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SOAP BOX

COMMENTS@CITYWEEKLY.NET @SLCWEEKLY

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Cover Story, Oct. 27, “Election Guide”

Vote the incumbents out. Stop voting straight party and do your research. Mia Love and Gary Hebert are horrible people.

@DRPKCKDHOOLIGAN Via Twitter

As Americans, the top priority is putting individuals in administrative positions because they are responsible in handling tax dollars. Not to find the most expensive way of spending the dollar for personal gain. But to help bless the nation. Not blowing money on individuals in administrative duties. Blessing the nation means having funds to build schools, highways and tons of infrastructure, and not being wasteful with taxpayer’s dollars. When individuals run for politics and believe they entered politics to collect huge perks because they make it about themselves and not the nation, it is heading in the opposite of what the constitution iterates: “We The People.” Mr. Trump is taking his personal money and investing this back into the nation. Unlike Hillary. By creating thousands of jobs. It puts millions back into the economy through payroll taxes, retail taxes, federal taxes, state taxes and much more. Have a close look at how the Clintons liked to handle charity dollars given to their foundation … Bill, Hillary and Chelsea also used a private jet to fly everywhere. Normally, when individuals fly around on charitable business, they use regular airlines to save money. We have to remember the money that is raised for charity is to be used to help a cause. Not for any personal benefits.

DON DECKER

Don’t forget Utahns for Peaceful Resolution. We were the keystone for forming the Community Coalition for Police reform that the ACLU is assisting. We also were the first group announcing publicly on the one-year vigil of James Dudley Barker’s death. The city needs to work with our community groups which happened two weeks later … forming the CCPR inviting in Deeda Seed and getting other groups to attend as well. We have attended 100 percent of all the CAG meetings and got it rolling. We are leading the voices to be heard. Thanks for writing this, Stephen.

HEIDI KEILBAUGH Via CityWeekly.net

Hits & Misses, Oct. 27 “Positive Sex Ed”

When will people learn that repression is not healthy?

@DOUGSCHROEDER Via Twitter

Five Spot, Oct. 27, Divorcée Café

Perfect timing for this to cross my newsfeed!

SHANNON TYLLIN NEELEY

Grocery story?

Remember when Salt Lake was a single congressional district and it was represented by a Democrat that, you know, represented it?

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Hahaha that’s awesome.

Wow City Weekly, I expected better of you.

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Dine, Oct. 27, “Trip to Bountiful”

Or Trader Joe’s

Editor’s response: You’d be hard-pressed to find another publication in the state that has done more to shine a light on the chronic homelessness issue. This was a commentary on gentrification; one of many causes of homelessness when you look at it with a macro lens. Bottom line: try putting your money where your keyboard is. Complaining on social media does nothing to help fix the problem; volunteering at the Fourth Street Clinic or the VOA Homeless Youth Resource Center does.

The Ocho, Oct. 27 “8 ways to rig the 2016 election” ROB TENNANT

I miss Carmack’s.

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STACY BERCOVITCH KAPLAN

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If police do not stop treating the population as targets, more officers will be shot. The police do not work for us anymore.

Essentials, Oct. 27, SLAC’s Winter

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News, Oct. 27, “Cop Talk”

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GUEST

OPINION

Weinergate: A Moment of Clarity

First there was Watergate. Then Chris Christie’s infamous Bridgegate. Now, there is Weinergate. Let me explain. There is a classic Twilight Zone episode wherein aliens from outer space came to Earth. Much like Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, they seemingly wanted to be friends with us. We took them at face value. And, much like Clinton and Trump, they even handed out advertisements and booklets to us Earthlings. The booklets were titled To Serve Man, as a show of friendship and commitment. Until, that is, some bright-eyed Earthling citizen discovered that To Serve Man was a cookbook! Moment of clarity. Ah-ha! We knew it! We knew there was something fishy about this whole friendship thing. And, not in a Twilight Zone episode, but in actual real life, Clinton has promised us she would unclassify the Area 51 and Roswell UFO information, suggesting that she knows something otherworldly and big. Her adviser and campaign chairman, John Podesta says, “The American people can handle the truth.” Yikes! I wonder what that could mean? In the 1973 movie Soylent Green, the moment of clarity came when a toothy, grimacing Charlton Heston announced after much drama and investigation, that the food additive our starving citizens in an overpopulated world were eating, was actually human remains. “Soylent Green is people!” Moment of clarity. Ah ha! I couldn’t help thinking—hoping— that suddenly a similar, striking, game-

BY JOHN KUSHMA

changing moment of clarity would reveal itself before the election and flush out the suffocating frustration and suspenseful confusion regarding the two protagonists of the recent presidential election. They are both eating us alive! The surreal presidential race has worn us all down, gotten on our nerves and has driven many of us either to apathy, or anger and frustration. More appropriately, to suspicion. Suspicion that Trump is a loose cannon on deck and would do more harm than good as president. Suspicion that Clinton is too dishonest and not trustworthy. Nobody was fully content with either candidate to be honest, nobody 100-percent liked them, and the alternatives, after Bernie Sanders dropped out, were both inconsequential and unrealistic, leaving us even deeper in depression, frustration, fear and anger. We (The People) need a national moment of clarity on the scale of “It’s a cookbook!” or “Soylent Green is people!” to get us through this. To save and assure us that everything is going to be alright. And if it’s not going to be alright, then let’s get on with it, whatever it’s going to be. We need a revelation, an epiphany or some divine intervention. Something more than just a little comic relief here and there by our late-night comedians. Something like, say, George Washington himself, from the grave and somewhere in the cosmos, intercepting our television signals, interrupting our regularly scheduled programming during prime time and telling us where we screwed up and what we need to do—kind of like in The Day the Earth Stood Still. Imagine, if you will, that Trump had dropped out at the 11th hour. Wouldn’t that have been great?

’t Just Sell B n o D e W

What if it had all boiled down to Anthony Weiner? It could’ve happened. It’s happened before. Sex scandals are notorious for bringing down the best and worst of us. Weinergate could very well have been our national moment of clarity—finally, something we could understand and sink our teeth into; a familiar port in the bizarre political storm we’ve been sailing through the past six months. Everybody loves and understands a good juicy one-on-one sex scandal, but to earn the “gate” suffix there must be many people involved—staffers, husbands, relatives, etc.—all unwittingly or by design deceiving the public interest. Whether there is criminal activity involved, and whether or not it has anything to do with Clinton and the presidency, the fact remains that Weiner took the spotlight for a moment. A moment when stakes were higher than ever, and the implications were astronomical. I’m really going out on a limb here, and this is totally my own opinion, but the shenanigans surrounding Clinton, Huma and Weiner seemed kind of fishy. Careless emails and texts, sex, vengeance, classified information, personal servers, misappropriation, FBI investigations, the presidency on the line all adding up to something … “deplorable.” Weinergate. What an irony, if Clinton were brought down by a guy named Weiner. Just sayin’. It would almost be poetic justice. More like just plain bad luck for her. Karmically … it’s the Curse of the Clintons. CW

AH-HA! WE KNEW IT! WE KNEW THERE WAS SOMETHING FISHY ABOUT THIS WHOLE FRIENDSHIP THING.

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John Kushma is a Logan-based communication consultant. Send feedback to: comments@cityweekly.net

STAFF BOX

Readers can comment at cityweekly.net

In an alternate universe, what should President Weiner’s first call to action be? Paula Saltas: Lower taxes, higher skirts. Scott Renshaw: “Recall message” feature mandatory on all cell phone providers.

Jeremiah Smith: To offer governmentfunded mental-health care. That way all the people he has traumatized with his cell phone can more easily integrate back into society.

Enrique Limón: For Eggplant Fridays to be recognized as bank holidays. Second: Make Browser Histories Sketchy Again. Nicole Enright: Making an app similar to Snapchat, but that doesn’t allow you to take screenshots. Randy Harward: A dick pic in every inbox! Mikey Saltas: #FreeTheWeiner. Andrea Harvey: More naughty emojis across all platforms to make sexting more convenient and less ... quotable. Sarah Arnoff: Unlimited data plans for all. Tyeson Rogers: For all the women in America to open the anon email in their spam folder right NOW.

Dylan Woolf Harris: Oversee a massive stimulus package, or fill the gaping hole in the Supreme Court, or ram necessary measures through Congress. Plenty of good things.

Pete Saltas: He’d institute a blank slate for all happenings on Twitter-After-Dark.

Derek Carlisle: To

appoint a Colonel Mustard and blame him for everything that happened in the Dinning Room with that cursed candlestick.

WE WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE AFTER THE FIRST SESSION.

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SKI TUNE-UP $15 REG $30 SNOWBOARD TUNE-UP $20 REG $40 Expires 4/1/17

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Renewable Energy

Since it’s election week, we’ll start with the good news: renewable energy. We know Salt Lake City Mayor Jackie Biskupski is committed to it, but so was former Mayor Rocky Anderson and the city is still polluted. Biskupski says it should generate all its electricity needs from renewables by 2032 and reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent by 2040. Now, she has persuaded Rocky Mountain Power to sign a five-year franchise agreement to work together toward those ends. Of course, it takes two of those years just to get the agreement in place. Meanwhile, Provo finally saw the light when its mayor vetoed a decision to charge a fee for rooftop solar. And a state initiative, UtahSolar, is helping middleclass homeowners make the switch to solar at no upfront cost through rebates and incentives. We’d better hurry. Indian capital New Delhi just had to close its schools and halt construction because of pollution.

Writing might be in author and publisher Karl Beckstrand’s DNA. His late grandfather, Ransom Wilcox, bequeathed him a mystery-story manuscript, which Beckstrand revised into a thriller, To Swallow the Earth. The book earned Beckstrand this year’s International Book Award for Western fiction given by Bookvana.com. The San Jose native, BYU graduate and Midvale resident talks about the new mystery—and books in general.

UTA Spending

This isn’t your first book, right?

Where are the Republican legislators who truly believe in the type of capitalism that raises up the successful and buries the losers? They are not around when it comes to the Utah Transit Authority. No amount of greed, of secrecy or of dishonesty will move the Legislature to rein in this behemoth that purports to serve the public. Here’s the latest. Thanks to Lee Davidson of The Salt Lake Tribune, we now know that the publicly financed UTA spent $46,701 on union-busting consultants to convince Trax supervisors to reject unionization. UTA tried to hedge its bets when asked, first saying it wanted the election to move ahead smoothly and later saying it just wanted to “educate” the workers first. Despite a change in top leadership and repeated promises to the public, UTA should be brought into the public fold entirely. The public needs to know how its money is being used.

A “Good” Deal

Oh, yeah, we just had to move the state prison, and now we get to buy the site near the airport for a good deal. It was only $12.4 million when they thought it would cost $30 million at least. Why so cheap? Because “engineers determined wetlands could be protected by a facilities alignment that provided a buffer for sensitive land with fewer acres,” the deputy director of the Department of Administrative Services said in an unintelligible Salt Lake Tribune quote. Friends of the Great Salt Lake begged to differ. Worried about the environmental impacts, Friends has had big problems gaining access to data. You know, it’s the trust thing. You can see that in the comments section starting with something about “crony capitalism.”

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No; my 18th book, The Bridge of the Golden Wood, is due out in January. It teaches kids how to earn money.

Tell us about your grandfather.

He was a character—had something like six wives [not at the same time], didn’t have a stable career and told off-color jokes—but he was generous, loved to dance and could fix anything. His other book, Horse & Dog Adventures in Early California, tells how his family farmed, tended livestock and sometimes got by via hunting and fishing in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. He had some narrow escapes, including one from a charging wild boar.

What’s the plot of the novel?

A tough young woman and a half-Mexican man raised by American Indians are each searching for missing family in silver-rush Nevada. They clash in a frightening land snare that leaves each unsure who to trust, and scrambling to stay alive.

Do you see any additional novels in your future?

I have one on the shelf that needs a lot of restructuring, and readers now want a sequel to To Swallow the Earth, so I’m starting to think on it.

I hear you have a book promotion going on.

Yes, To Swallow the Earth is free this month until Nov. 25 on most e-book platforms.

How did you begin writing?

By accident. I didn’t like writing, but got ambushed by ideas in college (when I should have been doing my homework).

Do you have any advice to budding writers? Prepare to rewrite a lot!

You’re also a publisher, right?

Yes, but since self-publishing is ubiquitous now, I’m more of a distributor for a couple other authors. And I have so many books in the pipeline that I don’t take submissions.

Any advice to authors who are trying to get their books in print? Pay a professional editor and learn self-publishing.

What about so-called “vanity presses” that charge writers to print manuscripts? Avoid them.

—LANCE GUDMUNDSEN comments@cityweekly.net


BY CECIL ADAMS SLUG SIGNORINO

STRAIGHT DOPE Human Devolution Thinking about current events, I often wonder: Is it possible that our species has entered a stage of devolution, or at least that we stopped evolving thousands of years ago? —Lee Williams

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Send questions to Cecil via StraightDope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

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while a genetic resistance to malaria might be developing in sub-Saharan Africa. In fact, more than two dozen human genes—including ones linked to speech, cognition, and defense against disease have been identified as still evolving today. Humans might already be developing resistance to HIV and other viruses. And women might be evolving more significantly than men. Working from almost 60 years of data from a major multigenerational study of cardiovascular disease, the authors of a 2009 paper project that the next generation of women in the study population will be slightly shorter and stouter on average than the preceding cohort, with lower cholesterol levels and systolic blood pressure, and an increased period of fertility—starting about a half a month earlier and ending a month later. Not as flashy as growing wings or tusks, certainly, but remarkable nonetheless. Our environment hasn’t stopped changing either—much of this our own doing, of course—and it’s sure to pitch us a curveball or two in the coming millennia. Beyond whatever we’ll have to adapt to on a hotter earth, attempts to survive in space or colonize another planet could amp up the evolutionary process. Travelers on space flights are exposed to heightened levels of chromosomedamaging radiation, and without some serious shielding, future dwellers on the lunar or Martian surface would receive doses dozens of times greater than the terrestrial going rate. Off-Earth life could gradually transform our bodies in other ways, too. Despite regular workouts while aloft, astronauts returning from the International Space Station have shown significant bone loss in their femurs; it might be that long-term existence in zero gravity would cause our legs to dwindle. Evolution isn’t the only force at work on how humans develop, though. We’re not just a species that reshapes its environment— through medical science, we’ve also become a species that controls how it adapts to that environment. If we haven’t quite conquered death, we’ve lowered infant mortality rates drastically and continue to extend age expectancy. And every year, researchers redraw the frontiers of prosthetic and implant technology: The average healthy denizen of 2316 could well be tricked out with so many nifty cyborg accessories that our current conception of the human body might no longer apply. But I’m confident that doomsayers will still find cause to complain that this new generation of post-humans is the dumbest bunch yet. n

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I know it’s easy to see humanity in an unflattering light these days, now that the most pea-brained among us can impulsively jab dim musings into their phones to share with all the virtual world. But you’re hardly the first to suspect that our species is slaloming downhill into a genetic sewage tank. Barely had the scientific community accepted evolution in the first place when some of its leading lights started worrying that natural selection might cease to affect humans, or even throw us into reverse gear. Their concern, though, was needless—just like yours is. Let’s back up to review Darwinian theory at its most basic. If you, an organism, are the lucky possessor of some inheritable trait that boosts your relative chances of thriving in the environment you occupy, that trait will tend to be passed along to your fortunate offspring, and to theirs and to theirs. But, the Lees of the world have long worried: What if humans have made our environment so uniquely cozy for ourselves that basically everyone thrives? What if, thanks to advanced medicine and other forms of coddling, all the negative traits that once led to genetic dead-ends no longer lower our likelihood of surviving and spawning? Surely that points to a future of sluggish dullards communicating solely in emoji, right? 
 Hardly. Natural selection is still affecting human development—very slowly. We mammals take our own sweet time evolving compared to fish or lizards, and humans average a leisurely 20 years between generations. Still, even within recent history (evolutionarily speaking), our genes have adapted to our changing circumstances, particularly to the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry, not to mention the discovery of fire. In the past 10 millennia, our skulls have rounded, our facial features have thinned and our jaws, adjusting to the softer food we eat, have shrunk. There have been downsides—the changes in our jaw and larynx structure beginning 300,000 years ago might have led to sleep apnea. But if you can drink a milkshake without doubling over in gut pain, thank natural selection—lactose tolerance is a late addition to humanity’s bag of digestive tricks. Our brains, it seems, continue to evolve: Key variants of two genes that influence brain size, MCPH1 and ASPM, showed up in our pool only about 37,000 and 5,800 years ago, respectively, and they continue to spread through humanity. And though “Should I eat this berry?” is hardly the lifeor-death question it used to be, other environmental factors remain in play, particularly among specific populations: Tibetans’ lungs and blood have adapted to the lowoxygen atmosphere of the Himalayas,


THE

OCHO

THE LIST OF EIGHT

BY BILL FROST

@Bill _ Frost

WINTER MARKET AT RIO GRANDE

Eight headlines prepared by City Weekly to cover all possible 2016 Election outcomes:

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10 | NOVEMBER 10, 2016

CITIZEN REVOLT In a week, you can CHANGE THE WORLD

8. “Donald Trump Clinches

Win; Nation Clenches Pussies”

7. “Jill Stein Victory Sends

Shockwaves Around Flat Globe”

6.

“Scrappy New World Order Android Evan McMullin FTW!”

! T O B O R Y BI G SHIN News from the geeks. what’s new in comics, games, movies and beyond.

5. “And He’s Not Gay. Not That There’s Anything Wrong With That.”

4. “Gary Johnson Smokes

Opponents; Celebratory Doob”

3. “Vermin Supreme: America’s Cinderella Story”

2. “All Local Elections: Same as

They Every Were, Duh”

exclusively on cityweekly.net

1. “Utah to Secede Before

We know winter is coming, even though there’s no snow. But there’s respite and fresh food from more than 60 local vendors at the Winter Market at Rio Grande. The market began its fourth season on Saturday, Nov. 5, and continues every other Saturday through April 22, 2017. Just in time for Thanksgiving are fresh locally raised turkeys. There’s plenty for your holiday table: squash, onions, potatoes, carrots, beets and several varieties of greens. Many of the food and non-food products are unique to the market. Rio Grande Depot, 300 S. Rio Grande Street, 801328-5070, Saturday, Nov. 19, 10 a.m.2 p.m., free, SLCFarmersMarket.org

SACRED EARTH DANCE

The Ragamala Dance Co. brings a transcendent evening of dance to Salt Lake City this weekend. The performance Sacred Earth explores the interconnectedness between human emotions and the environments that shape them. The dancers create a sacred space to honor the divinity in the natural world and the sustenance we derive from it. Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-581-7100, Saturday, Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m., $5-$30, Bit.ly/2fkbhIY

GLOBAL PEACE INITIATIVE

If Miss America wants world peace, why wouldn’t you? And on a more serious note, why wouldn’t you want to find out how to really make a difference and increase the level of love, prosperity and peace in the world? This is not just a lot of talk. Global Peace Initiative launches at the second World Parliament on Spirituality. This month, millions are expected to watch online and 2,000 to attend in person. The Peace Initiative will be announced and later implemented for years to come in collaboration with individuals and organizations worldwide. Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, 801-768-1720, ThursdaySunday, Nov. 17-20, see website for event schedule and pricing, WorldParliamentOnSpirituality.org

—KATHARINE BIELE

Hillary Clinton is Sworn In”

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S NEofW the

BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

WEIRD

Can’t Possibly Be True Kids as young as 6 who live on a cliff-top in China’s Atule’er village in Sichuan province will no longer have to use flexible vine-based ladders to climb down and up the 2,600-foot descent from their homes to school. Beijing News disclosed in October, in a report carried by CNN, that a sturdy steel ladder was being built to aid the 400 villagers after breathtaking photographs of them making the treacherous commute surfaced on the internet earlier this year. Round Up The Usual Suspects (“Youth Pastors”) Sentenced to six years in prison for sex with teenage girls (September): former Youth Pastor David Hayman, 38 (Hackensack, N.J.). Sentenced to six months in jail for sending inappropriate texts to teenage boys (August): former Youth Pastor Brian Burchfield (Shawnee, Okla.). Charged and awaiting trial for impregnating a 15-year-old girl (October): Youth Pastor Wesley Blackburn, 35 (New Paris, Pa.). Sentenced to 10 years in prison for sexual abuse of a 16-year-old girl (September): former Youth Pastor Brian Mitchell, 31 (North Olmsted, Ohio). Charged and awaiting trial for luring teenagers into prostitution (October): Youth Pastor Ron Cooper, 52 (Miami). Sentenced to 90 days in jail as part of a sex-assault case involving a 13-year-old girl (September): former Youth Pastor Christopher Hutchinson, 37 (Parker, Colo.).

The Science of Brewing...

Government in Action Mayor Paul Antonio of Toowoomba, Australia (pop. 100,000), admitted he had picked an uphill fight, but still has recently been handing out cards to men on the street asking them to help the city (in unspecified ways) become completely free of pornography. Though the city has several tax-paying sex businesses (even a strip club and a brothel), Antonio’s message (augmented by public confessions of men burdened by their porn habits) is directed at the internet’s ease of access to images of male “dominance and power” over females. The Passing Parade The town of Warley, England, announced it has applied to the Guinness people for the honor of having the world’s smallest museum. The Warley Community Association’s museum, with photos and mementoes of its past, is housed in an old phone booth. (So far, there are no “hours”; visitors just show up and open the door.)

Thanks this week to Alex Boese, Ellen Lockhart, Neb Rodgers, Mel Birge and John Smith, and to the News of the Weird Senior Advisors and Board of Editorial Advisors.

1200 S State St. 801-531-8182 / beernut.com www.facebook.com/thebeernut

Beer & Wine brewing supplies

Hours: Sun 10-5pm M-Sat 10am-6:30pm

NOVEMBER 10, 2016 | 11

n The recent 100th anniversary of America’s National Park Service drew attention to the park in Guthrie, Okla.—a 10-by10-foot space behind a post office, dating from the original Land Office on the spot in 1889. According to legend, the city clerk, instead of asking the government for a 100-by-100-foot square, mistakenly asked for “100 square feet.”

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Perspective In 1921, researchers for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife stated categorically in a journal that “the one predatory animal” inspiring practically nothing “good” is the mountain lion, but recent research in the journal Conservation Letters credits the animal for saving the lives of many motorists by killing deer, thus tempering the current annual number (20,000) of driver-deer collisions. Even killing deer, mountain lions still trail cats as predators; researchers in Nature Communications in 2013 estimated that “free-ranging domestic cats” kill at least 1.4 billion birds and 6.9 billion small mammals annually in the U.S.

n At press time, Leston Lawrence, 35, an employee of the Royal Canadian Mint in Ottawa, was awaiting a court decision on charges that he stole $140,000 worth of thick gold coins (“pucks”) that, over time, were taken from the mint in his rectum. The mint’s “highest security measures” never turned up a puck on or in Lawrence; he was arrested after the mint investigated a tip that he had sold an unusual number of them for someone of his pay grade.

Names in Florida News Arrested in October and charged with kidnapping a 4-year-old girl in Lakeland: a truck driver, Mr. Wild West Hogs. Arrested in West Palm Beach in August and charged with trespassing at a Publix supermarket (and screaming at employees), Mr. Vladimir Putin. And in August, at the dedication of a new unit at Tampa General Hospital’s pediatric center, longtime satisfied patients attended, including Maria Luva, who told guests her son, now 8 years old, was born there: Ywlyox Luva.

n Daniel, age 4—and a duck—accompanied a woman in her 20s in October on a flight from Charlotte, N.C., to Asheville, outfitted in a Captain America diaper and red shoes to protect its feet, occasionally (if inadvisedly) giving the woman a peck on the mouth. Reporting the event was author Mark Essig, who has written favorably about pigs but admitted he’d never before been on a flight with “companion poultry” and mused whether Daniel, gazing out a window, experienced an “ancestral” yearning to fly.

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Judicial Activism Jackson County, Mich., judge John McBain briefly gained notoriety in October when a Michigan news site released courtroom video of a December 2015 hearing in which McBain felt the need to throw off his robe, leap from the bench and tackle defendant Jacob Larson, who was resisting the one court officer on hand to restrain him. Yelling “Tase his ass right now,” McBain is shown holding on until help arrived—with Larson perhaps undermining his earlier courtroom statements claiming it was his girlfriend, and not he, who was the aggressor in alleged stalking incidents.

Recurring Themes Sovereigns! The director of the Caribbean Cultural Center at the University of the Virgin Islands, facing foreclosure of her home by Firstbank Puerto Rico, decided she was not really “Chenzira Davis-Kahina” but actually “Royal Daughter Sat Yah” of the “Natural Sovereign Indigenous Nation of … Smai Tawi Ta-Neter-Awe,” and she and her equally befuddlingly named husband have sued the bank for $190 million in federal court (and begun the flood of incomprehensible paperwork). The couple’s law of “Maat” conveniently holds that attempts by federal marshals to seize their property would double the damages to $380 million.

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An “Ant” Version of Hell Researchers in Poland reported in August the “survival” of a colony of ants that wandered unsuspectingly into an old nuclearweapons bunker and became trapped. When researchers first noticed in 2013, they assumed the ants would soon die, either freezing or starving to death, but, returning in 2015 and 2016, they found the population stable. Their only guess: New ants were falling into the bunker, “replacing” the dead ones. Thus, ants condemned to the bunker slowly starve, freezing, in total darkness, until newly condemned ants arrive and freeze and starve in total darkness—and on and on.

Least Competent Criminals On the way to the police station in Youngstown, Ohio, on Oct. 19, after being arrested for, among other things, being a felon in possession of a gun, Raymond Brooks, 25, asked an officer (apparently in all seriousness) whether, after he got booked at the station, he could have his gun back. The police report did not specify whether the officer said yes or no.


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12 | NOVEMBER 10, 2016

NEWS Walking the Line

ACTIVISM

“They were using sound-wave technology, the new crowd-control stuff. So you had to put in earplugs or you would get sick.” —Weston Bury

Local documentarians record “freaky” scene at Dakota Access Pipeline.

W

hen Robert Hunter saw a callto-arms on social media from organizers in North Dakota asking for assistance winterizing a camp near the epicenter of a pipeline protest, he armed himself with a camera and prepared for a 36-hour drive to the northeast. On a whim, Hunter, a member of the Blackfeet and Shoshone-Paiute tribes and a film student at Salt Lake Community College recruited a couple relatives as well as classmate Weston Bury and headed for the Dakotas to document the escalating conflict. “They put a call out for everybody who has the heart to go up there and help out in any way you can with your skillsets. If you’re good at building things, come help build,” he says. “I’m pretty skilled with a camera, I think. So I thought that was the only way I could contribute somehow. So I went up there with the intention of documenting as much as I could.” The confrontation has graced headlines across the country. At the heart of it is the construction of a 1,200-mile oil pipeline that will run from North Dakota to Illinois. Environmental activists joined with Native American tribes and others in opposition to the project on grounds that it traverses sacred burial sites and risks contaminating drinking water should the pipe spring a leak. Supporters descended on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation at the North DakotaSouth Dakota border in an attempt to halt construction. North Dakota responded by beefing up its police presence. The group arrived as a dicey standoff began to unfold. The demonstrators, who prefer to be referred to as “water protectors,” had set up the 1851 Treaty Camp, a tactical blockade. Hunter and Bury obtained credentialed media passes and began shooting photos and videos. A horseshoe-shaped line of police fanned out across the landscape. “They were pretty armed. They had snipers. They had tear gas, Mace, rubber bullets,” Hunter says. He captured the police action on film. Bury played a rough cut for City Weekly. Police slowly encroach on protesters to dismantle the

WESTON BURY

BY DYLAN WOOLF HARRIS dwharris@cityweekly.net @DylantheHarris

Thanks to social media, the eyes of the world are set on the fight brewing around the Dakota Access Pipeline. camp. In one scene, a person brought to his knees by pepper spray wipes his face and eyes with a wet cloth. Hunter says he saw one person Tasered in the face. A group of demonstrators hunkered together to pray. “There were around 46 people—men, women and elders—who joined hands and formed a prayer circle. They just started praying,” Hunter says. “Every single person in that circle got arrested that day.” One of Hunter’s relatives was among the detainees, who he says were threatened with felony charges for their civil disobedience. Hunter witnessed law enforcement unload canisters of pepper spray on demonstrators, shred tents with knives, spray paint X’s on teepees and tear down sacrosanct sweat lodges. Bury, a single father of a 10-year-old son, kept his distance—150 feet or so— to ensure he wasn’t among the more than 130 arrested near the North Dakota reservation. He was close enough to hear disruptive noise blasted through the air, however. “They were using sound-wave technology, the new crowd-control stuff. So you had to put in earplugs or you would get sick,” Bury says. “And it’s so piercing that it makes it so you can’t focus on anything, so most of us had to wear earplugs, which added a really new, strange dimension to the whole thing. Looking at it quiet is quite freaky. It brings everything into full relief.” He hesitated to snap many photographs of distressed Natives, concerned that his gain would come at the cost of exploiting the tragedy, he says. He characterized it as a moral conflict. “I saw tons of people coming out banged up, beat up, covered in Mace, throwing up, still shaking from the Tasing if they hadn’t been arrested,” Bury says. After several days, the small Utah group arrived home, weary but loaded with footage and pictures. That same morning, a coalition that included Native American rights groups and environmental activists as-

sembled in solidarity near Main Street. The demonstration reached its apex when the mass of about 100 flooded into the Wells Fargo Center lobby. Security called police, who promptly kicked out all but eight people. Those eight, some of whom had threaded a chain through bike locks closed around their necks, refused to budge. Outside protest chants resonated as onlookers watched the stalemate, which ended only after fire officials clipped the chain with a pair of bolt cutters. In succession, the eight were cuffed and escorted outside to a cordoned off segment at the Gallivan Center. Eventually, they were loaded onto a sheriff’s office bus and hauled to jail. Outside the lobby, Wasatch Rising Tide organizer Natascha Deininger held a Standing Rock banner. She said large banks, such as those with offices in downtown Salt Lake City, are culpable backers of the pipeline’s construction. “We came this morning together to lay down prayers and stand in solidarity with the people up in North Dakota, and a massive piece of the North Dakota Access Pipeline has been the funding behind it,” she said. “The pipeline would not be possible if big financial institutions didn’t provide the means to do it.” Repeatedly, protesters sang an adapted refrain, written by the New York Citybased Peace Poets: “The ground is shaking/ ’cause all the nations/ have come to say/ the land is native/ and they protect the water/ and they honor the land.” Water is the common current connecting people from disparate lands to stand with protesters in North Dakota. Those arrested in Salt Lake City, reticent to talk about the event for fear that doing so could complicate potential legal defenses, sent out a statement expressing the need to protect water, land and the rights of indigenous people. “Water is life!” one sentence exclaims. The day after eight were arrested by city police, Mayor Jackie Biskupski repeated the water-is-life slogan at a press conference where she proclaimed

November as Native American Month. The city figurehead put to rest any doubt that Salt Lake is too far removed from Standing Rock to be concerned. Biskupski signed her name onto a letter bound for President Barack Obama, urging the feds to halt the pipeline’s construction. The document, also signed by mayors in Seattle, Los Angeles, Portland and Madison, Wis., asserts the need for a full examination of the project’s environmental and cultural impacts before it moves forward. “We believe there is too much at stake to get this wrong,” she read from a prepared statement. “Our hearts break at the thought of decimating sacred lands. We fear the contamination of water and the effects that would have on the local environment. And we have deep concern of the long-term climate change impacts caused by the burning of fossil fuels.” James Singer, founding member of Utah League of Native American Voters, charged that the actions at Standing Rock revealed systemic racism, a disregard for climate change, unchecked power of corporations and an affront to tribes’ inherent sovereignty. He spoke at City Hall, supporting the mayor’s announcement. “Standing Rock has become a pivotal moment,” he said. “People from hundreds of indigenous nations have assembled in one of the largest displays of solidarity in decades.” That evening, Obama indicated he could support a possible rerouting of the pipe to avoid interfering with sacred grounds. Bury and others say avoiding hallowed land is a good start but ignores pressing environmental concerns, namely global warming. Hunter and Bury expect they’ll return to Standing Rock, so long as the conflict is not resolved. “Most likely I’m going back again for Thanksgiving,” Hunter says. “I have family going back up there. We’re going to go celebrate Thanksgiving at the camp and stay and be a family.” CW


PUBLIC SERVICE

Flame Keepers United Fire Authority sets sights on rebuilding, restoring morale. BY COLBY FRAZIER cfrazier@cityweekly.net @ColbyFrazierLP

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NOVEMBER 10, 2016 | 13

common cause to move the board in the right direction,” Pengra says. “I think all of the board members are dedicated to seeing UFA be successful and we realize that there’s a definitive purpose to move forward in a way that’s going to help us be successful.” In late 2015, UFA board members began to grumble about the more than $100,000 in bonuses that were doled out without board approval to Jensen, Scott and a pair of other top UFA officials. Scott, a 22-year veteran of the department, was the first to cut ties. After his resignation, a series of open-record requests showed that the man had racked up $110,000 on his UFA credit card in a five-year span. In addition to dozens of Apple products, Scott had purchased a pair of limited-edition rifles. Scott also used his UFA gas card to buy $28,800 in fuel over a five-year period—a distant jump from Jensen’s $16,600 gas bill during that same time. Although Jensen departed the organization a short time after Scott, his powerful place in Salt Lake County politics will likely remain: Up until the controversy surrounding his management with UFA came to light, he was running unopposed for a fifth-year term on the Salt Lake County Council. Since then, an opponent named Jeff White stepped up as a write-in candidate to challenge Jensen. As Watson has grappled with mending the UFA, he says the most important tool in his belt has been communication. In addition to speaking face-to-face with his firefighters spread out across 28 stations, Watson says he appears in a weekly video update that is distributed to all UFA employees. Watson says he has been shocked with the level of appreciation his employees have shown for the video, which he says is a simple update on the week that passed and on what’s to come. As for Pengra, he says the board has been awaiting the audit before implementing any serious changes to UFA policies. And a key stepping stone to restoring the organization to normal, he says, will occur when a new chief is hired. “Since things have happened and since Chief Jensen left, I think there was an initial impact that that was positive from the perspective of the employees,” Pengra says. “At this point, what we have to do is get a new chief in place before we can continue that forward momentum.” CW

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wo months after a pair of top chiefs at Unified Fire Authority resigned amid controversy surrounding their use of public funds, officials at the state’s largest fire department have been busy attempting to rebuild employee morale and restore trust with the communities it serves. Since August, when former chief Michael Jensen resigned, the UFA board, which is made up of elected officials from the towns and cities that utilize the UFA, have been busy attempting to hire a new chief. Meanwhile, a pair of audits—one by the state auditor and another by the UFA board—are pending. On the ground, interim chief Mike Watson says that he has been doing his best to improve employee morale, which he believes is on the mend, and help shepherd his nearly 700-person organization through the rockiest patch in its history. “I think morale is about what I thought; I knew it was bad, and this has been really hard,” Watson says. “We have people who work very, very hard to brand the UFA positively. I feel real bad that the organization is getting some black eyes. Right now it just is what it is and we have to get through it.” Watson anticipates that the pair of audits, which were announced amid a City Weekly investigation into heady bonuses being doled out to top UFA brass, and anomalies in credit-card and gas-card expenditures by former deputy chief Gaylord Scott, are expected to be complete by the end of the month. As the UFA board awaits the audit, Eagle Mountain Mayor Chris Pengra, who has been acting as spokesman for the board, says a nationwide search for a new chief should conclude in early 2017. With the departure of Jensen and Scott, Pengra says the board—once fractured in its approval of certain aspects of the department’s management—has united. “As more information has come out, it has helped to kind of unite the board on a

VEGAS JOHN

NEWS


Housing First is the salvation of Utah’s chronically homeless. But for some, it doesn’t work.

14 | NOVEMBER 10, 2016

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BY STEPHEN DARK sdark@cityweekly.net

A

mber Neves perches on the cigarette- and food-stained sofa, clutching a toothbrush. In the front room of a simple bed-and-kitchenette apartment in South Salt Lake, congested with three shopping carts full of bits and pieces that have value at least to 38-year-old Neves, she struggles to explain where she finds herself. “I need routine and structure,” she says on that muggy late May 2016 afternoon, if she is to negotiate the daily buffeting from being, she says, bipolar and obsessivecompulsive. Next to her are a few stained and wrinkled pieces of paper that explain how she lost that “routine and structure.” The tattered eviction notice reveals she was kicked out of her apartment in Palmer Court at 999 Main because she was a “nuisance.” Despite staff working with her for over a year at the 7-year-old, permanent supportive housing complex for 300 chronically homeless individuals and families, the notice states that Neves failed to clean her apartment and maintain it in a sanitary condition, rendering it “severely unsafe.” On a recent check, the door could only be partially opened because of her chronic hoarding and she had also been caught on camera sheltering a former resident who had been banned.

Neves spelled backward is seven, she says. “No luck,” she adds. With her eviction, she joined the list of those “86’d” from Palmer Court, as tenants call being banned. Which begs the question, where does a mentally ill person go when her last resort has turned her out? Staff at Palmer Court, which is run by the Road Home, told her to go the downtown shelter, but as for many single, homeless women and men, that’s a very dangerous prospect, given the level of crime and violence both within and outside the downtown shelter. Ask Neves what her options are and she says, “I don’t really have any.” That’s reinforced by a man waiting outside to change the locks and put her out on the street. All she has to her name is what’s in the shopping carts, the contents of a storage unit in West Valley City, her federal disability check and the kindness and concern of friends and advocates who fear for the worst if she ends up on the street. One such friend, and former boyfriend, is 59-yearold Ed Rehburg, a longtime Palmer Court resident. He negotiates his way around the mess in the apartment Neves is about to lose, trying to figure out how to help her pack. He doesn’t understand why Palmer Court evicted her. “They should be able to work with her,” he says. “Instead, they kick her out onto the street, and I’m afraid she will die.” Rehburg doesn’t know what to do. He can’t take her to his apartment because if he’s caught housing her, he could get kicked out, too. “I want to stay there,” he says. “I’d be lonely as hell if I had to leave.” Yet he can’t turn his back on a mentally ill person with nowhere to go, especially one he cares about. His fears are not without precedent that her eviction might amount to a death sentence. Jennifer Oryall was also evicted from Palmer Court with severe mental health problems. Six months later, despite efforts to house her elsewhere, she died in a hospital of

congestive heart failure aggravated by meth use. The stories of Neves and Oryall, while perhaps outliers as Palmer Court staffers say, nevertheless underscore the limitations of Utah’s much-publicized approach to housing the homeless when the wrap-around services to support them are under-resourced. “We are talking about a population of people who have an array of issues,” says Salt Lake City Homeless Court Judge John Baxter. “Poly-substance abuse, poor parenting, lack of education, lack of job skills, family associations and friend associations with people who are engaged in behaviors that are illegal or at least anti-social. And housing alone has not solved their problems.”

OFF THE STREETS

Palmer Court is one of the jewels in the crown of Salt Lake City’s embrace of the Housing First philosophy developed by national homeless advocate guru Sam Tsemberis. Housing First focuses on getting the chronically homeless off the streets and into housing to first stabilize and then provide them with services to build on that stability. When it opened in 2009, it was called a “paradise” in the local press, a description perhaps warranted not only for providing permanent homes for the chronically homeless, but also for its range of free services, including utilities, cable and a gym. Palmer Court offers a wide range of on-site services designed to support people dealing with, among other things, trauma, mental illness and substance abuse, although key to Housing First is that tenants should not be forced to use such services. For many of its 305 residents, says 51-year-old single father Jim Thurman who moved there in March 2016, it’s still paradise. “It’s a godsend. I feel blessed for the opportunity to start my life again at a place that has all


Jim Thurman

ents). In red Utah, where money has gone to securing the housing, what’s left over has allowed for little more than rationing of services, and Palmer Court appears to be a case in point. It has six case managers with caseloads of 32-45 households each. That’s a caseload Olsen acknowledges is high, “but bear in mind not everyone needs services every single day. Service need fluctuates over time.” She cites an ideal ratio of 20-25 households for families and 25-30 for singles. Tsemberis recommends a ratio of 12-15 clients per case manager, advocates say. That’s accurate, Olsen says, for scattered site-management, where a case manager has clients with acute needs in different parts of the city. Having said that, she notes, “We’d love some money to get two more case managers.” That would allow them, case-management director Kelli Bowers says, “to focus on some of the things beyond the struggle of the day-today and give us more opportunity to explore more and direct more what the future can bring for folks.” Judge Baxter argues for a 1-5 case-manager-to-client ratio, “given how needy folks are. Most of the folks I’ve interacted with, would be better off with daily contact, not just a 15-minute call or dropping by ‘to see how you’re doing.’”

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vices, what Palmer’s ultimate lack of success with Oryall and Neves reflects about homelessness at a time when Salt Lake City and Salt Lake County are in the midst of developing four new shelters, and she cites numerous factors that have remained, at best, marginalized in discussions mostly focused on the size of the shelters and where to locate them. With a 7,000-plus shortfall in the availability of affordable housing units in Salt Lake County, she points to a chronic need for not only a dramatic rise in affordable housing, but also a higher minimum wage. “At $7.25 an hour, a single person needs to work 72 hours a week to afford a modest one-bedroom,” she says. Along with the ever-fainter hope of expanding Medicaid to make substance abuse and mental health treatment available to all low-income households, she also cites “more resources for on-site services in permanent supportive housing.” That’s because, to some degree, the effectiveness of Housing First, particularly for those with extremely high needs such as Neves and Oryall, depends on the case-managers-to-clients ratio. (Palmer Court’s management is divided into a property issues team, for whom its population are tenants, and a case management team, for whom many of those tenants are cli-

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these things to offer,” he says, citing everything from a playground in the complex’s grass and concrete courtyard for his two children, to offices at the complex for multiple state and federal agencies, including Vocational Rehabilitation and Workforce Services, as well as counselors and food pantry deliveries. But over the last seven years, this permanent refuge for chronically homeless individuals and families has developed some problems. Largely infested with cockroaches and mice—a new extermination company was hired in September 2016—and plagued by “off the hook” drug use according to advocates and tenants, it generates calls for service in the thousands, particularly to the police, but also the fire department and ambulance services. In total, 52 tenants have died since it opened—an unsurprising number, say advocates, given the health and trauma issues its population inherited from years of homelessness. Nevertheless, cops and advocates complain that there are simply too many people with complex problems living together in one location, which itself is just around the corner from notorious motels on State Street riddled with drugs that only add to the situation. Palmer Court is run by The Road Home. Ask Jeniece Olsen, the shelter’s director of supportive housing ser-

NIKI CHAN

STEPHEN DARK

Amber Neves

NOVEMBER 10, 2016 | 15

NIKI CHAN

Jeniece Olsen

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NIKI CHAN

Kelli Bowers


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16 | NOVEMBER 10, 2016

One person who did need on-site case management, and lots of it, was Oryall. Her sister Jodie Johnson says, “The whole point of Palmer Court is to keep [the mentally ill homeless] off the street. They altogether need a lot of involvement, almost like running a state hospital but with more freedom. There needs to be more case management.” Judge Baxter expresses frustration with Housing First as it has evolved in the city. The idea was, “Once an individual was placed in housing that would make it easier or more practical to access services necessary to maintain a state of fundamental health. If there’s been any breakdown in that model, it has been the access to, and successful implementation of, services, which has not been as effective as we hoped it would be. Those services are there, but there are not enough of them. I suspect social workers tear their hair out at the inability to reach as many people successfully as they would like to.” Rehburg argues the system “should have given Amber more help.” He doesn’t understand how she could have been evicted with no case manager to follow up with her, to help her. “Kicking them out, that attitude is just wrong,” he says. “Especially the mentally ill, the schizophrenic. Where’s the safety net?”

NIKI CHAN

Jennifer Neiser

NIKI CHAN

Jim Thurman

IT TAKES A VILLAGE

When The Road Home’s director Matt Minkevitch found out a 297-room former Holiday Inn hotel on Main was up for sale, he tried to get both the city and county housing authorities to purchase it without success. Eventually, he secured private donors, including the LDS Church, with Salt Lake City Regional Development Agency tax credits funding a good chunk of the $21-million development. With an annual operating budget of $1.8 million, property management expenses come out of tenants’ rents—those that pay them—and county subsidies. “It’s a great adaptive reuse of an old hotel in terms of the reality of funding for permanent supportive housing for some of the highest users of services, some of the most expensive people on the street,” Salt Lake City Councilwoman Erin Mendenhall says. To be eligible for Palmer Court requires having experienced multiple episodes of homelessness and having a disabling condition as head of a household, such as substance abuse issues, mental or physical health. “Everyone needs housing but not everyone needs on-site case management,” Bowers says. Bowers adds that while her case managers’ work can be difficult at times, some residents “settle in, they do better, while others, for some reason, continue to need

a high level of case management. Some folks it takes a village and all of us to help.” Several residents selected by Palmer Court staff, shared their experiences. All of them stressed that staying away from the “drama” caused by what one calls the building’s “problem children,” made their lives easier. After Thurman’s marriage fell apart, he says he took to drinking and ended up homeless, electing to sleep on the streets rather than face the violence he witnessed during a brief time at the shelter. When Palmer staff showed him the apartment on the third floor designated for families, he slid against the wall in disbelief, tears running down his cheeks. On March 27, 2016, he moved into the two-bedroom studio with his 6-year-old daughter and 10-year-old son. “I don’t think I could have ever got anything to start out my life with my children as nice as this.” Residents pay 30 percent of their income to Palmer Court in lieu of rent. Thurman’s income comes from selling his blood, Palmer taking 30 percent of his plasma money, which amounts to $280 a month, from twiceweekly blood donations. He doesn’t let his children roam the hallways freely, as other parents do, but prefers to accompany them to the courtyard playground, or play catch with his son.

PALMER COURT BY THE NUMBERS No. of tenants: 305

(225 adults and 80 children)

No. of apartments: 201

No. of tenants evicted since opening: 33

No. of tenants with active leases who died since it opened: 52


SHARE AND SHARE ALIKE

The family of Jennifer Oryall are well known to homeless advocates, The Road Home and Palmer Court. “We have worked with the Oryall family for many years; their particular struggles have been addressed with great care and concern,” writes Olsen in an email. Jennifer’s mother Vonnie Johnson says she and her children have struggled with issues including victimization by pedophiles, mental illness, alcoholism and substance abuse, trauma and homelessness. None more so than her second daughter Jennifer. Jennifer Oryall would get upset with people staring at her in the street or in stores. “What are you staring at?” she’d shout, followed by a string of expletives. She struggled with paranoia, convinced people were following her, trying to hurt her. “At first I believed her, then I realized it was her mental illness,” sister Jodie Johnson says. Johnson is 38 and HIV-positive. “She’d get mad at me when I was not doing something. She’d call me every name in the book, including ‘AIDS-infested whore.’ I had to learn it was not her talking to me, it was her illness, I guess.” Judge Baxter says he misses Oryall and huddles over a

—Vonnie Johnson

BROKEN WINGS

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Oryall with her third daughter

Eight months after moving back in, Oryall was evicted. “You have been very disruptive to the enjoyment of other residents’ homes (screaming and yelling in the lobby and hallways even after being asked to stop on several occasions), threatening staff members and verbally abusing staff members and residents,” the court-filed notice dated July 30, 2015, stated. She called her sister in tears. “I got evicted. Where am I going to go now?” Oryall, who suffered from heart disease, went back to meth. “She went downhill from there, she let it all go, she didn’t care anymore,” Jodie Johnson says. Volunteers of America thought they found a place for her before Thanksgiving 2015, but the property owner belittled her because of her appearance and behavior. “She told her she couldn’t have it just by the way she looked,” Vonnie Johnson says. When Oryall came to see her mother that Thanksgiving, “her heart was broken. It was just like they broke her wings. ‘I don’t know why they won’t let me live there,’ she told me. ‘Do I look OK?’” The last three days of her life, Oryall slept on the floor in her sister’s house. She told her sister, Jodie Johnson recalls, “‘I’m dying, what do I do?’ What do you say to that?” Doctors gave her morphine, making her comfortable in her last hours at the Salt Lake Regional Medical Center one late night in early January 2016. Oryall was 33 years old. Oryall “wanted to be clean. She didn’t want to die,” her sister says. “She was living in fear she wasn’t wanted or needed.”

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reporter’s iPhone to look at photographs provided by her family. He recalls her as “a loud character, who might prove a little scary if you encountered her on the street.” Even when she appeared before him in Homeless Court, he recalls, she would come up to hug him. Her sister says Oryall was schizophrenic and had a mental age of 9-13. She got an apartment in Palmer Court in 2010, when she was pregnant with her third daughter, but ended up going to prison on an assault charge in March 2011. She gave temporary custody of the baby to the man she thought was the father, who was staying at her apartment. (A subsequent DNA test revealed the father was unknown). After Oryall got out of prison, she eventually returned to Palmer Court, Vonnie Johnson says, but to a different apartment from the man raising her child. When she got her Social-Security check, hangers-on would converge on her room, throw food and other matter on the floor. “People in there take advantage of the weak and Jennifer was weak,” Vonnie Johnson says. “They’d go up there and sit in her room till all her money was gone and then have nothing to do with her.” Salt Lake City councilman and longtime social worker Andrew Johnston says it’s very difficult to understand the isolation of the homeless. “It’s not just drug and alcohol abuse. It’s a symptom of needing other things; it’s a profound isolation experience. It’s hard to convey that to folks who see them on the street or in apartments, just how hard it is to have lost touch with family and friends.”

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Palmer Court is “overwhelming at times,” for law enforcement, says Salt Lake City Police Department spokesman Greg Wilking. It has a panoply of issues for law enforcement, fire department and EMTs to deal with. “Domestics, suspicious people, thefts, people dying, intoxication,” he lists. Putting a large, diverse group of people, many of them with mental health and substance abuse issues, in a confined space leads to other problems, he says, such as noise, fights and theft. While The Road Home might view Palmer Court as a success, law enforcement, Wilking says, fears “this model isn’t working.” Rather than answering calls from Palmer Court itself, the police are summoned to individual apartments, often with multiple residents not always registered with the complex. Calls for services over several years, he says, run into the thousands. “There’s definitely drug use,” Bowers says. But, Olsen adds, it’s no different than many other low-income housing facilities. When drug trafficking increases, staff monitors it and then addresses it, until dealers disperse and move on. “After we’ve figured out how they can come into the building, we push them out,” a staffer says. All external doors are locked, bar the front lobby, with several monitors over the weekends. But it’s more complex than simply dealers and addicts. “We have a really vulnerable population,” property manager Karen Grenko says. “Unfortunately they feel looking out for each other involves sharing what they have,” including drugs. “Then you have the other spectrum of tenants saying, ‘How can you tolerate this, how can this go on?’” In some cases, Palmer staffers say, calls are made for the sake of making calls, or because of mental illness. One mentally ill resident called claiming she had been shot. According to a Salt Lake City Police report accessed through a records request, “Staff stated that [redacted] had a been a problem and that they wanted to get her out of the building for a while due to her erratic behavior.” Sometimes, though, tenants still don’t get the help they need. One man requested an ambulance, was checked out by EMTs who then left. He asked a resident to take him to the hospital, where he died. No investigation followed. “It’s a hard topic to talk about, without having the feeling behind it,” Grenko says, succumbing to tears. Complaints by residents of being treated unfairly or abusively by the very same services they call for help upsets staff, she says, who “call them out,” when they learn of such behavior. Grenko says, “I don’t want someone in that position to make our tenants feel less respected.” At meetings with law enforcement, fire and EMT services, they in turn express their frustrations with timewasting calls or duplicitous efforts by residents to get free rides to hospital or secure drugs.

HANGERS-ON

JODIE JOHNSON

He’s passionate about his new home, but says if he got work and made money, he’d move out so others could enjoy the opportunity he’s had. In total, 438 men, women and children have moved out of Palmer Court, of which 42.5 percent, The Road Home has verified, went to other housing. Jennifer Neiser has no intentions of moving out. She and her daughter both are bipolar and came to Palmer Court in 2011 after homelessness and a spell at The Road Home. She has no income from which to pay rent, and is charged $25 a month. Neiser says she has all her needs met at Palmer, including ease of access to her meds and local supermarkets by bus. “As a mom, as an individual who has mental health issues, this is good,” she says.

“They’d go up there and sit in her room till all her money was gone and then have nothing to do with her.”


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NIKI CHAN

A PREFERABLE DEATH

Fifty two Palmer Court residents have died, most on the premises, since it opened in 2009, says Road Home’s Olsen. The annual candlelight vigil for the dead homeless last winter revealed 97 homeless people died in 2015. This year, thus far, according to Fourth Street Clinic, 60 have died, of whom 29 were housed, nine of them in Palmer Court. Salt Lake City Councilman Johnston frames such deaths as positive compared to the alternative. “They died in housing, you lived in a place, had a permanent address, people knew when you passed away. Instead of finding them by the river in a snow bank with no ID.” In mid-September 2016, the man who raised Oryall’s third child died at Palmer Court of a drug overdose. He raised the toddler for several years, but the state eventually took her away from him after he overdosed, and Oryall’s mother, Vonnie Johnson got the child to raise. Four months after Jennifer died, Vonnie Johnson learned she had cancer in 60 percent of her bones. She’s currently raising four grandchildren, two by Oryall, two from her son who also has mental health issues. Vonnie Johnson will shortly undergo a stem-cell transplant, which she hopes will allow her to care for her grandchildren into their teenage years. During an interview with a reporter, Oryall’s third child came home from childcare. Vonnie Johnson hadn’t told her that her father is dead. As with Oryall, she talks about him in the present tense. “I think this one knows more than anything,” she says about her granddaughter regarding Palmer Court. When the girl was in her supposed father’s care, he would tie her to him. When Vonnie Johnson asks the child where he tied the string, the girl touches her wrist. And where did he tie the string to him? Again she touches her wrist. Her father would pass out from drug usage and the child would crawl in a circle around his bed looking for food. After Vonnie Johnson got custody of her, she found her one day “scarfing” wet cat food out of a tin.

A LIFE OF TINY ROOMS

Palmer Court evicts on three grounds: drug manufacturing and dealing (if they have sufficient evidence), violence, and a third, more general rule, that covers “any type of behavior that threatens the health and safety and well-being of other people that live in the building,” Grenko says. “The Jennifers, the Ambers, they’re rare,” case management director Bowers says. “More of the folks that get evicted are predatory, violent, taking advantage of folks that live here.” Palmer Court is slow to evict, Olsen says, in part because people they kick out only have the Road Home to turn to, because, with an under 3 percent vacancy rate in Salt Lake County finding any available property is extremely difficult. When it came to evicting Neves, Palmer Court staff worked with her for a year, trying to addressing her hoarding issues. “Her personal health and safety was, and still is, paramount to our staff,” Olsen says. Palmer Court even hired a cleaning company, but still, “at one stage, the unit was so uninhabitable that Amber no longer slept there.” She moved to another unit while the first was sprayed and cleaned, but both units ended up “cluttered and uninhabitable.” When Neves was evicted, her case manager told her to go to the shelter, where she could get a long-term-stay bed, if one was available. Otherwise she would end up in the overflow beds. Once someone is evicted from Palmer Court, case management ceases. Prior to the individual leaving, Olsen says the shelter is notified, and if that individual, like Neves, doesn’t go to the shelter, then VOA’s Homeless Outreach team “can provide services geared toward housing.” She says, “We aim to catch individuals that might otherwise fall through cracks in the system.” Through the summer, things only got worse for Neves. For a while, several people hid her in different apartments, but after she fell asleep in one tenant’s shower, she flooded the place out and was removed to the street. Neves was briefly hospitalized after she vomited blood at a dollar store. After she was released, she went to a storage facility in West Valley City and sat in a chair by

the gate for 24 hours, waiting for someone to help her open the gate, only to suffer severe sunburn. By the end of September, a social worker had visited her at a motel on 3500 South, Rehburg says, and got her food and clothing. But by then, Rehburg was at his wits end. Her constant demands night and day were wearing thin. “This is killing me,” he says. Neves says she trusts no one and worries that her friends are trying to sabotage her. “I kind of get stuck in these tiny rooms,” she says.

ALONE ON A DAWN-LIT STREET

At both the national and state level, Olsen says, “mental health systems prioritize community care and inpatient treatment is scarce and hard to access.” To get someone “pink-sheeted” for a short-term-stay bed is one thing, to get them “white-sheeted” for a long-term-stay another because of a huge waiting list. “If we had that six-month time frame, where we could meet them at the hospital when they’re released, we’d have a chance,” Olsen says. “Without that chance, we’re stuck; we’re so stuck.” Olsen argues that Palmer Court, despite its flaws, is very much a success. “The families, the individuals that moved in here, even those that died, had their dignity restored, treated well, community around them cared about them and maybe that’s not something they had before. To us, that is a success.” Quite what success is for Neves, however, is difficult to tell. Her former case manager, Olsen says, recently reminded her she needed to schedule a meeting in October and negotiate returning. Staff at Palmer Court “care deeply for Amber and will continue to support her as long as she requires and through as many housing opportunities as it takes,” Olsen says. Problems for Neves, however, continue to push her back to the street. At 5:37 a.m. on an early October morning, Neves leaves a voicemail on a reporter’s phone. “Hi, it’s Amber. I’ve been outside Motel 6 all night long.” She says her reservation hasn’t been paid and her phone’s dying. “If you know of anybody who can help me, please let me know or send them my way. OK. Thank you.” CW


Salt Contemporary Dance: Salt in Concert

KIM REED

To quote The Stranger, “Sometimes, there’s a man; well, he’s the man for his time and place.” Saturday night is the time, Ogden is the place and the man is, of course, The Dude (Jeff Bridges), when Peery’s Egyptian Theater hosts the third annual Big Lebowski Festival. The 1998 Coen Brothers classic has a cult following that you can build an entire evening around— and plenty of people have, in events both official and (like this one) unofficial. The festival starts at 5:30 p.m. with bowling at Fat Cats (2261 Kiesel Ave., 801-627-4386, Ogden.FatCatsFun.com). Since we’re no longer in daylight-saving time, you won’t have to worry about rolling on shabbos. The fun continues at Peery’s at 7:30 p.m. with a costume contest. Prizes include a bowling ball and a rug that will really tie a room together. The screening of the movie follows at 8 p.m. The after-party then moves to Funk ’n’ Dive Bar (2550 Washington Blvd., 801-621-3483, FunkAndDive.com), where your ticket to the movie gets you in with no cover to enjoy White Russians, on sale for $4. According to festival director Ryan McDonald, the movie earned its cult following by being so unique. “There’s no other Big Lebowski,” he says. “The characters are very identifiable and have aspects that make them unique enough that it separates this movie from the thousands of other films released each year.” (Geoff Griffin) Ogden Big Lebowski Festival @ Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Nov. 12, bowling, 5:30 p.m.; costume contest, 7:30 p.m.; film, 8 p.m., $12. Facebook.com/OgdenLebowskiFest

Ogden Big Lebowski Festival

NOVEMBER 10, 2016 | 19

Despite his reputation as a genuinely nice guy, Jay Leno has had his share of problems. First, there was the public spat with David Letterman when Johnny Carson chose Leno as his heir apparent for The Tonight Show. Later, Leno had to deal with the indignity of being yanked off late night TV in favor of Conan O’Brien and given a primetime variety show that looked like a loser even at the outset. When the network knuckleheads realized they had erred, he was reinstated, only to be permanently replaced five years later. And then there are all those jokes about his big chin. Nevertheless, Leno’s done very well for himself, with a personal fortune estimated at $350 million. Yet, he’s also a workaholic. Little wonder then that in April 2009, when he was forced to cancel two Tonight Show episodes due to exhaustion, it was the first and only time he called in sick during his entire 17-year tenure. Indeed, his show biz schedule would put any lesser man to shame. Every night after his taping The Tonight Show, he would huddle with his writers and plot the next day’s program. When he wasn’t working on the show, he was spending his weekends doing stand-up, amassing up to 150 concerts per year. He hasn’t slowed down; he’s still touring and performing, making guest spots on TV and fronting Jay Leno’s Garage, a new series devoted to his love of vintage cars. Clearly, when it comes to multitasking, Leno still leads. (Lee Zimmerman) Jay Leno @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, Nov. 11, 8 p.m., $30-$125. ArtSaltLake.org

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SATURDAY 11.12

Jay Leno

Brand new work from a choreographer can be an indicator of a dance company on the cutting edge, while also showing that the company is good enough for choreographers to justify spending weeks working with its dancers. But, of course, premieres are a first draft in many ways. It’s hard to get it right the first time. So when a company like Salt Contemporary Dance includes four world premieres in a single concert, there’s a lot at stake. But if you look at the track record of the guest choreographers involved in Salt’s fall production—Eric Handman (Omnivore), Alex Ketley (A Particulate History of Friendship, The Trial and Absence of Stillard Mave), Jason Parsons (Tracing the Steps You Left), Ihsan Rustem (Voice of Reason) and Brendan Duggan (Comes the Night)—audiences can expect a spectacular evening. “This is a really exciting start to our fourth season,” Artistic Director Michelle Nielsen says. “Our mission is to be at the forefront of emerging dance, so we’re not looking for huge names as much as for head-turning work.” Two choreographers to watch in this concert are Rustem, the current resident choreographer for Northwest Dance Project, and Handman, associate professor at the University of Utah’s Department of Modern Dance and winner of the 2014 Northwest Dance Project competition, which praised the company’s “appetite for the creative process.” From the looks of it, Salt is reaching the point where they can show off big names and head-turning work as well. (Katherine Pioli) Salt Contemporary Dance: Salt In Concert @ Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, 801-355-2787, Nov. 10-12, 7:30 p.m., $25. ArtSaltLake.ArtTix.org

FRIDAY 11.11

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It’s among the better-known bits of presidential trivia that Abraham Lincoln’s wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, had mental-health issues, and stayed in an institution several years after the president was assassinated. But a savvy playwright can take such a footnote and make it a story that digs deeper, as Catherine Filloux has done with Mary and Myra. Pygmalion Theatre Co.’s production casts Tamara Johnson-Howell as Mary, who is early in her stay at Illinois’ Bellevue Place sanitarium circa 1875 as the story begins, having been admitted by her only surviving son, Robert. She receives a visit from her friend and correspondent Myra Bradwell (Teresa Sanderson)—a women’s rights activist and publisher who is determined to secure Mary’s release, despite the fact that women have been prohibited by the state from practicing law. Set entirely within the confines of Mary’s Bellevue hospital room—artfully cluttered by designer Thomas George with her many trunks—Mary and Myra keeps a tight focus on the sometimes contentious relationship between the two women, sharply performed by Johnson-Howell and Sanderson. While the text clearly means to explore societal obstacles facing women of the era, Filloux smartly identifies the things that often divide these two theoretical allies, whose perspectives on a woman’s proper role are not the same. The play maintains enough funny, spiky energy, even in its exploration of women not permitted to feel their grief, that it never feels like a lecture about the Bad Old Days. (Scott Renshaw) Pygmalion Theatre Co.: Mary and Myra @ Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, 801-355-2787, through Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., $20. PygmalionProductions.org

THURSDAY 11.10

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THURSDAY 11.10

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The Medium and the Message

COURTESY URBAN ARTS GALLERY

Jimmi Toro uses artistic collaboration to inspire in Art-Music-Video. BY BRIAN STAKER @stakerized comments@cityweekly.net

A

rtists evolve in different ways. Painting is usually thought of as a solitary medium, but local oil painter Jimmi Toro has recently expanded his artistic horizon by collaborating with other artists and adapting his work to other media. Opening at Urban Arts Gallery this month, Art-Music-Video—as the title implies—fuses three art forms to embody Toro’s vision of humanity. The exhibit’s six sections provide perspectives on his multifaceted artistic personality. Each one is titled for a song the self-taught musician wrote and recorded, and in each case, the collaborators helped expand on the themes. “Amy Jane” is a fictional tale of substance abuse, in which Toro created a painting of the character, while six local photographers—Heidi Gress, Keith Johnson, Chris Madsen, Cat Palmer, Kim Riley and Alexandra Welcome—produced photographic interpretations. Toro filmed their artistic process. “Soul,” a painting with a strip across the eyes—intended to depict “the face of a soul,” as an inscription on the painting

“Separation” by Jimmi Toro

COURTESY URBAN ARTS GALLERY

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says—included teenage collaborators from the Kimball Art Center’s Young Artists Academy, creating their own versions of the work. On “I Want to Be,” about child abuse, Toro worked with videographer Michael Christensen, who came up with the idea of a box with a child kept in it. “Separation,” produced in coordination with Ballet West principal Allison DeBona, used non-ballet dance moves to interpret its theme, with Toro filming her and painting some of the most striking images in the exhibit. “Love—Believe It,” (which he said I could punctuate as I saw fit) is a section of 45 small portraits of faces, and “Tell Me Brother” is comprised of several large portraits with one half of the face male, the other female. It calls into question how we define gender, and the often strict boundaries of identity. In addition to the interaction between artists, these works provide plentiful illustrations of the ways different artistic media influence and inform each other. Toro says his music is influenced by Beck and David Bowie, and the title and subject matter is a nod to the Thin White Duke’s Sound + Vision album. Given his virtuoso command of a visual vocabulary that seems to change from one painting to the next, it’s slightly startling when he notes “music has an outreach that [visual] art doesn’t, and with video, the power of the three together is amazing.” As a cornerstone of the Gateway mall, which has lost a number of stores and foot traffic to City Creek, the Urban Arts Gallery is still a bright spot. The site has always mounted imaginative, fun exhibits, and with old shelving removed, the space no longer has the “gift shop” atmosphere it had in the past. Its open floor plan creates a great space to view art on the walls, and the presentation of this exhibit is striking, one of Urban Arts’ best. Interestingly, the gallery’s press release states that in addition to viewing, watching video monitors, listening to the music

“Alexandra” by Jimmi Toro

through headphones and viewing wallmounted works, guests are invited to touch the paintings, which is usually taboo. But it’s not surprising given the artist’s desire to make emotional connections with the viewer. Toro’s painting style is as breathtaking as a ballerina, and the paint dances across the canvas—stipples, splotches, drips and swirls, and even occasionally forms geometric grids—but the central focus of each one is the human subject, delineated lucidly but also with emotional intensity. The textures created by his layers of paint create a very intriguing tactile experience. There’s a message behind the media in this art show. “I hope to inspire people to be better toward each other,” Toro says, as each of the narratives in the show ultimately offers some kind of hope for humanity, and the notion that love can be a saving grace. “There’s a lot of art for art’s sake, but I hope to produce art that has a little inspiration for people’s lives.” It is remarkable, and perhaps slightly hard to believe, that after working on the exhibit idea for years, he produced all these works—including more than 60 paintings—in just the past three months. The artistic process, the struggle to create, is part of his vision of humanity: “A dancer like DeBona makes it look effortless, but there is an agonizing side of being an athlete. That is beautiful as well.” His motto could serve as advice for other artists. He has found, “Your greatest teacher is to be prolific; just produce.” CW

JIMMI TORO: ART-MUSIC-VIDEO

Urban Arts Gallery 137 S. Rio Grande St. 801-230-0820 Through Nov. 27 Artist reception Nov. 18, 6-9 p.m. UrbanArtsGallery.org


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Local artist Todd Anderson’s mixed-media works—created from old books sealed with resin—are on display through Dec. 9 in the exhibit The Book of Love at Marmalade Library (280 W. 500 North, Salt Lake City, 801-594-8680, SLCPL.org).

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 385-4681010, times vary, Nov. 15-20, ArtSaltLake.org Catch Me If You Can Hale Center Theater Orem, 225 W. 400 North, Orem, 801-226-8600, through Nov. 19, HaleTheater.org Disney on Ice: Passport to Adventure Vivint SmartHome Arena, 301 W. South Temple, 801325-7328, Nov. 10-13, SmithsTix.com Heathers: The Musical Utah Repertory Theater Co., Sorenson Unity Center, 1383 S. 900 West, through Nov. 20, Friday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Saturday matinees, 2 p.m., UtahRep.org Mary and Myra Pygmalion Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787, through Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., PygmalionProductions.org (see p. 19) Nutcracker: Men in Tights Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, 801-2662600, Nov. 10-Dec. 31, DesertStar.biz Oklahoma! Brigham’s Playhouse, 25 N. 300 West, Washington, 435-251-8000, through Nov. 19, Thursday-Saturday, 7 p.m.; Saturday matinee, 2 p.m., BrighamsPlayhouse.com One Big Union Plan-B Theatre Co., Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, 385-468-1010, Nov. 10-20, ThursdayFriday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 4 p.m. & 8 p.m.; Sunday, 2 p.m. & 5:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org Sister Act Hale Center Theatre, 3333 S. Decker Lake Drive, West Valley City, 801-984-9000, times and dates vary, through Dec. 3, HCT.org Six Characters in Search of an Author Browning Center Eccles Theater, Weber State University, 3848 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, 801-626-7000, dates and times vary, through Nov. 19, Weber.edu/CAHCalendar Two Gentlemen of Verona Jewett Center for the Performing Arts, Westminster College, 1840 S. 1300 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-7651, Nov. 10-12 & 17-19, 7:30 p.m., WestminsterCollege.edu/Theatre What We Had To Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, 138 W. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801297-4200, Nov. 16, 7-9 p.m., PlanBTheatre.org Winter Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, 801-363-7522, through Nov. 13, WednesdaySaturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. & 6 p.m., SaltLakeActingCompany.org

DANCE

Madame Butterfly Capitol Theatre, 50 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787, Nov. 10-12, 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 12-13, 2 p.m., BalletWest.org Ririe-Woodbury Dance Co. Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, 435-649-9371, Nov. 11-12, 8 p.m., EgyptianTheatreCompany.org Sacred Earth Kingsbury Hall, 1395 Presidents Circle, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100, Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m., UtahPresents.org Salt Contemporary Dance: SALT in Concert Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 385468-1010, Nov. 10-12, 7:30 p.m., ArtSaltLake.org (see p. 19)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Ives, Brahms & Tchaikovsky Val A. Browning Center, 3848 Harrison Blvd., Ogden, 801-3999214, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m., BrowningCenter.org Salt Lake Symphony Libby Gardner Concert Hall, 1375 E. Presidents Circle, Salt Lake City, 801-5816762, Nov. 12, Saturday, 7:30 p.m., $10 for adults, $5 for students and seniors, Music.Utah.edu Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Ives Utah Symphony, Abravanel Hall, 123 W. South Temple, Salt Lake City, 801-533-6683, Nov. 11-12, 7:30 p.m., UtahSymphony.org WSU Symphony Orchestra Broadway Music Val A. Browning Center, 3950 W. Campus Drive, Dept. 1901, Ogden, 801-626-8500, Nov. 12, 7:30 p.m., BrowningCenter.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Adam Ray Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m.; Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, 801-4632909, Nov. 11-12, 8 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Christopher Titus Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Salt Lake City, 801-532-5233, Nov. 11-12, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., WiseguysComedy.com Jay Leno Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-2787, Nov. 11, 8 p.m., Live-At-The-Eccles.com (see p. 19) Laughing Stock Improv The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-355-4628, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., LaughingStock.us Random Tangent Comedy Improv Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Draper, 801-572-4144, every Saturday, 10 p.m., DraperTheatre.org Steven Briggs Sandy Station, 8925 S. Harrison St., Sandy, 801-255-2078, Nov. 11, 8:30 p.m., SandyStation.com


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moreESSENTIALS

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE @ CITYWEEKLY.NET

LITERATURE

SPECIAL EVENTS

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

Anastasia Bolinder: From the Dust The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Nov. 12, 3 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Cressida Cowell: How to Train Your Dragon Provo Library, 550 N. University Ave., Provo, 801852-6650, Nov. 14, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com E.B. Wheeler & Jeffery Bateman: No Peace with the Dawn The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Nov. 12, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com James Aton: The Art and Life of Jimmie Jones Ken Sanders Rare Books, 268 S. 200 East, Salt Lake City, 801-521-3819, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., KenSandersBooks.com Jeff Kinney: Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Double Down (Book 11) Kennedy Jr. High School, 4495 S. 4800 West, Salt Lake City, 385-646-5214, Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Melissa Hartwig: Food Freedom Forever: Letting Go of Bad Habits, Guilt, and Anxiety Around Food The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Nov. 10, 7-9 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Nicole Lowe: Never Let Me Go Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, 801-328-2586, Nov. 11, 7 p.m., WellerBookWorks.com Raghavan Iyer: Smashed, Mashed, Boiled and Baked—and Fried, too! The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801484-9100, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Richard Paul Evans: The Mistletoe Secret Barnes & Noble, 1780 N. Woodland Park Drive, Layton, 801773-9973, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., BarnesAndNoble.com Robin King: Memory of Monet Miri Gallery, 3605 S. West Temple, Ste. C, Salt Lake City, 385414-5988, Nov. 11, 7:30 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Sebastian Junger: Saluting Our Heroes Grand America, 555 S. Main, Salt Lake City, 801-2586000, Nov. 16, 12-1:30 p.m., KingsEnglish.com Shannon & Dean Hale: The Princess in Black Takes a Vacation The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Nov. 12, 11 a.m., KingsEnglish.com Tracy Manaster: The Done Thing The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-484-9100, Nov. 16, 7 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

TALKS & LECTURES

Beneath the Surface: Complicating Progressive Narratives of Womanhood Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, Nov. 10, 7-8:30 p.m., UtahMOCA.org World Affairs Lecture Series: Summer Sanders Westminster College Jewett Center for the Performing Arts, 1840 S. 1300 East, Nov. 15, 7 p.m., UtahDiplomacy.org

Ogden Big Lebowski Festival Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, 801-689-8700, Nov. 12, bowling, 5:30 p.m.; costume contest, 7:30 p.m.; film, 8 p.m., Facebook.com/OgdenLebowskiFest (see p. 19) Salt Lake Freedom Film and Storytelling Festival Fort Douglas Post Theater, University of Utah, 1511 S. 1500 East, Salt Lake City, 801-5322766, Nov. 12, 9 a.m.-10:30 p.m., KingsEnglish.com

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

A Perspective on Memory: Paintings by Rebecca Reeder Anderson-Foothill Library, 1135 S. 2100 East, 801-594-8611, through Dec. 1, SLCPL.org Alyce Carrier: Old Work Museum of Contemporary Art, 20 S. West Temple, 801-328-4201, through Jan. 14, UtahMOCA.org Benny van der Wal: Desert Trashscapes Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, 801-530-0547, through Nov. 18, SaltLakeArts.org Brett South: Water + Earth = Life Salt Lake City Library Day-Riverside Branch, 1575 W. 1000 North, 801-594-8632, through Nov. 20, SLCPL.org The Documentary Project Fund Holiday Print Sale SLC Arts Hub, 663 W. 100 South, Salt Lake City, Nov. 16, 6 p.m., DocumentaryProjectFund.org Drew Conrad: The Desert Is A Good Place To Die CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Jan. 13, CUArtCenter.org (see p. 18) Glass At The Garden Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way, 801-585-0556, through Dec. 18, RedButteGarden.org Glorious Nature: Photography by Paul J. Marto Jr. Salt Lake City Chapman Library, 577 S. 900 West, 801-594-8623, through Dec. 29, SLCPL.org Heads in the Sand! Salt Lake City Main Library, 210 E. 400 South, 801-363-4088, through Nov. 12, 6-9 p.m., ArtAtTheMain.com Jimmi Toro Urban Arts Gallery, 137 S. Rio Grande St., 801-230-0820, gallery stroll Nov. 18, 6-9 p.m.; exhibit through Nov. 27, UtahArts.org (see p. 20) Just Press Print Gittins Gallery, Art & Art History Dept., University of Utah, 375 S. 1530 East, through Nov. 25, Art.Utah.edu Lexi Rae Johnson: Wait Here Please Art Barn/ Finch Lane Gallery, 1340 E. 100 South, through Nov. 18, SaltLakeArts.org Todd Anderson: The Book of Love Marmalade Library, 280 W. 500 North, 801-594-8680, through Dec. 9, SLCPL.org (see p. 22) Peter Everett: Transmutation CUAC, 175 E. 200 South, 385-215-6768, through Jan. 13, CUArtCenter.org


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Ghost Story

DINE

New Mexican eatery follows in La Fountain’s tasty steps. BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

H

ang around and eat enough in Salt Lake City, and you begin to see ghosts. To wit, the old stand-alone building at 209 W. 200 South, which was once home to a sushi restaurant, Ginza. It was taken over by restaurateur Carlos Rodriguez after Ginza closed, and he opened the popular La Fountain restaurant. The Mexican eatery was always a bit cramped, but I was bummed a few months ago to see that the doors were permanently shuttered. La Fountain offered good Mexican fare and great service at wallet-friendly prices. However, with the wrecking ball seemingly on the horizon—the block is virtually vacant—Rodriguez moved on. Thanks to City Weekly’s intrepid, longtime circulation manager, Larry Carter, I learned that La Fountain was to be rebranded and rebooted in a bigger space, just a block or so west of the original location. Now called Chile-Tepin, Rodriguez’ new space is large and airy, and located in the Crane Building on the corner of 200 South and 300 West, formerly home to the Vietnamese restaurant Café Trang (after Xiao Li Chinese eatery vacated it). I told you there were ghosts. Where does the name come from? Chiltepin chiles are tiny red peppers that pack a whopping punch. Known by some as “Mexican Viagra,” and also as bird’s eye peppers, this diminutive North American native pepper weighs in at 50,000-100,000 units on the Scoville heat scale. That’s up to 40 times hotter than a jalapeño. If you’re averse to spicy food, however, don’t stop reading. There are plenty of flavorful but mild dishes to enjoy at Chile-Tepin. Promptly seated by a friendly hostess on a recent Wednesday night, I was surprised at how bustling the restaurant was. Most of the tables in the large, open dining room were full, and folks seemed to be having a merry old time. No sooner were we seated than water glasses were filled and gratis chips and salsa arrived. I thought, if this is any indication of what’s to come, it’s going to be a good night. The chips have an unusual orange hue, but are homemade and delicious, accompanied by a rich, dark red salsa that’s about as perfect as it gets. And they were replenished frequently. Perusing the drink list, I honed in on a glass of shiraz ($5) while my wife opted for a Sauza Plata margarita ($6)—one of seven margarita variations available, not count-

JOHN TAYLOR

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LOCAL OWNED

ing flavored options like strawberry, peach, mango and pineapple. The Sauza Plata was outstanding; easily the best margarita I’ve tasted for that price. Our dinner guest—a wine-industry expert who’d just returned from a taxing week-long “wine camp”— opted to stick with cold water. Running down the menu, my eyes quickly zeroed in on the word molcajete. For most of my life, I knew it to be a Mexican stone mortar and pestle (sometimes made from porous lava rock), derived from the Nahuatl word molcaxitl. It’s used for grinding corn, spices, chiles, garlic and just about any other foods that can be ground or mashed. Many restaurants use them to serve guacamole or salsa in. Somewhere along the line—I first began seeing them about 15 years ago—molcajete went from being not just the stone kitchen tool, but also the name for a dish in which the tool itself became a serving vessel. At Chile-Tepin, the bowl is brimming with a “stew” of scrumptiousness: grilled chicken ( pollo asado), strips of carne asada, shrimp, nopales (cactus strips), charred jalapeños, onions and rectangles of Oaxacan cheese the size of Jenga blocks—all simmered in a lava-hot tomatillo sauce ($24.99). The menu says it serves two. Well, maybe as a main course. As an appetizer, it served the three of us with leftovers. It also comes with a choice of warm corn or flour tortillas, a heaping pile of Mexican rice, and bowls of outstanding smoky-flavored soup with pinto beans. Heat seekers would do well to order the camarones a la diabla ($14.99). It’s a

Chile-Tepin’s molcajete devilishly spicy and vibrant dish of tender, plump shrimp in a chiltepin-infused tomato sauce, served with white rice and a side salad of shredded greens and chopped tomatoes topped with crumbled queso fresco. A carnitas plate ($12.99) with excellent refried beans, Mexican rice, guacamole and pico de gallo fell a little short due to the dryness of the shredded pork. I felt like I’d gotten the scrapings from the bottom of the carnitas pan. The flavor, still, was outstanding. An order of carne asada ($13.99) featured a generous portion of marinated, thin-sliced, charred beef with the same accoutrements as the carnitas, plus a roasted jalapeño pepper and lime wedges. Throughout the evening, service could not have been more friendly or professional. My overall feeling was that Carlos Rodriguez and Chile-Tepin have thrown down the gauntlet and raised the stakes regarding Mexican food in downtown Salt Lake City. As we walked away from our meal satiated, my wine geek friend—who is normally quite articulate—said, “I am going to eat the shit out of this place!” Agreed. CW

CHILE-TEPIN

307 W. 200 South, Salt Lake City 801-883-9255 Facebook.com/ChileTepin


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NOVEMBER 10, 2016 | 27

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FOOD MATTERS BY TED SCHEFFLER

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Eastside Döners

Spitz, the “home of the döner kebab,” has a new eastside location, just off of I-215 in Cottonwood Heights. Promising to be a great spot for après-ski in winter, the new Spitz is located at 3158 E. 6200 South (801-930-5114, SpitzSLC.com) and is open daily 11 a.m.-10 p.m. They feature their famous döner sandwiches, wraps and salads, plus an nice array of cocktails, beers, wine, sangria and more, including brunch 11 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Their brunchtime “Hangover Basket” is just what the doctor ordered.

Pick up the NEW issue of Devour Utah

Laziz Live!

Many of this column’s readers know Laziz Kitchen for their top-notch Lebanesestyle hummus, muhammara and toum, found at markets like Caputo’s, Harmons, Liberty Heights Fresh, Urban Farm & Feed, Whole Foods and The Market in Park City. Well, you’ll be happy to know that Laziz Kitchen is now a café (912 S. Jefferson St., 801-441-1228, LazizKitchen.com), serving Middle Eastern cuisine in a contemporary sit-down setting with a mini-market on the premises. Congratulations to founders Moudi Sbeity and Derek Kitchen on their new adventure.

Go to devourutah.com for pick up locations.

This is

IT

Caputo’s Chocolate

Caputo’s fifth annual Chocolate Festival takes place at the downtown Caputo’s Market & Deli (314 W. 300 South), beginning at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 17. This year’s festival spotlights Utah’s highly awarded Amano Chocolate with local chefs and mixologists creating chocolatebased food and drink to benefit the Heirloom Cacao Preservation Initiative. Crafting creative cuisine with chocolate is Briar Handly and Alexa Norlin of HSL, Courtney McDowell of Pallet, Akane Nakamura of Naked Fish Japanese Bistro, Amber Billingsley of Amour Café and Alicia Pacheco of Publik Kitchen. Also on the event menu is chocolatey craft libations concocted by Water Witch Bar and brewed-to-order coffee supplied by La Barba Coffee Roasters. Admission is $35 per person, plus $15 for optional alcoholic beverage pairings. Reserve your spot by calling 801-531-8669 or by visiting CaptuosDeli.com. Quote of the week: “Your hand and your mouth agreed many years ago that, as far as chocolate is concerned, there is no need to involve your brain.” —Dave Barry Send tips to: tscheffler@cityweekly.net

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The Mysteries of Mezcal Why is there so much tequila in Utah, but so little mezcal? BY TED SCHEFFLER comments@cityweekly.net @critic1

D

what Utahns get to drink—just don’t like it. Does that mean that none of us should be able to buy it? Mezcal is easily misunderstood. First, there’s the bit about the worm. Some varieties contain a worm at the bottom of the bottle, or affixed in a small pouch to the bottle’s neck. But that is the outgrowth of a Mexican marketing strategy, not tradition. Second, mezcal—which some folks seem to mistake for mescaline—does not have any hallucinatory or psychotropic properties as many of you might have been told. Sorry. It can mess you up, however. Like tequila, mezcal is made from a form of agave cactus, the maguey plant. The name originates from the Nahuatl term for “oven-cooked agave.” Its alcohol content is like tequila’s—about 40 percent (80 proof). What makes mezcal distinctly different from tequila is its rich, smoky flavor, which is attributed to the way mezcal is made: roasting the heart ( piña) of the maguey over hot rocks in stone-lined pits. During the baking process, the sugars begin to caramelize, which lends a sweet flavor that helps to balance out the smokiness. Having previously only tasted the ubiquitous, but inferior, Monte Albán mezcal—the one that’s been discontinued in our state— I was shocked when an anthropologist friend of mine brought me to a mezcalería in Oaxaca years ago. I was shocked because

DRINK there were so many different mezcals to try, and so many good ones. As mentioned, I’d only previously tasted bad mezcal. At its best, it can be sipped like cognac or brandy from a snifter. Seriously. When buying it, look for bottles labeled as 100 percent agave. Lesser quality mezcal, called mixto, only has to contain 80 percent. And, although it’s not the most versatile “mixer” on the bar rack, I’ve had some excellent cocktails made with it, particularly at HSL, where master mixologist Scott Gardner (now at his own Water Witch bar) crafted amazing mezcal drinks. Although there are only three avail-

able in the Beehive, they are good ones. These are ones you want to sip and savor, not pound down as shots. In order of price, they are: Wahaka Mezcal Joven Espadín ($31.99), Mina Real Mezcal Reposado ($39.99) and Los Amantes Mezcal Añejo ($79.95). Wahaka has a distinctly surreal bottle label, and is unaged ( jóven). It tastes somewhat similar to a tequila blanco, but has fruity flavors followed by black pepper and smoke. It’s a very smooth-drinking mezcal, and one I’d prefer for mixing. You can give it a try at places like Pallet, Copper Onion, HSL, Bar X, Under Current and The Ruin. The Mina Real sold here is reposado (aged 2-11 months) and exhibits subtle floral qualities. It’s less smoky than many mezcals, hence lighter on the palate—a very nice sipper. Los Amantes is an añejo (aged) variety that is kept in French and American oak for two years. It’s big-bodied, with woody scents combined with vanilla and caramel. Sip it with a cigar in hand. CW

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

uring a recent dinner at new downtown Mexican restaurant Chile-Tepin (see p. 26), a wine-expert buddy and I were discussing mezcal. Specifically, we were discussing the lack of it in Utah. Whereas the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control lists 128 tequila selections on their website (ABC.Utah.gov), there are exactly four mezcals listed, one of which has been discontinued. Perhaps that’s because nobody at the DABC really knows anything about mezcal. They’re too busy selling Fireball Cinnamon Whisky and Jägermeister. I was told by an insider that one DABC taster said mezcal “tastes like Band-Aids.” So it seems that some people—including those who decide

BEER, WINE & SPIRITS

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NOVEMBER 10, 2016 | 29


Complete listings at CityWeekly.net The Other Place

This classic, friendly restaurant specializing in Greek and American comfort food has a bevy of longtime loyal customers who come in for the renowned marinated steak and eggs and the seasoned, knowledgeable service team. Generous portions are standard here, whether you’re in the mood for a savory lamb dish, a platter of Greek mezedakia, soup, pasta, a sandwich or a sweet serving of housemade baklava or rice pudding. There are also tasty gyros and kebabs to be had, and breakfast is served anytime. 469 E. 300 South, Salt Lake City, 801-521-6567

R&R Barbeque

6213 South Highland Drive | 801.635.8190

Few are as loyal to the art of barbecue as the owners of R&R. Competition veterans Rod and Roger Livingston pride themselves on their smoke, fire and patience. The restaurant offers pork spare ribs, pulled pork, beef brisket and chopped brisket, as well as burgers, smoked and deep-fried wings, and traditional sides like baked beans, fried okra, hush puppies and coleslaw. Order an ice-cold beer, pull up a chair and prepare for authentic, slow- and low-cooked, finger-licking barbecue. 307 W. 600 South, Salt Lake City, 801-364-0443, RAndRBBQ.net

Britton’s

At this Sandy restaurant, you’ll find old-fashioned burgers and shakes, along with breakfast items like pancakes, omelets, “garbage hash” and French toast served all day long. A must-try at this cozy eatery is the famous “Hog burger,” which is wrapped in two grilled-cheese sandwiches. It’s crazy and delicious. The house specialty grilled pork chops is another customer favorite. Add a housemade milkshake and you’re good to go. 694 E. Union Square, Sandy, 801-572-5148, BrittonsRestaurant.com

Avenues Bistro on Third

Avenues Bistro focuses on organic, free-range, locally sourced ingredients and products whenever possible. Local purveyors of fine foods are represented on the menu, which focuses on new and traditional American cuisine as well as tapas. In the morning, fresh coffee, pastries and other breakfast foods are available for a quick pick-me-up or a leisurely meal. Menu items are selected according to what meats, vegetables, fruits and herbs are freshest and in season. 564 E. Third Ave., Salt Lake City, 801-831-5409, AvenuesBistroOnThird.com

30 |NOVEMBER 10, 2016

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GOODEATS

Stay warm with your friends at

20 W. 200 S. SLC | (801) 355-3891 | siegfriedsdelicatessen.biz

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THE OTHER PLACE RESTAURANT OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK | MON - SAT 7AM - 11PM ● SUN 8AM - 10PM 469 EAST 300 SOUTH ● 521-6567


P.J. SNELLING

REVIEW BITES A sampler of Ted Scheffler’s reviews

King Shawarma

Middle Eastern Cuisine

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Award Winning Vietnamese Cuisine

Ti Amo’s Neapolitan-style pizza Ti Amo

6001 S. State St. Murray | 801-263-8889 cafetrangonline.com

*Gluten-free menu options available

Eat Right, Live Right, Fresh & Healthy!

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In The Heart Of Sugar House

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catering • delivery• dine-in 2121 s. McClelland Street (850 east) 801.467.2130 I couscousgrillexpress.com

Serving American Comfort Food Since 1930

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www.ruthsdiner.com | 801 582-5807 | 4160 Emigration Canyon Road

2005 E. 2700 SOUTH, SLC FELDMANSDELI.COM FELDMANSDELI OPEN TUES - SAT TO GO ORDERS: (801) 906-0369

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NOVEMBER 10, 2016 | 31

-Cincinnati Enquirer

| CITY WEEKLY |

-CityWeekly

“Like having dinner at Mom’s in the mountains”

now serving breakfast

-Creekside Patio -87 Years and Going Strong -Breakfast served daily until 4pm -Delicious Mimosas & Bloody Marys -Gift Cards for sale in diner or online @ruthsdiner.com “In a perfect world, every town would have a diner just like Ruth’s”

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

The best Neapolitan-style pizza I’ve tasted in Utah is at Bountiful’s Ti Amo. In Italy, uttering ti amo to someone means you are deeply in love with them. Just ask the establishment owners. Long before Mauro and Gloria Bonfanti moved here—in Marina di Pisa on the Mediterranean west coast—Mauro shouted at his would-be wife, “Ti amo, Gloria!” They would eventually marry, have three children (their two sons work in the restaurant) and bring fresh, Italian pizza flavors to Utah. Mauro cooks his pizzas at around 600-650 degrees Fahrenheit in a wood-fired brick oven imported from Italy. He is a master pizzaiolo, and rarely takes his eyes off of the pizzas baking in his small oven, occasionally rotating them to cook evenly. The dough is made with local wheat flour, water, salt, yeast and extra-virgin olive oil, yet it simply tastes better than most; it has flavor as well as perfect texture. The sauce is made from San Marzano tomatoes, of course, giving it sweetness to balance the tomato tang. And fresh, wholemilk mozzarella imparts a creamy, rich flavor and texture. Reviewed Oct. 27. 515 W. 2600 South, Bountiful, 801-294-5180, TiAmoPizza.co


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32 | NOVEMBER 10, 2016

Two and a Half Men

CINEMA

A24 FILMS

FILM REVIEW

Moonlight beautifully examines the intersection of sexuality and masculinity. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

“W

hat’s a faggot?” 9-year-old Chiron (Alex Hibbert) asks local drug dealer Juan (Mahershala Ali) early in Barry Jenkins’ revelatory Moonlight. It’s a hard question for anyone, and an even harder question in the tough Miami neighborhood where Chiron is growing up. Living with a crack-addicted single mother (Naomie Harris), Chiron faces a struggle with basic survival. That’s even before taking into account the chasing and bullying he already faces from classmates, before he even has a chance to understand his own sexual identity and how it could be possible to embrace that identity as a poor black male in America. But Juan’s response is perhaps unexpected, with no rebuke or insult. There’s compassion in his words, and assurance that Chiron will have a chance to figure out for himself who he is. That surrogate parent relationship is only one part of the magnificent complexity of Moonlight, where basic questions of identity become some of the hardest questions a person can possibly face. Adapting the semi-autobiographical play In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue by Tarell Alvin McCraney, Jenkins tells Chiron’s story in three parts, beginning with that 9-year-old Chiron, who has been given the dismissive nickname of Little. Later, as a high-school student (Ashton Sanders), we see him have his first sexual experience with his friend Kevin (Jharrel Jerome), at the same time that being perceived as weak exposes him to an even greater threat of violence. Then, as a grown man (Trevante Rhodes), Chiron—now using the street name Black—has in some ways taken over the role once held by Juan, before unexpectedly hearing from Kevin (André Holland) after many years.

Jenkins’ narrative structure presents an obvious challenge in casting, with a need for three actors of different ages who somehow create a complete character. These three actors meet that challenge remarkably, as Jenkins guides them to body language and facial expressions that achieve a beautiful, cohesive picture of a boy struggling to become a man, without knowing if he can openly be the person he truly is. Sanders seethes with swallowed rage and even-more-deeply swallowed attractions, while Rhodes offers the different challenge of a man whose carefully constructed public face is an elaborate disguise. Collectively, they’re one of the year’s most mesmerizing performances. It’s such a distinctive structural dynamic that it would be far too easy to get caught up in it and ignore the beauty of Jenkins’ visual storytelling. While at times he opts for a naturalistic vibe with diegetic music, he understands when to shift toward something more haunting and composed, with an equally evocative score by Nicholas Britell. His use of the beach as a recurring motif allows for some of Moonlight’s loveliest scenes, yet Jenkins and cinematographer James Laxton can also create a single startling shot out of something as simple as teenage Chiron’ pulling his battered face out of a sink full of ice water, facing his future with a grim determination. At every turn, Jenkins refuses to allow Moonlight to take the obvious turn, even as it ventures into territory that could have played out as surviving-the-’hood cliché.

Alex Hibbert and Mahershala Ali in Moonlight

Given the grace with which Jenkins balances the three individual segments—and the magnetic performances that can be found in every one of them—it’s almost unfair to place one above the others. But Moonlight builds with remarkable precision to its finale, in which Chiron accepts an invitation from Kevin to visit him at the diner where Kevin works. The interaction is fittingly awkward, given everything that has passed between the two men, and it is perhaps one of the film’s few failings that it doesn’t prove entirely convincing that Chiron and Kevin should be more to one another than old friends trying to move past old wounds. What makes Rhodes and Holland so good in those scenes is that they manage to convey subtle shades on two individual coming-out journeys, and how those journeys are hindered by hardwired cultural ideas of black masculinity. The heartbreaking core of Moonlight emerges in this stunning piece of filmmaking when it becomes clear that far more important than the answer to “What’s a faggot?” is the answer to “What’s a man?” CW

MOONLIGHT

BBB.5 Trevonte Rhodes Ashton Sanders Alex Hibbert Rated R

TRY THESE Paris Is Burning (1990) Documentary Rated R

Fresh (1994) Sean Nelson Giancarlo Esposito Rated R

Medicine for Melancholy (2008) Wyatt Cenac Tracey Heggins Not Rated

Pariah (2011) Adepero Oduye Kim Wayans Rated R


CINEMA CLIPS

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Information is correct at press time. Film release schedules are subject to change. ALMOST CHRISTMAS [not yet reviewed] A dysfunctional family tries to honor their father’s request to spend a conflict-free holiday together. Opens Nov. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

KING COBRA B.5 I guess lurid tabloid-fodder stories will always have a certain appeal, but it’s almost worse when a filmmaker tries to pretend that it’s really about something more. Writer/director Justin Kelly explores the real-life story of San Diego teenager Sean Lockhart (Garrett Clayton), who becomes a gay porn star using the stage name Brent Corrigan under the tutelage of fictionalized producer Stephen (Christian Slater), only to get caught up in the darker side of the industry. That darker side also includes rival producer Joe (James Franco, James Franco-ing as only James Franco can) and Joe’s younger lover/protégé Harlow (Keegan Allen), and the movie uses these parallel stories as a way to tease some subtext involving generational differences in gay men coming out in different eras. But King Cobra ultimately feels much more tied into the lurid moments—fetish escort dates, bursts of violence—than with anything more complicated. Even the casting of former youth stars (Slater, Molly Ringwald, Alicia Silverstone) feels like a calculated attempt to play with naughtiness. If there’s anything more complex here than “Scandal in gay porn!” it’s awfully difficult to spot it amid all the scandalous gay porn. Opens Nov. 11 at Tower Theatre. (NR)—SR

INDIGNATION At Park City Film Series, Nov. 11-12, 6 p.m.; Nov. 13, 8 p.m. (R)

MOONLIGHT BBB.5 See review p. 32. Opens Nov. 11 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (R) SHUT IN [not yet reviewed] A psychologist (Naomi Watts) caring for her paralyzed son believes someone might be invading their isolated house. Opens Nov. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

EVA HESSE At Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Nov. 16, 7 p.m. (NR)

RETURN OF THE RIVER At Main Library, Nov. 15, 7 p.m. (NR) THIS IS SPINAL TAP At Tower Theatre, Nov. 11, 11 p.m. (R)

CURRENT RELEASES DOCTOR STRANGE BB Oh, sure, it certainly looks different from other Marvel movies, but even its differences are familiar—think Inception dreams in The Matrix. But the busy CGI can’t hide the yawning emptiness where the story’s emotional core should be. Benedict Cumberbatch wields a distractingly terrible American accent as brilliant, arrogant neurosurgeon Stephen Strange, whose search for healing after a terrible accident leads him to Nepal. There, a sorcerer known as the Ancient One (Tilda Swinton) inducts him into “Kamar-Taj,” the “mystical Avengers” who protect Earth from arcane threats, including a rogue member of the group (he’s not much of a villain, despite the best efforts of Mads Mikkelsen). Not scary enough, not bonkers enough and not funny enough, Strange is clearly tired of the superhero origin story; it treads water to get to the bits when Stephen can play the master sorcerer. There is real power in the finale as the movie sets up an exciting new villain for Strange’s next outing, and the mid-credits sequence that brings Stephen onto the larger Marvel scene is fab. We should have just skipped all this and jumped right into Doctor Strange 2. (PG-13)—MaryAnn Johanson

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HARRY & SNOWMAN BB.5 If you want a great object lesson in how there are better and worse ways to approach a very similar subject, compare this documentary with this year’s Dark Horse. This variation on the underdog-horse-tale documentary deals with Harry de Leyer, a Dutch immigrant horse trainer who rescued a 10-year-old plow horse called Snowman, who was bound for the glue factory, and turned him into a champion show-jumper. Director Ron Davis tries to connect the backstory of man and beast—characters of whom nothing was expected, playing in a rich man’s sport—while occasionally attempting to anthropomorphize Snowman. But where Dark Horse maintained a sharp focus on that connection, Harry & Snowman drifts toward other elements from de Leyer’s life—his childhood in Nazi-occupied Holland, the effect of his fame on his family, his career after Snowman’s retirement—in a

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ARRIVAL BBBB Here’s an optimistic science-fiction tale that tells an engrossing story about mankind’s worst tendencies—selfishness, suspicion, aggression—threatening to overtake our best ones. When aliens arrive suddenly in what could be attack formation, renowned linguist Dr. Louise Banks (Amy Adams), aided by a simpatico theoretical physicist (Jeremy Renner), is summoned to decipher their language and determine their threat level. Though the circumstances are perilous, it’s not an Independence Day kind of film. Instead, director Denis Villeneuve (Prisoners, Sicario) emphasizes the scientific process, striving to put the events in a real-world context. Yet the film (expanded by screenwriter Eric Heisserer from Ted Chiang’s short story Story of Your Life) is not dour. It has sequences that exist just to fill us with wonderment, and no coyness about showing the aliens (after a terrific build-up and reveal, that is). But the film’s greatness is in its heart. The aliens’ mission and technology dovetail sublimely with Louise’s personal quests—the dreamy prologue shows her mourning a death—bringing symmetry to the story and grounding it in relatable experiences and fears. This is poignant, personal sci-fi at its best. Opens Nov. 11 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

way that seems to miss the point. In a perhaps-fitting bit of irony, Harry & Snowman tries to keep Harry in the spotlight even as his life, and this movie, prove considerably less interesting without Snowman in it. Opens Nov. 11 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—Scott Renshaw

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TRUE BY B I L L F RO S T @bill_frost

Mama Drama

TV Better

Better Things wraps a perfect first season; Good Behavior is your new obsession.

Gooder Worser

Better Things Thursday, Nov. 10 (FX)

Season Finale: Like the just-wrapped Atlanta, Better Things is a comedy like no other—on FX or elsewhere. Pamela Adlon’s semi-autobiographical story of a B-level actress/ saint-level mom (her daughters are the worst) delivers no overly grand statements or sitcom-wacky situations; it just makes it through another day and drops subtle, been-there wisdoms. Better Things swings from sweet to sad to snarky with an assured precision that her creative partner, Louis C.K.’s Louie, never quite nailed, and Adlon subverts the first impressions of her co-stars beautifully (OK, her daughters aren’t that bad). Hell, FX aired the 10 episodes in random order—a note to future on-demanders—and it still worked.

People of Earth Mondays (TBS)

New Series: It’s not as instantly defined as recent TBS comedies like The Detour or Angie Tribeca (you know, as Vacation and Naked Gun clones, respectively), but People of Earth at least has ex-Daily Show correspondent Wyatt Cenac, which is a hell of a start. Cenac plays a New York City journalist dispatched to a small upstate town to interview an alienabductee support group, and investigate “extraterrestrial activity” in the area. It’s a quirky enough setting, like Parks & Recreation with Lexapro dumped in the water supply, but People of Earth leans more weird than funny, and the characters are even less fleshed-out than those of TBS’ weakest new sitcom, Wrecked. But, as I always say about TBS: At least it’s not another King of Queens rerun.

Good Behavior Tuesday, Nov. 15 (TNT)

Series Debut: Whereas Animal Kingdom—TNT’s previous bid for grit-drama cred—was mostly bark and little bite, the rebranding network’s new Good Behavior has teeth. Notso-lovable loser Letty Dobesh (Michelle Dockery, Downton Abbey) is fresh out of prison and low on prospects when she hooks up with a magnetic hitman (Juan Diego Botto)

who’ll most likely derail her already shaky plans for getting straight (well, him and the drugs). Like Cinemax’s fantastic and novel-based (writing matters, people) Quarry, Good Behavior takes a boilerplate crime-noir setup and twists it into unexpected shapes, going deeper than usual TNT fare. Dockery and Botto are transfixing to watch, and director Charlotte Sterling (who also helmed Queen of the South’s similarly impressive pilot) brings the sweat of the South alive. Yes, now there’s another show you have to watch.

Sweet/Vicious Tuesday, Nov. 15 (MTV)

Series Debut: Intentions were good-ish: Sorority girl Jules (Eliza Bennett) and outcast computer-punk Ophelia (Taylor Dearden) team up to beat down sexual predators on their college campus, like Kick-Ass filtered through Jezebel. It’s a heavy balance to strike, avenging rape survivors and dropping post-feminist snark (not to mention keeping up on classwork; vigilantes should be sponsored by Red Bull), and Sweet/Vicious’ Serious Issues half isn’t yet as compelling as its Violent Fun half. Still, credit to first-time creator/writer Jennifer Robinson and MTV for hitting on a hot topic while it’s timely, instead of five years from now in a tossed-off Law & Order: SVU episode. And, of course, the soundtrack rocks—MTV hasn’t completely lost its touch.

Better Things (FX)

Ice Wednesday, Nov. 16 (Audience/DirecTV)

Series Debut: Crackle’s The Art of More—a star-studded drama about high-end art crime—streams its second season today, and now DirecTV’s Audience network is debuting Ice, a star-studded drama about diamond thieves. Is there a new 1-percenter TV trend that I missed? Anyway, Freddy (Jeremy Sisto) puts his family diamond business—and his family—in jeopardy when he kills a connected rival gem dealer; now it’s up to his half-brother Jake (Cam Gigandet) to save his ass from a ruthless diamond-cartel crime boss (Donald Sutherland). Violence, sex and shiny-object fondling ensue, but who needs to add this “meh” trinket to an already overstuffed Too Much TV queue? And why wasn’t it titled On the Rocks?

Listen to Frost Mondays at 8 a.m. on X96 Radio From Hell, and on the TV Tan podcast via Stitcher, iTunes, Google Play and BillFrost.tv.

Want to sell your company? Utah Business Consultants is the premier business brokerage in Utah, where we’ve been operating since 1989. Give me a call and we’ll chat about the options. 801-424-6300 office 801-440-3176 cell George@UBCUtah.com www.UBCUtah.com Mon - Sat 8am to 5pm • Closed Sunday 9275 S 1300 W 801-562-5496 glovernursery.com


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MUSIC

Baby Daddies

WEDNESDAY

Cult band Baby Gurl wants you to taste their crotchfruit. BY RANDY HARWARD rharward@cityweekly.net

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Jordan Fairbanks and Chris Wadsworth

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Wednesday, Nov. 16, 8 p.m. (doors) Metro Music Hall 615 W. 100 South free, 21+ Facebook.com/MetroMusicHall BabyGurl.Bandcamp.com

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instrument and told Baby Gurl they didn’t need guitar. “He said, ‘Just do what you guys are doing. It sounds awesome,’” Wadsworth recalls. What Baby Gurl does is a sludgy rumble that’s at once cartoonish and epic. It’s not remotely accessible, at least in the conventional sense. There’s enough metal, punk and noise for fans of each to latch on to—as well as some prog, jazz and experimental touchstones—but not enough of each for the easy application of a label. Noise is as close as anyone gets, even the band. But let’s stop short of coining a new name for it, or indulging in the vanity of naming a new genre for the band. Or should we? It might fittingly describe the intersection of Wadsworth’s fuzzy bass riffs and licks, and Fairbanks’ sick, robotically precise drumming, surprisingly judicious use of hallucinatory effects and samples, and the pair’s relentless parade of dick and poop jokes. Especially since Fairbanks and Wadsworth both insist that there wasn’t a conscious effort to create a particular sound. True to his joke about befouling their own instruments, Wadsworth says, “It’s just what came out.” So what do we call it? Babygurl? Bbygrrl? Just gurl? Maybe it needs its own term, sans self-reference. Kinda like Heathen Ass Worship and their “sexgrab” music. Given the excretory theme, maybe it’s brown noun. I dunno. One thing I do know, is Baby Gurl is definitely the shit. CW

NOVEMBER 16:

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

omething you should know about Baby Gurl: They do nothing conventionally. Case in point: This Facebook post from drummer/vocalist Jordan Fairbanks announcing the two-man noise band’s upcoming gig with another two-man band, Big Business. Here it is, presented for fun as a pseudo-Mad Libs sentence: “You ever [brown noun] yourself, but you’re acting like a cat (school project, I swear) and so you start to clean yourself up but you’re a cat and the only way you know how to clean yourself is to [verb] your feline self all over, then you end up eating your own [brown noun], ’cause you’re a cat? Yeah. Come watch us do that.” In spite of the scatological humor and the coprophagia, that’s kind of a nice metaphor for Baby Gurl—you know, in the sense that Fairbanks and bassist/vocalist Chris Wadsworth operate on unfiltered instinct, musically and otherwise. An earlier Facebook pouting said, perhaps apropos of nothing, “Hey [effwerd]heads. Get your [downtown noun] lubed up. We shot some [brown noun] to shove in your [pink noun].” “You know the Big Business show is canceled, right?” Wadsworth says as he lights a cigarette outside Uptown Music, where Baby Gurl practices. In case it wasn’t obvious, Baby Gurl’s FB outbursts should be interpreted as self-deprecating and self-defecating enthusiasm. Big Business puts on a hell of a show, and the Gurls were pretty stoked about playing with them. It’s a bummer, but they’re taking it in stride. Brown noun happens. Like when Baby Gurl was nominated for Best Metal Act and Best Live Act in City Weekly’s Best of Utah Music 2016. Those who nominated them did so in all seriousness, with the utmost respect— likewise for the diversity of fans who sing their praises—but Fairbanks and Wadsworth don’t really see why. “We’re not really a metal band,” Fairbanks says. “And we’re not really good live. Man, people got those wrong!” It’s not difficult to understand why people like Baby Gurl. They’re a couple of goofballs who feel they’re most photogenic when baring their chests, who posed for a portrait beneath another portrait of two bears (a cheeky juxtaposition of ursine pairs), whose 2013 debut album A Name and a Blessing boasts songs like “Crotchfruit” and “Tuna In The Key Of Pussy,” and whose current, year-old album is called Incompoop. Alone, this is nothing special. It’s when Baby Gurl plays that their Wonder Twin powers activate (we’ll elaborate later). Fairbanks and Wadsworth are local music vets. Fairbanks played in a handful of loud bands, most notably Eons and Madea; Wadsworth was a founding member of alt-rock outfit Medicine Circus, “shitty punk rock” band Heathen Ass Worship and powerpop band Long Distance Operator. The two had mutual friends, and one day in 2007, Fairbanks cold-called Wadsworth to see if he wanted to play bass for Madea. He didn’t, because LDO had just recorded an album with producer-engineer Matt Winegar (Primus). “I said, ‘Fuck you, chump!’” Wadsworth blurts. Six years later, Wadsworth officially met Fairbanks through a hookup app. The latter’s profile said, “I’m all about music,” so that union came first. Wadsworth says with a belch, “I said, ‘Jordan, let’s play some music. But when I say music, I mean, let’s shit all over our instruments and call it a song.’” The pair tried out a few different guitarists before Josh West, Wadsworth’s old HAW and LDO bandmate, put down his


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

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36 | NOVEMBER 10, 2016

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Marching Alone

The March Divide, aka popsmith Jared Putnam, does a lot by not quitting. BY ALEX SPRINGER comments@cityweekly.net @captainspringer

FR 11 I NO R VEMBE

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NIGH T L I T

WAGGE S / R W

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UR W/ SPECIAL GUESTS TS N PHY GIA & E H T S

AT 12 NOVEMBER

1492 S. STATE | PIPERDOWNPUB.COM

I

nitially, it was tough to put my finger on what exactly lured me in to the unapologetically earnest charms of Saturdays, the third full-length album by San Antonio native Jared Putnam, aka The March Divide. It’s anthemic as hell, packed with songs that are relentlessly likable and catchy enough to make a crotchety music snob like me perk up and remember how to have fun with an album. It’s one of the first things that I discuss during a telephone conversation with Putnam. “Musically, I was trying not to take things so seriously and let go a little bit,” he says. “It’s just pop music. I’m not going to cure cancer with it.” Putnam credits his interest in music to a cousin who happened to have an interest in ’80s metal bands like Iron Maiden and Metallica. “I was in a metal band when I was in high school, but that was very far removed from what I do now,” he says. “Everybody was in a metal band at some point.” While The March Divide definitely knows how to channel a proper rock ’n’ roll aesthetic, his music is a bit more in the vein of early ’90s emo greats like The Get Up Kids and The Promise Ring. Putnam has been running The March Divide as a one-man show since he launched it back in 2012. He started by releasing a handful of singles—among which were a few beautifully stripped-down versions of classic songs by The Cure and Radiohead. In 2013 came Music for Film, his first full-length album, and Putnam really hasn’t taken a break since then. In addition to that and 2014’s Billions and Saturdays, he’s also released four EPs—the latest of which, Bribing Jace, was released this month. While this kind of output is impressive for any band, the

GREG GABRISCH

MUSIC

Jared Putnam

fact that Putnam is a solo act self-releasing so much music makes it all the more admirable. “The one thing about doing it on your own is that it’s easy to get down on yourself if you don’t really connect with the crowd one night,” he says. “But, I’ve been able to do a lot just by not quitting and putting the work in.” It’s interesting to listen to Saturdays in the same sequence as The March Divide’s earlier albums. While there are clear evolutionary differences among all three albums, there’s something optimistic and uninhibited about this one. “In the past, I had just written a bunch of depressing stuff, so I just tried to have more fun with it. It was nice to do,” he says. As we discussed the differences between Billions and Saturdays, Putnam reveals that having his first child had a huge impact on the latter album’s creation. “It’s the first album that I’ve done post-kid, and … I felt like a lot more of a grown-up making it.” Our conversation took place just before Putnam hit the road for the tour, but he spoke fondly of visiting Utah again. “I used to be in a band called The Conversation, and we always had a great time in Utah. I’m looking forward to seeing a lot of friends that I haven’t seen in a long time,” he says. For the first five days of the tour, he’s playing with a full band, featuring Garrett Klahn of Texas Is the Reason. By the time Putnam reaches Utah, he’ll be flying solo, playing acoustic sets. Wrapping up, he takes a moment to discuss the state of the music industry in 2016. “There’s so much more opportunity for people to get noticed,” he notes. “2016 has been the best year, as far as albums being released, in my lifetime, and the indie rock underground scene is stronger than ever.” With stalwarts like The March Divide giving us an excuse to pump our fists in the air, it’s not much of a surprise. CW

THE MARCH DIVIDE W/ THE WICKED NOTIONS

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THURSDAY 11.10

Steve Grimmett’s Grim Reaper

It never made sense why Beavis and Butthead bagged on Grim Reaper, and it’s a shame that this is one of the most commonly regurgitated facts about the severely underrated English ’80s heavy metal band. Although southpaw guitarist Nick Bowcott isn’t around to wring killer riffs, squeals and divebombs out of his Union Jack guitars, Steve Grimmett’s voice is the band’s other great asset, and it sounds incredible after nearly 40 years. The band’s latest album, Walking in the Shadows (Dissonance Productions) is only their fourth—and the first since 1987. Even absent Bowcott’s guitar, it’s a feast for fans who’ve long hoped for new Grim Reaper music. Seeing the band perform classics like “Fear No Evil” and “See You in Hell,” on the tiny Liquid Joe’s stage will be, to borrow from B&B, huh-huh … cool. (Randy Harward) Liquid Joe’s, 1249 E. 3300 South, 7 p.m., $10 in advance, $12 day of show, 21+, LiquidJoes.net

FRIDAY 11.11

Jai Wolf, Jerry Folk, Khai

In July of 2015, Rolling Stone proclaimed Jai Wolf (born Sajeeb Saha) one of their “10 New Artists You Need to Know.” Jai Wolf’s notoriety came in large part from the Middle Eastern-tinged remix that he

composed of Skrillex’s “Ease My Mind.” The dubstep legend was so impressed with Jai Wolf’s musical instincts that he released the song via OWLSA, his own record label. From there, Jai Wolf got involved with Foreign Family Collective, where he released “Indian Summer,” which was the kind of blockbusting debut that threatened to leave other EDM luminaries in the dust. He’s currently touring in preparation for the upcoming release of Kindred Spirits, his first EP. In addition to checking out the first of Jai Wolf’s new material, fans can also look forward to the genre-defying work of Oslo native Jerry Folk and the R&B-inspired beats of Austin-based Khai. (Alex Springer) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 8 p.m., $16 in advance, $18 day of show, 21+, TheUrbanLoungeSLC.com

Grim Reaper The Nods (7-inch release), Brain Bagz

Yes, there is old-school punk rock in Salt Lake City—the kind played without an ounce of irony. The kids even put out records, or since vinyl has become eclipsed as the hip musical medium, cassette tapes. Three-year-old four-piece The Nods have an eight-song album, last year’s Ariadne’s Thread (TheNods.Bandcamp.com) under their belts, and are releasing a limitededition two-track 7-inch this Friday via the Scottish label Hail Atlantis. The Nods, who at times, bring to mind the Dead Kennedys and Brain Bagz, are somewhat reminiscent of the Cramps, with Mikey Blackhurst’s vocals and a ’70s touch of punk-rock sax. (Brian Staker) Big Iron, 438 W. 700 South, 10 p.m., $10

Steven Wilson, Bruce Soord

Jai Wolf

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Steven Wilson is a prog guy, one of those old school experimental types that believes in taking music well beyond the confines of the standard three-minute song template and instead adding intriguing imaginative elements. Sounds that allow the audience to think, ruminate and ponder the possibilities. Wilson’s main vehicle is the band Porcupine Tree—a leading progressive rock band of the modern era. However he’s also shown due reverence for his forebears by remixing and reintroducing classic albums by earlier auteurs such as Jethro Tull, King Crimson, Yes and XTC. In short, he’s one prolific producer. The bill also features Bruce Soord, known not only as the founder of the band The Pineapple Thief, but also as one of today’s most interesting and innovative musicians. In addition, he frequently collaborates with other artists, which has helped him work his way into major prog prominence. (Lee Zimmerman) In the Venue, 219 S. 600 West, 6:30 p.m., $30 in advance, $35 day of show, IntheVenueSLC.com

Steven Wilson

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The Manhattan Transfer Meets Take 6

Perhaps one of the longest-running vocal ensembles in North America, The Manhattan Transfer has been honing their particular cocktail of jazz, a cappella and gospel for more than 40 years. Despite the tragic loss of founder Tim Hauser in 2014, the remaining members of the Grammy Award-winning quartet are still committed to performing the music that has carried them through their long career. With new vocalist Trist Curless joining Cheryl Bentyne, Alan Paul and Janis Siegel, The Manhattan Transfer has organized a fall and winter tour that will take them all over the United States and Europe. The tour features a guest appearance by Take 6, the Alabama-based gospel sextet who are celebrating the March release of their 14th album, Believe. (AS) Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts, 1901 University Circle, Ogden, Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m., $15-$45, BrowningCenter.org; Cache Valley Center for Arts, 43 S. Main, Ogden, Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m., $33-$52, CacheArts.org

Take 6

TUESDAY 11.15

Glen Phillips, Jonathan Kingham

His thriving solo career aside, Glen Phillips has been involved in many diverse and dynamic musical enterprises; chief among them are Toad the Wet Sprocket and the supergroup WPA, as well as one-off projects like Plover and Remote Tree Children. Phillips’ ability to write songs that boast a cheerful sweep and a keen melodic prowess remains a constant throughout his musical ventures. Phillips’ latest album, Swallowed by the New, is a perfect primer—a collection of tracks that attest to his wonderfully affecting tones and easy, breezy demeanor. In concert, he’s a real charmer, effortlessly dissolving any barriers between artist and audience. Opener Jonathan Kingham is no slouch, either. With three albums that mesh folk, pop, rock and jazz, he’s well worth the price of admission on his own. (LZ) The State Room, 638 S. State, 8 p.m., $20, 21+, TheStateRoomSLC.com

Glen Phillips

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Escape The Fate + Nonpoint + Get Scared + Failure Anthem + Through Fire (In The Venue) Rata Blanca + Sonic Prophecy + Leyenda Oculta (The Complex) Steven Wilson + Bruce Soord (In The Venue) see p. 38 Lil Rob + MC Magic (Liquid Joes) Dan + Shay + Walker Hayes (The Depot) Fictionist + Step Rockets + Mmend (Velour Live Music Gallery) Jai Wolf + Jerry Folk + Khai (The Urban Lounge) see p. 38 Oli K + Chariot + Drink Up Gerald (Audio West) The Nods + Brain Bagz (Big Iron) see p. 38 Ricky Eat Acid + Kitty (Kilby Court) Quinn Brown Project (Brewski’s) Well Dressed Mannequins + Hotel Le Motel + My New Mistress (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar) Gloe (Muse Music Cafe) Nero (Park City Live) Metal Dogs (The Spur Bar & Grill) Jon McLaughlin + Josh Taerk (The State Room)

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brewfish herban empire

Tuesday 11/15

Grim Reaper (Liquid Joe’s) see p. 38 John Allred + Madilyn Paige + Kitfox (Velour Live Music Gallery) Head Portals + Skin & Bones + Gregory Belle + Foxtrot (Kilby Court) ’90s Television + Choir Boy + First Daze (The Urban Lounge)

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Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

12th Planet (The Complex) Brisk (Downstairs) Damn Girl! + Huxley Anne + La Flaca + Sautrah (Metro Music Hall) King Tiiiger + Red Bennies + Civil Lust + Peopleskillz (The Urban Lounge) Morrissey (Eccles Theater) see p. 43 Pop Warner + Cat Ghost + Life Lessons (Muse Music Cafe) Rage Against the Supremes (The Spur Bar & Grill) Solarsuit + RKDN + Paint The Woods (Velour Live Music Gallery)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE DJ Latu (The Green Pig) Dj Linus Stubbs (Funk ’n’ Dive Bar)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SUNDAY 11.13 LIVE MUSIC

Trails and Ways + The Artificial Flower Company + First Daze (Kilby Court) David Gans + Mokie (The State Room) Postmodern Jukebox (Eccles Theater) see p. 43

KARAOKE

Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue on State) Karaoke (The Tavernacle) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

MONDAY 11.14 LIVE MUSIC

The Fabulous Miss Wendy + Detour + Suburban Hell Kill + LSDO (Club X) see p. 45 Nina Diaz + Spenny Relyea + One Night (Kilby Court) The March Divide (The Dawg Pound) see p. 36 The Manhattan Transfer + Take 6 (Val A. Browning Center for the Performing Arts) see p. 40

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Monday Night Blues Jam (The Royal) Open Blues Jam (The Green Pig)

KARAOKE

Bingo Karaoke (The Tavernacle)


SATURDAY-SUNDAY 11.12-13

CONCERTS & CLUBS

Morrissey

CHARLIE LLEWELLIN

Here’s something for fans of The Smiths and their temperamental lead singer Morrissey to obsess over (you know, besides a pie-in-the-sky reunion): Just kiddin’, suckers. I got nothin’. And I join you in the desire to see Moz and Marr and those other two guys onstage together again, for two reasons: One being that everyone wants to see a raging egomaniac either humbled or redeemed—and, in this case, eating the word “never.” No. 2: Because it’d be bitchin’. Sorry, Moz. They aren’t the most poetic of reasons, but you know I’m right. The mending of fences—even for show and filthy lucre—just so you can rekindle some of the magic you once achieved together and share it with the people whose adoration equals your career, has to be worth something. Otherwise, you’re the father, son and heir of nothing in particular, goin’ about things the wrong way. (RH) Eccles Theater, Delta Performance Hall, Nov. 12, 9 p.m., $35-$89.50 What if you took today’s contemporary pop hits and played them in the musical styles of yesteryear? Turns out they sound a lot better coming from real musicians instead of plastic pop stars. (RH) Eccles Theater, Delta Performance Hall, 131 S. Main, Nov. 13, 7:30 p.m., $35-$150, Live-At-The-Eccles.com

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The Word Alive (The Complex) YG (The Complex) Cash’d Out + The Delta Bombers (The Urban Lounge) The Manhattan Transfer + Take 6 (Cache Valley Center for Arts) see p. 40 Night Beats + The Mystery Lights + Red Dog Revival (Metro Music Hall) Lucius + The Cactus Blossoms (Park City Live) Glen Phillips + Jonathan Kingman (The State Room) see p. 40

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Lukas Graham (The Complex) Saywecanfly + Johnnie Guilbert + Social Repose (The Loading Dock) Hive Riot + Kim Boekbinder (Kilby Court) Johanna Johanna + Sarah Anne Degraw + Michelle Moonshine (The Urban Lounge) The Night Caps (Gracie’s) Baby Gurl + Cornered By Zombies + Donner Partyhouse (Metro Music Hall) see p. 35 Max Frost + The Young Wild + Sinclair (The State Room)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Open Mic (Muse Music) DJ Birdman (Twist) DJ Kurtis Strange (Willie’s Lounge)

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Areaoke (Area 51) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal) Superstar Karaoke w/ DJ Ducky (Club Jam)

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MONDAY 11.14

CONCERTS & CLUBS

MATTHEW DOLINAR

The Fabulous Miss Wendy, Suburban Hell Kill, Detour, LSDO

It takes stones—not just balls—to call yourself “The Fabulous” anything. In spite of this cheesecake picture, Wendy has some hefty boulders south of her equator. She picked up a guitar at age 10 and was a virtuoso by 12. She played guitar in Green Jello for a year, was handpicked by Slash to open his tour, and has supported UFO, Quiet Riot and Nashville Pussy. Gerald Casale of Devo produced her first album, and the legendary Kim Fowley (The Runaways, Kiss) produced her third, No One Can Stop Me (TheFabulousMissWendy.com). Live, she prowls and writhes all over the stage while playing her poppy punk/hard rock tunes, flashing a flirty smile, baring butt cleavage—and demonstrating a hip-shake that looks like it could put you through a wall. No wonder Revolver called her “the sexiest rock star ever.” The woman is a rock ’n’ roll dynamo, and she will tear you to pieces this Monday. (RH) Club X, 445 S. 400 West, 8 p.m., $5 in advance, $10 day of show, 21+, ClubXSLC.com

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Nov 26: Flash & Flare Friendsgiving Nov 29: Indigo Plateau Nov 30: Benjamin Francis Leftwich

NOVEMBER 10, 2016| 45

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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Š 2016

LEFTIST

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

ACROSS

Last week’s answers

| CITY WEEKLY |

NOVEMBER 10, 2016 | 49

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

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1. Rome's ____ Fountain 2. Nickname for the Anaheim Angels 3. Scope 4. Capri, per esempio 5. "The Silence of the Lambs" org. 6. Appear in print 7. Texter's "Unbelievable!" 8. "Phooey!" 9. Strong suit 10. Org. for the Suns or the Heat 11. Geisha's sash 12. Sn, to a chemist 13. Aliens, briefly 18. Pale

52. Mideast's ____ Heights 55. Groovy music? 56. Vexation 57. Actress Vardalos 58. Photo blowup: Abbr. 59. Motel freebie 60. Shiner? 61. Baseball great Williams

SUDOKU

DOWN

21. Calc prerequisite 23. Damp at dawn 24. 401, in old Rome 25. Have 26. Reach the Top 40, say 27. Where sailors go 28. Tom of "The Seven Year Itch" 29. Actress Hannah 32. Execs 33. Fund 34. Muse of poetry 35. More confident 36. India Pale ____ 37. Ode title opener 39. Children's author Silverstein 41. Only state with a twovowel postal code 42. Agcy. for retirees 43. Up to, informally 45. Replied to an invitation 47. Score before ad in or ad out 48. Egg cells 49. Pained reaction 50. "Sounds likely to me" 51. Prefix with surgeon

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1. Asian cuisine 5. Do that's picked, briefly 8. Worth mentioning 14. NFL team that returned to Los Angeles in 2016 after 20 years in St. Louis 15. Ski or tennis follower 16. Shire dweller 17. Right-wing aggression in a crowd? 19. Flows out 20. "Behold!" 21. Parlor design, perhaps 22. Leftist admission of error? 30. Dickens' "The Mystery of ____ Drood" 31. "Isn't it funny ____ bear likes honey?": Milne 32. Right-wing indecisiveness? 37. You may be shocked by it 38. Challenging for a sitter 39. To a great degree 40. "Do ____ to eat a peach?": Eliot 41. Leftist's snarky reply after a lecture? 44. Carry 45. Riveter painted by Rockwell 46. Right-wing circus act? 53. Green of "Penny Dreadful" 54. YouTube upload 55. A suspect might appear in one 59. Leftist city on the Bosphorus Strait? 62. His 2016 death prompted Barack Obama to make the statement "Today, the world lost a creative icon" 63. Billiards stick 64. Michael of "Juno" 65. Shut up 66. Cut short 67. School for Prince Harry


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Anne of Green Gables

figures. The group has even begun offering theater classes and workshops specifically designed for home-schooled kids. “I love observing the kids after they’ve seen the shows,” Smith says. “They come out of the theater talking about it, and you see how much information these kids can retain.” And, of course, there are always funny moments. “We were doing The Three Musketeers, and Lady DeWinter had just died,” Smith recalls. “One of the little kids, probably 3, gets out of his seat, walks up to the stage and shouts, ‘She’s breathing!’ The actress was holding her breath trying not to laugh.” For those who want to check out the Utah Children’s Theatre, upcoming performances include Anne of Green Gables and The Wizard of Oz. Tickets usually start at $10 per show and group packages are available. Local actors are also invited to audition for upcoming plays. n

Utah Children’s Theatre 3605 S. State, Salt Lake City 801-532-6000 UCTheatre.org

JOE PURNHAGEN

COMMUNITY BEAT PG. 50 INK PG. 51 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY PG. 53 UTAH JOB CENTER PG. 54 URBAN LIVING PG. 55 POETS CORNER PG. 55

It’s never too early to expose children to the fine arts. And at Utah Children’s Theatre, the experience is tailored specifically for kids. “A lot of people hear the name and think it’s children acting—it’s actually adult actors performing for young audiences,” box office manager and marketing director Amanda Smith says. While the company does occasionally cast kids if the role calls for it, she says that the goal is children’s education, both artistic and civic. For the past 29 years, the’ve produced shows based on classic literature and important historical events in order to provide them with powerful, educational entertainment. “Kids understand a lot more than we give them credit for,” Smith says. With a recently remodeled theater, she’s excited about the future and how many more children they will be able to reach for years to come. Utah Children’s Theatre is a nonprofit and is always seeking donations and sponsors so they can continue their mission. The group has a wide range of projects, including producing plays for the general public, holding field trips, hosting an annual Shakespeare Festival and conducting a year-round after-school theater program to train students in the fields of acting, singing, play development and more. The group also offers unique, kid-friendly features like a vintage soda fountain and a party room for private events. The field trips in particular cast a huge turnout across the state. Utah Children’s Theatre reaches roughly 7,000 elementary school children each year, performing original plays that explore the lives of inventors, pioneers and other historical JOE PURNHAGEN

INSIDE /

AMANDA K SMITH

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B R E Z S N Y

Go to RealAstrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “Don’t be someone that searches, finds and then runs away,” advises novelist Paulo Coelho. I’m tempted to add “... unless you really do need to run away for a while to get better prepared for the reward you have summoned … and then return to fully embrace it.” After studying the astrological omens, Scorpio, I’m guessing you can benefit from hearing this information. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Go ahead and howl a celebratory “goodbye!” to any triviality that has distracted you from your worthy goals, to any mean little ghost that has shadowed your good intentions and to any faded fantasy that has clogged up the flow of your psychic energy. I also recommend that you welcome secrets that have somehow remained hidden from you, and simple lessons you haven’t been simple enough to learn before now, and to breathtaking escapes you have only recently earned. P.S. You are authorized to refer to the coming weeks as a watershed. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Musician and visual artist Brian Eno loves to dream up innovative products. In 2006, he published a DVD called 77 Million Paintings, which uses technological trickery to generate 77 million different series of images. To watch the entire thing would take 9,000 years. In my opinion, it’s an interesting but gimmicky novelty—not particularly deep or meaningful. During the next nine months, Capricorn, I suggest that you attempt a far more impressive feat: a richly complex creation that will provide you with growth-inducing value for years to come.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) The coming weeks will be a good time to fill your bed with rose petals and sleep with their aroma caressing your dreams. You should also consider the following acts of intimate revolution: listening to sexy spiritual flute music while carrying on scintillating conversations with interesting allies … sharing gourmet meals in which you and your sensual companions use your fingers to slowly devour your delectable food … dancing naked in semi-darkness as you imagine your happiest possible future. Do you catch my drift, Cancerian? You’re due for a series of appointments with savvy bliss and wild splendor. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “I have always wanted … my mouth full of strange sunlight,” writes Leo poet Michael Dickman in his poem “My Honeybee.” In another piece, while describing an outdoor scene from childhood, he innocently asks, “What kind of light is that?” Elsewhere he confesses, “What I want more than anything is to get down on paper what the shining looks like.” In accordance with astrological omens, Leo, I suggest you follow Dickman’s lead in the coming weeks. You’ll receive soulful teachings if you pay special attention to both the qualities of the light you see and the inner light that wells up in your heart.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) The Passage du Gois is a 2.8-mile causeway that runs between the western French town of Beauvoir-sur-Mer and the island of Noirmoutier in the Atlantic Ocean. It’s only usable twice a day when the tide goes out, and even then for just an hour or two. The rest of the time it’s under water. If you hope to walk or bike or drive across, you must accommodate yourself to nature’s rhythms. I suspect ARIES (March 21-April 19) there’s a metaphorically similar phenomenon in your life, Virgo. To Now and then you display an excessive egotism that pushes get to where you want to go next, you can’t necessarily travel when people away. But during the next six weeks you’ll have an excel- you feel like it. The path will be open and available for brief periods. lent chance to shed some of that tendency, even as you build But it will be open and available. more of the healthy pride that attracts support. So be alert for a steady flow of intuitions instruct ing you on how to elude LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) overconfidence and instead cultivate more of the warm, radiant Modern toilet paper appeared in 1901, when a company in Green charisma that is your birthright. You came to Earth not just Bay, Wis., began to market “sanitary tissue” to the public. The to show off your bright beauty, but also to wield it as a source product had a small problem, however. Since the manufacturing of inspiration and motivation for those whose lives you touch. process wasn’t perfect, wood chips sometimes remained embedded in the paper. It was not until 1934 that the product was TAURUS (April 20-May 20) offered as officially “splinter-free.” I mention this, Libra, because “How often I found where I should be going only by setting I suspect that you are not yet in the splinter-free phase of the out for somewhere else,” inventor Buckminster Fuller said. I promising possibility you’re working on. Keep at it. Eventually don’t fully endorse that perspective. For example, when I said you’ll purge the glitches.

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Greenland sharks live a long time—up to 400 years, according to researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The females of the species don’t reach sexual maturity until they’re 150. I wouldn’t normally compare you Pisceans to these creatures, but my reading of the astrological omens suggests that the coming months will be a time when at long last you will reach your full sexual ripeness. It’s true that you’ve been capable of generating new human beings for quite some time. But your erotic wisdom has lagged behind. Now that’s going to change. Your ability to harness your libidinous power will soon start to increase. As it does, you’ll gain new access to primal creativity.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) If you were an obscenely rich plutocrat, you might have a pool table on your super yacht. And to ensure that you and your buddies could play pool even in a storm that rocked your boat, you would have a special gyroscopic instrument installed to keep your pool table steady and stable. But I doubt you have such luxury at your disposal. You’re just not that wealthy or decadent. You could have something even better, however: metaphorical gyroscopes that will keep you steady and stable as you navigate your way through unusual weather. Do you know what I’m referring to? If not, meditate on the three people or influences that might best help you stay grounded. Then make sure you snuggle up close to those people and influences during the next two weeks.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Do you know about the Lords of Shouting? According to Christian and Jewish mythology, they’re a gang of 15.5 million angels that greet each day with vigorous songs of praise and blessing. Most people are too preoccupied with their own mind chatter to pay attention to them, let alone hear their melodious offerings. But I suspect you might be an exception to that rule in the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you’ll be exceptionally alert for and receptive to glad tidings. You might be able to spot opportunities that others are blind to, including the chants of the Lords of Shouting and many other potential blessings. Take advantage of your aptitude!

goodbye to North Carolina with the intention to make northern California my new home, and that’s exactly where I ended up and stayed. Having said that, however, I suspect that the coming months could be one of those times when Fuller’s formula applies to you. Your ultimate destination might turn out to be different from your original plan. But here’s the tricky part: If you do want to eventually be led to the situation that’s right for you, you have to be specific about setting a goal that seems right for now.


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Poets Corner

Don’t go off into the cold dark. Don’t leave me in the light. Biting wind Baiting forward Rising tide of anxiety Bringing up unspoken words.

Beryl Smith Send your poem (max 15 lines), to: Poet’s Corner, City Weekly, 248 South Main Street, SLC, UT 84101 or e-mail to poetscorner@cityweekly.net.

Published entrants receive a $15 value gift from CW. Each entry must include name and mailing address.

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A Hoot for the Hooties

One time my wife and I traveled to the west coast of Florida after a convention, just to see what that part of world was like. While driving around a neighborhood looking at houses (because that’s what realtors do), we stumbled upon a roughly 10-by-10-foot plot of land on a street of large homes with large lots. We thought maybe it was for a new sewer line. As we drove to the next block, we found the same thing, and then again on the next block. Then we saw a tiny sign on the ground that said, “Do not disturb burrowing owls!” Have you ever seen a burrowing owl? They are the cutest damned miniature creatures you might ever come across. We watched and laughed as they hopped in and out of holes like rabbits with wings, turning their heads in that nearly 360-degree way and chirping warnings to their fellow little buddies after seeing us. Utah has 13 species of owls: flammulated, western screech, great horned, snowy, northern pygmy, elf, burrowing, spotted, great gray, long-eared, short-eared, boreal and northern saw-whet. I used to go out and hunt (not with guns) birds of prey for Hawkwatch International as a weekend hobby to help count migrating birds. Our state has one of the five major migrating paths of birds flying from North to South America and back again. Twice a year, you can climb hills or drive to certain locations and watch thousands of them fly to summer or winter destinations—an avian highway like nothing you’ve ever seen before. I know it sounds totally geeky, but being able to pick out a ferruginous from a Swainson’s hawk is just cool to a bird-lover like me. I once found a nest of three owlets out in a canyon by Grantsville that looked as if they were wearing Ninja Turtle masks. So damn sweet. Owl lovers will be glad to know that humans have won a small battle to help save a nesting area here in Utah, just up the hill from Ruth’s Diner, known as “Owl Meadow.” The Great Salt Lake Audubon Society and the Willard L. Eccles Charitable Foundation have teamed up with various organizations from around the country to raise $400,000 to buy the habitat land. They needed $250,000 more to complete the purchase, and, luckily two other donors pledged $50,000 if the county pitched in to protect the 4.6 acres from development of roads and buildings. So here’s a big hoot for the hooties! n

Content is prepared expressly for Community and is not endorsed by City Weekly staff.

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