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Equality & Diversity Annual Report July 2010 – July 2011

www.citysun.ac.uk


Contents 1. Policy Statement������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 04 2. Equality and Diversity Week����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 06 3. Age���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������12 4. Disability������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������13 5. Sex/Sexual Orientation�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������19 6. Race����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 23 7. International Developments��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 38 8. Religion and Beliefs������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ 39 9. Fair Trade And Human Rights����������������������������������������������������������������������������������41 10. Corporate Social Responsibility����������������������������������������������������������������������� 42 11. Equality and Diversity Action Plan����������������������������������������������������������������� 43 12. Equality and Diversity Group Membership������������������������������������������������� 54

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Equality & Diversity Annual Report July 2010 – July 2011 Executive Summary The area of Equality & Diversity continues to develop across the UK, through both political and social cohesion agendas and the new Equality Bill which will be implemented on 5th April 2010. City of Sunderland College embraces the equality legislation and has moved on to the next stage of development well in advance of legislative requirements. The college’s six core values underpin everything we do. Equality and diversity is one of our key values but is also embedded within all the other five values. Partnership The college promotes and develops partnerships with a wide range of organisations and individuals locally, regionally, nationally and internationally. It has forged strong partnerships with organisations which can enhance and contribute to the training and education of people from a wide range of backgrounds and support needs. It also develops partnerships with organisations that support aspects of equality and also contribute to a number of activities in the college. Respect The college aims to provide an inclusive environment where students and staff are highly valued, and relationships are based on mutual respect to provide a positive experience for all members of its community. Innovation The college embraces innovation across all areas; particularly in the ways we provide both access and support, enabling students to learn in ways which meet their needs and aspirations. Diversity The college has a reputation for working to remove barriers to achievement. This ethos enables us to recruit from a diverse range of staff and students and to ensure that they progress and achieve successfully. Ethical The college aims to provide fair practices and a commitment of Corporate Social Responsibility for staff and students.

Pride We aim for our whole college community to take pride in our record on equality and diversity and strive to embed good practice throughout the organisation. Equality and Diversity principles are now an integral part of everything the college does. Our Equality Scheme ensures that college decisions are made in consultation and consider any negative impact on any of the diverse range of students we attract. This report will outline the measures being taken to assess the impact of actions taken by the college in the last twelve months. This supports our ambitions to be a centre of excellence for equality and diversity.

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1. Policy Statement City of Sunderland College actively promotes equality and diversity in all aspects of its work and aims to provide an environment where all individuals have the opportunity to achieve their full potential with a feeling of self esteem. It will eliminate unfair discrimination through a zero tolerance approach, regular target setting and monitoring and the development of positive action programmes. In exercising its functions as a public authority, the college welcomes its duty towards those individuals sharing one or more of the protected characteristics of age, disability, gender re-assignment, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation and, where relevant, marriage and civil partnership. The college is mindful of the need for it to have due regard to: • Eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other conduct prohibited by the Equality Act 2010. • Advance equality of opportunity between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not. • Foster good relations between people who share a protected characteristic and those who do not. As part of its commitment to advancing equality, the college will endeavour to: • Remove or minimise disadvantage experienced by people due to their protected characteristics. • Take measures to fulfil the needs of individuals from protected groups where these are different from the needs of other persons. • Support and encourage individuals with protected characteristics to participate in the public life of the organisation, especially where participation is disproportionately lower. POLICIES Area

Relevant Legislation

College Policies and Practices

Age

Age Regulations October 2006

Policies impact assessment and practices informed by regulations. Signed up to Age Concern pledge. Retirement policy introduced

Disability

DDA 1995 SENDA 2001 DDA amended 2005

Code of practice for employing disabled people. Disability Equality Scheme. Disability tick symbol employer. Committed to the Mindful Employer charter and practice. Single equality scheme and action plan (from Jan 2010). Disability support team.

Race

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Race Relations Amendment Act (RRAA) 2003

Race equality scheme. Single equality action plan.


Area

Relevant Legislation

College Policies and Practices

Religion or belief

EU Regulations on Religion or Belief 2003

Equality and Diversity Policy encompasses religion and beliefs. College chaplaincy service available to students. Faith rooms available on all sites.

Sex/Gender

Sex Discrimination Act 1975, amended 2003. Equal Pay Act 1970, amended 2003. Gender Duty 2007

IIP standard for fair recruitment and selection. Equal pay policy and annual audits. IIP standard for our suite of Work-Life balance policies. Gender equality scheme and action plans.

Sexual orientation

EU Regulations on Sexual Orientation 2003. Equality Act (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2007

Policy on sexual orientation.

Fixed term staff

Fixed-term Employees Regulations 2002

Consistent application of HR policies to fixed term staff

Part time staff

Part-time Workers’ (prevention of less favourable treatment) Regulations 2002

Pro-rata equivalence of terms and conditions

Equality - All protected characteristics

Equality Act 2010

• Equality and Diversity Committee

• Age • Disability • Gender Re-assignment • Pregnancy and Maternity • Race • Religion and Belief • Sex • Sexual Orientation • Marriage and Civil Partnership (where relevant)

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• Current involvement in 157 Group E&D Project • Development of Equality Objectives • Re-assessment of Equality Impact Assessment process • All managers trained in EIA procedures • College involvement in regional equality awards judgement panel (2011)


2. Equality and Diversity Week A. Background The college makes a genuine and realistic commitment to continually raising awareness of equality and diversity matters both within and outside of curriculum settings to challenge and minimise discrimination and prejudice in all of its forms. Recognition of the college’s stance and approach to equality and diversity and the benefits this bestows on the student experience was of course given by OfSTED following a full college inspection in January 2010 when an Outstanding grade was awarded for this important area of provision. In addition the implementation of the new Equality Act in October 2010 and the wider range of protected characteristics it entails reinforces the importance of maintaining momentum and recognising the college’s public duties in terms of promoting and celebrating equality and diversity at every opportunity. Following on from the success of the first Equality and Diversity (E&D) Week event held in December 2009 and subsequent discussion and evaluation by the college Equality and Diversity Committee, a decision was taken to hold a further E&D Week event during December 2010. It is now envisaged that Equality and Diversity Week will become a regular and enduring feature of the college events calendar. As previously, the aim of the week long event is to focus a range of activities, campaigns and information sessions in order to further inform and raise the awareness of the college community on equality and diversity based issues. The event would be complemented throughout by curriculum based activity focussing on equality and diversity themes via tutorial, and enrichment. The dates of 6th December to 10th December 2010 were finalised as the college Equality and Diversity week. B. Outline of City of Sunderland Equality and Diversity Week 2010 • A small working group comprising a representative range of E&D committee members, marketing, tutorial and enrichment staff and the Chair of the college governing body was set up and met on five occasions to organise the event. • It was agreed that the “rolling roadshow” of agencies/ organisations would again be the core feature of the event, visiting a different college centre each day of the week from (approx) 12.00 noon until 2.00pm to capture student attention during lunch break periods. The wider range of “protected characteristics” arising from the new Equality Act (Oct 2010) would of course, need to be considered in terms of the “roadshow” range.

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During the actual week, external agencies/individuals that participated included: • Early Intervention into Psychosis Team (LA/NHS) • Sunderland Arch (Combating Racism and Homophobia) • Fair Trade • Inland Revenue (LGBT Representative) • Northumbria Police (Hate Crime) • Roadahead (Guide Dog Etiquette/Accessibility/VI Awareness) • Unity Multicultural Organisation • Age UK • Amnesty International • MESMAC (LGBT) • MIND (Washington) • Tyne and Wear Fire Service (Equality and Diversity Lead) • Ingrid Wagner (Rug and Art Creation – [Yarn Bombing]) • Chris Ellis (Vision Impaired Poetry Reading) • College Nurses (Pregnancy and Maternity) The Roadshow took place as follows: • Monday 6th Dec 2010 - Hylton Skills Campus • Tuesday 7th Dec 2010 - Usworth Campus • Wednesday 8th Dec 2010 - St Peter’s Campus • Thursday 9th Dec 2010 - Shiney Row Campus • Friday 10th Dec 2010 - Bede Centre The Roadshow was complemented during the week by a range of college based activities including: • Student competitions (centre based) with a prize awarded For example: The St Peter’s competition invited students to comment on what Equality and Diversity meant to them. The two winning statements outlined below capture the importance of student participation in such events: “We are all human; we have hearts, we have feelings, yet because externally we are different means that some people are subject to abuse. We are all unique in our own special way, and we should be recognised for that. We should not be judged for anything on the exterior – looks fade it’s what’s inside that counts.” Niamh Baldasera (AS Levels) “I believe that equality and diversity means many things, but most importantly to me a person who can go out into the world without having that fear inside of them of being abused, attacked or looked at because of their race, religion, disability, age etc. being a Muslim, as I am, teaches us that in the eyes of God (Allah) we are all equal, nothing comes in the way of that. Everyone in life is different and unique in their own way, but what matters is being treated the same with equal rights! Being accepted for who you are rather than how you look is what matters in life and is what can change the world.” Ruksar Qureshi (ICT)

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Similarly the winning entry in the Usworth poetry competition captures the Equality and Diversity sentiment well: Competition Winner’s Poem - Jasmine Smith, Adam Speight, Taylor Ellis (First Year As Level Students) There’s a girl called Jane, Who’s not quite the same, She’s a little too tall, When her friends are rather small, She’s fat and hairy, And generally quite scary. When she walks down the street, she’s branded a freak, People stop and stare, But don’t seem to care, That poor Jane can hear, Which often leads to a tear. What would you do, If Jane was you, Would you go home and cry too, Or would you make a stand, And tell everyone to hold hands, And shout Everybody’s the same to you!” Student participation One very encouraging feature of the week was the level of student participation in E&D events as compared to last year. As well as the centre based competitions, individuals and groups of students were involved in a range of activities including: Graffiti Knitting which aimed to create a collective knitted end product (e.g. long scarf) produced by a wide range of students both female and male from various cultural and ethnic backgrounds. On two of the days Helen Willey managed to engage Ingrid Wagner, the World Champion knitter who led two “knit ins” for students, ably assisted at the Shiney Row event by Angela O’Donoghue the College Principal. As visiting textile artist, Ingrid became involved in the E&D week after the idea of Graffiti Knitting was proposed. Ingrid has been a guest artist in the past and engages well with students. She also holds the world record for knitting with the largest knitting needles (4 metres long). The objective of Graffiti Knitting allowed students from all centres to take part in a skill, bringing people together who perhaps wouldn’t normally mix with each other socially, engaging them in a common activity. Engaging the students in the knitting activity and placing it in a prominent position (Shiney Row reception) meant that it attracted attention. This increased the interest of passers by and therefore increased the interest around the Road Show. This in turn also created a good atmosphere where students from all disciplines also mixed with staff members. On some of the roadshow days students were also keen to be involved in staffing stands/desks including selling Fair Trade goods and promoting Amnesty International. In general it is widely regarded that the degree of student interest and involvement in the event was much higher than last year and at least two centres’ tutorial teams are assessing the overall impact of the E&D event in terms of student interest and involvement. Some students at St Peter’s also gave up their time to organise a henna tattoo stand which generated much interest during the day.

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Physical Theatre Performance (Second Year BND Drama) This performance on Tuesday 7th December, was produced by Second Year BND Drama students, which was based around the themes of three religions: Buddhism, Catholicism and the Ancient Mayan religion. Students researched these religions and produced a powerful performance through the media of dance, movement and music. Students from other centres were invited to watch the performance. What was interesting was that not only were the BND Drama students performing to a different audience (construction engineers from Hylton) it meant that the audience was experiencing a new understanding of their fellow students and an insight into what they study. Tutorial curriculum to reflect E& D themes To coincide with the event a week long tutorial theme, focussing on equality and diversity was held. On each of the roadshow days, “Roadahead” a small organisation dealing with vision impairment/guide dog awareness, delivered a tutorial to groups of students emphasising the impact of acquired disability. Alongside the Equality and Diversity Fair, the students at Usworth were also invited to attend the following sessions; Sign Language, Deaf Awareness and Bitesize Japanese Language Sessions. The Student Council and members of the Student Body also organised and ran a small coffee morning for a local elderly care home. Throughout the week the students were encouraged by members of the Tutorial Team to participate in all events. The feedback from the students was good, most saying that they thoroughly enjoyed the broad range of events on offer and that they felt that not only had they learned something new but they were now able to see how the principles of Equality and Diversity could be achieved in their day to day lives. In addition, Chris Ellis, a blind student from the college, delivered a poetry reading to tutor groups at Bede as part of the week’s tutorial activities. Disability Advisors also produced tutorial resource/support packs relating to disability hate crime and disability awareness for use with tutor groups during and after Equality and Diversity week. Another guest speaker, Dorothy Ishmael a refugee / asylum speaker, addressed two tutor groups at the Hylton Skills Campus. The aim of this session was to dispel myths and tackle prejudices surrounding asylum seekers and refugees currently residing in Sunderland. Dorothy relayed facts surrounding the rights refugee and asylum seekers’ gain when entering Britain. Students challenged and discussed prejudices refugee and asylum seekers face and the fairness / impact this has on them as human beings. Additional E& D oriented exhibitions (e.g. Auschwitz display – all centres) The Auschwitz photographic display was the outcome of a college human rights visit to the former concentration camp led by a member of staff Peter Mulligan and two students in 2009. The display – a series of very powerful, enlarged photographic images of the death camp, overlaid with slogans relating to prejudice and discrimination of minority groups, e.g. “prejudice against people with disabilities led to this”. The display at all centres generated a high degree of student interest, providing the opportunity to extrapolate the effects of low level prejudice against minorities to the extremities of ethnic cleansing and extermination of other diverse groups. Other features of the week included: • Refectory fare to reflect cultural diversity (See page 30) • Enrichment based activities

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C. Findings Formal evaluation of the week long event was attempted via a questionnaire to a sample of the external agencies. Three completed returns were received, making an informed analysis difficult. In addition to this some agencies did not attend all of the days during the week, making comparisons between centres and days difficult. However in conversation, all of the respondents were positive about the usefulness of their participation in terms of raising awareness and distributing information. Quoting the Tyne and Wear Fire Service the most useful aspect of their participation in E&D Week (2 days) was the opportunity for: “Giving advice to students on the career opportunities for diverse groups currently under-represented in the Fire service e.g. Females and BMEs” All organisations were generally positive about contributing further to the college Equality and Diversity agenda by way of talks to groups including staff meetings, leading discussions on specific issues and participating in future events. Two of the participating agencies also suggested working with student groups as a precursor to the actual event instead of just “turning up” on the week. Notably where student were involved in exhibitions/stands etc there appeared to be wider interest from other students. In terms of advising on any changes to future E&D week events, the main response was: “More preparatory work with the college before the week” Notably and possibly as a corollary to involvement in last years’ event, Sunderland Arch, an organisation tackling racial prejudice and homophobia have already delivered awareness raising sessions in the college to international students. Similarly, the Early Intervention into Psychosis (NHS) team have, during 2010, delivered awareness raising sessions on cross-college CPD days. A brief student questionnaire was distributed at Usworth. Out of 44 returns 34 students said they had attended between one and three of the weeks Equality and Diversity activities with 10 students indicating they had attended none. A sample of quotes from Usworth students regarding Equality and Diversity elicited some imaginative responses including: “Everyone is equal, everyone is different” “I understand that equality and diversity means that everyone may be different, but at the end of the day people should be treated the same” “For everyone to be equal we all need to be diverse in our own way” “Everyone is equal regardless of race, ability, gender and age”

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D. The Future Notwithstanding the success and positive outcomes of the event a number of potential improvements have been identified for a subsequent Equality and Diversity week at the college. These include the need for: • Student involvement in the planning process • Preparatory work by external partners with student groups prior to the event • Inform/involve local media to publicise event • Invite the local community to future events • A manager from each college centre identified to drive central themes, oversee specific centre roadshow events, troubleshoot etc • Production of an event programme to collate the week’s activities. Comments from students at Usworth in relation to improving future events were also important: “I would like to see more charity organisations which we can raise money for” “I think the event was run well, and so there was not much that I would change” “Show Racism the Red Card” “Different Languages” If you wish to access the videos, which capture a number of the activities carried out in Equality and Diversity week, these can be accessed by visiting http://www.citysun.ac.uk/equality-diversity/.

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3. Age Employment legislation The college reviewed its employment policies in line with the Employment Equality (Age) Regulations 2006 that came into effect in October 2008. We have provided training for managers on age discrimination legislation and reviewed a number of procedures and requests for information which may result in age discrimination. In light of the new legislation due to be implemented in October 2011, we have reviewed our policy on retaining the normal retirement age of 65. In 2010/11 we received a number of requests by staff who were due to retire under the normal retirement age to remain in employment. All requests to date have been granted, three in total. BREAKDOWN OF STAFF BY AGE 150 Female

No. of Employees

125

Male Grand Total

100 75 50 25 0

18-25

26-30

31-35

36-40

41-45

46-50

51-55

56-60

Age Groups

Partnership Activities The college is a key member of the Sunderland Local Strategic Partnership alongside representatives from the third sector and Age Concern. The City aims to be an ‘age friendly’ city where people of all ages can enjoy a healthy life with opportunities to work and study in Sunderland. One-third of the population is over 50 and every effort is being made to enable them to contribute to the economy of the City and maintain healthy, active enjoyable lives. The college, due to lack of funding, has had to stop providing some of the programmes previously offered in the community, which often recruited those over 50 years of age. However, we have maintained a curriculum offer based on leisure activities for which a charge is made to cover the costs of the venue and the lecturer. We also offer the use of our premises for any informal ‘learning’ groups which have been established in our local communities.

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61-65


4. Disability Disability Equality Scheme The original College Disability Equality Scheme (DES) and Action Plan has now ended its three year life span. The scheme has served as a realistic and effective framework to develop the disability agenda within the college during this period both to comply with legislation and create a more inclusive mind set and environment amongst the college community. The Disability Equality Duty did require public bodies to revise and publish a new Disability Equality Scheme (DES) no later than the end of the period of three years beginning with the date of publication of its first Scheme; and subsequently at intervals of no more than three years beginning with the date of publication of the last revision of the Scheme Regulation 2(4), Disability Discrimination Regulations 2005. The purpose of revising a DES is: • to base actions on current evidence and the views of disabled people. • to reflect on what has been achieved and focus on where more work is required. • to ensure the scheme accurately reflects current business and gives attention to areas that have changed since the last Scheme. • to ensure priorities are refocused to tackle the most relevant and significant issues to bring about disability equality. In large part the new equality legislation (Equality Act 2010) over-rides the requirements of disability law. However, the college decided to publish a revised DES and Action Plan in December 2009 which will, if necessary remain live until December 2012. In keeping with the new equality legislation which was introduced in October 2010, the college has also published a set of draft Equality Objectives which incorporate the protected characteristic of disability. The college has consulted widely on its equality objectives, both within and outside of college, with organisations including: Equality North East, Sunderland Arch, Early Intervention into Psychosis team and Sunderland People First. The College Disability Equality Scheme also served as an important and influential document in the development of the draft college Single Equality Scheme and Action Plan, which it published in January 2009. The college is now well prepared to adjust to the requirements of the general and specific duties of the new equality legislation and is currently involved in a 157 Group project to develop a human resource toolkit for further education colleges.

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Disabled Student Questionnaire/Student Voice The Learning Support Directorate organise and oversee in year surveys and live forums of students with disabilities and/or learning difficulties. Such consultation with, and involvement of, disabled individuals are now regular features of the college disability strategy. The college chair of governors is scheduled to attend the next disability/ALS forum in May 2011. These procedures are designed to gain insight and information on issues and barriers faced by disabled individuals in the college context. Topics covered include accessibility and mobility around college centres and suggested improvements, the quality and effectiveness of support, and the promotion of disability equality. For 2009-10 an ALS/Disability student survey was conducted between April 19th 2010 and April 30th 2010 which attracted 149 respondents including individuals with a range of disabilities from vision and hearing impairments to dyslexia, learning difficulties and physical difficulties. An ALS/Disability student forum, overseen and supported by college Disability Advisors was also held on 28th April 2010. The Department of Supported Learning has also worked in conjunction with the college Quality and Standards team to develop symbols versions of cross college student surveys to maximise the involvement of learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities in such important information gathering exercises. As in previous years, the outcomes of these information gathering exercises were discussed and actioned by the college Equality and Diversity Committee. Student Survey results and feedback are available on Moodle under the Equality & Diversity section. Disability Support Team/Curriculum In its efforts to continue to develop high quality support and promote disability equality across the college, the Learning Support Directorate maintains a Disability Support Team. Whilst all of the Directorate personnel are members of the support team there is a core team of Disability Advisors (DAs) deployed across all college centres. All DAs are qualified teachers who deliver specialist support to learners with identified needs for a range of areas of disability/learning difficulty. DAs also contribute significantly to ongoing CPD for all college staff in matters related to disability and maintain a portfolio of staff development/awareness raising modules. Disability Awareness delivered by the Learning Support Directorate remains a compulsory element for all college staff in their continuing professional development. Within the LS Directorate there is also an extensive Learning Mentor (LM) team who deliver 1:1 or small group support to students for a range of difficulties including: Challenging Behaviours; Moderate to Severe Learning Difficulties; MHD and Autism Spectrum Disorders. The LM team includes Lead Mentors for MHD, ASD and DHD. From the Basic Education Directorate the college delivers programmes in line with Regional and National strategies and government targets as identified in the North East Regional Strategy document, Sunderland NEET Strategy and Learning for Living and Work. It has a cohort of 19+ learners with a wide range of disabilities and/or learning difficulties and taught in a supported environment.

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The provision within this department is diverse and includes courses over 11 different levels, from Milestone 4 to Milestone 8, Entry Level 1 to Entry Level 3, Level 1 and Level 2. The aims of these courses are: • to provide opportunities for students with learning difficulties and disabilities to access differentiated contextualised programmes to enable them to develop their literacy, numeracy and communication skills • to provide opportunities for students with learning difficulties and disabilities to develop independent living, personal and social and vocational preparation skills, as appropriate to the individual • to provide opportunities for students with little or no previous academic achievement to develop the necessary personal, study and basic skills to enable them to enter, progress through college and to gain appropriate employment • to support the progression of each individual as appropriate • to promote inclusivity, equality of opportunity, widening participation and lifelong learning A dedicated Visual Impairment Facility also provides expert support and learning resources for all learners with a visual impairment, regardless of degree. This unit has specialist, well experienced staff, including a Qualified Teacher of the Blind, who support learners across a variety of curriculum areas. The facility has the capacity to convert print to Braille. Project activity and Promotion of Disability Centre for Excellence in Teacher Training (Inclusive Learning) CETTIL In March 2010 a college Disability Advisor who is also a Qualified Teacher of the Blind, in conjunction with a college student who is registered blind, delivered two workshops to a national conference at Northumbria University on the topic of Assistive Technology. Mental Health Over the course of the 2009-10 academic year there has been much activity in the area of mental health provision to build on the existing college commitment. This includes: • Disability Advisor (as the further education national representative) contributions to a personality disorders forum organised by NIACE in London 2009. • College contribution to regional Mental Health and Employability “Face to Face” events in January 2010. • NHS Early Intervention into Psychosis team input to cross college CPD Days and involvement in college Equality and Diversity Weeks. As a corollary student declarations at enrolment for mental health for the current academic (2010-11) year show a further 23% increase on the 2009-10 figure (51 to 63).

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Campaigns/Promotions The college maintains a commitment to the advancement of equality of opportunity and the fostering of good relations between people who have a disability and/or learning difficulty and those who do not. In doing this the college organises and maintains involvement in a number of events and campaigns. These include: • World Mental Health Day (10th Oct 2010) – this event took place at all college centres and included participation by external agencies including MIND and the EIP team who organised a “Happiness Is...” activity. All college centres organised local competitions and a college wide online mental health quiz attracted 800 student entries – the prize being an iPod Nano. Free apples were a feature at all centres to emphasise the importance of the five a day campaign to good mental health. The WMHD campaign was complemented well by mental health oriented tutorial activity throughout the week. • Equality and Diversity Week - disability awareness also remains a core feature of the college (Dec 6th 2009 - Dec 10th 2009) – disability campaign groups participated enthusiastically throughout the week including: Road Ahead Group (Vision Impairment); NHS Early Intervention into Psychosis team; MIND; Age UK. The week also incorporated poetry readings by a blind former student and a Disability Awareness Tutor Support Pack was also published. The college also recognises other areas of Learning Difficulties and Disabilities in the context of dedicated campaign focussed time as well as on an ongoing basis. e.g. • Dyslexia Awareness Week (wk beg 1st Nov 2010) • World Autism Awareness Day (2nd April 2010) • Disability Awareness Day (11th July 2010) Student Data The college is committed to including and supporting students with Disabilities and/ or Learning Difficulties and to ensure equality of opportunity therein. For those learners receiving additional learning support the overall retention rate in 200910 was 1% point higher than those not requiring support. The overall success rate for those learners with disabilities and/or learning difficulties (LDD) is equal to those with no LDD. Given the barriers and disadvantage presented through having a LDD, including the likely prospect of failure or non-completion, the figures suggest that the strategies the college organise to support students with disabilities is successful in enabling such learners to stay on and achieve in their chosen course of study.

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Student Data 100 90

Difficulty

No Difficulty

80 Success Rates %

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

07-08 08-09 09-10

07-08 08-09 09-10

07-08 08-09 09-10

Years 2007 - 2010

Progress on Action Plan The table below summarises progress on the College Disability Equality Scheme Action Plan 2006-2009 which has now been subsumed by a revised Disability Equality Scheme (20092012), a draft Single Equality Scheme and the compilation of a new set of Equality Objectives in preparation for the General and Specific duties required by the Equality Act 2010. The Plan had 15 sections and the audit has shown the following progress – where an action is ongoing this is being addressed in the revised plan. Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Progress

Organisational leadership which promotes and supports the development of disability equality and ensures the CoSC DES is put into practice.

All actions complete

Ensure CoSC policies procedures and plans and practices reflect the promotion of Disability Equality (Impact Assessment)

All actions complete

Promote the consultation with and active involvement of staff and students in the development and monitoring of the CoSC Disability Equality Scheme

All actions complete. Draft Learner Involvement Strategy has been discussed at the Student Support Committee. Actions now complete and embedded into directorate strategy

Ensure there is appropriate and sufficient information to inform the promotion of Disability Equality across the College

All actions complete

Ensure College Information, course Materials and Services are accessible and encourage the inclusion of disabled individuals

All actions complete.

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Strategic Priority Areas and Targets Ensure that CoSC endeavours to establish and develop a workforce to reflect representation from the disabled community and promotes equality of opportunity with regard to staff training and promotion

Progress 2/4 actions complete. Remaining two scheduled to be completed by end of term (HRM) All actions now complete

Maximise opportunities for disabled individuals to gain physical access to - and be mobile within - college facilities and services

All actions complete

Ensure there are appropriate and adequate staff development opportunities to enable the CoSC workforce to address the DED/DES agenda

All actions complete

Establish an assistive resource and equipment capacity to cater for the wide spectrum of disability the college is likely to need to cater for

All actions complete and development of accessibility ongoing

Ensure the college curriculum enhances the inclusion, progression and achievement of individuals with disabilities

All actions now complete

Ensure account is taken of those with disabilities when addressing the Not in Education Employment or Training (NEET) agenda

Action complete and ongoing

Ensure CoSC application, admissions and enrolment procedures maximise the participation of individuals with disabilities

All actions complete

Ensure that CoSC assessment and examination procedures do not disadvantage disabled individuals

5/6 actions complete, 1 ongoing. Where appropriate, liaison with exam bodies takes place to discuss access issues as they arise

Ensure college tasters, external visits, placements and residential experience allow for participation by all learners

All actions complete. Examples provided show that learners with disabilities have been able to attend these events. All visit plans should include impact assessment

Liaison with other agencies

Communication and liaison with a wide range of external agencies is ongoing

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5. Sex/Sexual Orientation The table below summarises progress on the five areas of the college Gender Equality Scheme Action Plan 2007-2010 – updated at January 2010. There are 27 actions in total across the Gender Equality Scheme. Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Progress

1. Organisational leadership which promotes and supports gender equality and ensures the college’s scheme is put into practice.

All actions (9) complete

2. Ensure college Policies, Procedures, Plans and Practices reflect the promotion of Equality Scheme (Impact Assessment).

All actions (3) complete

3. Ensure there is appropriate and sufficient information to inform the promotion of equality across the college.

4 of 5 Actions complete 3.3 Develop means of analysing data with franchise partner organisations action ongoing

4. Ensure that the college endeavours to establish and develop a workforce to reflect representation from the community and promotes equality of opportunity with regard to staff training and promotion.

All actions (5) complete

5. Maximise opportunities for individuals to gain access to college premises, facilities and services.

All actions (5) complete

The college fully implemented the actions/plans in relation to its Gender Equality Scheme which came to an end in December 2010 except for one action which is ongoing. The new Equality Act does not have a requirement for a specific Gender Equality Scheme but the overall college action plan for equality (Chapter 11) does identify some key actions in relation to improvements in gender equality. Student Data In 2009-10 the overall success rate for 19+ learners is 90% and for 16-18 learners is 83%; both are above the relevant national averages which have a similar differential. The difference in success rates for male and female learners across the college is not significant, the success rate for female learners is 3% points higher. The table below shows that we do tend to recruit less 19+ males than females.

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Success rate breakdown by gender Female Year

Male

No. of Starts

Success Rate %

No. of Starts

Success Rate %

Gender by Success Rate Difference %

Whole College (excluding key skills) 2007-2008

11621

82

7703

80

-2

2008-2009

11939

87

9700

86

-1

2009-2010

10428

87

8493

84

-3

16 – 18 (excluding key skills) 2007-2008

5543

72

4807

73

+1

2008-2009

7173

84

6987

84

=

2009-2010

5857

84

6031

82

-2

19 + (excluding key skills) 2007-2008

6078

91

2896

90

-1

2008-2009

4766

91

2713

91

=

2009-2010

4571

91

2462

88

-3

SUCCESS RATE BREAKDOWN BY GENDER 100 90

Female

Male

80 Success Rates %

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

07-08 08-09 09-10

07-08 08-09 09-10 Years 2007 - 2010

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07-08 08-09 09-10


STAFF PROFILE BY GENDER (01/11/09) 1000

Number of employees

900

Female

800

Male

700

Grand Total

600 500 400 300 200 100 0

Management

Academic

Support

Grand Total

Job category

STAFF Data - agency staffing Gender

Total

Protocol National %

Blue Square %

Male

79

42.246

60

Female

108

57.754

40

187

100

100

At present we do not collect data in relation to sexual orientation or gender rearrangement. The new Equality Act requires us to collect such data to ensure that those with these protected characteristics are not being discriminated against and that we foster good relations. We will attempt to collect this data in 2011/12 but this may prove to be very difficult. Events Organised to Promote Gender Equality The Construction Department have continued this year to deliver a construction programme for females to all school pupils with the aim of encouraging females to consider a career within this area. We have also visited all secondary schools and carried out career talks focusing both on Construction, Green Technology and Building Services. Students have continued to be involved in E&D events within the college and recently produced a cross for Easter festivities that was used by the college. The Construction Department is currently producing a curriculum offer that addresses the NEET agenda for students to enrol on courses during the year and also to experience all trades prior to deciding on a particular career route. The department is also working with schools in offering level one courses to pupils who are disengaged with the school curriculum.

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Work with Bridge (Associate College) The college continues its long term support to Bridge. Bridge provides a wide range of confidence building and vocational courses all supported with quality childcare. Programmes are run within Bridge centres and in various outreach venues across the City including the local children’s centres, community centres etc. Bridge runs the Connect programme for young mothers and pregnant young women aged 16-19 years who are not engaging with education and training. Last year they worked with 30 young women providing the crucial support needed to enable them to engage and achieve. Bridge and the Sunderland Women Centre (also part of the network) take time out each year to celebrate International Women’s Week by organising celebratory events, tasters etc which is used to highlight the plight of women globally and to celebrate women’s economic, political and social struggles and achievements in the past and present. The college is also working with Sunderland-wide young mums from age 14. They attend college, do ‘buddy’ days and engage in college activities. Childcare The college tries to remove as many barriers as possible in people accessing its provision. For women in particular, childcare support is crucial in removing such barriers. The college provides childcare on site at Hylton Skills Campus. However, childcare funding is available to eligible students in order to access the facilities near their place of residence or the college. In 2010-2011 CoSC has 40 students receiving support from Care to Learn which is a national scheme providing free childcare support for students up to the age of 20. In addition CoSC utilises Learner Support Funds to support students aged over 20 in receipt of a means tested benefit with childcare support at Hylton Nursery, at franchise venues and at local childcare providers. There are currently 94 students over 20 being supported with childcare costs through Learner Support Funds. Sexual Orientation Sexual orientation is an area which is not always addressed positively in the North East of England and as a result this can affect the confidence of lesbian, gay and transgender employees and students. The college has developed a policy on sexual orientation. However, this is an area of equality and diversity which has not been well promoted in the college and will be a focus over the next 12 months. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) History Month will be marked in February and International Day Against Homophobia (IDAHO) will be marked on May 17th. Stonewall In 2010 the college worked with Stonewall, the gay rights campaign organisation, attending an event held in the region, which shared good practice ideas across public sector organisations. Stonewall has provided publicity materials for display in college Learning Resource Centres and Student Services centres. Equality & Diversity Week In December, as part of Equality and Diversity Week, an LGBT Representative from the Inland Revenue and MESMAC (Men who have Sex with Men-Action in the Community) ran a stall at all the centres giving out information, badges and whistles. They were very positive about the reception they had from our students.

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6. Race The Race Equality Scheme and Action Plan was completed in December 2010. The table below summarises progress on the nine areas of the plan. RACE EQUALITY SCHEME 2007-2010 The table below summarises progress on the nine areas of the College Race Equality Scheme Action Plan 2007-1010 – updated in January 2010 There are 36 actions in total across the Race Equality Scheme Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Progress

1. Organisational leadership which promotes and supports race equality and ensures the college’s scheme is put into practice.

All actions (10) complete

2. Ensure college Policies, Procedures, Plans and Practices reflect the promotion of Equality Scheme Impact Assessment.

All actions (3) complete

3. Ensure there is appropriate and sufficient information to inform the promotion of Race Equality across the college.

4 of 5 actions complete. 3.3 Develop means of analysing data with franchise partner organisations action ongoing

4. Ensure that the college endeavours to establish and develop a workforce to reflect representation from the community and promotes equality of opportunity with regard to staff training and promotion.

All actions (4) complete

5. Maximise opportunities for individuals to gain access to college premises, facilities and services.

4 of 5 actions complete. Action 5.1 - Review student recruitment literature, material and practice to ensure non-discrimination and positive promotion on the grounds of race and ethnicity – in progress

6. Via flexible, dynamic, innovative and supportive methods, promote the consultation and active involvement of staff and students from diverse backgrounds in the development, implementation and monitoring of Equality Schemes

All actions (4) complete

7. Ensure Equality and Diversity indicators are taken account of when addressing the Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) agenda

Action complete

8. Ensure CoSC application, admissions and enrolment procedures maximise the participation of individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds

All actions (2) complete

9. Liaison with other agencies

All actions (2) complete

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Student Data Part of the action plan related to the analysis of data by race in a number of areas including participation numbers, success rates, retention and achievement. The table below sets out this data which is monitored on a regular basis by the Equality and Diversity Committee. Monitoring also occurs throughout the college during the curriculum reviews and self assessment process when course teams, curriculum areas and subject sector areas analyse the data and develop action plans to address any issues identified. Ethnicity – Success Rate Trend The overall success rate for non-white British learners is 1% point higher than that for other learners (this differential has been narrowing consistently year on year). White British Year

No of Starts

Non-White British

Success Rate %

No of Starts

Success Rate %

Ethnicity by Success Rate Difference %

Whole College (excluding key skills) 2007-2008

17627

80

1697

89

+9

2008-2009

20617

86

1022

90

+4

2009-2010

17863

86

1058

87

+1

16 – 18 (excluding key skills) 2007-2008

10011

73

339

78

+5

2008-2009

13634

84

526

88

+4

2009-2010

11453

83

435

90

+7

19 + (excluding key skills)

24

2007-2008

7616

91

1358

92

+1

2008-2009

6983

91

496

91

=

2009-2010

6410

90

623

84

-6


SUCCESS RATE TREND BY ETHNICITY 100 90

White British

Non-White British

80 Success Rates %

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

07-08 08-09 09-10

07-08 08-09 09-10

07-08 08-09 09-10

Years 2007 - 2010

Ethnicity Breakdown in 2009-10 (% shown in brackets identifies proportion of starts) 19+ Ethnicity

16-18

Whole College

No of Starts

Success Rate %

No of Starts

Success Rate %

No of Starts

Success Rate %

Black African

80 (1.1%)

76

31 (0.3%)

97

111 (0.6%)

82

Other Asian

52 (0.7%)

79

24 (0.2%)

96

76 (0.4%)

84

Mixed

84 (1.2%)

88

52 (0.4%)

83

136 (0.7%)

86

Any Other

33 (0.5%)

67

22 (0.2%)

86

55 (0.3%)

75

Chinese

18 (0.3%)

89

13 (0.1%)

100

31 (0.2%)

94

Bangladeshi

37 (0.5%)

76

166 (1.4%)

94

203 (1.1%)

91

Indian

25 (0.4%)

100

39 (0.3%)

87

64 (0.3%)

92

Pakistani

33 (0.5%)

88

22 (0.2%)

91

55 (0.3%)

89

Black Other

5 (0.1%)

60

0

0

5 (0.03%)

60

3 (0.04%)

67

3 (0.03%)

100

6 (0.03%)

83

60 (0.9)

93

13 (0.1%)

77

73 (0.4%)

90

White

6603 (94%)

90

11503 (97%)

83

18106 (96%)

86

Total

7033 (100%)

90

11888 (100%)

83

18921 (100%)

86

Black Caribbean Unknown

The proportion of students from ethnic minority groups within the college continues to be around 4% of total starts.

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There is a higher representation of students in the 19+ category which is due to the increased numbers of international students now attending the College. Ethnicity Breakdown 2009-10 for 16-18 year olds

Black African Other Asian Mixed Any Other Chinese Bangladeshi Indian Pakistani Black Other Black Caribbean Unknown White

Ethnicity Breakdown 2009-10 for ages 19+

Black African Other Asian Mixed Any Other Chinese Bangladeshi Indian Pakistani Black Other Black Caribbean Unknown White

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Ethnicity Breakdown 2009-10 for Whole College

Black African Other Asian Mixed Any Other Chinese Bangladeshi Indian Pakistani Black Other Black Caribbean Unknown White

Ethnicity Breakdown 2009-10 for 16-18 year olds Comparing learner satisfaction rates for demographic groups within the college against the relevant external benchmark for similar groups shows that the college is ranked in the upper quartiles against other colleges for almost all categories. Levels of satisfaction with teaching and learning from 16-18 Chinese (0.2% of college population) and Pakistani (0.3% of the college population) learners are lower than other learners.

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Equality and Diversity Focus Group Equality and diversity is one of the six core values at City of Sunderland College. With regard to ‘race equality’ the college policy is based on Race Relations Amendment Act (RRAA) 2003. Through its race equality scheme and single equality action plan, the college aims at recruiting students and staff from a diverse range of backgrounds and ensuring that they progress and achieve effectively. In line with the college plans and practices, the Racial Equality Focus Group (REFG) was set up in November 2009. The group is committed to the creation of an inclusive working and learning environment for all students and staff at City of Sunderland College. The Group aims at ensuring a proactive stance in tackling racial discrimination, promoting racial equality and fostering the development and maintenance of parity between all racial groups in order to support and create effective opportunities for all staff and learners. The group meets every eight weeks at the Bede Centre to plan their activities and represents 17 ethnicities including English, Pakistani, Zimbabwean, Eritrean, Bangladeshi, Kazakh, Iranian, Kurdish, Chinese, Estonian, Polish, Thai, Afghan, Indian, Turkish, Bulgarian and Ukrainian.

The group also runs a site on Moodle which contains key information for students and staff on current members, minutes of past meetings, useful resources and information on various past, present and future activities the group has organised or is planning to organise. It also includes a selection of music from various countries around the world. In addition, there is a beautiful gallery of pictures of various past events.

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International Cultural Event The most important event the group organised was an International Cultural Day on 28th May 2010. A small steering group comprised of students and staff was set up to organise the event and was later joined by the Bede Enrichment Team. The Steering Group met every week to provide updates on the arrangements being made. The key features of the event were: Workshop on Bite-sized Beginners French and Romanian languages Jane Hetherington, an ESOL Lecturer, delivered the French language workshop, while Ioan Bocica and Mihaela Paraschiv, two ESOL students from Romania, led the Romanian language workshop. The workshops were attended by 15 students. Given the level of participants’ language proficiency, the feedback was sought through a simple questionnaire asking them whether they liked the workshop or not. All participants responded in affirmative.

Bracelet Making Liia Dimitrijeva, an Entry 1 ESOL student from Estonia, facilitated the workshop with support from Christine Stanley, ESOL Team Leader. 13 Sixth Form students attended the workshop. Participants learnt how to make bracelets by following a step-by-step instruction menu. The feedback was sought through a simple questionnaire. Ten participants responded to the questionnaire. Out of ten, eight (80%) found the activity excellent, as it was very interesting and enjoyable, one participant (10%) said it was good and one (10%) student found it satisfactory. All participants (100%) found the activity useful.

29


Web-design Grazyna Lewandowska, a Level 2 ESOL student, led the workshop with support from Andrew Bridgett from the E-learning Team. Seven students took part in the workshop. The feedback was obtained through a simple questionnaire. All participants responded to the questionnaire. Out of seven participants, six (86%) found the activity excellent, as it was very interesting and enjoyable. One participant (14%) said it was good. All participants (100%) found the activity very useful. A Variety Show The variety programme was held in Bede Refectory and was hosted by Jane Hetherington, an ESOL Lecturer. The programme included a beautiful dress show, two lovely Romanian songs, a very exciting Kurdish dance and prize distribution. The students and staff adorned stunning dresses from Thailand, Burma, Sudan, Kurdistan, Romania, Bangladesh and China. The show ended with Nigel Harrett distributing prizes among winners of Motto and Chess competitions. At the end of the show the participants were served soft drinks, fruit and a selection of delicious Asian food prepared by Bede Refectory.

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A Chain of Hands After the variety show, the participants went out in the field with balloons in their hands and made a chain of human hands to symbolise racial equality and unity. At the end they let the balloons in the air.

Display of Countries Projects Throughout the year students worked on a project of information about their countries of origin. Students from China, Bulgaria, Thailand, Iran, Bangladesh, Romania, Poland and Estonia put their projects on display in Bede Refectory.

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Feedback on the event: “In the refectory I particularly liked seeing the clothes from different countries and the excellent display boards which some of the ESOL students had prepared. The henna hand painting was very popular with the students from the Sixth Form, and the Kurdish Dancers were extremely entertaining.” (Jane Hetherington: An ESOL Lecturer) “I enjoyed the information stands, the displays relating to the different national dress and also I thought the joining of hands were all great to be part of. I’m only disappointed that I missed some of the language taster sessions as I was unable to attend before they started. Once again, many thanks for arranging the event which I think overall was very successful.” (Neil Price (Managing Diversity: Course Tutor) “The function was excellent! I have attended this kind of get- together for the first time since I arrived in the UK. It was absolutely fantastic. The function was very well organised; everyone had obviously put in tremendous effort. I think we should have these types of celebration every year. In this way we will know each other’s culture and we will develop respect towards different customs and religions. Many thanks for organising this function.” (Mohamed and Aaisha Salim: ESOL Entry 3 Students) “It was a great day and we had a lot of fun. I saw people from various nationalities dressed up in their traditional clothes. I also had the chance to learn their French and Romanian languages. Some people danced their traditional dance and some others sang their traditional songs. I gained a lot of knowledge about their cultures and languages. This show was very well-organised and the presentation was really nice. I came to this show with my family and we all had a lot of fun. In fact, it is a memorable day for all of us. I wish to see many such international cultural events in future. Thank you for inviting me to the show!” (Ye Kyaw Thu / Moe Thu/: Burmese Students) “I saw all my friends from college wearing their national costumes. They looked very different from the way they usually dress. I also enjoyed looking at all the pictures of the different countries.” (Agneszieka Kubiak : A Polish Student) “I came to college in a long dress from Eritrea and I saw the other students wearing clothes from lots of different countries. I liked watching the clothes show and eating with my friends.” (Elsa Girmay: An Eritrean Student) “I really enjoyed wearing my silk dress from Thailand because usually I just wear jeans to college. When we all held hands outside on the field, all of our clothes looked very colourful.” (Oy Irving: A Thai Student) “I think it was a really good idea, because we met a lot of people from other countries, saw their traditional clothes and learnt their languages. I think it was wonderful, as it helped us to learn about other cultures. Thank you for organising this event.” (Salman Ahmed: A Bangladeshi Student)

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Photography Competition In order to celebrate the rich diversity of cultures in Sunderland today, a photography competition for both students and staff was organised to give them the chance to share their photographic skills with the college community. The theme of the competition was ‘Multicultural Sunderland: Through My Eyes’ and all students and staff were invited to contribute a photograph that they thought encapsulated this theme to good effect. Each participant was allowed to submit a maximum of two photographs taken by themselves and not by any third party or from a commercial source. They were also allowed to submit photographs as prints or in digital form. There was one prize of £20 for the winning, entry which was chosen by a specially selected judging panel. According to the judges, Katarzyna Madej-Jach, a Polish student, won the prize. She was awarded the prize by Nigel Harrett, Head of Bede Sixth Form, at the end of the International Variety Show on 28th May.

Motto Competition

This competition was organised with a view to choose a motto that will be an inspiration for its members, and also that encapsulates all the good work that the group does to foster community integration and cohesion. The entries were accepted from all students and staff. Angela O’Donoghue, the College Principal, acted as the judge. In total 13 motto entries were received. Ivalina Tosheva, a Bulgarian student, won £20 for her entry ‘Different but Equal’. She was awarded the prize by Nigel Harrett, Head of Bede Sixth Form Academy, at the end of the International Variety Show on 28th May. The winning entry will be used as the group’s motto in future.

33


Talk on Personal Safety The talk was advertised around the college and was held on 4th March in Bede Hall. A team of four serving Police officers and Community Support Officers from Sunderland West came along. Approximately 36 ESOL and International students attended the talk. Students felt free to talk to the police. Free invisible marker pens, safety alarms, NHS language cards and the translated versions of a booklet entitled ‘Be Safe, Be Secure: Your Practical Guide to Crime Reduction’ published by The Home Office were distributed. Later copies of the booklet in Chinese (required by International students) and some other languages were also obtained from The Home Office. Copies of a catalogue of helpful contact numbers as well as websites here requested. Students also asked for more safety alarms, and the police are going to look at this. It was suggested that such events can be made a regular occurrence particularly for new students each year. The police are ready to hold regular weekly/monthly surgeries lasting one-two hours for students and staff if required, provided they have a base room or a meeting pod. The photos of the session are available on ‘Racial Equality Focus Group’ site.

34


Talk on Fire Safety Two sessions of the talk were held on 25th March 2010 at 10:00 and 14:00. Mark Skeleton, a Community Officer from the Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service, delivered a very lively and animated presentation in Bede D305. The talk consisted of a video clip, an interactive session and printed materials for distribution. Eight students filled the forms to have a fire safety alarm installed in their houses. Approximately 47 ESOL students and staff attended the event. Students were given a worksheet to complete with information while listening to the talk, and later they wrote a report of the event. The photos as well as a report of the event are available on ‘Racial Equality Focus Group’ site. A selection of photos from the event are below:

Overseas Qualified Professionals There have been a number of qualified professionals particularly teachers from Eastern European countries in ESOL classes. The group decided to introduce them to the relevant departments in the college. A qualified Chemistry teacher observed Chemistry classes and helped students prepare for their A level exams. A qualified History teacher from Romania was introduced to a lecturer in the History Department to get information about how the classes are run at college.

35


Arch Sunderland ARCH went ‘live’ in 2007. It is a system designed for reporting, recording, monitoring and acting to combat racist incidents. The introduction of this system to Sunderland will enable residents, students, refugees, migrant works and other visitors to the city to report race crimes through a variety of sources and agencies. The University of Sunderland is a key partner in this initiative which now links the information gathered by Campus Watch security team to colleagues across the city. ARCH is an efficient way of reporting incidents via partner organisations and enables responses to be co-ordinated. This helps to ensure that a victim receives appropriate support and that effective action is taken against perpetrators. By bringing ARCH to Sunderland, partners can make referrals for support from other agencies and co-ordinate these through a case management system and operational support group meetings. ARCH addresses the issue of under-reporting, identifies ‘hotspots’ more easily and improves community intelligence. The aim is that an initial increase in reported cases, due to this better co-ordination, will ultimately lead to a reduction of incidents via a concerted approach against discrimination and the promotion of social inclusion. ARCH made a significant contribution to the colleges Equality & Diversity Week. They had a presence at each site one day during the week to promote their work. In addition they have delivered a number of awareness raising sessions for International students new to the city.

36


Festivals The college celebrated two festivals during 2010. April 14th - Baisakhi The college celebrated the Festival of Baisakhi which is the Sikh New Year. It is also important as it founded the Sikh community known as the Khalsa in 1699. Each centre of the college provided displays in their Learning Centres explaining the importance of the festival and a visit was arranged to a Sikh Temple as part of the celebration. November 5th - Diwali Diwali is known as the festival of lights and is celebrated by Hindus. This famous date in the Hindu calendar is similar to the English New Year as it relates to wishing for a new start and is linked to the Goddess of Wealth, Lakshmi. Again, each centre provided a small display in their library explaining the importance of this festival, particularly to the Indian community. Staff Data The college annually monitors workforce data in the organisation and reports the details to the Equality and Diversity Committee. The low numbers of staff from ethnic minority backgrounds is still an issue for the college. We have taken a number of actions to try and improve the ethnic diversity of the staff, including developing links with local ethnic minority communities, providing training on completion of application forms and providing opportunities for training to work in the sector. Ethnicity Ethnic Origin

Academic

%

Asian or Asian British

1

0.26

Senior Manager

%

Chinese or Chinese British

Support

%

Grand Total

%

3

0.82

4

0.52

2

0.54

2

0.26

Other Ethnic or Mixed Background

2

0.52

2

0.26

Refused declaration

1

0.26

1

0.13

Undisclosed

5

1.31

2

7.41

5

1.36

12

1.55

White (British, English, Scottish, Welsh, Irish, Other)

372

97.64

25

92.59

357

97.28

754

97.29

Grand Total

381

27

367

775

Professional Development for BME Staff The college is a member of the Network for Black Professionals. This network provides training and mentoring and also brokers secondment opportunities for staff from Black and Minority Ethnic backgrounds with the aim of increasing the numbers of BME staff in management positions within the FE sector.

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7. International Developments The college has actively developed a new International Directorate to grow our International portfolio and help internationalise the curriculum. We have significantly increased the numbers of students from a range of ethnic backgrounds in the college in 2010-11. We now have students from India, Pakistan, Myanmar and China studying predominantly higher education programmes. The college has invested in a comprehensive support system for these students including compliance with border agency requirements and the provision of suitable accommodation within the city. To support these students’ language development we appointed a new language support manager who has developed a service of language development for international students across the college. The college is a recognised IELTS centre and is continually increasing the numbers of students using the test centre and undertaking programmes to improve their language scores. Summer Schools In July / August, 2010, the City of Sunderland College’s, International Department, held its now well-established series of Summer Schools at the St Peters Campus. The college welcomed 40 young learners from China for a three week all inclusive educational and cultural Summer School. The students participated in English language lessons and were introduced to British culture and people through various social programme activities. The Summer School also involved weekend day excursions exploring the North East of England and a one week visit to London. While the teenagers enjoyed the sights of the capital city, they were happy to return to Sunderland among the friendly, warm-hearted people. We also conducted a four week Teaching Methodology, TKT, Summer Programme. The group was a diverse mix of practising teachers from China, who were here to update their skills, as well as individuals from England, all eager to develop the skills and knowledge necessary for teaching English as a foreign language. Though the course was very intensive with lots of hard work the individuals were also able to discover the sights and culture of England through weekend day excursions, social programme activities and a one week visit to London. To complete the course the students sat the Cambridge ESOL Teaching Knowledge Test (TKT) and students and staff were happy with the high results and 100% retention and achievement for the course. International Staff Exchanges As part of the college development of International work, a number of staff have visited partner institutions in China, India and Malaysia to share expertise and knowledge. This has provided excellent staff development for staff and enables them to understand the cultural issues/ differences of the young people who may progress to City of Sunderland College.

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8. Religion and Beliefs The college aims to support and share experiences across faiths within Sunderland. We encourage all students to feel free to express their faiths and religious beliefs without fear of discrimination. Chaplaincy The college now has an Anglican chaplain available to all faiths based at the Bede Centre one day a week. The chaplain has now become a member of the college’s Equality and Diversity Committee and will work with the college in supporting all of its students. The college has provided time for a member of staff to train as a chaplain. She is a full time member of staff who offers a range of ‘faith’ support for students across a number of centres. The college has begun to talk with the headteachers of the Faith Schools to link into their faith networks to further support students to attend events and activities linked to their beliefs. Prayer Rooms The college provides multi-faith prayer rooms at Shiney Row, Bede, Usworth and St Peter’s centres and is looking to develop a facility at the Hylton Skills Campus. Easter Cross Event The carpenters and joiners at the Hylton Skills Campus fabricated a man-size crucifix to be carried from the Bede Centre to Sunderland Minster the week before Easter. Students at each Centre were posed the question: “Who are the Oppressed?” in tutorial sessions. Their responses were then represented graphically on the cross, with the help of local artist Maria Makepeace. Following the procession to the Minster, the cross was on public display over the Easter period. An article on this appeared in the Sunderland Echo.

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Holocaust Memorial Trees Tree planting: The Memorial Day was commemorated this year with the planting of trees at all centres. Tutorial groups had to find names of Holocaust victims and write these on a plastic tag which was then placed by each tree when planted. In all, 105 trees were planted in college grounds with five potted olive trees for the St Peter’s Campus. Tutorial activities were supported with DVD’s from the BBC covering historic footage of the Holocaust, as well as some resources provided by the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust. The event was covered by the Sunderland Echo.

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9. Fair Trade And Human Rights Fair Trade Staff from all centres have been involved in the organisation, planning and implementation of a number of Fair Trade/Human Rights projects. It is to their credit that they have built on the successes of previous years and have extended the range of activities and rates of participation throughout the whole college. Staff have been pro-active in encouraging the participation of students with disabilities/learning difficulties/different cultures in all these activities. Fair Trade Fortnight This annual event continues to be well supported college wide. Fair Trade food samples and resources were distributed to all tutor groups and a quiz on Moodle was also used to publicise the principles of Fair Trade. A Fair Trade stall was held at each centre, run by students and a representative from Traidcraft, during Equality and Diversity week. A total of £200 was raised from the sale of these craft goods from the Thai/Burma border and will be sent to the Boarding High School for Orphans on the border as part of our new link with the school and City of Sunderland College. A representative from the Co-op ran a promotional stand on Fair Trade at the Hylton and Bede Centre during Fair Trade Fortnight. Link with school for orphans on the Thai/Burma border Lecturer Peter Mulligan visited the Thai/Burma border to try and establish links with a community school. He also met with ex-political prisoners and sourced a variety of Fair Trade products to sell in college. The leaders of the AAPP (Assistance Association of Political Prisoners) sent a video message of thanks to show to the students and staff who have helped to raise awareness of the abuse of rights of political prisoners in Burma. Students from the school on the border sent a PowerPoint presentation which showed activities from their daily lives. The resource has been used in tutorial activities at the Usworth Campus. Greetings Card Campaign – Amnesty International This event has proved popular as an annual Christmas time activity. All centres received materials to cover this and Bede students sent over 200 cards to prisoners of conscience in nine different countries this year. Human Rights The college actively promotes Human Rights through the tutorial curriculum and a range of events organised by the college Human Rights Group, a student led/organised group facilitated by Peter Mulligan, a tutor based at the Hylton Skills Campus.

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Visit from Jewish Human Rights organisation: ICAHD Yohav Zohar, from ICAHD, the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions, spent an afternoon explaining to students and staff at Shiney Row about the abuse of human rights in Palestine. Following his presentation he took questions from the floor and later said that of all his presentations on his national tour this year, this was the best one because of the pertinence of the questions asked ! Approximately 65 people were at the event and further publicity followed with an article in the local press. “ Dog cell” and political prisoners in Burma A “dog cell” replica of punishment cells used in Burmese jails was built by the joiners at the Hylton Skills Campus and used to draw attention to the abuse of rights of political prisoners in Burma. The cell has been used to promote the “Free Zargana” campaign (from Amnesty International) at all centres. The event was covered by the Sunderland Echo. Visit to Speaker’s Apartments – House of Commons Bede student Nadia Caney was invited to make a presentation in London at the Speaker’s apartments to commemorate 10,000 student visits paid to Auschwitz by students from the U.K. (A scheme run by the Holocaust Educational Trust). Nadia met with John Bercow, Michael Gove, Ed Balls, several Lords, other MPs and Holocaust survivors and was congratulated on her eloquent and passionate speech to the invited dignitaries. Coverage of the visit appeared in the local press. Disability Hate Crime A DVD resource, “Tormented Lives”, with supporting literature was circulated to all tutor groups to address this shocking aspect of prejudice and discrimination.

10. Corporate Social Responsibility The college’s Strategic Plan (2007-2010) has ‘Ethics’ clearly signalled as one of the established core values under the logo ‘PRIDE’. During the past year we have achieved the following: • All hospitality is now Fair Trade. • St Peter’s Sixth Form and Usworth Sixth Form are paperless offices. • Commissioned Turner Townsend to develop a specification for the design and implementation of a new IT infrastructure that will be centred on ‘green’ energy. • Worked with a football company who will invest £2.5m in a sports pavilion and 10 all-weather pitches. • Installed a new heating system at Bede with help from an interest free loan from the Carbon Trust. The system includes solar panels installed on the roof which heat all the hot water at the centre. • In the new strategic plan we have set a yearly target of 50% reduction of carbon emissions.

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43

Organisational leadership which promotes, supports and advances equality of opportunity and work s to eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and other prohibited conduct between people who share the protected characteristics of:

1.

• And those who do not.

• Sexual Orientation

• Sex

• Religion or Belief

• Race

• Pregnancy & Maternity

• Gender Re-assignment

• Disability

• Age

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Ref

“Equality and Diversity in Action”

Equality Objectives 2011

1.1.

Ensure all college strategies address the principles of and commitment to an Equality Duty

Objectives & Actions

Reports / Monitoring Equality and Diversity (E&D) Committee

Lead Principalship/ Governing Body

The college has prepared a new action plan to reflect the requirements of the new Equality Act. The plan outlines our main areas of focus/development for the next 12 months.

11. Equality and Diversity Action Plan

On-going

Timescale

Lead statement (College Strategic Plan)

Success Indicators

Comments


44

Ref

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets Re-affirm commitment to Equality and Diversity and a zero tolerance to unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation in college Strategic Plan/s Provide training for all staff in Equality and Diversity including updates in relation to Equality Act 2010 Include Equality and Diversity principles in Leadership and Management Development programmes Communicate to all staff the benefits, need and importance of promoting Equality and Diversity (Staff Bulletins) Establish role and functions of Equality and Diversity Committee in the context of the college’s Equality Duties

1.2.

1.3.

1.4.

1.5.

1.6.

Objectives & Actions

Staff Development statistics and reports

On-going

SPG Equality and Diversity Committee College Principalship E&D Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

Principalship/ Governing Body Principalship

Principalship

May 2011

May 2011 On-going

Staff Development statistics and reports

On-going

SPG E&D Committee

Assistant Principal Teaching & Learning/CPD

E&D Committee minutes

Bulletins

Publication of SP which includes appropriate statements

Throughout timescale of Strategic Plan

Equality and Diversity Committee

Success Indicators

Principalship/ Governing Body

Timescale

Reports / Monitoring

Lead

Comments


45

Ref

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

1.8.

1.7.

Formally gather the views of students and staff, including those who share a protected characteristic and those who do not, of their experiences of college through the QDP survey and Learner Involvement Strategy for students and staff focus groups.

• LGBT Month

• EID

• Equality and Diversity Week

• e.g. World Mental Health Day;

Implement and support an on-going (rolling) programme of college wide events to include involvement of external agencies to promote Equality and Diversity across the range of protected characteristics:

Objectives & Actions

Vice Principal Quality & Student Support Director Quality and Standards

Director Learning Support Link Governor E&D

Lead

Student Support Committee / Principalship

Equality and Diversity Committee

Reports / Monitoring

On-going

April 2011 On-going

Timescale

Meetings structure in place Views gathered from students and staff at least 2x year

Press reports Publicity materials

Success Indicators

Comments


46

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Ensure college Policies, Procedures, Plans and Practices reflect the promotion and advancement of Equality across all protected characteristics (Impact Assessment).

Ref

2.

In accordance with its Equality Duty develop a process for Impact Assessment of existing Policies, Procedures, Plans and Practices to extend to all Protected Characteristics. Ensure all college managers embed principles of impact assessment for all protected characteristics in all new policy and planning procedures.

2.1.

2.2.

e.g. Estates changes Staffing restructures Redundancy proposals

Inform relevant college managers of their direct responsibility in relation to the college’s General and Specific Equality Duties.

1.9.

Objectives & Actions

All college managers to undertake IA awareness raising

IA built into review of policies and procedures

Publication of amended IA proforma to support quality processes

April 2011 and onwards Equality and Diversity Committee Quality Committee

Director – Quality and Standards All college managers

Annual Report to E&D Committee

Annual reports on Impact Assessment July each year

Equality and Diversity Committee

Equality objectives prepared and published. General Equality Duty information gathered

Success Indicators

Director -Quality and Standards

April 2011 and onwards

Timescale

Equality and Diversity Committee

Reports / Monitoring

Principalship

Lead

Comments


47

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Ensure there is appropriate and sufficient information to inform the promotion of equality across the college.

Ref

3.

Through systematic review of existing quality processes, embed impact assessment to cover all protected characteristics. Require all curriculum managers to impact assess their course specific recruitment and selection criteria to cover all protected characteristics. Use the outcomes of data analysis for students from self assessment and surveys/ forums to inform annual review of equality strategy. Use the outcomes of HRM workforce audit (4.1. below) to inform annual review and update of equality strategy. Work with franchise partners to provide information streams to inform annual review and update of equality strategy.

2.3

2.4

3.1

3.2

3.3

Objectives & Actions

SAR analysis Annual review of General and specific Equality Duties Annual analysis produced

Annual SAR

April 2011 onwards

July 2011 onwards

Equality and Diversity Committee Quality Committee Equality and Diversity Committee Management Forum Equality and Diversity Committee

VP Q+SS

VP Q+SS

Community/ franchise unit

Analysis of partners data undertaken

Completed impact assessments for entry and selection processes

April 2011 onwards

Quality Committee

VPQ+SS & Director Learner Support

Impact assessment of course specific selection criteria

Success Indicators

April 2011 onwards

Timescale

E&D Committee

Reports / Monitoring

Director – Quality and Standards

Lead

Comments


48

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Ensure that the college endeavours to establish and develop a work force to reflect representation from all sectors of the community and promotes equality of opportunity with regard to staff training and promotion.

Ref

4.

Continue to analyse complaints to account for individual protected characteristic and feed into annual review of General and Specific Equality duties. Build data analysis into student satisfaction surveys and take account of protected characteristics where possible, to identify differences in usage of facilities and their satisfaction rates Undertake an audit of employees to develop a race, gender, age and disability breakdown and distribution to establish a workforce profile. Within the audit where possible, indicate any likely representation on sexual orientation, religion or belief and transgender (provided that no individuals can be identified as a result)

3.4

3.5

4.1

Objectives & Actions Equality and Diversity Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

Quality & Standards Team

HRM Manager

Reports / Monitoring

Quality & Standards Team VP Q+SS

Lead

Aug 2011 onwards

August 2011 On-going

Sept 2011 onwards

Timescale

Statistical base of staff established

Analysis from student surveys complete

Analysis of complaints considered at least annually

Success Indicators

Comments


49

Ref

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets Monitor the age, gender, race and ethnicity and disability profile in terms of job applications, promotion, training. Indicate any likely representation on sexual orientation, religion or belief and transgender (provided that no individuals can be identified as a result) Monitor the incidence of Protected characteristics in terms of grievance, disciplinary action, dismissals and reasons for leaving Publish results annually

Undertake regular analyses of pay for males and females to determine if there is a gender pay gap. Develop Positive Action Strategies and incorporate into the college’s Recruitment Procedures

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

Objectives & Actions

Equality and Diversity Committee Equality and Diversity Committee Management Forum E&D Committee

HRM Manager

HRM Manager

Equality and Diversity Committee

HRM Manager

HRM Manager

Equality and Diversity Committee

Reports / Monitoring

HRM Manager

Lead

April 2011 onwards

April 2011 onwards

Aug 2011 onwards

Sept 2011 onwards

Sept 2011 onwards

Timescale

Increase in applications across the range of protected characteristics

Analysis complete

Positive report to E&D Committee

Monitoring report

Monitoring report

Success Indicators

Comments


50

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Maximise opportunities for individuals to gain access to college premises, facilities and services.

Ref

5.

Review student recruitment literature, material and practice to ensure nondiscrimination and positive promotion on the grounds of age disability, gender re-assignment, pregnancy & maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. Review Course Validation documentation in relation to learner accessibility to account for all protected characteristics. Make all staff, both teaching and non-teaching, aware of the requirements of the Equality Duties to enhance access at college enrolment sessions for those sharing protected characteristics. Incorporate awareness of the equality objectives and duties in the college’s induction programme for all new permanent and agency staff.

5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

Objectives & Actions

Aug 2011 onwards

July 2011 on-going

July 2011 onwards

Equality and Diversity Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

VP Quality and Business Support

Associate Principal Teaching & Learning/CPD

Associate Principal Teaching & Learning/CPD

Aug 2011 – on-going

Equality and Diversity Committee

Strategic Marketing Manager

Timescale

Reports / Monitoring

Lead

Internal/External Inspection outcomes

Increase in applications across the range of protected characteristics

Increased participation of non-traditional students

Increased levels of non-traditional students

Success Indicators

Comments


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Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Via flexible, dynamic, innovative and supportive methods, promote the consultation and active involvement of staff and students from diverse backgrounds in the development, implementation and monitoring of the college equality objectives and duties

Ref

6.

Implement user forums/ focus groups to identify issues related to Equality and Diversity in the college

6.1

Ensure Learner Involvement Strategy addresses Equality and Diversity issues Develop opportunities for electronic means of consultation and involvement incl: direct emailing; college website; message board; chatrooms, blogs etc. Ensure the outcomes of consultation and participation are published and acted upon.

6.2

6.3

6.4

e.g. Race equality focus group Disability forum.

Provide training programmes to encourage the development of appropriate teaching methods, curricula and assessment techniques, in order to positively support students irrespective of whether they share a protected characteristic.

5.5

Objectives & Actions

Equality and Diversity Committee Learning Committee E&D Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

Director ILT

VP Quality and Business Support

Equality and Diversity Committee

Director Learning Support

Director Student Services

Equality and Diversity Committee

Reports / Monitoring

Associate Principal Teaching & Learning/CPD

Lead

July 2011 onwards

May 2011 onwards

April 2011 onwards

April 2011 onwards

Aug 2011 onwards

Timescale

Report to appropriate committees

Report to appropriate committees

Outcomes published

Outcomes of forums/focus groups/surveys published

Training programme in place

Success Indicators

Comments


52

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Ensure Equality and Diversity indicators are taken account of when addressing the Not in Education, Employment or Training (NEET) agenda

Ensure CoSC Application, Admissions and Enrolment procedures maximise the participation of individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds

Ref

7.

8.

Design and promote courses to meet the needs of learners from a range of backgrounds and cultures for whom attendance on mainstream courses is not appropriate. Ensure that no learner is refused entry to an appropriate college course solely on the grounds they share a protected characteristic or because the college is unable to provide appropriate facilities and support unless the Principal or nominee is satisfied that it is impossible. Include positive images of people from a diverse range of backgrounds in all college marketing literature.

7.1

8.1

8.2

Objectives & Actions Equality and Diversity Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

Director Student Services

Strategic Marketing Manager

Reports / Monitoring

Engagement Group

Lead

Aug 2011 onwards

Aug 2011 onwards

April 2011 onwards

Timescale

Improved participation rates

Improved participation rates

Increase in NEET cohort

Success Indicators

Comments


53

Strategic Priority Areas and Targets

Liaison with other agencies or third parties

Ref

9.

Work actively with third party providers, Local Authority and other agencies as appropriate in order to eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimisation and promote and advance the educational interests of learners from a diverse range of backgrounds. Contribute to the development of regional and local strategies to facilitate the transition of learners with a diverse range of backgrounds from school to college Work actively with third party providers in order that college equality strategy is mirrored to the benefit of (third party) staff and students.

9.1

9.2

9.3

Objectives & Actions

Reports / Monitoring Equality and Diversity Committee

Equality and Diversity Committee

Management forum

Lead Principal and or delegated Manager

Principal and or delegated Manager

VP Curriculum

April 2011 onwards

April 2011 onwards

Timescale

Improved satisfaction rates amongst third party providers

Increased involvement of individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds

Increased involvement of individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds

Success Indicators

Comments


12. Equality and Diversity Group Membership Name

Job Title

Department

Angela O’Donoghue

Principal (Chair)

Executive

Suzanne Duncan

Vice Principal Quality & Business Support

Executive

Joe Leggett

Director

Learning Support

Maureen Earley

Director of Quality & Standards

Quality Division

Mike Lanaghan

Head of Sixth Form

Usworth Sixth Form

Julie Raine

Director

Basic Education

Gerard Elder

VLE Systems Development Officer

E-Learning

Karen Wade

Head of Facilities Management

Facilities

Dave Riddell

Director

Student Services

Andrea Elliott

Human Resources Manager

Human Resources

Jude Letham

Specialist Tutor for Students with Visual Impairment/Disability Advisor

Learning Support Directorate

Peter Mulligan

Disability Advisor/Specialist Tutor

Hylton Skills Campus

Alison Rudman

Tutor/Assessor

Employer Engagement

Jennifer Bradshaw

Chaplain

Samia Gillani

Associate Lecturer

ESOL, Basic Adult Education

Trevor Ashton

Assistant Principal, Business Development

International Operations

Deborah Simpson

Curriculum Leader Tutorial

St Peter’s Sixth Form

Judith Nicholson

Head of Department

Learning and Standards, Hylton Skills Campus

Lesley Hall

Head of Department

Supported Learning

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Phone: 0191 511 6000 www.citysun.ac.uk If you require this booklet in an alternative format e.g. Braille, large print or audio, please contact us on 0191 511 6000 or email marjorie.ford@citysun.ac.uk


Equality and Diversity Report 2010-2011