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Table of Contents

Market Assessment - draft Presented to: The City of Winter Haven, Florida April 6, 2011

Market Assessment | 0


Introduction……………………………………………….....

2

Executive Summary………………………………………..

5

SWOT Analysis……………………….……………………..

8

Orlando

Demographic Trends………………………………….……. 13 Economic Trends……………………………………..…….. 22 Human Capital/Talent…………………………….………... 32 Innovation……………………………………………………. 38 Infrastructure, Business Climate and Quality of Life…..... 43 Next Steps & Transition to Target Industry Analysis .….. 50

Winter Haven Tampa

Appendix A: Methodology…………………………………. 52 Appendix B: Business Survey Results……...……………. 53 Appendix C: List of Colleges & Universities……………… 61 Appendix D: Photo Credits………………………………… 64

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 1


Introduction In an effort to improve current economic conditions, to prepare for anticipated growth and to become more competitive within the region, the City of Winter Haven has engaged AngelouEconomics of Austin, Texas to evaluate the present conditions of the local economy and to recommend potential strategies for advancing the city’s economic development efforts. This report is the first of four that will be delivered to the City of Winter Haven. It provides background information that will serve as the base for future research and is essential to the project team and the city in the preparation of an economic development strategic plan. It is comprised of both qualitative and quantitative information. The qualitative – information gathered through surveys, focus groups and interviews – tells the story of what residents and businesses think about Winter Haven. The quantitative – what the statistics show – is often the perspective seen by external businesses and site selection consultants. By reviewing both qualitative and quantitative information about the local economy, the area workforce and market characteristics, AngelouEconomics, together with the City of Winter Haven, is more able to identify key assets and challenges and to determine what strategies are most appropriate to the needs and objectives of Winter Haven, Florida.

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 2


BENCHMARKS In order to gauge where Winter Haven stands relative to other peer or competitor communities, this report assesses its performance against three benchmark communities including Lakeland, FL, Winter Park, FL, and Beaufort, SC. The benchmark communities were chosen for characteristics that each shares individually with the City of Winter Haven. These include items such as the community’s size, its geography and proximity to key markets and population centers. The benchmark communities also share a similar industrial heritage and natural features. Specifically, Lakeland was selected for its role as a primary urban center in Polk County, while Winter Park was chosen for its proximity to Orlando and status as a destination for retirees. Beaufort, South Carolina, on the other hand, was selected as an out-of-state benchmark that stands as a popular travel destination due to its location near the beaches of South Carolina. Additionally, the study benchmarks Winter Haven against Polk County, the State of Florida and the United States as a whole.

*See further explanation on following page

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 3


GEOGRAPHIC BOUNDARIES OF ANALYSIS In order to provide analysis that is based on the deepest and most consistent sources of data and in order to ensure that the analysis provided is comparable across categories, AngelouEconomics used formal political boundaries at the local- and county-levels. Specifically, references to “Winter Haven� as found in the quantitative portions of this study refer to the City of Winter Haven proper and do not include areas outside city limits that may, from either a popular or practical standpoint, be considered part of Winter Haven. Therefore, it is important to note the significant number of individuals that live outside of the City of Winter Haven who may be considered, or may consider themselves, part of the Winter Haven community. This may, for instance, include the 27,537 residential customers of the Winter Haven Utility District which would yield a population count of 61, 411. In the end, it was determined that the use of the City of Winter Haven proper would be most conducive to the type of analysis to be conducted for this study. In other instances, a broader geography (such as Polk County) was used due to restrictions in the availability of data at more specific geographies. For portions of the study that are less sensitive to formal geographic boundaries, specifically those portions that rely upon qualitative analysis as obtained through interviews, focus groups and site visits, a broader definition of the Winter Haven community was often employed. This has allowed AngelouEconomics to take into consideration a multitude of factors that are contributing to the present and anticipated economic conditions found within and around Winter Haven, Florida.

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 4


Executive Summary SUMMARY OF KEY FINDINGS Perhaps the greatest opportunity identified by community stakeholders is the anticipated growth that is expected to occur with the opening of Legoland Florida in October of this year. A strong sense of urgency is prevalent among community stakeholders, as several major concerns have been voiced related to the challenge of accommodating the influx of visitors that is expected to result from the theme park's opening. Of particular note among these concerns is the challenge of providing adequate hotel space to visitors, to draw Legoland visitors into the City of Winter Haven, to position the community as a destination and to improve the attractiveness of the built environment, particularly along key gateways to the community. Despite these challenges, the opening of Legoland, as well as the anticipated development of an integrated logistics center by CSX Railroad, present many opportunities for growth and development within Winter Haven. This has generated a great deal of optimism within the community, and many are eager for Winter Haven to take the steps necessary to fully capitalize on the opportunities before it.

“You have the feeling of being on the ground floor with tremendous growth and opportunity ahead !� - Focus Group Participant

Polk County has been growing strongly over the past decade, however the City of Winter Haven is missing out on the growth that is occurring around it. The data supports findings in interviews and focus groups that most growth is occurring outside of city boundaries. New residents are moving to Polk County (including all cities and unincorporated areas) from Orlando, New York City and other parts of the Northeast, while residents are leaving Polk County for Atlanta, Houston and other locations in the Southeast U.S.

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 5


Of those who currently live in Winter Haven, a high proportion are seniors. However, a growing proportion of the local population is found in the under 25 age group. The number of individuals that fall into the young adults cohort (those aged 25-44) is low by comparison to county, state and national levels. Winter Haven is challenged by low educational attainment – an issue that is of particular concern to community stakeholders. Growth in the number of residents with a Bachelor’s degree or above has been very limited during the past decade as well. However, R&D expenditures in the USF and UCF systems have been growing strongly in recent years, and enrollment in Polk State College has increased by over 21% since 2006. Winter Haven is faced with a number of challenges to supporting a higher level of entrepreneurship, particularly in the near-term. Polk County offers very limited access to venture capital and patent activity in Winter Haven has been low. Housing in Winter Haven is very affordable, but may be generating downward pressure on rental rates. This may be limiting the city’s ability to draw more residents into the downtown area which has benefited from a number of revitalization efforts in recent years. The Winter Haven economy enjoys a strong presence of Health Care jobs and has seen encouraging growth in Hospitality and Professional Services. Much of the local economy, however, is dominated by low skill, low wage industries. The City is importing many high-skill professionals from outside the community in order to support businesses present within the city. Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 6


Median income levels in Winter Haven are moderately below state and county levels and per capita income growth has been very slow. Nearly 15% of Winter Haven households fall below the poverty line. An increase in the number of jobs has been a bright spot for the community in recent years, as job growth in Winter Haven has outperformed Lakeland, Polk County, the State of Florida and the U.S. as a whole. Unemployment in Winter Haven is in line with county and state levels. With an improving national economy and the addition of Legoland Florida and the CSX Integrated Logistics Center, growth in employment and development is expected to occur in Winter Haven over the next several years. Capitalizing on and managing this growth is both a challenge and an opportunity to the community.

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 7


SWOT Analysis STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES, AND THREATS This section of the report highlights the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for Winter Haven, as collected through stakeholder discussions, survey information, and quantitative databases. We do not intend for this analysis of issues to be all-inclusive. Rather, we focus on those areas that will have the most direct impact on future economic development efforts in Winter Haven. We define the four aspects of “SWOT” in these terms: •Strengths: Issues or characteristics that can be built upon to advance current and future economic growth opportunities in Winter Haven. •Weaknesses: Issues or characteristics that, if not addressed effectively, could limit current or future growth opportunities. •Opportunities: Assets, events, or trends that offer Winter Haven the potential for economic growth and attraction of new industry. •Threats: Obstacles, events or trends that, if not addressed effectively, could threaten the City’s economic potential and its ability to attract, expand and start up new employers.

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 8


SWOT Analysis Education and Workforce Recruitment, Retention and Development

Strengths

Weaknesses

Opportunities

Threats

• Polk State College campus in Winter Haven • Career academies within the public school system • New USF Polytechnic campus and research park to open • Commitment by State to using USF Poly to boost technology industry in region • Strong presence of Health Care jobs in the city

• Difficulty attracting/retaining young professionals • Limited population growth within the city itself • Perceived disconnect between area colleges and businesses on workforce needs • Significant challenges to public schools, particularly in terms of performance and perception • Overrepresentation of low-wage, low-skill jobs • Slow income growth • Limited basic interviewing/personal presentation skills of workforce • Importing many highskilled workforce from outside of the city • Low educational attainment

• Continuing to engage young adults/professionals in leadership positions in city • Ongoing and enhanced communication of available resources and success stories relating to local education, especially K-12 • Increased partnership between educational institutions and area businesses • Engaging high school students and recent high school graduates in civic and business opportunities

• Continued or increased difficulty attracting and retaining professional labor in Winter Haven • Persistent perception issues affecting area schools • Inadequate creative/artistic infrastructure to support and promote growth of creative class • Drug use and criminal activity among workforce

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 9


SWOT Analysis Strengths

Weaknesses

Threats

• Strong business community with a commitment to economic development • Low property costs

• Business community perceives city as part of “good ‘ol boy” network

• Legoland Florida and CSX ILC are tremendous opportunities • Other tourism related assets including outdoor recreation • Additional opportunities identified include healthcare/medical R&D, agriculture related technology development, agri-toursim, datacenters, boutique hotel in the downtown, “Natural” Florida

• Lack of workforce which meet the needs of employers • Frustration with city government • Lost opportunities due to permitting and other development delays

• Presence and activities of 6/10 Corporation • Main Street Association and recent improvements to downtown • Blue Sky Incubator

• Little-to-no venture capital in the region

• Developing “culture of entrepreneurship” • Leveraging and building upon existing resources • Identifying additional capital resources for new and small businesses

• Lack of public and private organizations focused on entrepreneurship (i.e. angel networks) • Limited capital

Business Climate and Retention/ Expansion/ Recruitment

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development

Opportunities

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 10


SWOT Analysis Strengths

Marketing and Economic Development

Sites and Infrastructure

Weaknesses

Opportunities

Threats

• A+ bond rating • Recent attraction of Legoland Florida and CSX ILC • Strong sense of urgency • Multiple partners and organizations to leverage for economic development

• Current brand of city as retirement community is perceived as a barrier • Limited education of the public on economic development related issues • Limited communication between economic development partners • Confusing roles and responsibilities, as well as limited resources, related to economic development

• Maximizing resources through partnerships • Transparency and accountability • Joint marketing with Legoland • Attraction of international visitors • Promoting a Live/Work/Play community

• Continued lack of cohesion and persistent east-west divide in Polk County • Perception that city is not business friendly • Lack of product and lack of program and resources to promote it • Content with status quo

• Central location between Orlando and Tampa • Recent infrastructure investments/commitments • Local airport with new terminal (uncontrolled) • Reduced natural disaster risk to due to area’s elevation above sea level • Water and sewer are city owned utilities • Strong partnership with TECO

• Lack of hotels and poor condition of several existing hotels in area • Minimal residential development is occurring inside of the City of Winter Haven • Lack of available, undeveloped land within the city limits • Cumbersome, inconsistent zoning and slow permitting • Management of the Chain of Lakes is perceived negatively, particularly with regard to maintaining consistent water level in the canals

• CSX Integrated Logistics Center • Addition of new parkway leading south around Winter Haven from Lakeland • Increased bikefriendliness, potential for regional commuter rail and multi-modal transportation • Annexation to support growth • Clearer, more effective and flexible zoning • Growth opportunities to the south/southeast of Winter Haven • Accelerate transportation projects

• Unprepared for the opening of Legoland Florida and anticipated growth of the city • Increased traffic problems • Perceptions of higher home utility costs in the City of Winter Haven

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 11


SWOT Analysis Quality of Life

Strengths

Weaknesses

Opportunities

• Chain of Lakes, climate and other natural amenities • Small town atmosphere • Generous, philanthropic community • Sense of community • Close (enough) to big cities • Ridge Art & Theatre Winter Haven • Affordable housing

• Negative appearance of parts of the city • Lack of gateways into the city • Very limited quality housing or rental opportunities within the city and specifically downtown

• Better quality of “place” • Improved attractiveness of Winter Haven entrances and corridors • Increased lake access throughout the year • More mixed use development throughout the city • Redevelopment

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Threats • Continued patterns of sprawl development • Unprepared to accommodate visitors to Legoland • Significant and persistent inequality in income distribution • Lack of water conservation

Market Assessment | 12


Population Growth

Demographic Trends POPULATION GROWTH

After missing out on much of the growth occurring around it, Winter Haven has now begun to grow in pace with Polk County as a whole.

POPULATION GROWTH, 1990-2010

60%

% change ('90-'00)

% change ('00-'10) 48.5%

50% 40% 30%

28.3% 25.5%

33.1% 26.4%

45.3%

24.4%

24.0% 17.6%

12.1% 9.9%

20% 10%

9.6% 4.6%

0% -10%

(-5.5%)

-7.7%

-20% Winter

Lakeland Winter Park

Beaufort

Hav en

Polk

Florida

County

United States

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Decision Data Resources

POPULATION PROJECTION PROJECTED POPULATION GROWTH RATE, 2010-2015

15% 10% 10% 6% 5%

3%

2%

Beaufort

Lakeland

4%

5%

Florida

United

0% -5%

•Although the population of the City of Winter Haven grew by 28.3% between 1990 and 2010, this lagged substantially behind growth levels of Polk County as a whole during that time period. However, over the past decade growth conditions changed as Winter Haven grew at a slightly faster pace than Polk County as a whole (25.5% vs. 24.4% respectively). •Much of the population growth in Polk County during the past decade has occurred outside of the major cities, often in unincorporated portions of the county. •Winter Haven is currently projected to grow by 6% over the next five years, topping Lakeland, the State of Florida and the United States as a whole, but still behind projected growth for Polk County. However, as previous projections for the Florida benchmarks (including Winter Haven) were easily surpassed by actual growth, it is a strong possibility that the current projections may be conservative as well.

-3% Winter Hav en

Winter

Polk

Park

County

States Source: Decision Data Resources

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 13


Components of Population Change

Demographic Trends The source of population change in Polk County has primarily been domestic – though this has diminished in recent years.

POPULATION CHANGE IN POLK COUNTY COMPONENTS OF POPULATION CHANGE, 2001-2009

Natural

30,000

Net International

Net Domestic

•Polk County has experienced a consistent mix in the components of its population change, with domestic sources bringing the most net new residents in most years.

25,000 60,337 20,000

16,702

15,000 15,501

7,787

10,000

4,502 5,000

4,690

3,775

0

1,172 1,367

3,291

2001

2002

-5,000

•2006 was a year of substantial growth for Polk County, led by over 60,000 net new domestic residents.

8,464

5,180

2003

12,298

10,562 1,340 1,741

1,118

2004

2005

10,630

2,166 2006

1,174 3,113

3,188 1,043 3,044

2007

2008

1,304 2,552 -572 2009

•2009 was the first year since 2001 in which Polk County witnessed negative net domestic population change. •Polk County has experienced a consistent level of positive net population change originating from international sources.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Sources: Business Survey, See Appendix For Additional Responses

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 14


Race and Ethnicity

Demographic Trends Winter Haven is slightly more diverse than its benchmarks.

POPULATION RACIAL BREAKDOWN, 2010 White 100% 80%

Black

Asian/Pacific

3.50% 1.8%

3.80% 1.9%

2.30% 2.7%

1.70% 1.2%

21.2%

20.5%

15.4%

23.8%

Other 6.30% 1.5% 13.70%

3.40% 2.30% 15.6%

5.70% 4.6% 12.4%

60% 40%

69.40%

70.50%

75.80%

71.30%

75.30%

75.50%

73.50%

Winter Hav en

Lakeland

Winter Park

Beaufort

Polk County

Florida

United States

20% 0%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Decision Data Resources

HISPANIC POPULATION %, 2010 23%

25% 18%

20% 15%

13%

•While across most racial categories, Winter Haven is similar to its benchmarks in terms of the degree to which various races are represented. Winter Haven does, however, have a higher proportion of black residents than most of the benchmarks. •At 11%, Winter Haven‘s Hispanic population is significantly below that of Polk County, the State of Florida, and the U.S. as a whole, and lower also than the City of Lakeland. •The US Census considers Hispanic descent to be an ethnicity rather than a race. This allows survey respondents to claim both race and ethnicity, such as a person reporting to be a white Hispanic. For this reason, Hispanic ethnicity must be examined independently of racial population distribution.

17%

11%

10%

7%

7%

Winter

Winter

Beaufort

Hav en

Park

5% 0% Lakeland

Polk County

Florida

United States

Source: U.S. Census

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 15


Age

Demographic Trends Although Winter Haven has a high proportion of seniors, residents under age 25 are growing as a proportion of the total population.

AGE DISTRIBUTION, 2010 0 TO 14

100% 19.8%

24.1%

15 TO 24

14.9%

20.9%

80% 60% 40% 20%

21.2%

22.9%

25 TO 44

17.9% 28.8%

45 TO 64

65+

17.6%

17.7%

23.5%

26.1%

13.3% 25.9%

26.3% 25.4%

23.6%

6.79% 20.5%

27.0%

26.1%

25.7%

12.4%

12.4%

13.7%

11.2%

14.0%

18.1%

19.6%

6.4%

20.6%

20.4%

18.0%

20.0%

Winter Hav en

Lakeland

Winter Park

Beaufort

Polk Country

Florida

United States

12.3%

0%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Decision Data Resources

AGING POPULATION (% OF POPULATION) GROWTH IN PERSONS AGE 25-44 AND AGE 55+ AS A % OF POPULATION, 1990-2010

Age 25-44 Lakeland

-19.1%

Beaufort

-18.9%

Age 55+ 6.0% -0.6%

Polk County

5.6%

-15.3%

Florida

18.3%

-16.8%

United States

-25% -20% -15% -10% -5%

• An aging population is a nation-wide challenge with significant economic and workforce development implications. Due to the region’s appeal as a retirement destination, many communities in Florida, including Winter Haven, must balance the growth that can be generated by retirees with the challenges that come with too few young adults. •At 42.4, Winter Haven’s median age was surpassed only by Winter Park.

MEDIAN AGE 2010

-3.3% -7.0% -1.1% -6.3%

Winter Park

•At 26.3%, Beaufort, South Carolina offers the highest percentage of individuals aged 25 to 44 of all the communities studied.

•Between 1990 and 2010, the under 25 age group grew to be a more significant portion of the local populace, however, this group remains at levels below U.S. and Florida standards.

11.7%

-8.2%

Winter Haven

•The young adult cohort, ages 25-44, is an important group for business creation and innovation. The percentage of Winter Haven residents in this age group is below that of the state and is also behind the nation as a whole.

0%

5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%

Winter Park

44.8

Winter Haven

42.4

Lakeland

37.8

Beaufort

30.5

Polk Country

37.8

Florida

40.5

United States

37.1

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Decision Data Resources

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Decision Data Resources

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 16


Income

Demographic Trends Income levels in Winter Haven are below state and national levels, with income growth slower than for Polk County as a whole.

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME (% GROWTH SINCE 2000), 2010

Median Household Income, 2010

% Growth, '00‐'10

$80,000 $70,000 $60,000 $50,000 $40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $0

120% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Winter Lakeland Winter Beaufort Polk Park

Hav en

Florida United

County

•At $39,825 in 2010, median household income for Winter Haven is only slightly below Lakeland at $40,422, though significantly lower than Polk County ($44,582), Florida ($48,310) and the U.S. as a whole ($51,517). •Growth in per capita income between 1990 and 2010 was lowest in Winter Haven among the benchmarks studied.

States

Source: Decision Data Resources

PER CAPITA INCOME PER CAPITA INCOME (% GROWTH SINCE 1990), 2010

$60,000

Per Capita Income, 2010

 Growth, '90‐'10

140% 120%

$50,000

100%

$40,000

80% $30,000 60% $20,000

40%

$10,000

20% 0%

$0 Winter Park

Beaufort

Winter Hav en

Lakeland

Polk County

Florida

United States

Source: Decision Data Resources

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 17


Income

Demographic Trends Income levels in Winter Haven are lower than state and national averages, with more than 60% of residents earning less than $50,000 per year.

INCOME DISTRIBUTION, 2010 $0 to $14K

120% 100% 80% 60%

10.3% 29.3% 17.6%

12.4% 28.1%

26.5% 0%

34.6%

$35K to $49K

$50K to $99K

13.7%

11.4%

25.6%

33.2%

16.6%

27.4%

15.4%

27.7%

11.1%

28.6%

40% 20%

$15K to 34K

17.5%

$100K+

17.2%

19.9%

31.2%

31.5%

17.3%

15.6%

14.4%

25.9%

23.5%

21.5%

16.3%

15.3%

9.4%

16.7%

12.2%

12.4%

12.8%

Winter Hav en

Lakeland

Winter Park

Beaufort

Polk County

Florida

United States

Source: Decision Data Resources

•The income distribution of Winter Haven is overrepresented by low-income earners. The city holds a much smaller percentage of high-income earners than either the State of Florida or the U.S. as a whole. However, income distribution in Winter Haven generally reflects that of Polk County and Lakeland. •Polk County has a significantly higher proportion of residents with incomes between $50,000 and $99,999 than Winter Haven and Lakeland. •Winter Park holds a disproportionately higher number of high income earners in comparison to Florida and the U.S. •Beaufort, South Carolina has the highest proportion of low income residents among the communities studied.

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 18


Migration

Demographic Trends

Although many people are moving to Polk County, a similarly significant number are moving out. •Net migration for 2007-2008 amounted to a gain of 2,146 people. •The majority of new residents moved to Polk County from the Orlando metro area, from metropolitan areas in the Northeast U.S. and, to a lesser extent, from the Midwest. •Most residents who have left Polk County have settled in Southeastern states, particularly Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. •The Atlanta and Houston metropolitan areas stand out as the most significant destinations for residents leaving Polk County. •An additional 196 residents moved to Polk County from outside the United States while 106 residents moved outside of the country. Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 19


Commute Shed

Demographic Trends COMMUTE SHED WHERE WINTER HAVEN RESIDENTS WORK, 2009

Jacksonville 2.6%

Orlando 3.5% Lake Buena Vista 4.2%

Auburndale 2.1%

Tampa 2.1%

Lakeland 8.2% Winter

Cypress Gardens CDP* 1.3%

Haven Lake Wales Bartow 4.2%17.8% 1.6%

All Other Locations 52.3%

* CDP = Census Designated Place Source: Census Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 20


Labor Shed

Demographic Trends LABORSHED WHERE WINTER HAVEN WORKERS LIVE, 2009

Auburndale 2.7% Lakeland 4.3%

Jan Phyl Village CDP Inwood 2.1% CDP 2.0%

Bartow 2.4%

Lake Alfred 1.3%

Haines City CDP* 2.0%

Cypress Gardens CDP 4.5%

Lake Wales 1.3%

All Other Locations 65.4%

* CBSA = Core Based Statistical Area Source: Census Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 21


Balance of Labor Exports

Economic Trends The Balance of Labor Exports illustrates the proportion of residents who live in Winter Haven and work in a particular industry relative to the number of jobs located within Winter Haven for that industry. This is expressed using the “Home-to-Work” ratio. A ratio of 1.00 indicates that for every individual living in Winter Haven that works in a particular industry, there is an equal number of local jobs for that industry. A ratio higher than 1.00 indicates that there are more residents who work in a given industry than there are jobs in the area for that industry, thus the community is an exporter of professionals for that industry. A ratio lower than 1.00 indicates that there are more local jobs for a given industry than there are local residents who work in that industry, thus requiring more of the jobs to be filled by workers who live outside of the city. The chart below and accompanying graph indicate the balance of labor exports for select industries within the City of Winter Haven as well as the rate at which this has changed over the past five years. Home - 2005 Work - 2005 Home - 2009 Work - 2009 Home-Work Ratio % Change Balance of Labor Exports Jobs by NAICS Industry Sector Health Care and Social Assistance Administration & Support, Waste Management and Remediation Manufacturing Public Administration Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Finance and Insurance Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Educational Services Real Estate and Rental and Leasing

Count 1,604 1,503 994 712 299 629 435 1,163 211

Share

Count

12.3% 11.5% 7.6% 5.4% 2.3% 4.8% 3.3% 8.9% 1.6%

5,107 6,090 640 1,022 156 736 631 544 240

Share 22.0% 26.2% 2.8% 4.4% 0.7% 3.2% 2.7% 2.3% 1.0%

Count 1,679 891 805 734 592 551 462 341 268

Share 13.8% 7.3% 6.6% 6.0% 4.9% 4.5% 3.8% 2.8% 2.2%

Count

Share

3,377 1,878 973 1,331 352 1,077 897 668 460

17.9% 10.0% 5.2% 7.1% 1.9% 5.7% 4.8% 3.5% 2.4%

2005 0.31 0.25 1.55 0.70 1.92 0.85 0.69 2.14 0.88

2009 2005-2009 0.50 58% 0.47 92% 0.83 -47% 0.55 -21% 1.68 -12% 0.51 -40% 0.52 -25% 0.51 -76% 0.58 -34%

Source: AngelouEconomics, Census LEHD

The City of Winter Haven is importing its high skill professionals from outside the community in order to support businesses present within the city.

2005 - 2009

•The City of Winter Haven is challenged by an unbalanced Hometo-Work ratio that indicates that it relies significantly on residents from outside of the city to support its high skill industries. •The region is a net-exporter of labor in the Arts, Entertainment and Recreation industry, possibly reflecting the numerous employment opportunities within this industry that exist outside of Winter Haven. The opening of Legoland just outside of city limits will likely exaggerate this figure in the years to come. •Change in the home-to-work ratio over the past five years indicates that Administration and Healthcare & Social Assistance are improving and moving towards a balance, whereas most other professional jobs are increasing in the rate at which they are filled by individuals who live outside of Winter Haven.

Source: AngelouEconomics, Census LEHD

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 22


Job Growth

Economic Trends JOB GROWTH

Winter Haven has experienced strong job growth in the past decade, led by Professional Services, Hospitality, Education and Health Care.

% CHANGE IN TOTAL EMPLOYMENT 2003 - 2009

25%

20%

20% 15% 10%

6%

4%

5%

5%

0% -5% -10%

-2% Lakeland

Beaufort

Winter

Winter

Polk

Hav en

Park

County

-1%

-1%

Florida

United States

-15% Source: LEHD, Bureau of Labor Statistics

‘01

’02

•At 20% between 2003 and 2009, Winter Park experienced the most substantial job growth among all of the benchmarks. •The number of individuals in Polk County employed in farming declined steadily between 2001 and 2008. •After a three-year rise between 2003 and 2006, farm compensation in Polk County fell sharply through 2008.

POLK COUNTY FARM EMPLOYMENT AND COMPENSATION Farm Employment, 2001-2008 Employment

•With 6% job growth between 2003 – 2009, Winter Haven exceeded the overall growth in jobs within Polk County and avoided the declines experienced by Lakeland, the State of Florida and the United States during that time.

Total Employee Compensation

’03

’04

’05

‘06

‘07

‘08

Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 23


Employment

Economic Trends INDUSTRY EMPLOYMENT

Hospitality, Retail Trade and Health Care are currently the largest employing industry sectors.

% OF TOTAL JOBS IN WINTER HAVEN BY SECTOR, 2009 Info rmatio n Educatio n A griculture

Other

•Hospitality is Winter Haven’s largest employing sectors, accounting for nearly 16% of local employment.

Ho spitality Transpo rtatio n/ Wareho using Who lesale Trade Co nstructio n

Retail Trade

P ro fessio nal Services Go vernment M anufacturing

Health Care F.I.R.E. Source: LEHD

NEW JOBS IN WINTER HAVEN 2001-2009 NEW JOBS BY INDUSTRY SUPERSECTOR

Hospitality Health Care Professional Serv ices Retail Trade Education -5 Transportation/Warehousing Wholesale Trade -19 Gov ernment -27 Information -31 Manufacturing -37 Construction -60 -225 F.I.R.E. Agriculture -391 Other -954 -1,500

-1,000

-500

119 84 43 26

0

Winter Haven Growth Rate 31.1% 324 23.9% 43.4% 12.7% 44.5% 20.5% 20.5% 11.7% 2.5% 9.9% -0.2% -1.5% -7.9% -48.0%

U.S. Growth Rate 7.7% 15.9% 3.7% -2.6% 14.7% 1.2% -0.4% 4.5% -12.0% -18.4% -10.7% -2.6% -1.2% 17.8%

500

F.I.R.E. = Finance, Insurance & Real Estate

•At 13.8%, Health Care and Retail Trade share an equal proportion of Winter Haven jobs and represent the next-largest areas of employment within the city after hospitality. •After these top three sectors, employment in Winter Haven is distributed rather evenly between F.I.R.E. (Finance, Insurance and Real Estate – likely representative of State Farm’s presence in the area), Manufacturing, Government, Professional Services and Construction. •Within the City of Winter Haven, Education, Agriculture and Information make up the smallest portions of local employment. •Between 2003 and 2009, the largest gains in employment in Winter Haven was within the Hospitality sector, followed by Health Care and Professional Services. •The largest declines in employment between 2003 and 2009 occurred in Agriculture, F.I.R.E. and a collection of other industries, including Utilities and Waste Management.

Source: BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, LEHD

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 24


Unemployment

Economic Trends Unemployment remains high in Polk County and has yet to turn the corner.

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE, 2001-2010 Winter Haven Lakeland

Winter Park

Polk County

United States

14.00

Florida

•At 12.0%, unemployment in Winter Haven is lower than Lakeland and Polk County, but remains higher than the state and national unemployment rates.

Beaufort County

12.00 10.00

•Although the rate of increase in unemployment has slowed for Polk County in the past year, the area has yet to experience the decline in unemployment that has been felt elsewhere in the nation.

8.00 6.00 4.00 2.00 0.00 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011*

*January, Preliminary Source: BLS Local Area Unemployment Statistics

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE, JANUARY 2011

14%

12.4%

12.7%

12.0%

11.8%

12% 9.3%

10%

9.8% 8.1%

8%

•High unemployment is a persistent challenge in Florida, with Polk County experiencing particularly poor employment conditions. Substantial improvement in employment will likely take a number of years to take place in Polk County, however, Winter Haven may have an opportunity to diverge from its surroundings in this measure due to the anticipated opening of several large projects such as Legoland Florida and the CSX intermodal facility. Nevertheless, improving the local unemployment rate will be a long-term challenge for the community.

6% 4% 2% 0% Lakeland

Winter

Winter

Hav en

Park

Beaufort

Polk County

Florida

United States

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 25


Labor Force

Economic Trends LABOR FORCE GROWTH Winter Haven’s labor force is growing strongly.

LABOR FORCE GROWTH, ‘00-’10

30%

27.7%

25%

21.0%

18.8%

20%

16.3%

18.7%

•Winter Haven’s labor force grew by 21% between 2000 and 2010, outpacing all of the benchmarks, with the exception of Beaufort, South Carolina.

17.6%

15% 7.9%

10% 5% 0% Beaufort

Winter

Lakeland

Winter

Polk

Park

County

Hav en

Florida

United States

Source: BLS Local Area Unemployment Statistics

•While it is a positive sign to see growth in the local labor force, it is important to recognize that this is an incomplete measure of the overall health of the local labor market. In addition to labor force growth, it is necessary to consider a community’s unemployment rate and, just as important, the readiness of the local labor market to support desired industry.

LABOR FORCE LABOR FORCE, 2000-2010

70,000

Winter Hav en

Lakeland

Winter Park

Beaufort County

60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 26


Local Employment Outlook

Economic Trends

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Many Winter Haven employers expect to increase employment during the next two years. •Respondents to a survey of Winter Haven businesses indicated generally strong expectations for employment within their organization over the next two years. •54.5% of respondents expect the number of full time equivalents (FTEs) to increase, while only 3.4% anticipated a decrease in employment. The remaining 42% of respondents expect their number of employees to remain the same.

Sources: Business Survey, See Appendix For Additional Responses

Market Assessment | 27


Major Employers

Economic Trends Major Employers in Winter Haven Number of Employees Employer in Winter Haven Winter Haven Hospital 2,500 State Farm 1,500 School Board of Polk County 1,262 Wal Mart 1,200 Publix 520 City of Winter Haven 475 Bond Clinic 360 Gessler Clinic 340 Source: Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce

Winter Haven’s largest employer is Winter Haven Hospital, followed by State Farm. •Winter Haven’s top four employers maintain a collective 6,462 jobs. However, many of these jobs are filled by individuals living outside the City of Winter Haven. •When asked, Winter Haven businesses indicated that the top reasons they are located in the community include its close proximity to a customer base or suppliers and also the quality of life found within the area. The top reason given, however, was that the business had historically operated in Winter Haven.

Sources: Business Survey, See Appendix For Additional Responses

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 28


International Commerce

Economic Trends When surveyed, over 20% of Winter Haven businesses indicated that they engage in international business. •20.9% of respondents to a survey of Winter Haven businesses indicated that they conduct some form of activity outside of the United States. •For those businesses that do engage in international commerce, 87.5% indicated that their business has foreign customers or clients.

Sources: Business Survey, See Appendix For Additional Responses

Sources: Business Survey, See Appendix For Additional Responses

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 29


Layoffs

Economic Trends Major Layoffs Since 2006

Official reports may underrepresent the impact of the recent recession.

Year

Company

# of Layoffs

Industry

2011

Greatwide

131

Transportation and Warehousing

2010

-

-

-

2009

-

-

-

2008

-

-

-

2007

-

-

-

2006

ACCENT Marketing Services, LLC

180

Administrative and Support Services

•According to official state figures, Winter Haven has been subject to two major layoffs (one planned) during the past five years. •Interviews administered by AngelouEconomics of individuals and company representatives in Winter Haven suggest that layoff activity may actually be higher than indicated in the chart at left. •Recent layoffs in and around Winter Haven seem primarily to be the result of the effects of the recent recession and U.S. housing crisis.

Source: Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 30


Retail Leakage

Economic Trends Polk County currently loses an estimated $928 million in retail sales to surrounding communities. As is often the case for smaller or more rural communities located near much larger metropolitan areas, automobile sales contribute most to total retail leakage. The reason for this is often twofold: first, automobiles are individually very expensive items in comparison to most other categories of retail and second, larger cities are generally able to offer a broader selection of vehicles due to their position in a larger market. – this, in turn, attracts buyers from surrounding locations that may have a more limited selection to choose from. Looking beyond automobiles, Polk County leaks over $32 million in Electronics and appliance sales , $71 million in Food and Beverage sales and $39 million in Clothing sales. In contrast, however, Polk County draws a surplus of $30 million in Health & Personal Care sales and $7.3 million in Home Improvement sales.

Polk County Retail Leakage Retail Sector Total Retail Sales Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers Automobile Dealers Other Motor Vehicle Dealers Auto Parts, Accessories, and Tire Stores Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores Furniture Stores Home Furnishings Stores Electronics & Appliance Stores Bldg Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores Building Material and Supplies Dealers Lawn and Garden Equipment and Supplies Stores Food & Beverage Stores Grocery Stores Specialty Food Stores Beer, Wine, and Liquor Stores Health & Personal Care Stores Gasoline Stations Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores Clothing Stores Shoe Stores Jewelry, Luggage, and Leather Goods Stores Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, and Music Stores Sporting Goods/Hobby/Musical Instrument Stores Book, Periodical, and Music Stores

Retail Sales of Polk County Retail Purchases of Polk Area Establishments County Residents (Supply-Retail Sales) (Demand-Retail Potential) $4,375,981,279 $5,303,987,167 $842,590,154 $1,146,015,645 $667,040,351 $976,163,995 $110,320,424 $98,741,315 $65,229,379 $71,110,335 $135,553,162 $152,080,291 $100,524,332 $119,806,690 $35,028,830 $32,273,601 $52,079,588 $84,481,248 $195,113,072 $187,803,246 $186,889,644 $180,205,670 $8,223,428 $7,597,576 $824,076,036 $895,316,755 $796,569,984 $843,290,007 $9,795,891 $32,541,478 $17,710,161 $19,485,270 $201,301,900 $171,048,886 $703,921,241 $748,641,721 $108,990,652 $148,005,182 $77,774,832 $112,324,377 $16,030,251 $18,421,971 $15,185,569 $17,258,834 $41,548,848 $60,370,298 $25,354,613 $26,650,362 $16,194,235 $33,719,936

Retail Gap ­$928,005,888 ­$303,425,491 ­$309,123,644 $11,579,109 ­$5,880,956 ­$16,527,129 ­$19,282,358 $2,755,229 ­$32,401,660 $7,309,826 $6,683,974 $625,852 ­$71,240,719 ­$46,720,023 ­$22,745,587 ­$1,775,109 $30,253,014 ­$44,720,480 ­$39,014,530 ­$34,549,545 ­$2,391,720 ­$2,073,265 ­$18,821,450 ­$1,295,749 ­$17,525,701

Leakage / Surplus Factor* ­9.6 ­15.3 ­18.8 5.5 ­4.3 ­5.7 ­8.8 4.1 ­23.7 1.9 1.8 4.0 ­4.1 ­2.8 ­53.7 ­4.8 8.1 ­3.1 ­15.2 ­18.2 ­6.9 ­6.4 ­18.5 ­2.5 ­35.1

*The Leakage/Surplus Factor is a measure of the relationship betw een supply and demand that ranges from +100 (total surplus) to -100 (total leakage). A positive value represents a surplus of retail sales, a market w here customers are draw n in from outside the trade area. A negative value represents "leakage of retail opportunity outside the trade area. Source: ESRI

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 31


Education

Human Capital / Talent Winter Haven has a low proportion of residents with higher degrees.

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT, 2010

100% 80% 60% 40%

No High School Diploma

High School Graduate

Associate's

Bachelor's or Higher

20.2% 7.6% 19.0%

23.4% 8.7% 18.6%

7.2% 22.8%

26.3%

27.9%

8.7%

7.6%

19.7%

19.9%

31.1%

29.7%

36.7%

34.4%

8.0% 16.1%

16.4%

14.9%

17.9% 6.0%

12.4%

17.3%

14.3%

14.8%

Winter

Lakeland

Winter Park

Beaufort

Polk County

Florida

United

20% 0%

18.4% 7.8% 18.5%

31.9%

52.0%

Some College

38.0% 25.8%

Hav en

States Source: U.S. Census Bureau Decision Data Resources

BACHELORS DEGREES AND ABOVE % OF POPULATION WITH BACHELORS DEGREES OR ABOVE, 2010

Individuals wih Bachelors Degrees or Above

60%

 Growth, '90‐'10 60%

50%

50%

40%

40%

30%

30%

20%

20%

10%

10%

0%

•The distribution of academic degrees in Winter Haven reflects that of Polk County as a whole with a low percentage of residents bearing Bachelor’s degrees or higher when compared to Florida and the United States. •The City of Lakeland has a similar distribution of educational attainment, however, it enjoys a somewhat higher proportion of residents with college degrees. •At 17% between 1990 and 2010, growth in the number of individuals with a bachelor’s degree or higher is greatly below growth in Polk County as a whole (43%). •A limited number of individuals with advanced degrees may limit Winter Haven’s ability to attract and/or support various growing industries.

0% Winter Park Beaufort

Lakeland

Winter

Polk

Hav en

County

Florida

United States

Source: Decision Data Resources

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 32


Educational Performance

Human Capital / Talent Polk County graduation rates are in line with the U.S. average, however, testing performance is lagging.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES NUMBER OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES WITH GRADUATION RATES, 2009

Graduation Rate

Total High School Graduates

100% 80%

66.30%

73.60%

69.90%

73.10%

12,500

68.60%

10,000

60%

•Polk County’s graduation rate placed it in the middle among the benchmarks.

7,500

9,119

40% 20%

•At 69.9%, Polk County’s graduation rate is below that of the State of Florida and slightly higher than the U.S. average.

15,000

•SAT scores in Polk County fall below all of the benchmarks, with the exception of Beaufort, and are 5.5% below the national average. ACT scores illustrate similar performance.

5,000 493

2,500

4,449

0%

0 Beaufort HS

Polk

Orange

Florida

U.S.

Source: Florida Dept of Education, Beaufort High School, NCES

•Overall educational performance within Polk County is fair in comparison to the benchmarks, but requires improvement.

HIGH SCHOOL SAT SCORES

HIGH SCHOOL ACT SCORES

2009-2010 SAT SCORES BY SCHOOL DISTRICT

2009-2010 ACT SCORES BY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Beaufort County

1416

Polk County

Polk County

1426

Orange County

Orange County

1474

Beaufort County

Florida

1497

Florida

United States

1509

United States

-100

400

900

1400

1900

2400

Sources: National Center for Education Statistics, SAT, Florida DOE, South Carolina DOE

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

•Underperformance in secondary education (and/or perceptions of its current quality) in Winter Haven and Polk County may hinder Winter Haven’s ability to develop or attract a professional workforce or high-skill industries.

18.4 19.1 20.7 19.5 21.0 0

6

12

18

24

30

36

Sources: National Center for Education Statistics, ACT, Florida DOE, South Carolina DOE

Market Assessment | 33


K-12 School Systems

Human Capital / Talent WINTER HAVEN HIGH SCHOOL STATE REPORT CARD WINTER HAVEN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL (481) POLK (53)

POLK COUNTY CAREER ACADEMIES

2009‐2010 74 % of criteria satisfied: No Reading  • 39% of students reading at or above grade level • 43%��of students making a year's worth of progress in reading • 39% of struggling students making a year's worth of progress in reading Math  • 64% of students at or above grade level in math • 71% of students making a year's worth of progress in math • 62% of struggling students making a year's worth of progress in math Writing • 80% of students are meeting state standards in writing. (This school has met this criteria. ) Science • 32% of students at or above grade level in Science.   Retakes • 51% of 11th and 12th grade students passed the FCAT Reading Retake. • 50% of 11th and 12th grade students passed the FCAT Math Retake.

WINTER HAVEN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 2009 ‐ 2010 School Year Total Enrollment Total Dropouts Polk School District 32,520 1,340 1,867 41 Winter Haven High School

Sources: Florida Department of Education

Total Dropout Rate 4.12 2.20 Sources: Florida Department of Education

WINTER HAVEN PRIVATE SCHOOLS Winter Haven, FL Private High Schools School Students All Saints Academy 522 Haven Christian Academy 169 Heritage Christian Academy 70 St John's Christian School 77

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Academy of Art, Design and Technology Lakeland High School Academy of Children’s and Educational Studies Haines City High School Academy of Design and Technology George Jenkins High School Academy of Finance Lake Gibson High School Academy of Hospitality and Tourism Winter Haven High School Academy of Legal Studies George Jenkins High School Academy of Media Production Haines City High School Academy of Veterinary Science Lakeland High School Auburndale Communications Academy Auburndale High School Auburndale Medical Academy Auburndale High School Bartow Medical Academy Bartow High School Central Florida Aerospace Academy Kathleen High School Criminal Justice, Law and Career Academy Kathleen High School Distrotek Kathleen High School Early Childhood and Teacher Education Academy Lake Wales High School Engineering Technology Career Academy Ridge Community High School Future Educators Academy Bartow High School George Jenkins Medical Academy George Jenkins High School Imagination, Inc. Lake Region High School Industrial Biotechnology Academy Lake Gibson High School Innovative Spaces Frostproof Middle/Senior High School Interactive Design McKeel Academy IT Academy of Lakeland Lakeland High School Lake Gibson Medical Academy Lake Gibson High School Lake Region Medical Academy Lake Region High School Lakeland Electric Power Academy Tenoroc High School Mulberry Auto Garage Mulberry High School Polk Academy of Business and Technology Lake Gibson High School Ridge Community Medical Academy Ridge Community High School Winter Haven Medical Academy Winter Haven High School Source: Polk County

Sources: High –Schools.com

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 34


Colleges & Universities

Human Capital / Talent Winter Haven is within driving distance to numerous post secondary educational facilities.

COLLEGES & UNIVERSITIES* COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES WITHIN 50 MILES OF THE CITY OF WINTER HAVEN

•Winter Haven has access to 38 two- and four-year colleges and universities within a 50-mile radius. •The location of Polk State College and the new campus of USF Polytechnic are strong assets to the local economy and present many opportunities to the community.

Source: ESRI

* See Appendix C for a Full List of Area Colleges and Universities including Program Descriptions

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 35


Employment Resources

Human Capital / Talent AVAILABLE CAREER RESOURCES Winter Haven Career Centers Polk Works One Stop Career Center Job seekers can take advantage of a variety of programs and services available for no cost.

Employ Florida Marketplace Associated with the Florida Research and Economic Database (FRED). This site is a powerful online labor market information system, accessed as a web site on the Internet or an Intranet at a OneStop Center. It was specifically designed for job seekers, students, employers, training providers, workforce professionals, and others seeking to explore local labor markets. This system provides fast access to a complete set of employment tools in one web site.

The Career Zone The Career Zone is located in the Loren T. Byce Administration Building in Academic Advising at the Polk State College Winter Haven campus. The Career Zone at Polk State College offers the following resources: • Information on 4 year universities and transfer process • Career Interest Inventories • Research Careers and Occupations • Assistance with Resumes and Video Portfolios • Skillshops • Career Reference Library

Job Placement Programs Polk Works Employability Skills Workshop Free 10-day program specifically designed for adults who are interested in gaining career advancement. Topics include how to: • Use the One Stop Career Center database (Employ Florida Marketplace) to search for jobs and research potential employers • Create or update your resume • Answer questions about employment gaps, negative work history or criminal background • Answer the top 10 interview questions and respond appropriately and positively to other difficult interview questions • Network to find job leads and gain exclusive interviews • Dressing for the job you want • Complete and use a Master Application

Source: Polk Works, State of Florida, Polk State College

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 36


Employment Resources

Human Capital / Talent AVAILABLE CAREER RESOURCES (continued) Additional Resources Agency for Workforce Innovation The Agency for Workforce Innovation is Florida’s lead state workforce agency and directly administers the state’s Labor Market Statistics program, Unemployment Compensation, Early Learning and various workforce development programs. The Office of Early Learning, a division within the agency, provides oversight of Florida’s school readiness programs and is the lead entity for implementing the state’s successful Voluntary Prekindergarten program.

Polk Small Business Development Center at the Central Florida Development Council (SBDC) Services include: • One-to-one confidential professional counseling • Ongoing educational entrepreneurial seminars and workshops • Guidance with steps necessary to starting a small business • Guidance with business plan research, preparation and review • Assistance with loan package development • Marketing, Branding and Sales planning consultation • Assistance with accounting and recordkeeping software, and how to use this information to help business growth. • Internet Strategies: Website, Search Engine Optimization, Search Engine and Email Marketing, Social Media • Government Contracting • State Certification as a Woman, Minority or Disabled Veteran Enterprise • Improving Customer Service • Patent, Trademark or Copyright assistance Source: State of Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation, Central Florida Redevelopment Council

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 37


Venture Capital

Innovation Access to venture capital (VC) is very limited in Winter Haven. •There are very few venture capitalists or angel investors in Polk County. Therefore, entrepreneurs seeking venture capital investment are more likely to look to Orlando or Tampa.

VENTURE CAPITAL FUNDING VC FUNDING ($MILLIONS), 2001-2010

Winter Hav en / Lakeland - FL 12th Congressional District

•Venture capital in the 12th Congressional District (encompassing most portions of Polk County and its primary population centers) has fluctuated within a steady and limited range during the past eight years. In that time, annual VC investment reached a height of $14.8 million in 2005, but has since fallen to $0 for 2010.

$50 $40 $30 $20 $10 $0 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Source: PWC Money Tree

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

•Despite the presence of many retirees in the area, entrepreneurs in Winter Haven have very limited opportunity to attract venture capital investment. However, entrepreneurs are also likely to finance their ventures through personal savings, credit and family/friends. •A lack of formal associations or firms that focus on providing, stimulating or supporting venture capital and angel investment activity may be a hindrance to the area’s ability to support an entrepreneurial environment.

Market Assessment | 38


Patents

Innovation Patent activity in Winter Haven is low, but somewhat in line with the State of Florida.

PATENTS IN WINTER HAVEN NUMBER OF PATENTS ISSUED, 2003-2010

Inventor City

20

•Patent activity in Florida is very low in comparison to the broader United States.

Assignee City

•After falling from the higher levels that were established in the early portions of the decade, patent activity has remained very limited in Winter Haven.

15 10

•Most patent activity associated with the City of Winter Haven involves the assignment of a patent (i.e. to a company present in the area) rather than to the presence of the patent’s inventor within the city.

5 0 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

-5 Source: US Patent and Trademark Office

Patents by Assignee: The number of patents awarded to organizations in a particular city Patents by Inventor: The number of patents invented by individuals residing in a particular city

PATENTS BY ASSIGNEE CITY

PATENTS BY INVENTOR CITY

NUMBER OF PATENTS ISSUED PER 10,000 POPULATION, 2010

Winter Hav en

NUMBER OF PATENTS ISSUED PER 10,000 POPULATION, 2010

2.1

Lakeland

2.5

Beaufort Winter Park

12.9

United States 4

6

8

10

12

14

Source: US Patent and Trademark Office

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

0.0 0.2

Winter Park

3.6 1.1

United States

7.9 2

Winter Hav en

Florida

2.4

0

0.0

Lakeland

3.2

Florida

Beaufort

7.9 0

2

4

6

8

10

Source: US Patent and Trademark Office

Market Assessment | 39


Research & Development

Innovation Winter Haven’s location along the I-4 corridor and proximity to USF Polytechnic is a strong competitive advantage.

UNIVERSITY R&D EXPENDITURES ($THOUSANDS), 2005-2008

USF Sy stem $350,000

UCF Sy stem

U. South Carolina Sy stem

•Its location along the I-4 Corridor between Orlando and Tampa places Winter Haven (and Polk County as a whole) in a position where it can take advantage of its proximity to major research institutions.

$300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $0 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Source: National Science Foundation

UNIVERSITY R&D PER ENROLLED STUDENT 2008 UNIVERSITY R&D EXPENDITURES PER TOTAL STUDENTS ENROLLED

U. South Carolina

•Research expenditures by the University of South Florida system (measured as a whole) ranks 64th among all U.S. universities. •Research expenditures by both the USF and UCF systems rose steadily between 2000 and 2008.

$133

Sy stem

•The growth and proximity of USF Polytechnic is a strong opportunity for Winter Haven and surrounding communities to leverage research that is planned or currently being completed there in support of the community’s economic development and industry attraction efforts.

$2,286

UCF Sy stem

USF Sy stem

$6,028

$0

$1,000 $2,000 $3,000 $4,000 $5,000 $6,000 $7,000 Sources: NSF, U. South Carolina, UCF, USF

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 40


University Research Programs

Innovation USF Polytechnic Programs & Research Technology and Innovation •Innovation Management –USF’s business program teaches students the fundamentals of business and offers Bachelors degrees in Marketing, Management, and Business Administration, as well as an MBA program. • Engineering & Applied Sciences –Offers a wide variety of BSAS programs, including Criminal Justice, Early Childhood Development, Industrial Operations, and Leadership Studies. Also offers a BS in Industrial Engineering and Junior-Level Engineering Courses. • Information Technology-The IT division provides students with the knowledge necessary to bridge the gap between computer science and management information systems. Offers a variety of degree options, including a BSIT and MSIT, a minor in IT, as well as Professional and Management Certificates. Human and Social Sciences • Education –USF’s nationally-accredited education program graduates more first-year teachers than any other Florida university. It offers a BS in Elementary Education, MAs in Counselor Education and Reading Education, as well as an MEd in Educational Leadership. • Social Sciences –Offers degree programs in general social sciences, criminology, psychology, and a minor in sociology. • Allied Health Services –USF plans on creating new degree program offerings in Health Sciences in the near future. Applied Arts & New Media •Technical & Professional Communication – Offers students the option of pursuing a minor in Professional & Technical Writing or Communication. • Architecture & Design/Digital Arts & Digital Media- –USF plans to offer Bachelors and Masters degrees in Architecture & Design and Digital Arts & Digital Media in the future. Center for the Development of Information Technology Applications for Manufacturing and Distribution (CITA) This new research and professional development center is a partnership between USF Polytechnic and the local business community. It engages with current and emerging regional manufacturing, warehousing and distribution industries in order to enhance the development of technology applications, professional development systems, and post-secondary IT programs. An interdisciplinary team of faculty from USF IT, Business and Engineering divisions work with industry Focus Groups and Advisory Panels to develop current reports and future plans for the three areas highlighted above. Computing Education Research at Lakeland (CEReAL) The CEReAL group consists of faculty interested in identifying barriers faced by undergraduate students in the computing curricula; designing innovative instruction methods to combat these barriers; and leveraging state of the art open source technologies to extend the impact of teaching on students. Source: USF Polytechnic

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 41


Private Sector R&D

Innovation Inland Fiber & Data Technology Park (IF&D) IF&D is a technology park located in Winter Haven that provides businesses with disaster recovery and workforce recovery solutions. It covers around 4 city blocks and includes over 300,000 square feet of data center, collocation, telecommunications, and technology space, as well as corporate and medical offices. Its location in the center of Florida allows for easy access to Tampa and Orlando markets, while its protected inland location 168 feet above sea level and outside the 500 year flood zone make it an ideal location for critical company infrastructure needs. Its network of onsite service providers includes Verizon, FPL FiberNet, Perpetual Technology Solutions, Qoncert, RecoveryPoint, and TECO Tampa Electric. The data centers at IF&D provide an extremely resilient, secure, managed and environmentally controlled infrastructure for an organization’s critical systems, applications and telecommunications. The Data Center Solutions include: • Collocation-Offerings include hardened data center collocation and hosting services, disaster recovery services, Internet gateway office services, and contiguous collocation cages. • Data Suites-Targeted at financial services, government and healthcare industries, IF&D’s private custom DataSuites provide a completely private environment that is walled with secure access, as well dedicated “in room” environmental infrastructure components and other equipment. • Disaster Recovery-The Florida Business Continuity Center (FBCC) provides customers with an alternate work site for use in the event of a disaster, outage, or other events that prevent the use of the primary office location. The center provides clients with typical office amenities, such as cubicles, computer systems, internet access, conference rooms, office equipment, kitchen/shower facilities, and onsite support. • High Connectivity-IF&D maintains a complex LAN and Internet/WAN network infrastructure that is dedicated to each customer and configurable as a dedicated private line or in a burstable 95th percentile methodology, ranging from standard Ethernet to Gigabit configurations. Source: 6/10 Corporation

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 42


Infrastructure, Business Climate & Quality of Life

Labor Costs

AVERAGE ANNUAL WAGES

Wages in Polk County are well below state and national levels.

AVERAGE ANNUAL WAGE, 2009

•Average annual wages in Polk County are 13.4% lower than the Florida annual average and 22.1% below the national average.

$41,048

Orange County

$35,485

Polk County

•Polk County’s low wage environment makes it attractive to low-wage industries – many of which already have a strong presence within Winter Haven and surrounding areas.

$32,081

Beaufort County Florida

$40,970 $45,559

U.S. $0

$10,000

$20,000

$30,000

$40,000

Note: Wage data is only available at the county level, not at the city level.

$50,000

•Growth in average annual wages between 2003 and 2009 for Polk County exceeded that of Orange County and Beaufort County, but fell short of state and national growth.

Source: QCEW

WAGE GROWTH % GROWTH IN AVERAGE ANNUAL WAGE, 2003 - 2009

Polk County

10.1%

Orange County

8.9%

Beaufort County

5.3%

Florida

11.3%

United States

12.0% 0%

5%

10%

15%

Note: Wage data is only available at the county level, not at the city level.

20%

25%

30%

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Sources: Business Survey, See Appendix For Additional Responses

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 43


Tax Structure

Infrastructure, Business Climate & Quality of Life TAX STRUCTURE Winter Haven Tax Applies

State

Business Formation Tax

X

Corporate Income Tax

X

Lakeland

Other Information Tax Applies Rate $35.00; Filing Fee; $61.25; Annual Report; $138.75 Annual X Supplemental Corporate Fee 5.5% X

Winter Park

Other Information Tax Applies Rate $35.00; Filing Fee; $61.25; Annual Report; $138.75 Annual X Supplemental Corporate Fee 5.5% X

Rate

Beaufort

Other Information Tax Applies Filing Fee; Annual Report; Annual X Supplemental Corporate Fee 5.5% X

$35.00; $61.25; $138.75

Other Information

Rate

$100

5.0%

Personal Income Tax

n/a

n/a

n/a

X

3% - 7%

Capital Value Tax

n/a

n/a

n/a

X

$15 plus $1 per each $1,000 of capial stock plus paid in surplus. Minimum fee, $25.

6% Paid by Consumer

X

6%

Sales Tax

X

Tangible Personal Property Tax

X

State Business Tax Climate Index Rank

Property Tax - Real

X

Combined county 1.0% and school district

X

Per $1,000 valuation; Average of rates within Winter Haven; 21.14075 0.6328 mills in unincorporated areas of county

X

Per $1,000 valuation; Average of rates within 21.14075 Winter Haven; 15.98355 mills in unincorporated areas of county

Local

Property Tax - Tangible

Applied at local level Out of 50 U.S. states ranked 5th best (1st) to worst (50th)

X

X

n/a

Local Income Tax Local Sales Tax

6% Paid by Consumer

6%

Paid by Consumer

Applied at local level Out of 50 U.S. states ranked 5th best (1st) to worst (50th)

X

X

n/a X

Combined county 1.0% and school district

X

Per $1,000 valuation; Average 20.04185 of rates within Lakeland

X

Per $1,000 valuation; Average 20.04185 of rates within Lakeland

Applied at local level Out of 50 U.S. states ranked best 5th (1st) to worst (50th)

X

Organization Fee

Bracketed by every $2,740 of income up to $13,700 (above which maximum rate applies)

Paid by Seller; 5% on sales to those age 85 and above

Applied at local level Out of 50 U.S. states ranked best 24th (1st) to worst (50th)

n/a X

X

X

n/a

0.5%

School district

16.7515

Per $1,000 valuation; Total rate applicable to Winter Park

16.7515

Per $1,000 valuation; Total rate applicable to Winter Park

X

1.0% County Sales Tax

X

Per $1,000 valuation; Assessment ratio 224.75 of 4.0%; Total rate applicable to Beaufort

X

Per $1,000 valuation; Assessment ratio 224.75 of 4.0%; Total rate applicable to Beaufort

Source: 2011 All States Tax Handbook, TaxFoundation.org, Websites of Applicable Jurisdictions

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 44


Commercial Real Estate

Infrastructure, Business Climate & Quality of Life Polk County Office Real Estate

Polk County Industrial Real Estate Industrial Manufacturing R&D / Flex Warehouse All Industrial

# Buildings 49 19 322 402

Building SF 5,117,952 649,633 26,816,047 34,180,223

Vacancy 15.1% 48.5% 12.6% 13.1%

Asking Lease $ 4.36 $ 6.23 $ 4.34 $ 4.48

Total SF Total Vacant SF Vacancy Class A (Prime) Asking Rent Class B (Secondary) Asking Rent

3,832,049 409,071 10.9% $19.44 $17.46 Source: Grubbs & Ellis

East Polk County Industrial Manufacturing R&D / Flex Warehouse All Industrial

# Buildings 14 3 83 103

Building SF 1,409,874 164,096 7,565,527 9,540,083

Vacancy 43.4% 98.2% 26.8% 29.3%

Asking Lease $ 4.00 $ 5.99 $ 4.28 $ 4.39

West Polk County Industrial Manufacturing R&D / Flex Warehouse All Industrial

# Buildings 35 16 239 299

Building SF 3,708,078 485,537 19,250,520 24,640,140

Vacancy 4.9% 31.7% 11.1% 10.0%

Asking Lease $ 5.30 $ 6.47 $ 4.39 $ 4.56 Source: CBRE

Polk County Industrial Real Estate Markets

Polk County as a whole currently maintains good vacancy levels for office space, however, East Polk County is challenged by high vacancy rates in industrial real estate. •Current lease rates for office space in Polk County sit at $19.44 sq ft for Class A and $17.46 sq ft for Class B. •Although there are very few R&D or Flex buildings in East Polk County, vacancy rates remain very high at over 98%, indicating that these buildings sit virtually empty. •With large projects on the horizon, such as the CSX ILC, there are reasons to be optimistic about the future of commercial real estate in East Polk County, however, it is likely that improvement will require several years.

Source: CBRE

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 45


Utilities

Infrastructure, Business Climate & Quality of Life UTILITIES

Polk County is challenged by utility rates that are higher than state and national averages.

AVERAGE ELECTRICITY RATE (PER KILOWATT HOUR), 2010

6.48 Beaufort

9.25

•Electricity costs in Polk County are higher than state and national averages, with industrial rates being well above the national average (this, however, is symptomatic of Florida as a whole).

11.50

9.63 Winter Hav en

11.23 12.49 9.63

Lakeland

•While, in one respect, higher utility prices may deter certain industries from locating in the area, they also sometimes lead existing businesses and residents to develop their own cost-saving solutions out of necessity (some of which may be applied to other markets or support local entrepreneurial activity).

11.23 12.49 9.90 10.97

Winter Park

13.73 9.63

Polk County

11.23 12.49 9.32

Florida

10.77

Industrial

12.39

Commercial

6.70

United States

10.26 11.51 0

5

10

Residential 15

20 Source: EIA

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 46


Physical Infrastructure

Infrastructure, Business Climate & Quality of Life

I- 4

Lakeland

Winter Haven

25

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 47


Housing & Rent

Infrastructure, Business Climate & Quality of Life HOUSING

Housing in the City of Winter Haven is very affordable and may be generating downward pressure on rental rates.

MEDIAN VALUE OF OWNER-OCCUPIED HOUSING UNITS, 2009

Winter Hav en

$124,600

Lakeland

•Median home value in Winter Haven in 2009 was the lowest among the benchmarks studied and 33% below the U.S. median home value.

$137,600 $209,600

Beaufort Winter Park

$390,100

Polk County

•Median contract rent in Winter Haven is significantly lower than county, state and national rates. This may, in part, be a result of the low price of single-family homes in the area.

$139,800 $211,300

Florida

$185,400

United States $0

$100,000

$200,000

$300,000

$400,000

$500,000

Source: American Community Survey

HOUSING MEDIAN CONTRACT RENT, 2009

Beaufort

$753

Winter Hav en

$758

Lakeland

•Affordable single family homes can be attractive to families relocating to the area, however, low rental rates may depress the development of downtown or multifamily units that may be well-suited to young professionals and recent college graduates.

$854

Winter Park

$990

Polk County

$811 $934

Florida United States

$817 $0

$200

$400

$600

$800

$1,000

$1,200

Source: American Community Survey

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 48


Average Daily Commute

Infrastructure, Business Climate & Quality of Life AVERAGE DAILY COMMUTE

Winter Haven is subject to average commute times when compared to Polk County as a whole, the State of Florida and the United States.

Mean Time to Work (in minutes), 2009

Beaufort

17.2

Winter Park

20.7

Lakeland

•At 24.8 minutes, the average daily commute in Winter Haven is roughly in line with county, state and national averages.

21.8

Winter Hav en

24.8

Polk County

25.4 25.8

Florida United States

25.2 0

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

5

10

15

20

25

30

Source: American Community Survey

Market Assessment | 49


Next Steps

TOP 15 WINTER HAVEN INDUSTRY CLUSTERS Industry

TRANSITION TO TARGET INDUSTRY OPPORTUNITIES

Employ ment

Establishments

LQ

1,179

9.57

Agriculture

5,950

Food Processing

2,632

460

8.13

715

159

5.43

Mass Media

2,424

216

4.71

Financial Services

4,612

1,109

4.03

Eat/Drink

3,889

514

2.33

587

110

2.05

1,916

157

1.88

209

6

1.15

Industry clusters are highly integrated groups of businesses with strong vertical and horizontal linkages. “Vertical linkages include the suppliers and customers in a region that combine to create a competitive business model, whereas “horizontal” linkages include the relationships between competing companies-which often recruit from the same labor pool of talent-and supporting public institutions. Clusters often mature when businesses expand their relationships with existing supplier firms in a region. As the clusters grow, additional supplier firms are attracted to the region, eventually creating a well-diversified “critical mass” of production, labor, and information.

Energy & Nat. Resources

1,864

105

1.13

AngelouEconomics has defined 35 standard industry clusters to categorize businesses according to their final product and how these products are related to each other and integrated along the vertical supply chain. To access the strength of a cluster in a regional economy, AngelouEconomics has calculated location factors (or quotients) to each cluster. These factors are calculated by comparing the cluster’s share of total local employment to the cluster’s national share. This location quotient will yield a value generally between 0 and 2, where a result of “1” demonstrates that the cluster commands an average (expected) share of the local economy. Cluster location factors greater than 2 indicate a strong cluster agglomeration, while those less than .5 indicate extremely weak clusters.

Communication Services

252

43

1.12

Industrial Supplies

323

20

0.65

What industries are currently strong in Winter Haven? The chart to the right shows the top fifteen clusters in Winter Haven while the chart on the following page lists the top ten industries compared with cluster strength in the benchmarks. Importantly, the following analysis is intended only to provide an industry baseline for which competitiveness can be measured in the regional and global economies. In the next report – the Target Industry Report – the project team will compare these industry clusters to regional and national cluster trends – thus making them potential economic development targets. Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Transportation Services Hotels & Entertainment Apparel & Textiles General Services

51

14

0.43

Chemicals & Plastics

148

30

0.41

Industrial Machinery

46

9

0.38

Aerospace & Defense

Source: Dun & Bradstreet

Location Quotient (LQ) A calculated ratio between the local economy and the national economy that indicates industry concentration. LQ = 1.0 indicates average concentration LQ > 2.0 indicates a strong cluster LQ < 0.5 indicates a weak cluster

Market Assessment | 50


Winter Havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Current Top Industries

Transition to Target Industry Opportunities

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 51


Appendix A

APPROACH AND METHODOLOGY The Market Assessment evaluates the current state of affairs in Winter Haven in areas that are most critical to business and industry growth and job creation. Using data that was provided by the City of Winter Haven, the Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce, or collected independently by AngelouEconomics, this report allows us to take a step back and evaluate trends, data, and perceptions of the community. This report assesses the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current economic situation and the trends that have shaped it. Specifically, we evaluate its readiness to attract and direct future economic development. We analyze the community in a range of economic and demographic variables by comparing it against a group of benchmark communities within Florida and elsewhere in the Southeast U.S. AngelouEconomics used a variety of sources to collect the quantitative and qualitative information used in our analysis. To begin, the consulting team collected previous studies and plans developed for Winter Haven. Quantitative data was collected from national and state sources, including the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Census, Decision Data Resources, the National Science Foundation, the Internal Revenue Service and numerous private sector sources. AngelouEconomics also gathered qualitative data through numerous focus groups, one-on-one interviews, and community tours. A business survey was conducted to provide further insight into the economy of Winter Haven. In order to gauge where Winter Haven stands relative to peer communities, this report assesses its performance against a number of benchmark communities selected based on similar size, location, and economic characteristics. Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 52


Appendix B

SURVEY RESULTS As part of the data collection process, a survey was developed to obtain insight from business leaders in the community on topics related to economic development. The following pages present a selection of the survey results. The survey had 92 responses.

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 53


Business Survey Results

Appendix B

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 54


Business Survey Results

Appendix B

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 55


Business Survey Results

Appendix B

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 56


Business Survey Results

Appendix B

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 57


Business Survey Results

Appendix B

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 58


Business Survey Results

Appendix B

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 59


Business Survey Results

Appendix B

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 60


2-Year Institutions

Appendix C TWO-YEAR COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Name

Distance From Winter Haven City Center

Type

Awards offered

Student population

Undergraduate students

Student-to-faculty ratio

560

560

20 to 1

2‐year, Public

Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Two but less than 4 years certificate Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Associate's degree;Two but less  than 4 years certificate

2902

2902

15��to 1

31.3 miles

2‐year, Public

Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Two but less than 4 years certificate

861

861

17 to 1

Westside Tech

38.2 miles

2‐year, Public

Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Two but less than 4 years certificate

1065

1065

11 to 1

D G Erwin Technical Center

38.9 miles

2‐year, Public

Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Two but less than 4 years certificate

810

810

8 to 1

Mid Florida Tech

39.3 miles

2‐year, Public

2042

2042

14 to 1

Hillsborough Community College

43.8 miles

2‐year, Public

26964

26964

25 to 1

Orlando Tech

44.0 miles

2‐year, Public

866

866

11 to 1

Valencia Community College

44.0 miles

2‐year, Public

39008

39008

34 to 1

Winter Park Tech

47.9 miles

649

649

8 to 1

Sanford‐Brown Institute

38.9 miles

1379

1379

19 to 1

Southern Technical College

39.3 miles

Ultimate Medical Academy‐Tampa

42.9 miles

Anthem College‐Orlando

45.5 miles

Concorde Career Institute

46.7 miles

Ridge Career Center

3.5 miles

2‐year, Public

South Florida Community College

31.1 miles

Technical Education Center‐Osceola

Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Two but less than 4 years certificate Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Associate's degree;Two but less  than 4 years certificate Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Two but less than 4 years certificate Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Associate's degree

Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Two but less than 4 years certificate One but less than two years certificate;Associate's  2‐year, Private for‐profit degree Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  2‐year, Private for‐profit years certificate;Associate's degree 2‐year, Public

2‐year, Private for‐profit Less than one year certificate;Associate's degree Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  2‐year, Private for‐profit years certificate;Associate's degree Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  2‐year, Private for‐profit years certificate;Associate's degree

982

982

32 to 1

1852

1852

26 to 1

609

609

37 to 1

587

587

33 to 1

Source: National Center for Education Statistics

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 61


4-Year Institutions

Appendix C FOUR-YEAR COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES Name

Distance From Winter Haven City Center

Type

Awards offered

Student population

Undergraduate students

Student-to-faculty ratio

Polk State College

3.5 miles

4‐year, primarily associate's, Public

Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Associate's degree;Two but less  than 4 years certificate;Bachelor's degree

9437

9437

16 to 1

Florida Southern College

12.1 miles

4‐year, Private not‐for‐profit

Bachelor's degree;Master's degree

2426

2278

15 to 1

Southeastern University

12.1 miles

4‐year, Private not‐for‐profit

2950

2665

25 to 1

Webber International University

17.6 miles

4‐year, Private not‐for‐profit

669

605

22 to 1

Warner University

25.6 miles

4‐year, Private not‐for‐profit

1078

964

17 to 1

Saint Leo University

39.4 miles

4‐year, Private not‐for‐profit

14339

11961

15 to 1

The University of Tampa

43.8 miles

4‐year, Private not‐for‐profit

6291

5546

17 to 1

Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences

45.5 miles

4‐year, Private not‐for‐profit

Bachelor's degree;Master's degree Associate's degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's  degree Less than one year certificate;One but less than two  years certificate;Associate's degree;Bachelor's  degree;Master's degree Less than one year certificate;Associate's  degree;Bachelor's degree;Postbaccalaureate  certificate;Master's degree Associate's degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's  degree;Post‐master's certificate One but less than two years certificate;Associate's  degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's degree

Rollins College

47.9 miles

4‐year, Private not‐for‐profit

University of South Florida‐Polytechnic

11.3 miles

4‐year, Public

University of South Florida‐Main Campus

40.6 miles

4‐year, Public

Everest University‐Lakeland

12.1 miles

4‐year, primarily associate's, Private for‐profit

Everest University‐South Orlando

36.0 miles

4‐year, primarily associate's, Private for‐profit

Everest University‐Brandon

38.5 miles

4‐year, primarily associate's, Private for‐profit

Everest University‐Tampa

46.7 miles

4‐year, primarily associate's, Private for‐profit

Everest University‐North Orlando International Academy of Design and Technology‐ Online

47.4 miles

4‐year, primarily associate's, Private for‐profit

Bachelor's degree;Master's degree Bachelor's degree;Master's degree;Post‐master's  certificate Associate's degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's  degree;Post‐master's certificate One but less than two years certificate;Associate's  degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's degree One but less than two years certificate;Associate's  degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's degree One but less than two years certificate;Associate's  degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's degree One but less than two years certificate;Associate's  degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's degree One but less than two years certificate;Associate's  degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's degree

49.0 miles

4‐year, primarily associate's, Private for‐profit

Associate's degree;Bachelor's degree

ITT Technical Institute‐Tampa

49.0 miles

4‐year, primarily associate's, Private for‐profit

Associate's degree;Bachelor's degree Less than one year certificate;Bachelor's  degree;Master's degree;Post‐master's certificate

772

635

10 to 1

Associate's degree;Bachelor's degree Associate's degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's  degree Associate's degree;Bachelor's degree;Master's  degree Bachelor's degree;Master's degree;Post‐master's  certificate

1121

1121

15 to 1

528

528

19 to 1

1460

1448

21 to 1

1463

1194

16 to 1

University of Phoenix‐West Florida Campus

37.6 miles

4‐year, Private for‐profit

International Academy of Design and Technology

39.3 miles

4‐year, Private for‐profit

South University‐Tampa International Academy of Design and Technology‐ Tampa

46.7 miles

4‐year, Private for‐profit

49.0 miles

4‐year, Private for‐profit

University of Phoenix‐Central Florida Campus

49.5 miles

4‐year, Private for‐profit

2662

2621

14 to 1

3294

2581

10 to 1

1304

1087

23 to 1

40022

30536

27 to 1

972

972

24 to 1

7799

7691

20 to 1

9886

9614

17 to 1

1756

1714

24 to 1

1609

1556

20 to 1

1409

1409

24 to 1

837

837

24 to 1

Source: National Center for Education Statistics

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 62


Polk State College

Appendix C POLK STATE COLLEGE DEGREE PROGRAMS Bachelor's Degree Programs Bachelor's in Business Administration Bachelor's in Public Administration Bachelor's in Public Safety Management

Associates in Applied Science Cardiovascular Technology Computer Network Engineering Computer Systems and Business Analysis Criminal Justice Diagnostic Medical Sonography Digital Media / Multimedia Early Childhood Education Emergency Medical Services Engineering Technology Fire Science Technology Health Information Management Medical Coding Specialist Medical Office Administration Nursing Occupational Therapy Assistant Office Administration Physical Therapist Assistant Radiography Respiratory Care

Associates in Arts Art Biological Sciences English for Academic Purposes Liberal Arts Mathematics Music Department Physical Sciences Theatre

Certifications Advanced Cisco CCNP Certificate Cisco CCNA Certificate Emergency Medical Technology, ATD Medical Coding Specialist Certificate Medical Records Transcription, ATD Microcomputer Repair/Installation Certificate Office Management Certificate Office Specialist Technical Certificate Office Support Technical Certificate Paramedic Certificate Windows Server 2008 MCTIP Enterprise Administrator Certificate Windows Server 2008 MCTIP Network Administrator Certificate 

Source: Polk State College

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 63


Appendix D

PHOTO CREDITS Cover………………………. Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce Table of Contents………… Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce Introduction……………….. Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce Executive Summary……… Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce SWOT Analysis…………… Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce Next Steps.………………... Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce Appendix A………………... Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce Appendix B……...………… Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce Appendix C………………... Winter Haven Chamber of Commerce

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Market Assessment | 64


Project Team

AngelouEconomics

Angelos Angelou Principal Executive Officer Carrie Yeats Vice President, Economic Development

AngelouEconomics partners with client communities and regions across the United States and abroad to candidly assess current economic development realities and identify opportunities. Our goal is to leverage the unique strengths of each region to provide new, strategic direction for economic development. As a result, AngelouEconomics’ clients are able to diversify their economies, expand job opportunities and investment, foster entrepreneurial growth, better prepare their workforce, and attract ‘new economy’ companies.

Winter Haven Economic Development Action Plan

Michael Hennig Associate Project Manager

Market Assessment | 65


Economic Development - Winter Haven Market Assessment