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LORETTA'S JUSTICE 45 years later, cold murder case in rural Utah heats up. By Carolyn Campbell & Richard Shaw


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COVER STORY LORETTA’S JUSTICE

2 | FEBRUARY 23, 2017

More than four decades after it happened, grisly murder that shook rural Utah town gets solved.

Explore Salt Lake

Cover illustration by Derek Carlisle

14

Meet the locals Discover the neighboorhoods LGBT Scene in SLC Arts | Shopping | Recreation Nightlife | Food

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4 LETTERS 6 OPINION 8 NEWS 17 A&E 22 DINE 28 CINEMA 30 TRUE TV 31 MUSIC 44 COMMUNITY

LEE ZIMMERMAN

Music Live, p. 34 An accomplished writer, blogger and reviewer, Zimmerman contributes to several local and national publications, including No Depression, Paste, Relix and Goldmine. The music obsessive says he owns too many albums to count and numerous instruments he’s yet to learn.

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Pork and orange juice—a match made in heaven.

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COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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@SLCWEEKLY

News, Feb. 9, “Meet the Muslims” Subhanallah.

HAMID MEHKRI Via Facebook 1. Allah in the name of The Most Affectionate, the Merciful. 2. All praise unto Allah, Lord of all the worlds. 3. The most Affectionate, The Merciful. 4. Master of the Day of Requital. 5. We worship You alone, and beg You alone for help. 6. Guide us in the straight path. 7. The path of those whom You have favored. Not of those who have earned Your anger and nor of those who have gone astray. Please educate yourself correctly. Don’t translate it with your own meaning. Go see imam to elaborate.

KYRUL EZAM

Via cityweekly.net

greater awareness of the world, today’s soldiers have a much closer tie to the “enemy” they are destroying, plus many see that their “honorable” service is probably just for political quarrels and corporate profits.

Please stop sending our boys thousands of miles away to fight in stupid wars against religious nut cases.

get behind this. This is a subject I am not open-minded on. I do believe that it’s not a great environment for children, but couples can have shitty homes, too. My biggest issue is having children one after another without enough money. Government assistance for people unable to use sound judgment on family planning shouldn’t be an option.

Via Facebook

Via Facebook

Blog post, Feb. 10, “Bigamy offense bill draws crowd to Capitol”

Marry a toaster for all I care. None of my business. Have my hands full with my own life.

JOAN LIND,

Via Facebook

The Candyman

JOE SCHMIDT Via Facebook

KERRY KNOWLES

I support polygamy 100 percent as long as all parties involved are willing and consenting to the relationship. Love is love is love, people! Just because it isn’t our personal choice doesn’t mean it is wrong.

NICOLE BELL

Opinion, Feb. 9, “Nazis and Vaginas”

By all means, feel as hopeful about a Trump presidency (see, I didn’t call him Orange Hitler even though I wanted to) as you want. I’m going to take a wild guess that you are Caucasian and heterosexual. So, yeah, most of what he is spouting won’t affect you. Do you have any LGBTQ friends? How about a friend who is black or brown? If you do, have you engaged them in conversation? Have you listened to their fears? I would highly recommend you do so you can understand why half of this country is not feeling hopeful for the future. And while you are at it, why don’t you adopt a child or two because, at the rate this regime is going, we will have an abundance of babies who need a home.

LESLI BAKER, Murray

Straight Dope, Feb. 9, “PTSD Past”

With our military reduced to 30-something Reserves and National Guards being deployed, many with wives, children and

Via Facebook It’s oppressive to women altogether. Whether they are willing participants or not. Therefore it should not be legal—by any means.

DOMINICK CAPUTO

back pocket and that it works its way into your soul: Your reign will [eventually] end. The choices you are making right now will dictate how history remembers you.

AUBRE WILLIAMS

MICHELLE GARCIA

Not my (blank)

I have been trying to deal with saying the two words, “president” and “Trump,” together. But Mr. Trump has provided a glorious solution—a third word to be used in conjunction with federal officials, “so-called.” I now joyously can combine this third word and it doesn’t bother me nearly so much. “So-called president Trump” sounds so much better.

ROBERT JACOBS,

Cottonwood Heights

Via Facebook Playing devil’s advocate, I did a research project on polygamist relationships, and they can be quite beneficial. Granted they’re not for everyone, but why not make it available for those who do believe in it and want to practice it? We’re free to choose so many things, like religion, careers, where we want to live, etc. Why not have the freedom to choose what kind of relationship we want to be in? I can see how it poses a problem for those who abuse it and marry underage children, but make it legal and it might decrease some of these problems?

KRISTAL BULLOCK Via Facebook

Oh dear. I think my prejudice just cannot

Open letter to Rep. Chaffetz

I am not in your district, but I could be. I have seen the clips from the town hall meeting last week, and, while I give you points for showing up, those points plus more get subtracted for your statements that the meeting was full of “paid protestors.” ... Here’s the problem: We didn’t ask for this. We didn’t ask to have our voices gerrymandered away from us. We didn’t ask to feel powerless and helpless knowing that, no matter what you do or say in office, we really can’t vote you out. … It is clear that you care more for your own position and power than you care about the security and safety of American democracy. But I hope you keep this thought in your

Salt Lake City

Last year, Chaffetz said, “Let me loose,” promising to be “a kid in a candy store” investigating potential conflicts of interest in the event of a Trump presidency. Today, Utahns are sending the congressman a whole store’s worth of candy to remind him to follow through with an investigation. Bulk candy costs $10-$20 for a box; please consider making your own contribution. We are coordinating to make our purchases today, while Chaffetz is still on the radar for his town hall. Join us! The more “gifts,” the louder the message. Here are the details: 1. Buy a large amount of candy to ship to Chaffetz’ office (51 S. University Ave., Ste. 318, Provo, UT 84601). 2. Make it a gift, and in the message, say something like, “Congressman Chaffetz, in June 2016, you said you’d be like a kid in a candy store investigating Trump. Here’s the candy. Now dig in! Do the right thing and do us proud. With love, The American Public.” 3. Take a screenshot of the checkout screen. 4. Tweet and share the screenshot on Facebook (using public settings if possible), and share within political groups, using the hashtag #sendchaffetzcandy.

ERIN BEAN

Via Facebook

STAFF Publisher JOHN SALTAS Editorial

Editor ENRIQUE LIMÓN Arts &Entertainment Editor SCOTT RENSHAW Music Editor RANDY HARWARD Senior Staff Writer STEPHEN DARK Staff Writer DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS Copy Editor ANDREA HARVEY Proofers SARAH ARNOFF, LANCE GUDMUNDSEN

Editorial Interns SULAIMAN ALFADHLI, DAVID MILLER, KAUSTUBH THAPA Contributors CECIL ADAMS, KATHARINE BIELE, MISSY BIRD, ROB BREZSNY, CAROLYN CAMPBELL, BABS DE LAY, BILL FROST, KIETH L. MCDONALD, STAN ROSENZWEIG, TED SCHEFFLER, RICHARD SHAW, GAVIN SHEEHAN, CHUCK SHEPHERD, ERIC D. SNIDER, ALEX SPRINGER, BRIAN STAKER, LEE ZIMMERMAN

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OPINION

Homelessness Continues

News editors sometimes make a fundamental error when reporting on the drug-addicted and the homeless, treating the two as if they are one and the same. Reporters sometimes use the two terms interchangeably, causing the rest of us to fall into the same trap. As recently as this month, the two Salt Lake City dailies have ran stories that continue to do this, which is a disservice to those who suffer from addiction, those who are without a place to call home and the general population. The Salt Lake Tribune ran a Page 1 story, “Homeless-rehabilitation planners ‘heartened’ by program’s early results.” Aside from complaints from Mayor Biskupski and others—that insufficient jail capacity often makes the Operation Diversion choices a hollow threat because subjects know they can reject therapy and not have to face jail time—the article noted the minority of homeless are people suffering from addiction or mental illness. Yet, the article headline began with the word homeless and Page 1 ended with: “Please see HOMELESS, A5.” “HOMELESS,” of course, was not the subject. It really was about crime, drugs and rehab. On Page A5, the article continued to detail the success of Operation Diversion, which offers addicts a choice of jail or treatment, while lessening various consequences, such as homelessness and crime. The headline, again, wasn’t about drugs, police success, deterrence or treatment. No, just “homeless.” So, for those among us who have been weaned away from in-depth analysis and get our news and perceptions from tweets and headlines, what do we conclude? We conclude that the addicts, criminals and homeless individuals and their families are irrevocably linked.

B Y S TA N R O S E N Z W E I G

Former Utah State Sen. Scott Howell is an active member of the Pioneer Park Coalition (PPC), along with Tiffany Price, a Rio Grande neighborhood business owner. Recently, they met with me regarding their perception that that homeless problem and crime are exacerbated by The Road Home shelter. We met because Howell and I have become friends and have worked together to advance other civic issues. In my opinion, he’s a good guy. But he, Price and other local business owners in PPC are not without conflicting interests. The Rio Grande area is experiencing an economic-development surge and the shelter property would be very valuable if there weren’t so many poor people around. PPC gets support from some legislators and government officials, but they are getting additional help, perhaps unwittingly, from the press. PPC photocopies and distributes articles like one from the Deseret News headlined, “How a historic property became a haven for drug addicts,” a wellwritten story that traces the history of one area landlord and his deteriorating, abandoned building that has become, according to the article “a magnet for the homeless and drug addicts.” The presumptions are: 1. Open drug abuse is killing the Rio Grande area, and business is suffering. 2. Illegal drug abuse and homelessness are one and the same. 3. Get rid of homeless people in the Rio Grande area and business will thrive. In a past column [Opinion, Oct. 16, 2016, “Solving Homelessness”], which Howell was kind enough to forward to more than 600 PPC members), I said that shelter beds of any kind are not a long-term solution, but maintaining those beds is critical until a solution is at hand. I believe that no reduction in shelter capacity can occur until we, as a community, fully implement a way out of chronic homelessness.

For about half of the homeless shelter clients, this means medical and mental health support and drug programs that work. The other half require training for jobs that pay above-subsistence wages. There must also be a quantum leap in affordable housing units. Until we can resolve the root causes, more shelter beds will be needed. Solutions from Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County and the State of Utah are conceptually reasonable, and I applaud Mayors Biskupski and McAdams, House Speaker Hughes and Gov. Herbert. But these efforts are taking too long and lack scalability to be more than a drop in the bucket. Pioneer Park Coalition and other good citizens, too, are moving at the glacial speed of government. A couple of months ago, I took a tour of the Salt Lake County Jail. It was fascinating. More recently, I toured The Road Home shelter. Both the jail and shelter facilities are dreary. There are other similarities, except that the homeless are imprisoned by health and economics rather than judicial sentence. In the face of such dreariness, the 110 employees of The Road Home organization are heroic, providing services to as many as 1,500 individuals a night, and more than 10,000 a year, most of whom— except for the lack of available housing and a livable wage—could be back into productive society. So, in addition to building 600 beds away from Rio Grande to replace the 1,100 beds now operating (a concept seriously in need of remedial math tutoring), all possible resources should be directed toward job training to lift living wages. And, by all means, please increase support for organizations that will commit to developing more rental units and who give life-saving shelter to the thousands of homeless Utahns who now must carry everything they own on their backs. CW

SHELTER BEDS OF ANY KIND ARE NOT A LONG-TERM SOLUTION.

Send feedback to: comments@cityweekly.net

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

What’s been missing from the dialogue to solve homelessness? Tyeson Rogers: A community that is actually willing to help. I live right up the street from one of the new shelter locations, and while they didn’t ask/inform anybody about putting it there, I understand why. Because now, nobody wants any part of it, even though it’s to their benefit. Jeremiah Smith: I am not sure it’s missing, but I feel like the most prominent problem we have for tackling the homelessness issue, is the discrepancy between income vs. purchase power in the housing and rental market.

Pete Saltas: A spokesperson from the homeless community. Think about it: We have a bunch of people (likely with homes) talking about how to cure the problem. It’s antithetical. Ask them directly how they can best be served or learn what the root problem is, then we can fix that problem instead of shifting their location and serving mediocre meals on end. They have zero representation and, thus, an inadequate understanding of their situation abounds.

Nicole Enright: They need to address the real issues here, mental illness and selfmedicating. Juan Sanchez: I blame religion. What is the point of having a house of worship, which is often opulent and excessive in its architecture and size, when it only serves the congregation? Why not consolidate and turn some places of worship into shelters to serve the needs of the less fortunate? I grew up in a neighborhood in Sugar House that had five or six houses of worship in walking distance for one denomination alone! Why not take those resources and use them to take care of the homeless?

Randy Harward: Actually, I’d like to hear more extemporaneous monologues— freestyle!

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RANDOM QUESTIONS, SURPRISING ANSWERS

“Primary Breadwinners”

Let’s not get too distracted by all those well-meaning men who purport to speak for the little woman. The poor guy from Wasatch County is a good example. James Green resigned from his post as vice chairman of the county GOP after his letter to the editor in The Wasatch Wave went viral—even making it into The Washington Post. All this because he railed against Sen. Jacob Anderegg’s bill to study equal pay. Of course, he did say men were the “primary breadwinners,” and that equal pay could mean less money for them to support their families. There are worse things, like in Wyoming and Oklahoma, where the legislatures are assigning abortion issues to the agricultural committee and calling women mere fetus hosts. But here in Utah, we are still shaming Green, who tried unsuccessfully to apologize by saying he worked his fingers to the bone so his Wife could stay at home and raise their two amazingly successful sons, according to a letter via Fox News.

Anti-Vaxers Compromise

Compromise is not a word we’ve been hearing lately from Republicans, but now it’s out there in big letters—all because of the anti-vaxers. An article in Science-Based Medicine (oh, sorry—science!) fears that the anti-vaccination movement is on the upswing with the election of @realDonaldTrump. Robert F. Kennedy was an anti-vaxer, too, and The Atlantic detailed his and Trump’s dalliance with the vaccination spooks. Now, Rep. Norm Thurston, R-Provo, has bought into the proposition with three bills, which, according to the Deseret News, offer a compromise by requiring some kind of video information. It’s a compromise, he says, because you can’t always get what you want. One physician commenting on the article says, OK, but that could mean multiple invasive tests for unvaccinated kids. You know, you can’t always get what you want.

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HITS&MISSES

Diversity & Redistricting

Suddenly, everyone’s reading the Constitution. And kind of like the Bible, they’re picking and choosing what they like. Take, for instance, Rep. Merrill Nelson, R-Grantsville, and his bill to eliminate consideration of gender and race from judicial appointments. Utah Policy writes that the state Constitution lets the Legislature decide qualifications, and it’s only on merit. It doesn’t matter that a roomful of white males sees merit differently than a diverse one would. Democrats have already lost the fight for equal representation on state commissions, so narrowing the thought process is nothing new. There is one light in the wilderness, though. Slate writes that the U.S. Supreme Court likely will be taking up the issue of redistricting, which has given all those pasty white males a leg up in politics.

Noor Ul-Hasan immigrated to California from India at age 2, moved to Utah in 1989 and is well known throughout the Salt Lake Valley as a Muslim leader, community activist, nonprofit organization founder, radio host, busy public speaker, wife and mother.

You recently were given yet another award for public service, this time by the city of Cottonwood Heights, in the very same week that you were one of the principal organizers for Utah Women United at the Capitol. Isn’t that a bit incongruous?

Well, no. Both activities reflect an interest in protecting conservative family values shared in my Muslim faith as well as by my friends in the LDS community and other faiths. Reflecting our shared values to help others, I have served the Cottonwood Heights Board of Adjustments for all 13 years of our city’s existence. Helping organize the Utah Women United march to the State Capitol on the first day of the 2017 legislative session reflect these same values by telling Utah elected officials that their original opposition to the misogynist Donald Trump was the right call. My participating in the Washington, D.C., march against the way he portrays women does that, too.

The faith values we all share extend to your other activities, as well. Tell us about them.

Along with my husband, I am one of the founders of the Salt Lake Interfaith Roundtable, which we created for visiting athletes during the 2002 Winter Olympics. We kept it going and now we have 150 members from numerous faith-based and other organizations. February is Interfaith Month and the Interfaith Roundtable has created a very busy and inclusive calendar with so many groups. And, just after Thanksgiving, I became part of Refuge Justice League of Utah, founded by the law firm of Parker & McConkie and 70 pro-bono local attorneys who help refugees with issues even more critical since the Trump election. I am outreach coordinator and I am signing up community, school and religious organizations to help get to those in need.

Tell us about your radio program and public speaking.

I co-host KRCL 90.9 FM’s Radio Active program Tuesdays from 6-7 p.m. This is a community program that reviews local current events, such as weekly updates of the Legislature. And I do a lot of public speaking at colleges and universities, high schools, LDS wards, and anywhere where people would like to know more about what Islam is, and women in Islam. I am a go-to person for Islam information.

You do a lot. How do you have the time for all this?

I’m just like anyone else. I’m a wife and mother of two who believes in family values. As we are taught, I stand up for those who are unable to stand up for themselves.

— STAN ROSENZWEIG comments@cityweekly.net


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

8. BroDown Winter Cargo Shorts & Flip-Flops Pageant.

on Alt-Science.

6. BawitdabaCon: A

Celebration of Kid Rock.

5. K.N.I.T. (Knitting Nationalists in Totality) White-Yarn-Only Market.

Totally Clean Energy Symposium.

Annual Paid Protester Job Fair.

Want® Expo.

1. Trump/Yiannopoulos 2020: Make America Greater Again-er (monthly event).

Despite a Republican letter putting a halt to those “violent” town halls, the Utah Town Hall for All presses on. Rep. Angela Romero and other state legislators speak at this week’s event designed to give Utah’s congressional delegation a shot at their constituents—up close and personal. They won’t be attending, but plenty of others are, including Planned Parenthood, the Green Party, the Utah Rivers Council, Utah Moms for Clean Air and more. This is all about political accountability and civic engagement. You can listen to constituent questions read and answered, and a community action fair can help you find out about your district’s town halls. The event will be livestreamed. They suggest donations to help pay for the facility, as no protesters have been paid to attend. Cottonwood High School, 5715 S. 1300 East, 385722-4138, Friday, Feb. 24, 7-9 p.m., donations requested, bit.ly/2kG9uim, fundraiser: bit.ly/2lVzKa4

SELF CARE AND REBELLION

Hey, take it easy and don’t let them wear you down. Sometimes the biggest wounds are from exhaustion, and the fight for women to be elevated is going to be a long, hard process. The Self Care as an Act of Rebellion Workshop promises a relaxing morning with people who care about your mental well-being during these contentious times. The event is sponsored by Utah Women Unite, a group that includes Utahns from marginalized groups, including women of color, LGBTQ individuals and women of all abilities and socioeconomic statuses. The morning includes multiple break-out sessions—yoga and healing; craftivism; art and expression; and mindfulness and music. You’ll finish with delicious food by refugee women from Spice Kitchen Incubator and a mini concert. Clubhouse on South Temple, 850 E. South Temple, Saturday, Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-noon, $15 suggested donation, bit.ly/2lTgbm8

DIVERSITY TRAINING

Are you worried—fearful of your community now that world has been turned upside down? Join Emma Houston, director of Diversity and Inclusion for Salt Lake County as she helps us to understand how to better love and appreciate those in our community. The focus of this Diversity Training is on what unites, not what divides us. The training should last about an hour with questions following, and is not intended to be a political discussion. AndersonFoothill Branch, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-755-0964, Wednesday, March 1, 6-8 p.m., free, bit.ly/2lrUdpr

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I bought a Fitbit for my company’s health challenge, and I was surprised to see how it could not only monitor steps but also track sleep, calories and resting heart rate. This made me wonder what other information about me could be learned from these data. What are the privacy concerns? I don’t care if my employer knows I ride my bike 50 miles a week, but could they know if someone was at the bar until 2 a.m.? —Dennis Hussey A nosy boss snooping on your off-theclock peccadilloes might be the least of your worries. Fitness trackers can upload a nearly complete record of where you’ve been and what you’ve been doing during your every waking moment—and then how soundly you slept at night, too. As police and judges recognize the evidentiary value of such data, it’s possible that every step you take can and will be used against you in a court of law. And most of these devices—Fitbit’s the best known, but its competitors are legion—lack some basic security precautions. Even if you’re one of those upstanding nothing-to-hide types, you might not want someone creeping in and tracking your movements, or worse. Fitbit privacy has been a gradual process for maker and wearers alike. At first, the device’s default settings made your online user profile public. Soon enough, those who hadn’t paid attention to such details discovered that a quick Google search would turn up their Fitbit-measured activities— potentially including their, ahem, most intimate. Now publicly visible data is an opt-in, not an opt-out. Another privacy upgrade was a business necessity: In 2015, Fitbit voluntarily became compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, the federal law that sets privacy and security requirements for medical info. Though HIPA A doesn’t cover wearable devices (or online health-record storage, athome paternity tests or gene-testing companies, for that matter), Fitbit had to adopt its standards anyway in order to partner with corporate wellness programs. But the big security hole for fitness trackers, according to a study published last year by the Canadian nonprofit Open Effect, is the way the wearable device gets your activity stats online for storage and review—namely via a Bluetooth link with your phone. Fitbit and most other popular wearables broadcast a single, unique Bluetooth address; whenever they’re not actually connected to a mobile device, the report warns, this allows for “long-term tracking of their location.” (The Apple Watch, which emits multiple randomized addresses, evidently does better on this front.) A Bluetooth signal can’t travel far—only about 10 meters—but a set of monitors arrayed strategically in a mall could trail you from store to store, whether for overzealous inventory-control purposes

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or to build a profile of your shopping habits that marketers would pay well for. Increasingly, law enforcement is also curious about what your Fitbit might have to say. The U.S. Supreme Court says police need a warrant to search your cell phone, so fitness trackers would probably be similarly protected; Fitbit’s privacy policy allows that your data may be disclosed “if we’re required to by law.” But where other tech companies including Google and Facebook regularly issue transparency reports, providing stats like how often the authorities have requested user info and how often the company has complied, Fitbit has yet to adopt such a policy. And reported on or not, fitness tracker data is finding its way into legal proceedings. In 2015, a woman in Pennsylvania who told police she’d been raped was charged with making a false crime report after the cops found that tracking information from her Fitbit contradicted her story. A cyclists’ tracking app showed that Christopher Bucchere was over the speed limit when he rode his bike through a San Francisco crosswalk in 2012 and killed a 71-year-old pedestrian; he pleaded guilty to felony vehicular manslaughter. On the bright side, you might be able to use fitness stats on your own behalf as well: In a recent Canadian personal-injury case, lawyers for a former personal trainer have sought to introduce Fitbit data to demonstrate their client’s allegedly reduced level of activity following a car accident. It might seem surprising how quickly insurers and courts are coming to accept tracker data as fact, given what seem to be real limits on the systems’ reliability. Independent studies have found that devices have difficulty consistently measuring heart rates accurately; the FDA announced last summer that it wouldn’t regulate them. And tracker apps are hardly impervious to hacking—about a year ago, e-intruders busted into some Fitbit accounts and tinkered with user names and passwords, apparently hoping to use customer warranties to get replacement devices and sell them. The Open Effect study reports that some other fitness trackers are even more vulnerable, allowing hackers to delete or modify activity data, and you could do the same if you’ve got know-how and lack scruples. Modified heart-rate stats might convince an insurance company you’re a fitter specimen than your doctor might think you are. And a tweaked itinerary? A solid alibi for the cops. n Send questions to Cecil via straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.


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Utah AIDS foundation continues free clinic in the face of possible funding cuts. BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @DylantheHarris SARAH ARNOFF

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Utah AIDS Foundation’s Jared Hafen says around 3,000 Utahns are living with HIV.

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can come off as invasive. That’s not his intention, of course. But the counselor with the most relevant information is the one who can best collaborate on the development of a healthy plan. Rivera pauses from inquiries about my sexual history in the past year to drive this point home. “To be fair, I’m not judging,” he says. The counseling session promotes open, honest conversations between sexual partners. This includes frank discussions beforehand about when you and your partner were last tested. Testing isn’t the only service provided by the AIDS Foundation. Inside the center, there are rooms for group counseling, a library, a hotline center and, in the basement, a food bank, which looks like a miniature convenience store. “It can be for anybody but it’s designed specifically for people with HIV,” Hafen had said. It is stocked by small donations, holiday drives and private pledges. “Even Stevens [Sandwiches] has been pretty amazing,” he added. In a one-on-one counseling room, Rivera offers some advice, then I head back to my spot on the sofa and Pirates until I am called by another volunteer holding a chart, which I assume has my blood results. This volunteer, an elderly divorcée, sits me down in an office room and looks me in the eye as he tells me the verdict. As to how much longer the clinic will be able to sustain free testing, give peace of mind to those who test HIVnegative and offer treatment options for those who test positive, Penfold says the foundation is committed to continue to provide the screenings. If the Affordable Care Act is repealed, it wouldn’t impact testing directly, but it could present challenges to the way the foundation provides treatment. “That could have really significant impacts on people living with HIV,” he says. CW

wide smile and speaks in soft tones. It’s Celestia’s job this night to determine which tests for sexually transmitted infections I should take. I’m here for HIV testing, so I stick to the plan. But those who might be concerned can get a more thorough exam. The center can check for hepatitis C, chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis through a blood draw. “It’s just a recommendation,” she says. “Final judgment is yours.” From a slow cooker, Celestia pulls a warmed rice bag and hands it to me. It’s meant to keep the blood flowing in my fingers, and she passes my file to another volunteer wearing a gray sweatshirt. We go upstairs where I wait in another communal room to be called back by a technician, who will prick my finger, draw my blood into a thin straw and test it. When I spoke with Hafen, he explained that the testing window for HIV is best two to four weeks after engaging in risky sex. Results might not be accurate for a person who tested on the same day he or she contracted HIV. “We use the fourth-generation test and it’s testing for antibodies and antigens,” Hafen had informed me. “It is accurate, about 99 percent accurate, after two weeks.” I massage the rice bag nervously, like it’s a piece of molding clay I’m working to soften. Moments like this—ones that requires a blood sample and intervals of waiting—can inherently induce anxiety. But the AIDS Foundation tries its best to create an atmosphere that minimizes those feelings. After my blood is sucked into a tube, I am ushered into another waiting room with leather couches. Pirates of the Caribbean is on TV. Test results take about 25 minutes to process, they say. Shortly thereafter, I’m called into a small room for counseling. Before asking about my sex habits, Camrin Rivera, my volunteer counselor, acknowledges his line of questioning

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newly diagnosed persons with HIV are finding care within a year. Almost 67 percent are linked to care within the first month of testing positive. HIV treatment has made enormous strides in the last few decades. And partners of people with HIV can also take medication to reduce their risk of infection. Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, shortened to PrEP, is a daily pill, for instance, that if taken as prescribed can drastically cut down the risk of contracting HIV. “It’s fairly new here, but becoming more and more popular,” Hafen says. It’s Hafen who suggests, during a recent interview, that I go through the testing procedure for a first-hand account of the process. The AIDS Foundation provides the only free test in the state for people who might be at risk of contracting HIV or potentially passing it along to another. The clinic is funded through federal dollars that are obtained through grants to the state health department, as well as private donations. The total operating cost is about $100,000 per year, according to Executive Director Stan Penfold. Due to an uptick in clientele, money is stretched thin, and often funds run out before the fiscal year’s end. Penfold says, however, that the foundation can supplement the clinic budget from other programs to cover the costs. About $45,000 of the operating costs comes from a grant for HIV testing. Penfold says if the federal government were to cut that amount, the foundation would need to scramble to make up the difference. “That would be concerning,” he says. On this Monday evening, though, a local waiting room is open and filling up. After about half an hour of rigorous eye shifting, a volunteer calls out, “No. 7.” I go into a screening room and sit opposite Celestia O., a shy volunteer who is reluctant to share her last name. She wears a

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alf a dozen men sit along the perimeter of a small room, shifting their eyes this way and that while buoyant dance music plays through twin speakers. I sheepishly bumble in and find a seat. We are, in effect, facing the same brown table, cluttered with magazines and clipboards—the very essence of a waiting room, the same scene from a thousand doctors’ offices across the land. Except on this table, the centerpiece is a purple container filled with condoms. A couple more men slip in and find unoccupied chairs. Arriving two minutes after 5 p.m., I am the seventh client. To maintain confidentiality, my name for the next 90 minutes becomes “No. 7.” One guy smirks and says quietly to another man on his left, “Maybe we’ve all been messing around with the same girl.” The joke fell flat, likely in light of the import of the test we are about to take, or because several of the assumed heterosexual men in the room actually aren’t. Or maybe because, simply enough, it felt worn and not particularly funny. Maybe it was for all those reasons. Maybe something else. I catch myself wondering who writes Rihanna’s lyrics; one of her songs pulses through the otherwise still air. This is the initial point of entry at the Utah AIDS Foundation clinic. Twice a week, it offers free HIV testing for anyone who has had sex or injected drugs within the last year. As is the case with infectious diseases, detection is paramount. The Centers for Disease control estimates about 13 percent of people infected with HIV are not aware they have contracted the disease. In Utah, almost 3,000 people are HIV-positive, Utah AIDS Foundation Program Director Jared Hafen says. That means if national statistics bear out, between 200 and 400 Utahns could be carrying the virus and not know it. Consequently, it’s unlikely those people likely are not receiving treatment. A Utah Department of Health report from 2015 indicates that 93 percent of


The hand of the federal government lies heavily on the state’s prosecutions of two former AGs on corruption charges. BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net @stephenpdark

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s the state rolled out its case against former Attorney General John Swallow in early February, two things became apparent. One was that former AG Mark Shurtleff and his “fixer,” the late Tim Lawson, while not on trial, were center-stage for prosecutors intent on showing Swallow was part of a conspiracy of extortion and bribery. The other was that Swallow was seemingly little more than a bystander in some of those allegations. While Salt Lake County veteran prosecutors outlined the case in 3rd District Court, there was another player at work, largely hidden from view. That player was the federal government, and its fingerprints—often times relegated to motions, emails and frustrated conversations—are the Touhy regulations. Roger Touhy was an Illinois inmate who sued his penitentiary’s warden in 1951 for access to federal documents he claimed showed that his conviction was based on fraud. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the feds were right to restrict access to their files. Out of that ruling came regulations that, in both the Shurtleff and Swallow prosecutions, played a significant role. “Touhy is a federal regulation that the U.S. government uses to determine what they are and are not going to share with third parties, unless they determine it’s material to the case,” Davis County Attorney Troy Rawlings says. The Department of Justice cited Touhy in denying the defendants access to evidence their attorneys have argued they are constitutionally entitled to. Less overtly, Touhy shaped the direction the prosecutions have taken. This was apparent to Rawlings, who prosecuted and ultimately dismissed all charges against Shurtleff, when witness Marc Jenson outlined in Swallow’s trial an alleged $35-million conspiracy involving the Utah Transit Authority (UTA), Utah Speaker of the House Greg Hughes and former U.S. Sen. Harry Reid. Rawlings’ and Shurtleff’s defense attorneys spent years asking the Department of Justice and the FBI for material relating to similar allegations. “Since October of 2013, the FBI/DOJ has adamantly maintained that the UTA and Whitewater VII matters relate to ‘another separate investigation,’” Rawlings wrote in an email response to questions from City Weekly. The Whitewater VII development project of a FrontRunner stop in Draper was alleged to be central to the conspiracy. While the feds acknowledged having records, “They have refused to turn the evidence over, wrongfully citing the federal Touhy regulation,” Rawlings continued. He wrote that both the Utah United States Attorney’s Office (USAO) and Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill had asked him not to pursue that investigation, “as they have maintained they are in no way related to the Mark Shurtleff/John Swallow investigations and prosecutions.” The Utah USAO’s spokesperson said that her office couldn’t comment, as it was recused from these cases several years ago. Gill did not respond to a request for comment. Ironically, Rawlings says, local FBI agents in January requested his information on Whitewater VII for the Swallow case. “I kid you not,” he says, “I have the letter.” Part of what complicated this situation was that the local FBI office and the Utah Department of Public Safety (DPS) agreed to jointly investigate the two men and report to the state. But when Rawlings sought the evidence they gathered for his prosecution of Shurtleff, the

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CORRUPTION NEWS The Touhy God

Defense attorneys Brad Anderson (left) and Scott Williams (right) talk to their client, former Utah Attorney General John Swallow

feds told him he had to go through Touhy. “Touhy became the God of this case,” he says. If the feds thought that Rawlings would follow their lead and keep his prosecution limited to allegations that Shurtleff shook down Jenson, they were wrong: The prosecutor called their bluff and ultimately dismissed the charges. Swallow’s lead defense attorney Scott Williams understands Rawlings’ frustrations. He says he had not thought there would be any “Touhy requirement” to the case, only to find that “the Touhy process was being used and continues to be used in an obstructionist manner,” much, he adds, as Rawlings complained about. Williams wants to examine on the stand federal and state agents, including controversial DPS Agent Scott Nesbitt. While Williams says that he’s been granted authorization by the feds to do so, “there’s been reference to a potential for limitation on the scope” of his questions. Those limitations, he’s been told, are much like porn: “You’ll know them if you see them.” Rawlings says the Swallow prosecution, notably in terms of the about-face the FBI performed on the centrality of the alleged Whitewater VII conspiracy, serves to underscore his complaints that the feds sought to control his prosecution of Shurtleff and stop his bid to mount a grand jury investigation of Sen. Reid. He points to Williams receiving, weeks before the trial, 848 pages of agent notes, something the feds withheld from Rawlings for years. “We don’t prosecute people in America without giving them the evidence—unless you are the U.S. government,” he says. CW

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45 years later, cold murder case in rural Utah heats up. By Carolyn Campbell & Richard Shaw

Price Police Chief Art Poloni walks through the Carbon County Courthouse parking lot before a hearing with suspected killer Tom Egley in August 1970.

Carbon County Sheriff Al Passic and Price Police Chief Art Poloni kneel down to examine evidence in the home where Loretta Jones was murdered in July 1970.

COURTESY SUN ADVOCATE

The victim, Loretta Jones, in the late 1960s.

COURTESY SUN ADVOCATE

Thomas Egley in 1970.

COURTESY SUN ADVOCATE

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or the past seven years, Carbon County Sheriff’s Detective David Brewer drove around with a piece of jewelry hanging from his police cruiser’s rear view mirror. “It has helped to remind me of what I was doing,” he says. “It got me through some tough times when I didn’t think we could keep it going.” That small, bedazzled leprechaun reminded him daily that he was working on a case that needed to be solved; the 46-yearold murder of Loretta Jones—a 23-year-old mother who was stabbed 17 times, raped and strangled. The woman’s daughter gave him the charm after learning that he was resolutely investigating the murder. For Heidi Jones-Asay, the time that Brewer spent working on her mother’s case was long in coming. She was 4 years old the day she found her mother dead, lying in a pool of blood. For the next four decades, she kept the fire alive to find the killer. “I knew who did it all along,” she says. “But I just couldn’t get anyone to listen to me, to reopen the case.” Thoughts of the man who killed her mother haunted her while she was a child living with her grandmother after the tragedy. She told the older woman, “Tom is going to come get me,” referring to Thomas Egley, a local drifter. For all intents and purposes, he was always the only real suspect. Yet, just before Christmas 1970, a judge dropped charges against him, saying there was not enough evidence for trial. In the subsequent years, reaching the truth was increasingly elusive. Egley lived many different places before and after he killed Loretta Jones. He never had a stable home life. He lived with women, married three times, fathered five children and mostly kept to himself in the years before his arrest last July. It’s hard to understand what kept him from being prosecuted for murder right away as by the time he was arrested, a seemingly iron-clad case had been made. A Sun Advocate photo published late that summer shows Egley walking, cigarette in hand, across the parking lot of the thenCarbon County Courthouse, casually speaking with Price Police Chief Art Poloni, who was also walking with him but about 15 feet away. This was on the day when he was taken to court to see if he would stand trial. Was this casual approach—Egley wore no shackles nor handcuffs—just a product of the times? Or was the whole affair not handled by the book? That question will never be answered as the then-30-yearold got off scot-free and lived out most of his life abusing drugs and alcohol and getting in and out of minor scrapes with the law while an eastern Utah family grieved daily. What really happened during the night of the killing was never definitively known until now—now that Egley is housed at the Utah State Prison. After Jones-Asay talked with Brewer about her mother’s murder at the 2009 Helper Art Festival, he began investigating with only a couple of local newspaper stories as leads—and very little else. By then, most people involved in the case were dead or so old, there was concern that their memories

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LORETTA'S JUSTICE

might fail during testimony. Police records and, initially, all of the court records that could help him sleuth the case, had long since been lost. Brewer had reason to believe the original suspect committed the murder. Shortly after beginning the investigation, he knew that Egley was still alive, living in Rocky Ford, Colo. He knew, too, that somehow he would find a way to prove that the now-76year-old was the killer. Events of that night as spelled out in news reports are fairly detailed, yet incomplete. Brewer still needed to place Egley near or at Jones’ home. He needed someone who could prove the drifter was there that night. And while no one seemed to be able to do that in 1970, with the help of many people, Brewer was recently able to put Egley near the scene at the time of the killing. On July 30, 1970, a man accosted a young girl in the 400 South and 700 East block of Price. She was riding her bike in the street near dusk that evening when he grabbed her from behind, clamping a hand over her mouth. She was chewing a wad of bubble gum. In fear, she forced it out and he let her go. As she ran toward the basement apartment where she lived, he started to run away. Her brother, a friend and her stepfather were home at the time. They saw the bike fall, but at first didn’t see the attack. As they ran outside, she told them what happened. They gave chase, but lost the man as he ran south in the dimming light of dusk. Police were called and they began an investigation. The next morning, 4-year-old Jones-Asay peered through a keyhole from her bedroom into the living room of her house a couple of blocks south of where the assault was reported. The little girl saw her mother lying on the floor. She ran out of the house and encountered a neighbor boy who was searching his front lawn for night crawlers to go fishing. She said to him, “I think my mommy is dead.” The boy went to her house, looked through the door, ran home and told his mother, who also came over and looked. The police were immediately called. Investigators found Jones wearing few clothes, surrounded in a pool of blood and showing multiple stab wounds. It was a savage sexual assault and murder. Both County Sheriff Al Passic and Police Chief Poloni were involved in the initial investigation. Officers combed the house for clues. They began to question everyone in the area. With a small, thin-blade knife, Jones had been stabbed 17 times in the back, twice in the chest and suffered a gash across her neck. The murder weapon was never recovered. There was also no sign of a forced entry. As police began to assemble evidence, the young girl’s description of the man who accosted her the previous night began to resemble someone Jones knew—Thomas Egley. However, before local authorities began to act on that possible lead, Provo police heard the description and arrested a man there first, thinking he might be the one that Carbon authorities were seeking. The young girl was taken to Provo, but she said that the arrested man was not the one who’d attacked her.


RICHARD SHAW

RICHARD SHAW

Carbon County Detective David Brewer holds the leprechaun charm that Jones-Asay gave him a few years ago. He said he continued to carry it as a reminder to keep working on the case.

Heidi Jones-Asay stands in front of the house where her mother was killed in late July 1970.

FROZEN IN TIME

“They told me they had done everything they could, except interview the original suspect. ” —Heidi Jones-Asay

DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS

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“The truth is the truth,” Brewer says during a recent interview about why he worked so hard to solve a case that seemed unsolvable. “I believe in that and that it should come out.” So, he rolled up his sleeves and went to work. Shocking evidence he uncovered continued to affirm that Egley did the deed. Even more surprising was his discovery that obvious evidence was overlooked or at least never presented. He was also taken aback that Jones-Asay was never considered as a witness, regardless of her young age. She was convinced Egley killed her mother, possibly recalling something in her young mind that later became obscured by the passing of time. But Brewer was determined to see justice done. “First, I had to put Egley in the area of Price where the murder happened,” he says. Brewer discovered more detail regarding the attack on the young girl after interviewing her and her brother who chased her assailant. She told him the perpetrator was wearing an odd, multicolored hat that he dropped as he attacked her. He ran back to retrieve it before the family started to chase him. Egley was known to have such a “welder’s cap.” Later, a witness reported seeing a similar hat hanging on a hook by Egley’s door

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colder and colder—almost frozen in time. Some witnesses drifted away and others died. Consequently, the matter never passed the investigatory stage. At one point, according to Jones-Asay, when the Price police reopened the case in 2009, she only found out about it through someone else. She was eventually told that they couldn’t find anything new. “They told me they had done everything they could, except interview the original suspect,” she tells City Weekly. Hatch, who passed away a few years ago in Sunnyvale, Calif., took anything he knew with him. Keller died in 2012. These were the details left for Brewer when he decided to investigate. This information, other than what Jones-Asay told him, was all he had to work with. All evidence had disappeared and, until 2015, no court transcript of the original judicial hearings could be found.

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As the investigation progressed, persons of interest developed in the case. The strongest lead came from an anonymous phone call concerning Egley, a young man who lived at the Newhouse Hotel in Helper. At that point, he became the focus of the investigation. Egley was brought in for questioning, and he reportedly admitted that he had been in Price that night, but that was all. Then he asked for a lawyer. Further questioning resulted in no information. Police did not have enough to hold him, so he was released. A few days later, he was questioned again with the same result. On Aug. 6, however, he was booked for the assault of the girl. While he was considered a suspect in the Jones murder, there wasn’t enough evidence to book him. During that time, four other suspects were apprehended, but cleared of the charges. Egley was still the main suspect. On Aug. 31, after more interviews and the completion of some FBI evidence reports, Passic and Poloni arrested Egley for murder. At his preliminary arraignment before Price City Judge Tom Platis that afternoon, the court deemed Egley indigent and appointed Thorit Hatch, a Helper attorney who previously served in the Utah House of Representatives as defense counsel. Hatch was also the lawyer who advised Egley not to talk to police during the original questioning. After the arraignment was continued until the next day, Egley was remanded without bail. Hatch asked for another attorney to assist him. Arraignment was then continued until Sept. 4, when the court set a preliminary hearing for Oct. 8. But the day of the prelim, County Attorney Dan Keller asked the judge to postpone the hearing for three reasons. First, some persons of interest who knew both the suspect and victim were recently located in Kansas. Police had not yet had a chance to speak with them. Second, some anticipated FBI reports had not been completed. Finally, Poloni was unavailable to testify because he was attending law-enforcement school in New York. Hatch protested the continuance, saying that his client’s civil rights were violated due to his long incarceration with no preliminary hearing. He stated that the police went on “fishing expeditions” concerning the guilt or innocence of his client and “had not succeeded.” “If the state has not prepared its case by now, my client should be released,” Hatch told Platis. Platis granted the continuance, providing the prosecution file an affidavit detailing its reasons for the continuance. Keller agreed. Egley was denied bail and a new hearing date was set for Nov. 5. That day, the prosecution pleaded with the judge to formally charge Egley, but he decided that there wasn’t enough evidence to hold Egley for trial. The judge then ordered Egley released. Reportedly, Egley stayed in Helper only until about January, 1971. He then moved on. Over the years, the murder case picked up steam at least once with an additional investigation, but then continued to grow

at the Newhouse. Also, before the incident, the brother and the friend of the girl that was attacked had noticed the man who accosted her sitting on the curb near an Arctic Circle eating a hamburger. They lived just a few doors down from the fast-food restaurant then located on Main Street. The brother identified Egley as the attacker and said that he was wearing the cap. The attack of the girl happened at dusk—probably about 9 p.m. The murder was determined to have ocurred around 10 p.m. Price Police Officer Barry Bryner arrived first at the scene the next morning. During the investigation, Bryner told Brewer that Jones lay still in a pool of blood. Yet, before she died, she scrawled letters in blood, smearing a “T” into the carpet, followed by an “O” written over the first letter as she died. At least one person besides Bryner saw this. It was known that Jones previously dated Egley, so the “T” and the “O” were significant evidence. Yet their existence was never addressed in the hearings. While the letters were clearly legible, it was hard to reach collaboration on this point over 40 years later as all crime photos and statements from that time went missing. However, a family member photographed the blood on the floor. For a long time, those photos were in the Jones’ family picture album at Jones-Asay’s grandmother’s house. “Over the years, I would look through the family photo album. Among all these happy photos were these pictures of the crime scene,” Jones-Asay says. “I asked my grandmother to take them out and she finally did. Then, years later, I realized that we needed them and she found them.” The most telling photo is one of 4-year-old Jones-Asay standing in the doorway to her mom’s bedroom. The bloodstained letters are on the floor in front of her. When blown up, they’re quite obvious. Later that evening, at about 11:30 p.m., Egley showed up at the Highway Rendezvous Club south of Helper with “pink spots on his shirt,” a bar operator told Brewer during the investigation. She said he was adamant that he needed to find someone who was driving into Helper to get a ride from them. However, the Newhouse was only about three blocks away so she didn’t understand why he needed a ride, but he found one. He left sometime before midnight with another man.


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Egley lived at the Newhouse with his pregnant girlfriend. She told Brewer that he didn’t come home until “3 or 4 a.m.” When he arrived, she chewed him out for getting back so late. She said he went into the bathroom and took a bath in his clothes. He then took the clothes off and put them in a bag by the door. The next morning he got up early and told her he was going to wash the clothes. He asked her if she had any laundry she wanted him to do. “This was highly unusual,” Brewer says. “She said that he never did the laundry.” He left and apparently went to the laundromat. In those days, coal furnaces heated much of the town and there were burn barrels scattered around town used for disposing “clinkers,” the leftover furnace ash and rock. Despite it being summer, the barrels smoldered during warm weather from people burning trash. That morning, a bar operator across the street from the laundromat saw Egley standing by a barrel with smoke coming from it. All these details, witnesses, stories and information were available to authorities in 1970. “Had DNA testing been available then, the case would have been a slam dunk,” Brewer says. “But with so much evidence left out or not found, it just ended.” Starting a cold case over is much harder than investigating the original. Still, as things added up, Egley became an increasingly likely prime suspect.

TIME HEALS ALL WOUNDS?

In 2010, Brewer traveled to Colorado to interview Egley, who denied all involvement. However, when the wily investigator asked him a particular question, Egley’s answer was telling. “I asked him if we did find the person who murdered Loretta after 40 years of looking for them, what should happen to them.” Egley said that would depend on whether the person had committed any more murders since. A break in the case came when Brewer was given the supposedly missing court transcripts by the court reporter who was working at the time. He had talked to her years earlier, because the transcripts were not in the county files. At the time, she said she didn’t think she had anything on it. “I was talking with County Attorney Gene Strate, and at the end of the conversation, he said that some lady had dropped something off for me,” Brewer says. “It was the transcripts.”

RICHARD SHAW

RICHARD SHAW

Carbon County Sheriff's Detective David Brewer shakes hands with Duane Jones, Loretta’s brother, at the Elmo Cemetery on the day her body was reinterred. On the night of the crime, Duane and his father were across the street from the house in which the murder took place. Also in the photo are Carbon County Sheriff Jeff Wood, Chief Deputy Cletis Steele and Detective Wally Hendricks.

Detective David Brewer gives Heidi Jones-Asay a hug just before the body of her mother is reinterred at the Elmo Cemetery in Emery County.

They provided much more insight into what happened and who testified than he had from other sources. The case took another leap forward. Once Brewer visited Egley, the suspect became increasingly nervous. Brewer’s second visit made him even more agitated. Then, last summer, Brewer announced that authorities planned to exhume Jones’ body to look for DNA. At that point, Egley began to crack. Brewer made sure that Egley knew about the exhumation, despite the fact that he lived more than 560 miles away. Egley began to ask people whether they thought there could be any DNA left in a body after that long. Later, he asked a neighbor if she could take care of his animals if he had to go away for awhile. Then he told her what he had done. The neighbor contacted Brewer and told the detective about the confession. Prior to that contact, the Utah Attorney General’s Office told Brewer they thought there was enough circumstantial evidence to convict Egley when the detectives presented them with the information. But one of the lawyers there joked that it would sure be a lot easier if he could come up with a confession. In retrospect, Brewer smiles at that comment. Soon after Egley’s neighbor contacted them, Brewer and Carbon County Sheriff’s Detective Wally Hendricks visited Egley in Rocky Ford once more. “I didn’t even have to ask him a question,” Brewer says. “He began the story and then everything just flowed after that.” Egley’s story was very close to what Brewer had supposed. He denied some aspects, saying he did have sex with Jones, but hadn’t raped her. He further admitted to killing her with a pocket knife that he threw into Price River from a Helper bridge soon after the killing. His story included how he got to Price, that he ate at Arctic Circle and that he later ended up at her house. He made the chilling claim that he asked her for sex and she said no, then went into the kitchen. When she returned, he killed her. The U.S. Marshal’s Service arrested Egley on Aug. 18, 2016, then extradited and booked him into the Carbon County Jail on Aug. 26. Throughout the fall of 2016, hearings on the case continued. The once young, strapping man that some remembered was now a shriveled, bent, elderly individual who, on his first court appearance, looked older than his 76 years. “I expected a monster, but he was just an old man,” JonesAsay says after first seeing him. After much finagling, a plea deal was reached. Egley admit-

ted to the murder, but not the rape. However, he still didn’t seem to get it. Apparently, like his answer to Brewer’s question when they met in Colorado, he remained under the illusion that just because he hadn’t done anything since, he should be let go. “I don’t understand why they are going back to [something that happened] in 1970, 46 years ago,” Egley told Judge George Harmond in his 7th District courtroom as Harmond asked questions to be sure that Egley understood the plea deal. On Nov. 22, 2016, Egley was sentenced to 10 years to life in prison for second-degree murder. And, for the first time, JonesAsay got to unload 46 years of pain, misery and toil to achieve justice for her mom. Facing Egley in court, she said, “My mother is my hero. She never screamed or called out when she was being murdered. She protected me and I found her in a pool of blood. How does that make you feel, Thomas Egley?” The man who she knew all along had caused the death of her mom finally went to prison. Jones-Asay later said that if he ever comes up for parole, she will be there “to be sure he never walks as a free man again.” Looking at him, few expect he will survive 10 years. Even if he does, it’s not hard to figure what a parole board would do. So the case is solved; all is done. Well, maybe not. Jones-Asay said a lot of other people face similar circumstances in their lives—having someone taken and not having resolve. She is now working with various groups that have family and friends in similar situations. She is proof that perseverance can pay off, even when it seems time has taken away the chance for justice. As for Brewer, after such a long investigation, is there a void to fill? “I am not at the point where I have a hole in my life from spending so much time working on this yet,” he says. “I don’t know if I ever will feel that.” He also points out that there are still loose ends on evidence and aspects of the case that he would like to know more about. He might even interview Egley again, in prison, to get more answers. And, of course, a successful detective, especially one who solves such a long-running case, receives more requests about other cold cases that need to be solved. He has been inspired by doing the right thing, and finding that “truth” he talked about. And the little leprechaun? It still hangs from the visor in his F-150. CW


PIERRE WACHHOLDER

Farce is hard; farce that actually tries to include a message is even harder. So all credit to playwright Wendy MacLeod—and the production team at Pioneer Theatre Co.—for delivering broad and brassy comedy with a bit of an emotional kick. The premise, on its face, is fairly outlandish: Middle-aged Salt Lake City divorcées Mary (Anne Topegin) and Jo (Rosalyn Coleman) become convinced that the guy their pal Liz (Elizabeth Meadows Rouse) is dating—a dentist named Jackson Scull (Joe Gately)—might be responsible for the recent disappearance of one of his hygienists. And when Liz’ teenage daughter Amanda (Betsy Hellmer) plans a weekend camping trip with Jackson, they’re sure her life is at risk. Director Karen Azenberg has a lot of pieces to set up during the first act, and the result is a play that takes some time not to feel forced. The momentum definitely picks up once Amanda and her estranged boyfriend Trenner (CJ Strong) play more of a significant role; their over-the-top comic chops as the prototypical bimbo and the prototypical snow bum, respectively, make for some of the most hilarious scenes. Meanwhile, MacLeod is telling a sharp story about protective female friends trying to navigate their next phase of life. And with Tolpegin’s Mary providing the (relatively) sane center, Women in Jeopardy! complements its big laughs with a bit of wisdom. (Scott Renshaw) Women in Jeopardy! @ Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through Feb. 25, Thursday, 7 p.m.; Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, 2 p.m. & 7:30 p.m., $29-$44, pioneertheatre.org

On March 30, 1958, choreographer and activist Alvin Ailey and his young dance troupe initiated a journey that would forever change the course of modern dance. Ailey helped bring it to the masses by reimagining its performance through the cultural filter of the African-American experience, and its impact on the nation as a whole. Soon to become a worldwide sensation, Ailey and company were deemed America’s “Cultural Ambassador to the World.” Nearly 60 years later, that legacy endures through Ailey II, the newest incarnation of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater family. Revelations made its bow on Jan. 31, 1960, and has since become the company’s signature presentation. A dramatic series of expressive, interpretive dances that encapsulate the African-American tenuous journey from slavery to freedom, it’s accompanied by music closely identified with that cultural transition in the form of blues and gospel. Ailey himself referred to the work as “blood history.” Dance Magazine called it “second to none.” Ailey II’s history with the Eccles Center dates back to 1998—the venue’s premier season—and the company has returned on a regular basis over the course of the two decades since. Teri Orr—executive director of Park City Institute, the presenting arts organization—is quoted in a press release as saying, “You cannot watch that powerful, exhausting, beautiful piece filled with gospel music and not feel like you have been both schooled and churched.” We couldn’t agree more. (Lee Zimmerman) Alvin Ailey Dance Co. II: Revelations @ Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-8252, Feb. 24-25, 7:30 p.m., $29-$79, ecclescenter.org

FEBRUARY 23, 2017 | 17

War affects everyone differently—especially those who experience it firsthand. In Kathleen Cahill’s Harbur Gate, several U.S. Marines react to the same situation in contrasting ways. But there’s a similarity among all of them: What they endured changed their lives, and not necessarily for the better. Told in three parts, the play starts in 2005 with Chad Conroy (Matthew Sincell) potentially earning a Purple Heart. He and Carey Pollack (Natalia Noble) were medics in a convoy when it was hit with an improvised explosive device. Although they saved many lives, Carey is reluctant to relive the harrowing ordeal. That incident is shown in flashback during the second section, with Alyson Moss (Cassandra Stokes-Wylie) driving Vincent Russo (Topher Rasmussen) on the road between Harbur Gate and Mosul, Iraq. Their conversation meanders from misogynistic to why Alyson is driving in the first place—she replaced a fellow Marine who had food poisoning. That Marine was Michelle Kessler (Ariana Broumas Farber), who bumps into John Sullivan (Lane Richins), a blind artist, in a park. For the first time, Michelle finally admits why she wasn’t on that convoy. The trauma these soldiers endured carries through each part of the story. While there’s a connection between Carey and Alyson, the link from Alyson to Michelle feels less welldeveloped. Still, it’s difficult to deny the impact a play like Harbur Gate has on audiences. War is hard for many of us to understand. The aftermath is even more so. (Missy Bird) Salt Lake Acting Co.: Harbur Gate @ 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through March 12, Wednesday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m., $26-$40, saltlakeactingcompany.org

Alvin Ailey Dance Co. II: Revelations

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FRIDAY 2.24

Pioneer Theatre Co.: Women in Jeopardy!

FRIDAY 2.24

Salt Lake Acting Co.: Harbur Gate

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With his low-toned voice that sounds almost completely devoid of emotion, Todd Barry has made himself the alternative to alternative comedians. His delivery, timing and approach to storytelling are examples of what teachers of acting and comedy would tell you not to do. But for Barry, this package has made him a standout star and a must-see act when he’s on tour. With four live albums to his credit—along with a number of stand-up specials and appearances on television ranging from Louie to Squidbillies—Barry has become one of the most recognizable voices in comedy. That voice has been featured in animated programs like Space Ghost: Coast to Coast and Aqua Teen Hunger Force. His latest tour has been taking him across the U.S. as he prepares for a brandnew special with all new material, his first since 2012’s Comedy Central special Super Crazy. “I’m preparing to tape an hour special, so my set will be whatever jokes I’ve written over the past few years that aren’t already on a special,” Barry says in an online chat. He visits Salt Lake City for a one-night-only engagement, bringing with him stories of touring, interactions with fans and celebrities and observations on food. It’s a shame we won’t get him for more than an evening, but if you happen to run into the man sometime before that, be sure to recommend him some local grub. “I really enjoyed my last show at Wiseguys in Ogden. I won’t be in SLC for very long, but hopefully I’ll find some good food and coffee,” he says. (Gavin Sheehan) Todd Barry @ Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m., $20, wiseguyscomedy.com

THURSDAY 2.23

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DAVID DANIELS

FRANCINE DAVETA

THURSDAY 2.23

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, FEB. 23-MARCH 1, 2017

COURTESY PIONEER THEATRE CO.

ESSENTIALS

the


Don’t Shoot, I’m an Artist!

Police violence inspires thought-provoking works in Mestizo’s new group show. BY BRIAN STAKER comments@cityweekly.net @stakerized

W

ith highly publicized, politically charged occurrences of police violence against often-unarmed, usually non-white citizens across the country, people have responded in diverse ways, including activism and protests. Artists have also raised their voices in a wide variety of media. In response, Mestizo Gallery, on the western cusp of downtown Salt Lake City, hosts Hands Up, Don’t Shoot, a group show exploring themes of police brutality and violence against underrepresented groups. Gallery director and curator Jendar Marie Morales conceived of the idea last summer. “With all the events that have happened in recent years regarding cases of police brutality against people of color, and since our mission is to create social change through dialogue and activism, I decided this was a show we needed to have at our gallery,” she says. The nonprofit gallery and community center’s board originally sought art entries through the end of October 2016, but with all the activity around the presidential election, it was extended to January. All submissions were accepted, and the halfdozen artistic visions—though small in number—pack an aesthetic punch. Andrew Fillmore’s photographic essay— titled “I Am Michael Brown,” after the young African-American shot in Ferguson, Mo., in 2014—consists of shots taken at marches, protests and rallies around the country in response to fatalities from police shootings. “These pictures are intended to be a direct representation of the anger, the hurt, the continual vulnerability of our POC friends and family, and the ravenous and unquenchable need for justice,” he explains. These riveting images are a frank reminder of the emotional toll violence has taken on communities. Ella Mendoza created the image “Justice 4 Abdi,” dedicated to Abdullahi “Abdi” Mohamed, the teen shot by Salt Lake City police almost a year ago while wielding a broomstick. He was in a coma for several weeks, and recently released police video footage sparked outrage among local advocacy groups who have demanded that charges of aggravated robbery and drug distribution against him be dropped. The poster, depicting Mohamed wearing a

COURTESY MESTIZO GALLERY

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Black Lives Matter hat, is copyright-free, and sales are being donated to support the youth and his family. “I feel that, as Salt Lake City residents, it is our responsibility to respond to police brutality in our neighborhoods,” Mendoza says. “It is important for us to continue to rise up for Abdi since his life has been forever altered by the actions of the police officer who shot him, and the choices made by the Salt Lake City Police Department.” Native American artist Denae Shanidiin contributed a work that looks at wider political issues. “God Bless Our Oil, Our Law Enforcement, and Our Uplifting Corporate Empire” is a triptych composed of three inkjet prints, each in a license-plate frame. The piece incorporates found objects, including vinyl Coca Cola ads proclaiming, “I’m proud to be an American,” “All I do is win” and “This is how I do it” in the first image. The second one is a newspaper headline, “State seeks to fix failed oil well,” with the subheadline “Crews climb atop Rushmore to ensure memorial’s future.” The artist notes that the land into which the Mount Rushmore monument was carved belongs to the Lakota Sioux, taken away by a controversial treaty, and believes those statesmen carved there “supported and profited off the land and deliberate genocide of Native people.” A third image utilizes a poster reading, “We support our law enforcement. Thank you. All lives matter” in a license-plate frame reading, “United States of America. Blue Lives Matter.” Alexis Rausch’s “Instructional Clothing for Police Brutality: Article One” is

Alexis Rausch’s “Instructional Clothing for Police Brutality: Article One”

an installation piece—a hoodie similar to those worn by three high-profile policebrutality victims. But this one is fashioned from translucent organza, referencing traditional burial shrouds, and paired with shades of “panic room pink,” a color that covers surfaces in panic rooms inside high-security prisons where particularly violent inmates are often isolated. She is concerned about the role of violence in society, and asks, “Are we, as consumers of violent media, memorializing victims or glorifying criminality?” The discussion around these issues can sometimes become volatile and not always productive, but Morales believes, “Art can challenge people and their views. It can help them question things and think about difficult issues. Art can reach groups and places that other mediums might not be able to reach.” It’s important that the discussion continues, she finalizes. “This is an issue that we need to continue fighting for. It is time to break the cycle of violence against minorities and underrepresented groups.” CW

HANDS UP, DON’T SHOOT

Mestizo Institute of Culture & Arts 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700 801-596-0500 Through Friday, March 9 facebook.com/mestizoarts


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FEBRUARY 23, 2017 | 19


moreESSENTIALS

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Artist Shonto Begay presents dreamlike imagery (“Peaceful Eve” is pictured) in Aje’ Ji’— The Heart Way at Modern West Fine Art (177 E. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-3383, modernwestfineart.com) through March 11.

20 | FEBRUARY 23, 2017

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PERFORMANCE THEATER

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FIND CITY WEEKLY OUT AND ABOUT. WE ALWAYS HAVE SOMETHING GOOD TO GIVE YOU. UPCOMING EVENTS

UTAH MUSIC FESTIVAL

MARCH 2-5

ST. PATRICK’S PARADE

MARCH 19

Annie The Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 S. Washington Blvd., Ogden, 855-944-2787, through March 18, 7:30 p.m., theziegfeldtheater.com The Comedy of Errors The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, 801-957-3322, through Feb. 25, times vary, grandtheatrecompany.com Disney’s The Little Mermaid Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, through March 4, 7 p.m.; Feb. 25 matinee, 2 p.m., drapertheatre.org Harbur Gate Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through March 12, saltlakeactingcompany.org (see p. 17) Indiana Bones: Raiders of the Wall Mart Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-2662600, through March 18, times vary, desertstar.biz Live Museum Theater Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, 801-581-6927, through April 15, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., nhmu.utah.edu The Magic Show Utah Children’s Theatre, 3605 S. State, 801-532-6000, through Feb. 25, times vary, uctheatre.org Mary Poppins CenterPoint Legacy Theatre, 525 N. 400 West, Centerville, 801-298-1302, Feb. 24-March 25, centerpointtheatre.org Matilda the Musical Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, through Feb. 26, artsaltlake.org The Mountaintop Good Company Theatre, 260 25th St., Ogden, 801-564-0288, through Feb. 26, Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 4 p.m., goodcotheatre.com The Other Place Sorensen Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, 801-535-6533, through March 4, 7:30 p.m., sorensonunitycenter.com Peter and the Starcatchers Hale Center Theater, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through April 8, times vary, haletheater.org RAIN: A Tribute to the Beatles Weber State University Central Campus, 3848 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, Feb. 28, 7:30 p.m., calendar.weber.edu

Virtue Plan-B Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through Feb. 26, planbtheatre.org Women In Jeopardy! Pioneer Theatre Co., 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through Feb. 25, Monday-Thursday, 7 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., pioneertheatre.org (see p. 17)

DANCE

Ailey II: Revelations Eccles Center for the Performing Arts, 1750 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-655-8252, Feb. 24-25, 7:30 p.m., $29-$79, ecclescenter.org (see p. 17) Ballet West: The Sleeping Beauty Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, through Feb. 26, balletwest.org Night of Shining Stars 2017 Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, 801-355-2787, Feb. 25, artsaltlake.org

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

The Chamber Music Society of Salt Lake City: The Minetti Quartet Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, March 1, 7:30 p.m., tickets.utah.edu Lun Jiang and Karlyn Bond in recital Vieve Gore Concert Hall, 1250 E. 1700 South, 801-4847651, Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m., westminstercollege.edu Tradewinds Pacifica The Acoustic Space, 124 S. 400 West, Feb. 26, 2 p.m., facebook.com/tradewindspacifica Utah Symphony: Brahm’s Symphony No. 4 Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, 801-5336683, Feb. 24-25, 7:30 p.m., utahsymphony.org Utah Chamber Artists: The Fruit of Silence Libby Gardner Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, 801581-7100, Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m., utahchamberartists.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

ImprovBroadway 496 N. 900 East, Provo, 909260-2509, Saturdays, 8 p.m., improvbroadway.com Improv Comedy Ziegfeld Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., ogdencomedyloft.com


moreESSENTIALS Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., laughingstock.us Off the Wall Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-5724144, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., drapertheatre.org Pauly Shore Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Feb. 24-25, 7-9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Quick Wits Comedy 695 W. Center St., Midvale, 801-824-0523, Saturdays, 10 p.m., qwcomedy.com Sasquatch Cowboy The Comedy Loft, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 435-327-8273, Saturdays, 9:30 p.m., ogdencomedyloft.com Todd Barry Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, 801-532-5233, Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com (see p. 17)

LITERATURE AUTHOR APPEARANCES

FARMERS MARKETS

Winter Market Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through April 22, Saturdays, 10 a.m.2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org

TALKS & LECTURES

1 Million Cups Impact Hub, 150 S. State, Ste. 1, 385-202-6008, Wednesdays through June 14, 9 a.m., hubsaltlake.com

VISUAL ART

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FEBRUARY 23, 2017 | 21

Aleta Boyce: Dreams of A Lucid Traveler Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801328-0703, through March 10, accessart.org Amy Caron: Angel Series Corinne & Jack Sweet Library, 455 F St., 801-594-8651, through Feb. 25, slcpl.org Be It Ever So Humble Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley, 801-9655100, through March 1, culturalcelebration.org Benjamin Cook: Allure of the Mountains Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-5948623, through Feb. 28, slcpl.org Brent Hale: Creatures of Imagination Art at the Main, 210 E. 400 South, through March 11, artatthemain.com

GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

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SPECIAL EVENTS

Christopher Boffoli: Food for Thought Kimball Art Center, 1401 Kearns Blvd., Park City, 435-6498882, through March 19, kimballartcenter.org Collect Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, 801274-7270, through March 20, heritage.utah.gov Doug Braithwaite and George Handrahan Pioneer Theatre, 300 S. 1400 East, 801-581-6961, through Feb. 25, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., pioneertheatre.org En Plein Air: Levi Jackson and Adam Bateman Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through March 10, heritage.utah.gov Erin D. Coleman: In the Distance from Here to My Heart SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org Fabricated: Recent works by John O’Connell “A” Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, 801-583-4800, through Feb. 28, agalleryonline.com The Future Isn’t What It Used to Be Street + Codec Gallery, Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through May 13, free, utahmoca.org Hands Up, Don’t Shoot Mestizo Institute of Culture and Arts, 631 W. North Temple, Ste. 700, through March 9, free, 801-596-0500, mestizocoffeehouse.com (see p. 18) H. James Stewart: The Wall Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through Feb. 24, saltlakearts.org Howard Brough Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through Feb. 24, saltlakearts.org Imagining Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through April 15, utahmoca.org John Sproul Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, through Feb. 24, saltlakearts.org Jared Steffensen and Christopher Kelly: Get Used To It CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-2156768, through March 13, cuartcenter.org Kay Miner Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Feb. 26, redbuttegarden.org Lindsay Daniels: Nepal Rises Sprague Library, 2131 S. 1100 East, 801-594-8640, through March 18, slcpl.org Marc Toso: Ancient Nights Art Access Gallery, 230 S. 500 West, Ste. 125, 801-328-0703, through March 10, accessart.org Micheal Jensen: Where Is My Mind SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-594-8680, through March 3, Monday-Saturday, slcpl.org Only God Can Judge Me Utah Museum of Contemporary Art Projects Gallery, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through March 18, utahmoca.org Paul Vincent Bernard and Rose Umerlik: Modern & Minimal J GO Gallery, 408 Main, Park City, 435-649-1006, through March 15, jgogallery.com Rona Pondick & Robert Feintuch: Heads, hands, feet; sleeping, holding, dreaming, dying Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through July 15, utahmoca.org Shonto Begay: Aje’ Ji’—The Heart Way Modern West Fine Art, 177 E. 200 South, 801355-3383, through March 11, 5 p.m.-9 p.m., modernwestfineart.com (see p. 20) Vatsala Soni Ranjan: Spirit Animals DayRiverside Library, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-5948632, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org Wayne L. Geary: Topographies SLC Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-524-8200, through Feb. 24, slcpl.org World of the Wild Art Show Hogle Zoo, 2600 E. Sunnyside Ave., 801-584-1700, through March 12, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., hoglezoo.org

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Bim Oliver: South Temple Street Landmarks The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Feb. 24, 7-9 pm, kingsenglish.com Guest Writers Series: Linda Bierds and Davis McCombs Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, 801-596-5000, Feb. 23, 7 p.m., saltlakearts.org Liz Wright: Bare Naked Nomad Weller Bookworks, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Feb. 25, 2 p.m., wellerbookworks.com McKenzie Wagner Barnes & Noble, 7157 Plaza Center Dr., West Jordan, 801-282-1324, Feb. 25, 1 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Shelly Brown: Ghostsitter Barnes & Noble, 7157 Plaza Center Dr., West Jordan, 801-2821324, Feb. 24, 6 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Tricia Levenseller: Daughter of the Pirate King The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Feb. 28, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com William B. Matson: The Lakota Warrior’s Life and Legacy King’s English, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Feb. 25, 2 p.m., kingsenglish.com

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AUTHENTIC GERMAN

CUISINE & MARKET

RESTAURANT REVIEW

DINE

A Sense of Purpose BEST SCHNITZEL with SPAETZLE

BEST SAUSAGES

Siegfried’s Deli Serving Imported Beers & Wine Open M-W 9am-6pm Th-Sat: 9am-9pm

20 W. 200 S. • (801) 355-3891

Italian Village italianvillageslc.com

Get your Italian on. 5370 S. 900 E. MURRAY, UT MON-THU 11a-11p FRI-SAT 11a-12a / SUN 3p-10p

801.266.4182

Passion for food—but not sushi—is on the menu at Ikigai. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

I

t’s a little tricky to translate to English, but the Japanese concept of ikigai has to do with purpose and meaning—a reason for being—not unlike the French phrase raison d’être. Terms like “mission calling” or “commitment to a cause” would not be too far afield. Restaurant owner Johnny Kwon speaks of ikigai partly in terms of passion and of destiny. Without getting too personal, when Kwon’s best friend passed away last year, the then owner of Naked Fish Japanese Bistro made a decision: He wanted to open a restaurant where ikigai would pervade the atmosphere and the cuisine. Kwon’s desire to bring love, purpose and meaning to his business enterprise ultimately led him to close Naked Fish and open his new restaurant, simply called Ikigai. I was one of many who were sad to see Naked Fish close. During the past couple of years, I considered it to be one of Utah’s highest-echelon eateries. Maybe Kwon was tired of seeing so many sushi restaurants open along the Wasatch Front, so he created a Japanese restaurant with nothing called sushi or sashimi on the menu. This has undoubtedly confused some patrons, who come to Ikigai looking for rolls and such. But, hey, you can get those even at your local grocers these days; what Ikigai offers is much harder to find. Should there be a wait for a table, settle into a comfortable seat in Ikigai’s lobby and enjoy a snack and a cocktail like the shiso gin and tonic. I was surprised by how much I loved the hotate chips ($8) because, frankly, they didn’t sound too appealing. Hotate is Japanese for scallop, and this dish from the snack portion of the menu is scrumptious housemade rice crackers (not those tasteless hockey puck-shaped things), each with a couple dollops of dried and cured scallop that has been transformed into an airy, delicious mousse-like consistency, then garnished with minced scallion. Delicate Kumamoto oysters on ice (three for $10) are subtly dressed with just a hint of ginger-infused house mignonette, and serve as a perfect meal starter. If you prefer your seafood cooked, the calamari—Japanese sea squid in this case—is kept simple: battered, fried and served with a delectable burnt garlic aioli. It’s some of the best fried calamari I’ve ever had.

NIKI CHAN

BEST REUBEN

The remainder of Ikigai’s concise menu consists of “cold plates” and “warm plates.” It’s not easy to describe Chef David Hopps’ cold amberjack dish ($14) without oohing and ahhing. Like many of his creations, this one seems, at first look, to be oh-so simple. In a way, it is, but there is more going on than meets the eye. Hobbs utilizes the Japanese method of aging/curing fish for 2-4 days before serving it up sashimi-style. This is a practice that only a handful of restaurants in the U.S. utilize. In this case, Japanese hamachi (aka amberjack) is cured in Okinawan salt and raw brown sugar for a couple of hours, then rinsed and aged for two days in a special antibacterial cypress (hinoki) box. Now, most people I know think they like their raw fish (sashimi) as fresh as can be—directly off the boat, if possible. But aging fish, much like aging a quality beef steak, imparts umami and enriches the flavor. It’s a remarkable thing. The hamachi is then cut into artful pieces and served raw with subtle garnishes of puréed pickled plum (umeboshi), candied pistachio crumbs and mitsuba leaves. A richer, oilier fish like Japanese mackerel requires longer aging. But again, Hopps’ aged mackerel is so full of flavor itself that it requires nothing more than a little pickled seaweed and “petite” red onions ($13). Red snapper with yuzu and green tea ($14) is also not to be missed. The “hot plate” section of the menu is full of temptations, too. Take, for instance, ramen “carbonara” ($16)—an inventive dish that combines perfectly cooked fresh ramen noodles, egg and, in the place of bacon, guanciale or pancetta. Chef Hopps brings a smoky, meaty flavor to the dish by sprinkling the top with katsuobushi: dried, fermented and smoked skipjack tuna, sometimes called bonito.

Ikigai Chef David Hopps Let’s talk tofu. My wife (who is nuts about it) and I agree that Ikigai’s agedashi ($10) is the best rendition of tofu we have ever tried. The rap on tofu is that it’s bland and flavorless (which it can be) and is only rescued by whatever sauce or seasonings accompany it. That’s not the case with Hopps’ take—lightly fried tofu with the most delicate, crisp exterior and a creamy, soft, ethereal interior, topped simply with katsuobushi and served in a bowl with dashi broth. On one visit, a special of the evening was a visual stunner: grilled madai (Japanese snapper) head. It’s seasoned, roasted and grilled while being sprayed with sake (which I would also want if my head were grilled), split down the middle and served with scallion shreds and pickled radish. It’s a little scary to look at, sure, but it’s a divine dish. Table service is impeccable here, and there’s one more surprise in store for visitors: dessert. Elyse Osguthorpe is dessert chef as well as Hopps’ fiancé, and her creations are other-worldly. Her wizardry includes an amazing toasted rice ice cream with pavlova and candied shiso leaf, and the light and fluffy Japanese “cheesecake” that’s like eating clouds sprinkled with ginger beer ice pebbles, crumbled spiced cocoa and burnt honey. If you’re looking for food with purpose and passion, Ikigai is for you. CW

IKIGAI

67 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City 801-595-8888 facebook.com/ikigaislc


Contemporary Japanese Dining 18 MARKET STREET • 801.519.9595

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Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930 BRING THE FAMILY UP EMIGRATION CANYON THIS WINTER

-Creekside Patio -87 Years and Going Strong -Breakfast served daily until 4pm -Delicious Mimosas & Bloody Marys -Gift Cards for sale in diner or online 4160 EMIGRATION CANYON ROAD 801 582-5807 | WWW.RUTHSDINER.COM

FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER

S ON U W O FOLL TAGRAM INS

@critic1

Chef Seth Adams

NIKI CHAN

AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Riverhorse Provides

Since opening on New Year’s Eve in 1987, Riverhorse on Main (540 Main, 435-6493536, Park City, riverhorseparkcity.com) has been one of the area’s top dining destinations, appealing to both locals and visitors alike. Now, owner and Executive Chef Seth Adams has opened Riverhorse Provisions at 2212 Main in the historic Imperial Hotel. Provisions is aptly named, insofar as it offers grab-and-go items—from breakfast foods, gourmet sandwiches, custom gift baskets, soups and salads— to fresh produce and entrées for at-home preparation. Also operating as a café, Riverhorse Provisions serves freshroasted coffee and espresso drinks, breakfast, lunch and après-ski menus. For those looking to spruce up their homes, items like ceramics, fresh floral bouquets, wine glasses, cutting boards, kitchen aprons and such are also available.

KLY

WEE C L S @

Kudos for Cat

According to the website Delish, one of the best 17 airport restaurants in the country is at the Salt Lake City International Airport. Congrats to the owner of the namesake Cat Cora’s Kitchen. The cocktail and tapas lounge features both to-go gourmet food items and eat-in dishes such as the popular lobster macaroni and cheese and the sesame lamb meatball skewers. Other winning eateries include Tony Lukes—where I always stop for a pre-flight cheesesteak at the Philadelphia International Airport—Houston’s Pappadeaux for Cajun cuisine, Rick Bayless’ Tortas Frontera at Chicago’s O’Hare and Deep Blue Sushi, my favorite spot at JFK International Airport.

Food & Wine Classic Returns

Tickets are now available for the upcoming 13th annual Park City Food & Wine Classic, which runs from July 6-9. Benefitting the nonprofit People’s Health Clinic, it brings together internationally known chefs, sommeliers, vintners and distilleries with an array of tastings, dinners, demonstrations, live music and activities like hiking, mountain biking, fly fishing, cycling and more. Many of the popular events sell out quickly each year, so it’s not too early to order your tickets online at parkcityfoodandwineclassic.com. Quote of the week: “What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child?” —Lin Yutang Send tips to tscheffler@cityweekly.net

Award Winning Donuts

705 S. 700 E. | (801) 537-1433


BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

Eight Great Utah Brews

Shedding light on some underrated Beehive beers. BY TED SCHEFFLER tscheffler@cityweekly.net @critic1

A

Amarillo hops. Bold tropical fruit and resin aromas, along with sweet malt flavors, unite in Elephino to create a beautifully balanced brew. The first Beehive beer I ever tasted was from Squatters. I was impressed back then, and I still am. With so many Squatters beers to sample, it’s hard to know where to begin, but I suggest trying 2014 GABF Gold Medal-winning Squatters Hell’s Keep ($9.99/750 ml). The Belgian strong pale ale brims with banana and clove flavors from Belgian yeast—a deceptively light-bodied beer given its not-so-light 7.75-percent ABV. Bohemian Brewery is nirvana for lager lovers, and their recreation of the Bohemian 1842 Czech Pilsener Lager ($1.50/354 ml) is spot-on. Not that I was around to taste the original version, but this is a perfect tribute to world-class Czech-style pilseners, made with Czech Saaz hops and pale pilsener malt. It’s crisp, clean, wellbalanced and eminently easy to sip. Once you crawl into the Epic Brewing Co. labyrinth of beers, you may never crawl out. I lost count somewhere around brew number 75. So, narrowing it down to a single recommendation is daunting, and I certainly haven’t tasted them all. But I’ll go with the whopping 12.8-percent-ABV Epic Double Barrel Big Bad Baptist Imperial Stout ($12.49/651 ml). You certainly won’t forget it. CW

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ssociating Utah with good beer might seem a little like equating our current president with humility. But, thanks to a foundation laid by Utah’s first two brewpubs, Wasatch and Squatters, the quality of local craft brews has risen to world-class heights in the two decades I’ve lived here. Don’t believe me? Just take a look at all the Beehive State winners from the Great American Beer Festival. It’s impressive and much deserved. Here are eight that might just change how you think about local suds. Uinta Brewing Co.’s new golden ale can designs celebrate our National Park system, with the initial set depicting Arches, Yosemite, Acadia and five others. You

should also get your mitts around a bottle of Uinta Anniversary Barley Wine ($2.25/355 ml), which has been going strong for more than 24 years. You’ll want to savor this one—which boasts 10.4 percent alcohol by volume—slowly. I’m a fan of many Proper Brewing Co. beers, but none is better than their flagship Proper Beer ($2.09/355 ml). It’s a classic English golden ale made with English Maris Otter pale malt, English hops, German pilsener malt and American yeast—a perfect Brit-style session ale. An interesting high-wire act of balancing bitter and floral aromas and flavors with Nugget and Cascade hops makes Roosters Hellevation IPA ($2.95/500 ml) a somewhat unusual IPA, but a delightful one. Established in 1986 by Greg Schirf, Wasatch Brewery has perfected the art of craft brewing. To wit, try a glass of rich, malty and complex Wasatch Devastator Double Bock ($1.95/355 ml). As Schirf says about Devastator, “If you are going to sin, sin big.” At 8 percent ABV, this is a big beer with toasty malts, nutty flavors and a hint of chocolate. Make a meal of it. There are lots of Red Rock Brewing beers to love, but I have a particular passion for Red Rock Elephino ($3.95/500 ml). This is an 8-percent-ABV American-style IPA that is double dry-hopped using whole leaf

DRINK

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G

TO THE GR EE

GOODEATS Complete listings at cityweekly.net

K!

E

E TM

Pick up the NEW issue of Devour Utah

Featuring dining destinations, from buffets and rooms with a view to momand-pop joints, chic cuisine and some of our dining critic’s faves. The Bayou

It’s “beervana” at The Bayou—with a selection of over 300 brews, it would take nearly a year to try them all, though owner Mark Alston is always making additions to his impressive stock. Still can’t decide on a particular brewski? Download The Bayou App, which randomly selects 10 beers from the complete beer list. The Bayou doesn’t just serve the Devil’s nectar, though. They also have an amazing dining selection, such as the Cajun Chicken Sandwich, served with spicy chicken, chipotle aioli, provolone and onions. 645 S. State, Salt Lake City, 801-961-8400, UtahBayou.com

Breakfast

OMELETTES | PANCAKES • GREEK SPECIALTIES

Lunch & Dinner

HOMEMADE SOUP • GREEK SPECIALS GREEK SALADS • HOT OR COLD SANDWICHES KABOBS • PASTA • FISH • STEAKS • CHOPS GREEK PLATTERS & GREEK DESSERTS

Oh Mai

Beer & Wine

THE OTHER PLACE

RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM SUN 8AM - 10PM

Go to devourutah.com for pick up locations.

469 EAST 300 SOUTH | 521-6567

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FOOD & Fresh Nayarit Style Seafood

Whether you have the classic pho soup with fragrant broth in mind, a banh mi sandwich served on a French baguette, or traditional noodle and rice bowls, Oh Mai has you covered on all things Vietnamese. The restaurant—which now has three Salt Lake City locations— first took off as a banh mi and sandwich shop, but now covers all bases with their extensive and delectable menu. Multiple Locations, OhMaiSandwich.com

Provisions

This American craft kitchen preaches seasonal, organic and locally produced ingredients. The house-inspired architectural design might even convince you that you’re sitting at your own dining room table. The small plates

are all wonderful, including the steamed buns and roasted-beet salad, but don’t leave the restaurant until you try the tagliarini: braised rabbit coated with a sage brown butter sauce that melts in your mouth. 3364 S. 2300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-410-4046, SLCProvisions.com

R&R BBQ

Seasoned veterans of the barbecue industry, Rod and Roger Livingston, take pride in their craft—a little smoke, fire and rub, and soon enough you’ll get the best in town. The slow-smoked brisket is second to none, and the smoked sausage, pulled pork, barbecue ribs and chicken are equally sensational. R&R BBQ fanatics can get their dose of smoked goodness at the downtown spot or the recently opened South Jordan location. 307 W. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-364-0443, RAndRBBQ.net

Sage’s

Located since late 2013 in the iconic former Jade Café building, Sage’s specialty is vegetarian, organic cuisine. For veggie lovers, there are “Meatless Monday” specials, as well as several vegetarian pizza and pasta options. The restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner every day, with late-night weekend dining and an extended brunch menu on Saturday and Sunday. 234 W. 900 South, Salt Lake City, 801-322-3790

Mi Lindo 145 E. 1300 S.

Nayarit 

#303

801.908.5727

F ALL F O 50% LLS O R I& SUSHD AY E V E R Y D AY !

RAMEN SHOP NOW OPEN AT SANDY LOCATION

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Mon-Thurs 11-10 Friday 11-11 Saturday 12-11 Sunday 12-9 AND ASIAN GRILL

9000 S 109 W , SANDY & 3424 S State St 801.566.0721 • 801.251.0682 ichibansushiut.com

Indian Style Tapas

From the Creators of The Himalayan Kitchen Next to Himalayan Kitchen

ChakraLounge.net 364 S State St. Salt Lake City


JOHN TAYLOR

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

Yupin and Wichai Charoen

Laan Na Thai

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Thai immigrants Wichai and Yupin Charoen are the nuts, bolts, beams and foundation of Laan Na Thai and the epitome of the American dream. The restaurant is tiny—just a small kitchen with counter service, a few stools inside and some sidewalk tables outside—but the menu isn’t. Customers seem to favor the bargain-priced combo meals, where a oneitem combo with rice is $5.99, and the two-item combo with rice and an egg roll is $8.49. Along with staples that are familiar to many, they also offer dishes native to northeast Thailand, like nam tok, a meat salad of tender stir-fried flank steak strips with romaine lettuce and sticky rice, brimming with spicy, tangy and salty flavors of scallions, Thai chiles, fish sauce, shallots, lime and cilantro. The exquisite hung lay pork features melt-in-your-mouth pork belly in a rich, spicy curry with coconut milk, carrots and potatoes. I start every meal there now with an order of chicken puffs: delicate, made in-house puff pastries filled with minced chicken and onion, fried until golden, crispy and delicious. The curry dumplings— minced pork and scallion dumplings bathed in a slightly sweet yellow curry—are another fab starter. Reviewed Dec. 8. 336 W. 300 South, 801-363-2717, Facebook.com/LaanNaThai

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BREAKFAST and LUNCH served

 Established 2004 

ALL DAY!

brittonsrestaurant.com

INDIAPALACEUTAH.COM 1086 WEST SOUTH JORDAN PARKWAY (10500 S.) #111 | 801.302.0777

FEBRUARY 23, 2017 | 27

801-572-5148 | 7 Days a Week | 7am - 3pm

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694 East Union Square, SANDY

AWARD WINNING INDIAN CUISINE


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O B O R Y N I H S G I B

T! FILM REVIEW

News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

Guess Who’s Coming to Die Here

CINEMA

Get Out offers satirical horror on race in the suburbs.

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

BY ERIC D. SNIDER comments@cityweekly.net @EricDSnider

G

exclusively on cityweekly.net ALL THE NEWS THAT WON’T FIT IN PRINT

Long-long-long-read Interviews With Local Bands, Comedians, Artists, Podcasters, Fashionistas And Other Creators Of Cool Stuff Only On Cityweekly.net! CITYWEEKLY.NET/UNDERGROUND

et Out plays as a feature-length version of the not-quite-joking sentiment among African Americans that the suburbs—what with their overwhelming whiteness and cultural homogeneity— are eerie twilight zones for black people. Far from being a one-joke movie, however, Jordan Peele’s feature directorial debut is a clever, consistently funny racial satire and horror film mocking white liberal cluelessness and finding humor in (without dismissing) black people’s fears. Thematically, it’s very of-the-moment, though Peele (half of Comedy Central’s Key and Peele flying solo) has smartly avoided any acutely topical references. His screenplay, which he swears is not based on his wife’s family (he’s married to Brooklyn Nine-Nine actress Chelsea Peretti), has a 20-something black man named Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) traveling with his white girlfriend, Rose (Allison Williams), to meet her affluent family in their prim, well-manicured community. Rose has not told her parents that her boyfriend is black, but she swears they’re so progressive that the only race-related problem will be how much her dad talks about his love for Obama. Sure enough, Rose’s folks—neurosurgeon Dean (Bradley Whitford) and psychiatrist Missy (Catherine Keener)—are educated, gracious and clumsily welcoming; Dean greets Chris with “my man” and tells him proudly of how his own father’s claim to fame was losing to Jesse Owens in a 1936 Olympics pre-trial. (This is a gag, but like many gags in the film, it’s also foreshadowing.) Dean feels embarrassed to be a wealthy white man who employs black servants (a maid and a groundskeeper),

but they worked for his parents before they died and now they’re part of the family—a part that, Chris notices, is unusually deferential and mild-mannered, like Stepford wives. There’s more weirdness when the extended family and neighbors arrive for the annual summertime gathering. (Rose also has a brother, played by Caleb Landry Jones, who serves no function in the story.) Chris is the only black man among them, save for one (Lakeith Stanfield) who’s married to an older white woman but is as docile as the servants, and dresses as though he were his wife’s contemporary. Everyone is effusively polite to Chris, earning laughs with their self-satisfied manifestations of “acceptance”—for example, making sure to mention that Tiger Woods is their favorite golfer—that are sure to ring true for a large part of the audience. Chris occasionally checks in via phone with his friend Rod (Lil Rel Howery, soon to be a breakout star), a TSA agent back in the city whose speech and manner are more authentically—perhaps stereotypically?— African-American. In narrative terms, Rod fills the role of Jive-Talking Black Friend, the person in the horror movie who says, “Aw, hell no, I ain’t goin’ in there, you people are crazy!”—the voice of reason, in other words, and the voice of the presumed audience. That he is, in this case, the Jive-Talking Black Friend to someone who shouldn’t need one, whose own interior monologue should be doing the job of warning him, is

Daniel Kaluuya in Get Out

part of the film’s humor about varying levels of “blackness.” No one comes out and says it, but there’s the implication that Chris’ dating a white girl has made him lose some of his natural instincts. Get Out is a comedy first and foremost, but there are thriller elements sprinkled throughout, including a trippy hypnosis scene with Chris and Rose’s psychiatrist mom, and in the end the plot turns to overt horror. Peele’s facility with comedy is well documented, but his deft touch with the scary parts is a nice surprise, and genre fans will appreciate his willingness to deliver satisfying violence when it’s called for. Best of all, though, is his ability to embed themes of racial equality in a mocking satire masquerading as a date-night horror-comedy, and to make fun of white people without becoming the stereotype of the Angry Black Man (not that this will stop Bill O’Reilly from calling him one). Biting but good-natured, incisive but not preachy, this is the kind of self-reflective comedy that can bring America together. CW

GET OUT

BBB Daniel Kaluuya Allison Williams Bradley Whitford Rated R

TRY THESE Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967) Spencer Tracy Sidney Poitier Not Rated

The Wicker Man (1973) Edward Woodward Christopher Lee Rated R

The Stepford Wives (1975) Katharine Ross Paula Prentiss Rated PG

Keanu (2016) Keegan-Michael Key Jordan Peele Rated R


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. COLLIDE [not yet reviewed] A young American (Nicholas Hoult) tries to get away from European drug smugglers. Opens Feb. 24 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) GET OUT BBB See review p. 28. Opens Feb. 24 at theaters valleywide. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES A CURE FOR WELLNESS BB.5 If you’re making a freaky amalgam of allegory, morality play and body horror, it’s best to let people know that’s exactly what they’re in for. The story follows financial services whiz-kid Lockhart (Dane DeHaan) as he tries to retrieve his company’s MIA CEO from an exclusive Swiss spa—where he finds a creepy cult-like atmosphere. Creepiness is a vibe director Gore Verbinski can manage well, and he sets the stage with a handful of arresting shots. Yet as fascinating as the onscreen image might be, eventually there’s the small matter of what the movie is actually about, and that’s where things get messy. The mythology gets more complicated by the minute, through dental torture, rape and incest, until the resolution begins to test the limits of when a viewer will say, “Seriously, that’s where you were going with this?” (R)—SR FIST FIGHT BB.5 Charlie Day has made a name for himself playing frenetic, highpitched idiots in the Horrible Bosses movies and TV’s It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, so his performance here—as a mildmannered, reasonably intelligent high school English teacher—is risky. He’s up against Ice Cube, typecast as a terrifying history teacher who gets fired, blames Day’s character and challenges him to a fight after school. The film is at its best when Day unravels, though there are sporadic laughs throughout thanks to a general sense of cheerful anarchy—it’s the last day of school, and the students are in open rebellion—and supporting characters like Jillian Bell’s meth-using, student-seducing guidance counselor. The sitcom-simple screenplay is bogged down by extraneous

THE GREAT WALL BBB As monster movies go, you could do far worse than this silly, lively and kind of gorgeous adventure. Two medieval European mercenaries—William (Matt Damon) and Tovar (Pedro Pascal)— seeking the mythical combustible “black powder” in China instead find an army defending the nation from a horde of voracious beasts. The narrative awkwardly tries to craft a redemption arc for Damon, who imbues his warrior with seen-it-all stoicism and a vague, undefinable accent. Fortunately, director Zhang Yimou’s sense of style—from the bold colors of various military units’ uniforms to a funeral ceremony involving thousands of airborne lanterns—makes for a fairly spectacular experience even when creatures aren’t being dismembered and/or dismembering. It’s rare enough to find a creature-feature that inspires smiles through its inherent goofiness; it’s rarer still to find one likely to leave you thinking, “oooooh, pretty.” (PG-13)—SR THE SALESMAN BBB.5 Asghar Farhadi (A Separation) tells the story of two married actors, Emad (Shahab Hosseini) and Rana (Taraneh Alidoosti), whose relationship is strained by an incident at their new apartment where Rana is apparently accosted by an intruder. The action is framed by their production of Death of a Salesman, and there are certainly levels on which that provides subtext about a man trying to maintain his dignity. But the meat of Farhadi’s morality play rests on cultural ideas of shame and victim-blaming which sadly seem just as fitting in America, building to a confrontation that’s more about vengeance than justice. It might not be as devastating a portrait of moral failure as Farhadi’s earlier masterpieces, but it’s still a potent story of how much a man is willing to destroy simply to preserve his sense that he’s still a man. (NR)—SR

SPECIAL SCREENINGS 2017 ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATED SHORT FILMS At Park City Film Series, Feb.24-25, 8 p.m. & Feb. 26, 6 p.m. (NR) EDEN At Fort Douglas Post Theater, March 1, 7 p.m. (R)

MONDAY 27TH

UNDERCOVER BROTHER

LEGO BATMAN

FIST FIGHT

677 S. 200 W. SLC • BREWVIES.COM • 21+ • CALL FOR SCOTTY’S SHOWTIMES & SPIEL @ 355.5500

FEBRUARY 23, 2017 | 29

FREE!

| CITY WEEKLY |

FILM • FOOD • NEIGHBORHOOD BAR SHOWING: FEBRUARY 24TH - MARCH 2ND

more than just movies at brewvies

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ROCK DOG [not yet reviewed] He’s a dog, he loves music and he’s animated—whaddaya need, a road map? Opens Feb. 24 at theaters valleywide. (PG)

HOT SHOTS! At Brewvies, Feb. 27, 10 p.m. (R)

characters and gratuitous swearing—it’s like the writers just learned the F-word—but energetic, almost cartoonish mania wins out in the end. (R)—Eric D. Snider

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

THE RED TURTLE BBB.5 The Studio Ghibli logo at the beginning might be a bit misleading: In style and tone, this gripping, nearly wordless animated fairy tale is its own distinctive creation. Writer/director Michael Dudok de Wit begins his story with a nameless male protagonist already lost at sea, Cast Away-style, and stranded on a deserted island. After several strangely thwarted attempts to escape the island, he encounters a mysterious giant, red sea turtle, and … well, what happens next is what takes it from the realm of realistic survival yarn to fantasy. There’s little in the way of traditional character arc, notwithstanding a thread involving our hero facing some guilt from an act of violent frustration. But the simplicity of de Wit’s compositions—precise shots like a tiny head emerging from the immensity of the ocean—and the near-pervasive silence make for an enveloping experience. When the surprising plot turns lead to an unexpected sense of epic emotional consequence, you get a reminder of how many different ways there can be to tell an animated story, and how satisfying it can be to see someone break from the norm. Opens Feb. 24 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

GLEASON At Main Library, Feb. 28, 7 p.m. (NR)


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0 | FEBRUARY 23, 2017

TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Bad Hombres

TV

The Blacklist: Redemption spies hard; Taken is a piss-poor prequel. The Blacklist: Redemption Thursday, Feb. 23 (NBC)

Series Debut: Hardcore Blacklist fans are asking, “How’s this spinoff going to work?” while casual viewers are curious to know, “How many encoded tattoos can she fit on her body?” For the latter: That’s Blindspot, dumbasses. For the former: Undercover op and ex-Blacklist bad hombre Tom Keen (Ryan Eggold) has a wife and a baby at home, but now he’s going to be traipsing around the world with mom “Scottie” Hargrave (Famke Janssen) on missions the U.S. government won’t avow because, karma. It’s best to forget the parenting logistics of The Blacklist: Redemption and just go with the action (which will only span eight episodes, so Tom will be back with Liz and Agnes on The Blacklist proper soon enough). But, if Redemption is a hit—which it could be; Blacklist faithful won’t be disappointed—they’re going to have to work out a nanny schedule for future missions.

Sun Records Thursday, Feb. 23 (CMT)

Series Debut: Many a dramatized biopic and miniseries have tackled the rock ’n’ roll legend of Elvis Presley—but none have brought together the “Million Dollar Quartet” that also includes Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis. Sun Records attempts to contain all of these personalities and chronicle the civil rights movement of late-’50s Memphis, and fares mostly better than expected for reality-damaged CMT (which, as a reminder, still stands for Country Music Television, not Cheerleaders, Mullets and Trucks). The Quartet are portrayed well-if-not-vacantlypretty enough, but it’s Billy Gardell’s (Mike & Molly) turn as Elvis manager Colonel Tom Parker that provides Sun Records’ real spark.

The 89th Annual Academy Awards Sunday, Feb. 26 (ABC)

Special: More than just another overlong awards show wherein rich celebrities exchange trophies for being rich celebrities who put out semi-commercially viable content last year, The 89th Annual Academy Awards will also be an

Proceed Hold Abort overlong soap box for rich celebrities to rail against the rich celebrity currently residing in the White House (or Mar-a-Lago, or wherever). As boring as that sounds, it’s nothing compared to the snooze-inducing qualities of several of this year’s Best Picture nominees: The most—really, only—exciting part of Arrival was Amy Adams’ CGI floatygravity hair; La La Land somehow made jazz and musicals even more unpalatable; and Manchester by the Sea … WTF was that mumbly tone poem of tragedy? Have fun watching the dresses and No Orange Order rants.

Taken Monday, Feb. 27 (NBC)

Series Debut: Bryan Mills—the man with a very particular and dangerous set of skills who still couldn’t protect his daughter and wife from being kidnapped and/or killed over the course of three movies—is back! More accurately … was back? Doomed TV knockoff Taken is a prequel, set 30 years before the films, starring Clive Standen (Vikings) as a younger, fashionably bearded Mills, who’s recruited into the CIA after his sister is gunned down by terrorist goons on his watch (it does not pay to be related to this guy). Soon, his covert-agency boss (Jennifer Beals) is putting him through the usual crime-drama-case-of-the-week grind, leaving fans of far-more-ambitious timeslot occupant Timeless to wonder, “NBC cut the season short for this?”

Dream Home FIND YOUR NEXT

WITH

The Blacklist: Redemption (NBC)

President’s Address to Congress Tuesday, Feb. 28 (most channels)

News Special: What’s President … yep, still funny … Donald Trump going to pull out of the pocket of his illfitting big-boy suit this time? Another attack on real information leaks that somehow led to fake news? More victory laps for winning so hard/narrowly months ago? A eulogy for Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Celebrity Apprentice? A declaration of war on New Mexico? (“So much more advanced and dangerous than old Mexico, believe me.”) As thrillpressing (thrilling + depressing, new term) as the many, many, many possibilities are, The Only TV Column That Matters™ suggests watching the new Roger Corman cinematic masterpiece Death Race 2050 on Netflix, instead. It’s the best indicator of where ’Merica is headed since Idiocracy, believe me.

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and billfrost.tv.

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MUSIC

CURTAIN CALL

Wings of Change

Looking back on Elytra’s flight as it comes to an end. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

ALICIA PARRY

E

february 24

february 26

Left to right: Janet Chotia, Lindsay Heath, Scotty-Ray Phillips, Chris Murphy and Secily Saunders. gender issues. “What’s more important to me, rather than spending a lot of time talking about my own gender identity,” Phillips says, “is just being who I am and letting people see it.” Fortunately, that’s easier to do nowadays. In previous decades, gender-bending from musicians like Boy George was treated as gimmickry. “I almost view the androgyny that came through in the ’80s as kind of exploitative as far as identity,” Phillips says. “If those artists were also openly sleeping with people from the same sex, I feel like they wouldn’t have been as accepted.” Phillips has noticed a more positive change in modern music’s acceptance of gender fluidity, citing Antony from Antony and the Johnsons and Jake Shears from the Scissor Sisters. “I think that mentality is going away.” Although the band had planned to spread its wings with shows at Velour and Metro Music Hall this week, its members have gone their separate ways. Every end brings a beginning, however, and Phillips is already writing music for a currently untitled project. All the same, Elytra has made Utah’s local music scene more vibrant and diverse, empowering audiences and peers to reveal themselves and fly. CW

march 17

may 13

fortunate youth

IRON MAIDENS

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they follow through, they sang at every opportunity, and in a variety of formats. After high school, and moving out on their own, “I thought I’d try singing in a band.” Phillips then started The Femme Medea, with cellist Tanner Crawford and drummer Cameron Jorgenson. Together, the trio moved from their small town of Huntington to Salt Lake City in an effort to pursue their musical careers. “We played shows for a few years and it just naturally came to a halt,” Phillips says. When TFM performed at Craft Lake City in 2014, they met local musician Lindsay Heath (of Redd Tape, Delicatto and Lindsay Heath Orchestra), who invited Phillips to jam. Heath had been composing with keyboardist Chris Murphy and, after a few sessions, she asked Phillips to write lyrics for some of their songs. “I didn’t really feel a connection to the genre of music,” Phillips says. “So we decided to create something new together.” With Murphy, Heath on drums, Secily Saunders on guitar and Janet Chotia on bass, Elytra played alt-rock that dabbled with synth-pop elements to create the perfect backdrop to the front person’s soaring voice. Thematically, Embers and Stardust explores the idea of transcendence. Songs like the title track and “To the Sky” swell with lyrics about breaking free from restrictive social structures. Phillips’ own experiences also add nuanced insights to the songs—but they’re quick to veer the discussion away from becoming a treatise on

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

lytra’s name comes from the Greek word for sheath, which entomologists have used to name the tiny shells that separate to expose the wings of certain kinds of beetles. Close examination of the elytra often reveals an iridescent sheen that is beautiful on its own, but their whole reason for existing is to protect those precious, glittering wings that let beetles take flight. Listening to the quintet’s 2016 EP Embers and Stardust (elytra.bandcamp.com) presents a similar experience. At first, it comes across as a well-arranged collection of altrock ditties that shimmer with the occasional appearance of cellos, synths and pianos. Once that shell separates, the listener gets a peek at what’s happening beneath the surface. The album becomes beautiful in an entirely different way, as it explores the mysteries behind face values and socially mandated labels. The contrast between outer and inner dichotomies in music and gender identity is something that lead vocalist Scotty-Ray Phillips—who identifies as nonbinary and prefers the gender-neutral pronoun they—discusses at length over the phone while driving back to Salt Lake City from a family dinner in Stansbury Park. Phillips’ first conflict between creating and performing art came early in life. “I have this strange, vivid memory of singing a song by The Carpenters for a school assembly when I was 7,” they say. “The teacher told me that I had a really beautiful voice, and that sparked something in me.” Having spent most of their childhood with “pretty severe” social anxiety and stage fright, this was a pivotal moment for Phillips. “I had this idea that I was going to become a singer one day, but I was also terrified of singing in front of people.” When Phillips turned 14, their school choir held a singing competition. This would force them to overcome anxiety toward performing in public. “My dad didn’t believe that I would be able to get over my stage fright and do it, and I wanted to prove him wrong,” Phillips says. Not only did

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MUSIC

DDM (Due Diligence Mix)

A Utah Music Festival playlist to get you prepped and pumped. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

. LOCAL S.L.C

REED ROWE

W

ith any multi-venue music festival, due diligence is advised. In order to maximize your experience, you gotta research the lineup and make a schedule. As co-sponsors of the inaugural Utah Music Festival, happening March 2-4 at 12 local venues from downtown Salt Lake City to Draper, City Weekly has done some of the work for you. Let this playlist help you discover the best UMF has to offer. Advent Horizon: “Midweek Maniac” from Stagehound (adventhorizonband.com) Lush, intense and atmospheric, this song is progressive rock through a youthful Warped Tour filter (minus the scene hair and histrionics—think Coheed and Cambria) and a singer-songwriter’s sensibilities. Why aren’t these guys bigger? W/Jody Whitesides, MiNX; Friday, March 3, 7 p.m., A Bar Named Sue. Badfeather: “Babbling Riverside Blues” from Signal Path (badfeather.bandcamp.com) It’s a sunny, idyllic spiritual sequel to the Doobie Brothers’ “Black Water,” where Pretty Mama’s taken you by the hand and you’re sittin’ on the bank, sharin’ a doob, a summer day, your thoughts ... and other stuff. W/Arizona Sun, Vintage Overdrive; Saturday, March 4, 8 p.m., The Royal. Crook & The Bluff: “Devilish Deeds” from Down to the Styx (crookandthebluff.bandcamp.com) With an all-killer, no filler album like C&TB’s debut, you can close your eyes, spin around, point to the track list and hit goodness. I landed on this creepy-smooth psych-Westernlounge-noir number—a personal favorite. W/ Brumby, Grey Glass; Friday, March 3, 7:30 p.m., Lumpy’s Downtown. Dine Krew: “Simplicity” from Dine and Dash (piccolo.bandcamp.com) Some of the best hip-hop songs don’t need a sick beat—they’re dreamy, stream-ofconsciousness mantras that heal for real. Dine and Dash is

full of heady, mellow jams like this one, which is perfect for when life gets complicated and you need a reminder to keep it simple, stoopid. W/Barbaloot Suitz, Motion Coaster; Thursday, March 2, 7:30 p.m., Metro Music Hall. House of Lewis: “We’re All Gonna Die” from Lickity Split Vol. 1 (houseoflewis.bandcamp.com) You know when they say to put your hands in the air and wave them like you just don’t care? You can die at any moment, choking while chomping chicken (or chomping on your tongue while you’re choking … never mind). Might as well indulge in 2:32 of funky beats and sly bars while you can. W/Burnell Washburn, Grits Green; Thursday, March 2, 7 p.m., The Urban Lounge. Le Voir: “Gravity” from Dualities (levoirmusic.com) Sometimes you meet someone and you’re drawn to them at 9.28E-7 grav to some ridiculous exponential power. Eyes meet, minds meld, souls entwine, worlds collide and uglies bump. I’m pretty sure that’s what Gillian Chase sings about in this airy, pulsating soft-tronica tune (sans the bastardized physics reference and puerility). W/Festive People,

Le Voir

Spirit City; Saturday, March 4, 7 p.m., The Acoustic Space. MiNX: “This Is Who I Am (Unplugged)” (minxband.com) Why recommend an acoustic song by an electro-pop duo? Because when you’re lost in rhythm, lyrics are secondary. Hearing this first, you can get into what MiNX has to say, then groove to the party version on two levels. W/Jody Whitesides, Advent Horizon; Friday, March 3, 7 p.m., A Bar Named Sue. Secret Abilities: “Werewolf Love” from Music To Break Up By (secretabilities.bandcamp.com) What’s more awkward than a lycanthrope in love? Hungry lust, lusty hunger—it all blurs together until you’re literally or metaphorically feasting, and it’s messy any way you slice it. The band’s raucous, frenetic dork-punk makes a great musical bedfellow for the scenario. W/Belle Jewel, Cherish DeGraaf, Coral Bones; Thursday, March 2, 7 p.m., Kilby Court. CW

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MUSIC PICKS

THURSDAY 2.23

Pharoahe Monch, Ras Kass, El Gant

Known for their clever rhyme schemes and a knack for choosing compelling beats, the MCs on this bill represent three of underground hip-hop’s most overlooked but relevant artists. Pharoahe Monch started his career with Prince Po as a beatboxer in the alt-rap group Organized Konfusion. As a solo MC, Monch has four more servings of top-shelf hip-hop, including his best work, PTSD: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (W.A.R. Media, 2014). On his own, Monch has four more platters of top-shelf hip-hop, including his best work, PTSD: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (W.A.R. Media, 2014). Ras Kass comes from his own hip-hop supergroup, The HRSMN (with Canibus, Killah Priest and Kurupt), but also keeps busy with solo records like Intellectual Property: SOI2 (That’s Hip Hop, 2016) and Blasphemy (Mello Music Group, 2014), his highly regarded collaboration with Apollo Brown (which also features a cameo by Monch). El Gant might be unknown to casual fans, but the hungry New York rapper has been ripping beats since 2001 while working with Kool Keith, The Beatnuts and Masta Ace. Check out Beast Academy (Diamond Media 360/Rule by Secrecy, 2014) and catch up. (Keith L. McDonald) Metro Music Hall, 615 W. 100 South, 8 p.m., $20 presale, $25 day of show, 21+, metromusichall.com

FRIDAY 2.24

Stef Chura, Primitive Programme, Sally Yoo

Detroit upstart Stef Chura is a musical chameleon able to channel various melodious voices, from Liz Phair to Natalie Merchant

Stef Chura

MICHELLE GRACE HUNDER

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to Best Coast’s Bethany Cosentino. Her debut album, Messes (Urinal Cake), takes her lyrical flights on guitar-fueled trajectories. She asks, “Why can’t I watch you in slow motion?” and it’s a statement of regret at the hectic pace of human interaction, but her own music matches that in an up-tempo, indie-rock kind of way. On “Human Being,” she is reminiscent of Cat Power/Chan Marshall: “Someday, they’re gonna know/ that you’re a real human being.” Real honest-to-goodness vulnerability in pop music—what a concept. (Brian Staker) Diabolical Records, 238 S. Edison St., 7 p.m., $5, facebook.com/diabolicalslc

SATURDAY 2.25

Stevie Nicks, The Pretenders

Everyone has a crush on Stevie Nicks. That’s not to diminish anyone’s closely held preferences, but come on; it’s Stevie Nicks from Fleetwood Mac, one of the coolest bands in history. Asexuals, eunuchs, monks, nuns, people in a persistent vegetative state—even rocks feel somethin’ when she’s floating around the stage, letting all

Pharoahe Monch that taffeta or whatever billow out behind her while singing in that rasp of hers about gypsies, dreams, witches, landslides, draggin’ hearts around and standing back. She has this mysterious, otherworldly vibe, like she’s possessed of real magic (even if it’s the ability to do so much coke—as her 2015 authorized biography related—that it literally burned a hole in her nose, yet ultimately kick the habit). She’s known for being as cool as you’d hope she’d be— down-to-Earth, kind to fans, and she’s even made custom mixes on iPods for wounded soldiers. She deserves our love. As for The Pretenders, their new album Alone (featurin’ some dude named Dan Auerbach) alludes to the fact that the band is really just frontlady Chrissie Hynde. She alright, too. (Randy Harward) Vivint Smart Home Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 7 p.m., $49-$147, uconcerts.com

»

Stevie Nicks

MATT BECKER

ARVIDA BYSTRÖM

34 | FEBRUARY 23, 2017

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PINKY’S THIS WEEK’S

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ROCK The Cold Year, Skye, Ginger and Gents

Metro Music Hall

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Kilby Court POP/SINGER SONGWRITER Coral Bones, Secret Abilities, Belle Jewel, Cherish Degraaf AMERICANA Grizzly Goat, The Johnny Utahs, Matthew and The Hope

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POP ROCK Festive People, Spirit City, Le Voir

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HARD ROCK Martian Cult, Perish Lane, American Hitmen

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Alejandro Escovedo, as a chief architect of insurgent Americana, continues to further the cause by cutting a swath though both rock and roots, deliberately defying the norms. Sometimes strident, always unrepentant, he resides among the upper echelon of Austin’s elite, releasing records that foster ongoing devotion from his faithful followers. Consequently, it’s little surprise that Escovedo looked to the past with his most recent effort, Burn Something Beautiful (Fantasy, 2016), an album that nods back to his early punk efforts in The Nuns and Rank and File, and is co-written and produced with Scott McCaughey (of The Young Fresh Fellows and The Minus 5) and Peter Buck (of R.E.M.). Opener Jesse Malin draws from the same wellspring, having initiated his career at 12, when he fronted the hardcore band Heart Attack, going on to found glam-punk outfit D Generation. While his solo work is closer to the blue-collar anthems of Springsteen and Mellencamp, a new album from D Generation (Nothing Is Anywhere, Bastard Basement, 2016), proves he’s still a punk. (LZ) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $22, 21+, thestateroomslc.com

Amigo the Devil

w/ the wayne hoskins band sunday 2/26

Alejandro Escovedo

TUESDAY 2.28 Amigo the Devil

He looks like a chubby Coffin Joe—and makes fun of this with beer koozies that say, “Praise the Lard.” Other merch in his online store at amigothedevil.com includes a fetal mandible ($95, sold out), an articulated human foot ($260, sold out) and a 1978 solid brass Shriners belt buckle (only $10, but … sold out). It figures, then, that Danny Kiranos’ chosen sound is “murderfolk” and he has songs about serials killers Ed Gein and Jeffrey Dahmer (“Dahmer Goes Hollywood”) and a Carl Panzram T-shirt that says, “I hate all the fucking human race. I get a kick out of murdering people” (that’s sold out, too). What you don’t get from this is how sweet the guy can be, evil aside, and how—absent a crossroads deal co-signed “Ol’ Scratch”—he can write these excellent folk-Americana songs where bad people do bad things and it seems kinda normal, to the point that you crave, with an ancient and insatiable hunger, the love described in the banjo-and-Theremin-fueled “Hell and You”: I’d rot in hell with you/ if you just asked me to/ I love the shitty things we do together/ Live with me in this sin forever./ Hell and you/ I know you want it, too/ I say you take the shot/ see this chance/ feel the fire/ and let me/ have this/ dance with you. Listen to his three EPs (2010’s Manimals, 2013’s Diggers and 2015’s Decompositions) and you’ll see why all of his merch is sold out—even the CDs. In fact, the only thing you can still buy is a ticket to this show. So get one. (RH) Kilby Court, 741 S. 330 West, 7 p.m., $10, kilbycourt.com

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CITY WEEKLY’S HOT LIST FOR THE WEEK

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THURSDAY 2.23

The Brothers Comatose + Rainbow Girls (The State Room) Fairpark Twins + Jill Johnson + Josaleigh Pollett + Marny Lion Proudfit (Kilby Court) Les Femmes de Velour, Night 1 feat. Emily Bea + Belle Jewel + Faith Johnson + Mia Grace (Velour) Live Music at El Chanate (Snowbird) Mia Grace + Faith Johnson + Belle Jewel + Emily Bae (Velour) Nathan Spencer Review (The Green Pig Pub) Otep + The Convalescence + One Day Waiting (The Urban Lounge) Pharoahe Monch + Ras Kass + El Gant (Metro Music Hall) see p. 34 Reggae Thursday feat. Synergy (The Royal) Robben Ford (Egyptian Theatre) Starbass (Club X)

Hive Riot + Elytra + Pipes + Emily Brown (Velour) The Iron Maidens (The Royal) Live Bands (Johnny’s on Second) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music (Outlaw Saloon) Live Music at The Aerie (Snowbird) Live Music at The Wildflower (Snowbird) Mykki Blanco + Cakes Da Killa + Lisa Dank + Opal Ascension (The Urban Lounge) Native/Tongue + The Comedown + Vitae + No Robot (Audio West Performance Venue) The Roomsounds (Cinnabar Lounge) Robben Ford (Egyptian Theatre) Rick Gerber & the Nightcaps (Brewskis) Skillet + Sick Puppies + Devour the Day (In the Venue) Stef Chura + Primitive Programme + Sally Yoo (Diabolical Records) see p. 34 Weslynn + Luxxe + Mojave Nomads + The Viiceroys (Muse Music Cafe)

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DJ/VJ Birdman (Bourbon House) Dueling Pianos (The Spur) Dueling Pianos: Drew & JD (Tavernacle) Hot Noise + guest DJ (The Red Door) Housepitality w/ Funkee Boss (Downstairs) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz Joint Thursday w/ Mark Chaney & the Garage Allstars (Garage on Beck) The New Wave (’80s Night) w/ DJ Radar (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Carnage (Sky)

KARAOKE

Cowboy Karaoke (The Cabin) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Live Band Karaoke with TIYB (Club 90) Throwback Thursdays (Liquid Joe’s)

FRIDAY 2.24 LIVE MUSIC

Après live Music (Park City Mountain) American Grim + Glaciers In Pangaea + Never Go Back + Pigget (The Loading Dock) Big Blue Ox (The Cabin) An Evening with Mr. Brenton Wood (Liquid Joe’s) Hip-Hop Roots w/ Burnell Washburn + Dumb Luck + Scenic Byway + Clear Sauce Music + more (Metro Music Hall) Chad Valley + Computer Magic (Kilby Court) Datsik + Crizzly + Virtual Riot (The Complex) Hat Trick (Funk ’n’ Dive)

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + Darkwave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Chaseone2 (Twist) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos: Troy and Drew (Tavernacle) Friday Night Fun (All-Request Dance) w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Hot Noise (The Red Door) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue on State)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 2.25 LIVE MUSIC

‘80s Dance Party w/ Flash & Flare (Urban Longe) Les Femmes de Velour, Night 3 feat. Stephanie Mabey + Bri Ray + Drape + The Aces (Velour) Après Live Music (Park City Mountain) The Cody Blackbird Band + Blackkiss (The State Room) Joy Spring Band (Sugar House Coffee) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue) Live Music (Outlaw Saloon) Live Music at The Aerie (Snowbird) Live Trio (The Red Door) Dylan Scott (The Royal) Railroad Earth + Pert Near Sandstone (The Depot) Raze the Pyre (Club X)


SATURDAY 2.25

CONCERTS & CLUBS

GUS BLACK

Rebelution, Passafire

The things you learn in college: how to be out on your own, to accept newfound responsibility, new skills and what it takes to form a band. Well, that last bit isn’t always acquired, but for Rebelution and Passafire, higher education made music possible. The members of Rebelution met at the University of California Santa Barbara, while Passafire came together at the Savannah College of Art and Design. Nowadays, both bands (or at least their parents) have seen their tuition transformed into a valuable investment. Of their five releases in the past 10 years, Rebelution’s Falling Into Place (Easy Star) scored a 2017 Grammy nomination for Best Reggae Album, while their debut effort earned an iTunes Editors’ Choice award for Best Reggae Album of 2007. Passafire can also claim kudos, including reaching No. 1 on Billboard’s Reggae Albums chart with Start From Scratch (Flame Guy, 2011) and Vines (Easy Star, 2015). See, kids—college counts! (Lee Zimmerman) Park City Live, 427 Main, 8 p.m., $32.50-$60, 21+, parkcitylive.net

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Winter is here New Expanded Hours for Rye: Monday-Friday from 9am-2pm Saturday and Sunday from 9am-3pm Friday and Sunday from 6pm-11pm

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Access Music Program (The Spur) Après Live Music (Park City Mountain) Body Void (Club X) Fall River Ramblers (Garage On Beck) Live Bluegrass (Club 90) Live Music at El Chanate (Snowbird) Max & Iggor Cavalera + Immolation + Full of Hell (Metro Music Hall) Pacific Dub + Tunnel Vision (The Royal)

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Ragged Union (The Cabin) Rebelution + Passafire (Park City Live) see p. 39 Robben Ford (Egyptian Theatre) Secondhand Serenade + Hawthorne Heights + Ronnie Winter (In the Venue) Stevie Nicks + The Pretenders (Vivint Smart Home Arena) see p. 34 The Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Telestial (Muse Music Cafe)

Ceremony (All-Request Gothic + Industrial and Dark Wave) w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) DJ Handsome Hands (Bourbon House) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) DJ Latu (The Green Pig) Radio Play (Remix) w/ DJ Jeremiah (Area 51) Dueling Pianos: Troy and Drew (Tavernacle) Live Local Music (A Bar Named Sue on State)

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Dueling Pianos (The Spur) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) DJ Juggy (Downstairs) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig) Red Cup Event w/ DJ Juggy (Downstairs)

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MONDAY 2.27 LIVE MUSIC

Alejandro Escovedo + Jesse Malin (The State Room) see p. 36 Blake Crestani Music (Brittney Thompson Vocal Studio) Crocodiles + AJ Davila + Fossil Arms (The Urban Lounge) see p. 41 JoJo (The Depot)

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TUESDAY 2.28 LIVE MUSIC

Amigo the Devil (Kilby Court) see p. 36 Joyce Manor + The Hotelier + Crying (Kilby Court) Bad Suns (In the Venue) The Lazlo Trio (Gracie’s) Live Music at The Bistro (Snowbird)

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Karaoke (Tavernacle) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Twist) Karaoke w/ DJ Thom (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke w/ Spotlight Entertainment (Keys on Main) Karaoke w/ Zim Zam Ent. (Club 90)

WEDNESDAY 3.01 LIVE MUSIC

After the Burial + Emmure + Fit For A King + Fit For An Autopsy + Invent + Animate (In the Venue) Darkest Hour + Ringworm + Rotten Sound + Rivers of Nihil + The Wake of an Arsonist (Metro Music Hall) Live Jazz (Club 90) Live Music at The Aerie (Snowbird) Mother Lights + The Wednesday People + Doctor Barber (The Urban Lounge) Rohrer (Shades of Pale)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Birdman (Twist) DJ Curtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge) DJ Brisk (Downstairs) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Live Jazz (Club 90) Open Mic (Muse Music) Open Mic (Velour)


MONDAY 2.27

CONCERTS & CLUBS

JIMMY FONTAINE

Crocodiles, AJ Davila, Fossil Arms, DJ Cesar Reyes

Seattle noise-pop duo Crocodiles find themselves in the rarified position of being among today’s so-called bands to watch—but to their credit, they avoid a comfortable niche. After veering from psychedelia to progressive rock, their sixth album—aptly titled Dreamless—finds them indulging in synthesizers and sensuality, with lush keyboards and a broader sonic expanse. Title aside, the album is both daring and dream-like. Opening act AJ Davila makes a distinctive statement all his own. While most people equate Latin music with Santana, Shakira and Menudo, Davila’s sound blends grunge, garage, punk and ’80s pop. Taking a break from his day job with namesake band Davila 666, he offered a solo debut, Terror Amor (Nacional, 2014), featuring appearances by members of Los Fabulosos Cadillacs and The Black Lips. His latest, Beibi, is on the Burger label. Locals Fossil Arms and DJ Cesar Reyes (Super 78) open. (LZ) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $10 presale, $12 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2016

LOADED QUESTIONS

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

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FEBRUARY 23, 2017 | 43

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

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1. Scornful dismissals 2. Geronimo's tribe 3. Young and feminine 4. Come to a close 5. Late-night coffee, maybe 6. Like virgin snow 7. Came together 8. Maven 9. Search far and wide 10. Crime novelist James who wrote "L.A. Confidential"

56. California's historic Fort ____ 57. Traditional Valentine's Day gift 58. 911 respondent, for short 62. Attorney-at-____ 63. Eggs in clinics 64. Mathematician's "Done!" 65. Tres menos dos 66. ____ Amin, Oscar-winning role for Forest Whitaker

SUDOKU

DOWN

11. Brit's sweater with a close-fitting collar 12. Chinese menu general 13. Put in stitches 18. Gobbled up 19. Shortest mo. 24. Family ____ 25. "Our flag is red, white, and blue, but our nation is a ____": Jesse Jackson 26. Impact result 27. Ali, before he was Ali 28. So last year 33. Its cap. is Beirut 34. Focus of a yearly shot 36. Ernesto Guevara, familiarly 37. "Yo!" 39. 20th-century Eur. conflict that succeeded 43-Across 40. Rams 41. Labor org. established on the Pacific coast in 1937 42. NBC's "Late Night with ____ Meyers" 43. Part of an Internet address 47. What is cast, in a saying 49. "You ____ kidding!" 51. Escape 52. Laundry worker 53. Pugnacious 55. Triangular traffic sign

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1. Web ____ 5. Eyesore 9. Back-to-school mos. 14. "Wheel of Fortune" option 15. Cabinet dept. since 1977 16. "You're almost there" 17. Really funny comic, say 20. Often-injured part of the knee, for short 21. Paver's supply 22. Prefix with zone or trash 23. On 6/17/94, 95 million people watched the California Highway Patrol follow one 29. Fortuneteller 30. "Lost" actor Daniel ____ Kim 31. Hoot and holler 32. North Pole worker 35. Move slowly (along) 38. He's no gentleman 39. 1978 hit by Journey 43. 20th-century Eur. conflict that preceded 39-Down 44. Gardener's purchase 45. Palindromic body part 46. Katarina ____, two-time Olympic goldmedalist skater 48. Blow away 50. "Glad the week's almost over!" 54. Postcard message 59. Next in line 60. CD-____ 61. French "you" 62. Apt description of 17-, 23-, 39- and 54-Across? 67. Pop singer Lavigne 68. Cousin of -trix 69. 1982's "Ebony and Ivory," e.g. 70. Used hip boots, say 71. Sleuths connect them 72. Humble response to praise


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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY B Y R O B

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) What would your best mother do in a situation like this? Please note that I’m not asking, “What would your mother do?” I’m not suggesting you call on the counsel of your actual mother. When I use the term “your best mother,” I’m referring to the archetype of your perfect mother. Imagine a wise older woman who understands you telepathically, loves you unconditionally and wants you to live your life according to your own inner necessity—not hers or anyone else’s. Visualize her. Call on her. Seek her blessings. ARIES (March 21-April 19) My astrological radar suggests there’s a space-time anomaly looming just ahead of you. Is it a fun and exotic limbo where the rules are flexible and everything’s an experiment? That might be cool. Or is it more like an alien labyrinth where nothing is as it seems, you can hear howling in the distance and you barely recognize yourself? That might be weird. What do you think? Is it worth the gamble? If so, full speed ahead. If not, I suggest a course correction.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) You could make a vow like this: “Between now and April 15, I will be relentless in getting my needs met. I will harbor a steely resolve to call on every ploy necessary to ensure that my deepest requirements are not just gratified, but satiated to the max. I will be a dogged and ferocious seeker of absolute fulfillment.” If you want to swear an oath like that, Virgo, I understand. But I hope you will try a softer approach—more like the following: “Between now and April 15, I will be imaginative and ingenious in getting my needs met. I will have fun calling on every trick necessary to ensure that my deepest requirements are playfully addressed. I will be a sweet seeker of unpredictable fulfillment.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) How would Buddha ask for a raise or promotion? How would Jesus tinker with his career plans as he took into consideration large-scale shifts in the economy? How would Confucius try to infuse new approaches and ideas into the status quo of his work environment? Ruminate deeply on these matters, dear Libra. Your yearning to be more satisfyingly employed might soon be rewarded—especially if you infuse your ambitions with holy insight. How would Joan of Arc break through the glass ceiling? TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Someone on reddit asked readers to respond to the question, How would Harriet Tubman deal with the inefficiencies caused “What is the most liberating thought you’ve ever had?” Among by excess testosterone? How would Hildegard of Bingen seek the replies were the following six: 1. “If new evidence presents more emotional richness on the job? itself, it’s OK to change my beliefs.” 2. “I get to choose who’s in my life and who isn’t.” 3. “I am not my history.” 4. “You can’t SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) change something that has already happened, so stop worrying I suspect you would benefit from acquiring a new bedroom about it.” 5. “I am not, nor will I ever be, conventionally beauti- name, my dear. But should I be the one to give it to you? I’m ful.” 6. “I don’t have to respond to people when they say stupid not sure. Maybe you could invite a practical dreamer whom s*** to me.” I hope these testimonies inspire you to come up you adore to provide you with this crazy sweet new moniker. If with several of your own, Taurus. It’s a perfect time to formulate there is no such person to do the job (although given the current astrological omens, I bet there is), I’ll offer the following array of liberating intentions. amorous aliases for you to choose from: Wild Face, Kiss Genius, Thrill Witch, Freaky Nectar, Boink Master, Lust Moxie, Pearly GEMINI (May 21-June 20) It has been a while since I told you that I love you. So I’m doing Thunder, Peach Licker, Painkiller, Silky Bliss, Slippery Diver, it now. I LOVE YOU. More than you could ever imagine. And Swoon Craver. that’s why I continue to offer these horoscopes to you free of charge, with no strings attached. That’s why I work so hard to SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) be a playful therapist and an edgy mentor for you. That’s why I Soon I’ll be off on my first vacation in 18 months. At first glance, am so tenacious in my efforts to serve you as a feminist father it might seem odd for an astrologer like myself to have selected figure, a kindly devil’s advocate and a sacred cheerleader. Again, two Sagittarians to be my housesitters. Members of your sign I don’t expect anything in return from you. But if you would are reputed to be among the least home-nurturing people in like to express your appreciation, you could do so by offering a the zodiac. But I’m confident that, by the time I return, raccoons similar type of well-crafted care to people in your own sphere. won’t be living in my kitchen, nor will my plants be dead, my snail mail stolen or my TV broken. The current astrological omens Now would be an excellent time to give such gifts. suggest that most of you Centaurs, at least for the foreseeable future, will display an uncommon aptitude for the domestic arts. CANCER (June 21-July 22) “I like the word ‘bewilderment’ because it has both ‘be’ and ‘wild’ in it,” poet Peter Gizzi says. I propose that you go even CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) further, Cancerian: Express a fondness for the actual experience The near future will be mutable, whimsical and fluky. It’ll be serenof bewilderment as well as the word. In fact, be willing to not just dipitous, mercurial and extemporaneous. You should expect happy tolerate but actually embrace the fuzzy blessings of bewilder- accidents and lucky breaks. Your ability to improvise will be quite ment. In the coming weeks, that’s your ticket to being wild in valuable. Do you believe in lucky numbers? Even if you don’t, yours the healthiest (and wealthiest) ways. As you wander innocently will be 333. Your sacred password will be “quirky plucky.” The through the perplexing mysteries that make themselves avail- cartoon characters with whom you will have most in common are able, you’ll be inspired to escape formalities and needless rules Bugs Bunny and Roadrunner. The place where you’re most likely to encounter a crucial teaching is a threshold or thrift shop. Your colors that have kept you overly tame. of destiny will be flecked and dappled. (P.S.: I suspect that an as-yetundiscovered talisman of power is crammed in a drawer full of junk.) LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Are you familiar with psychologist Carl Jung’s concept of the shadow? It’s the unflattering or uncomfortable part of you AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) that you would prefer to ignore or suppress. It’s the source of Treat your body like a sublime temple, please. And regard your behavior about which you later say, “I wasn’t acting like myself.” imagination as a treasured sanctuary. Be very choosy about Jungians say that the shadow hounds you and wounds you to the what you allow to enter in to both of those holy places. This degree that you refuse to deal with it. But if you negotiate with strategy is always a wise idea, of course, but it’s especially so it, it leads you to beautiful surprises. It prods you to uncover now, when you are extra sensitive to the influences you absorb. riches you’ve hidden from yourself. I mention this, Leo, because It’s crucial that you express maximum discernment as you deterany shadow work you do in the coming weeks could generate mine which foods, drinks, drugs, images, sounds and ideas are likely to foster your maximum well-being—and which aren’t. rather spectacular breakthroughs. Be a masterful caretaker of your health and sanity.


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Grown-Up Liquor Laws

You knew it, I knew it, and now it’s official: According to California’s Alcohol Research Group, Utah has some of the most expensive booze in the U.S. because there’s no competition—all sales and operations are controlled by state government. Our price markup for wine is the highest in the country, at 88 percent. And the markup for spirits, also 88 percent, is the sixth highest. Folks who visit here often think we have insanely archaic liquor laws. Many believe we still only sell liquor in mini-bottles at restaurants. But when the Olympics came to town in 2002 our laws conveniently became more lax, allowing visitors to enjoy a cocktail before the torch was lit. You might laugh, but if you wanted a cocktail back in the day, you had to mix it yourself and buy a mini bottle (like the ones on planes) from restaurant hostesses. If you craved a Manhattan or sex on the beach, you’d have to go to a private club and buy a membership— which usually cost $30 per year. For those of us that drank booze and liked to party, we’d have to buy memberships to each and every club. Think about it—you like to go to Bar X, The Green Pig, The Oyster Bar or Funk ’n’ Dive at different times. Back then, you’d have to have a card to each bar or club, which would be around $120 per year for just those four. The private club has virtually disappeared and soon 3.2 beer will also vanish. Utah Beer Wholesalers Association reported that last year Utahns drank 29 percent of the 3.2-percent alcohol-by-volume beer in the U.S., only behind Oklahomans who drank 56 percent. Oklahoma passed a law this last fall allowing for wine and fullstrength beer to be sold in grocery and convenience stores, and they were just as, if not more, conservative in their drinking laws. Now the boozy floodgates are open and big mainstream breweries are scurrying to cut down on 3.2 beer production. Utah might have a hard time getting its piss water in the future as craft beers take over the planet. Consumers will surely demand that craft beers with higher alcohol content be sold in stores other than state liquor outlets. And if you can get craft beer with, say, 6 percent alcohol, why not allow wine at 10 percent? Changes are coming, Utah. It’s only logical. It might also explain why legislators are trying lower the legal driving limit to .05 percent BAC. Who knows? n

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The Man With the Golden Mop San Francisco’s best-paid janitor earned more than a quarter-million dollars cleaning stations for Bay Area Rapid Transit in 2015, according to a recent investigation by Oakland’s KTVU. Liang Zhao Zhang cleared almost $58,000 in base pay and $162,000 in overtime, and other benefits ran his total income to $271,243. He worked at San Francisco’s Powell Street station, a hangout for the homeless, who notoriously sullied the station 24/7 (urine, feces and needles, especially), necessitating overtime hours that apparently only Zhang was interested in working. In one stretch during July 2015, he pulled 17-hour days for two-and-a-half straight weeks.

Priests Gone Bad Prominent Tallahassee, Fla., pastor O. Jermaine Simmons—a community leader who ministers to the homeless and downtrodden—was rescued by police on Jan. 17, naked and hiding behind a fence after making a run for it when the husband of his mistress found the two in bed. The husband, screaming, “I’m gonna kill him,” ran for his handgun, and the mistress summoned police, but by Jan. 30, all involved had declined to press charges. Simmons, married with a son, is highly regarded for good deeds such as running a “cold night” shelter.

Wrong Place, Wrong Time An Abbotsford, British Columbia, burglar was successful in his Feb. 7 break-in at a home, but his getaway was thwarted by a snowfall that blocked him in on a roadway. He eventually decided to ask a passerby for help—and inadvertently picked out a man (of the city’s 140,000 residents) whose house he had just broken into (and who recognized him from reviewing his home’s security camera footage). The victim called police, who arrested the man (and reported that it was the second residential break-in that night in which the snowfall had foiled a burglar’s getaway.)

n The decidedly uncelibate Catholic priest Don Andrea Contin, 48, of Padua, Italy, was accused by three women in December of having as many as 30 different lovers over the years, organizing orgies on church property, visiting a swingers’ resort in France several times, making pornographic home videos of his trysts, encouraging one woman to have sex with a horse and “always” carrying a briefcase full of vibrators, sex toys and bondage equipment. Contin has not yet been charged with a crime but, said a Catholic official, is “finished” as a priest. (Bonus: The boxes for his home videos were labeled with the names of Popes.)

Everyday Hazards In Portland, Ore., in January, Ashley Glawe, 17—a committed goth character with tattoos, piercings and gauged earlobe holes —was, she said, “hanging out” with Bart, her pet python, when he climbed into one of her earlobes. She couldn’t get him out, nor could firefighters, but with lubrication, hospital emergency workers did, thus avoiding an inevitable split lobe if Bart had kept squeezing his way through.

Wait, What? In January, a New York City judge dismissed the original indictment of John Kennedy O’Hara, 55, who had been convicted in 1996 of the crime of “felony voting”—the only person convicted under that state law since Susan B. Anthony, who cast a ballot in 1872 even though females were barred from the polls. O’Hara was indicted for voting in 1992 and 1993 after registering in Brooklyn elections from a “bogus” address—a basement apartment that was considered uninhabitable. (A judge in 2017 determined that the apartment “could” have been habitable.) O’Hara paid $15,000 in fines and did 1,500 hours of community service.

WEIRD

Great Art! German art collector Rik Reinking paid the equivalent of about $138,000 in 2008 for a resplendent, complex drawing by Belgian artist Wim Delvoye, but it was one created in ink on the skin of (the still-alive) tattoo parlor manager Tim Steiner—to be delivered only upon Steiner’s death, when his skin will be displayed in Reinking’s collection. The deal also requires that, in the meantime, Steiner personally showcase his back at galleries three times a year, and BBC News recently caught his latest appearance.

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The Passing Parade Belgium’s federal parliament decided to keep supplying free beer and wine during legislative sessions (over the objection of its ethics committee) because, since drinkers would continue to drink off-premises, anyway, serving the items on-premises would at least improve attendance.

A News of the Weird Classic (April 2013) Those Clever Toddlers of Finland: A University of Kansas professor and two co-authors, in (2013) Journal of Finance research, found that children age 10 and under substantially outperformed their parents in earnings from certain stock trading. A likely explanation, researchers said, is that Mom and Dad were buying and selling in their children’s accounts if they had illegal insider information—because they feared getting caught by regulators if they used it for their personal accounts. The kids’ accounts (including those held by babies) were almost 50 percent more profitable than their parents’. (The study, reported by NPR, covered 15 years of trades in Finland, which, unlike the U.S. and most other countries, collects traders’ ages.)

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Least Competent Criminals Once again, in January, curiosity got the better of a perp. Adriana Salas, 26, allegedly stole a truck in Jonesboro, Ark., and drove it to Fort Smith, 260 miles away, but then could not resist stopping by the local sheriff’s office to ask whether the truck had been reported stolen. (It had; deputies, taking a look outside, read Salas her Miranda rights.)

n On Jan. 30, as police, with a search warrant, approached the front door of child-porn-possessing suspect Brian Ayers, 57, they spotted him inside, hatchet in hand, pounding away at his tablet computer. Ayers, of Florence, N.J., was free at the time, pending sentencing in another New Jersey court on earlier counts of distributing child porn.

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More Things To Worry About The first robots to have survived journeys close to the “core” of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan (which melted down in a 2011 earthquake) returned a reading of 530 “sieverts” per hour. (Some scientists label just four sieverts an hour fatal to half the people exposed to it.) Since the robots stopped short of the actual nuclear fuel, and since they only visited one of the three cores, the true danger of Fukushima remains unknown. On a more optimistic note, scientists in February said they have developed a computer chip that would survive on the surface of Venus for 21 days, eclipsing the old record of two hours—long

Julie “Bella” Hall

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Government Action Legislators in Iowa and Florida recently advanced bills giving women who receive legal abortions up to 10 years (or longer, in Iowa) to sue the doctor if the abortion winds up causing them “emotional distress.” (Doctors in all states are already liable, of course, for actual “negligence” in their practice.) In the Iowa version (which The Des Moines Register reported would likely face amendments), even a signed consent form by the patient would not immunize the doctor, but might mitigate the number of damages awarded.

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n Iraqi forces taking over an ISIS base in Mosul in January reported finding papers from at least 14 Islamic State “fighters” who had tried to claim health problems, asking commanders to please excuse them from real combat (and martyrdom). One (a Belgian man) actually brought a note from a doctor back home attesting to his “back pain.” Five of the 14 were initiated by volunteers from France, a country that endures a perhaps-deserved national reputation for battle-avoidance.

enough to send back meaningful data, including the temperature. The current estimated temperature is 878 degrees Fahrenheit.

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City Weekly February 23, 2017  

Loretta's Justice

City Weekly February 23, 2017  

Loretta's Justice