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JUNE 2019

Art Lover’s Delight: Chill Out at SMoCA This Summer

ummer in the Valley is the perfect time to get out of the heat and into a museum. Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA) presents a wide range of exciting and diverse events, to keep art lovers cool in a 68-degree museum. This season is packed with artist-led talks and workshops and the return of fan favorites Mystery at the Museum and Art Handlers Triathlon. Additionally, several events relate to the 2019 summer exhibitions. These events offer guests the opportunity to engage with artists, the community and museumgoers to consider the questions and themes explored throughout the Museum.

”KnightRise” Photo:Sean Deckert

Staycation Staycation It Is! Is! It

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June 6: Artist Talk — Aakash Nihalani and Daniel Rozin; 7pm Artists Aakash Nihalani and Daniel Rozin team up to talk about their work in the exhibition “Mutual Reality: Art on the Edge of Technology.” Guests will get a sneak peek of Nihalani’s new artwork inside SMoCA Lounge before it’s revealed to the public. June 7: Summer Opening Party; 7–9pm Join SMoCA in celebrating another season of new exhibitions. Chat with curators, mingle with artists and explore the exhibitions. Cash bar. June 21: Sunset in the Skyspace; 7:30pm; $10 Spend the longest day of the year at SMoCA. Celebrate the summer solstice by watching the sunset in James Turrell’s “Knight Rise” Skyspace. Refreshments included.

July 6: The Studio @SMoCA — Simply Succulents with Dig It; Noon–3pm; $45, pair; $30, individual Horticulture experts from Dig It Gardens in Phoenix will show participants how to create and care for their own succulent terrarium. Materials provided. Light refreshments included. July 19: Beer ‘n Bingo; 7pm; $15 (includes one drink) Anwar Newton hosts an evening of craft beer and bingo with a SMoCA twist. This is not your grandmother’s bingo night. One free beer sample per person. Cash bar and snacks included. All events are free and take place in SMoCA Lounge, unless noted otherwise. Free events at SMoCA fill quickly and are first come, first served; early arrival is encouraged. Visitors can RSVP and purchase tickets at www.smoca.org.

POSTAL CUSTOMER

Schedule of summer events (subject to change):


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Go Where Your Wander Takes You

INDEX

EDITOR’S PICKS

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn M. Miller

“Wander a whole summer if you can...time will not be taken from the sum of your life. Instead of shortening, it will definitely lengthen it and make you truly immortal.”

Creative Director Jenifer Lee Assistant to the Publisher Darlene Keberle

~ John Muir What a glorious and surprising month of May we had weather-wise! As I write this, a snowstorm has just moved through Northern Arizona, and in the Valley, we have enjoyed a week of temps in the 70s and low 80s. Now, June is on the horizon and with it will surely come the higher Celebrate Wright’s Wright’s Birthday Birthday temps we are accustomed to. For Celebrate those of us not vacationing out of state over the summer, it’s a perfect Around Town: Town: Around time to do some wandering in the Musical Icons Icons Musical high country, maybe commune a bit with nature — or maybe wandering into a new bar, restaurant, area museum or local library is more your speed… Wherever your wander takes you, I wish you a beautiful summer of exploration and discovery.

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Until next month, all my best,

Kathryn M. Miller, Editor-in-Chief kathryn@CITYSunTimes.com

Publisher Lorrie Pomeroy

Columnists Stephen Cohen, O.D. Cathy Droz Barbara Kaplan Rabbi Robert Kravitz Allen Nohre James Roberts Pastor Paul Witkop Contributors Cave Creek Mayor Ernie Bunch Dr. Debbi Burdick Carefree Vice Mayor John Crane Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane Account Representatives Bob Hesselgesser Susan Pine Bulk Distribution Mark Feinberg

Call for Artists

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inside this issue YOUR COMMUNITY NEWS

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ... 38 Around Town

Scottsdale ... 6

North Phoenix ... 12

Fountain Hills ... 18

Carefree ... 19

FOOD & WINE ... 43

Cave Creek ... 26

DESTINATIONS ... 44

COMMUNITY ... 35

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YOUTH & EDUCATION ... 37

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CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers personalized news each month to Scottsdale, Paradise Valley, North Phoenix, Carefree and Cave Creek. CST is mailed to area homes and businesses and is available for free pick up at locations in Paradise Valley, North Scottsdale, North Phoenix, Carefree, Cave Creek, Anthem, Black Canyon City, New River and Fountain Hills. Editorial deadline: The first of the month preceding publication. Submit materials to news@CITYSunTimes.com. Advertising deadline: The 15th of the month preceding publication. Submit materials to advertise@CITYSunTimes.com. Corrections: Submit via e-mail corrections@CITYSunTimes.com.

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MAYOR LANE WRITES... Scottsdale Earns What Works Cities Certification

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By Mayor Jim Lane

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In April, Scottsdale was recognized by Blomberg Philanthropies as one of the seven cities to achieve a What Works Cities Certification in 2019 — a national standard of excellence in city governance. The city earned a silver level certification, which rates how well cities are MAYOR City of Scottsdale managed by measuring the extent to which data and evidence is incorporated into city leaders’ 480.312.3111 www.scottsdaleaz.gov decision-making. Scottsdale is the smallest city to be certified to date. The program, launched in April 2017, allows cities with populations of 30,000 and higher to participate. What Works Cities experts and members of the Standard Committee have in-person site visits to determine certification levels. The evaluation process looks at several factors including whether there is dedicated staff responsible for helping departments use data to track their progress; whether contracts are awarded based on past performance; meetings are focused on numbers; key datasets are open to the public and whether there is transparency both in the goals set and the progress toward achieving them. Among other accomplishments, the city was recognized for embedding data in decision making, adopting a business mindset to run a well-managed government and embracing transparency. For more information, please visit www.whatworkscities.org.

Pictured, L–R: Cassie Johnson, Police Analyst Senior and team leader for the Data Analytics Team; Adam Samuels, Budget Analyst Senior, team leader for the Quarterly Performance Report/ Benchmarking Team; Megan Lynn, Management Assistant to the City Manager, and team leader for the Performance Management Team; Mayor W.J. “Jim” Lane; Brent Stockwell, Assistant City Manager and Executive Champion for the Performance Management Team; Cindi Eberhardt, Volunteer Program Manager, and team leader for the Behavioral Insights Team Scottsdale; Jen Jensen, IT Management Analyst Senior, and team leader for the Process Improvement Team; Brad Hartig, IT Director and Data Analytics Executive Champion

Eagle Scout Project Benefits ADAPT Shop The ADAPT Shop recently received a generous donation from a local Boy Scout. One of several Easterseals disabilities services provided by Southwest Human Development, the ADAPT Shop focuses on improving the development of young children. The team’s specialists design and create mobility devices, custom seating and more for young children with disabilities. Local Boy Scout Riley Hoffer decided to dedicate his Eagle Scout project to crafting a fleet of wheelchairs for the ADAPT Shop. The shop features a collection of mobility devices that families may borrow to see what fits their children’s needs. But these mobility devices are expensive, making it difficult for the ADAPT Shop to meet the needs of Phoenix-area families. Hoffer, a freshman at Horizon High School, heard about the ADAPT Shop and the work they do from his

mom. Hoffer saw an opportunity to help area families by building wheelchairs for children with mobility difficulties. “I wanted to do something that was going to have a big and lasting impact,” Hoffer says. Hoffer went online and found blueprints for a wheelchair commonly used by young children. He

then raised funds by hosting a “Polar Bear Plunge” party at his house, inviting friends and family members to donate money to jump into his ice-filled pool during December. Using the Polar Bear Plunge funds, Hoffer purchased the materials needed to create five wheelchairs to donate to the ADAPT Shop. Several stores, including Home Depot and Bed Bath & Beyond, donated materials to help out with the project. Hoffer also enlisted the help of his family members and fellow Boy Scouts to help him assemble the wheelchairs. Thanks to the donated materials, Hoffer came in under budget. He generously decided to donate the remainder of the money (almost $1,400) to the ADAPT Shop. To learn more about the ADAPT Shop, visit www. swhd.org/adapt.


Help Scottsdale Seniors ‘Beat the Heat’ The City of Scottsdale offers a number of programs for area seniors, one of which is “Beat the Heat.” The City says that the number of recipients has risen every year… they now have over 300 seniors as recipients of the Beat the Heat program. Area residents are invited to donate items for senior centers’ summertime program. Contributions accepted include new reusable water bottles, nutritional supplement drinks, bottled water, small healthy snack items, unused personal hygiene items, stamps and grocery store gift cards. Residents may drop donations to the Via Linda Senior Center, located at 10440 East Vía Linda in Scottsdale, by early June. To learn more about programs offered by the City of Scottsdale, contact Human Services Representative Ross Heyl at 480.312.5811 or visit w w w. s c o t t s d a l e a z . g o v / s e n i o r s / adopt-a-senior.

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The Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce will join forces with the Greater Phoenix Chamber and the Tempe Chamber of Commerce Thursday, June 6, 5–7pm, for its annual Los Tres Amigos mixer event. The event will be held at Volanti Restaurant and Lounge, 15000 North Airport Drive in Scottsdale. This night of networking will offer a high-energy social setting with more than 300 business professionals. The Chamber’s next AM Connect event is scheduled for Thursday, June 20, from 7:30–9am, at Brunch Café, 15507 North Scottsdale Road in Scottsdale. The event is free to members and $30 for guests. In addition, the Chamber will host a Meet Your Neighbors for Lunch event at Nirvana Indian Cuisine, 14891 North Northsight Boulevard, Suite 119, in Scottsdale, Friday, June 28, 11:30am–1pm. Meet Your Neighbors is a monthly networking event held the last Friday of each month at various locations throughout Scottsdale. The cost to attend is $15 for members, $30 for guests. For a complete listing of upcoming events, or information about the Chamber, call 480.355.2700 or visit www.scottsdalechamber.com.

Scottsdale

Network with the Scottsdale Chamber in June

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Scottsdale

Spring Menu Runs Through June 15 at Thirsty Lion Thirsty Lion Gastropub and Grill launched a new spring fresh seasonal menu that includes six dishes, a dessert and two cocktails. The new menu is offered to guests through June 15 at all three Valley locations. A few highlights of the menu include: • F  alafel Salad Bowl — Quinoa tabbouleh, arugula, spinach, marinated feta, Kalamata olives, cucumber, pear tomato, red peppers, pickled onion, fried garbanzo beans, crispy falafel, tzatziki sauce, and tahini-harissa dressing. $14.95 • D  ragon Roll Sushi — Tempura fried shrimp, avocado, cucumber, sriracha sauce, fried lotus root, pickled ginger and wasabi. $12.95 • B  ison Burger — Grilled with bacon jam, Muenster cheese, arugula, crispy onions and mayonnaise on toasted ciabatta. $15.95

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• S  panish Style Seafood Paella — Shrimp, salmon, Mediterranean mussels and linguica sausage, sautéed with asparagus, chicken breast, saffron rice and shrimp stock. $21.95

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• S  eared Chilean Seabass — Sautéed vegetables, asparagus, green beans, red and yellow tomatoes, roasted peppers, spinach, parmesan cous cous, red lentils and lemon beurre blanc. $28.95 • S  trawberry Rhubarb & White Chocolate Cheesecake — White chocolate, sour cream, whipped cream, strawberry rhubarb purée and fresh sliced strawberries in a chocolate-hazelnut crust. $7.95 New cocktails include: • A  perol Spritzer — made with Aperol Apertivo liqueur, prosecco and soda water. $10 • P  endleton Brown Derby — made with Pendleton whiskey, Giffard grapefruit liqueur, muddled mint, limes, honey syrup and Q grapefruit soda. $10.50 Thirsty Lion combines the traditional values of European and American pubs, creating a gathering place where friends and family can come together to celebrate. The menu features handcrafted food, 25 beers on tap, including locally brewed Arizona beers, and signatures cocktails. Happy Hour specials run seven days a week from 3-6pm and 9:30pm Visit Thirsty Lion in Scottsdale at 7014 East Camelback Road, Suite 1423. For more information, visit www.thirstyliongastropub.com.


The 44th Annual Mighty Mud Mania splashes into Chaparral Park Saturday, June 8, from 7am to noon. The event offers muddy obstacles for people of all ages and ability levels. There are even non-muddy activities for those who prefer not to get muddy. The event includes “The Original Mud Obstacle Course,” a footrace for those 7 to 12 years old with obstacles and mud pits as deep as 5 feet to run, jump and crawl through; ropes to swing on into mud, a slide to go down, and a tube dive that children dive through into a pit of mud.

The Extreme course will have similar obstacles, more challenging, for 13 years and older. The “Mini Mud Course” is for children 4 to 6 years old and “The Muddy Tot” will provide fun for children 1 to 3. Participants 6 and under can also participate in “Mudville” a “town” destined to provide a mighty muddy good time. The event also includes inflatable water slides, inflatable activities, food vendors, open play mud pits, sponsor area, and wash stations. The event is free for everyone to attend; mud courses are free for anyone through age 17. Mighty Mud Mania is also geared to help neighbors in need — donations of non-perishable food items will be accepted to benefit the Vista del Camino food bank. Chaparral Park is located at 5401 North Hayden Road in Scottsdale. For additional information, visit www.scottsdaleaz. gov/mighty-mud-mania

Scottsdale

Get Ready for Some Good, Not-So-Clean Fun

The Tasty Side of Beating Summer Slide Serving the Community Since 2002

“Summer slide” is commonly known as the loss of learning that grade-school students experience over the months when schools out for summer. Researchers have found that giving kids 12 books to read over the summer was as effective as summer school in raising kids reading scores and improving literacy skills. Locally owned and operated, Parma Italian Roots encourages continued reading throughout summer break to support on-going learning in kids. Parma is partnering with the Scottsdale Public Library to promote its summer reading program, which runs June 1 to August 1. At each point milestone — i.e., 250, 500, 750 and 1,000 point levels — a child can pick any item off of Parma’s kids menu for free with no purchase necessary. The library uses www.maricopacountyreads.org to track the number of minutes read. On Saturday, June 1, from 10am to 6pm, participants can stop by the Appaloosa, Arabian, Civic Center and Mustang Scottsdale Public Library locations to register. Parma is located at 20831 North Scottsdale Road, Suite 117, Scottsdale. For more information, visit www.parmaitalianaz.com or call 480.292.9900.

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Scottsdale

Get Up-Close-and-Personal with Authors at Poisoned Pen The Poisoned Pen Bookstore continues to bring authors to the Valley for book-signing events and conversations throughout the summer months. All events are held at Poisoned Pen and free to attend, except where noted. Book costs vary. • June 1: Douglas Preston signs Talking to the Ground – 6:30pm; book costs $17 • J une 2: Becky Masterman signs We Were Killers Once – 2pm; book costs $27.99

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• J une 3: Brittanica Editor in Chief Theodore Pappas in conversation with Larry Siegel – 7pm; Pappas signs Brittanica’s 250 Anniversary Collectors Edition of the Encyclopedia’s final yearbook ($69.95) and True Grit: Classic Tales of Perserverance ($19.95)

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• J une 4: Martin Walker signs The Body in the Castle Well – 7pm; book costs $25.95

• J une 6: Matt Goldman and David Ricciardi in conversation with Robin Burcell – 7pm; Goldman signs The Shallows ($26.99); Ricciardi signs Rogue Strike ($27) • J une 8: Jenn Ashley signs Death in Kew Gardens; Kate Carlisle signs Book Supremacy; Lauren Willig signs The Summer Country – 2pm; books cost $15, $25 and $26.99, respectively • J une 10: Stephen Coonts and Barrett Tillman sign Dragon’s Jaw – 7pm; book costs $28

• J une 11: Mike Maden signs Tom Clancy: Enemy Contact; James O’Donnell signs The War for Gaul – 7pm; books cost $29 and $27.95, respectively • J une 12: Michael Brandman signs Wild Card – 7pm; book costs $26.95 • J une 13: Cara Black signs Murder in Bel-Air; Nina Laurin signs The Starter Wife – 7pm; books cost $27.95 and $14.99, respectively • J une 15: David Wagner signs Roman Count Down – 2pm; book costs $15.95 • J une 20: James Ellroy signs This Storm – 7pm; book costs $29.95 • J une 22: Nancy Atherton signs Aunt Dimity and the Heart of Gold – 2pm; book costs $26 Poisoned Pen is located at 4014 North Goldwater Boulevard in Scottsdale. For additional information, call 480.947.2974 or visit www.poisonedpen.com.


Abrazo Scottsdale To Hold Cereal Drive Drop off healthy cereal donations in hospital cafeteria Donations of healthy cereal to benefit local food banks will be accepted June 7–14 at Abrazo Scottsdale Campus, 3929 East Bell Road. Abrazo Health is leading a community effort to provide area children and adults struggling with hunger with a healthy breakfast during the summer. Abrazo’s Healthy Over Hungry cereal drive will benefit the St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance. Whole-grain cereal, when part of a healthy, balanced breakfast including dairy, fruit and lean protein, is a popular food item that experts say can easily address the hunger gap during the summer months when children are not in school. “Summer is a particularly difficult time because many children in need can no longer rely on their school meals for a nutritious breakfast, so their families often turn to food banks for help,” said Ed Staren, chief administrative officer, Abrazo Scottsdale Campus. “We recognize the importance of beginning each day with a nutritious breakfast and, through this drive, we hope to help those in our community struggling with food insecurity.” The Healthy Over Hungry Cereal Drive is supported by Abrazo Health’s parent organization, Tenet Healthcare, which in 2018 collected five million servings of cereal and donated $380,000 through the efforts of its facilities across the U.S. Packages of healthy breakfast cereal may be donated June 7-14 at Abrazo Scottsdale Campus. For additional information, visit www.abrazohealth.com.

CONSULTATION for ESTATE PLANNING Call (602) 375-6752 for your appointment! Use an experienced estate planning attorney for your estate planning for the same reason you should use a licensed electrician for your electrical wiring needs.

AVOID Do It Yourself Estate Planning

Learn why: • Your family and you can be properly cared for in case of incapacity or death • Estate Planning is NOT just for the Rich or Old • The State has a plan if you die without a will, but it may not be what you want • There are EASY, AFFORDABLE solutions for your estate “To know that we know what we know, and to know that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowledge.” ~ Nicolaus Copernicus/Quotes

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Kitten season is in some ways as delightful as it sounds — when the world is full of newborn cats. Unfortunately, it’s also when shelters become full of kittens and cats that are looking for their forever home. With the warmer climate in Phoenix, kitten season is almost all year long. To assist, the Arizona Animal Welfare League (AAWL) and Scottsdale Quarter are teaming up for their fifth annual Kitten Pop-Up shops. The event began in May and will run monthly from 10am until 3pm or 4pm through September. At each adoption event there will be about 20-25 kittens available and this paw-some pop-up will be held around the corner of Urban Outfitters. Every year, the Scottsdale Quarter provides free space for a kitten pop-up adoption shop in order help with the increase of litters to adopt during kitten season. AAWL helps thousands of kittens and cats find homes, and over the years of this partnership it has helped several of hundreds of kittens find their forever homes. Tentative Kitten Pop-Up dates are June 22–23, July 27–28, August 24–25 and September 21–22. For more information, visit www.scottsdalequarter.com or call 480.270.8123; visit www.aawl.org or call 602.273.6852.

FREE

Scottsdale

Find a New Furry Friend at Kitten Pop-Up Shop

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Visit www.libbybanks.com to request your free estate planning consultation. 602.375.6752 Libby@LibbyBanks.com www.LibbyBanks.com

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Health Futures Center Breaks Ground in North Phoenix

Phoenix Student Wins NASA Essay Contest

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Image: CO Architects

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Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego joined Arizona State University (ASU) president Michael M. Crow, Mayo Clinic president and CEO Gianrico Farrugia, M.D., and District 2 Councilmember Jim Waring at a groundbreaking ceremony April 25 for the new ASU Health Futures Center. The Health Futures Center represents a collaboration between ASU and the Mayo Clinic with the shared goal of improving health and well-being outcomes to the community. The center offers the community a chance to participate in a world-class research, innovation and learning Pictured, L–R: Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego; ASU President Michael M. Crow; Mayo Clinic president and CEO, Gianrico environment. The leading-edge facility will feature a med-tech Farrugia, M.D.; City Councilmember, Jim Waring innovation accelerator, biomedical engineering and informatics Photo: Charlie Leight, Arizona State University research labs and an innovative education zone.  Programs from several ASU schools and colleges will benefit from the proximity of this facility to the Mayo Clinic Hospital and Cancer Center. ASU programs include College of Health Solutions, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, Fulton Schools of Engineering, and Entrepreneurship and Innovation, as well as collaboration programs within the Mayo Clinic. Project architects are DFDG Architecture and CO Architects. DPR Construction is the builder. The 150,000square-foot, $80 million Center is located northeast of the Mayo campus at 6161 East Mayo Boulevard and is expected to be completed November 2020.

Sinchana Keshav, a seventh grade student at BASIS Phoenix, is a national winner in NASA’s Scientist for a Day essay contest. Sinchana’s essay about Saturn’s moon, Titan, was one of just nine winning essays nationwide. Sinchana won a video conference to ask questions of scientists and engineers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The videoconference, which took place May 7, included participation by Sinchana’s teacher, Shelby Stringer, and her fellow classmates. Representatives at the Jet Propulsion Labaratory say that 1,400 students in 45 states participated in the essay contest. All of the contest winners’ essays can be found at https://go.nasa.gov/2GWc80A.

Stock & Stable Celebrates Three Years with Anniversary Menu Stock & Stable in Phoenix is celebrating its third anniversary throughout June with a three-course, $33 anniversary menu. Plus, enjoy complimentary wine pairings and a new favorite summertime treat, housemade cheesecake lollipops, with every anniversary menu. Handcrafted by Chef Joe Absolor, Stock & Stable’s anniversary menu tempts guests with a surf-and-turf culinary adventure combining Hawaiian blue prawns and Prime NY Angus Steak for $33++ per person. Offered nightly from 3–10pm, this is the perfect chance to discover a new seasonal favorite, or simply celebrate with favorite Stock & Stable dinnertime dishes.

The anniversary menu includes: • First Course: Frozen grapes, honey, pistachio • Second Course: Hawaiian blue prawns, Calabrian chili, basil, oregano, garlic butter, Noble bread, 2014 Scribe Chardonnay • Third Course: Prime New York angus steak, anchovy gremolata, simple greens, 2016 Chappellet Mountain Cuvée • Dessert: Cheesecake lollipops Stock & Stable’s anniversary menu and wine pairings will be offered nightly for dinner June 1–30. The restaurant is located at 5540 North 7th Street in Phoenix. For reservations or more information, call 602.313.1001 or visit www.stockandstable.com.


that met our new lifestyle criteria,” says Linda. “Kenny knew that ice cream was my favorite dessert and that I wasn’t willing to give it up, so he started hand mixing and creating his own flavors in our kitchen. Eventually, the unique and original ice cream flavors he created ended up tasting incredible.” There are 24 different flavors on the menu at all times. The three classic flavors — vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry — always feature a blend of two premium chocolates, all-natural vanilla beans and fresh strawberries. Guests will also find clever ice cream creations such as the “Mississippi Mudpie” with an infused coffee base from fresh coffee beans, fudge swirl and chocolate cookies, and the “Ooey Gooey Buttercake” with vanilla ice cream, mixed with butter cake pieces. The Screamery is located at 10625 North Tatum Boulevard, Suite 136, in Phoenix. For more information, call 602.368.1362 or visit www. thescreamery.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

The Screamery ice cream parlor in Northeast Phoenix will host a fun-filled Start-of-Summer Ice Cream Party Sunday, June 2, 1–3pm. A professional balloon artist will be on-site creating free balloons for all the kids and special ice cream deals will be offered, too — $2 kid-size ice cream cones (reg. $2.95) and $5 ice cream sundaes (reg. $7.50). Founded in Tucson in 2014 by Linda and Kenny Sarnoski, The Screamery ice cream chain in Arizona is known for its old-fashioned simplicity — using premium milk and cream, all-natural ingredients, and for pasteurizing its own sweet cream ice cream base. No chemicals, corn syrup, synthetic hormones, pesticides or anything unnatural will be found in these ice cream tubs. There are currently five locations in Tucson, one in Phoenix and another location will soon be opening in Chandler. The Sarnoskis are the first in the state to become certified in pasteurizing their own ice cream base. Plus, they also feature two, non-dairy options on the menu at all times — their fruit sorbet and their Fudgesicle flavor that’s made with almond milk, agave nectar and two types of chocolate. “It all started when Kenny and I decided to begin a new diet and we were both determined to eat only natural, wholesome ingredients, but we discovered that there was absolutely no ice cream on the market

North Phoenix

Welcome Summer at The Screamery Ice Cream Party

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North Phoenix

Sports Arena Breaks Ground in North Phoenix

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Pictured, L–R: Eric Milberger from The Milberger Architectural Group; Jay Jolley from K&I Architects and Interiors; Adam Mays from A.R. Mays; Rob Eaton, owner; Sabrina Eaton, owner; and Pastor Manny Martinez at the May 7 groundbreaking ceremony.

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Legacy Sports Arena broke ground May 7 for its new state-of-the-art facility at 2727 West Bronco Butte Trail, in Gateway Village North. Legacy owner and Cave Creek resident, Rob Eaton says that it is pushing hard to open this 170,000-plus square foot amateur facility and adjoining sports catering hotel by the fall of 2020. Legacy Sports Arena will be a completely air-conditioned indoor facility with two NHL sized ice rinks, and a new high-tech, giant-sized glass floor with underneath LED lighting that accommodates basketball courts, volleyball courts, dodgeball, soccer, lacrosse and even a dozen pickleball courts. Also included is a large upstairs restaurant with special spectator seating, a gymnasium and numerous other amenities. Sports arena architect Eric Milberger states that, “The interior of the building’s focus is on the spectator

and player, from beginner to elite athlete. Open space viewing throughout the arena shares lighting, sounds and sights of multiple activities. This means someone can sit and relax with a cup of gourmet coffee while watching several events and the crowd, all at the same time. Legacy incorporates green concepts in its passive and active planning for lower energy usage, while the roof will incorporate solar panels to generate energy year around.” Hotel architect Jay Jolley also remarked, “We wanted to design a roomier sports theme hotel that not only caters to local visitors and business travelers but accommodates the sports athlete that plays at Legacy Sports Arena with some larger team rooms and special amenities for all ages.” The owners expect to not only attract participation from neighborhood and North Valley residents

but establish the area as a destination magnet for tournament play, sports camps, conventions, family vacations and special events. For additional information, call 623.580.9444 or visit www.legacyarena.org.

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Derma Health will open at Desert Ridge Marketplace this year.

The Phoenix Chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners (NAWBO) will hold its next meeting Wednesday, June 12, at 6pm. The evening event is the organization’s annual Desert Diamonds Awards honoring NAWBO and community members. The event will be held at Chateau Luxe, 1175 East Lone Cactus Drive in Phoenix. The cost is $105 for members, $115 for guests. Tickets may be purchased online at www.nawbophx.org. Since 1975, NAWBO has helped women evolve their businesses by sharing resources and providing a single voice to shape economic and public policy. NAWBO is the only dues-based national organization representing the interests of all women entrepreneurs in all types of businesses.

North Phoenix

NAWBO to Honor Members, Community at June Event

Medical Spa to Bring Aesthetic Services to North Phoenix and medical grade aesthetic services. The med-spa is ranked as the top one percent in the nation by Allergan and is the No. 1 provider of facial fillers and Botox in the Southwest. Over 5,000 Botox and filler injections are administered each month at all five Valley locations. “Derma Health’s comprehensive approach to wellness and aesthetics makes it a leader in the Valley beauty industry,” said Jenny Cushing, vice president of leasing at Vestar. “We know the clinic’s wide range of services will keep North Phoenix looking and feeling its best.” Derma Health is dedicated to providing its highly trained medical staff with ongoing training in the most advanced techniques in all services. Extended weekday and weekend hours are provided to accommodate busy schedules. Learn more about Derma Health at www. dermahealthinstitute.com. Desert Ridge Marketplace is located in Phoenix just north of the Loop 101 on Tatum Boulevard. For more information, visit www. shopdesertridge.com.

Business owners, are you reading this?

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Derma Health Skin & Laser will open its newest location at Desert Ridge Marketplace in fall 2019. Locally owned and operated since 2004, Derma Health will offer its medical-grade aesthetic services in the 2,700-square-foot space located on the southwest side of the center. “Desert Ridge Marketplace continues to make a name for itself in Phoenix and we are excited to be part of its development in the North Valley,” said Trish Gulbranson, founder and CEO of Derma Health. “Our skilled medical professionals and aestheticians will provide exceptional service to the Desert Ridge community, while also educating patients on the latest aesthetic innovations to help them look as beautiful on the outside as they feel on the inside.” This location marks a unique transition for Derma Health, evolving from a medical clinic environment to a retail setting. More than 50,000 patients have received treatments and services at Derma Health, which offers laser, skin and body treatments, Botox, dermal fillers, body contouring

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So it DOES work! 480.922.8732 advertise@CITYSunTimes.com

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North Phoenix Serving the Community Since 2002

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Two Arizona Youth Honored for Volunteerism Arizona’s top two youth volunteers of 2019, Nathaniel Simmons, 18 and Eden Sapien, 13, both of Phoenix, were honored in the nation’s capital last month for their outstanding volunteer service during the 24th annual presentation of The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Nathaniel and Eden — along with 100 other top youth volunteers from across the country — received a $1,000 award and personal congratulations from awardwinning actress Viola Davis at an award ceremony and gala dinner reception held at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. The Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program, sponsored by Prudential Financial in partnership with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP), named Nathaniel and Eden Arizona’s top high school and middle level youth volunteers in February. In addition to their cash awards, they each received an engraved silver medallion and an all-expense-paid trip with a parent to Washington, D.C., for four days of recognition events. Nathaniel, a senior at Sunnyslope

High School, is a founding board member of a nonprofit organization that has mobilized young people to collect hundreds of thousands of unwanted school supplies, toys and shoes for kids in need in Arizona and five other countries. While visiting a

school in Africa in 2012, Nathaniel and his brother, Seamus, were struck by how little its students had in the way of tools to support their education. They were even more shocked after returning home and seeing how many decent school supplies were discarded by classmates at the end of the school year — “supplies that would be cherished in the African school,” he said. Seeing an obvious opportunity, Nathaniel and his brother began recruiting young volunteers and schools for the “Re-Pack Project” to collect surplus school supplies for African kids, and also for homeless shelters in Arizona. Eden, a member of Girl Scouts– Arizona Cactus-Pine Council and an eighth grader at Stetson Hills Elementary School, assembled nearly 1,000 toiletry bags of soap, shampoo, conditioner and lotion collected from local hotels, and then delivered them

to a rescue mission that serves the homeless in her community. Her project sprang from an article about a charity that recycles soap from hotels for people living in poverty in other countries. “I thought it was a great idea,” said Eden. “I see more and more people who are living on the streets and don’t have the basics that we all take for granted, and I wanted to help.” She visited the Phoenix Rescue Mission and learned that handing out soap and other hygiene products not only prevents disease, but also is key to creating trust with homeless people and encouraging them to accept other available services. So, Eden sent 30 letters to hotels in her city, asking for used bars of soap and empty shampoo bottles. With hardly any response, she made personal visits to each of the hotels on weekends. Finally, three of them agreed to her request. After winning a $500 grant to buy soap-making supplies and shampoo, Eden recruited 18 friends and family members to shred, melt and mold soap bars in her backyard, and fill bottles with shampoo, conditioner and lotion. Over two days, they packaged 965 toiletry bags for the mission to distribute. Eden also provided people experiencing homelessness with 144 toothbrushes, toothpaste tubes and deodorant products. Youth volunteers in grades 5–12 were invited to apply for 2019 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards last fall through schools, Girl Scout councils, county 4-H organizations, American Red Cross chapters, YMCAs and affiliates of Points of Light’s HandsOn Network. More than 29,000 middle level and high school students nationwide participated in this year’s program. For more information, visit http://spirit.prudential.com or www.nassp.org/spirit.

PVSchools Expands Early Childhood Learning Programs PVSchools is expanding its early childhood learning programs with the opening of the Little Cubs at the Arrowhead Early Childhood Center July 25, at the Arrowhead campus. “Little Cubs is opening to provide our employees and working families an option for childcare in the southern area of the district. Families will have district staff taking care of their children. This is the beginning of their experience with PVSchools,” said Jennifer Kelly, childcare coordinator with the Community Education Department.

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See PVSchools, page 18


Father’s Day Tribute — Jewelry Gifts By Indra Jhaveri Hard working fathers who work tirelessly to provide and care for the family, to raise children with right value system and education so they could have bright future and civic values for civil society deserve a recognition. Father’s Day is reserved for that purpose, and children, spouses and family members celebrate in different ways. One of those ways is giving jewelry gifts. Traditionally, the following jewelry items have been used in the past with many other variations and most of the time somewhat masculine in size and visual look/appearance.

1. Rings: Signet rings (with engraved initials, messages, significant dates and or family logos), diamond rings or gemstone rings (popular being bezel set in ruby, sapphire or emerald in precious stone category). Cabochon cut birthstone in semi-precious stone category. Less expensive rings with masculine appearance like Tungsten, Titanium, Cobalt and Stainless Steel have also been used. 2. Bracelets and Chains: Masculine looking bracelets or chains in gold or silver in Figaro, Gucci, Marine, Miami Cuban, Franco, Rope, Byzantine, etc. styles with normally bigger width / diameter (3 mm or bigger) have been considered in the past. Trends do change so you can check out for newer trends also — Tungsten, Titanium, Cobalt, Stainless Steel, etc,. which tend to be quite less expensive. 3. Watches: Big variation in prices of the watches. In general, Chinese, mass-produced watches tend to be the least expensive. Japanese and USA manufactured watches tend to be middle price point (Seiko, Citizen, Casio etc.), while Swiss manufactured watches tend to be the most expensive (Patek Philippe, Rolex, Corum, Breitling etc.). Digital vs. automatic is another distinction to pay attention to. Digital watches are a lot less expensive generally compared to automatic for the same brand watch. 

5. Diamonds: Diamonds at the right price could also be a decent investment, normally 3/4 carat or bigger sizes. Quality of the diamond also plays a good part. As mentioned in earlier articles, GIA certified well cut diamond, which is accepted throughout the world at wholesale to below wholesale price, could be a empowering portable wealth that you can wear and enjoy and grow in value over a period of time. To contact Indra Jhaveri, send email to amidiamond@live.com or visit www.amidiamondsandjewelry.com. One can also reach him at (602)923-8200 or (602) 432-2920.

Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation (PMCF) will host a bowling fundraiser Saturday, June 29, from 1pm to 4pm at Let It Roll Bowl & Entertainment in Phoenix. Proceeds from the event will benefit charities that serve veterans, children and pets. The PMCF works to aid charities who provide life-sustaining resources and support to disadvantaged children, veterans and their families and at-risk animals in the community. There will be fun bowling contests, industryspecific competitions, food, vendor tables, silent auctions and more. Groups can reserve their lane for up to five for $100 (or $25 for single bowler), which includes 3 hours of unlimited bowling, shoes, food and fun. PMCF has a number of sponsorships available and is also seeking donations of items or gift baskets worth a minimum of $25 to include in a silent auction and raffle. They will also welcome smaller donation items, such as coupons, gift certificates and giveaway items for its activity and contest prizes. Let It Roll Bowl & Entertainment is located at 5925 North 12th Street in North Phoenix. Visit Phoenix Metro Chamber Foundation’s website, www.phxmcf.org, for full event details, sponsorship information and to register.   In additional to the Foundation’s work, the Phoenix Metro Chamber holds a number of networking events throughout the month. The Chamber will host a breakfast event June 5, luncheon events June 12 and June 26; and a mixer event June 19. For complete event information, or to learn more about the Chamber, visit www.phoenixmetrochamber.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

4. Accessories like Cuff Links, Knives and Money Clips, etc.: Personalize these types of gifts with engraving. Today engraving using capital, italic, roman etc. lettering is common and could be done with engraving machines or laser engraving machines, which can be programmed for more versatility.

Chamber Foundation to Host Bowling Fundraiser

North Phoenix

ADVERTORIAL

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Serving the Community Since 2002

PV Schools, continued from page 16

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The center is fully licensed by the Arizona Department of Health Services. The program will be open 6:30am–5:30pm Monday through Friday and will follow the school calendar. One feature that stands out from other childcare programs is that the Little Cubs will also have an onsite registered nurse. Parents will have peace of mind knowing that a trained medical professional is on site should a situation or issue arise. Children attending the Little Cubs program will participate in art, music, dramatic play, story time, songs and dance. “Children are naturally curious. We play with them, introduce toys or activities that are right for their age. We read to them, sing, and dance with them,” said Barbara Bush, a childcare associate at Pinnacle High School. “Our Infant and Toddlers program will incorporate individual play using developmentally appropriate toys good for both large and small muscles, socialization with children in the classroom, story books, art activities, music, and movement. We also work on toilet training in the Toddler 2 classroom. Children are diapered and fed on a fixed schedule.” Parents provide diapers and wipes in these classrooms. In the infant room, parents also provide bottles of either breast milk or formula. Children in the Toddler 1 and 2 Program are fed breakfast, lunch and two snacks daily. Infants nap according to their individual schedule, and children in the Toddler 1 and 2 Program nap after lunch daily. A 3-Year-Old Program, Lil’ Pioneers Program at Pinnacle High School, is also available to parents. “A typical day will include large and small group activities that are developmentally appropriate for 3-year-olds. These will include activities in literature, early math, art and music, as well as social studies and science. Children will also have the opportunity to choose free choice dramatic play, use large muscles on the playground, develop social skills, and make friends. The children nap after lunch,” said Ms. Bush. The center provides breakfast, lunch, and two snacks daily. Daily reports are provided to parents. These reports include when diapers are changed, nap times, activities completed, food eaten, and eating time. Those interested in touring Little Cubs at the Arrowhead Early Childhood Center prior to July should call Ms. Bush at 602.449.4080 to tour the Lil’ Pioneers Program at Pinnacle High School. After July, call the Community Education Department at 602.449.2200. Learn more about the programs offered through the Community Education Department at www.pvschools.net/domain/1928.

Copperstate and FHT to Present

One-of-a-Kind Musical Copperstate Productions announces the world premiere of a brand new, interactive musical revue, Mickey’s Jukebox, A Tribute to the Music of Disney. In this one-of-a-kind musical, audience members who arrive at least 15 minutes before curtain, are invited to select their favorites from a giant jukebox of over 100 of the greatest Disney songs ever written. The choices are tallied and a brand-new revue, created by the audience, is brought to life before their very eyes by the talented and versatile cast. Each show is as unique and as different as the audience that created it. When no two shows are ever the same, it can be a challenge. As exciting for the performers as it is for the audience, a great part of the show takes place backstage out of the audience’s sight. Mickey’s Jukebox, A Tribute to the Music of Disney requires an amazing cast of actors whose versatility is put to the test each night as they adapt to the demands of each evening’s audience. During the half hour before curtain, the cast mingles with the audience, and collects their jukebox selections for the evening. Those selections are then carried backstage where the choices

are quickly tallied, and the most requested songs are compiled. With the help of the staff, songs are frantically put in dramatic and comedic order, divided by style, duets and ensemble numbers and then with literally only minutes to go until curtain, the final list is copied on to a giant whiteboard which is posted backstage, just in time for the cast to make their first entrance. Mickey’s Jukebox, A Tribute to the Music of Disney is produced by Copperstate Productions, created and directed by Peter J. Hill, choreographed by Noel Irick and musically directed and accompanied by Jay Melberg. The production will run June 14 – Aug. 4, in the Mainstage Too venue of the Fountain Hills Theater (FHT). Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30pm and Sundays at 2pm. Individual tickets are $33 for adults and $12 for children 17 and under and students with ID’s. Veteran, active duty, senior and group discounts available through the box office, 480.837.9661, Ext. 3, and at the theater’s website, www.fhtaz. org. All performances are at Fountain Hills Theater at 11445 North Saguaro Boulevard.

SEEKING FOREVER HOME! Hello, my name is Bingo. I’m a male Dalmatian/Pointer mix and about two years old. Everyone says I’m adorable, sweet and shy. Rescue Pals took me in after I was injured and they nursed me back to health. They take me on walks where I get treats and lots of love for learning my leash manners. It takes me a little while to warm up but when I do I am all yours! In foster, I am a perfect houseguest! I especially love playing with children.

Please visit

/RescuePals


VICE MAYOR CRANE WRITES... Town of Carefree Marketing: A Team Effort By Vice Mayor John Crane

VICE MAYOR Town of Carefree 480.488.3686 www.carefree.org

The Town of Carefree has been working to tailor our marketing efforts in compliment with those of our merchants. Our main goal this past season was to improve communications and build relationships between the Town and our business leaders, and in turn improve business visibility with our residents and visitors. The first fruits of those efforts are being implemented over the next few months:

Thunderbird Artists Issues

• VisitCarefree.com Business Directory: An updated directory has been introduced on the refreshed VisitCarefree.com website. Every Town business will be represented with their own page, which includes a powerful search tool, descriptions, contact information, photographs and links. Tech4Life has been instrumental in assisting us with “shaping up” our visitor website, and our goal is to have each business listed on the new directory by September 1. • Town Signage: Identifying where Town businesses and destinations are located can be a challenge for residents and visitors alike. We will be hiring an independent signage company later this year to begin a complete review of all of our Town signage, with an eye toward how it impacts our businesses, visitors and residents. • Parking Concerns: To alleviate parking pressure during festival events, Thunderbird Artists will be renting off-site parking areas for their venders and volunteers and will provide a license plate list of those participants for monitoring. Likewise, the Enchanted Pumpkin Festival will utilize off-site parking for vendors and volunteers and will maintain security at the Post Office south side parking lot to keep this space reserved for Post Office patrons this October. • Town Events: Building upon our positive rental experiences this past season, such as the weekly Carefree Farmer’s Market and the Rock the District fundraising concert, the Town is encouraging other business and nonprofit organizations to produce their own events with the support of the Town. Moving forward, we want to hear from YOU — our merchants, residents and visitors — as to what we can do to help with your needs. We encourage our Town business owners to attend our quarterly breakfast meetings. Merchants, residents and visitors are encouraged to stop by Town Hall, call or send an email and let us know about your ideas, concerns and comments. We can do even better if we all work together.

“A Cappella Sunrise” by Artist Sarah Goodnough

hunderbird Artists is planning for its 38th season by issuing a “Call for Artists” for its premier, award-winning fine art festivals, which begin in November. Juried enrollment is open to national and local artists who create original, high-quality fine art. Based in Arizona, Thunderbird Artists produces sophisticated, world-class fine art and wine festivals throughout the Phoenix metropolitan area. The family-owned business was the only Arizona producer of fine art festivals to be included in Greg Lawler’s ArtFairSourceBook.com (AFSB) ranking of the 2019 “Premier 100” Fine Art Events from throughout the U.S. Rankings are based on artists’ net average sales at each show. All three Thunderbird Artists Carefree Fine Art & Wine Festivals ranked within the top 55, with the November fall show scoring the No. 2 spot, behind La Quinta Arts Festival in California. The January winter show ranked No. 45 and the March spring show ranked No. 53. “This was a huge honor for us,” said Denise Colter, president of Thunderbird Artists. “We never know how we will rank because the artists report their sales directly to the Art Fair SourceBook. While we have an idea of how successful our festivals are, it’s very rewarding to learn that our Carefree shows ranked among the best in the nation.”

Serving the Community Since 2002

CALL FOR ARTISTS

• Carefree Business Light Post Banner Program: To costeffectively improve visibility for Town businesses, we are working with Bertram Signs to create branded light post banners, providing merchants an opportunity to display their logo and gain visibility with Town visitors and residents.

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“Guts and Glory” by Artist Jerry Bergin

Photos courtesy of Thunderbird Artists

See Call For Artists, page 20

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SOUL CONNECTION

Soul Connection: Allie is Walking! By Allen Nohre

I headed into the Grotto Café in Cave Creek for my morning latte and I saw a stack of CITYSunTimes newspapers in a rack. I quickly grabbed a copy because I knew the May edition has a Soul Connection article by a guest writer ALLEN NOHRE — our 13-year-granddaughter, Nicole. The theme of Nicole’s article was Writer about trusting God to guide her family to do the right thing for Allie, their paraplegic, black Lab. It has been 18 months since Allie was brought home from the from the veterinary clinic where costly surgery did not correct her hind-quarter paralysis. Nicole wrote, “Many people told us we should just give up and put Allie down. Despite what people said, we pulled together as a family to do what we could for Allie. I think this was God’s way of guiding us through a hard time.” When I arrived home with the two lattes and two copies of the CITYSunTimes, Kathie said, “Look at this!” She was watching a video on Facebook of Nicole and Allie playing on the green grass in the front yard of their Minneapolis home. Playing? Allie walking? I was shocked. Allie was walking a wobbly trek of at least 20 to 30 feet, using all four legs responding to Nicole saying “Come Allie. Come Allie.” When Allie stumbled, she got back up on all four legs and courageously struggle forward again. Nicole was beaming and I am sure Allie was too. I learned Allie’s conquering of her paralysis has been, recent and gradual. She had been taking a few steps in the house and she is now making incredible progress. Allie still needs her wheelchair to walk around the block with her family. Perhaps the miracle we are seeing will continue happening and she will make it around the block without her wheelchair. Faith doesn’t guarantee results. But it is clear to me that Nicole and her parents, and maybe even Allie, were trusting that the Spirit of God would be with them and the Spirit filled them with healing compassion. “A Soul from Minnesota,” by Allen Nohre, a collection of CITYSunTimes essays, is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle. Allen can be reached at anohre@cox.net.

Call For Artists, continued from page 19 Judi Combs, Thunderbird Artists’ founder, predicts another successful season ahead, thanks to a strong economy and other factors, such as a robust housing market and an influx of tourists to Arizona. “Patrons and artists alike know that we go above and beyond to produce high-caliber events,” Combs said, adding that the wine tastings, live music and food add to each festival’s ambiance. “Artists also have shared that they appreciate the friendly, supportive culture we create with each show.” The ongoing-juried open enrollment enables painters, sculptors, glass and stone artists, bronze and metal artists, fine jewelers and artists working in mixed media to apply for a booth in one or more of Thunderbird Artists festivals. The 26th Annual Fall Carefree Fine Art & Wine Festival kicks off Thunderbird Artists’ new season Nov. 1–3 in downtown Carefree at Easy and Ho Hum Streets. The other five shows planned for the 2020 winter and spring season include the 8th Annual Surprise Fine Art & Wine Festival Jan. 10–12; the 27th Annual Winter Carefree Fine Art & Wine Festival Jan. 17–19; the 9th Annual Scottsdale Waterfront Fine Art & Wine Festival Feb. 7–9; the 25th Annual Spring Carefree Fine Art & Wine Festival Feb. 28 – March 1; and the 16th Annual Fountain Hills Fine Art & Wine Festival March 6–8. To download an application or apply online, visit www.thunderbirdartists. com or call 480.837.5637.


The Foothills Community Foundation’s Holland Gallery of Fine Art presents “A League of Their Own” June 1–27 and June 29 – July 25. The two exhibitions will feature the artists from 19 of the Arizona Art Alliance Member Leagues (www.azartalliance.com). The Leagues represent many Arizona communities, and this show will demonstrate the diversity of the many member artists. An artist’s reception will be held for both exhibits; June 8 for the first exhibit, and July 13 for the second exhibit. Both receptions will be held 4:30–6:30pm. The Holland Gallery of Fine Art is located at 34250 North 60th Street, Bldg. B, in Scottsdale. Call 480.488.1090 for additional information about the gallery.

Carefree

Join Arizona Art Alliance for Two Summer Exhibitions

Kiwanis Club Announces New Officers At its May 8 weekly meeting, the Kiwanis Club of Carefree elected officers for next year. The following officers’ terms will begin October 1, 2019: • Cannon Dart, immediate past president • Mike Poppenwimer, president • Andrew Donohue, president elect • Scott Brown, vice president • Toby Payne, secretary • Howard Dicke, treasurer (in office for one more year) • Joyce Jordan, director The focus of the Kiwanis Club of Carefree is on helping children recognize and develop their potential. They offer post-secondary scholarships, summer art programs, community science fairs and mentoring, special needs support, youth service organizations and more. The vast majority of the funds the club raises are invested in the children of their community and programs benefitting the community. Today, the club has about 200 members, ranking it within the top 10 largest Kiwanis clubs in the world. They believe that investing even one fraction of one’s time, talents, energies and experiences will make a world of difference tomorrow, while also making friends along the way. Those interested in becoming a member may contact Steve Morse at 480.488.2800. Visit www. kiwaniscarefree.org for more information.

Serving the Community Since 2002

• Bob Moore, director

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Desert Hills Introduces ‘The Gathering’ Desert Hills Presbyterian Church (DHPC) invested in significant changes in the last year. The church says that its most dramatic change came through Mikey Moomey, worship director for The Gathering. The Fellowship Center building was completely reconfigured to better accommodate a modern, more contemporary worship service now known as “The Gathering.” Moomey joined DHPC at the end of November. His BS in Biblical Studies from Arizona Christian University has provided a strong spiritual foundation for his ministry. Moomey’s experience and leadership continues to enhance the weekly worship. He says “One thing that stands out to me about DHPC is the vision. I love it, how biblical and countercultural it is. It is clear that DHPC is about living out the word of God in every way possible. Also, there is so much activity and ministry going on in so many areas. The heart to reach and to love everyone where they’re at is evident!” Moomey leads worship each Sunday morning at The Gathering with a team of musicians, but DHPC also offers traditional worship services in the Sanctuary building with the Chancel Choir, occasional Hand Bell Choir, and special music led by Traditional Music director Jeffrey Anthony. Pastor Jim Noble provides a biblical sermon to teach “the word of God, challenge thinking, and apply principles to daily life, resulting in a transformed life.” Worship times during the months of June through

September are 9am for Traditional Worship and 10:30am for The Gathering. October through May, the worship times are 8:15am and 9:45am for Traditional Worship and 11:10am for The Gathering. Childcare is provided by trained, screened and loving individuals for children nursery through third grade (not available at 8:15am). Older children are welcome to stay during the worship services. Students fourth grade and older are also invited to join DHPC Sunday afternoons for Adventures Youth Group

Celebrate with Dad at Keeler’s In honor of Dad, Keeler’s Neighborhood Steakhouse is offering $1 draft beers and $1 wines by the glass with the purchase of a steak on Father’s Day, Sunday, June 16, 5–9pm. Keeler’s Neighborhood Steakhouse is the answer to the demand for a high value for the dollar, top-quality steakhouse experience in North Scottsdale, and is the latest concept by the family-run company, Keeler Hospitality Group, LLC. Keeler’s features only the finest Certified Angus Beef steaks, freshest available seafood, chicken and American specialties. In addition to fine dining, Keeler’s features an inviting and upscale neighborhood social house atmosphere. The restaurant boasts a centrally located island bar, large adjacent patio, courtyard and roof-top deck designed for star gazing and lounging after a good wholesome meal.  Keeler’s Neighborhood Steakhouse is located at 7212 East Ho Hum Road in Carefree. Reservations can be made by calling 602.374.4784 or online at www.keelerssteakhouse.com.


Carefree

DFT Summer Offerings: Jazz Vocalist Performance & July Summer Camps

July camps include: • Camp 1: Broadway Disney songs — ages 8–14; July 8–12 • C  amp 2: Grease in Concert — ages 8–14; July 15–19 • Camp 3: Classic Broadway Songs — adults or youth ages 15 and over; July 22–26 Shannon Wallace

The award-winning Desert Foothills Theater has been presenting live performances in the far North Valley since 1975. For tickets and more information about upcoming events, visit www.dftheater.org or call 480.488.1081.

Serving the Community Since 2002

he Desert Foothills Theater (DFT) invites music lovers to spend an evening with jazz vocalist Shannon Wallace Sunday, June 23 at 6:30pm. A resident of Cave Creek, Wallace’s professional career spans 25 years and has taken her from small trios to fronting 20-piece big band orchestras, performing around Arizona, nationally and in Europe. While working on recording her debut album, Wallace delights in sharing her talents with her local community. Wallace will perform in the Foothills Community Foundation’s Holland Community Center, 34250 North 60th Street, Building B, Scottsdale. Light refreshments will be served along with a cash bar. Tickets for the performance are $29.50 and may be purchased at www.dftheater.org. In addition, registration is now available for musical revue camps to be held in July. “Our musical revue camps offer students the chance to shine and improve their vocal singing techniques by practicing songs from their favorite musicals,” says Tia Wooley, managing director of the Desert Foothills Theater. “Campers will work with a music director and choreographer to create moving choral pieces as well as solos. There will be a performance on Friday at 3pm at the end of each week for the Musical Review Camps.”

Camps are held at the Foothills Community Foundation’s Holland Community Center from 9am to 3pm. The cost is $235 per week and registration can be made at www.dftheater.org.

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Local Scout Completes Cemetery Beautification Project

noah Mohn, an Eagle Scout candidate with Boy Scout Troop #15, completed his Eagle Project Saturday, May 4, with a beautification project in the Cave Creek Cemetery in Carefree. A group of about 50 volunteers showed up to assist, about half of which were under 18 years old. They cut mistletoe out of trees, removed dead brush and raked and developed a path that was lined with river rock

donated by Foothills Granite. Knoah discovered when he requested his donation that Barry Myers, the father of Ashley and Justin Myers, brother and sister co-owners of Foothills Granite, is buried in the cemetery. Knoah said, “I was very warmed and excited by all of the people that decided to show up for my project and was very happy to see that 50 plus people were able to attend. I was super excited that

we were able to finish the project in one day and we had enough time to over beautify and trim headstones.” “The Town of Carefree went out the very next day to see the improvements that we made and were very pleased by the work the Boy Scouts from Troop #15 had done. All in all, I was very happy with the results and thought it was a very beneficial Eagle Project to the town, community and especially those interred there.” His work was acknowledged Monday, May 27, during the Memorial Day Tribute held by the Town of Carefree in Cave Creek Cemetery. In addition to Foothills Granite, Knoah offered a special thanks to Harold’s Cave Creek Corral for providing pizzas for all the workers after the project. Additionally, he offered extra special thanks to Mayor Les Peterson and all the people at the Town of Carefree who provided him with this idea and supported him in this project. His extra, extra special thanks was offered to his grandpa, John Lassen

Photos courtesy of Knoah Mohn

and all of his family and friends that supported him in this project. Boy Scout Troop #15 is in the Pinnacle Peak District of the Grand Canyon Council.

Mix & Mingle with the Chamber in June The Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce will hold its next mixer event Wednesday, June 12, 5:30–7pm. This month’s event is hosted by Advanced Dentistry and Implant Center of Scottsdale, which is located at 10031 East Dynamite Boulevard, Suite 200, Scottsdale. Learn more about the host business at www.advanceddentistryscottsdale.com or by calling 480.725.9188. Always the second Wednesday of each month, the mixer event offers the opportunity to join Chamber members to network, socialize and win prizes. The cost to attend is $5 for members and $15 for non-members (non-members may attend twice before joining). To learn more about the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org.


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Chamber Celebrates the ‘Best Of’ Carefree & Cave Creek

MAYOR BUNCH WRITES...

Serving the Community Since 2002

By Mayor Ernie Bunch

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Wow! Is it June already? As I write this on the 20th of May, I’m thrilled with the weather. I can’t actually ever remember a more pleasant May and I’m looking back at 43 of them here in the Valley of the Sun. Having said that though, there is a real threat to Cave Creek and that threat is all MAYOR of the dried weeds and brush that Town of Cave Creek sprang up over last winter. It really 480.488.1400 is time to do something about that www.cavecreek.org before the “dry lightning” strikes occur prior to the summer monsoons. A neighborhood brush fire would surely ruin your summer and with all of the fuels that is a very likely possibility. Now that the crowds and traffic have lessened in our town it is time to enjoy what Cave Creek has to offer. Nights will still be mostly pleasant, so come on out and enjoy what we have to offer. Live music, bull riding, great food… and don’t forget City Creamery for ice cream that tastes like you churned it yourself. Your Town Council will still be trying to navigate the sign ordinance and we’ll hopefully get that right. I’ve found that with issues like this, when neither side is completely pleased, you’ve likely gotten it right. Still, with the constitutionality issues some will likely be less pleased than others. Having said that, make sure to enjoy your start of summer!

At the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce “Best Of” Celebration of Excellence awards presentation, held Wednesday, May 8, at the Prickly Pear Inn, The Grotto Café was named “Business of the Year” (www.thegrottocafe. com). Other awards included the Mick Ennis Service Award, presented to Rick Perraut of Schooley Mitchell; the IMPACT Award, presented to Desert Foothills Library; the Genesis Award, presented to Bartlett Lake Marina; and the Community Award, presented to Rustyn Sherer of APS. To learn more about those honored at the event, visit www.carefreecavecreek.org/weve-done. For more information about the Chamber, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org. Pictured: Patty Villeneuve, Chamber president and CEO; Curtis Arny, owner of The Grotto Café. Photos: Jim David Photography

Sarah Weiss Named National Merit Scholarship Finalist Cactus Shadows High School (CSHS) announced that Sarah Weiss was named a National Merit Scholarship Finalist. Sarah will receive the New American University Scholarship for National Scholars from her top-choice university, Arizona State. The New American University Scholarship from ASU is $16K per year, renewable for four years. CSHS principal James Swetter said, “I am so proud of Sarah for being named a finalist in the National Merit Scholarship process. Sarah has demonstrated a tremendous work ethic and is very deserving!” Sarah will also receive one-time thesis research support of $1,500 and $1,000 toward a study abroad program with

Barrett, the Honors College. Sarah has been accepted at Barrett and plans on studying biology in preparation for medical school. The process of becoming a National Merit Scholar Finalist is lengthy, but it all starts with the PSAT test she took as a junior. Sarah knew the significance of this test and she excelled on it, which made her eligible to advance in the award process. Superintendent Burdick said, “Our CCUSD students continue to embody our mission: Inspire Excellence!”  Cactus Shadows High School is part of the Cave Creek Unified School District. For information, contact Principal Swetter at jswetter@ccusd93.org or visit www.ccusd93.org.


School may be out for the summer, but the learning never stops at Desert Foothills Library. Area families looking to escape the summer doldrums can check out the library this month for fun, engaging activities for children of all ages. Tuesdays: Family Storytime; 10–10:45am Children ages 2–6 and families are encouraged to join the library for a 30–45 minute story time featuring music, movement, craft and stories. Siblings are welcome. June 11 will be a special Rainbow Storytime for LGBT Pride Month. June 18 will be a ScienceTellers Storytime (Aliens Escape from Earth) with space-themed science experiments. Call to register; drop-ins also welcome.

Cave Creek

Get into Summer Learning at the Library

Thursdays: Baby & Toddler Lapsit; 10–10:30am Geared to children 10 months to 3 years, join this group for a fun 25-minute romp with music, books, rhymes, fingerplays and bubbles. June 3: Discovery Playdate — Preschool Playtime; 11am–noon Discovery playdate is unstructured playtime for children up to age 6. This constructive free play is a great time to socialize with other children. Activities will rotate and include several of the following: sensory activities, water table, building toys and manipulatives, STEM and technology toys, board books, art activities and games. No registration necessary.

June 10–13: Theatre & Arts Camp; 1–3:30pm Join the library for its first Theatre and Arts Camp. Children ages 5–7 are invited to an afternoon camp where they will learn performing skills, play games, make art and put on a small performance. Email info@dfla.org for more information about this free summer camp. Registration will take place prior and will be limited to 12 participants. June 14: Taiko Drumming – A Universe of Stories; 2:30–3:15pm This program is for all ages. Hear and experience Japanese Taiko Drumming, and listen to the sounds of drumming from around the world. Call to register. June 21: Alien Invasion — Learn & Play in Space ; 11am–noon Learn about space in this stellar program for ages 3–7. Practice math and literacy skills with fun activities and games. Snack provided. Siblings are welcome. Call to register or drop-in for a fun time.

Serving the Community Since 2002

June 5: Outer Space Snack Time; 3:30pm Enjoy a space themed snack time at this program for children of all ages. The group will use Oreos to learn about the phases of the moon and make fruity spaceship kebabs. Call 480.488.2286 to register to ensure enough snack ingredients.

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June 24: Dr. T-Rex — Science Exploration; 10:30–11:15am Kids of all ages are invited to join Dr. T-Rex for hands on and interactive scientific experiments. Call to register; drop-ins also welcome. June 26: Throwback Thursday — Vinyl Party; 4pm Ages 11 and up are invited to the teen room to discover the sounds of vinyl music while making art with vinyl records. Rewind and unwind as library staff play great music from the stars of decades past and enjoy a snack. Desert Foothills Library is located at 38443 North Schoolhouse Road in Cave Creek. For information, call 480.488.2286 or visit www.desertfoothillslibrary.org.

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Cave Creek

Kiwanis scholarship recipients and committee members.

Photos by Bill Waters

Serving the Community Since 2002

Kiwanis Club Awards $280,000 in Scholarships

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Kiwanis president Mike Poppenwimer

The Kiwanis Club of Carefree hosted the 2019 Scholarship Awards Program May 15 at the Cactus Shadows Fine Arts Center. Thirty-four local high school students were presented a total of $280,000 in various scholarships and merit awards generated from the Kiwanis Foundation including private donations channeled through the Foundation. These graduating students will be attending a wide variety of colleges and universities across the United States. The 34 recipients were selected from 135 applications from four high schools after hundreds of intensive reviews by the Scholarship Committee, chaired by Janet Busbee. The Scholarship Awards program was led by Mike Poppenwimer, president of the Kiwanis Club of Carefree. Historically, over 250 scholarships, worth over $1.8 million, have been awarded by Kiwanis since 1986 to just local area students. This Awards Program follows the Kiwanis mission of “Serving the Children of our Community.” Tara Jackson, president of Arizona Town Hall, was the keynote speaker at the May 15 event and gave an inspirational speech to the award recipients, describing how just one caring adult can change the trajectory of a child’s life. The Kiwanis Club thanks the local community for their support of the Marketplace/Foundation through donations of gently used goods for resale, volunteering, and shopping at the Marketplace saying that, “Without these efforts we would be unable to host this scholarship event.” Last year, the Kiwanis Marketplace booked over $1.1 million in sales and returned 68 percent of that into the local community. Kiwanis intends to continue to make a significant contribution to the children of the community. For additional information, visit www.kiwaniscarefree.org.

Join the Chamber for Breakfast Join members of the Carefree Cave Creek Chamber of Commerce for an informational monthly business breakfast presentation and early morning networking. This month’s breakfast event will be held June 27, 7:30–9:30am, at Harold’s Cave Creek Corral, 6895 East Cave Creek Road in Cave Creek. To contact Harold’s call 480.488.1906 or visit www.haroldscorral.com. The cost to attend is $8 for member and $15 for non-members. To learn more about the Chamber or find other events, call 480.488.3381 or visit www.carefreecavecreek.org.


Cave Creek

June 29: Fairy Duster and Mariposa Hill Hike 7–9:30am Explore the two newest trails in the conservation area — the Fairy Duster Trail and the Mariposa Hill Trail — as well as a trip around the Metate Trail for a grand total of about three miles. No reservations are required; meet at the main trailhead area where restrooms and picnic tables are located. Moderate hike. Spur Cross Ranch, part of the Maricopa County Regional Parks System, is located at 44000 North Spur Cross Road in Cave Creek. For more information, call 602.506.2930, Ext. 8, or visit www.maricopacountyparks.net.

Savor Summertime at Spur Cross

Photos courtesy of Spur Cross Ranch Conservation Area

Spur Cross Ranch Conservation Area encompasses 2,154 acres of diverse, rugged upper Sonoran Desert. The park offers ranger-led programs each month — here are a few of the programs coming up in June. June 14: Desert Wash Walk 7–9:30am Discover the fascinating world of a desert wash. This hike will feature the exploration of Cottonwood Wash, a major tributary of Cave Creek. Along the way, discuss desert washes and mesas and how the ecosystems differ. Long pants and sturdy shoes are recommended. No dogs on this hike. No reservations are required; meet at the main trailhead area where restrooms and picnic tables are located. Moderate hike. June 15: Moonlight Hike 8–10pm The conservation area is a different experience when seen softly illuminated by the silver moon. While the group will attempt to minimize the use of flashlights, bring one in case it is needed. Moderate hike. June 22: Hohokam Houses-the Ruins of Spur Cross 7–10am Join staff for this 2.5-mile hike that will introduce visitors to the rich archaeological history of the area. See evidence of prehistoric Hohokam dwellings and learn about their culture while trekking up to one of their mesa-top compounds. Bring plenty of water. No dogs on this hike. No reservations are required; meet at the main trailhead area where restrooms and picnic tables are located. Moderate hike.

Serving the Community Since 2002

June 8: Life Along the Creek 7–9:30am Join rangers as they look at the plants and animals that live in the riparian area along a perennial stretch of Cave Creek. The hike will take the group through the Jewel of the Creek Preserve and along the lower Dragonfly Trail for a distance of approximately 1.5 miles. No reservations are required; meet at the main trailhead area where restrooms and picnic tables are located. Moderate hike.

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CATION UNIFIED EDU CAVE CREEK‘GRANTS THE DISTRICT’ FOUNDATION CITY BLACK CANYON

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ation k Unified Educ he Cave Cree best (CCUEF) is Foundation g yearly showcasin known for its the talent, Rock of musical grows, presents only not h District, whic musical ’ ents stud applauds and ed dollars s much need talents, but raise s. rated for classroom , CCUEF celeb Last semester ol District Scho k Unified the Cave Cree grants whose teachers TAKE ONE rict (CCUSD) Dist the with Grant COURTESY OF were funded of the CITYSunTimes along members and brought h Education e Creek Yout from CCYEF (Cav FEBRUARY 2019 rters and two repo S ol’sANTHEM Foundation) Scho HILL High TAIN Shadows com YON (Cactus FOUN essCITY CSPr spaper). BLACK CAN news.CITYSunTimes. ent-run new ST PHOENIX stud THEA er NOR winn sroom award TSDALE t the District pillars are: Clas CREEK SCOT annual Gran CCUEF’s four gy); Music During the CAREFREE CAVE travels to the w uding Technolo SD school bus (Desert Willo ; and Supplies (incl ts. event, a CCU + Ms. Bayless th and Wellness iPads for receiving gran Heal for hers 68 e: Arts; teac $2,2 Dat the and Elementary) schools of the Save the are brought Learning. their classes said, International the art studio Teachers and Burdick surprised Rodeo Days t and Sun ol nden ert scho rinte (Des the Supe um cated, harde to the front of jump off + Ms. Kerschba Put group of dedi Carefre 25Libra Trustees who 00 for “Don’t t the ry “CCUEF is a 2019 ills ge . Academy) $2,5 by the CCUEF who only wan theFooth pa balloons rs t k, ntee on chec ou le” t esert volu g a Pick in a gian working Check beginnFebru schools. They p ary as “I Love the bus with Your Health in students and student grou ERE! Editionunced son best for our This year, a hers have po and Mr. Niel IT’S Hl Events anno ol — h.” The event was and flowers. year that teac + Ms. Stum My Library Mont dle School) ows High Scho make sure each Specia ss additional a anonymous from Cactus Shad oran Trails Mid acce an to with (Son to g ity nse ry alon bus, s and the opportun ch 1 & 2 libra initiated in respo $15,000 CCYEF, also rode the $1,000 for Fren their classroom gift to raise up to ographer and resources for lucky to matching grant , Ms. Dahlke, tional CS Press reporter and phot grateful and and teen educa + Ms. Lindstrom i CCUSD is so to enhance youth foundation es. Ms. D’Ambros ll but mighty local dignitari at the library. Ms. Watts and ers: l Art Inspire es and programs have this sma servic s Middle ion, the 2018 winn Visua these Trial are miss raise oran Here to our s (Son supporting pillars.” for Special Ms. Taylor and @ just four week tions ugh their four SeriesWith School) $1,844 + Ms. Cardin, y is asking for dona Excellence, thro CCUEF, nology (Black Mountain funds mation on nd, the librar and advocates to help rise Ms. Steward Education Tech Holla For more infor the s, 02 for ef.org. visit Faus $2,3 .ccu from supporters to is ry) Ms. ry www med at enta klin, Libra Con Elem website one is welco ine, r + Mr. Desert Foothills Every Cente Petr h of February visit their g it a Chromebooks Ms. mont to the challenge. tesogn,the relies on kindergarten community, makin Ms.ryKnu see photos of durin rted library that Libra Spiess of services, programs to the (Lone Mountain online now to Ms. array a member-suppo andvast that serves unity ents. GET MORE: go Skin Hendrie the ssic Creek institution verner ol) + Ms. Classic its members, comm disco e Cla d Cave and CCUSD stud to Ms. dle Scho Car preschool value efree s Midrces Carefre the generosity of Trailresou offered to the the grant awardees library ry) $2,250 forarea. oranand (Son Elementa s.com. gy to Desert Foothills for funding. The ams ly Time rs nolo entire progr Rally Car dono YSun the nts tech local ng Car Ral s.CIT reside s and addi ry staff invite es and Visit new a (Desert $2,500 for Libra y of quality servic + Ms. Camaras community. check provides a variet ry) $2,500 for the Science lab. se the shelves, Willow Elementa to, “Come in, brow or sit down and read El periodico out a book or two, again.” fall in love all over attend an event – library supporters Beyond donating, their ence by sharing differ a make can Library t Desert Foothills enthusiasm abou ook or media, on Faceb through social one is invited Every alib). Instagram (@dfl and love the library to share why they during s to donate encourage other ry Month.” “I Love My Libra ) 501(c a is ry Libra Desert Foothills tions ization. All dona : (3) nonprofit organ r for be matched dolla Soul Connection eers up to $15,000 will . unt are tax deductible Why Terry Vol dollar. Donations d at 38443 North The library is locate For in Cave Creek. Schoolhouse Road 88.2286 ation, call 480.4 additional inform rg. tfoothillslibrary.o deser www. visit or Desert ways to support Looking for more Host See “Library to g year Foothills Library? having a winnin on page 28. tball program is Baske Gala” y al Varsit 35. Annu news.CITYSunTimes.com Boys page Tenth ws High School Read the story on

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or the sixth year in 2019 a row, chefs from some of the state’s most popul ar restaurants will use their culinary prowess to re-imagine one of the beloved flavors of Girl Scout Cookies — Do-Si-Dos, Savannah Smiles, Tagalo Samoas, ngs, Thin Mints and Trefoils — into a custom dessert menu item during the Girl Scout Cooki Dessert Challenge. e Each restaurant will feature its dessert on their menu Feb. 1–28, with a portio n of the proceeds from each dessert sold directly suppo rting Girl Scouting in Arizona. “Girl Scouts–Ariz ona Cactus-Pine Council (GSACPC) is thrilled that both Rusconi’s American Kitchen and The Thumb are taking part again. They’v e been with us for all six years and are major suppo rters as a result,” says Susan de Queljoe, senior associate of marketing and communications. “It’s also so inspiring to see Original Gravit y, PNPK, ZuZu at Hotel Valley Ho, The Herb Box and Lovecraft taking part since they are all either proud woma n-owned businesses have female chefs or in the kitchen.” First-time challengers this year include Babbo Italian Eatery, Jake’s Unlim ited and The Phoen ix Ale Brewery Central Kitchen. In year’s past, the Dessert Challenge Champion was decided by desser t sales. This year, the Council is hosting poll at www.girlscou a tsaz.org/dessertch allenge. But beyond conce ptualizing, creatin g and offering the desserts on their menu s, this year the chefs are also partnering with the Girl Scouts on severa l enhanced elements of the challenge. “Last year, we got the idea to have a few girls join us in the kitchen to see all the moving parts that goes into both runnin g a restaurant and delivering food to the table,” says chef Lance Whipple of Proof is the largest girl-le at the Four Seaso d entrepreneurial ns Scottsdale Resor program in the world: Girl Scout Cooki t Troon North. “It was such e Season. a hit that we are All the chefs hope hosting ‘Girl Scout Trips’ with some local not only to raise funds Field local Girl Scouting, troops this year to to support really get them excite but also to inspir about the art, math e home cooks across d and science behind Arizona to buy an extra what we do. Maybe box or are even a few future two this there season to create their desserts. Girl Scout chefs in our mix!” own Cookie season runs Similarly, Aioli Gourm through March 3 year. Locations of et Burgers, ZuZu, this cookie booths can PNPK and others will bring girls behin be found online at d the scenes this cookie girlscoutsaz.org/co www. okiefinder. season. And severa partners are helpin l g troops to set up forma l boothing station outside their venue s s, allowing our girls GET MORE : Find to sell cookies in the delectable detail what s of each venue’s creation online now. Visit news.CITYS unTimes.com.

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Book Your SUMMER FUN at the Library Tots • Teens • Adults

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Cave Creek

How to Set the Price When Selling Your Home

Youth Programs Outer Space Snack Time • June 5 • 3:30 - 4:30 pm ScienceTellers: Alien Storytime • June 18 • 10:30 - 11:15 am Dr. T-Rex: Science Exploration • June 24 • 10:30 - 11:15 am Build it with Boxes: Rocket Ships! • June 27 • 1:00 - 2:30 pm

By Jennifer Patnode, Desert Dream Realty

The price is the first thing buyers notice about your property. If you set your price too high, then the chance of alienating buyers is higher. You want your house to be taken seriously, and the asking price reflects how serious you are about selling your home. Several factors will contribute to your final decision. First, you should compare your house to others that are in the market. If you use an agent, he/ she will provide you with a CMA (Comparative Market Analysis). The CMA will reflect the following: • Houses in your price range and area that were sold within the last half-year • Asking and selling prices of houses

Teen Programs

Washer Jewelry Making • June 6 • 4:00 - 5:00 pm Throwback Thursday: Vinyl Party • June 26 • 4:00 - 5:00 pm

All Ages Programs

Restore with Music and Color • June 12 • 2:00 - 3:00 pm Taiko Drumming • June 14 • 2:30 - 3:15 pm

Complete Details at: www.dfla.org

• Features of each house on the market From the CMA, you will learn the difference between the asking price and selling price for all homes sold, the condition of the market, and other houses comparable to yours. Also, try to find out what types of houses are selling and see if it applies to your area. Buyers follow trends, and these trends can help you set your price. Always be realistic. Understand and set your price to reflect the current market situation. Desert Dream Realty was named the 2018 “Best Real Estate Company” in Carefree/Cave Creek by the Chamber of Commerce. Want more information? Call 480.252.8300 or visit our website at www.desertdreamrealty.com.

Farrier • Blacksmith • Knifemaker Supplies

Serving the Community Since 2002

38443 N. Schoolhouse Road, Cave Creek, AZ 480-488-2286 • www.dfla.org

• Current inventory of houses on the market

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29834 N. Cave Creek Road Suite 134 Cave Creek, AZ 85331 (480) 626-0924 Summer Hours: Mon-Fri 7 am-5pm; Sat 8am-2pm

661 E. Howards Road Suite J Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 554-0700 Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

www.piehtoolco.com | 888.PIEHTOOL

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Cave Creek Serving the Community Since 2002

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Pieh Tool Continues Forty-Year Family Tradition in Cave Creek Amy Pieh, president of Pieh Tool Company, tells this story about how she ended up selling horseshoes and blacksmith supplies. “In 1960, seven years before I was born, my father Bill and mother Bonnie started Centaur Forge, Ltd. I grew up knowing blacksmiths and shoers.” “Dad and Mom’s passion for taking care of the folks who depended upon them brought them success in their business. They also made a lot of friends. As far as my parents were concerned, ‘caring’ was a 110 percent effort. It was always their goal to provide the widest selection of products from books to anvils for the best value. That stuck with me.” Pieh joined the United States Air Force and became a safety inspector on aircraft. After she separated from the military, she continued as an inspector in the aerospace, fossil fuel and nuclear power industries worldwide. She says that when her father became seriously ill and died in 2000, she moved back to Wisconsin to help at the company. Not long after, her mother also passed away. “In the two years I worked at my parents’ company, I realized that there was more to my returning home than

just helping out,” says Pieh. “I was carrying on a 40-year family tradition.” She says that Centaur Forge’s customers had become her parents’ friends, and their friends quickly became her friends too. When the company was sold, she went back to work at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station in Arizona, and then one day she visited Camp Verde. Looking across the wide open, western landscape, she realized that she missed the blacksmith and horseshoe supply business and the people. In that moment, Pieh Tool Company of Camp Verde was envisioned. Then, in March 2013, the company opened a second location in Cave Creek. In May 2018, they moved the Cave Creek store to a new location. Pieh says that the new location is twice the size and offers a drive through. A complete list of supplies and tools, including the Pieh Legacy Collection, can be found on the company’s website, along with information about its metalworking school in Camp Verde and other events. In Cave Creek, Pieh Tool is located at 29834 North Cave Creek Road, Suite 134. Call 480.626.0924 or visit www.piehtoolco.com for details.


Ranging in elevation from 2,000 feet to 3,060, Cave Creek Regional Park is 2,922 acres of desert oasis providing any hiker and equestrian majestic views. The Go John Trail loops around a mountain to provide the illusion of being miles away from civilization. In the 1870s, fever-stricken gold seekers staked their dreams on the jasperstudded hills. Guided trails to these sites give visitors an opportunity to travel back in time. Ranger-led activities taking place this month include:

Cave Creek Regional Park is located at 37900 East Cave Creek Parkway. Park hours are Sunday through Thursday, 6am–8pm; Friday through Saturday, 6am–10pm. For information, call 602.506.2930, Ext. 8, or visit www.maricopacountyparks.net. Photo by Ranger Kevin; Courtesy of Cave Creek Regional Park

Serving the Community Since 2002

June 8: Field Observations — Scorpions 7–8:30pm Scorpions are nocturnal creatures, venturing forth after sunset to do what scorpions do, in the dark. That’s when participants will search out these elusive creatures of the night. Meet at the Nature Center where the ranger will guide guests on this nocturnal adventure. Sturdy shoes are recommended for this easy 1- 2-mile hike. Bring plenty of water and a flashlight. No pets.

June 22: Wilderness Survival Basics 10am–11:30am The wilderness is no place to get caught guessing and the Sonoran Desert is unforgiving in its extremes. Meet the ranger in the Nature Center to learn the basics of wilderness survival. All ages welcome. Be sure to bring plenty of water. No pets.

Cave Creek

June Ranger-Led Hikes at Cave Creek Regional Park

June 15: The Old Clay Mine Adventure 6–7pm Inside the mine, rangers will discuss the history of this site and explore how its contents were used to “cure what ailed ya.” Bring water, a flashlight, and a camera. No pets. Park at the Nature Center and follow the directions at the trailhead kiosk to the Clay Mine. This program is firstcome, first-served by reservation, only. Tours begin every 30 minutes. Allow for approximately 20-30 minutes of “hike” time from the parking lot to the mine. This hike is considered easy to moderate. For reservations, contact Ranger Mark at mark.paulat@maricopa.gov.

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Cave Creek Serving the Community Since 2002

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6268 E Cave Creek Road, suite 7B cave creek, arizona 85331 480.361.4446 i OPEN weekdays 10am-3pm 6.19


Celebrate Wright’s Birthday at Taliesin West

• A  new print-on-demand program featuring Wright-inspired textiles and discover design options for the home • B  ox Projects collection. The traditional Box Projects were originally gifts made by apprentices and Fellowship members on Wright’s birthday and at Christmas.

Fundraiser to Benefit Fetch Foundation The Arizona Chapter of the National Concierge Association presents its 11th Annual Fundraiser & Silent Auction Monday, June 10, 5:30-8:30pm. This year a portion of the proceeds raised will benefit The Fetch Foundation (www. thefetchfoundation.com). The organization will also accept any physical donations of animal necessities or gift cards during the event. The Fetch Foundation is dedicated to assisting displaced animals and providing “The Fido Bag” to local first responders to assist when there is a tragedy including a pet. This program supplies local fire departments with the necessary pet emergency equipment and training so pets can receive medical help immediately at the point of rescue. The nonprofit organization also assists families who cannot afford the veterinary care in these situations with funds to save their beloved pet. In addition, the organization’s Search and Service program identifies dogs that have been discarded or surrendered and whose personalities may do well as Search and Rescue K9’s or become service dogs. The event will be held at Fleming’s Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar, 6333 North Scottsdale Road in Scottsdale (www.flemingssteakhouse.com). Admission is $5. For updates, visit www.facebook.com/ncaarizonachapter.

• G  et hands-on with the Education Department and take part in two activities: a bridge-building lab and a cyanotype photographic printing workshop. • W  atch a classic film once shown at Taliesin West during Wright’s time, The Wizard of Oz, as well as a video introduction to the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and a 2017 BBC documentary Frank Lloyd Wright: The Man Who Built America. “We’re so excited to showcase and share all of the exciting things we’re working on at the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, and hope to build connections with the community that will last for many years to come,” Kevin Conley, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation vice president of Public Engagement said. “Discovery Day is an opportunity for us to welcome everyone to experience Wright’s great legacy firsthand, while exploring his winter home and desert camp.” For additional information, visit www.franklloydwright.org and click on the “Events & Programs” link.

Serving the Community Since 2002

In celebration of Frank Lloyd Wright’s 152nd birthday, the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation invites the community to the first-ever Discovery Day Saturday, June 8. At the event, guests are invited to a day of exploring Taliesin West and enjoying live entertainment and pop-up shops from local makers. This community event is sponsored by Comerica. Admission for Discovery Day is free, but an advance reservation is required to guarantee entry. From 10am–4pm June 8, with the last entry at 3pm, guests will make their way through Wright’s winter home desert laboratory, they will stop at different stations throughout the campus to participate in a variety of activities and demonstrations from Foundation staff members, including: • An inside look into challenges and techniques of the Preservation Department, with some of the basics of building conservation science, as well as how technology can be used to analyze material composition and methods of degradation involving wood, finishes and masonry

• P  op-Up Shop featuring the work of local artisans including Arlee Kasselman Jewelry, Jodi Bombardier Jewelry, WhenLifeGivesURocks by Teri Welsch, Loving Earth Pottery by Calvin Hiser, RK3 Handcrafted Fine Arts

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Community

COMMUNITY VOICES

BARBARA KAPLAN Scottsdale Interior Designer

This is the Day PASTOR PAUL WITKOP

Serving the Community Since 2002

Light of the Desert Lutheran Church

You and I have been given one life. We do not know how many years will be given to us on this earth. That is why I try to live with the mindset that “every day is a gift.” In Psalm 118:24, the psalmist writes, “This is the day that the Lord has made. We will rejoice and be glad in it.” How are you going to live this day? Really, today is the only day that is yours to effect. You cannot change the past and you do not know what will happen the future. CS Lewis said, “You can’t go back and change the beginning, but you can start where you are and change the ending.” Today is your day…so make it count. There is nothing wrong with planning for the future. Most of us work hard to plan our careers, our relationships, our finances and our pursuits in the next chapter of life. God cares about them too. God loves you very much and wants to help you to be prepared for the future. But God is also very concerned about what you are doing with today. Every choice you make today is important…and it’s in the little choices that the bigger ones take shape. Rather than dwelling on trying to know the future, God calls us to focus on what we know to be true today. • Live thankfully: I Thessalonians 5:16–18 • Live to serve: Matthew 20:25-29

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• Do the right thing, not the easy thing: Micah 6:8 • Stop worrying: Philippians 4:6–7 • Be yourself: Ephesians 2:8–10 When we remember to focus each day on these basic truths and pursue them, God will reveal his plans for the future, in his time. Everything you have in your life today is a gift from God. The next breath you take, the next meal you eat, the next sunset you enjoy, the next hug you treasure — all of them are gifts. He is very generous with his provision. As we trust him, he will help us to best use each day. Today is your day…it is a gift…so make it count.

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Workspaces Need Personal Touches, Too

Paul Witkop is Pastor of Light of the Desert Lutheran Church in Cave Creek. Call 480.563.5500 or email paulw@lightofthedesert.org.

Q: Should people be allowed to personalize their offices? If so, how do you “monitor” or “keep control” of the overall appearance? A: This question, of course, touches my heart because my answer is based on the philosophy of the Bajaro Method, which holds that everyone needs to live in their own personal expression. It is helpful when everyone has a personalized space in which to function and be productive, since this is where so many of us spend most of our waking hours. Whether we are in an office, showroom, store or vehicle, we need to be comfortable and feel supported in our workspace. Keeping control of this has its challenges; however, it is well worth the exercise because people react differently to colors and styles. Giving people choices, such as the colors they want to work in, will empower and help them be productive and reach their maximum potential. Start the process by determining how open the employer is to this concept rather than how much personal expression you want. Next consider if the public is entering your space. For instance, if you have a private office it is easy to make a statement with color and style. If you have an open, modular office space you must modify your personal statement to be less conspicuous in your decoration choices, keeping them more subtle. In a retail business you might work from an open desk — this is where you might have a picture, personal desk blotter and chair that are meaningful to you. Additionally, a nice vase of flowers or interesting bookends may be your only private statement. If you are in your vehicle all day, you have lots of opportunity to bring things into your car such as pictures, pillows, blankets, refreshments in special containers, music, motivational tapes or writing materials. It isn’t necessary for others to notice the items you have chosen to have around you. Try keeping your choices generic enough so as not to offend anyone else who is working with in the same space. Keep things that make you smile tucked away in drawers. If there are no guidelines in place for items brought from home, you may want to create a company standard. (This can be detailed by size, color and subject. I recommend that if anyone objects to a particular item, this is enough not to have it there.)

Male Call: Terms of Non-Endearment JAMES ROBERTS Phoenix

There’s no question that the dating industry — and by this we mean online dating sites as well as coaching services — is big business. According to Judi Schindler, author of Husbands: An Owner’s Manual, it’s forecast to reach $3.2 billion by next year. Apparently “dating coach” is one of the hot new careers of the 21st century. Frankly, and with due respect to coaches everywhere, The Male Call Advisory Board™ can’t see such coaching being of much use. Yes, a good advisor can fix your out-of-focus, groupshots-with-the-besties and (yes) upside-down pictures. Your bad spelling. Your “love to laugh” and “no drama” clichés. But they can’t…ahem… fix you. Not that you need fixing but if someone tarts you up like a prom pic, you’re going to disappoint when they see the un-prom’d version. With that in mind, we’re providing the next best thing: explanations of the new terminology that is making your online experience miserable. • Breadcrumbing: sending messages, “digital morsels,” that suggest they’re still interested in you when in fact they’re unlikely to want to meet. • B  enching: like above but usually occurs after an actual meeting — when they don’t really want to date seriously but just “keep you on the bench” for emergencies. • G  hosting: suddenly disappearing and not responding after a few dates in hopes you’ll get the hint. Similar to the “slow fade” or “drizzle.” • D  aterview: a series of seemingly prepared questions designed to “get your resume” (a la TV’s “Survivor”) to determine if you’re dateable. In short, a job interview. • C  atfishing: popularized by the MTV show, a “catfish” creates fake personal profiles on social media sites to trick an unsuspecting person (the “hopeful”) into some scheme. • A  nd our favorite (because we just made it up) … • D  rama: stuff you have in your life, but they don’t, because theirs is “adventure” …or being a “partner in crime.”

Author of BarbarasPicks.com, a unique online resource for people to learn about quality vendors, extraordinary materials, special craftspeople and experts in unique services and areas of design and lifestyle. To contact Barbara, e-mail barbara@barbarakaplan.com.

A significantly over 40-something Phoenix-based writer, author of On Being Eight Again and The Tao of Coyote. Divorced with no children, he has been exploring the dating scene and collecting tales of woe for many years. Need a guy’s perspective? Email jrobertpenn@aol.com. For more words, ideas and whimsy, visit jveeds.wordpress.com.

GET MORE: Read more about personalizing a workspace online now. Visit news.CITYSuntimes.com.

GET MORE: For additional terms and weblinks, go to news.CITYSunTimes.com now.


SUPERINTENDENT’S MESSAGE

YOUTH & EDUCATION

With the 2018–19 school year completed, CCUSD is looking forward not only to the upcoming school year, but also to future years with an Innovation Committee working diligently to develop new Strategic Plan goals and objectives that will guide CCUSD for the next three years. Made up of parents, teachers, staff, students and community members, the Innovation DR. DEBBI BURDICK Committee is reviewing hundreds of responses from staff members, parents and community Superintendent Cave Creek Unified School District members to the following questions: • How should our learning environments be structured to meet the needs of our students? • What does the perfect school look like? • H  ow will we prepare our graduates to be ready for college and 21st Century careers? • What do you feel are non-negotiables for student learning and success? The CCUSD Leadership Team and educators continue to explore innovation and relevancy of our curriculum and teaching practices as we challenge and engage our students. The Innovation Committee’s task will be to maintain and expand the strong legacy of learning, which is a hallmark of the district. The Superintendent’s Student Cadre at Cactus Shadows High School provided input into the process by defining “innovation” for the committee as they began their work. Here are their insightful contributions. Innovation is: • Working for change to help others and strengthen our society • The ability to adapt into new circumstances

• Something that creates a positive change in everyday life • Creating an idea or something new to benefit society • New, Improve, Being one step ahead • B  eing able to evolve in the future using modern technology and other things to get better over time — adaptation

ueblo Grande Museum invites families to come enjoy hands-on children’s storytelling and crafts every Saturday from June 1–29, from 10am to noon. Each book is read by the author followed by story related crafts and a light snack. Programs are $5 each, perfect for children in pre-kindergarten through fourth grade and includes Museum admission for the participant. The program is made possible by the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary. Parents can register online at www.pueblogrande.com or check in at the front desk each Saturday to participate. All participants must be accompanied by an adult, there is no program fee for adults. The Arizona Authors Summertime Storytelling & Craft Saturdays is also part of the Maricopa County Reads program, where children get badges and points for participating in different programs around the Valley. Attend a storytelling program at Pueblo Grande to get a secret code and enter them at www.maricopacountyreads.org to collect badges. June 1 The Red Tail Tale on the Arizona Trail by Rodo Sofranac Rowen, a young, red-headed explorer, and Rojo, a clever, red-tailed hawk meet, bond, and experience a wonderful adventure on the fascinating Arizona National Scenic Trail. June 8 Who Eats Orange? by Dianne White Who eats orange — a bunny? A chicken? Maybe you? Find out in this unique exploration of the rainbow of colorful foods eaten by animals around the world. June 15 Fast Freddie, The Legend In A Shell by Michael Hale Freddie is a Desert Tortoise who refuses to live a slow and boring life. It is a humorous rhyming tale of a running tortoise whose life becomes the stuff of legend. June 22 Babies Nurse - Así se alimentan los bebés by Phoebe Fox Babies – whether pandas, puppies or people – nurse. This bond is precious; this process, a natural art. Luminous illustrations and lyrical text will inspire conversations about caretaking in the natural world, while the bilingual format makes this charming book accessible to speakers of both Spanish and English.

• B  eing able to evolve through technology and using the most of our creative ability To learn more about the CCUSD Innovation Committee, go to the Innovation Committee webpage link: www.ccusd93.org/page/8780.

My Magic Hat Rules! because My Magic Hat Goes to School! by Debi Novotny My Magic Hat Rules! is a creative, fun way of teaching fundamental phonics all the while using a play on words. Let this magic hat walk you and your kids through a fun story with learning intertwined. Its repetitive structure allows the young reader to gain confidence in fluency and holds your interest with introducing new reading rules as the story progresses.

To contact Dr. Burdick, call 480.575.2000. For more information on the Cave Creek Unified School District, visit www.ccusd93.org.

Pueblo Grande Museum is located at 4619 East Washington Street in Phoenix. For information, call 602.495.0901 or visit www.pueblogrande.com.

June 29

Summer Etiquette Camps Offered for Kids Those who would like their child to get a few helpful and fun-filled lessons in manners and proper etiquette this summer are in luck. As much as parents try teaching manners and proper etiquette at home, sometimes children just need to listen and learn from another adult. SueAnn Brown, a certified etiquette instructor and owner of It’s All About Etiquette, will offer four-day summer etiquette camps to children, ages 6 to 8, June 4–7 and July 9–12. Brown will also offer camps to children, ages 9 to 12, June 18–21 and July 23–26. For the summer etiquette camps children meet for just two hours a day, from 10am to noon at the St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church in Scottsdale. Children will learn proper dining skills, how to set a table, having proper eye contact, shaking hands, phone etiquette, proper introductions, how to write thank-you

notes, the importance of having good hygiene and many more valuable life lessons. The cost is $250 per child and includes a dining tutorial, class supplies, snacks and an etiquette workbook. A special graduation ceremony will be held on the last day of class. Advanced registration is required as space is limited. Teens can get helpful lessons in manners and proper etiquette this summer, too. It’s All About Etiquette will offer two-day “Essential Etiquette for Teens” college prep workshops for ages 13 to 18 June 29–30 and July 27–28. These three-hour workshops will be held from 1–4pm at St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church. Brown will help prepare teens for the many new social and business situations they will face as young adults and provide them with the self-confidence, enthusiasm and motivation that is essential as they

move into the next phase of their lives. The topics covered include interviewing tips for college and job interviews, handshakes and eye contact, body language, the art of small talk, how to speak with the right tone with clarity, leadership qualities, how to make a positive first impression, social media etiquette, dating etiquette, dining etiquette, seating a lady at the table, tipping guidelines, dressing the part, being a good listener, interview follow-up calls and thank-you notes, grooming and skin care. The cost $285 per teen and includes snacks, certificate, and an etiquette reference book. Advanced registration is required as space is limited. St. Bernard of Clairvaux Church is located at 10755 North 124 Street Scottsdale. For additional information and to register, call 480.510.6346 or visit  www.itsallaboutetiquette.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

• A  tool or skill that can be used to make the world better or make something easier

Arizona Authors Summertime Storytelling & Craft Saturdays

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

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AROUND TOWN

June 2

1

Todd Herzog

Musical Instrument Museum

3 June 7

Foreigner

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The Pool at Talking Stick Resort June 7

JD Souther

Musical Instrument Museum June 1

June 7–9

Khani Cole’s Sonic Table

Musical Instrument Museum www.mim.org; 480.478.6000 June 1

The Clairvoyants

Detour Company Theatre: Mamma Mia!

Photo: Chad Kamenshine

June 3

Dessa

The Showroom at Talking Stick Resort www.talkingstickresort.com; 480.850.7777

Musical Instrument Museum

June 1–2

Chase Field

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. New York Mets

Chase Field www.mlb.com/dbacks; 602.514.8400

June 3–5

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts www.scottsdaleperformingarts.org; 480.499.8587

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Arizona Diamondbacks vs. Los Angeles Dodgers

Ryan Sell in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Photo: Joan Marcus 2017

June 11–16

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

June 6

Patty Griffin

ASU Gammage www.asugammage.com; 480.965.3434

Musical Instrument Museum

June 12

Train with Goo Goo Dolls

Photo: Rose Tores

Ak-Chin Pavilion www.livenation.com

June 8

Musical Mayhem

Scorpius Aerial Studio at Metropolitan Arts Institute www.scorpiusdance.com

June 13

The Cookers

Musical Instrument Museum

June 9

June 13–23

Tab Benoit featuring Whiskey Bayou Revue

Musical Instrument Museum

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12th Annual New Summer Shorts 2019

Theatre Artists Studio www.thestudiophx.org; 602.765.0120

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June 11

Aly & AJ

The Van Buren www.thevanburenphx.com June 11

Sona Jobarteh

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Musical Instrument Museum

Brian Chartrand

June 14

A Tom Petty “Wildflowers” Tribute

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts


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June 23

Phoenix Mercury vs. Los Angeles Sparks

Talking Stick Resort Arena https://mercury.wnba.com; 602.252.WNBA

Talking Stick Resort Arena

June 14–30

Musical Instrument Museum

Valley Youth Theatre at Herberger Theater Center www.vyt.com; 602.253.8188

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. Los Angeles Dodgers

June 24

Orquesta Akokán

Freaky Friday

June 24–26 Chase Field

June 21

June 16

Jay Leno

Jennifer Lopez

June 26

Salt River Grand Ballroom at Talking Stick Resort

Talking Stick Resort Arena www.livenation.com

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June 21

Dee Dee Bridgewater

Musical Instrument Museum

Paul McCartney

Talking Stick Resort Arena www.livenation.com

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June 21–23

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. San Francisco Giants Chase Field June 22

Eddie Izzard World Tour 2019: Wunderbar

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June 26

Todd Rundgren

Celebrity Theatre www.celebritytheatre.com; 602.267.1600

Photo: Laura Mariet

June 26

June 16

Rickie Lee Jones

Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Ensemble

Musical Instrument Museum

Musical Instrument Museum

Skerryvore

Santana: Supernatural Now

June 18–20

Arizona Diamondbacks vs. Colorado Rockies Chase Field

Ak-Chin Pavilion www.livenation.com

Musical Instrument Museum

June 22

Phoenix Mercury vs. Indiana Fever

June 28

Melissa Manchester

June 19

Talking Stick Resort Arena

Musical Instrument Museum

Hootie & The Blowfish Ak-Chin Pavilion www.livenation.com

June 27

June 22

22

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June 19

Crystal Bowersox

Musical Instrument Museum June 20

Khalid

Gila River Arena www.livenation.com June 20

Blue Highway

Musical Instrument Museum

June 22–23 22–23 June

Musical Icons: Icons: Musical Johnny Cash Cash and and Johnny June Carter Carter June

Musical Instrument Instrument Musical Museum Museum

June 29

Indigo Girls

The Van Buren

Talented young musicians in grades 7–12 are invited to join a new Youth Orchestra sponsored by the Scottsdale Philharmonic. “Our mission is to bring classical music free of charge to people of all ages,” says Joy Partridge, president and co-founder of the Scottsdale Philharmonic. “Our mission is growing. This past year, we began work to form a Scottsdale Philharmonic Youth Orchestra for all students in the Valley grades 7–12. We’re excited to move forward with our auditions and practices.” The Scottsdale Philharmonic Youth Orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Daniel Atwood, will meet Tuesdays from 7pm to 9:30pm at the New Vision Center located at 18010 North Tatum Boulevard in Phoenix. The group plans four concerts between October 2019 and May 2020. Admission to the Scottsdale Philharmonic Youth Orchestra is by audition. Musicians who would like to arrange an audition can visit www. scottsdalephilharmonic.net/youthorchestra for more information and to download the audition application. Scholarships are available to help with the application and participation fees. “We are also working to create an Annual Scottsdale Children’s Concert to introduce all third graders to classical music,” Partridge continued. “For the past two years, we provided music camp scholarships to underprivileged youth.” Upcoming free concerts include Oct. 13 and Nov. 24. Doors open at 3pm for each concert, and free parking is available. For a $15 tax-deductible donation, attendees can have a VIP preferred seat — payable on the website. For additional information, call 480.951.6077 or visit www.scottsdalephilharmonic.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

Orpheum Theatre http://phoenix.ticketforce.com

Auditions Open for Area Youth Orchestra

Arts & Entertainment

June 14

Phoenix Mercury vs. Los Angeles Sparks

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Arts & Entertainment Serving the Community Since 2002

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Celebrate a ‘Fortnite 4th’ at WestWorld of Scottsdale The Scottsdale Fourth of July celebration presented by Plexus Worldwide, returns for the sixth year to the 300,000 square-foot fully air-conditioned Tony Nelssen Equestrian Center at WestWorld of Scottsdale, Thursday, July 4, 4–9:30pm, for a full night of Fourth of July fun suitable for all ages. This sixth-year celebration takes on the theme “Fortnite 4th” featuring gamers live in action on a 16x9 LED Wall, Fortnitethemed games for kids to enjoy, and a full menu of Fortnite-themed food and beverages including Fortnite Fries, Rice Krispy Med Kits and more available for purchase. This red, white and blue event brings together rides, interactive games and food for the whole family, all within a cool environment, ending the night with a bang — a fireworks show at approximately 9pm. In addition, guests attending the event have the option to upgrade their experience with a Backyard Barbecue ticket. Paying $35 in advance, admission includes unlimited food by Chef Michael DeMaria of M Culinary (www.mculinary. com), including hamburgers and cheeseburgers, barbecue pulled pork, Vienna Beef hot dogs, potato salad, green salad, watermelon, all-American desserts and ice cream, and beverages in an exclusive area encompassing the South Hall.

This ticket delivers a photo booth to capture patriotic moments, lawn games including cornhole, as well as unlimited access to all the fun, games and festivities for the whole family throughout the event. General admission tickets include abundant free activities, and kids’ wristbands are also available for purchase for unlimited fun featuring exciting rides and features. Adult and child general admission tickets in advance are $15. Activity Wristband in advance is $15. Adult and child Backyard Barbecue tickets in advance are $35. Child Backyard Barbecue tickets include an Activity Wristband. Kids 5 and under receive free admission and access to inflatable Toddler Town. Ticket prices increase at the door/ day of event. Military and first responders receive one general admission ticket with ID at the door. Parking is $5. Guests also have the option to park on the polo field at WestWorld with friends and family for $20 a carload to see the fireworks show set against the McDowell Mountains. Polo field lot opens at 7pm. Fireworks show starts at 9pm. WestWorld of Scottsdale is located at 16601 North Pima Road in Scottsdale. For event information, or to purchase tickets, visit www.scottsdale4th.com.

Enter online at news.CITYSunTimes.com/contests or complete the short survey form, indicate which event you would like to attend and mail to CITYSunTimes, 10645 North Tatum Boulevard, Suite 200-413, Phoenix, AZ 85028. Deadline to receive submissions is June 15.

Enter To Win! [ ] A  pair of tickets to see CHA WA American Traditions at Musical Instrument Museum July 16 [ ] A  pair of tickets to see the Arizona Diamondbacks take on the Philadelphia Phillies at Chase Field Aug. 7 Name _________________________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ Phone Number _________________________________________________________ E-Mail _________________________________________________________________

H H H MAY WINNERS! H H H A pair of tickets to see Sona Jobarteh at Musical Instrument Museum: Janet Vives of Carefree

Do you receive CST at [

] your home or [

Do you have children? [

] Y or [

] N

] pick up on newsstand? Pets? [

] Y or [

]N

Who is the primary reader of CST in your home? __________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ What kind of advertising do you look for in newspapers? ___________________

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A family 2-pack of tickets to the Valley Youth Theatre production of Disney’s Freaky Friday: Pam Siegal of Paradise Valley

______________________________________________________________________


Arts & Entertainment Serving the Community Since 2002

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Serving the Community Since 2002

HEALTH & WELLNESS

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Monthly Memory Café Presented by JFCS Jewish Family & Children’s Service (JFCS) presents its monthly Memory Café Thursday, June 6, at Beth El Congregation, 1118 West Glendale Avenue in Phoenix, 10–11:30am. June’s special guest artist is Janina Phinao, who will help everyone create unique centerpieces for their own. Phinao is the activity coordinator at Belmont Village in Scottsdale. She works directly with the residents helping to keep their lives filled with a wide variety of meaningful creative opportunities. “I love getting to know people,” she says, “and making sure they have a fun, purposeful lifestyle.” JFCS will provide all the necessary materials to create a centerpiece specifically for Fourth of July or more generally for summer. Participants are welcome to bring in elements such as artificial flowers or personal items to incorporate as well. The Café is a meeting place for those with changes in their thinking or memory, mild cognitive impairment or dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease or a related disorder, along with their care partners. It is a place to socialize, relax, meet others and have fun through an arts activity. Coffee and snacks are provided. This month’s café is sponsored in part by 24 Hour Home Care, working throughout the Valley to provide excellence in in-home care (www.24hrcares.com). There is no charge to attend, but registration is required. The Café is open to people of all backgrounds. To register or for further information, email kathy.rood@jfcsaz.org or call Kathy at 602.452.4627. Learn more about JFCS at www.jfcsaz.org.

Use The ‘ABCDE’s’ For Men’s Health Week & Month June is designated as Men’s Health Month (www. menshealthmonth.org) with screenings, health fairs and outreach activities taking place around the country. For men in Arizona, it’s an especially good time to talk about skin cancer, the most common form of cancer in the U.S. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2019, it’s expected more men (57,220) than women (39,260) will be diagnosed with melanomas of the skin. It’s estimated more men (7,230) than women (2,490) will die from melanomas of the skin in 2019. The experts at Affiliated Dermatology, which was founded in July 2002 by Dr. Richard L. Averitte, Jr., are encouraging people to share the “ABCDE” tool with the men in their lives. Just like self-exams for breast cancer, the tool created by the American Academy of Dermatology is designed to help catch problems early. Consult with a dermatologist right away if any moles or pigmented spots exhibit any of the following:  • A = Asymmetry. One half does not match the other. • B = Border. The edges are irregular or poorly defined. • C = Color. The color varies or has shades of tan, brown or black. • D = Diameter. Melanomas are usually bigger than 6mm (the size of a pencil eraser) when diagnosed but can be smaller. • E  = Evolving. A mole or lesion that is changing in size, shape, color or looks different from the others. Since its founding, Affiliated Dermatology has grown to eight locations providing skin cancer prevention and treatment, medical and aesthetic dermatology services and allergy testing. Dr. Averitte also established the Arizona Skin Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to providing financial aid to people with skin cancer who cannot afford treatment. For additional information, visit www.affderm.com.

Dine at Barro’s — Help Raise Funds to Fight Pediatric Cancer With their continued commitment to helping local families, family owned Barro’s Pizza and Pepsi are teaming up for the fourth year this June to raise money for children and families affected by pediatric cancer. In June, all Barro’s Pizza locations will donate proceeds up to $40,000 from the sale of any lunch special to the Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children (ACFC), a local nonprofit whose mission is to help Arizona families with the high costs and challenging logistics while caring for their children during cancer treatment. “Helping others in our community is paramount to our family and our business,” said Bruce Barro, owner of Barro’s Pizza. “We are constantly looking for ways to make a difference in our community so, in June, we will donate all proceeds from the sales of any lunch special purchased to help families that have children battling cancer.” Arizona Cancer Foundation for Children (www.azcancerfoundation.org) was founded by Chrisie

Funari after she lost her young daughter, Ava, to cancer. Funari traveled the country seeking the best treatments and care for her daughter. Knowing the struggle and the toll it takes on the family, Funari started the organization to empower families by ensuring they have a secure place to live, access to medical treatment and continued support. “Barro’s Pizza goes to such great lengths each year to support our mission,” said Funari president and founder of ACFC. “We are so thankful for their generosity each summer. The money donated will help cover expenses associated with a child’s cancer diagnosis, provide Sunshine Packs filled with items that provide comfort and fun while undergoing treatment and emotional and financial support for end of life.” Since it started in 2013, ACFC has helped hundreds of local families, and with the help of companies like

Barro’s Pizza, hopes to continue to help more and more families each year. During the entire month of June, Barro’s Pizza is encouraging guests to choose from an array of lunch specials starting at 10:30am daily at all locations. Lunch hours vary by location. For more information visit www.barrospizza.com.


FOOD & WINE

Pastrami Hash and Eggs

...with a Taste of Italy

In honor of Dad, Original Breakfast House is offering five scrumptious specials exclusively on Father’s Day, Sunday, June 16. Breakfast offerings include: • Crab Omelette, $15 • Pastrami Hash and Eggs, $14.50 • Mexican Eggs Benedict, $14 • Shrimp and Grits, $14 • Carrot Cake Pancakes, $11.25 These featured dishes are offered all day (6:30am–2pm) in addition to the restaurant’s regular menu. Original Breakfast House is located at 13623 North 32nd Street in North Phoenix. For more information, call 602.482.2328 or visit www.originalbreakfasthouse.com.

Someburros Expands –

Newest Location Planned for Uptown Phoenix Someburros is expanding outside the East Valley, and Uptown Phoenix will be the first to get a taste. The family-owned, fast-casual eatery known for its time-tested Mexican recipes and community-focused philanthropic efforts will open later this summer at 7th Street and Camelback in Phoenix, giving the uptown crowd easy access to its burros, tacos, enchiladas and other authentic Mexican eats. In addition to indoor seating and takeout options, this Someburros location will feature a patio with bistro lighting overlooking 7th Street, which happens to be right in the heart of Someburros co-owner Amy Vasquez’ own neighborhood. “It’s been a dream of mine for some time to open a Someburros in my neighborhood,” she said. “We know this community, we love this community and we’re raising our own families in this community, so we can’t wait to build our workforce and fanbase within it.” Someburros has a long history of giving back to the communities that welcome it, and Amy, alongside her brother and Someburros co-owner, Tim Vasquez, says that they look forward to partnering with local schools as part of Someburros’ continued outreach efforts. “This is a bustling area, and with so many students, professionals and residents around, fast-casual is always in demand,” said Tim, of the decision to open in Uptown Phoenix. “We’ve been thinking about expanding to this area for a while now, but we wanted to wait until we could find the perfect place. Now that we’ve found it, we can’t wait to get the doors open.”

Serving the Community Since 2002

Father’s Day is around the corner, and Pomo Pizzeria wants to help celebrate Dad with all day discounted bites and libations. Get ready to say, “Felice Giorno Del Padre,” because Pomo is celebrating Italian style on Father’s Day, June 16, with all day happy hour at all three locations in Scottsdale, Phoenix and Gilbert. This includes mini meatballs for just $6, Calamari ($7), Salumi Board ($8), Crostini ($7) and much more. Libations include a $4 Italian Prosecco, $5 Peroni, $4 house wines and $2 off craft cocktails. The signature style of Pomo Pizzeria aims to create unparalleled pizza experience that combines authentic flavors with techniques handed down over generations. Visit www.pomopizzeria.com for more details.

Treat Dad to Breakfast this Father’s Day

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In addition to a full lineup of Mexican fare, Someburros Uptown will offer draft beers and frozen margaritas alongside its award-winning eats. Someburros’ new Uptown Phoenix spot will join existing Valley locations in Tempe, Chandler, Queen Creek, Gilbert and Scottsdale. To check out the menu or view a full list of locations, visit www.someburros.com.

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DESTINATIONS DESTINATIONS Tucson Museum of Art Celebrates Travel and Exploration

Serving the Community Since 2002

Peter G. Holbrook, Isis Temple and Colonnade, 1995; oil on canvas, 30 x 45 in. Collection of the Tucson Museum of Art. Virginia Johnson Fund. 1995.48 © Peter G. Holbrook

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The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block (TMA) kicked off the summer season in May with an exhibition focusing on art inspired by travel. Travelogue: Grand Destinations and Personal Journeys includes paintings, drawings, photographs, graphics and travel ephemera by artists surveying nearly 250 years of travel from the “Grand Tour” of Europe and the Middle East to sojourns through the American West. The exhibition runs through Sunday, September 29, at the James J. and Louise R. Glasser Galleries. Public programs are planned throughout the run of the exhibition. Travelogue is organized by the Tucson Museum of Art and co-curated by Dr. Julie Sasse, chief curator, and Christine Brindza, senior curator, Glasser Curator of Art of

Nellie Mae Stowe, Unknown Title, c. 1900; oil on canvas, 19.5 x 32 in. Collection of the Tucson Museum of Art. Bequest of Ruth Field Curry. 1990.3.1

the American West. According to Dr. Sasse, “Artists have long inspired us to explore the world. This exhibition reminds us of the joy of observation and celebrates creativity inspired by place.” More than 80 artists are represented in Travelogue, including Diane Burko, Harry (Henry) Chase, Tseng Kwong Chi, Eanger Irving Couse, Randall Davey, Fremont Ellis, Frederick Carl Frieseke, Ralph Gibson, Lawrence Gipe, Peter G. Holbrook, Mitchell Johnson, Maria Martinez, Steve McCurry, Richard Miller, Orrin Sheldon Parsons, Awa Tsireh (Alfonso Roybal), Millard Owen Sheets and Lone Wolf (Hart Merriam Shultz). The Tucson Museum of Art and Historic Block will offer special events throughout the show run, including free First Thursdays programming, free Second SundAZe Family Day, travel-themed films, lecture opportunities and more. For additional information, visit www.tucsonmuseumofart.org or call 520.624.2333.


Destinations

Slightly Stoopid

Cool Pines – Hot Music:

Head to Flagstaff this Summer Located at Fort Tuthill County Park in Flagstaff, Pepsi Amphitheater presents the perfect opportunity to escape the Valley heat by offering a multitude of entertainment this summer. Events take place through September but here are just a few coming up in June, July and August.

June 14: Rebelution Gates open 5:30pm, show begins 7pm. Grammy award nominated reggae group Rebelution brings their Good Vibes Summer Tour with special guests PROTOJE, Durand Jones & The Indications and Dj Mackle. June 16: Sublime with Rome Show begins at 4pm, gates open 3pm. Sublime with Rome, SOJA and special guest Common Kings promise an energetic show at Pepsi Amphitheater. Sublime with Rome’s latest studio album, “Sirens,” debuted in at No. 3 of Billboard’s Rock Albums chart. July 4: Flagstaff Symphony Orchestra In its 69th year, the orchestra will take the stage in Fort Tuthill Park to bring the community and amphitheater to life. Free to attend. Aug. 2: Buddy Guy & Jimmie Vaughan Blues icons Buddy Guy and Jimmie Vaughan bring their talents to Pepsi Amphitheater this summer. Guy released his latest album, “The Blues is Alive and Well,” in June. The 82-year-old’s 2015 album “Born to Play Guitar” won a Grammy for best blues album in 2016.Vaughan, older brother

Buddy Guy

of the late blues singer and guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan, has won four Grammy awards, including one for best traditional blues album “Do You Get the Blues?” in 2001. Aug. 4: Los Lonely Boys and Ozomatli Show begins at 6pm, gates open 5pm. Grammy award winners Los Lonely Boys bring their La Familia Tour with Los Lonely Boys & Ozomatli to the Pepsi Amphitheater for an evening of Latin rock music. Aug. 15: Slightly Stoopid Show begins at 6pm, gates open at 5:30pm. The Ocean Beach, CA based group, released their latest studio album, “Everyday Life, Everyday People,” in July 2018. Pepsi Amphitheater is their only Arizona show during their How I Spent My Summer Vacation 2019 tour with special guests Tribal Seeds, Matisyahu, HIRIE. Tickets for all shows, as well as VIP tickets to Made in the Shade Beer Festival, are on sale now. Keep up with events at Pepsi Amphitheater on Facebook (flagstaffamp) and Twitter (@pepsiampflag). For tickets and information, visit www.pepsiamp.com.

Serving the Community Since 2002

June 8: Made in the Shade Beer Festival Tickets for GA and VIP on-sale now. Festivities begin at 1pm and culminate at 5pm. VIP guests enter venue at noon. All proceeds from the 21+ event benefit Sun Sounds of Arizona.

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Destinations Serving the Community Since 2002

Head South for Sweet Summer Deal

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Summer is sweeter in Southern Arizona — especially when staying at Canoa Ranch Golf Resort. Located just 20 miles south of Tucson, this retreat sits in the heart of historic Santa Cruz Valley and offers stunning desert views. Picture cactus plants dotting an unspoiled landscape, while Elephant Head Mountain rises magnificently toward a brilliant sky. And when the sun goes down, there’s nothing quite like looking up at the stars while savoring a cool desert night. If the picturesque views haven’t already offered inspiration to pack up for an escape, the resort’s latest special certainly will. With one-bedroom suites starting at $109 a night from June through September, Canoa Ranch Golf Resort proves there’s no better time to soak up the sun and reflect on the stars. In addition to a private bedroom, each suite comes complete with a state-of-the-art kitchen, dining area, generous living room and private balcony, perfect for enjoying a summer getaway with the whole family. All rooms and suites also include access to the resort’s complimentary breakfast buffet featuring made-to-order eggs and an omelet station to start desert adventures off right. When it comes to fun in the sun, the options are virtually endless at the resort. Whether making a splash at the outdoor pool and hot tub, perfecting one’s swing at one of the six golf courses within 10 minutes of the property, or hiking and biking the scenic trails of Green Valley, the resort’s thoughtful amenities and prime location offer endless opportunities for being outdoors. An array of museums and underground caverns are also within easy reach for visitors looking to stay cool during summer afternoons. With summer being a hot time for family festivities, Canoa Ranch Golf Resort can create the perfect backdrop for making memories. Reserve the resort’s event space for a family gathering in a banquet style and soak up views from floorto-ceiling windows overlooking the pool and the mountains beyond. With access to the outdoor patio and barbecue, it’s the perfect setting for a casual family reunion with space for up to 100 guests. Canoa Ranch Golf Resort is located at 5775 South Camino Del Sol in Green Valley. For reservations, call 520.382.0450 or email info@canoaranchresort.com. For additional information, visit www. canoaranchgolfresort.com and find the resort on Facebook.


Staycation It Is!

Destinations

No Time for Travel this Summer?

An urban oasis in the heart of the desert, Kimpton Hotel Palomar Phoenix is the perfect getaway for summer travelers. With LUSTRE Rooftop Bar, named one of the country’s coolest rooftop bars by Travel & Leisure and USA Today, perched on its third-floor pool deck and the hotel’s signature new American kitchen, Blue Hound Kitchen & Cocktails offering familiar, yet refined dishes that share the spotlight with an award-winning cocktail program, there’s no shortage of things to do at the Downtown Phoenix hotel. In addition, the annual “100 Days of Summer” event series at LUSTRE kicked off Memorial Day weekend complete with a brand-new lineup of live music, nightlife events and more. Summer deals include:  00 Days of Summer 1 Available to book from May 31 through Sept. 30, 2019, for stays June 1 through Sept. 30, 2019, the “100 Days of Summer” package includes:

• 20 percent off overnight accommodations • 20 percent off all food and beverage We Love Locals! Available to book now through Aug. 30 for stays June 1 through Sept. 30, 2019, the “We Love Locals!” package includes: • Rates starting from $99 (65 percent savings off of peak season, normally $349) • 25 percent off any two-night stay Must present and share Arizona ID upon check in. Extend Your Weekend Available to book now through Aug. 30 for stays May 1 through Sept. 30, 2019, the “Extend Your Weekend” package includes: • For just $49, receive a late checkout at 5pm and a $20 food and beverage credit to enjoy poolside at LUSTRE or at Blue Hound. To book a summer reservation or for more information on Kimpton Hotel Palomar Phoenix, visit www.hotelpalomar-phoenix.com/things-to-doin-phoenix/summer.

Serving the Community Since 2002

• Rates starting from $129 (50 percent savings off of peak season, normally $349)

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FEBRUARY 2019 or the sixth year in a row, chefs from some of the state’s most popular restaurants will use their culinary prowess to re-imagine one of the beloved flavors of Girl Scout Cookies — Do-Si-D os, Samoas, Savannah Smiles, Tagalon gs, Thin Mints and Trefoils — into a custom dessert menu item during the Girl Scout Cookie Dessert Challenge. Each restaurant will feature its dessert on their menu Feb. 1–28, with a portion of the proceeds from each dessert sold directly support ing Girl Scouting in Arizona. “Girl Scouts–Arizona Cactus-Pine Council is thrilled that both (GSACPC) Rusconi’s America n Kitchen and The Thumb are taking part again. They’ve been with us for all six years and are major support ers as a result,” says Susan de Queljoe , senior associate of marketi ng and communication s. “It’s also so inspirin g to see Original Gravity, PNPK, ZuZu at Hotel Valley Ho, The Herb Box and Lovecraft taking part since they are all either proud womanowned businesses have female chefs or in the kitchen.” First-time challeng ers this year include Babbo Italian Eatery, Jake’s Unlimit ed and The Phoenix Ale Brewery Central Kitchen. In year’s past, the Dessert Challenge Champion was decided by dessert sales. This year, the Council is hosting a poll at www.girlscoutsa z.org/dessertchallenge. But beyond concept ualizing, creating and offering the desserts on their menus, this year the chefs are also partnering with the Girl Scouts on several enhanced element s of the challenge. “Last year, we got the idea to have a few girls join us in the kitchen to see all the moving parts that goes into both running a restaurant and delivering food to the table,” says chef Lance Whipple of Proof is the largest girl-led at the Four Seasons entrepreneurial program Scottsdale Resort in the world: Girl Scout Cookie Troon North. “It was such Season. a hit that we are All the chefs hope hosting ‘Girl Scout Trips’ with some local not only to raise funds Field local Girl Scouting troops this year to to support , but also to inspire really get them excited about the art, math home cooks across and science behind Arizona to buy an extra what box or two this season we do. Maybe there are even a few future to create their own desserts. Girl Scout chefs in our mix!” Cookie season runs Similarly, Aioli Gourme through March 3 year. Locations of t Burgers, ZuZu, this cookie booths can PNPK and others will bring girls behind be found online at girlscoutsaz.org/cookiefi the scenes this cookie www. season. And several nder. partners are helping troops to set up formal boothing stations outside their venues, allowing our girls GET MORE: Find the to sell cookies in delectable details what of each venue’s creation online now. Visit news.CITYSunT imes.com.

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Profile for Jenifer Lee

North Valley June 2019 Issue of CITYSunTimes  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

North Valley June 2019 Issue of CITYSunTimes  

CITYSunTimes is a locally owned community publication now in its 17th year, serving over 80,000 readers in the North Valley. CST offers pers...

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