAIR Via Facebook

Seagulls, coal and masturbation. @RyCunn’s articles lately prove that he totally gets Utah.

@YEAROFJEN

TIFFANY YOUNG Via Facebook

There has to be a twist.

PETER MADSEN Via Facebook

The Ocho, Feb. 16, “Eight new fastfood innovations coming soon to top Taco Bell’s Naked Chicken Chalupa”

After many years of trying to swear off fast food, this picture has, at long last, pushed me over the edge.

TAYLOR BROWN Via Facebook

Music, Feb. 16, “Deconstructing Puzzle”

There’s a thousand ways to die in this naked city!

DEWIGHT SMITH Via cityweekly.net

Via Twitter My former secretary, a member of the Assembly of God Church, asked what a Jack Mormon was. I told her it was someone who did not observe the social practices of no smoking or drinking followed by many Mormons. “Oh,” she said. “In my church we call them hypocrites.” It is like the old joke: What is a Jack seagull? One that won’t eat crickets.

JERRY CROUCH, Salt Lake City

News, Feb. 16, “Pinball Wizards” Like The Who? Charlie Montoya Via Facebook

Dine, Feb. 16, “Mountain Meals”

Made me hungry for some mid-mountain pho. Thanks for the weekend ideas! #FridayMotivation

@LOOP2USOLUTION Via Twitter

Protect our public lands

I write to highlight and oppose actions by our Legislature and congressional representative to do away with or shrink Bears Ears National Monument and Grand Staircase-Escalante Monument. These lands will benefit Utah’s lucrative outdoor tourism industry and be a legacy for generations to come. But Utah politicians want to sell off this precious and sacred land, and it’s hurting our pocketbooks. Our politicians are shoot-

ing themselves in the foot by driving away events like the Outdoor Retailer exposition, which has brought 40,000 visitors and $45 million each year by itself. The outdoor tourism industry creates over $1 billion in tax revenues for this state, and is growing. Places like Comb Ridge, Valley of the Gods, Grand Gulch, Natural Bridges, Moki Canyon and House on Fire are shining Utah treasures. This gorgeous array of canyons and mesas has sacred ground as well as tens of thousands of archaeological sites amid cliffs and canyon bottoms. Extraction industries directly threaten these places and put money in the pockets of out-of-state companies that take the money and leave. I recognize the importance of mining industries, but mining should take place away from our beautiful lands. They use public lands as an excuse for not fund-

ing our education system and not helping rural Utah diversify its economy. Rural counties have a bigger share of money from the visitors to our natural beauty, and lots of room to grow. We should be expanding our counties’ economies into a growing source of money and jobs like revenue from tourism and recreation, not threatening our Utah parks to make quick profits off our lands.

FELECIA MAXFIELD-BARRETT, Salt Lake City

And the Oscar goes to ...

Jason is doing his job. Rep. Chaffetz to investigate Oscar snafu!

ROBERT JACOBS,

Cottonwood Heights

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns SULAIMAN ALFADHLI, DAVID MILLER Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KIMBALL BENNION, KATHARINE BIELE, KRISTEN BONKOSKI, ROB BREZSNY, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, MARYANN JOHANSON, KEITH L. MCDONALD, DAN NAILEN, JOHN RASMUSON, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ZAC SMITH, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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Art Director DEREK CARLISLE Graphic Artists CAIT LEE, SUMMER MONTGOMERY, JOSH SCHEUERMAN

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Circulation Manager LARRY CARTER

Business/Office

Associate Business Manager PAULA SALTAS Business Department Administrator ALISSA DIMICK Technical Director BRYAN MANNOS Office Administrator NICOLE ENRIGHT

Marketing

Marketing & Events Director JACKIE BRIGGS Street Team STEPHANIE ABBOTT, SHAUNTEL ARCHULETTA, BEN BALDRIDGE, TYLER GRAHAM, ADAM LANE, ANDY ROMERO, LAUREN TAGGE, MIKAYLA THURBUR, STEVEN VARGO

Sales

Director of Advertising, Magazine Division JENNIFER VAN GREVENHOF Director of Advertising, Newsprint Division PETE SALTAS Senior Account Executives DOUG KRUITHOF, KATHY MUELLER Retail Account Executives LISA DORELLI, NICK SASICH, SIERRA SESSIONS, JEREMIAH SMITH Digital Operations Manager ANNA PAPADAKIS

Director of Digital Development CHRISTIAN PRISKOS Digital Sales MIKEY SALTAS, JUAN SANCHEZ Display Advertising 801-413-0936 National Advertising VMG Advertising 888-278-9866 vmgadvertising.com

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Salt Lake City Weekly is published every Thursday by Copperfield Publishing Inc. The Salt Lake City Weekly is an independent publication dedicated to alternative news and news sources, and serves as a comprehensive entertainment guide. 50,000 copies of the Salt Lake City Weekly are free of charge at more than 1,800 locations along the Wasatch Front, limit one copy per reader. Additional copies of the paper may be purchased for $1 (Best of Utah and other special issues, $5) payable to the Salt Lake City Weekly in advance. No person, without expressed permission of Copperfield Publishing Inc., may take more than one copy of any Salt Lake City Weekly issue. No portion of the Salt Lake City Weekly may be reproduced in whole or part by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the written permission of the Publisher. Third-Class postage paid at Midvale, UT. Delivery may take one week. All Rights Reserved. ®

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OPINION

Work

“The best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.” —Theodore Roosevelt Matthew Cockrum, a minister at the First Unitarian Church of Salt Lake City, concludes his emails by writing, “Here’s to the work, friends.” It is such a nicely inflected phrase. I often pause to reflect on its nuances. It reminds me of the toasts I offered, glass raised, at formal Army dinners long ago. Not quite a rallying cry or call to action, “the work” maps the shared commitment of a cohort. It could be a commitment to social justice or to political activism or to religious doctrine. Regardless, the end state of “the work” is understood to have value and import. Weeding the gardens on the church grounds is not what the Rev. Cockrum has in mind. In my life, work has been grounding and consequential. It has dictated where I lived and how I spent my days. In the years I worked in an office, the best part of the workday began at 5 p.m. when I traded typewriter for maul. Physical work has always been restorative for me. I preferred to take vacation days in my garden instead of at a beach. In many cases, work determines what people wear, when they sleep, why they vote the way they do. The unavailability of work was a factor in many people’s decision to support Donald Trump. There are also people whose work defines them. Artists fit in this category as do clergymen like Cockrum. So do Cliven Bundy and his gun-totin’ followers. Soldiers, too. Soldiering was men’s work until recent times. Women were barred from such combat units as infantry platoons and artillery batteries. Gender bias has now been excised from Army regulations—women have choices—but it persists elsewhere like moss in the shade or hypocrisy in the Legislature. Even in the Beehive State! Two

weeks ago, James Green, the co-chairman of the Wasatch County Republican Party, sparked a firestorm of outrage with his assertion that housework is the bailiwick of women. It brought to mind Bella Abzug’s 1970 campaign slogan, “This woman’s place is in the house … the House of Representatives.” I also thought of Brenda Barnes, the CEO of Pepsi-Cola in 1997, who quit to be a full-time mother. She eventually returned to the workforce to be CEO of the Sara Lee Corp. She died of a stroke two months ago at 63. New York Times columnist David Leonhardt wrote, “At a celebration of life, her daughter thanked people for coming and offered this parting shot: ‘My mom would want me to tell you, “Don’t work too hard.”’” Workaholics are a minority, but plenty of people avoid hard jobs. Others are lazy. An incredible number of employees—50 percent, according to Gallup polling—are disengaged: They “show up and kill time.” I have worked in places where minor tasks were dragged out in such a way that it took an entire shift to finish them. Employees considered it “job security,” but I thought the practice was corrosive. Maybe that judgment reflects a Utah bias. After all, we live in a state whose motto is “Industry.” Mormon settlements were founded by faith and nourished by irrigation, Wallace Stegner wrote. Settlers tithed labor to such communal projects as digging canals and building roads. Hymn 252 in the LDS hymnal puts an edge on “Here’s to the work” with a spirited chorus to rally the faithful: “We all have work; let no one shirk/ Put your shoulder to the wheel.” Like Roosevelt, I think most work is usually worthwhile. Work is edifying. Even digging a deep hole—a job I detest—has animal appeal when the sidewalls are plumb and the bottom is clean and level. Work has its gradations, of course. Busy work, dirty work,

BY JOHN RASMUSON

homework, grunt work—all of which have a place on a résumé that documents my transition from digging holes to writing essays. At 12, I mowed neighbors’ lawns for $1. At 15, I delivered the Deseret News every afternoon to 80 customers. At 17, I worked after school in the sprawling nursery Hank, “the Petunia King” built on 3900 South. Hank paid a miserly wage for hard labor. Half a century later, I am still working to cobble together the 900-plus words on this page. It isn’t pick-and-shovel work, but it isn’t as easy as it looks. I made the drive to Ogden a few weeks ago to catch a traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution. Called The Way We Worked, it examines “the strength and spirit of American workers through archival images, compelling videos and fascinating interviews.” Among them I recognized parts of my own generational story, especially the effect of technology on a family who worked with words. My mother was a stenographer in the early 1940s. She took dictation in Gregg Shorthand and transcribed it using a manual typewriter. By the time I came of age, Shorthand was passé and the IBM Selectric had upended the market (as the Apple Macintosh did in the mid-1980s.) The Selectric was the Rolls Royce of typewriters. (I do remember seeing an early Wang word-processor and not appreciating what it presaged.) My son now writes on a laptop. What he crafts for software companies is “optimized for search engines,” a skill I am too old to learn. The Way We Worked is free to the public in Ogden’s Union Station through March 18. The exhibit will then travel around the state, arriving at the Park City Museum on Nov. 11. It’s worth a look. Send feedback to: comments@cityweekly.net

WORK IS EDIFYING. EVEN DIGGING A DEEP HOLE—A JOB I DETEST—HAS ANIMAL APPEAL ...

STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What do you remember the most from your first job? Pete Saltas: On the first day I started delivering City Weekly issues, my dad said, “If you fuck up, I’ll be the first to fire you.” I haven’t forgotten that since.

Josh Scheuerman: When working in the fastpaced environment of sandwich-making using an electric circular meat-slicer, pay attention. I watched a fellow employee almost take his finger off and ruin a perfectly good Blimpie Best in the process. Jackie Briggs: The boss sauce. I worked for a Northwest health-Mex restaurant called Macheezmo Mouse, and they had this weird-ass sauce that was so good called Boss Sauce. I’ll never forget it.

Scott Renshaw: Since it was at a movie theater, it was coming to hate the smell of popcorn, and becoming intoxicated with the effect that a communal viewing experience could have on people. A hundred times watching crowds go nuts after the “crane kick” finale from The Karate Kid will change your life. Andrea Harvey: I’ll never forget this lady who made me cry at Panda Express. I was covering the drive-thru by myself during the lunch rush, and she ordered food for her entire family—like, five large boxes of orange chicken—and I was running back and forth to make sure she didn’t wait too long. After a few minutes at the window, I handed her the order, and she said, “You could learn a thing or two from Taco Bell across the street. Their drivethru is way faster,” and then drove off. Nicole Enright: ​I n high school, I worked at a gas station. People are fucking gross. That’s my biggest takeaway. Also, my biggest pet peave is people who throw open liquids in garbage cans. Do you know how awful that makes someone’s day? Don’t do it. Don’t be a dick.

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In the Moonlight

Moonlight is the first LGBTQ film to win Best Picture at the Oscars. But will it win the hearts of lawmakers? It tells the story of a young, gay, black man’s life—it’s not an easy one, although the trailer notes he is “guided by the kindness, support and love of the community that helps raise him.” Utah just has a hard time with all that. The LDS church last year made a feeble attempt at accepting the LGBTQ community as long as they don’t live the life. But their stance toward transgender youth hasn’t changed. In fact, the church recently filed a brief in a U.S. Supreme Court case on transgender rights. PinkNews wrote the headline “Mormons fight for ‘right to discriminate’ against transgender children.” Local therapists are conducting surveys for Mormons to gain a deeper understanding of the issues, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. And a John Hopkins study found that teen suicide attempts declined after same-sex marriage became legal. Think about it—in the moonlight.

Power Struggle

The past presidential election brought with it confusion and controversy—not to mention a lot of fistpumping. Checks and balances aside, the question of who’s in charge has become paramount. Can the president just do what he wants, with or without Congress? With state’s rights at the forefront, do cities have any say in their futures? Poor little Jason Chaffetz is getting the business. We all know what Utah Indivisible has been saying—or screaming—at him. CNN has been covering Chaffetz’ quixotic attempts to rein in the District of Columbia, which recently passed an assisted suicide law. D.C. now has a “Hands Off” movement and has set up a PAC to help oust him. The Pew Trust offers research warning that cities and states will be in for a lot more confrontation this year. In fact, politics this year has been all about confrontation.

Trust & Transparency

It’s no secret that Donald Trump dislikes the media, and therefore the First Amendment. Transparency has taken a hit in the new age of reporters as enemies of the people, and now Rep. Mike McKell, R-Spanish Fork, wants to keep secret the names of police officers involved in “critical” incidents for up to four months. OK, no one wants people harassing officers or judging them before the facts come out. But as former Salt Lake Police Chief Chris Burbank says, this kind of cover-up could hurt the public’s trust of police, Deseret News reported. Local officers are already navigating the homeless scene and staving off the federal government’s attempt to make them tools of immigration enforcement. They need to be recognized and named—for good or ill—because they are public servants doing the people’s work.

Rich Woodruff has the good fortune of being able to combine three of his life’s passions, and he is doing well by doing good.

Everyone wants to save the world, make a living and have an enjoyable life. How have you managed to combine all three?

Ever since I was a teenage Air Force brat—son of an airman who performed keyboard when off duty—I wanted to play music. Today, not only am I in the band Bone Pile, but my latest career is about helping people through the American Red Cross, which I also love. My wife and daughter are Red Crossers, too, which is the best.

Most of your career was in music and radio. Tell us about it.

Dad was a phenomenal keyboardist. When I expressed interest in drums, he hooked me up with the percussionist in the airlift military command band and took me to St. Louis to see Buddy Rich and other greats. Throughout high school, I played weekends in bars. I worked through college playing gigs in one of St. Louis’ top bands. Dad encouraged a fallback career, so I studied broadcasting, but I always had a band. In 1979, I graduated from Southern Illinois University, drove my car with whatever I could fit to Douglas, Ariz., and got hired as morning host at a country station. Soon I graduated to a bigger market in Nogales, Ariz., on the Mexican border, where my music director introduced me to a pretty girl named Margie, who was a teacher. We married in 1981 and moved to Phoenix, where I became the morning show host in the No. 1 Top 20 country market. Around 2010, I got a great job as general sales manager for six stations in St. George, Utah, where my wife got involved with the Red Cross and I started volunteering. When the opportunity opened up three years ago for both of us to move to Salt Lake and work for the Red Cross, we took it.

You are communications director for the Red Cross in Utah and Nevada. Was that a big change?

I’ve never loved a job more than this one. It is a privilege to go to disasters and see the mission up close. It really touches me to realize that all the stuff I do contributes in some way to the mission. This morning, I was explaining the free Red Cross flood app. If just one person downloads that app and it saves them, think of the impact we have just by giving people information.

Plus, you still have your music.

I love everything I am doing, especially my music. It’s part of my soul. Bone Pile plays at places like Barbary Coast, A Bar Named Sue and Park Silly. I can’t imagine not playing.

—STAN ROSENZWEIG comments@cityweekly.net


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STRAIGHT DOPE After It’s Confiscated ... On a recent trip to the White House gardens, I had to pass through TSA-type metal detectors at the entrance. It was a spontaneous visit and I had my Leatherman multi-tool attached to my belt. The Secret Service promptly confiscated it and told me I wouldn’t be able to recover it after the tour. What happens to all the items taken away at these checkpoints, or at the airports? —Peter

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You’re lucky they let you in at all. While you might not find any mentions of climate change or civil rights on the official website of the executive branch, you will see this: “Individuals who arrive with prohibited items will not be permitted to enter the White House.” In practice, as you learned, most absentmindedly armed visitors—as well as those bearing purses or bags, lotion, makeup or other miscellaneous no-nos—can just hand the offending items over to the agents. But don’t expect to get a claim ticket. The White House site again: “No storage facilities are available on or around the complex.” Surely there’s enough petty cash in the budget to spring for a locker or two (this is a regular online complaint from the sort of people who regularly complain online), but we’re talking about the federal government here, and rules are rules. And rule No. 1 is that government officials can’t return items handed over to them. That’s apparently just how it is. The stuff is classified as “voluntarily abandoned property”—you might believe that your Leatherman was confiscated, but as the government sees it, you volunteered to surrender the multi-tool, since you had the option to turn around and walk home with it instead. The methods an agency may use to dispose of these lawfully gotten gains are prescribed by the General Services Administration, the bureaucrats in charge of administering government bureaucracy. Their regs affect almost all Americans, because they apply not just to the White House guards, who few of us regularly encounter, but to some far more familiar confiscators: our handsy pals at the Transportation Security Administration. Though TSA employees don’t get to keep your goodies themselves (despite common misconception), the agency is permitted to retain abandoned property if there’s some official use for it—except, as per statute, “large sedans and limousines,” which wouldn’t fit underneath your seat or in the overhead compartment anyway. As the agency has no pressing need for nail clippers or pump bottles of Jergens, a large portion of the TSA’s haul is slated for what the federal code calls “abandonment and destruction.” Most of the more valuable stuff, though, goes up for sale. Federal agencies aren’t allowed to turn a profit on your abandoned goodies, but nothing prevents the state where the airport’s located from making a buck, and there’s a thriving secondary

BY CECIL ADAMS

SLUG SIGNORINO

The Science of Brewing...

market for this plundered booty at staterun surplus stores. The TSA gathers up their haul periodically and ships it out for resale, and there’s a quite a load to ship— the “property custodian” at Newark, for instance, visits 10 sites and gathers up more than 100 pounds of stuff daily, maybe twice that on holidays. Some states give cops and firefighters first dibs on the loot, but usually it goes straight to the shelves, or is sold online through private companies like govdeals.com, which says its inventory comes from “8,500 government entities.” And what are these shops and sites peddling? Well, they’re overstocked with Leathermans, along with kitchen knives, baseball bats (tip: neither the scaled-down wooden collectibles nor the Wiffle-ball variety are allowed onboard), and many, many pairs of scissors. You might even find a samurai sword or a replica WWII-era German submachine gun—yes, people who walk among us have tried to bring those on planes. What you won’t find, even though plenty get seized at airport checkpoints, are actual, working guns. The TSA maintains a blog, presumably intended to make the not entirely beloved agency seem more upfront and friendly, and here they disclose their weekly weapons haul. In one week this January, for instance, the TSA found 70 guns (unloaded, loaded and chambered), and that seems to be a fairly typical number. These get turned over to local law enforcement, who may destroy them or resell them as they see fit. Each new TSA post contains boilerplate language gently chiding forgetful airport-bound gun owners, but it doesn’t seem to be working. One starts to understand why those agents can act so testy. Of course, the White House and the airport aren’t the only entry points where the feds diligently empty your pockets. A lot of crap, for instance, was confiscated—sorry, abandoned—at the entry to last month’s inauguration festivities. As at many largescale events, umbrellas were prohibited (leaving George W. Bush to don a poncho as best he could), but a BBC employee reported that his colleague had to surrender a banana; according to a McClatchy article, other impounded items included two cans of Chef Boyardee ravioli and a tin of sardines, which one volunteer suggested might wind up as lunch for event staffers. A mild enough joke, but the General Services Administration probably doesn’t think it’s funny at all. n

Send questions to Adams online at straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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The Day the Pouring Died Longtime patrons bid adieu to iconic Sugar House watering hole. BY KRISTEN BONKOSKI comments@cityweekly.net @rascal_rides

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The Bar in Sugarhouse’s exterior is adorned with a frosted funeral cross on Tuesday, Feb. 28, as the watering hole is packed up.

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Jeremy Cox, a regular at the bar, complained about the neighborhood’s new development: “You can’t stop progress, but it should be done in a tasteful manner.” The Ahrends themselves seemed disdainful of this new era. “This ‘new’ Sugar House consists of modern architecture, high-end grocery stores and downtown-style living,” they wrote. “The days of the quaint little tavern will only live in the history books.” Of course, Sugar House’s modernization is not all bad. The outdoor plaza at Sugar House Crossing provides a lively outdoor space where shoppers and diners are treated to live music in the warmer months. Families are able to safely walk and bike to shops thanks to the new Parley’s Trail tunnel under 1300 East, and soon on the improved McClelland Trail. Young, urban professionals have moved into the newly built apartments where they can walk to work, to dinner and to the grocery store. The economic impact of the new development is undeniable. Since the establishment of the Sugar House Neighborhood Development Plan in 1986, the taxable value of the properties in the area has increased 357 percent, from $54.5 million to $248.8 million, according to a report by Salt Lake County. That said, for the patrons of The Bar in Sugarhouse—many of whom experienced their first beer at the old wooden bar decades ago—drinks at The Ruin or at Wasatch Brew Pub will never be able to replace the community they had at the pint-sized establishment. “The bar will never be replicated and it will always have its own special place in the hearts of all of us that were fortunate enough to have gone there,” Gabbitas concluded. “I’ll always cherish the time I had at the little bar.” CW

While the owners have undoubtedly been given a large payout to shut down, the heart and soul of the joint—its bartenders—have been left with no severance and only days to find new jobs. Despite this sudden ending, bartender Brian Gabbitas was more concerned about the community than about himself. “We were local; we were a part of the neighborhood,” he mused. “Losing the bar is a huge loss for Sugar House. It really sucks that I’m out of a job, but it is worse that all these people I care about no longer have a place to hang out.” The shuttering of the venerable chalet not only represents the the loss of a meeting place, but also a part of Sugar House’s history. The structure was originally a chiropractor’s office owned by Spencer Ahrend’s grandfather. In 1946, the building was leased to Manny Daniels who started the tavern, then known as the Tap Room. After a legal dispute, the bar closed in 2001 and then reopened under new ownership (that of the Ahrends) and a new name. So what will become of 2168 Highland Drive? The property has been purchased by developer Craig Mecham who has spent years snatching up land in the area, including Fat’s Grill. Mecham’s other projects in the neighborhood include Sugar House Crossing—a multiuse development that includes The Vue apartments and Wasatch Brew Pub. Mecham plans to use his newly acquired property to build the Dixon Medical Building. According to the Sugar House Community Council, the new structure will provide medical office space and a University of Utah medical clinic will be the primary tenant. Drawings show a boxy, six-story building that one online critic called “another hideous box by unimaginative architects.”

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

by where they could walk to both the little bar and to neighboring Fat’s Grill. Much to their dismay, both businesses closed in the short time since. “I’ve always had a soft spot for the dive bar,” Galarza says of the two establishments. “The gritty, honest conversation and beer. We really liked going down to The Bar or Fat’s after work. Sugar House had both these low- and high-class vibes, it felt very eclectic.” The Ahrends announced the sale on Feb. 20, five days before the bar closed. Immediately, longtime patrons began flooding the small space. On Thursday night, Tim Ball visited for the last time. Outside, heavy snow fell in a late February blizzard, but inside was cozy. The walls were covered in original wood paneling and illuminated by the glow of neon Coors and Budweiser signs. Ball and his friends nursed their pints and recalled fond memories there. “We moved here from Alaska with no friends,” Ball said. “It was New Year’s Eve. We were walking by and were drawn in. The first person we met bought us beers all night long. It was always easy to make a friend here.” A week later, visiting the bar for a second time, Ball and his fiancée met the person who would later be their wedding officiant. “This bar is like Cheers … everyone knows your name.” Evidently, Ball wasn’t the only one that considered the tavern his real-life Cheers. On that same Thursday night, the jukebox began blaring the theme song from the ’80s television sitcom and the entire bar—drunk and sober alike— sang along. The scene was both heartwarming and heart-rending. Perhaps those most affected by the bar’s closing are its employees, who were given a sudden one-week warning.

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hile Utah’s liquor laws changed dramatically during The Bar in Sugarhouse’s 70-year reign, the iconic tavern avoided most of the legal churn by serving only one kind of beverage: beer. Granted, it was weak, 3.2-percent-ABW beer—a threshold established for taverns in 1934 and unchanged since—but it was cold, cheap and plentiful. Poured in a tiny A-frame ski chalet, the pints drew locals in, and the atmosphere and familiar faces kept them coming back. But the commercialization of Sugar House was one change the bar couldn’t withstand. This past Saturday was its final last call. In a letter to customers, owners Spencer and Lisa Ahrend lamented that the tavern had succumbed to “what we are all experiencing as the development of the ‘new’ Sugar House.” Ironically, it seems that even the “new Sugar House” is mourning the loss of the tavern, affectionately known as “the little bar.” The Ruin, a new addition to the neighborhood, is a hip and modern lounge best known for its cocktails. The polar opposite of The Bar in Sugarhouse, The Ruin considered the tavern an integral part of the community. “It’s sad to see it go,” says Chase Worthen, a manager at The Ruin. “We’ve been working to build a bar community here. The Bar in Sugarhouse was always a great stop between The Ruin and other Sugar House bars. Unfortunately, their closing affects us all.” On Saturday night, it was clear that the bar will leave a hole in the hearts of many locals. On any given weekend night, the chalet’s 625 square feet often were filled to capacity; on closing night, the room was packed shoulder-toshoulder and patrons spilled out onto the sidewalk, saying their goodbyes. The conversation varied between typical boisterous bar chatter and somber—sometimes angry—discourse over the future of Sugar House. Alysson Galarza, a Salt Lake City native and frequent patron, moved back to Sugar House a year ago after nearly two decades living in Montana. She and her husband chose to buy a house near-


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12 | MARCH 2, 2017

THE

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can

CHANGE THE WORLD

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

WOMEN’S WEEK

Don’t wear provocative clothing, and you won’t get raped, right? Wrong. That’s called victim-blaming. This year’s Women’s Week explores rape culture and how it is manifested. More importantly, the events promote ways to disrupt the status quo. Highlights include special guest Staceyann Chin, a spokenword poet, acclaimed performing artist and political activist; a panel discussion on society’s desensitization to sexual assault; a bystander intervention training session; a film screening of Private Violence, and more. Women’s Week celebrates the importance of social, economic, cultural and political achievement and well-being of women and girls. Don’t miss it. Various locations, University of Utah, Monday-Friday, March 6-10, diversity.utah.edu

CANNABIS PANEL

Once again, it looks like medical marijuana is the can that Utah legislators keep kicking down the road. They just can’t seem to get there, but that doesn’t mean you can’t. Join panel discussion Medical Cannabis in Utah with board members of TRUCE (Together for Responsible Use and Cannabis Education). Learn where Utah is on cannabis, what your local and federal options are, and how you can get involved. Christine Stenquist, co-founder of TRUCE, recounts being bedridden for 16 years with a brain tumor until discovering the medicinal benefits of cannabis. Washington Branch, Washington County Library, 220 N. 300 East, Washington, Tuesday, March 7, 5-6:45 p.m., bit.ly/2kUP8Hd

A DAY WITHOUT A WOMAN

Not sure that Washington is getting the message? Don’t stop now. International Women’s Day is an opportunity to make yourself heard. Ignore those corporations that harm you and find ways to support businesses, organizations and communities that sustain you. Ask yourself: Do businesses support our communities, or do they drain them? Do they strive for gender equality, or do they support the policies and leaders that perpetuate oppression? Do they align with a sustainable environment, or do they profit from destruction and steal the futures of our children? It’s up to you how to support the International Women’s Strike: Women may take the day off from paid and unpaid labor, avoid shopping (with exceptions for small, women- and minority-owned businesses) and wear red in solidarity with A Day Without A Woman. Everywhere, Wednesday, March 8, womensmarch.com/womensday

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

@Bill _ Frost

Eight Sugar House gentrification headlines from the year 2040:

8. “New, Retro-Themed ‘A’

Frame Tavern to Become Last and Only Bar in People’s Republic of Utah.”

7. “Beloved Authentic

Neighborhood Mexican Eatery Chipotle Closes.”

6. “High-Rise Apartments

Vacant for 20 Years Now Home to Radioactive Zombie Hives.”

5. “Re-Elected Sen. Hatch

Breaks Ground on New ‘Uncle Orrin’s Vitamin Shoppe’ Location.”

4.

“Red Lobster Now Importing Seafood Directly from Nevada Shoreline Fisheries.”

3. “Mega-Franchise Del Taco Bell Time to Open in Chipotle Space.”

2.

“Sugar House State Liquor Store Still Petitioning to Expand Beyond 10 Parking Spaces.”

1. “Raunch Records Introduces

Mosh-Pit VR Simulator for Older Punks.”


MIX TAPE

CITY WEEKLY’S annual offering to

2017

t he local

music gods.

I

16

17

18

MARCH 2, 2017 | 13

15

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14

2017

—Randy Harward rharward@cityweekly.net

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MUSIC ISSUE

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THE

t gets tiring, hearing how some people still think Salt Lake City is a cultural Salton Sea—barren, cracked and dry due to an oppressive ball of hot gas. We know better. We live here. We have all four seasons, each clearly doin’ its own thing, which is to say, we’re a diverse and variously inspired city—nay, valley—and so are our neighbors to the north and south. Ogden has always been secretly, and now not-so-secretly, cool. Even Provo’s learning to party some. And the denizens of all three towns, among others, are making more and better music. Not that we’ve had a shortage of good music, especially in SLC where, yes, we locals have rightly felt encumbered—but also inspired—by the prevailing culture. There’s just more of it. You can’t throw a rock without hitting a rock—or blues, country, funk, jazz, jam or hiphop—musician in this town. There are more venues, too; from clubs to well-curated perennials like the eagerly anticipated Red Butte Garden Outdoor Concert Series and Twilight Concert Series, and festivals like CrucialFest and the burgeoning Utah Arts Festival. City Weekly is a proud co-sponsor of the inaugural Utah Music Festival (see p. 18), an ambitious event focused on promoting our embarrassment of musical riches. Wouldn’t it be good to see some of these hardworking musicians get their national—or global—due? Don’t you want to see Baby Gurl on the cover of Rolling Stone? Sculpture Club on Juxtapoz? Dine Krew on Rachael Ray Every Day? Or how about Thunderfist on Hustler? For now, we’ll have to settle for giving them mostly interior shots in our regular music section, and this lone yearly whopper dedicated to all things local music. It’s our way of telling our resident tune-pushers to roll those amp dials to 11 and— kerrrrr-annnnng!


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14 | MARCH 2, 2017

P

opular music, especially rock ’n’ roll, has always been a highly visual medium. Every standout album has an eye-catching album cover, and that’s no less true of local acts. We chart the evolution of local music through some of the best artwork to grace the releases of exceptional Utah bands, which helped them make their mark in Salt Lake City and beyond. And one that’s just plain weird.

Koala Temple—Blue Milk (koalatemple.bandcamp. com, 2014) Artist: Andrew Sato Now inactive, these Psych Lake City stalwarts released several albums, and the mixedmedia collage for their second and final LP is a stunning work of art: a tour-de-force overspill of images including topiary, insects, automobiles, astronauts, spaced-out faces and slight nudity. This is such a splendid visual piece that you might hang it on your wall. If you do, you get extra cool points for framing this photo of framed art. Andy Warhol would be proud. Numbs—Nfinity (Earth Burn, 2007) Artist: Cornel “Rooster” Saluone These local hip-hop pioneers burst onto the scene with their 2001 debut, The Word, but NFinity found them maturing, and the split-screen action portrait cover art emphasized Numbs’ collective effort and the teamwork inherent in great hip-hop groups. A decade later, it’s still an essential release: a brilliant work in the genre and unabashedly Utahn. Puri-Do—A Red Sequinned Spirituality (8ctopus, 1996) Artist: Lincoln Lysager The music of Puri-Do combines an unconventional eroticism with acidic, plaintive punches against the local majority religion. Instead of their usual sepia-toned photos, a cartoonish character set against a moonlit sky reveals this as our local counterpart of Sebadoh—a bit awkward, yet rugged and emotionally vulnerable. Bob Moss—Folknik (Soundco, 2002) Artist: Daniel Clowes By the new millennium, everyone’s favorite local musical eccentric finally started to get attention outside the Zion Curtain, and Soundco Records engaged comic artist Daniel Clowes (Ghost World) for this cover, a moving image of the loneliness at the center of Moss’ music.

Salt Lake Electric Ensemble—Perform Terry Riley’s in C (saltlakeelectricensemble.bandcamp. com, 2010) Artist: Charlie Lewis and Oliver Lewis The Salt Lake Electric Ensemble’s performance of experimental composer Terry Riley’s in C was a landmark event in the local music scene, a multimedia extravaganza updating the 1964 composition with laptop computers’ more precise ability to sculpt sound. The cover art recalls the ’60s—an effusion of musical notes speaking in concert.

FIRSTns

o i s s e r p m I

A look at some iconic album covers from our musical galaxy, spanning 35 years. BY BRIAN STAKER

Spaces—Border Radio (Red Giant, 1981) Artist: Neil Passey The late ’70s/early ’80s were the heyday of jazzfusion and progressive rock, and this was our local entry into a field of sometimes spacey music with oftentimes far-out cover art. It was all about blending genres, baby—and plenty of borders got crossed.

The Stench—Crazy Moon (Running Records, 1989) Artist: Greg Overton The Stench was one of the original Salt Lake punk bands in the ’80s, and though they were as hardcore as anybody, Terrance D.H. and Co. had a sense of the lyrical, and that shows in the album art, which is reminiscent of more artistically inclined groups like TSOL. SubRosa—More Constant Than The Gods (Profound Lore, 2013) Artist: Glyn Smith All of local goth/doom band SubRosa’s album covers are gorgeous— broodingly beautiful, embellished yet restrained, echoing the contradictions in their music. The band’s most musically funereal album melds the somber and the sensual with exquisite subtlety for a release that finds them perfecting their own art. Vile Blue Shades—Live! in Salt Lake -or- Live! in Denver (I Don’t Remember) (8ctopus, 2013) Artist: Sri Whipple Local collective of musical (and probably, actual) debauchery Vile Blue Shades went out with a bang with their final release, as chaotic as ever, and Sri Whipple’s cover art depicted the mesmerizing monstrosity. If you want to feel strangely aroused, check out Whipple’s fast and bulbous art, a labyrinth of extremities and orifices, on their 2009 album John Thursday: California Adventure. Wasnatch—Front to Back (cdbaby.com, 2013) Uncredited photo, supposedly from a 1970s porno It’s impossible not to mention a local album that made it into Billboard’s “Worst Album Covers of The Year.” The image, which the internet believes comes from a 1970s porno, suits the eternally loopy ska/reggae genre—in the key of … F? CW


TOP in’s

h t e m So

CONCISE KILGORE KiL JOY DIVISION ALYSHA RENEE KESTER

Our unranked list of the local platters that mattered most in 2016. BY CITY WEEKLY MUSIC STAFF

R

emember the good ol’ days when we eagerly awaited a music mag’s juicy listicle of Top Somethin’s—usually albums—with easily digestable fun-sized commentary? We’d scan the layout for our personal faves to see how our own music-pickers rated against the arbiters’, variously spitting kudos or bile at hits and misses. Now pretty much everyone has a platform for their opinions, and lists rule the People’s Idio-cratic Republic of TL;DR. So here ya go: City Weekly’s favorite local albums of 2016, concise and unranked—but alphabetized!

Badfeather—Signal Path

(Lolipop Records) Ancient Grease is a garage-rock opus perfect for MP&TG’s intro to the Lolipop Records label and the big kids on the mean streets of NYC, where they are currently tearing up clubs. “Evil Desert Mountain People,” “Don’t Shake My Busch” and other epics epitomize the greasy apex of these skateboarders’ surf-garage sound, which, even in their absence, leaves us lubed and panting. (Brian Staker)

New Shack—Eingang (newshack.bandcamp.com) With their second full-length album, Provo’s darkwave dark horse New Shack appears to have designs on leaving its small-town status behind with their night-in-the-city Drive soundtrack synthpop. Named after the German word for

(s t a r m y. b a n d c a m p . com) In showbiz, you’re supposed to go out with a bang and leave ’em wanting more. If Mike Sartain and company really call it a day, then this fist-pumpin’, chinrubbin’, soul-searchin’ collection is a big-bang leaving a black hole of want. So, if you really wanna quit when you’re writing some of the best shit of your career, then go ahead and take your curtain call, dick. Or make another album. (RH)

SubRosa—For This We Fought the Battle of the Ages (Profound Lore) The band’s fifth LP is emotionally and metaphorically heavy, like eyelids in wee hours and depression in daylight. The songs oscillate between angelic anodyne melodies and visceral, dirge-y rhythms, while their literary lyrics plumb black Marianas depths, yet dare to hope. Ages reflects life—the battle for the ages—in all its gray shades, leaving listeners thinking long after it ends. (RH) CW

MARCH 2, 2017 | 15

(Diabolical Records) The pressure-cooked artrockery on FB’s second album scalded so good with angry arrangements of squeaky guitars, tense rhythms, pumping fuck-you bass lines and vocals that conjure daydreams of a Rock ’Em Sock ’Em Robots match between cyborg versions of Jello Biafra and Fred Schneider, with Mark Mothersbaugh tagging in without taking off his glasses. And then, of course, Foster Body broke up. If that’s what the intra-band energy was like, I get it. Still sucks, though. (Randy Harward)

Max Pain and the Groovies—Ancient Grease

Starmy—Heart Beat Breaks Glass

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Foster Body—Moving Display

(joshysoul.bandcamp.com) Joshua Strauther might have released his first studio album a few decades too late. Vintage Dreamin’ is an eight-track throwback joint steeped in classic R&B. Joshy is no slouch with the vocals but you gotta give it up to the band for masterful work on drums, horns and strings. With live instrumentation, feel-good lyrics and a timeless style, Vintage Dreamin’ is right on time. (KLM)

(Cercle Social Records, sculptureclub.bandcamp.com) Formerly JAWWZZ!!, Sculpture Club’s arty post-punk with a smidgen of Cure-ish goth makes this trio the new poster children for retro-’80s now-sound. The Paisley Undergroundstyle distortion on Chaz Costello’s guitar and his reverb-laden vox profundities take you back a decade or three. On opener “Black Coffee,” Costello croons, “I wanna be ordinary,” but this 11-song set is anything but. (BS)

(Pink Cookies) KiL Joy Division features ’Cise’s distinct vocal twang, creative rhetoric and punchlines that you couldn’t see coming from a watchtower with binoculars. The top-notch production is mostly covered by Finale Grand, but local tastemaker BriskOner and hip-hop icons like Statik Selektah and DJ Babu also helm tracks. KJD blends the best of local talent with cameos from out-of-town heavyweights for 2016’s most fully realized local rap album. (Keith L. McDonald)

Joshy Soul—Vintage Dreamin’

Sculpture Club—A Place to Stand

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Concise Kilgore—KiL Joy Division

(johnlouviere.bandcamp.com) Local scene veteran John Louviere unearths a vulnerable side of himself in a record about loss of love, time and self. Written after a divorce and the death of his mother, the album reveals Louviere’s tender voice that gets a welcome boost of instrumentation from producer Andrew Goldring, making a record that hearkens back to AM-radio glory without losing Louviere’s deeply personal touch. (KB) UMF show: Thursday, March 2 at 50 W. 300 South

entrance, Eingang functions as a doorway to New Shack’s haunting synth arrangements and hallucinatory vocals, and a window into deeply surreal Happy Valley melancholy. (Alex Springer)

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(badfeather.bandcamp.com) On this Salt Lake Citybased quintet’s debut album, the songs variously check classic rock, funk, blues, soul and bluegrass, but Badfeather deftly avoids disjointed overextension. You can thank lead singer Rick Gerber’s rocksolid voice and vivid tunes, and the virtuosic players’ measured restraint as they endeavor to serve only the song. Ultimately, Signal Path is a sublimely satisfying tour through music history. (Kimball Bennion) UMF show: Saturday, March 4 at The Royal

John Louviere—The Future Is Now


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16 | MARCH 2, 2017

s r a St k c Ro PART-TIME

A peek into the lives of five musicians making it work in Salt Lake City. BY CITY WEEKLY MUSIC STAFF

PHOTOS BY RANDY HARWARD

S

alt Lake City’s music scene is populated with more talent than ever. We have the ubiquitous glut of underground strugglers, but also more bands signing deals with bigger indie labels and, failing that, steering their own careers as they navigate interstates in gear-burdened vans. That doesn’t always mean they’ve made it. You’d be surprised to learn how many of your favorite non-local bands, after signing autographs in Salt Lake City, return home to part-time jobs or even school. Because everyone in the world wants to do what they love, not what they must, and sometimes that means doing a little of both.

Booked: Eagle Twin’s Gentry Densley

Pagará: Marco Antonio Garcia

Dine Alone: Erasole James

Makin’ Grains: Secily Saunders

Gentry Densley is known nationally for the bands Eagle Twin and Iceburn, but he still keeps a day job as a librarian at the Salt Lake County Jail. How does he balance work, two bands, a guitar amplifier company and a new baby? “There’s a bit of pressure,” he tells City Weekly before a Saturday-morning shift. “But I leave it at the gates when I go home.” Densley says working with the inmates is rewarding. “I think if they didn’t have books and other programs, they might turn inward or turn against each other more. It gives them a kind of escape.” His supervisor is mindful of Densley’s need for time off to record (new releases are imminent for both bands) and tour—Eagle Twin will cover the U.S., Europe and Australia this year. So far, he’s achieved a good balance, finding inspiration in his work. English poet Ted Hughes’ book The Crow influenced his band’s first two albums, The Unkindness of Crows and The Feather Tipped the Serpent’s Scale (Southern Lord, 2009 and 2012). Hughes’ style even informs Eagle Twin’s two upcoming albums. “I identify with the language so much. It’s really animistic, but talks about human problems,” the staple of the local metal, punk and experimental scenes says. (BS)

Marco Antonio Garcia could be reading any of the comics on the Watchtower Café shelves. Instead, he studies a textbook. The printer, graphic design student and musician has a 5 p.m. class across the street at Salt Lake Community College. Now 35, Garcia had just started playing music when he left Guadalajara at 18 to join his father in SLC. “I loved it,” he says. “But when I got here, it was kinda hard because it wasn’t that much of a scene.” Alone in his room, he played songs by Latin bands like Soda Stereo and Cuca on his father’s guitar. In 2002, an ad in the Spanish-language publication El Semanal led him to join Elemento, gigging at places like Club Mambo in South Salt Lake. When Garcia met Gabino Ramirez and his brother Juan Rodriguez, they, with guitarist Angel Martinez, formed the rock en Español group, Leyenda Oculta. Garcia continues to play bass with Leyenda and sing in La Calavera, and both bands open SLC shows by some of Mexico’s biggest acts, like Cuca, Molotov and El Tri. And the local rock en Español scene is alive with bands like Cenizas Ajenas, De Despedida and Musor, and bimonthly shows at Liquid Joe’s. It remains somewhat of a “hidden legend” (to translate Leyenda’s name), but Garcia knows hard work pays off. (RH)

Rapper-artist-designer Erasole James is everywhere and nowhere. He dropped his phone in the Pacific Ocean a couple of weeks ago. He finally sends a Facebook message from a random woman’s account, and we connect at The Urban Lounge. Rocking black retro Jordans, items from his own clothing line and a “brand-new” flip-phone, James says how, despite quitting (perhaps losing) his day job, he’s one of the hardest-working and well-traveled artists in Salt Lake City. Currently, James is dropping jams and music videos like the proverbial golden goose while fellow members of Dine Krew, like Piccolo and Shelby, work on solo material of their own. “2016 was a really explosive year,” James says from behind circular shades. He dropped two albums on Dine Records. Into the Muh was written on the island of Kauai and Memories de Miramar was penned while on an eco-tourism trip to Havana. Through his deal with the Damn Son label came Before Common Era, which was created in Las Vegas and California. Travel, he says, is partly to escape the inversion. “The air—I need to get out of the garbage,” he says. “It’s dirty.” It’s also inspirational. “Whenever I’m in the Islands or the Netherlands or L.A., albums just come pooping out of my head. As soon as I touch down—bars.” (KLM)

Secily Saunders doesn’t remember a time when she wasn’t playing music. She spent her formative years in Cleveland and then Orem, performing in the Mo-pop universe that suited her LDS upbringing. “I’m on church soundtracks,” she says. “My first real gig was at Kingsbury Hall with Alex Boyé.” Although she’s left the church, Saunders never left music—it’s all she does. She was the founding music director for Rock ’n’ Roll Camp for Girls SLC, and also worked with the Portland and L.A. camps, and plans to become involved with more camps in the future. She also helps produce the SLUG Magazine Soundwaves podcast. There’s never been a better time to get to know Utah’s diverse music scene, she says. Her folk group Canyons, which she formed with her girlfriend Kate Anderson, helped fill an important space for both the LGBTQ and alternative music communities in SLC. Now, after Canyons’ recent breakup, Saunders and Anderson have a new band called Winter Grain. The band will soon travel to Seattle to record their first album at Brandi Carlile’s Bear Creek Studio with producer Ryan Hadlock (of The Lumineers, Foo Fighters and Carlile). Working with someone who has produced their idols feels surreal. “We’re really freaking lucky. It feels like a whirlwind, and I don’t want to look at it or it’ll go away.” (KB)

SubRosa: Rebecca Vernon

getting a corporate job because I thought it would take away my freedom,” Vernon says. “But if it wasn’t for my job, we wouldn’t be able to do half of the things we get to do.” She means touring, mainly—SubRosa goes as far as Russia, where they’re bona fide rock stars. While it’s true that Vernon’s career happens to have enough flexibility to balance her passion for making music, the fact

remains that it’s possible to juggle both a career and a doom-metal band. Most musicians will inevitably seek out day jobs, and Vernon is an example of why that’s not necessarily a bad thing. “I see a job as a way to find fulfillment in life, but also as a means to support my art. You have to do it for love of the music,” she says. “You have to love it or it won’t sustain you through the hard times.” (AS) CW

SubRosa’s Rebecca Vernon has a lot in common with comic book superheroes. By day, she’s a mild-mannered proposal manager for Orion Health, where she compiles and assembles information into lengthy business documents. By night, she breathes shadowy un-life into the eldritch compositions that make up SubRosa’s dark repertoire. “I always resisted


KNOCKOUTS: FROM THE OUTSIDE

THE BANDS THAT

K

d e k c no

O.G. rock critic Fred Mills gives an outsider’s perspective on some of Utah’s best local bands. BY FRED MILLS

ME OUT

A music editor’s coming of age.

Purr Bats

90s Television

Two strikes for the silly stage attire (capes?!) and Google-unfriendly name (hint: include “SLC” with search terms), but I’ll give ’em a ground-rule double for their infectious, shambling, Flying Nun Records-inspired jangledom. Maybe even an inside-the-park home run.

Crook & The Bluff

I know this sound; I lived it for a decade in Tucson. Desert-informed blues, rock and psychedelia have a permanent through-line, no matter the region. Alternately desolate and expansive, lunarlit and sunbaked, this pushes my primal button—and as a result, I just bought their album. UMF show: Friday, March 3, 9 p.m. at Lumpy’s Downtown

Sarah Anne DeGraw

Quite a maturation/evolution, judging by 2012-2016 YouTube clips that show her going from wispy, tentative, anodyne folkie to assertive, sexy, swaggering rocker. She compares favorably to Sharon Van Etten and Angel Olsen, and her pipes fill up the room.

Tony Holiday and the Velvetones

Leyenda Oculta

During my Harp tenure, Randy sold me on the then-burgeoning Latin alt-rock scene in the U.S. But in SLC? This band’s like the Clash and Thin Lizzy jointly storming the gates.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Every city with a club scene has the proverbial journeyman blues band that perennially tops annual Best of awards but remains unknown nationally. But I come pre-sold on this harppowered outfit, having already heard of its rep for sinewy, tuneful chops and a full-tilt appreciation of the form. UMF show: Thursday, March 2, 9:30 p.m. at Leatherheads.

The Moths

Elsewhere, I namecheck late ’70s Cleveland; The Moths would be lower Manhattan from the same era, influenced by the Velvet Underground and the New York Dolls while rubbing shoulders at CBGB with Television, Mumps, Milk ’N’ Cookies, etc. Dark, powerful, insidious stuff. CW Fred Mills lives in Asheville, N.C. He currently is the editor of Blurt as well as business publication Capital at Play.

MARCH 2, 2017 | 17

so liberally applied, we had Chubby Bunny, Redd Tape and The Rodeo Boys. The garagepunk-psych scene started by The Wolfs and Red Bennies grew to encompass The Rubes and Pink Lightning. And there was a cadre of relentless creatives contorting the framework of rock ’n’ roll—nay music—in Alchemy, Vile Blue Shades, Blackhole and Tolchock Trio. I could go on. I want to expound. But we’re only at the mid-2000s. That’s when my work with Harp magazine took me away from covering local music. I slowly lost track of the scene, but still gave local music pride of place with its own alphabetically sorted section in my wall-to-wall, floorto-ceiling collection. But I couldn’t listen to it much because I was wrapped up in covering national/international artists. When Harp shut down, I focused on school. I thought my days writing about music were done. Yet, here I am. And in 18 months as City Weekly’s music editor, I’m maybe still not completely up to speed. The scene is so much larger now. I keep thinking how it’s only a matter of time—I’m not gonna say that again. Sure, some local acts, like Neon Trees, have blown up. But a music scene is about its underground. Tons of other—I dare say better—bands are still slogging away after all these years, or just getting started. I don’t need to tell you who’s knocking me out now. You’ve seen, and will see, them in these pages. It’s more important to say something else. The magic of the music in your own backyard is a connection that comes from sharing a city, sky and culture with these artists. You can hear a song by Townes Van Zandt or Ray LaMontagne and find something relatable. But when you hear a tune by Sarah Anne DeGraw or Dan Weldon or Mike Sartain and find that mutual root in familiar soil, a reference or scene that’s uniquely and innately Utahn? The connection is so much deeper. It would be nice to see more Utah musicians find success, and for that to spread throughout the scene. Far nicer is the realization that at least you found the music that’s been within earshot all along. Now that it’s easier than ever to record and release music, there will only be more. And it’s so exciting to know that, soon, across the country, every local music scene will become a self-contained microcosm rich with natural resources, where its rockstars and fans mingle in real time, in real life and, at night, commune in the ritual of music. CW

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est Engine was in full chug, and we rode the funky verses and snarling choruses, picking up pieces of Tom Cram’s philoso-geek lyrics about alienation, inclusivity and questioning authority. We grooved along with Jonni Lightfoot’s pop-and-choke bass in lockstep with Eric Empey’s skittering, jazzy beat. We might have squealed like fangirls at Carter’s manic, whammy-fueled solos. The set culminated in what we’d learn was Honest Engine’s favorite closer, an explosive anthem about a population mad with existential questions that decides to “Turn Out the Sun.” That was the first time I heard a local band that knocked me out, and whose CDs, shirts and stickers I would die without. I dragged so many people to Honest Engine shows, where I stood in front of The Bar and Grill’s stage mowing on Taco Time smuggled in from next door, drunkenly shouting requests and, afterward, pestering Cram with questions. I did likewise with The Obvious, Wish, Clover, Megan Peters, Headshake, Tongue N Gruv, Insatiable, Wolfgang. Two years later, Honest Engine finally finished their album. There was no internet music buffet in 1995, so I babied that disc like my birth certificate. In 1998, my wife and I had a real baby. My priorities changed; for all I knew, it was the end of my local music romance. Then, by some fluke, I found myself writing for SLUG Magazine, where I’d read about so many local bands I’d never see, and The Event NewsWeekly where I met current City Weekly contributor Brian Staker. SLUG and Staker helped me amass a varied pile of local music by Red Bennies, the Wolfs, Erosion, Purr Bats, Thirsty Alley, Fistfull, Crapshoot, Sugarpants, Atomic Deluxe, Magstatic, Fat Paw, Bob Moss and more. I was stunned at the amount of great original local music that had emerged in three years. I believed it was only a matter of time before the scene blew up. When I came to City Weekly in 2000, I wrote about a different local act each week. I learned the scene was larger than I’d imagined, and still growing. We had an alt-country scene (The Trigger Locks, J.W. Blackout, Dirty Birds, Silent Sevens), blues acts (Harry Lee, Zach Parrish), punk (The Corleones, The Downers), hip-hop (The Numbs, Ebay Hamilton, SEM), singer-songwriters (The Legendary Porch Pounders, Mary Tebbs, Nate Padley), metal (Hammergun, Le Force, Iota), straightup rock (Starmy). Before “indie rock” was

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hen I was 15 years old, I hit hipster puberty. I was too young for the club scene, and never heard local music— covers or otherwise—on the radio, and certainly not on MTV. I was coming into my teenage know-it-all years, wrapped up in adolescent egocentrism. I’d received my first record at age 4, and had been reading Creem and Rolling Stone since I was 8. I not only knew shit, I knew all the shit. So I didn’t care about my classmates’ tales of The Stench or Zion Tribe. I had Kiss, Petty and The Replacements. Oof. It hurts to admit I was a dumbass. Especially about music, which I purport to love and am paid to chronicle and criticize. Younger, dumber me screwed me out of some great music. I hate that little bastard. If I missed a mainstream album, I could always go to the record store. It wasn’t so easy with local music. It was so much harder to release a record back then. You had to see these bands live, and their life expectancies were much shorter than now. If you overlooked a band, you missed them altogether. I don’t have to tell a bunch of music fans how profound a bummer it is to miss a hot show or classic album. I missed a lot. Some, like at the storied punk and metal venue Speedway Café, were because I was too young or had a curfew. But The Stench, Boxcar Kids, PCP Berzerker—all were casualties of my ignorance. Fortunately, I got out there. At The Great Saltair one early-to-mid-’90s night, my friends and I attended a locals-only show headlined by local grungers The Obvious, who’d been getting played on X96. Being young, dumb and full of ourselves because we happened to play guitar (albeit poorly), we stood ready to judge all four bands harshly. But Iris’ fey take on erudite Smiths-Cure mope-rock was pretty cool. And being young, dumb and full of our lingering virginity, we got way too excited about their song “Justine and Julia.” Then Honest Engine started to set up and we got even more excited about the nerdy singer’s glittery Gretsch. They introduced themselves and launched into “U.R.V.R.,” a prescient tale of mind expansion via virtual reality that I’d later learn was the foursome’s go-to opener. Since my group was on a third-wave ska kick, Ben Carter’s clean chicka-chicka intro grabbed us. Before we could skank, Carter stopped. We dangled in suspense, hanging on the low roar of a power chord, which finally gave way to a mean, funky riff. Suddenly, Hon-

RANDY HARWARD

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BY RANDY HARWARD

[Music Editor’s note: I had the great pleasure of working under and learning from Fred Mills at Harp and Blurt. A rock ’n’ roll gentleman and scholar, he has written about music since the late ’70s for The Bob, Option, Spin, Magnet, Stereophile and various weeklies. You don’t publish that much by tossing kudos like confetti—if something sucks, Mills says so. So I sent him some of my favorite local music for an outsider’s perspective.] Covering a local scene can sometimes be a thankless job. Do you play cheerleader, and destroy your credibility, or do you throw rocks and get your ass beat by a disgruntled band member? I do recall, though, Randy Harward sincerely enthusing to me about several Salt Lake City bands, like the gorgeous Americana of Band of Annuals and the delightfully twisted rock of Red Bennies. Y’see, our prime directive isn’t to seem cool or all-knowing, but to share our enthusiasm and, occasionally, offer constructive advice. All of the artists below have merit, some more than others. But they all deserve their shot, so give ’em your attention.


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The Rock Princess

d e e S

BY ZAC SMITH

T

Andy Jorgensen, UMF creator/producer

ANDY JORGENSEN

he Utah Music Festival is a four-day and three-night showcase of Utah’s musical talent across a variety of genres,” says UMF creator/producer Andy Jorgensen, who’s also the owner of Lighthouse Investments, a Utah-based technology venture capital firm. “The goal of the festival is to let music lovers sample the great artists we have here in our own backyard,” he continues. Jorgensen, a New York native, has gained a deep appreciation for the Utah landscape and our ever-blossoming music scene over the past eight years. The inspiration to create the UMF came when Jorgensen met Rick Gardiner, host of the Summertime Brighton Cabin Concert Series and, like Jorgensen, a seasoned hiker. Gardiner welcomed Jorgensen into a community of Wasatch hikers and, during one particular sunset trek near Brighton, their friendship grew as they discovered a mutual interest in music. One evening, while attending one of the house concerts Jorgensen held as part of his 9708 Oakwood Concert Series, Gardiner suggested they join forces to create a music festival. “That was the last conversation we ever had,” Jorgensen says. “Rick passed away doing what he loved—hiking the Wasatch, just six weeks later.” Jorgensen created UMF in memory of Gardiner. “He planted a seed, and I’m sure he’s looking down on us now, watching it grow.” UMF offers an opportunity for new listening experiences, as well as the ability to tailor your experience to taste—not to mention geography. From March 2-5, more than 50 local bands are set to play in 12 venues. Instead of sticking to the usual cluster of downtown spots, the UMF scheduled shows from downtown Salt Lake City to Draper. Each one features three acts, represented anywhere from one genre to three closely related sounds. On Thursday, The Urban Lounge hosts a hip-hop per-

LISA LATONI

18 | MARCH 2, 2017

ALAN ROY CARRINGTON

The Utah Music Festival readies its debut.

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PLANTING A

John Louviere performs at the 9708 Oakwood Concert Series. formance by Burnell Washburn, Grits Green and House of Lewis. On the same night is a blues/country event at Leatherheads, headlined by Tony Holiday and the Velvetones, GrapeGrass and Carver Louis and the Old Lincoln Highway Band. On Friday, at A Bar Named Sue in Millcreek hosts one of the alt/pop/rock shows with Advent Horizon, Jody Whitesides and MiNX, while down in Murray at The Ice Haüs is a blues/indie show with I Hear Sirens, Mortigi Tempo and Lost in Bourbon. On Saturday, The Acoustic Place at the Gateway hosts an indie/pop/rock night featuring Festive People, Spirit City and Le Voir, and The Royal’s blues/rock/soul event has Badfeather, Arizona Sun and Vintage Overdrive. Other genre nights include EDM/house/hip-hop and rock/cover bands, among others. That’s a lot of music in a short amount of time, but don’t get overwhelmed. “Only about six to seven different venues will be used on any given night,” Jorgensen says, “so that people can go to places they may not have been before.” Alongside the sounds of many talented artists, UMF also offers music workshops for those looking to take their talents to the next level or make a larger splash in the record industry. Topics include “Creating a Community of Super-Fans” presented by Carlos Castillo, owner of Musicprenuer Apprentice; “Songwriting Mastery” with Utah NSAI Chapter President Chelsey Stallings; and “Getting Radio Play” from the KRCL team. In a format similar to that of the annual South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, one lanyard acts as an all-access pass—“an entire weekend of music for the price of a movie, popcorn and a large soda,” Jorgensen says. A portion of the UMF’s proceeds will be donated to local charities. If the inaugural UMF goes well, Jorgensen hopes the festival can grow to include venues in Provo, Park City and Ogden. “We’ll also look at expanding the offerings to include movies, technology and culinary arts.” A kickoff party is scheduled for Wednesday, March 1, at Brewvies Cinema Pub from 7-9 p.m. For more information, including the full schedule, visit utahmusicfest.com or facebook.com/utmusicfest. CW UTAH MUSIC FESTIVAL w/ House of Lewis, Le Voir, Tony Holiday and the Velvetones, Crook and The Bluff, Advent Horizon and more Various venues Thursday-Sunday, March 2-5 $25 utahmusicfest.com

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REBEL, REBELLE

Nonconforming, nonbinary local musicians sweeten SLC’s musical melting pot. BY ALEX SPRINGER

hen musicians like David Bowie, Patti Smith and Prince started using their gender-bending aesthetic to create popular music, it paved the way for mainstream artists like Lady Gaga and Billie Joe Armstrong to be more open about their own sexual identity. With conservative whackjobs becoming more prevalent in Congress, it’s suddenly more important than ever for LGBTQ artists from all walks of life to build upon that foundation. There are a lot of people out there who desperately need to see their own gender and sexual identities reflected in their favorite artists—and it doesn’t hurt if those artists just happen to make kickass music in the process. While this is a universal need among our country’s population, Utah’s local trans and gender-nonbinary music scene is particularly important. Despite turning Salt Lake County blue last November, our state continues to be a deep red—a reality that becomes more sinister with each day that the Donald and his legion of doom control the government. The musicians that comprise some of Utah’s most talented trans and gender-nonconforming outfits are not only building an inventive music scene along the Wasatch Front, but they’re shredding it on stage for every Utahn who has ever felt marginalized because of their gender identity. When Tess Bybee of Provo-based freak-folk band Batty Blue got started as a musician, gender conformity was something that they struggled with. “At some point I was taught that women needed to be a certain way or do certain things as musicians,” they say. “As I got older, I realized that those things don’t have to apply to me. When I came out as nonbinary, it just felt really right.” When discussing gender fluidity and its impact on rock music, Bybee cites glam and disco as milestones. “A lot of art and counterculture comes from the queer community. It’s a common thing among queer artists because they’re somewhat ostracized, so it makes sense for them to band together,” they say. “I think queerness shaped culture more than people realize.” It’s a cultural movement that Dahlia Bratt of darkwave maniacs Vengeance Tampon has recently seen gain traction. “There are definitely some strong trans and genderfluid artists out there, and I think it’s become more relevant today,” she says. “People are really putting it out there and making a statement about gender.” As a transgender woman herself, Bratt is no stranger to the intolerance that the LGBTQ community often faces in Utah. “There definitely is an audience, especially here with so many people that are juxtaposed against the system of the Mormons,” she says. “They want to come out and find a safe queer space, and that’s how the whole band was inspired to begin with.” Artists like Elytra’s Scotty-Ray Phillips have actually used their music as a platform to help educate others about gender issues in our community. Phillips was recently contacted by a social worker who works with younger clients that are gender variant. “He showed them my music and has just recently asked to introduce me to their parents so they have someone to talk to,” Phillips says. “I’m not really setting out to be a queer activist, but if talking to me could help a parent understand their child better, what more could I ask for? It’s a huge honor.” Sofia Scott, aka The Rock Princess, sees this burgeoning community as a great place to find collaborators. “I take a lot of inspiration from Dave Grohl,” she says. “He started writing his own music and he was just able to find people to collaborate with.” The Rock Princess recently tore the roof off of Kilby Court, but she is quick to note that it hasn’t been easy. “The hard part is that it’s kind of a niche market, especially here in Utah,” she says. Peach Dream guitarist Paula Bravo recognizes the struggle that gender nonconforming artists face, but they also recognize that things are evolving. “There’s definitely a lack of representation for trans and non-binary musicians, but that is gradually changing because so many folks are engaged in the work of raising gender awareness,” Bravo says. “I’m hopeful that more people will grasp the importance of all identities so that we can become a more inclusive music scene.” CW


Presented by:

VODKA

KICKOFF PARTY AT WEDNESDAY MARCH 1ST, 7-9PM OPEN TO ALL BANDS AND BADGE HOLDERS SCREENING OF SPINAL TAP! FREE POPCORN!

THURSDAY, MARCH 2ND Urban Lounge 241 S 500 E HIP HOP Burnell Washburn 7:30 Grits Green 9:00 House of Lewis 11:00

SATURDAY, MARCH 4TH

Ice Haus The Royal 7 E 4800 S 4760 900 E BLUES / ROCK ROCK Lost in Bourbon 8:00 The Cold Year 9:00 Mortigi Tempo 9:00 Skye 10:00 I Hear Sirens 10:30 Ginger and Gents 11:30

The Royal 4760 900 E SOUL / BLUES Vintage Overdrive 9:00 Arizona Sun 10:00 BadFeather 11:30

Sky Bar 149 W Pierpont Ave EDM / DANCE Dine Krew 8:00 DJ Echovox 9:00 Marshall Aaron 11:00 Club 90 9065 S 150 W ROCK / DANCE / COVER Listen Out Loud 8:30 Opal Hill Drive 10:30

Lumpy’s 145 Pierpont Ave ALT COUNTRY Crook and the Bluff 8:00 Brumby 9:15 Grey Glass 10:30 Bar Named Sue 3928 S Highland Dr ALT POP ROCK MiNX 8:00 Jody Whitesides 9:00 Advent Horizon 10:30

Acoustic Space 50 West 124 S 400 W SINGER SONGWRITER 50 W Broadway Missy Lynn 7:00 ALT POP ROCK Amber Lynn 8:00 Barsie 8:00 Ashley Hess 9:00 The Signal Sound 9:15 Stephanie Mabey Penrose 10:30 10:00

Club 90 9065 S 150 W ROCK / COVER Jana Alexander and the Rebels 8:30 Eighth Day 10:30 Acoustic Space 124 S 400 W POP ROCK Festive People 7:30 Spirit City 8:30 Le Voir 10:00 Ice Haus 7 E 4800 S HARD ROCK Martian Cult 8:00 Perish Lane 9:00 American Hitmen 10:30

WORKSHOPS: SATURDAY, MARCH 4TH NOON-5 @ ACOUSTIC SPACE CHARLES COLIN FORMALLY OF TRAIN, SPONSORED BY JOE PIA ENTERTAINMENT ATTORNEY Jody Whitesides, Music Media Placement Carlos Castillo-Creating Community of Super Fans

Mike Thornbrue-Independent or Record Label? Elm Street Studios

Chelsey Stallings-Good to Great Songs-Hooks & Imagery Charlie Colin-Creating Grammy Songs

PURCHASE NOW AT: UTAHMUSICFEST.COM

Sponsors:

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MARCH 2, 2017 | 19

BADGE HOLDERS RECEIVE ACCESS TO ALL THE SHOWS, WORKSHOPS, MIXERS AND MORE!

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The Loading Dock 445 S 400 W ALT ROCK / ROCK School of Rock Sandy 6:30 Mojave Nomads 7:30 The Wednesday People 9:00 Larusso 10:30

Acoustic Space 124 S 400 W AMERICANA Grizzly Goat 7:30 The Johnny Utahs 8:30 Matthew and The Hope 10:30

FRIDAY, MARCH 3RD

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50 West 50 W Broadway SINGER/SONGWRITER Melody Pulsipher 8:00 Kilby Court Andrew Wiscomb 9:00 741 S Kilby Ct SINGER/SONGWRITER John Louviere 10:30 Coral Bones 7:30 Secret Abilities 8:30 Belle Jewel 9:30 Cherish Degraaf 11:00

SHOWCASES:

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Metro Music Hall 615 W 100 S ALT POP / HIP HOP Scenic Byway 7:30 Barbaloot Suits 8:30 Motion Coaster 11:00

Leatherheads 12101 S Factory Outlet Dr (State St) COUNTRY / BLUES GrapeGrass 7:15 Carver Louis and the Old Lincoln Highway 8:15 Tony Holiday and the Velvetones 9:30

FESTIVAL MIXER FRIDAY, MARCH 3RD (PRIVATE EVENT FOR BADGE HOLDERS ONLY)


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BY JOSH SCHEUERMAN @scheuerman7

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR EVENT PHOTOS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET/PHOTOS

UPCOMING EVENTS

Annie Myers, Beth Weiner, Megan Crouse, Eliana Rivera

A Bar Named Suned Drive 3928 S Highla / facebook.com ue aBarNamedS

UTAH MUSIC FESTIVAL MARCH 2-5

Shay Read, Cicily Kind

Megan Gebhard, Kimberlee Montoya Ariel Gooch, Emily Jones

20 | MARCH 2, 2017

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SHOTS IN THE DARK

VIVA LA DIVA NYE SHOWS MARCH 5

AT CLUB X 2-5PM

Will Gillane, Tyson - The Sue, Pete Saltas, Stephen M. Page


NAOMI FISS

Now more than ever, Americans are demanding transparency and ethics when it comes to their food and where it comes from. They want it to be healthier, safer and more responsible in its production than ever before, and this can only be ensured through educating the public. The Natural History Museum of Utah contributes to this effort with a lecture series based around food. This week’s featured speaker, Naomi Starkman, is founder and editor-in-chief of Civil Eats—an award-winning daily news source educating the public on the American food system. She was a John S. Knight journalism fellow at Stanford, and helped found the Food and Environment Reporting Network. With this experience both in journalism and in food, Starkman is quickly becoming an authority on healthy eating in the United States. Michael Pollan, the renowned food activist and author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma, called her “one of the most influential” people in the food movement. “We’re living in a new paradox,” Starkman said in a 2016 interview with the New York City Food Policy Center. “Never before have we been so overfed and undernourished.” Join Starkman at the NHMU and learn from an expert about the social and cultural ties to food, as well as how it can influence business, government and communities. Start by educating yourself. (David Miller) Naomi Starkman: The Rise of the Good Food Movement @ Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 801-581-4303, March 7-8, 7 p.m., free, nhmu.utah.edu

When it comes to podcasting these days, it’s a rarity to feel like you’re a part of the conversation, or even in the room. A lot of shows take a direct approach toward interviews and content, and often it feels like you’re being talked to rather than listening in. But it’s a completely different vibe when you’re listening to About Last Night. Hosts Adam Ray and Brad Williams share stories of their stand-up lives on the road and give listeners a better perspective of what it’s like to be a 21st-century comedian. But it’s not just two guys getting drunk on their patio and relating funny anecdotes. Both men have purpose and reason for giving you a brief glimpse into their lives as they try to make sense of a business that often makes absolutely no sense. The duo’s guest list also reads like a who’swho of professional comedians and writers, along with up-and-coming celebrities and geeky people whose minds they want to pick. You ultimately feel like you just walked into a bar and found some old friends hanging out in the corner as they catch up. Ray and Williams bring their podcast to Wiseguys for a special one-night event, recording an episode for a live audience. No guests have been announced, but that doesn’t mean they won’t surprise us. At the very least, you’ll get a chance to see two men who genuinely like sharing their stories in a more candid way than many better-known comedians. (Gavin Sheehan) About Last Night @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, March 8, 7 p.m., $25, wiseguyscomedy.com

MARCH 2, 2017 | 21

During an intensive program at a theater in Los Angeles, Janice Jenson found people kept asking, when they found out she was from Utah, if she was Mormon. The answer wasn’t simple; although she was raised in the LDS church, she already had transitioned away from active membership. “I had to keep explaining a lot,” Jenson says in a phone interview. “And I realized that was a really important thing to explore.” Jenson, a Westminster College student working on her masters in community leadership, explores the journey away from Mormonism in (in)active Mormon women, which began as a project for her degree. Fifteen women—also inactive Mormons—were interviewed in “story circle” groups, and their narratives were then transcribed and turned into the script for this onenight-only production. A mix of professional and non-professional actors comprise the six-woman cast. “When you create a piece about a community,” she says, “you need to include people from that community.” Since Jenson herself was only 21 when she left the church, she found that the stories addressed a wide variety of experiences different from her own, including divorce, suicide, sexual abuse and dealing with a child coming out as gay. She has already gotten a sense for the power of telling these stories in initial read-throughs, after which audience members are asked to do introductions. “They immediately tell their own story, going into really beautiful, hard details from their lives,” Jenson says. “That tells me this is a really needed project.” (Scott Renshaw) (in)active Mormon women: an ethnodrama @ Salt Lake Acting Co. Chapel Theater, 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, March 7, 7 p.m., saltlakeactingcompany.org

Adam Ray and Brad Williams: About Last Night

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WEDNESDAY 3.8

Naomi Starkman: The Rise of the Good Food Movement

TUESDAY 3.7

(in)active Mormon women: an ethnodrama

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You could call Judd Winick a modern cultural phenomenon for any number of reasons. A popular comic book author whose work spans a variety of genres, he first made his mark in the graphic-novel industry. He came to prominence as a cast member of the pioneering MTV reality show The Real World, in which he was one of the San Francisco housemates of AIDS activist and educator Pedro Zamora (as well as his eventual wife, Pam Ling). The two formed a lasting bond that lasted until Zamora’s dying day. Winick’s friendship with Zamora led the innovative author to integrate concerns about AIDS and other pressing social concerns into his story lines, while expanding his reach from innovative takes on classic superheroes to his own original comic strips and an animated television series The Life and Times of Juniper Lee on Cartoon Network. “Ever since I was little, I only wanted to be a cartoonist,” he writes in an email interview. “I wanted to make things up and draw them.” Winick’s currently promoting Hilo, a line of comic books created for kids; the latest is titled The Great Big Boom. “For over a decade, I wrote superhero comics,” he says. “The current slate of superhero comics, including the ones I was writing, were geared toward older kids and grown-ups. So we set about getting some comics that kids could read. Hilo is the culmination of everything I’ve done as a storyteller. Comic strips, superhero books, animated TV—all of it, rolled into one loud, full-color package.” (Lee Zimmerman) Judd Winick: The Great Big Boom @ Viridian Event Center, 1825 W. 8030 South, West Jordan, 801-484-9100, March 2, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com

TUESDAY 3.7

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Judd Winick

Complete listings online @ cityweekly.net

JANICE JENSON

PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE

THURSDAY 3.2

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, MARCH 2-8, 2017

NB PHOTOGRAPHY

ESSENTIALS

the


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22 | MARCH 2, 2017

A&E

SYMPHONY

Gotta Orchestra ’em All

Pokémon and Harry Potter are among the ways for Utah Symphony to attract a fresher audience. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

ENRIQUE LIMÓN

A

symphony hall has long been a place for listeners to find Beethoven, Brahms, Mozart and Mahler. It’s a new twist to find Harry Potter and Pikachu there as well. As is true for many arts organizations in Utah and around the country, audience development is a challenge for Utah Symphony and Utah Opera. While older patrons fill the seats for performances focused around great works from the symphonic canon, there’s a need to bring new blood into Abravanel Hall. As part of that effort, USUO has created a new series of performances for the 2017-2018 season with the symphony playing the orchestral score to accompany movies projected onto a screen in the hall, inspired by the sell-out success of this season’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone performances. That’s in addition to other special performances appealing to a less traditional symphony audience, like this week’s Pokémon: Symphonic Evolution, showcasing music from recent and classic Pokémon video games. “There are certain things that are absolutely central to our mission: The Masterworks series, the opera, the education programming,” says Paul Meecham, president and CEO of USUO. “Those are the truly central parts of our scheduling. But we look at how we want to diversify and broaden our audience, I think we have to open more doors. There are different kinds of things that can become your first experience with the symphony or the opera.” The new “Films in Concert” season series includes four titles that take advantage of recent technology that digitally removes the orchestral soundtrack from movies, and allows live orchestra to provide the accompaniment. Raiders of the Lost Ark opens the series in September, with Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas in October, a continuation of a planned full Harry Potter cycle with Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets in December, and High Noon in February (the latter commissioned specifically by USUO, in conjunction with a Westernthemed art exhibition at the Utah Museum of

Fine Arts). “There are agencies that are developing new product for symphony orchestras, and the best ones are the ones that are in tune with what new and younger audiences are into,” Meecham says. “But again, it goes back to the music. This is mission driven, because it is great orchestral music. It just happens to have originally been written to accompany movies, but it stands up on its own very well.” The shift to include such programs is a recognition that the reality of keeping a symphony orchestra running has changed. Just 10 years ago, in the 2007-2008 season, the Utah Symphony was still including chamber music performances as part of its season. While Meecham was not in his current position with USUO at that time, he understands the circumstances that might have driven the decision. “I think there were a number of things that were stopped as a result of the economic recession,” Meecham says, “not because they were things we thought weren’t important, but simply economically some hard decisions had to be made. When you’ve got these talented musicians, you’ve got to figure out how their talents can be shared in multiple different ways. Adding these extra things, like the movies, has really been a challenge in finding the time in their schedule.” Additionally, these “Films in Concert” shows present unique logistical and artistic challenges—especially for a venue like Abravanel Hall that was not built with a sound booth or infrastructure to show movies. Fortunately, new advancements in laser projection—much quieter than the lamp projectors—allowed for the purchase of the necessary equipment without tearing out seats to build a sound-proof encasement, and a cost that was less than a year of renting the old projectors. As for the musicians themselves, Mee-

He’s a good conductor: Pikachu looks to electrify Utah Symphony’s audience.

cham says, “The conductor has to have a monitor right in front … to ensure that the orchestra is in synchronicity with the movies. From the minus side, it takes away some of the individual expression that the musicians can typically have in a concert; it has to be absolutely on time. The plus side is, the precision sounds absolutely amazing. If there’s a sound effect, and the orchestra is right on it, it really is very powerful.” Initial feedback for these performances has been enthusiastically favorable, and Meecham says that he’s heard no complaints from long-time subscribers, since the Masterworks program hasn’t been diminished to accommodate these additional performances. Whether the music at hand is Prokofiev, Potter or Pokémon, it remains part of a single mission to showcase great orchestral music, even if that music was first written to accompany the adventures of a boy wizard, or a little yellow electricity-shooting creature. “Will we convert first-time Harry Potter attenders to Beethoven attenders?” Meecham asks. “Probably not, but I think it’s a matter of getting them used to a live experience with an orchestra, which for many, it’s the first time ever. We’re getting them to be more comfortable with the idea that it’s … perhaps less stuffy than they had a perception.” CW

POKÉMON: SYMPHONIC EVOLUTION

Abravanel Hall 123 S. West Temple 801-355-2787 Saturday, March 4 7:30 p.m. $15-$74 utahsymphony.org


moreESSENTIALS

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PERFORMANCE THEATER

Mudson Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8680, March 6, 7 p.m., lovedancemore.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

E. H. Karl: Micaylah and the Never Never: Australia Beckons Barnes & Noble, 7157 Plaza Center Drive, West Jordan, 801-282-1324, March 4, 1 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Jessica Day George: Saturdays at Sea The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801484-9100, March 4, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Judd Winick: The Great Big Boom Viridian Event Center, 8030 S. 1825 West, West Jordan, 801-4849100, March 2, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 21) Lidia Yuknavitch Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, March 4, 7:30 p.m., ecclescenter.org

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 22, Saturdays, 10 a.m.2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

TALKS & LECTURES

1 Million Cups Impact Hub, 150 S. State, Ste. 1, 385-202-6008, Wednesdays through June 14,

MARCH 2, 2017 | 23

About Last Night Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, March 8, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 21) Ben Gleib Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, March 2-4, 7-9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Don Friesen Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-622-5588, March 3-4, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com ImprovBroadway 496 N. 900 East, Provo, 909260-2509, Saturdays, 8 p.m., improvbroadway.com Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273,

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

| CITY WEEKLY |

COMEDY & IMPROV

LITERATURE

Pokémon: Symphonic Evolution Abravanel Hall, 801-533-6683, 123 W. South Temple, March 4, 7:30 pm, my.usuo.org (see p. 22) NOVA Chamber Music: Robert Schumann at the Avant GaRAWge Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, March 5, 3 p.m., novaslc.org

Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., ogdencomedyloft.com Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., laughingstock.us Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-5724144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., drapertheatre.org Quick Wits Comedy 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, Saturdays, 10 p.m., qwcomedy.com Sasquatch Cowboy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., ogdencomedyloft.com

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DANCE

Artist Karen Horne shows off A Touch of Romance (“Anticipation” is pictured) in an exhibition at Horne Fine Art (142 E. 800 South, 801-533-4200, hornefineart.com), through March 15.

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

Annie The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through March 18, 7:30 p.m., theziegfeldtheater.com Disney’s The Little Mermaid Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through March 4, 7 p.m., drapertheatre.org Eclipsed University of Utah Department of Theatre, 240 S. 1500 East, 801-581-6448, March 3-5 & 9-11, 7:30 p.m.; matinees March 4 & 11, 2 p.m., theatre.utah.edu Eleemosynary Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through March 11, artsaltlake.org Harbur Gate Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through March 12, saltlakeactingcompany.org (in)active Mormon women: an ethnodrama Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, March 7, 7 p.m. saltlakeactingcompany.org (see p. 21) Indiana Bones: Raiders of the WallMart Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-2662600, through March 18, times vary, desertstar.biz Live Museum Theater Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 801-581-6927, through April 15, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., nhmu.utah.edu Luna Gale Emma Eccles Jones Conservatory, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, 801-484-7651, March 2-4 & 9-11, 7:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu/theatre Mary Poppins CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, through March 25, centerpointtheatre.org The Other Place Sorensen Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, 801-535-6533, through March 4, 7:30 p.m., sorensonunitycenter.com Peter and the Starcatchers Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through April 8, times vary, haletheater.org Steel Magnolias Heritage Theatre, 2505 S. Highway 89, Perry, 435-723-8392, March 3-25, 7:30 p.m., heritagetheatreutah.com


moreESSENTIALS 9 a.m., hubsaltlake.com Lidia Yuknavitch Eccles Center, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-3114, March 4, 7:30 p.m., EcclesCenter.org Naomi Starkman: The Rise of the Good Food Movement Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 801-581-4303, March 7-8, 7 p.m., free, nhmu.utah.edu (see p. 21)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

24 | MARCH 2, 2017

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| NEWS | A&E | DINING | CINEMA | MUSIC |

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Aleta Boyce: Dreams of A Lucid Traveler Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801328-0703, through March 10, accessart.org Brent Hale: Creatures of Imagination Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through March 11, artatthemain.com Christopher Boffoli: Food for Thought Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-6498882, through March 19, kimballartcenter.org Collect Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801274-7270, through March 20, heritage.utah.gov En Plein Air: Levi Jackson and Adam Bateman Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through March 10, heritage.utah.gov The Future Isn’t What It Used to Be Street + Codec Gallery, Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 13, free, utahmoca.org Hands Up, Don’t Shoot Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through March 9, free, 801-596-0500, mestizocoffeehouse.com Imagining Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

April 15, utahmoca.org Jared Steffensen and Christopher Kelly: Get Used To It CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-2156768, through March 13, cuartcenter.org Karen Horne: A Touch of Romance Horne Fine Art, 142 E. 800 South, 801-533-4200, through March 15, hornefineart.com (see p. 23) Lindsay Daniels: Nepal Rises Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through March 18, slcpl.org Marc Toso: Ancient Nights Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, through March 10, accessart.org Micheal Jensen: Where Is My Mind SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-594-8680, through March 3, Monday-Saturday, slcpl.org Only God Can Judge Me Utah Museum of Contemporary Art Projects Gallery, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through March 18, utahmoca.org Paul Vincent Bernard and Rose Umerlik: Modern & Minimal J GO Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, 435-649-1006, through March 15, jgogallery.com Rona Pondick & Robert Feintuch: Heads, hands, feet; sleeping, holding, dreaming, dying Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 15, utahmoca.org Shonto Begay: Aje’ Ji’—The Heart Way Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801355-3383, through March 11, 5 p.m.-9 p.m., modernwestfineart.com World of the Wild Art Show Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave., 801-584-1700, through March 12, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., hoglezoo.org

See Greece like a local..... september 15 - 25 Price: $1350* th

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Tour Greece with someone who speaks the language and knows what to see! EMAIL JBRIGGS@CITYWEEKLY.NET FOR TRIP DETAILS Limited spots available. *Triple and singel occupancey rates available *Airfare not included, **does not include historic site or museum fees


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TO THE GR EE

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DINE

RESTAURANT REVIEW

The Ramen Report Slurping up Jinya and Tonkotsu. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

Breakfast

OMELETTES | PANCAKES • GREEK SPECIALTIES TED SCHEFFLER

I

The steamed pork bun at Jinya Ramen Bar

THE OTHER PLACE

RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH | 521-6567

Italian Village italianvillageslc.com

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JINYA RAMEN BAR 5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT MON-THU 11a-11p FRI-SAT 11a-12a / SUN 3p-10p

TONKOTSU RAMEN BAR

1898 W. 3500 South, West Valley City 385-202-5241 tonkotsu.us

801.266.4182

MARCH 2, 2017 | 25

5905 State, Murray 385-474-6818 jinya-ramenbar.com

| CITY WEEKLY |

U.S. and opening a ramen bar in California. It was a quick success; even Pulitzer Prizewinning restaurant critic Jonathan Gold loved the place. So do I. The housemade gyoza ($6.95) is a fine place to start, but be certain to order a Jinya bun ($3.95). It’s a scrumptious, shareable-size, doughy steamed bun brimming with stuffings like tender, slow-braised pork chashu, mixed baby greens and cucumber and drizzled with “kewpie” mayonnaise and their original bun sauce. An appetizer of crispy fried chicken thigh morsels with garlic pepper and ponzu sauce ($6.95) was fairly forgettable; next time, we’ll order the crisp Brussels sprouts tempura. The ramen, however, is definitely memorable. There are a dozen different options, including two vegetarian ones, ranging in price from $9.95-$13. Portions are generous, and there are 25 add-on toppings that range from free garlic or butter, to pork or chicken chashu ($2). For $1 you can even get a noodle refill, but you won’t need it. I could barely finish my regular portion. The pork and chicken broth for the Premium Tonkotsu White ramen ($11.95) is flawless; the noodles are made in-house and cooked to perfection, albeit a tiny bit thinner than I prefer. Half a boiled egg beckons with its golden-orange yolk, and large chunks of pork require skillful chopstick technique. For something a bit different, try the also-excellent spicy chicken ramen ($11.25) with braised chicken, spinach, spicy bean sprouts and a choice of mild, spicy or hot chicken broth. CW

Beer & Wine

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For this popular Japanese street food, bitesized boiled octopus morsels are coated in a wheat flour-based batter and topped with Japanese mayo, takoyaki sauce, fish shavings (bonito), pickled ginger and scallion. While the flavor was great, the texture was not. The octopus was extremely tough and chewy, and most of our octopus balls went untouched. Along with ramen, Tonkotsu features a selection of rice bowls, including a not-soJapanese poke tuna ($12.95) option. Raw, sashimi grade ahi tuna is marinated in a Hawaiian-style soy-based poke sauce and served sprinkled with sesame seeds and alongside rows of bright orange masago (capelin roe), seaweed salad, cucumber slices, marinated sushi ginger and avocado. All of that is served on a sparse bed of steamed white rice; we would have liked more to eat with the abundant poke portion. Ramen choices here include standard ones such as miso, shio, shoyu, vegetable miso, curry and the namesake tonkotsu. There are also less routine versions like tantanmen—a Chinese-inspired ramen with chile-black bean paste, spicy chicken broth, ground pork and bok choy ($10.95). Of the types we tasted, the tonkotsu ($9.95) was my favorite. The light, clean-tasting pork broth was spot-on, seasoned judiciously with shoyu and served with a large (almost as wide as the bowl) braised pork belly chashu, menma (fried bamboo shoot condiment), fried burdock root, nori, scallions, bean sprouts and marinated soft boiled egg (ajitsuke tamago). Underneath it all were the nicely cooked egg noodles. All in all, it was a very satisfying ramen experience. Since Jinya opened in Murray, it’s been busy. With only seven counter seats and a total capacity of a few dozen, there’s usually a wait, but the line tends to move quickly. Is it worth your time? You bet. With 27 locations in the U.S. and Canada, this franchise is one that doesn’t feel or look like a restaurant chain. There is nothing cookie-cutter about Jinya, including the super-friendly servers. The son of a restaurateur in Japan, Tomonori Takahashi created the first location in Tokyo, before sensing a need for authentic noodles in the

Lunch & Dinner

HOMEMADE SOUP • GREEK SPECIALS GREEK SALADS • HOT OR COLD SANDWICHES KABOBS • PASTA • FISH • STEAKS • CHOPS GREEK PLATTERS & GREEK DESSERTS

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

t makes me happy that, for many of us, the word “ramen” no longer automatically conjures visions of the noxious, salty, 10-for-a-buck packages of noodles pre-fried in palm- and cottonseed oil. You know, the instant “food” staple that so many college students purportedly survive on. With real ramen—highquality fresh noodles bathed in slowsimmered, housemade broth with topnotch ingredients—garnering the culinary headlines of late, we’re seeking big, hearty bowls of steaming, delicious restaurant ramen. Well, seek and ye shall find. Now, before all you ramen fiends start sharpening your swords, I should mention that I’ve sung the praises of this dish at Tosh’s Ramen and Kobe Japanese Restaurant previously in these pages, as well as the short-lived noodle experiments at the now-shuttered Naked Fish and Plum Alley. Here I’m reporting on two newer hot spots: Jinya Ramen Bar and Tonkotsu Ramen Bar. Without going down too much of a rabbit hole, did you know that Japan has some 20 different regional styles of ramen? Indeed. All ramen is made up of four essential components: noodles, broth, toppings and tare, the salty essence (often shoyu) at the bottom of the bowls. However, regional styles in Japan range from Asahikawa (where melted lard is a topping) and the light, thin broth of Hakodate, to thick, hearty chicken-based kotteri-kei of Kyoto, and Nagoya’s “Taiwan” ramen, which contains ground pork, Chinese chives, hot chile peppers and garlic. The non-supermarket type that Americans are most familiar with is probably tonkotsu, where the tare flavors are derived primarily from pork bones and their broth. It’s the most common and popular style here, although many shops that serve it might also dish up shio-, miso-, and shoyubased ramen. As you’d expect from a place called Tonkotsu, that style is the house specialty at this West Valley City restaurant. Before diving into the noodles, you might want to enjoy an appetizer or two. The “Yaki Trio” ($9.95)—three yakitori skewers of pork, chicken and beef marinated in a sweet, yakiniku barbecue sauce and grilled, was sold out the evening of our visit. So, we enjoyed pork gyoza ($4.95), which were perfectly acceptable pork-stuffed dumplings, along with not-so-pleasing takoyaki ($5.95).


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26 | MARCH 2, 2017

FOOD MATTERS

Tradition... Tradition

BY TED SCHEFFLER

TED SCHEFFLER

@critic1

Fireside Dining

Expand your perspective – Broaden your vision – Let your palate roam

60 East 800 South, Salt Lake City, UT (385) 528-3675 www.theeklektik.com

Although it just barely opened to the public, the word on the street is that Fireside on Regent (126 S. Regent St., Salt Lake City, firesideonregent.com) is destined to be a hit. Talented chefs Steven Garner and Michael Richey are behind this new downtown eatery (adjacent to the Eccles Theater), specializing in house-extruded artisan pastas, Central Italian-style woodfire pizzas and a well-cultivated wine list. Pizza options from the imported Italian Valoriani oven include the Pink Pine (with house mozzarella, pork belly, ricotta and roasted shallots) and the Milk Run (featuring hen of the woods mushrooms, leeks, fontina, burrata, mozzarella and olive tapenade). As for pasta, I’ve got my eye on the gold potato gnocchi with langoustines, brown butter, cherry tomatoes, lemon, chile flakes and bread crumbs. Small plates such as arancini and fried squash blossoms are also offered, along with a quartet of salads.

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC Best of Utah FELDMANSDELI.COM 2015 OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

@ FELDMANSDELI

Just Slap Me

SlapFish, “A Modern Seafood Shack” (slapfishrestaurant.com) franchise is expanding into Utah, with a new location slated to open March 11 at 3320 N. Digital Drive in Lehi. Founded as an Orange County, Calif., food truck by chef Andrew Gruel in 2011, SlapFish is known for unique dishes like their clobster (half crab/half lobster) grilled cheese and chowder fries. I’m looking forward to getting my claws around Slapfish’s Lobster Grinder!

Fleming’s Down-Under Menu

In celebration of the Southern Hemisphere’s wine harvest, Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar (20 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3704, flemingssteakhouse.com) is highlighting vineyards and flavors from New Zealand, Australia and Argentina. Chef/ partner Jeremiah Hester’s meat options include New Zealand rack of lamb paired with (optional) Yalumba Barossa Patchwork Shiraz from Australia; and filet mignon with Southern Hemisphereinspired sides of mole and Cabernet butter sauces, plus chimichurri and black lava salts, with a suggested pairing of Argentina’s Catena Mendoza Vista Flores Malbec. Fish lovers might opt for Ora King salmon with Cloudy Bay Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough, New Zealand.

Award Winning Donuts

Quote of the week: “Give a man a fish, and he’ll eat for a day. Teach him how to fish, and he’ll sit in a boat with a fishing pole and drink beer all day.” —Lorena McCourtney Send tips to: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


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18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

MARCH 2, 2017 | 27

LUNCH • DINNER • COCKTAILS

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Contemporary Japanese Dining


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28 | MARCH 2, 2017

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Spanish Wine-Out

Sip on these wallet-worthy wines from España. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

t goes without saying that France’s winemakers produce some of the world’s finest wines. But then, so does Spain. The difference is that España oozes good wine bargains, while French values are harder to come by. The fact is that Spain is now the world’s biggest wine exporter. However, according to The Independent, Spanish wines sold abroad garnered, on average, less than a third of the price of their French counterparts. Quite simply, that means there are Spanish wine values to be had. Here are just a few of them. Buying $8 wine is a risky proposition— that is, unless it’s 5 Viñas Tempranillo ($7.99) from Luis Gurpegui Muga familyowned winery. This light, easy-drinking,

100 percent tempranillo wine is loaded with fruit (plum and strawberry) and is fairly low in acidity. It’s delicious to slurp with grilled and roasted pork dishes. I love it with Mexican-style carnitas. In a recent blind tasting of Garnacha wines from Spain, Bodegas Tintoralba Capitulo 8 Garnacha ($15.95) was easily my favorite; a full-bodied wine showing subtle balsamic and black cherry notes. The winery is situated in Spain’s La Mancha region, and Capítulo 8 (Chapter 8) refers to Don Quixote and carries a windmill on its label, along with a quote from Chapter 8: “Fly not, cowards and vile beings, for a single knight attacks you.” The stunning, Technicolor passion flower image on a bottle of Tarima Monastrell ($9.99) is eye-catching, to say the least. But it’s the wine in the bottle that wins the day. Made from gnarly, ungrafted vines in the rugged Alicante that average 35-40 years— and aged in stainless steel—Tarima’s semisweet notes of chocolate, anise, huckleberry and blackberry garnered 91 points from Wine Advocate’s Robert Parker. I can certainly see why. It’s unfortunate that I can’t recall the restaurant server who turned me on to Señorío de Astobiza Txakoli ($12.99) because I’d sure like to thank them. Although this white wine is slightly fizzy, it’s also very dry, high in acid and low in alcohol,

DRINK which makes it a delightful aperitif or accompaniment to tapas and pinchos, but pairs nicely with sushi and sashimi, too. Rosé wines from Spain are particularly good values, and that’s the case when it comes to El Coto de Rioja Rosado ($10.75). Winemaker César Fernández created this 48-hour maceration of tempranillo and garnacha grapes to extract color and flavor, followed by cold fermentation and bottling. Tangy strawberry and cherry flavors dominate, and healthy acidity makes this rosado a versatile wine to enjoy with salads, spicy foods, Mediterranean and Spanish fare or just as an apéritif to sip on the porch in warm weather. Another Spanish rosé worth tracking down is Cune Rioja Rosado ($13), made from 100 percent tempranillo. It’s fantastic with fish,

seafood and lighter meats like pork and chicken. Ribeiro wines from northern Spain are frequently good bargains and Coto de Gomáriz Ribeiro Blanco ($19.99) is one of them. This is a stunning blend of treixadura, godello, loureira and albariño, with honeysuckle and pineapple aromas, plus mandarin orange, lime and passion fruit flavors on the palate. Bone-dry and acidic, Coto de Gomáriz Ribeiro Blanco is a real beauty, especially with grilled seafood like octopus, blue- and swordfish. Grown in northwest Spain, the albariño varietal is one you really should get to know. Veiga Naúm Albariño ($13.99) is produced in Spain’s Rías Baixas D.O. (denominación de orígen), and is a solid expression of albariño’s rich, ripe, clean fruit flavors. It’s a full-flavored white wine that seems to have been built with complex vegetable dishes in mind. CW


AUTHENTIC GERMAN

CUISINE & MARKET

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD & Fresh Nayarit Style Seafood

Caputo’s

BEST REUBEN

BEST SCHNITZEL with SPAETZLE

Mi Lindo

Purveyors Tony Caputo and his son Matt have turned Caputo’s Market & Deli from a small, family-run local business into a hotbed of artisan cheeses and meats. The market has expanded from its original downtown location to a 15th & 15th establishment and a Holladay market, as well as a deli on the University of Utah campus. Caputo’s Cheese Cave—a massive cheese preserver with products from Italy, Spain, Greece, France and the United States— garners oohs and ahhs from passersby in the market. The deli dishes up subs stacked with meats, such as the Italian cold cut, which is piled high with sausage, Genoa salami, capicola, provolone and drizzled with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Multiple locations, caputosdeli.com

145 E. 1300 S.

Nayarit 

#303

801.908.5727

Cupbop

BEST SAUSAGES

Siegfried’s Deli Open M-W 9am-6pm Th-Sat: 9am-9pm

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891

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ALL

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Serving Imported Beers & Wine

When there’s a sighting of Cupbop’s distinctive blackand-yellow food truck, it’s a sure thing that there will be a line extending around the block to get a sample of their savory Korean barbecue. They keep things simple—choose from beef, spicy pork, chicken, noodles, tofu and kimchi, add some sauce and enjoy a cup of Korean goodness. Keep up with the food truck on Twitter @cupboptruck to find out where they’ll set up shop next, or pop into one of their non-mobile locations. 3619 S. 2700 West, West Valley City, 801300-1451, ext. 102; 815 N. 700 East, Provo, 801-916-8968, facebook.com/cupbop

Current Fish & Oyster

Mon-Thurs 11-10 Friday 11-11 Saturday 12-11 Sunday 12-9 AND ASIAN GRILL

Even Stevens Sandwiches

Go to devourutah.com for pick up locations

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MARCH 2, 2017 | 29

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Any Salt Lake City native will undeniably tell you the best burger in town is at Lucky 13. The bar and grill—situated right across the street from Smith’s Ballpark—is always bustling when the Salt Lake Bees are in town, with patrons lounging on the open patio. Favorite burgers here include the “Bacon Stinky Cheeseburger” dished up with melted stella blue cheese, as well as the “Ol’ Man Burger”—a creation not for the faint of heart, as it’s loaded with roasted jalapeños. 135 W. 1300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-487-4418, lucky13slc.com

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

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Lucky 13

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Even Stevens: a sandwich shop with a cause. For every gourmet sandwich purchased, the essentials to make sandwiches (bread, meat, cheese, lettuce) are contributed to local nonprofits to feed Salt Lake City’s less fortunate. Sink your teeth into the “Sprang Chicken Sandwich”—which is stacked with chicken, provolone, bacon, avocado, tomato and honey mustard—and feel accomplished knowing you helped feed another in the process. It’s always a win-win. Multiple locations, evenstevens.com

9000 S 109 W , SANDY & 3424 S State St 801.566.0721 • 801.251.0682 ichibansushiut.com

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This restaurant’s diverse menu consists of the best American seafood dishes chosen from executive chef Logen Crew, choice East and West Coast oysters and some tastes new to Utah for a memorable and contemporary dining experience in a historic atmosphere. The seafood selection is as endless as the ocean at Current, though they also dish up some meats grown on solid land for those who don’t have sea legs. 279 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-326-3474, currentfishandoyster.com


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JOHNTAYLOR

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

The

Chakra Lounge and Bar

Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen Next to Himalayan Kitchen

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City

Patatas Bravas Meditrina Small Plates & Wine Bar

Judging from the bustling scene, Jen Gilroy’s decision to move to the corner of 900 South and 200 West was a smart one. I like the more contemporary art-filled décor, which still retains the warm vibe of the original location. It’s a bit counterintuitive, but the small-plates menu somehow lends itself better to sharing than larger typical restaurant entrées. For as little as $3-$4, guests can share dishes like the vegan and usually gluten-free house pickles, chilled prawns with kimchi cocktail sauce, warm brown butter cucumbers with toasted sunflower seeds, and addictive spiced nuts. I could eat a couple dozen of the deep-fried falafel nuggets, given a Southern slant by the tzatziki spiked with Frank’s Red Hot sauce. My favorite hot dishes include melt-in-your-mouth Snake River Farms Wagyu steak frites: The boneless steak is rubbed with juniper and coffee before being cooked to perfection, sliced and served with roasted garlic beurre blanc. Gilroy’s shrimp and grits is always a crowd-pleaser, and we loved the housemade sundried tomato- and ricotta-stuffed ravioli, topped with pine nuts, mushrooms and diced tomato, nestled upon basil-arugula pesto and heavenly tomato brown butter. Reviewed Feb. 2. 165 W. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801-485-2055, meditrinaslc.com

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FILM REVIEW

Rage Before Beauty

CINEMA

Logan takes the Wolverine to a darker place. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

20TH CENTURY FOX

I

Hugh Jackman in Logan Even a grown-up’s idea of a comic-book movie can’t entirely shed the expectation that the fights will get bigger and bloodier right up to the climactic showdowns. It’s hard to complain about the ambition Mangold shows in Logan, considering how rare it is to find such an approach to these carefully protected intellectual properties. At times, the narrative seems on the verge of getting even stranger and wilder, including a subplot involving an agribusiness conspiracy that feels underdeveloped and tossed off. But Mangold is impressively dedicated to making the most of his character beats, especially in the messy but genuine relationship between Logan and Charles that benefits from the long cinematic history shared by Jackman and Stewart (whose performance is, by turns, sad and unexpectedly frisky). Perhaps it’s impossible to completely shed the tropes of the comic-book movie, but Logan at least earns its emotional moments by committing to a tale of the damaged man inside the Wolverine. CW

LOGAN

The Wolverine (2013) Hugh Jackman Tao Okamoto Rated PG-13

Deadpool (2016) Ryan Reynolds Morena Baccarin Rated R

CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND

MARCH 2, 2017 | 31

Children of Men (2006) Clive Owen Michael Caine Rated R

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net!

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BBB Hugh Jackman Patrick Stewart Dafne Keen Rated R

TRY THESE Shane (1953) Alan Ladd Jean Arthur Not Rated

ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

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the robot-handed government operative (Boyd Holbrook) determined to retrieve her. The parental dynamic between Logan and Laura drives much of the narrative in Logan, as the veteran killer accustomed to isolation poses as part of a makeshift family when forced to hit the road with Charles and Laura and seek out a mutant sanctuary rumored to exist in Canada. Jackman has inhabited this character for more than 15 years, and he digs deep to gather all the loss we’ve seen him endure in the other films (along with other revelations that trickle out over the course of this one). If this is indeed Jackman’s farewell to the Wolverine, as he has indicated, he goes out with a renewed vitality, and a recognition of how to fashion Logan’s journey as analagous to that of the eponymous hero of Shane, scenes from which are pointedly included here. Of course, much of Logan’s distinctive sensibility comes as a result of its R-rating, which likely was only made possible thanks to the success of the similarly brutal and foul-mouthed Deadpool. Mangold certainly doesn’t waste his opportunity to make an adults-only Wolverine story, as the severed body parts and fountains of CGI blood accumulate at an impressive rate. Yet while Logan isn’t nearly as gleeful as Deadpool in flaunting its license to kill and drop F-bombs, the action sequences begin to take on a numbing sameness—and that’s even after Laura is shown to be nearly as dangerous an adversary as Logan himself.

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f there was any reason to suspect that co-writer/director James Mangold was going to deliver just another adventure for the Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) in Logan, he takes approximately two minutes to dispatch such notions. Gone are the trademark muttonchop sideburns, replaced by a full (and graying) beard. The healing powers that have kept him alive for more than 150 years are fading, leaving him limping, coughing and selfmedicating through his days. As for the much-publicized decision to make this an R-rated film—well, the first word out of Logan’s mouth is “Fuck,” shortly before he skewers and dismembers a bunch of guys trying to jack the rims of the limo he drives as a chauffeur around El Paso, Texas. Stripping the claw-wielding mutant down to his brutal essence—a lonely warrior who never seems to have a shot at finding peace—makes for a fascinating change of pace for a character Jackman has already played in eight previous films. Mangold bypasses many of the trappings of the past decade’s superhero blockbusters, finding something that’s more mournful, and more packed with a violent sense of consequence, than other entries in this franchise. Yet that new direction also comes with its own set of unique pitfalls. None of that is the fault of the terrific setup, which finds Logan and the albino Caliban (Stephen Merchant) among the few surviving mutants in their world. In an abandoned building south of the U.S./Mexico border, they alternate serving as caretaker for Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart), whose mental powers are now a threat to everyone around him, as a degenerative illness results in periodic seizures. But their attempt to stay under the radar is thwarted by the appearance of a mute, nearly feral young girl named Laura (Dafne Keen) and


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CINEMA CLIPS MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. BEFORE I FALL BB Here is what would happen if Nicholas Sparks rewrote Groundhog Day as a teen-angst melodrama: The same lessons are to be learned, in the same order, only instead of a funny Bill Murray learning them, it’s a brooding Zoey Deutch. To be fair, Deutch gives a committed, nuanced performance that is many degrees better than the film deserves, playing Samantha Kingston, a high school senior who dies one Friday night and then keeps reliving her final day. Seems she was a bit of a mean girl, abetting queen bee Lindsay (Halston Sage) and the others in their clique as they harassed unpopular students, and now she must atone. The premise of reliving one day in a loop might be better suited to teens than grumpy weathermen anyway, given teens’ fondness for nihilism and having problems that no one can relate to, and director Ry Russo-Young (working from Maria Maggenti’s adaptation of Lauren Oliver’s young-adult novel), hits all the beats you expect from a teen drama. But except for Deutch’s mature performance, everything about the film is overly familiar, too mundane to justify its existence. Opens March 3 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider LOGAN BBB See review p. 31. Opens March 3 at theaters valleywide. (R) THE SHACK [not yet reviewed] A grieving man (Sam Worthington) is brought to a personal encounter with God (Octavia Spencer). Opens March 3 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) TABLE 19 [not yet reviewed] Wedding guests—including Anna Kendrick and Lisa Kudrow—try to make the most of being seated at the misfit table at the reception. Opens March 3 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) TIM TIMMERMAN, HOPE OF AMERICA BBB A shaggy, good-natured comedy can go a long way simply on the strength of a charismatic central performance, and that’s what cowriter/director Cameron Sawyer gets out of Eddie Perino in this

made-in-Utah effort. Perino plays Tim Timmerman, the ambitious, often irresponsible student body president of Mount Vista High School, whose efforts to land a prestigious political internship lead him to Sydney (Chelsea Maidhof), daughter of a Utah Senator. Sawyer sets the story in 1994—perhaps to show off a music budget that allows familiar radio hits—and the narrative sprawls over at least three too many subplots. But there’s a frisky energy that helps many of the jokes to land, solid supporting performances and a satisfying willingness to make its female romantic lead hearing-impaired, though it’s unnecessary from a plot standpoint. Mostly, it has Perino, who takes a mix of Ferris Bueller and Election’s Tracy Flick that could have come off as insufferably smug, and makes him a kid who just needs to do a little growing up. All that, plus dream-vision Bill Clinton as a mentor. Opens March 3 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw A UNITED KINGDOM BBBB In 1947, Seretse Khama (David Oyelowo)—black heir to the throne of Bechuanaland, the resource-rich British protectorate next door to South Africa—fell in love with Ruth Williams (Rosamund Pike), the white woman he met while studying in London. Everyone freaked out, but they got married anyway. As a romance, this is a beautifully passionate film, one of the very best in recent years; Oyelowo and Pike share a palpable and insistent chemistry that immediately ingratiates you into their relationship. But of course nothing about their story is just a romance. Director Amma Asante (the marvelous Belle) transforms it into an urgent, relevant tale about love as radical and capable of moving the mountain of the status quo; the tenacity with which Seretse and Ruth stuck with each other even in the face of mendacious opposition is directly responsible for Bechuanaland declaring its independence from the U.K. and becoming the Republic of Botswana. Sheer perfection every way, the film is a much-needed smack in the face to bigotry. Opens March 3 at Broadway Centre Cinemas and Megaplex Jordan Commons. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

SPECIAL SCREENINGS CAMERAPERSON At Rose Wagner Center, March 8, 7 p.m. (NR) KIKI’S DELIVERY SERVICE At Main Library, March 4, 11 a.m. (PG) LOVE ME OR LEAVE ME At Main Library, March 8, 2 p.m. (NR)

NERUDA At Park City Film Series, March 3-4, 8 p.m. & March 5, 6 p.m. (R) THREE BAD MEN At Edison Street Events, March 2-3, 7:30 p.m. (NR)

CURRENT RELEASES

GET OUT BBB Jordan Peele’s feature directing debut horror-comedy plays on the not-quite-joking sentiment among African Americans that overwhelmingly white, homogenous suburbs are eerie twilight zones for black people. A 20-something black man named Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) travels with his white girlfriend (Allison Williams) to meet her affluent family in their well-manicured community. Everyone is effusively polite to Chris, earning laughs with self-satisfied manifestations of “acceptance,” e.g. mentioning that Tiger Woods is their favorite golfer. This is a comedy first and foremost, but ultimately the plot turns to overt horror— and while Peele’s facility with comedy is well documented, his deft touch with scary parts is a nice surprise. Best of all is his ability to embed themes of racial equality in a mocking satire masquerading as a date-night horror-comedy. This is the kind of selfreflective humor that can bring America together. (R)—EDS

THE RED TURTLE BBB.5 The Studio Ghibli logo might be a bit misleading: In style and tone, this nearly wordless animated fairy tale is quite distinctive. Writer/ director Michael Dudok de Wit opens with a nameless male protagonist lost at sea, then stranded on a deserted island. Eventually he encounters a mysterious giant, red sea turtle, taking the tale from realistic survival yarn to fantasy. There’s little traditional character arc, notwithstanding a thread involving our hero facing guilt from an act of violent frustration. But the simplicity of de Wit’s compositions and the near-pervasive silence make for an enveloping experience. When the surprising plot turns lead to an unexpected sense of emotional consequence, you get a reminder of how many different ways there can be to tell an animated story, and how satisfying it can be to see someone break from the norm. (PG-13)—SR

ROCK DOG B.5 Low-key, this is a Chinese-financed movie about a native Tibetan who saves the day by abandoning his traditional culture—and that might not even be the worst thing about it. Bodi (Luke Wilson), a mountain-dwelling mastiff, leaves behind his role protecting the town’s sheep from predatory wolves, and follows his need to make music to the Big City. What happens there borders on irrelevant, save that it involves a writer’s-blocked rock star (Eddie Izzard, doing a family-friendly spin on Russell Brand’s Aldous Snow). Otherwise, this tale is another tired variation on the “junior knows best” plot trope, full of slapstick and action beats but lacking any personality for its dopily earnest hero, or a single memorable joke. Oh wait: The narrator is a yak named Fleetwood. Fleetwood Yak. So maybe that qualifies as the worst thing about it. (PG)—SR

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Time Wasters

TV

Right Now Near Future Nevermore

Making History re-resets America; Time After Time ticks away. Making History Sunday, March 5 (Fox)

Series Debut: After Frequency (R.I.P. at The CW), Timeless (the best of the lot, but struggling at NBC) and Time After Time (more in a moment), the current TV season’s glut of time-travel shows finally lightens up with Making History, even though the timeline-twisting consequences are no less dire. When Massachusetts college employee Dan (Adam Pally) discovers a timetraveling duffle bag (just go with it), he begins making regular, continuum-cocking trips to the 1700s to visit his easily impressed new Colonial girlfriend (Leighton Meester). No sooner than you can say “Hot Tub Time Machine meets Drunk History,” Dan’s dragging a history professor (Yassir Lester) back in time with him to re-reset the outcome of the American Revolution, lest the USA come to be ruled by a … psychotic dictator. Anyway: Making History is a funny, Fox-y comedy, unlike …

Feud: Bette & Joan Sunday, March 5 (FX)

Series Debut: On one hand, Ryan Murphy’s new secondary career as History-as-Meme TV director is already getting tiresome—FX already has, like, 12 seasons of American Crime Story planned, and the first one just sucked (admit it). On the other, watching stars playing dress-up as classic pop-culture fixtures is irresistible (The People v. O.J. Simpson was a visual hoot, at least). The eight-episode

Feud: Bette & Joan chronicles the legendary Hollywood rivalry between Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange) and Bette Davis (Susan Sarandon), who also battled sexism, ageism and every other -ism the early ’60s dished out. Predictably, Lange and Sarandon chew scenery portraying famed scenery-chewers, but at least there are some crumbs left for Sarah Paulson, Alfred Molina, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Stanley Tucci and Kathy Bates. Resistance is futile, darling.

The Arrangement Sunday, March 5 (E!)

Series Debut: The producers and stars of The Arrangement insist that E!’s new scripted soap is not based on Tom Cruise and Scientology … but it’s totally based on Tom Cruise and Scientology. Rising Hollywood starlet Megan (Christine Evangelista) is offered a $10 million contract to “marry” A-list actor Kyle (Josh Henderson), a member of a sketchy church called The Institute of the Higher Mind(!). The Institute’s leader, Terence (Michael Vartan), also manages Kyle; Terence’s wife, DeAnn (Lexa Doig) is Kyle’s producing partner; they all have secrets, as well as an interest in keeping up appearances with Megan (who has her own skeletons, because drama). There’s a lot going on here and,

The Americans Tuesday, March 7 (FX)

Season Premiere: Everything Cold War is new again, right? Much like daily news-cycle life in 2017 ’Merica, every season of The Americans is a white-knuckle ride through ’80s Soviet Union fear and loathing, and Season 5 (the series’ second-to-last) cranks the anxiety yet again. Suburban Russian spies Elizabeth (Keri Russell) and Phillip (Matthew Rhys) have begun training teen daughter Paige (Holly Taylor, slowly becoming the real star of the show) in the ways of the KGB, but can they keep her away from the cute boy next door who happens to be the son of an FBI agent? Of course not—devushkas will be devushkas. Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

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MARCH 2, 2017 | 33

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like The Royals, the series is surprisingly well-executed, for E! (read: not reality trash). Check it out before the lawsuits fly.

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Making History (Fox)

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Series Debut: Ugh. Based on the slightly less terrible 1979 time-travel movie of the same name, Time After Time follows a pretty H.G. Wells (Freddie Stroma) tracking a pretty Jack the Ripper (Josh Bowman) from 1800s London to presentday New York City, because god forbid we have a TV crime drama not set in NYC. What follows is the expected “What sorcery is this?!” marveling at modern technology and gentlemanly wooing of 21st century womenfolk that Sleepy Hollow already does waaay better. As with Making History, there’s the nagging question of “How do you get 13, or more, episodes out of this?” but Time After Time should be gone after three, so problem solved.

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Time After Time Sunday, March 5 (ABC)


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Life-Changing Experience Hendrix tribute brings Jimi’s old bass player and amazing cast of guitarists to Utah. BY DAN NAILEN comments@cityweekly.net @dannailen

B

illy Cox heard Jimi Hendrix playing guitar before he ever laid eyes on the man who would go on to be one of the revolutionary forces of rock ’n’ roll. Cox and Hendrix were both teenagers serving in the Army and stationed at Fort Campbell, Ky., in 1961. Cox and a buddy ducked into a building to avoid a rainstorm, and through a cracked window caught some sounds the music-loving Cox had never heard before. “There was a guitar playing, and I told the guy next to me, ‘That sounds kind of unique,’” Cox says, the memory still vivid as he recounts it from his Nashville home 56 years later. “And he says, ‘That sounds like a bunch of mess!’ But he was listening with the human ear, and I think I was listening with the spiritual ear.” Cox quickly introduced himself to the aspiring guitarist, and soon he was jamming along on bass as Hendrix developed his style. Joined by a drummer, they gigged around the South and moved to Nashville together before Hendrix left to tour the Chitlin’ Circuit as a backing musician—with The Isley Brothers, Little Richard and Curtis Knight— before starting his rise to global fame. While Hendrix was becoming one of rock’s most creative frontmen, Cox continued playing in Nashville, recording and touring with Sam Cooke, Etta James and others. In 1969, Hendrix got back in touch and convinced Cox to join his post-Jimi Hendrix Experience group that performed under myriad names, most notably the Band of Gypsys, at shows like Woodstock and Hendrix’s legendary Fillmore East performances. Cox played with Hendrix until the guitarist died in 1970. Cox is now leading the Experience Hendrix Tour, a traveling celebration of Hendrix’s songs featuring an incredible array of guitar players, including Buddy Guy, Zakk Wylde, Dweezil Zappa, Keb’ Mo’, Jonny

Billy Cox (Experience Hendrix Tour)

Lang and more—tearing into classics of the Hendrix canon. There’s a reason Hendrix’s music still resonates decades after he first heard that distinctive electric squeal, Cox says. And it’s a reason that goes back to hearing Hendrix with that spiritual ear. “Every now and then, a spirit slips through a portal in time into this reality and just blows our minds,” Cox says. “I think Jimi slipped through that portal, with all the geniuses. “That’s why he’s just as relevant in the 21st century as he was in the 20th century, because he wrote in the now. A lot of artists don’t do that,” he says. “You have guys like Bach, Chopin, Handel, Gershwin, Coltrane, Miles. These guys wrote in the now. And the artists who write in the now, they reach down generations and transcend cultural boundaries.” The lineup for the Experience Hendrix Tour is testament to how wide-ranging the man’s influence is. Guy is a blues legend, while Wylde is renowned as a heavy-metal master. Lang is a modern blues dude, while Zappa specializes in the off-kilter psychedelic freak-outs that were his dad Frank’s calling card. Each is a headliner in his own right, and brings a distinct style to the stage. “All these great guitarists who have reputations around the world, they leave their egos at home,” Cox says. “We all just have a grand time in the name of good music.” The guitarists and Cox are joined by Stevie Ray Vaughan’s old drummer Chris Layton, with Henri Brown on vocals, and Cox says the show often reaches two-and-a-half hours. Some of the guitarists stick close to Hendrix’s original licks, while others make the songs truly their own. He sees his job as bass man as being no different than when he and Hendrix were creating riffs that Hendrix called “patterns.” “You couldn’t be restricted by rules and regulations,” Cox says. “You had to be in that moment, and I freed myself to just play and be Jimi’s bass player, without regards to showboating or ego. And it worked great.” CW

EXPERIENCE HENDRIX TOUR

Monday, March 6, 7:30 p.m. Eccles Theater 131 S. Main 801-355-2787 $48.50-$102.50 All ages artsaltlake.org


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Had they done nothing more than record the ’70s radio staple “Amie,” Pure Prairie League would still be guaranteed enduring immortality. Overshadowed at the time by such like-minded country rock combos as Poco, The Flying Burrito Brothers and Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, they can nevertheless claim a pedigree that puts them at the forefront of the emerging Americana movement, well before the term was conceived. Indeed, considering their list of famous associates—like country superstar Vince Gill, country legend Emmylou Harris, Eagles’ Don Felder and painter Norman Rockwell (whose art, a play on his Saturday Evening Post covers, adorns PPL’s debut album—also the first appearance of their iconic, poncho-clad bandido mascot)—it’s clearly time they were recognized for more than that one simple, if simply beautiful, song. Now in their fifth decade, the band soldiers on with founding member John David Call and longtime bassist Mike Reilly still at the helm. And while they’ve undoubtedly influenced scores of rootsy rockers, PPL clearly remains in a league all their own. (Lee Zimmerman) The Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $23-$50, egyptiantheatrecompany.org

Tennis

JO CHATMANN

Pure Prairie League

FRIDAY 3/3 Tennis, Hoops

Tennis, anyone? No, not the sport—the Denver-based duo consisting of Patrick Riley and Alaina Moore, music makers who bill themselves with a sports moniker best identified with fuzzy balls, Wimbledon and superstar sisters Venus and Serena Williams. However, theirs is no racket (sorry) but rather a giddy, bucolic series of melodious, ’70s AM-pop and soulinfluenced songs on their new long-player, Yours Conditionally (Mutually Detrimental), which hits the streets one week after their Salt Lake City gig. Four albums into their career, the pair has been accorded all kinds of kudos and spots at the top of the charts, not to mention the full gamut of late-night television appearances. The song titles included on the new disc are especially expressive—”My Emotions Are Blinding,” “Please Don’t Ruin This for Me,” “In the Morning I’ll Be Better”—bringing to mind an unlikely mix of Belle and Sebastian twee, David Vandervelde’s sunny amber-toned popsmithing, The Smiths’ melancholia and Cocteau Twins’ cinematic dream pop. As a result, Tennis scores through a heady mix of angst and enthusiasm. Openers Hoops come from Tennis’ former label, Fat Possum— known for releasing only the good stuff. The fourpiece Indiana band shares some of the same retroLUCA VENTER

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Martin Sexton mindedness as their tourmates, perhaps with more of a Brit-influenced power-pop bent. (LZ) The State Room, 638 S. State, 9 p.m., $18, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

SUNDAY 3/5

Martin Sexton, Brothers McCann

An exceptional guitarist with a penchant for folk finesse and bluesy ballads—and possessed of an incredibly versatile and expressive voice—Martin Sexton is also an adept songwriter, boasting a 30-year career that’s garnered him a small but devoted following. After Sexton acquired his first guitar at age 14, he was a busker in Boston. Three years later, he issued a collection of demos titled The Journey on 8-track tapes, selling 15,000 copies— an especially remarkable feat for that time. From that point on, Sexton’s career quickly accelerated, and he earned rave reviews and even a nod from the National Academy of Songwriters, which named him their Artist of the Year in 1994. His latest effort, 2015’s Mixtape of the Open Road—released via his own Kitchen Table label—reflects a varied musical travelogue that often accompanies his incessant touring, all reflecting his remarkable diversity. For their part, opening act Brothers McAnn derive their sound from the same Northeastern environs. Their lush, supple blend of three-way harmonies, chiming acoustic guitars and sheer serendipity is simple and uncomplicated, predicated on coffeehouse ambiance. Flannel shirts and Birkenstocks not required, but you can wear them if you like. (LZ) Park City Live, 427 Main, Park City, 8 p.m., $25-$40, 21+, parkcitylive.net

»


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Live Music ShamROCK St. Patty's Day Party

3/17

Not enough local bands record live albums. Sure, you can find live recordings, but how many proper live albums—where a band tries to capture their very best performance, or at least a collection of stellar live moments, for posterity? If you’re Red Bennies (est. 1994), and you have a reputation for bitchin’ shows, then that’s an outstanding idea—and it’s already happening. For two years, head-Benny-in-charge David Payne has been recording the trio’s performances with what he calls “a unique process that might be interesting to read about, if not too nerdy.” Knowing Payne’s a tinkerer, it’s definitely extra-nerdy and super-geeky—but also cool as hell. He’s using an 8-track that records to SD cards, special flat mics that can be placed on the floor instead of on stands near his own

Red Bennies

handmade, hyperdirectional Space Invader speaker cabinets “that run multiple instruments but send separated line-outs to the recorder.” Payne is calling the project Dai Ou Jou, which he says translates loosely as “peaceful death.” Does that mean this might be Red Bennies’ swan song? That’s hard to imagine, since guys like Payne would wither if they didn’t have irons in the fire. But then, Payne has the lounge band Jazz Jaguars, nerdcore duo Jade Knight/Lord British and a slew of others to keep him busy if he decided to retire Red Bennies after its long and distinguished run. “No retirement,” he texts. “It works, though, in case we die first.” Maybe they should call the album Live Before Death. (Randy Harward) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., free, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

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SATURDAY 3/4

CONCERTS & CLUBS

The Cadillac Three, Quaker City Night Hawks

KARLO X. RAMOS

It’s easy to poke fun at rednecks, but some of that Duck Dynasty life ain’t so bad. I mean, they can keep the religion, jingoism, bigotry and hunting. I’m talkin’ about dirty, dangerous, hold-my-beer fun. Like the bottle rocket-and-Roman candle war I had in a rural Idaho cow pasture, where it was pitch-dark and the only light came from Bics and blasts. That’s a good-time Quaker City Night Hawks adrenalin rush for sure, especially if you’re turd-phobic and the battlefield is littered with cowpies and dipshits. (Don’t try this at home, children and easily led adults.) Both of these bands remind me of that night. The Cadillac Three’s unabashed redneck-ness is more Waylon than Toby, and their countryrock songs celebrate their heritage and use words like “Dixie”—but I haven’t spotted a Confederate flag in any of their vids and pics, so I won’t put sarcastic quotation marks around heritage. As for Texas quintet the Quaker City Night Hawks, I don’t go for none of that Amish mess. But I do love me some oatmeal—and reallyreallyreally love El Astronauta (Lightning Rod), the Texas band’s latest album of trippy Southern rock/blues informed by ZZ Top, Harper Lee, Heavy Metal, Mexico, spaceships, Mark Twain, the ’70s, Doug Sahm/Sir Douglas Quintet and possibly Dr. Timothy Leary. The SL County Debbilbabies open. Just kiddin’—they don’t exist. Yet. (RH) The Depot, 400 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $18 presale, $20 day of show, depotslc.com

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MAR 02:UTAH MUSIC FESTIVAL

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Utah Music Festival (Multiple venues) see p. 18 Access Music Program (The Spur) Dope + Combichrist + September Mourning + Dave Suicide (Liquid Joe’s) Eminence Ensemble (O.P. Rockwell) The Groovement (Hog Wallow Pub) Message to the Masses + Altered Perceptions + A Tragedy at Hand + The Sonder Complex (The Loading Dock) Pure Prairie League (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 36 Turkuaz (The State Room) Worthy + Justin Martin (Sky)

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK Adelitas Way + Letters From The Fire + The Black Moods + Autumn Kings (Club X) Aprés Live Music (Park City Mountain) Black Tiger Sex Machine + Dabin + Kai Wachi (The Complex) Candy’s River House (Funk ‘n’ Dive) Dubwise + Darkside + Illoom (The Urban Lounge) Ginger and the Gents + Skye + The Cold Year (The Royal) The Groovement (Cinnabar Lounge) I Prevail + Wage War + Islander + Assume We Survive (The Complex) Jerry Fee (Muse Music Cafe) LVL UP + Palm + Choir Boy (Kilby Court) Mean Red Spyder (Brewskis) Pure Prairie League (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 36 Tennis + Hoops (The State Room) see p. 36 Tombs + Unceremonial + Tomb of Belial (The Loading Dock) Voodoo Glow Skulls (Liquid Joe’s) Wolfgang Gartner (Park City Live)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Rondo and Frenz (Metro Music Hall) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Hot Noise (The Red Door)

SATURDAY 3/04 LIVE MUSIC

Utah Music Festival (Multiple venues) see p. 18 Aprés Live Music (Park City Mountain) Badfeather + Arizona Sun + Vintage Overdrive (The Royal) The Cadillac Three + Quaker City Nighthawks (The Depot) see p. 39 Candy’s River House (The Spur Bar and Grill) The Coverdogs (Brewskis) Child Ivory + Haarlem + Strange Familia (Velour Live Music Gallery) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Lettuce (Park City Live) Live Trio (The Red Door) Many Blessings + Torture Porn (Diabolical Records) Michelle Moonshine Trio (Hog Wallow) Mokie + The Zolotones (The Canyons) The Octopus Project + Sound of Ceres (The Urban Lounge) Pure Prairie League (Egyptian Theatre) see p. 36 Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Thorgy Thor + Leila McQueen + DJ Shutter + Kay Byee + More (Metro Music Hall) Vallis Alps + Matt Maeson (Kilby Court)

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Ceremony (All-Request Gothic + Industrial and Dark Wave) w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) DJ Linus Stubbs (Funk ‘n’ Dive) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Sky Saturdays w/ We Are Treo (Sky)

SUNDAY 3/05 LIVE MUSIC

Access Music Program (The Spur) Garage Artist Showcase (Garage on Beck) Martin Sexton + Brothers McCann (Park City Live) see p. 36 Stocksmile (Funk ‘n’ Dive)

MONDAY 3/06 LIVE MUSIC

AngelMaker + Falsifier + Extortionist + Filth (In the Venue) Experience Hendrix Tour (Eccles Theater) see p. 34 Iridium + I, Sentry + Dipped in Whiskey + False Witness + Transit Cast + Chronic Trigger + more (Kilby Court) Scott Foster (The Spur Bar and Grill)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Jazz Session (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Open Blues Jam hosted by Robby’s Blues Explosion (Hog Wallow Pub)

TUESDAY 3/07 LIVE MUSIC

Doctor, Doctor + Head Portals + Window Case + Sunset Theory (Kilby Court) Hippie Sabotage (The Depot) Red Bennies + Brain Bagz + Dark Lord + Muzzle Tung (The Urban Lounge) see p. 38

WEDNESDAY 3/08 LIVE MUSIC

Archgoat and more (Metro Music Hall) Comrades + Detour (The Loading Dock) He Is Legend + Strangefaces (Area 51) Inna Vision (The Lighthouse) Jeff Crosby and the Refugees (Hog Wallow) Live Jazz (Club 90) MAX + Kenzie Nimmo (Kilby Court) Rohrer (Shades of Pale) Slick Velveteens + Penrose + The Artificial Flower Company + Dealin’ In Dirt (The Urban Lounge) see p. 41 The Statesboro Revue (The State Room) Tchami (Park City Live) Tony Oros (The Spur Bar and Grill)


WEDNESDAY 3/8

CONCERTS & CLUBS

BRANDON RICHTER

Slick Velveteens (tour sendoff), Penrose, The Artificial Flower Company, Dealin’ In Dirt

Comin’ outta Bountiful like jack Mormons and refinery wind, with a name that sounds like a creepy porn site, Slick Velveteens are headin’ out on their first tour. That’s not meant as an insult. But the foursome does appear to be in development and, since they haven’t really recorded yet, this tour is probably an exercise in bonding and cohesion. Their concept and sound both come off undercooked on the three clips they have on YouTube, but something sure smells good. Filmed in December for Park City TV’s Mtn Views, the mix is bad (not their fault) and the songs are somewhat disjointed. “Crooked Stare” can’t quite reconcile the sweet indie-pop verses with the rollicking choruses. “Rogue” finds singer-guitarists Kenzi Waldon and Devi Strill trading vocals and, while more focused, it’s still a little off. “Cold Feet,” a fist-pumper featuring Strill, is by far their best tune—a real cooker. There’s something in the other tunes that wants to bubble up, and I’m eager to see how the band develops. But please tell me there’s more to the tour than the one show in Boise, dudes! (RH) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., free, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

© 2016

NOD SCHOOL

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

MARCH 2, 2017 | 43

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

| CITY WEEKLY |

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

SUDOKU

1. Kind of car or class 2. "The Glamorous Life" singer 3. Fanciful notion 4. Swiss-German artist Paul 5. Pronoun with an apostrophe 6. Homer's daughter

49. Cribside cries 51. "Things are bound to go my way soon" 54. Scottish caps 55. Cheers at a fútbol match 56. Part of ;-) 57. Shade of blue 58. Funnywomen Poehler and Schumer 59. "What greater gift than the love of a ____?": Dickens

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

DOWN

7. ____ empty stomach 8. Treating well 9. Eager as heck 10. Similar (to) 11. "Let yourself in!" 12. ____-faire 13. Bilko or Friday: Abbr. 21. Walloped, quickly 22. Racket 26. Politician with a like button? 28. Tesla Motors CEO Musk 29. Homer's neighbor 30. Rejections 31. Happy ____ be 32. "Ur hilarious!" 35. One of the Coen brothers 36. Circus safety feature 37. "Westworld" network 38. Suffix with schnozz 39. Emblem of a pharaoh 40. Where to begin 41. 1968 Julie Christie movie 43. Like a crucifix 44. Battle site of 1945 45. Released early 47. Div. for the Mets 48. Dated

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1. Top-left button on most keyboards 4. ____ Ren of "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" 8. Highly sought-after things 14. John who plays Harold in the "Harold & Kumar" films 15. Gone flat? 16. Art supply store stock 17. Wine: Prefix 18. 2013 film queen who sings "Let It Go" 19. Question that leaves an opening for doubt 20. What the element #28 expert and paleontologist gabbed about for hours? 23. Margarine 24. BBC rival 25. Letter before omega 27. First of a popular tech product that debuted in 2005? 32. Garlic relative 33. "Still ..." 34. Many August babies 35. "Being John Malkovich" director Spike 36. Where students are taught to agree silently? 39. White-barked tree 42. Fit for the job 43. Dreidel, e.g. 46. Proofreader's "leave it" 47. What an admonishment of the 49th state might sound like? 50. Teacher's ____ 51. Under the weather 52. Blender sound 53. "I won't be attending" ... or a hint to solving 20-, 27-, 36- and 47-Across 59. Piña ____ 60. Actor Hemsworth of "The Hunger Games" 61. Companion 62. Bad blood 63. A deadly sin 64. Lamb's mother 65. One may be doll-size 66. "The ____ the limit!" 67. His big day is in June


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44 | MARCH 2, 2017

Your dog’s home away from home -overnight dog boarding-cageless dog daycare-dog washing stations801-683-3647 • www.utahdogpark.com Woods Cross: 596 W 1500 S (Woods Cross) | Airport Location: 1977 W. North Temple

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B R E Z S N Y

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Your immediate future is too good to be true. Or at least that’s what you, with your famous self-doubt, might be inclined to believe if I told you the truth about the favorable developments that are in the works. Therefore, I have come up with some fake anxieties to keep your worry reflex engaged so it won’t sabotage the real goodies. Beware of dirty limericks and invisible ladders and upside-down rainbows and psychic bunny rabbits. Be on guard against accountants wearing boxing gloves and clowns singing Broadway show tunes in runaway shopping carts and celebrities telling you classified secrets in your dreams. ARIES (March 21-April 19) I predict that you will have earned the title of Master Composter no later than March 26. Not necessarily because you will have packed your food scraps, wilted flowers, coffee grounds and shredded newspapers in, say, a deluxe dual-chamber tumbling compost bin. But rather because you will have dealt efficiently with the rotting emotions, tattered habits, decrepit melodramas and trivial nonsense that has accumulated; you will have worked hard to transform all that crap into metaphorical fertilizer for your future growth. Time to get started! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) It’s a good time for you to wield your emotional intelligence with leadership and flair. The people you care about need more of your sensitive influence. Any posse or tribe you’re part of will benefit from your thoughtful intervention. So get out there and build up the group morale, Taurus. Assert your healing ideals with panache. Tamp down the insidious power of peer pressure and fashionable nonsense. You have a mandate to wake up sleepy allies and activate the dormant potential of collective efforts.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) In her poem “Not Anyone Who Says,” Virgo writer Mary Oliver looks down on people who declare, “I’m going to be careful and smart in matters of love.” She disparages the passion of anyone who asserts, “I’m going to choose slowly.” Instead she champions those who are “chosen by something invisible and powerful and uncontrollable and beautiful and possibly even unsuitable.” Here’s my response: Her preferred formula sounds glamorous and dramatic and romantic—especially the powerful and beautiful part. But in practice it rarely works out well—maybe just 10 percent of the time—mostly because of the uncontrollable and unsuitable part. And now is not one of those times for you, Virgo. Be careful and smart in matters of love, and choose slowly. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) The poet Rainer Maria Rilke bemoaned the fact that so many of us “squander our sorrows.” Out of self-pity or lazy self-indulgence, we wallow in memories of experiences that didn’t turn out the way we wished they would have. We paralyze ourselves with repetitions of depleting thoughts. Here’s an alternative to that approach: We could use our sadness and frustrations to transform ourselves. We could treat them as fuel to motivate our escape from what doesn’t work, to inspire our determination to rise above what demoralizes and demeans us. I mention this, Libra, because now is an excellent time to do exactly that.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) It’s time for the Bliss Blitz—a new holiday just for you Scorpios. To celebrate it properly, get as buoyant as you dare; be greedy for euphoria; launch a sacred quest for pleasure. Ah, but here’s the big question: Can you handle this much relief and release? Are you strong enough to open yourself to massive outbreaks of educational delight and natural highs? Some of you might not be prepared. You might prefer to remain ensconced in your protective sheath of cool cynicism. But if you think you can bear the shock of unprecedented GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If you were ever in your life going to be awarded an honorary PhD exaltation and jubilation, then go ahead and risk it. Experiment with from a top university, it would happen in the next few weeks. If the unruly happiness of the Bliss Blitz. there were even a remote possibility that you would someday be given one of those MacArthur Fellowship “genius” grants, SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) now would be the time. Likewise, if you had any hopes of being In his book The Horologicon, Mark Forsyth gathered “obscure selected as one of “The World’s Sexiest Chameleons” or “The but necessary” words that he dug out of old dictionaries. One of Fastest, Sweetest Talkers on Earth” or “The Planet’s Most his discoveries is a perfect fit for you right now. It’s “snudge,” a Virtuoso Vacillators,” the moment has arrived. And even if none verb that means to walk around with a pensive look on your face, of those things happen, I’m still pretty sure that your reputation appearing to be busy or in the midst of productive activity, when in fact you’re just goofing off. I recommend it for two reasons: and status will be on the rise. 1. It’s important for your mental and physical health that you do a lot of nothing; that you bless yourself with a healing supply CANCER (June 21-July 22) You’re wandering into places you’ve always thought you should of refreshing emptiness. 2. It’s important for your mental and be wary of or skeptical about. Good for you! As long as you pro- physical health that you do this on the sly as much as possible; tect your innocence, I encourage you to keep exploring. To my that you avoid being judged or criticized for it by others. delight, you have also been fantasizing about accomplishments that used to be off-limits. Again, I say: Good for you! As long as CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) you don’t overreach, I invite you to dream boldly, even brazenly. I wish your breakfast cereal came in boxes decorated with Matisse And since you seem to be in the mood for big thinking, here are and Picasso paintings. I wish songbirds would greet you each mornother revolutionary activities to consider: dissolving nones- ing with sweet tunes. I wish you’d see that you have more power than sential wishes, transcending shrunken expectations, escaping you realize. I wish you knew how uniquely beautiful you are. I wish you’d get intoxicated with the small miracles that are happening the boring past and busting irrelevant taboos. all around you. I wish that when you made a bold move to improve your life, everyone greeted it with curiosity and excitement. And I LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) I did a good job of raising my daughter. She turned out to be a wish you would let your imagination go half-wild with fascinating thoughtful, intelligent adult with high integrity and interesting fantasies during this, the Capricorn wishing season. skills. But I’m not sure my parenting would have been as effective if I’d had more kids. I discussed this issue with Nathan, a AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) guy I know. His six offspring are all grown up, too. “How did “You’re a different human being to everybody you meet,” novelist you do it?” I asked him. “Having just one child was a challenging Chuck Palahniuk says. Now is an excellent time to contemplate job for me.” “I’ll tell you my secret,” Nathan told me. “I’m a the intricacies and implications of that amazing truth—and start bad father. I didn’t work very hard on raising my kids. And now taking better advantage of how much freedom it gives you. Say they never let me forget it.” In the coming weeks and months, the following statements out loud and see how they feel: 1. “My Leo, I recommend that you pursue my approach in your chosen identity isn’t as narrowly circumscribed as I think it is.” 2. “I know field, not Nathan’s. Aim for high-quality intensity rather than at least 200 people, so there must be at least 200 facets to my character.” 3. “I am too complicated to be completely comprescattershot quantity. hended by any one person.” 4. “Consistency is overrated.”


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you’re no longer a teenager but you’ll be in my heart from this day on now and forever more.

HAPPY MIKEY SALTAS

MARCH 2, 2017 | 45

Birthday


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46 | MARCH 2, 2017

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I’ve never been to any of the Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C., but they’re on my bucket list—especially the new National Museum of African American History and Culture. Even Mr. President No. 45 made a visit between his golf games recently, and raved about it on Twitter. There are 16 Smithsonian Institution museums and galleries in D.C. alone, and 11 of them are in the National Mall. How the bloody hell does anyone decide which one to go to? There are also two in NYC and one in Chantilly, Va., and a traveling exhibit now at Ogden’s Union Station. The Way We Worked is an insightful collection of photos, audio clips, stories and posters from the National Archives that display the history of American workers (see p. 6 for more). The experiences of these men, women and children have been captured and preserved in photos between the mid19th century until the late 20th century. Even if you’re not a history buff like me, it’s fascinating to see. Plus, there are local photos from Ogden and elsewhere in Utah to make it more relevant. Before the railroad came to town, Ogden was simply a trading post for trappers and travelers. Union Station, designed in the Romanesque style, opened its arrival and departure gates in 1869. Within 20 years, a new building was constructed to include 33 hotel rooms, a restaurant and a barbershop, but it’s no longer a hub for longdistance travelers after Amtrak’s Pioneer service ended in 1997. The wonderful building is just south of Utah Transit Authority’s FrontRunner station and is now repurposed as a railroad, firearms, cowboy, car and art museum all under one roof. Thousands of workers have come through O-town throughout its history. The Way We Worked includes poignant photos of children slaving away in textile mills, as well as both posed and candid shots of women laughing and smiling while canning fruit. There’s a group photo of black men in porter uniforms and caps who worked for the railroads, hauling luggage and serving drinks to the higher mucky mucks in the club cars. It took many folks to build the world we live in today—people from all walks of life, all nationalities, colors and religions. Here in this Smithsonian display are the records of generations who lived without computers, cell phones or television and traveled by horse, cart or, later, by rail—right here in Utah. It’s free to see our mutual past at this exhibit, which runs through March 18. For more info, visit theunionstation.org. n Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

Poets Corner

CATS ARE EVERYTH ING (ACROS TIC)

Begin to feel well, you Really can tell, when It’s starting to get better. Zinka the Fairie, will give you magic berries and then you’ll be lIght as a feather. ToGether, I miss you and your Energy spirit. I wouldn’t say if I’d not Really meant it NORMA N D. HEINL Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

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U-S-A! U-S-A! Although discouraging the marriage of children in developing nations has been U.S. foreign policy for years, a data-collecting watchdog group in America disclosed in February that 27 U.S. states have no minimum marriage ages and estimates that an average of almost 25,000 children age 15 and under are permitted to marry every year (“estimates” because some states do not keep records by age). Child marriage is often allowed in the U.S. if parents approve, although no such exemption is made in foreign policy, largely to curb developing nations’ “family honor” marriages—which often wreck girls’ chances for self-actualizing. (However, “family honor” is still, in some states, the basis for allowing U.S. child marriages, such as with “shotgun” weddings.)

WEIRD

Compelling Explanations Glenn Schloeffel, vice president of the Central Bucks school board in a Philadelphia suburb, recommended that science books be viewed skeptically on climate change because teenage depression rates have been increasing. Surely, he said, one factor depressing students is reading all that alarming climate-change data. n Seattle’s Real Estate Services rental agency has informed the family of the late Dennis Hanel that it would not return his security deposit following his January death because he had not given the lease-required “notice” giving up his apartment. He had cancer, but died of a heart attack. Washington state law requires only that the landlord provide an explanation for why it is keeping the deposit.

Runaway Math John Haskew, who told investigators that he was “self-taught on the banking industry,” evidently thought he might succeed making bogus wire transfers to himself from a large (unidentified) national bank, in the amount of $7 billion. He pleaded guilty in February in Lakeland, Fla., and said he thought he “deserved” the money.

Wait, What? Researchers including Rice University biochemist John Olson revealed in a February journal article that one reason a man avoided anemia even though he had a gene mutation that weakened his hemoglobin was because he has been a tobacco smoker—that the carbon monoxide from smoke had been therapeutic. His daughter, with the same gene mutation, did develop anemia since she never smoked (although Olson suggested other ways besides smoking to strengthen hemoglobin, such as by massive intakes of vitamin C).

n Judith Permar, 56, who was found dead, stuck in a clothing donation drop-off box in Mount Carmel, Pa., in February (a result, police said, of trying to “steal” items), had driven to the box in her Hummer.

Recent Alarming Headlines “America’s Top Fortune Cookie Writer Is Quitting Because of Writer’s Block” (Time magazine, Feb. 3, 2017). “Vaginal Pain Helps Exonerate Man Accused of Murder” (Miami Herald, Feb. 8, 2017) (emergency medical technicians treating his sister corroborated his alibi). “Dresden Protest Against AntiIslam Pegida Group Banned Over Snowball Fight Fears” (The Independent, Jan. 24, 2017) (previously in Dresden, Germany, religious-freedom demonstrators chose “tossing snowballs” as appropriate for ridiculing Pegida). Phallic News From Overseas In February, doctors at Narayana Health City in Bangalore, India, were successful in a five-hour, 20-specialist surgery normalizing an infant born with the chromosomal abnormality “polymelia”—which resulted in four legs and two penises. Doctors praised the parents, from rural Puladinni village, for recognizing the issue as medical and not as superstition.

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n In February, police in southern Bangladesh arrested a family that used a fake penis to convince neighbors that the family had the powers of genies (“djinns”). The villagers had known the family had a girl, but overnight the genies had “changed” her into a boy, thus frightening the villagers into making offerings to the family.

Undignified Deaths Clifford Jones, 58, was killed in a one-vehicle crash in Detroit in January, having lost control of his car because, according to Michigan State Police, he was distracted by watching pornography on his cell phone. He was also not wearing pants. n Leslie Ray Charping, 75, of Galveston, Texas, lived “much longer than he deserved,” according to his daughter, in a widely shared obituary in February, in a life that “served no obvious purpose.” The death notice referenced his “bad parenting” and “being generally offensive,” and closed with “Leslie’s passing proves that evil does in fact die.”

Least Competent Criminals Willie Anthony, 20, and Jamarqua Davis, 16, were arrested in Kannapolis, N.C., in February after, police said, they broke into a Rent-a-Center at 2 a.m. and stole a big-screen TV. After loading the set into one car, they drove off in separate vehicles, but in their haste, smashed into each other in the parking lot. Both men subsequently drove the wrong way down South Cannon Boulevard, and both then accidentally crashed separately into other vehicles, allowing police to catch up. The Passing Parade Nelson Foyle, 93, is believed to be Britain’s longest-time patron of the same pub (the Dog and Gun in Salisbury, England), and fellow drinkers recently bought him an honorary “lordship” title to mark his 80th year on the establishment’s barstools. n An art collective in a Los Angeles storefront recreated (for a two-week run in January) a retro video store that featured only boxed VHS editions of the movie Jerry Maguire—about 14,000 copies.

Thanks this week to Stan Kaplan, Vernon Balbert, Harry Thompson and the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors.

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MARCH 2, 2017 | 47

n Several death-penalty states continue to be frustrated by whether their lethal-injection “cocktails” make death so painful as to be unconstitutionally “cruel,” and Arizona’s latest solution, announced as a Department of Corrections protocol, is for the condemned to supply their own (presumably less unpleasant) drugs. There was immediate objection, noting that such drugs might only be available by black market—and questioning whether the government can legally force someone to kill himself.

n In February, thieves unbolted and stole a PlayStation from the children’s cancer ward at Wellington Hospital in New Zealand.

| COMMUNITY |

n The highest bail amount ever ordered in America—$4 billion for murder suspect Antonio Willis—was briefly in play in Killeen, Texas, in February, set by Bell County’s elected Justice of the Peace Claudia Brown. Bail was reduced 10 days later to $150,000 by a district court judge, prompting Brown to acknowledge that she set the “$4 billion” to call attention to Texas’ lack of bail standards, which especially punishes indigent arrestees with little hope of raising even modest amounts when accused of minor crimes.

People With Underdeveloped Consciences Just before Christmas, Tammy Strickland, 38, was arrested in Polk County, Fla., and charged with stealing 100 toys from a Toys for Tots collection box.

All saints, sinners, sisterwives and...

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n Katherine Kempson, 49, deciding to pay cash for a $1.2 million home, forged (according to York County, Pa., deputies) a “proof of funds” letter from the Members 1st Credit Union. Home sales are, of course, highly regulated formalities, and several attempted “closings” were halted when her money kept not showing up. One deputy told a reporter, “I’m guessing that she probably didn’t think it through.”

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD


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48 | MARCH 2, 2017

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City Weekly March 2, 2017  

Local Music Issue

City Weekly March 2, 2017  

Local Music Issue