Page 1

Planning Commission Recommended Capital Improvements Program and Plan FY 2020 - 2029


Â


Capital Improvements Program and Plan Fiscal Year 2020-2029

Table of Contents Capital Improvements Program & Plan Overview

i

Capital Improvements Program & Plan - Summary by Fund

1

General Government – Fund Summary

3

Parks and Recreation

4

Public Buildings and Facilities

12

Public Safety

17

Transportation

28

Public Schools

39

Village & Neighborhood Initiatives

46

Public Utilities Fund

54

Water Projects

55

Sewer Projects

58

Stormwater Fund

60

Transit Fund

64

Fleet Fund

66

Information Technology Fund

68

Cash Proffer Report

72


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Ca apital Impro oveme ents P Progra am and d Plan n Ov verview w

 


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Capital Improvements Program and Plan (CIP) The purpose of the CIP is to plan for the renovation and construction of significant public improvements and the acquisition of major new and replacement equipment over a 10 year period. Years 1 through 5 serve as the capital improvements program, while the plan covers a 10 year horizon. The CIP is intended to: 

Plan for the construction and renovation of facilities and acquisition of equipment in support of the City’s public service responsibilities; Improve financial planning by comparing needs with resources, operating impacts, and annual tax rate implications; and Prioritize limited available funds for projects that will have a positive impact on Suffolk’s citizens.

 

All capital projects in the CIP are aligned with City Council target areas. City Council Target Areas    Public Safety – To preserve, promote, and continue to invest in public safety.     Financial  Stability  –  Continue  practices  that  ensure  strong  financial  management  and  fiscal  responsibility.     Growth  Management  and  Comprehensive  Planning  –  Use  the  Comprehensive  Plan  and  Unified  Development  Ordinance  to  enable  and  facilitate  private  investment  in  strategic  target  areas  and  preserve, conserve, and protect the City’s unique natural and agricultural heritage.     Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services – Ensure that all citizens have pertinent information in a  timely manner and provide convenient and diverse means for citizen input; provide responsive, effective  and efficient programs and services to citizens.     Expanded Economic Development – Implement strategies that add new businesses and provide jobs for  a  skilled  and  diverse  workforce,  retain  and  enhance  existing  businesses,  promote  entrepreneurship,  create a vibrant downtown, and build an economy that expands our tax base.     Public Education – Create a structure of shared accountability between the City and Schools to build an  educational environment known for excellence.     Leisure,  Health  and  Wellness  –  Implement  programs  and  services  designed  to  improve  the  health,  economic and social wellbeing of citizens.     Transportation – Increase capacity and connectivity of our roadways and public transportation system.  

  i


Eligible Projects Projects are eligible for inclusion in the CIP if they meet the following criteria: 

The project cost is at least $50,000. Projects that do not cost at least $50,000 are not eligible for inclusion in the CIP unless they are part of a larger project that meets this threshold. For example, furniture and fixtures which cost less than $50,000, but are part of a larger renovation or new construction project would be eligible.

The estimated service life of the project is at least five (5) years.

Recurring expenditures for items such as salaries, office supplies, personal computers and software, office furniture, routine maintenance and service contracts, vehicles and equipment or soft or non-durable purchases are not appropriate to include in the capital program. Exceptions are made for ambulances, fire trucks, or similar vehicles and equipment with long service lives or items that are part of a larger project with an estimated value of $50,000 or greater. CIP Development Process The CIP development process typically begins in September of each year with the distribution of CIP request packages and instructions to City departments and agencies. The requests are compiled and reviewed by staff and meetings with the requesting departments and agencies are held with the City Manager. Following these meetings, the City Manager’s proposed CIP is developed and presented to the CIP Subcommittee which consists of the Mayor, Vice Mayor, and two designated members of the Planning Commission. The CIP Subcommittee meets with the City Manager and requesting departments and agencies to review the proposed CIP and make any recommendations. The CIP Subcommittee recommended CIP is then presented to the full Planning Commission at its December meeting. The Planning Commission reviews the CIP, makes any recommendations, and adopts the CIP at its January meeting. The Planning Commission recommended CIP is presented to City Council at its first meeting in February. A public hearing is held to obtain citizen input on the proposed CIP at the second meeting in February. Following the public hearing, City Council directs any edits, and adopts the CIP prior to the development of the annual operating and capital budget. The first year of the adopted CIP is moved forward for consideration as part of the City Manager’s proposed annual operating and capital budget. It is important to note that even if a capital project is included in the adopted CIP, it only moves forward to implementation if included in the adopted operating and capital budget. CIP Calendar  CIP Request Package Distributed to City Departments and Suffolk Public Schools 

September

CIP Requests reviewed and compiled by staff  

City Manager CIP meetings with City Departments and Suffolk Public Schools    City Manager’s Proposed CIP prepared   

October

                                               

 

ii


iii


Debt as a Percentage of Assessed Value – The City strives to maintain a ratio of Debt as a Percentage of Assessed Value below 4%. This ratio indicates the relationship between the City’s debt and the total taxable value of real and personal property in the City. The ratio is an indicator of the City’s ability to repay debt which is paid for with property tax revenue. Debt to General Government Expenditures – The City strives to maintain Debt as a Percentage of General Government Expenditures below 10%. This ratio is a measure of the City’s ability to repay debt without hampering other City services. A smaller ratio indicates a lesser burden on the City’s operating budget. Operating Impact - Another important factor that is evaluated as part of CIP development is the financial impact that a capital project will have on future operating costs of the City. The City must evaluate and plan for the ongoing costs of operating a new or expanded capital facility or piece of equipment. As a result, departments and agencies are required to estimate the annual operating cost/recurring expenditures for each project that is submitted for consideration in the CIP. For example, the addition of a new recreation center requires additional staffing, utilities, landscaping, and routine maintenance expenses. Similarly, a new school, without the closure of another facility, requires the hiring of teachers, support staff, and administrative personnel, utilities, landscaping, and routine maintenance expenses. The estimated annual operating impact of capital projects are illustrated in a chart at the bottom of each fund summary page in the CIP. Additionally, debt service payments (principal and interest) must be accounted for the bonds issued to finance these projects. These are real costs that will have an impact on future operating budgets. The CIP includes a fund summary of the estimated annual operating impact of proposed capital projects and the corresponding impact on the real estate tax rate assuming no real estate assessed value growth or growth in other local taxes. Sources of Funding Capital projects are financed by a variety of funding sources including: 

General Fund Revenue – Funding derived from General Fund Revenue (real and personal property taxes, other local taxes such as sales and meals taxes, fines and forfeitures, charges for services, use of money and property, and miscellaneous revenue) is used to fund a portion of general government capital projects. General Fund revenue is the primary revenue source for achieving the City’s Capital Pay-Go policy which strives to cash fund capital projects equal to at least 3% of the General Fund departmental expenditures less certain transfers to other funds. General Fund revenue is typically targeted toward capital projects with shorter life spans. This strategy prevents the City from repaying debt for longer time periods than the useful life of an asset. Bonds are typically financed over a 20 to 30 year period. As such, it is to the City’s advantage to pay for projects, such as the capital maintenance of general government buildings, park facilities and amenities, sidewalks, and some types of equipment with General Fund cash.

Bond Financing – A major source of capital funding is municipal bonds, debt issued by the City to investors on the open financial market. The City has the ability to issue general obligation bonds and revenue bonds. General obligation bonds are backed by the full faith and credit of the City, while revenue bonds finance projects that are supported by user fees

  iv


such as public utilities. The cost of issuing general obligation bonds or revenue bonds is dependent upon the City’s credit rating and market conditions. Maintaining a high credit rating allows the City to obtain lower interest rates. The City receives credit ratings from national credit rating agencies including Fitch Ratings, Moody’s, and Standard & Poor’s. 

Fee Revenue – The City may use enterprise fund revenue generated from user fees such as stormwater or public utility water and sewer fees to offset the cost of capital projects specific to these enterprise fund operations. The use of fee revenue allows a portion of capital projects for business type enterprises such as Stormwater and Public Utilities to be cash funded which helps to limit borrowing or debt financing.

State and Federal Funding – The City seeks state and federal grant funds to offset the cost of capital improvements whenever possible. State and federal grant funds are typically available for parks and recreation, stormwater, and transportation improvements.

Private Contributions – Funding derived from private contributions and proffers are dedicated to offset the cost of specific infrastructure improvements such as schools, transportation, public safety, and parks and recreation.

  v


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Capital Improvements Program and Plan Summary By Fund


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN SUMMARY BY FUND FY 2020 - 2029

PLANNED EXPENDITURES

5 Year Summary 2019-2020

PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND

12,825,000

FLEET FUND

125,000

STORMWATER FUND

400,000

2020-2021 13,300,000 3,000,000

2021-2022

2022-2023

11,500,000 2,175,000 1,500,000

2023-2024

7,285,000 3,700,000

TRANSIT FUND

-

-

160,494

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FUND

-

-

6,894,000

1,600,000

-

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

18,205,000

63,115,000

114,405,000

177,520,000

6,000,000

8,300,000

6,325,000

14,625,000

3,700,000

12,300,000

10,125,000

22,425,000

1,890,066

2,050,560

-

-

2,050,560

8,494,000

1,200,000

9,694,000

GENERAL GOV'T. FUND

50,876,496

57,107,409

37,726,749

40,704,276

35,768,046

222,182,976

515,164,610

737,347,586

TOTAL ALL FUNDS:

64,226,496

73,407,409

59,956,243

53,289,276

65,563,112

316,442,536

647,219,610

963,662,146

FUNDING SOURCES 2019-2020 Public Utilities Revenue Bonds Transfer from Public Utilities Fund PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND General Obligation Bonds Transfer from Fleet Fund FLEET FUND State Transportation Funds Transfer from Stormwater Fund General Obligation Bonds STORMWATER FUND State/Federal Grant Funds Transfer from Transit Fund TRANSIT FUND General Obligation Bonds INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FUND

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

5,550,000 7,275,000

7,840,000 5,460,000

6,010,000 5,490,000

1,875,000 5,410,000

12,875,000 5,330,000

34,150,000 28,965,000

87,955,000 26,450,000

122,105,000 55,415,000

12,825,000

13,300,000

11,500,000

7,285,000

18,205,000

63,115,000

114,405,000

177,520,000

125,000

-

2,175,000 -

-

6,000,000 -

8,175,000 125,000

6,325,000 -

14,500,000 125,000

125,000

-

2,175,000

-

6,000,000

8,300,000

6,325,000

14,625,000

400,000

3,000,000 -

1,500,000 -

200,000 3,500,000 -

200,000 3,500,000 -

400,000 11,500,000 400,000

1,150,000 8,975,000 -

1,550,000 20,475,000 400,000

400,000

3,000,000

1,500,000

3,700,000

3,700,000

12,300,000

10,125,000

22,425,000

-

-

16,050 144,444

-

1,890,066 -

1,906,116 144,444

-

1,906,116 144,444

-

-

160,494

-

1,890,066

2,050,560

-

2,050,560

-

-

6,894,000

1,600,000

-

8,494,000

1,200,000

9,694,000

-

-

6,894,000

1,600,000

-

8,494,000

1,200,000

9,694,000

5,793,654 19,116,941 4,875,391 21,090,510

3,889,151 19,523,502 5,036,277 28,658,479

8,000,000 3,637,763 5,157,986 20,931,000

6,000,000 1,161,970 5,142,306 28,400,000

6,000,000 2,400,000 4,988,046 22,380,000

29,682,805 45,840,176 25,200,006 121,459,989

53,000,000 40,538,425 1,137,364 35,548,742 384,940,079

82,682,805 86,378,601 1,137,364 60,748,748 506,400,068

GENERAL GOV'T. FUND

50,876,496

57,107,409

37,726,749

40,704,276

35,768,046

222,182,976

515,164,610

737,347,586

TOTAL ALL FUNDS:

64,226,496

73,407,409

59,956,243

53,289,276

65,563,112

316,442,536

647,219,610

963,662,146

30,000,000

30,000,000

30,000,000

30,000,000

30,000,000

8,509,490

1,341,521

0

0

1,620,000

State Transportation Funds State/Federal Grant Funds Cash Proffers Transfer from General Fund General Obligation Bonds

GO Debt Capacity per Financial Advisor: GO Debt Capacity (Shortfall):

1


Annual Operating Impact UTILITY FUND - OPERATIONS: ANTICIPATED DEBT SERVICE: UTILITY FUND - CAPITAL CASH: PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND FLEET FUND - OPERATIONS: ANTICIPATED DEBT SERVICE: FLEET FUND - CAPITAL CASH: FLEET FUND

2019-2020 (225,000) (225,000) 125,000 125,000

2020-2021 444,000 (1,815,000) (1,371,000)

2021-2022 627,200 30,000 657,200

(125,000) (125,000)

-

2022-2023 480,800 (80,000) 400,800

2023-2024 150,000 (80,000) 70,000

174,000 174,000

-

2,000,000 2,000,000

-

STORMWATER FUND - OPERATIONS: ANTICIPATED DEBT SERVICE: CASH: STORMWATER FUND:

-

TRANSIT FUND - OPERATIONS: ANTICIPATED DEBT SERVICE: TRANSIT FUND - CAPITAL CASH: TRANSIT FUND:

-

-

IT FUND - OPERATIONS: ANTICIPATED DEBT SERVICE: IT FUND - CAPITAL CASH

-

-

-

551,520 -

100,000 128,000 -

FUND:

-

-

-

551,520

228,000

32,000 3,000,000 3,032,000

(1,500,000) (1,500,000) 144,444 144,444

(144,444) (144,444)

-

GENERAL FUND - OPERATIONS: ANTICIPATED DEBT SERVICE: GENERAL FUND - CAPITAL CASH

1,822,916

614,499 1,687,241 160,886

2,233,012 2,292,678 121,709

761,000 1,674,480 (15,680)

2,798,280 2,272,000 (154,260)

GENERAL GOV'T. FUND

1,822,916

2,462,626

4,647,399

2,419,800

4,916,020

2.7

5.0

2.6

5.3

General Fund Real Estate Tax Rate Impact:

2.0

2


General Government


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN GENERAL GOV'T. FUND FY 2020 - 2029

General Government Projects Planned Expenditures

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Parks & Recreation Public Building & Facilities Public Safety Transportation Public Schools Village and Neighborhood Initiatives

2,874,500 3,776,000 6,809,607 33,136,639 2,575,000 1,704,750

2,247,500 14,889,322 8,342,233 26,638,604 3,575,000 1,414,750

2,140,000 5,741,000 860,600 19,080,399 7,935,000 1,969,750

1,595,000 8,109,128 11,098,428 13,146,970 4,575,000 2,179,750

1,500,000 840,000 1,130,646 13,645,000 15,955,000 2,697,400

10,357,000 33,355,450 28,241,514 105,647,612 34,615,000 9,966,400

26,574,475 4,350,000 49,701,207 155,871,928 262,955,000 15,712,000

36,931,475 37,705,450 77,942,721 261,519,540 297,570,000 25,678,400

Total General Government:

50,876,496

57,107,409

37,726,749

40,704,276

35,768,046

222,182,976

515,164,610

737,347,586

General Government Projects Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

State Transportation Funds State/Federal Grant Funds Cash Proffers Transfer from General Fund General Obligation Bonds

5,793,654 19,116,941 4,875,391 21,090,510

3,889,151 19,523,502 5,036,277 28,658,479

8,000,000 3,637,763 5,157,986 20,931,000

6,000,000 1,161,970 5,142,306 28,400,000

6,000,000 2,400,000 4,988,046 22,380,000

29,682,805 45,840,176 25,200,006 121,459,989

53,000,000 40,538,425 1,137,364 35,548,742 384,940,079

82,682,805 86,378,601 1,137,364 60,748,748 506,400,068

Total General Government:

50,876,496

57,107,409

37,726,749

40,704,276

35,768,046

222,182,976

515,164,610

737,347,586

Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

Parks & Recreation Public Building & Facilities Public Safety Transportation Public Schools Village and Neighborhood Initiatives

-

589,499 25,000 -

6,400 2,226,612 -

11,000 750,000 -

65,000 400,000 2,333,280 -

Total Operating Cost

-

614,499

2,233,012

761,000

2,798,280

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

3


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PARKS AND RECREATION FY 2020 - 2029

Parks and Recreation Planned Expenditures Parks & Rec-Capital Maintenance Lone Star Lakes Park Trail Enhancements Driver Complex Sleepy Hole Park Renovation East Suffolk Athletic Fields Water Access-Nansemond River Joint Use Facilities Cypress Park and Pool Bennett's Creek Recreation Center Cedar Hill Cemetery Road Repairs Aquatic Facility Inclusive Playground - Northern End

5 Year Summary Previous Funding 3,060,000 200,000 1,150,000 200,000 664,975 200,000 3,672,117 -

Total

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

430,000 250,000 275,000 250,000 100,000 135,000 1,247,000 187,500 -

435,000 250,000 1,375,000 187,500 -

440,000 250,000 1,000,000 100,000 200,000 150,000

445,000 1,000,000 150,000

450,000 1,050,000 -

2,200,000 750,000 2,325,000 250,000 200,000 1,200,000 1,510,000 1,247,000 375,000 300,000

2,325,000 2,000,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 300,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 12,949,475 -

4,525,000 2,750,000 5,325,000 2,750,000 500,000 1,500,000 1,200,000 2,000,000 1,510,000 1,247,000 375,000 12,949,475 300,000

2,874,500

2,247,500

2,140,000

1,595,000

1,500,000

10,357,000

26,574,475

36,931,475

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Parks and Recreation Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

Lone Star Lakes Park Trail Enhancements Driver Complex State/Federal Grant Funds Parks & Rec-Capital Maint. Lone Star Lakes Park Trail Enhancements Driver Complex Sleepy Hole Park Renovation East Suffolk Athletic Fields Water Access-Nansemond River Joint Use Facilities Bennett's Creek Recreation Center Cedar Hill Cemetery Road Repairs Inclusive Playground - Northern End Transfer from General Fund Lone Star Lakes Park Trail Enhancements Driver Complex East Suffolk Athletic Fields Water Access-Nansemond River Joint Use Facilities Lake Kennedy Park-Drainage Improvmts Water Access-Nansemond River Cypress Park and Pool Bennett's Creek Recreation Center Aquatic Facility General Obligation Bonds

50,000 50,000 430,000 125,000 100,000 187,500 842,500 125,000 275,000 200,000 135,000 1,247,000 1,982,000

1,375,000 1,375,000

Total

2,874,500

2,247,500

Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

100,000 100,000 435,000 150,000 187,500 772,500 -

2020-2021

2021-2022 150,000 800,000 950,000 440,000 100,000 200,000 100,000 200,000 150,000 1,190,000 2,140,000

2021-2022

2022-2023 445,000 150,000 595,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,595,000

2022-2023

2023-2024 900,000 900,000 450,000 150,000 600,000 1,500,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

5,000,000

4,000,000

10,625,000

14,625,000

4,357,000

12,949,475

17,306,475

10,357,000

26,574,475

36,931,475

2023-2024

Parks & Rec-Capital Maintenance Lone Star Lakes Park Trail Enhancements Driver Complex Sleepy Hole Park Renovation East Suffolk Athletic Fields Water Access-Nansemond River Joint Use Facilities Cypress Park and Pool Bennett's Creek Recreation Center Cedar Hill Cemetery Road Repairs Aquatic Facility Inclusive Playground - Northern End

-

589,499 -

6,400 -

11,000 -

35,000 30,000

Total Operating Cost

-

589,499

6,400

11,000

65,000

4


Parks and Recreation Parks & Recreation - Capital Maintenance City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The Parks & Recreation capital maintenance program is implemented to ensure that existing and new parks and recreation facilities are maintained for continued public use and enjoyment. Funding is used to address compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), fire safety and building code compliance, lighting upgrades, and repair and replacement of antiquated shelters, restrooms, offices, and storage buildings. Other improvements include drainage, roadway, parking, landscaping, water and sewer connections, and minor alterations. FY 20 $430,000

FY 21 $435,000

FY 22 $440,000

FY 23 $445,000

FY 24 $450,000

FY 25-29 $2,325,000

Total $4,525,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Lone Star Lakes Park City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will implement the Lone Star Lakes Park Master Plan over a 10 year period. Projects will include trails on the north and south sides of the park, improvements to a wayside park at the Butler Tract, restoration, road improvements, and design and construction of a visitor center and meeting facility. FY20 funding is programmed for road infrastructure improvements, 30% design of the Butler Tract, and north/south trails. FY 20 $250,000

FY 21 $250,000

FY 22 $250,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $2,000,000

Total $2,750,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $11,000 for utilities and maintenance beginning in FY 23.

5


Parks and Recreation Trail Enhancements City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide for enhancements to existing trails as well as new trail connections as identified in the Suffolk Pedestrian Master Plan. FY20 funding includes $275,000 for trail enhancements to include the design and construction of additional parking and trail access to the Driver trailhead of the Seaboard Coastline Trail.

FY 20 $275,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $1,000,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $1,050,000

FY 25-29 $3,000,000

Total $5,325,000

Operating Costs: The project is not anticipated to have an annual operating impact in the first five years.

Driver Complex City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide for design and construction of athletic fields, trails, and water access. FY20 funding is programmed for design. Previous funding approved in FY19 is being used for demolition of existing structures and updating the master plan.

FY 20 $250,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $2,500,000

Total $2,750,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $100,000 for staffing and utilities beginning in FY 25.

6


Parks and Recreation Sleepy Hole Park Renovation City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide for renovations and improvements to the 66-acre Sleepy Hole Park. Planned improvements will include additional parking, access to shelters, trails, picnic shelters, replacement and restroom renovations. Other planned improvements include a dog park and an adventure camp area with a ropes course and group camping opportunities.

FY 20 $100,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $100,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $300,000

Total $500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $16,000 for equipment, supplies, and utilities beginning in FY 25.

East Suffolk Athletic Fields City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness This project will provide for the acquisition and development of property around the East Suffolk Recreation Center for multi-use athletic fields.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $1,500,000

Total $1,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $50,000 for utilities and supplies beginning in FY 26.

7


Parks and Recreation Water Access –Nansemond River City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide for the acquisition of property and the design and construction of deep water access to the Nansemond River. Previous funding is being used for a feasibility study and preliminary design.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $200,000

FY 23 $1,000,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,200,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $35,000 for staffing and maintenance beginning in FY24.

Joint Use Facilities City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide for continued partnering with Suffolk Public Schools for an additional joint use recreation center at a new elementary or middle school or renovation of an existing school.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $2,000,000

Total $2,000,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $65,000 for staffing and utilities beginning in FY 28.

8


Parks and Recreation Cypress Park and Pool City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide for renovations to the Cypress Park and Pool to include a beach entry for better accessibility, an expanded refinished pool deck with shade structures, a new pool liner, and restroom improvements. These improvements will enhance swimming lessons and pool enjoyment by children and adults. FY20 funding is programmed for design and engineering.

FY 20 $135,000

FY 21 $1,375,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,510,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $6,400 for utilities beginning in FY 22.

Bennett’s Creek Recreation Center City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide for the furniture, fixtures, fitness equipment, technology, and interior cabling and infrastructure improvements needed to open the Bennett’s Creek Recreation Center.

FY 20 $1,247,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,247,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $589,499 for staffing, utilities, and other operating expenses beginning in FY 21.

9


Parks and Recreation Cedar Hill Cemetery Road Repairs City Council Goal – Transportation The project will provide for repairs to the 32,000 linear feet of roadway within the Cedar Hill Cemetery which have become hazardous to staff and the public.

FY 20 $187,500

FY 21 $187,500

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $375,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Aquatic Facility City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide for an indoor year-round aquatic facility to include 25 meter x 25 yard lap pool, six competition lanes, one warm-up lane, family pool, rooms, lobby, vending/concession area, men’s and women’s locker rooms, party room, life guard office and locker room, staff office and first aid station.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $12,949,475

Total $12,949,475

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $575,000 for staffing, maintenance and utilities beginning in FY 26.

10


Parks and Recreation Inclusive Playground-Northern End City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness The project will provide an inclusive playground located on the northern end of the City. There is a need to provide an inclusive/sensory playground for youth with special needs.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $150,000

FY 23 $150,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $300,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $30,000 for maintenance and equipment beginning in FY 24.

11


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES FY 2020 - 2029

Public Building and Facilities Planned Expenditures City Airport: Obstruction Removal (2% Local) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (2% local) Corporate Hangar (2% local design) Airport Layout Plan Update (2% local) City Buildings: Public Building Capital Maintenance Central Library Human Resources Bldg. Renovation - School Administration

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

410,000 300,000 -

600,000 300,000 -

2,500,000 -

350,000

800,000 -

8,601,760 2,935,000 -

976,000 1,900,000 -

810,000 11,579,322 -

820,000 4,071,000 500,000

830,000 3,579,128 2,900,000

840,000 -

3,776,000

14,889,322

5,741,000

8,109,128

840,000

Total

-

5 Year Subtotal

600,000 2,800,000 800,000 350,000

4,276,000 21,129,450 3,400,000 33,355,450

6-10 Year Subtotal

-

10 Year Total

600,000 2,800,000 800,000 350,000

4,350,000 -

8,626,000 21,129,450 3,400,000

4,350,000

37,705,450

Public Building and Facilities Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

Obstruction Removal (90% Federal) Obstruction Removal (8% State) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (90% Federal) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (8% State) Corporate Hangar (80% State-Design) Airport Layout Plan Update (90% Federal) Airport Layout Plan Update (8% State) State/Federal Grant Funds Obstruction Removal (2% Local) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (2% Local) Corporate Hangar (2% local design) Airport Layout Plan Update (2% local) Public Building Capital Maintenance Transfer from General Fund Central Library Human Resources Bldg. Renovation - School Administration General Obligation Bonds

540,000 48,000 270,000 24,000 882,000 12,000 6,000 976,000 994,000 1,900,000 1,900,000

2,250,000 200,000 2,450,000 50,000 810,000 860,000 11,579,322 11,579,322

315,000 28,000 343,000 7,000 820,000 827,000 4,071,000 500,000 4,571,000

160,000 160,000 640,000 830,000 1,470,000 3,579,128 2,900,000 6,479,128

840,000 840,000 -

24,529,450

Total

3,776,000

14,889,322

5,741,000

8,109,128

840,000

33,355,450

Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

3,835,000

4,991,000

6-10 Year Subtotal

-

4,350,000

4,350,000

10 Year Total

3,835,000

9,341,000

24,529,450 37,705,450

2023-2024

City Airport: Obstruction Removal (2% Local) Terminal Apron Rehabilitation (2% local) Corporate Hangar (2% local design) Airport Layout Plan Update (2% local)

-

-

-

-

City Buildings: Public Building Capital Maintenance Central Library Human Resources Bldg. Renovation - School Administration

-

-

-

-

400,000 -

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

400,000

-

12


Public Buildings and Facilities City Airport Obstruction Removal City Council Goal – Transportation The project will provide for the acquisition of easements and removal of additional vegetative obstructions around the airport property as identified by the Federal Aviation Administration. Previous funding was provided for environmental assessment, easement acquisition and design. FY 20 funds are programmed for the construction/removal phase. The project will be funded through a combination of federal (90%), state (8%) and local (2%) funds. FY 20 $600,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $600,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Terminal Apron Rehabilitation City Council Goal – Transportation The project will provide for the resurfacing of the aircraft parking apron. The current pavement is over 25 years old and rated in poor condition. The project will be funded through a combination of federal (90%), state (8%) and local (2%) funds.

FY 20 $300,000

FY 21 $2,500,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $2,800,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

13


Public Buildings and Facilities City Airport Corporate Hangar City Council Goal – Transportation The project will provide for the design and construction of a Corporate Hangar. The hangar is needed to recruit and retain corporate customers to base their planes in Suffolk The building will have approximately 10,000 square feet of open hangar bay along with office and restroom facilities. The project will be funded with a combination of state and local funds.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $800,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $800,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Airport Layout Plan Update City Council Goal - Transportation This project will provide for the update of the Airport Layout Plan taking into account the last 10 years of development at the airport. The Federal Aviation Administration and Virginia Department of Aviation will support the planning exercise to study future facility requirements. The project will be funded through a combination of federal (90%), state (8%) and local (2%) funds.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $350,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $350,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

14


Public Buildings and Facilities City Buildings Public Building Capital Maintenance City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services A proactive building maintenance program is implemented to protect the City’s significant investment in public buildings. Capital maintenance projects include renovations and repairs to buildings and systems, as well as compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. FY20 funding includes $176,000 for expansion of the Animal Shelter parking lot. FY 20 $976,000

FY 21 $810,000

FY 22 $820,000

FY 23 $830,000

FY 24 $840,000

FY 25-29 $4,350,000

Total $8,626,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Central Library City Council Goal – Leisure, Health & Wellness This project will provide for the design and construction of a new Central Library on West Washington Street in downtown Suffolk. The facility will be approximately 50,000 square feet in size and replace the existing Morgan Memorial Library.

FY 20 $1,900,000

FY 21 $11,579,322

FY 22 $4,071,000

FY 23 $3,579,128

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $21,129,450

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $400,000 for staffing and utilities beginning in FY24.

15


Public Buildings and Facilities City Buildings Human Resources Building Renovation – Schools Administration City Council Goal – Public Education The project will provide for the renovation of the 40,000 square foot Human Resources Building to serve as the Suffolk Public Schools Administration offices. Suffolk Public Schools currently operates out of a leased facility in downtown. The scope of the renovation will include modifying the existing building layout to meet the programmatic needs of the Schools Administration operations along with upgrades to building systems and finishes such as flooring, ceilings, lighting, electrical, plumbing, heating, cooling, and ventilation, and furniture and fixtures. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $500,000

FY 23 $2,900,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $3,400,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

16


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PUBLIC SAFETY FY 2020 - 2029

Public Safety Planned Expenditures Fire & Rescue: Fire Engines (Various New Stations) Fire Engines (Replacements) Ambulance (Replacements) Ambulance (Various New Stations ) Aerial Platform Truck Aerial Ladder Truck Fire Rescue Truck (Various New Stations) Fire Rescue Truck (Replacements) Fire Tanker Truck Joint Public Safety & Training Ctr. Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4) Nansmnd & Wilroy Rd Fire Stn (36 staff) Carolina Road Fire Stn (21 staff) College Drive Fire Station (36 staff) Pruden Blvd. Rt. 460 Fire Stn (21 staff) Holland Road Fire Stn (36 staff) Breathing Air System Self Contained Breathing Apparatus Police: Joint Public Safety & Training Ctr (36 staff) Backup 911 Center

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

2,921,110 1,721,151 1,103,631 34,799 995,992 -

-

Total

2019-2020

814,081 620,060 506,479 1,100,000 2,500,000 1,268,987

6,809,607

2020-2021

838,503 838,503 577,130 350,097 5,000,000 250,000 -

488,000 8,342,233

2021-2022

360,600 500,000 -

860,600

2022-2023

889,568 863,659 306,138 371,418 1,671,673 1,475,848 1,520,124 4,000,000 -

11,098,428

2023-2024

630,646 500,000 -

1,130,646

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

1,728,071 2,516,243 2,494,574 721,515 1,671,673 1,475,848 1,520,124 506,479 1,100,000 4,500,000 500,000 7,500,000 250,000 1,268,987

2,861,215 6,100,965 742,816 1,194,631 3,877,546 1,656,935 3,996,000 4,000,000 4,500,000 4,500,000 250,000 -

4,589,286 8,617,208 3,237,390 1,916,146 1,671,673 3,877,546 3,132,783 1,520,124 506,479 3,996,000 1,100,000 4,500,000 4,500,000 7,500,000 4,500,000 4,500,000 500,000 1,268,987

488,000

14,000,883 2,020,216

14,000,883 2,508,216

28,241,514

49,701,207

77,942,721

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Public Safety Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

Fire Engines (Various New Stations) Fire Engines (Replacements) Ambulance (Replacements) Ambulance (Various New Stations ) Aerial Platform Truck Aerial Ladder Truck Fire Rescue Truck (Various New Stations) Fire Rescue Truck (Replacements) Joint Public Safety & Training Ctr. Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4) Fire & Rescue Operations Building Nansmnd & Wilroy Rd Fire Stn (36 staff) Carolina Road Fire Stn (21 staff) College Drive Fire Station (36 staff) Pruden Blvd. Rt. 460 Fire Stn (21 staff) Breathing Air System

464,081 620,060 -

500,000 577,130 350,097 250,000

360,600 -

306,138 371,418 -

630,646 -

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus Transfer from General Fund Fire Engines (Various New Stations) Fire Engines (Replacements) Aerial Platform Truck Aerial Ladder Truck Fire Rescue Truck (Various New Stations) Fire Rescue Truck (Replacements) Fire Tanker Truck

1,677,227 838,503 338,503 5,000,000 488,000 6,665,006

360,600 500,000 500,000

677,556 889,568 863,659 1,671,673 1,475,848 1,520,124 4,000,000 10,420,872

630,646 500,000 500,000

4,430,170

2,187,447

6,617,617

Fire & Rescue Operations Building Nansmnd & Wilroy Rd Fire Stn (36 staff) Carolina Road Fire Stn (21 staff) College Drive Fire Station (36 staff) Pruden Blvd. Rt. 460 Fire Stn (21 staff) Holland Road Fire Stn (36 staff) Self Contained Breathing Apparatus Joint Public Safety & Training Ctr. (36 staff) Backup 911 Center General Obligation Bonds

1,084,141 350,000 506,479 1,100,000 2,500,000 1,268,987 5,725,466

23,811,344

47,513,760

71,325,104

Total

6,809,607

8,342,233

860,600

11,098,428

1,130,646

28,241,514

49,701,207

77,942,721

Joint Public Safety & Training Ctr. Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4)

17


Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

2020-2021

Fire & Rescue: Fire Engines (Various New Stations) Fire Engines (Replacements) Ambulance (Replacements) Ambulance (Various New Stations ) Aerial Platform Truck Aerial Ladder Truck Fire Rescue Truck (Various New Stations) Fire Rescue Truck (Replacements) Fire Tanker Truck Joint Public Safety & Training Ctr. Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4) Nansmnd & Wilroy Rd Fire Stn (36 staff) Carolina Road Fire Stn (21 staff) College Drive Fire Station (36 staff) Pruden Blvd. Rt. 460 Fire Stn (21 staff) Holland Road Fire Stn (36 staff) Breathing Air System Self Contained Breathing Apparatus

-

25,000 -

Police: Joint Public Safety & Training Ctr (36 staff) Backup 911 Center

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

25,000

2021-2022

39,612 37,000 2,150,000 -

2,226,612

2022-2023

-

-

2023-2024

39,612 37,000 61,668 45,000 2,150,000 -

2,333,280

18


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Fire Engines City Council Goal – Public Safety The expansion of fire and rescue facilities and aging of existing fire engines requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new fire engines as new facilities are constructed and replacing old fire engines that have exceeded their life expectancy.

FY 20 $814,081

FY 21 $1,677,006

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $1,753,227

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $8,962,180

Total $13,206,494

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating costs of new fire engines purchased in the first five years is $79,224 beginning in FY 22. New fire engines programmed for FY 25 through FY29 that are associated with new fire stations will have additional annual operating costs of $39,612 per fire engine.

Ambulances City Council Goal – Public Safety The expansion of fire and rescue to include emergency medical services has necessitated the acquisition of additional ambulances to ensure the provision of rapid response to emergency medical incidents. This project identifies a systematic approach for acquiring new ambulances as new facilities are constructed and replacing old ambulances that have exceeded their life expectancy. Some replacement ambulances will require new monitors, stretchers, and equipment, while others will be outfitted with equipment transferred from ambulances that are being moved into a reserve capacity. FY 20 $620,060

FY 21 $927,227

FY 22 $360,600

FY 23 $677,556

FY 24 $630,646

FY 25-29 $1,937,447

Total $5,153,536

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating costs of new ambulances purchased in the first five years is $74,000 beginning in FY 22. New ambulances planned for FY 25 through FY 29 that are associated with new fire stations will have additional annual operating costs of $37,000 per ambulance.

19


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Aerial Platform Truck City Council Goal – Public Safety The expansion of fire and rescue facilities and aging of existing aerial platform trucks requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new aerial platform trucks as new facilities are constructed and replacing old aerial platform trucks that have exceeded their life expectancy. A new aerial platform truck is programmed in FY23 for the new Nansemond and Wilroy Road Fire Station. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $1,671,673

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,671,673

Operating Costs: A new aerial platform truck programmed for FY23 will have an annual operating impact of $61,668 beginning in FY24.

Aerial Ladder Truck City Council Goal – Public Safety The aging of existing aerial ladder trucks requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. These trucks provide elevated fire streams, facilitate the rescue of occupants from buildings, can be utilized for specialized rescue applications, provide entry and egress for firefighters during operations at buildings or access limited structures/locations, and provide an elevated lighting source during incidents. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new aerial ladder trucks as new facilities are constructed and replacing old aerial ladder trucks that have exceeded their life expectancy. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $3,877,546

Total $3,877,546

Operating Costs: Replacement aerial ladder trucks programmed for FY26 and FY28 will not have an operational impact on the City.

20


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Fire Rescue Truck City Council Goal – Public Safety The expansion of fire and rescue facilities and aging of existing fire rescue trucks requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. These trucks provide specialty rescue equipment such as air tools, hydraulic tools, cutting tools, cutting torches, and lighting for response to motor vehicle incidents, structure fires, collapsed structures, water rescues, and other incidents. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new fire rescue trucks as new facilities are constructed and replacing old fire rescue trucks that have exceeded their life expectancy. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $2,995,972

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $1,656,935

Total $4,652,907

Operating Costs: A new fire rescue truck programmed for FY23 and FY29 will have an annual operating cost of $45,000 A replacement fire rescue truck in FY23 will not have an operational impact on the City.

Fire Tanker Truck City Council Goal – Public Safety The expansion of fire and rescue facilities and aging of existing fire tanker trucks requires the acquisition of new and replacement equipment. These trucks are used for the purpose of transporting large amounts of water to the fire ground to make it available for extinguishing operations. These trucks are especially useful in rural areas where fire hydrants are not readily available and natural water resources are insufficient. A systematic approach is used for acquiring new fire tanker trucks as new facilities are constructed and replacing old fire tanker trucks that have exceeded their life expectancy. FY 20 $506,479

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $506,479

Operating Costs: A replacement fire tanker truck programmed for FY20 will not have an operational impact on the City.

21


Public Safety Fire & Rescue

Joint Public Safety and Training Center City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the construction of a 12,200 square foot police station and 19,000 square foot shared police and fire & rescue training facility to include three classrooms, an indoor firearms range, a burn building and other props, training staff offices, a K-9 Training Facility and restroom/shower facilities. The facility will enhance police protection in the Route 58/460 corridor, helping to reduce response times in the growing areas surrounding the facility. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $3,996,000

Total $3,996,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the fire & rescue department’s portion of the joint training facility is approximately $60,000 for utilities and maintenance beginning in FY26.

Lake Kilby Station Renovations (Station 4)

. City Council Goal – Public Safety This project will provide for renovations to Fire Station 4 including, but not limited to, an apparatus bay, improved restrooms and showers, kitchen and equipment upgrades, dormitory, and site improvements.

FY 20 $1,100,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,100,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $25,000 for utilities beginning in FY21.

22


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Nansemond and Wilroy Road Fire Station City Council Goal – Public Safety Funding will provide for the construction of a three bay fire station/public safety center to provide fire protection and emergency medical services to the growing areas along Nansemond Parkway and Wilroy Road.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $500,000

FY 23 $4,000,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $4,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $2,150,000 beginning in FY24 to include the addition of 36 new firefighters and utilities.

Carolina Road Fire Station City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the construction of a three bay fire station/public safety center to provide . fire protection and emergency medical services to the growing areas of Route 13 and Route 32 between Downtown Suffolk and the village of Whaleyville

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $500,000

FY 25-29 $4,000,000

Total $4,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the project is $1,254,166 including 21 new firefighters and utilities beginning in FY26

23


Public Safety Fire & Rescue .

College Drive Fire Station City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the design and construction of a three bay fire station/public safety center to provide fire protection and emergency medical services to the highly populated area of Harbour View in Northern Suffolk.

FY 20 $2,500,000 .

FY 21 $5,000,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $7,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $2,150,000 including 36 new firefighters and utilities beginning in FY22.

Pruden Boulevard Route 460 Fire Station City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the design and construction of a three bay fire station/public safety center to enhance fire protection and emergency medical services to the growing Pruden Boulevard area of the City.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $4,500,000

Total $4,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the project is $1,254,166 including 21 new firefighters and utilities beginning in FY28.

24


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Holland Road Fire Station City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the design of a three bay fire station/public safety center to enhance fire protection and emergency medical services to the growing area near Centerpoint and between the Forest Glen district and the village of Holland.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $4,500,000

Total $4,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the project is $2,150,000 beginning in FY29 to include the addition of 36 new firefighters and utilities. .

Breathing Air System City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the acquisition of replacement breathing air systems to refill breathing air cylinders used by firefighters during entry into hazardous environments, such as structure fires, vehicle fires, and hazmat incidents.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $250,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $250,000

Total $500,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

25


Public Safety Fire & Rescue Self Contained Breathing Apparatus City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the replacement of all selfcontained breathing apparatus (SCBA) used by the Department of Fire & Rescue. SCBAs or air packs are worn by firefighters to provide for safe breathable air in immediate dangerous to health or life atmosphere. The current air packs will have exceeded their useful life in addition to standards set by the National Fire Protection Association.

FY 20 $1,268,987

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,268,987

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

26


Public Safety Police Joint Public Safety and Training Center City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the construction of a 12,200 square foot police station and 19,000 square foot shared police and fire & rescue training facility to include three classrooms, an indoor firearms range, training staff offices, a burn building and other props, training staff offices, a K-9 Training Facility and restroom/shower facilities. The facility will enhance police protection in the Route 58/460 corridor, helping to reduce response times in the growing areas surrounding the facility.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $14,000,883

Total $14,000,883

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the police department’s portion of the project is $2,829,596 for staffing of 36 police officers, civilian personnel, and utilities beginning in FY 26.

Backup 911 Center City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for a Backup 911 Center in the event there is a power or function lost in the primary 911 Center. The facility would consist of a 40’ x 40’ 1,600 square foot room at a public safety center. Programmed funding in FY21 will be used for construction of the room. Future funding will be used for equipment and technology.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $488,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $2,020,216

Total $2,508,216

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

27


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN TRANSPORTATION FY 2020 - 2029

Transportation Planned Expenditures

5 Year Summary 5 Year Subtotal

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

57,683,424 -

12,500,000 -

12,500,000 -

10,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

25,000,000 30,000,000

50,000,000

25,000,000 80,000,000

5,375,000 2,250,000 6,000,000 700,000 100,000 1,083,382 231,000 4,000,000 17,078,876 20,522,924 50,000 850,000 150,000 -

3,000,000 2,000,000 1,000,000 5,796,698 95,000 1,101,779 4,583,162 80,000 1,980,000 1,000,000 -

2,000,000 1,778,302 156,800 500,000 6,543,452 1,430,050 80,000 1,650,000 -

2,000,000 655,636 500,000 3,765,275 2,079,488 80,000 -

372,530 2,000,000 694,440 80,000 -

1,500,000 2,000,000 65,000 80,000 -

3,000,000 3,872,530 1,000,000 8,000,000 7,575,000 655,636 1,011,240 1,000,000 11,410,506 8,092,700 400,000 3,630,000 1,000,000 -

2,038,425 10,000,000 33,000,000 1,499,295 400,000 46,000,000 400,000 10,034,208 1,300,000 600,000 600,000

3,000,000 5,910,955 1,000,000 18,000,000 7,575,000 33,000,000 2,154,931 1,411,240 1,000,000 11,410,506 46,000,000 8,092,700 800,000 3,630,000 1,000,000 10,034,208 1,300,000 600,000 600,000

33,136,639

26,638,604

19,080,399

13,146,970

13,645,000

105,647,612

155,871,928

261,519,540

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Local Urban Roadway Construction-Comp Plan Holland Road Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD

Local Urban Intersection Construction-Comp Plan N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd Intrsctn Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn Kenyon Road Connector Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD

Pitchkettle Road Improvements North Suffolk Connector Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging Rail Crossing Improvements Pruden Center Turn Lane Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection Shoulders Hill Road Widening Nansemond Pkwy/Wilroy Rd Flyover Miscellaneous Roadway Improvements Relocation of Zone C Headquarters Pruden Blvd Culvert Improvements Kimberly Bridge Wilroy Rd/Progress Rd Intersection Washington St/White Marsh Rd Intersection Constance Rd/Wilroy Rd Intersection Total

Transportation Funding Sources Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD Local Urban Intrsctn Const-Comp Plan N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd Intrsctn Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD Pitchkettle Road Improvements Pruden Center Turn Lane Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection Pruden Blvd Culvert Improvements State Transportation Funds Holland Road Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn (CMAQ) Rail Crossing Improvements Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection Nansemond Pkwy/Wilroy Rd Flyover State/Federal Grant Funds Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging Rail Crossing Improvements Miscellaneous Roadway Improvements Transfer from General Fund Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD Local Urban Intrsctn Const-Comp Plan N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd Intrsctn Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn Kenyon Road Connector Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD Pitchkettle Road Improvements Pruden Center Turn Lane Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection Relocation of Zone C Headquarters Pruden Blvd Culvert Improvements General Obligation Bonds Total

Previous Funding

1,500,000 895,305 2,898,349 500,000 5,793,654 12,500,000 1,101,779 4,583,162 18,184,941 95,000 80,000 175,000 -

1,000,000 889,151 250,000 1,750,000 3,889,151 12,500,000 3,043,452 1,430,050 16,973,502 156,800 80,000 236,800 -

5,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

1,000,000 250,000 1,750,000 8,000,000 265,275 2,079,488 2,344,763 655,636 80,000 735,636 5,000,000

1,000,000 6,000,000 372,530 629,440 1,001,970 65,000 80,000 145,000 5,000,000

1,000,000 6,000,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 65,000 80,000 145,000 5,000,000

-

-

29,682,805

53,000,000

82,682,805

40,005,176

37,538,425

77,543,601

1,437,436

2,299,295

3,736,731

1,500,000 1,104,695 1,000,000 2,898,349 1,980,000 500,000 8,983,044

-

1,000,000 889,151 250,000 1,750,000 1,650,000 5,539,151

1,000,000 250,000 1,750,000 8,000,000

1,000,000 6,000,000

1,000,000 6,000,000

34,522,195

63,034,208

97,556,403

33,136,639

26,638,604

19,080,399

13,146,970

13,645,000

105,647,612

155,871,928

261,519,540

28


Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

Local Urban Roadway Construction-Comp Plan Holland Road

-

-

-

-

-

Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD

-

-

-

-

-

N Pkwy/Bennetts Pasture Rd Intrsctn

-

-

-

-

-

Rt. 17 Crittenden Road Intrsctn

-

-

-

-

-

Kenyon Road Connector

-

-

-

-

-

Yr. 2 - 10 Projects - TBD

-

-

-

-

-

Pitchkettle Road Improvements

-

-

-

-

-

North Suffolk Connector

-

-

-

-

-

Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging

-

-

-

-

-

Rail Crossing Improvements

-

-

-

-

-

Pruden Center Turn Lane

-

-

-

-

-

Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt 17 Intersection

-

-

-

-

-

Shoulders Hill Road Widening

-

-

-

-

-

Nansemond Pkwy/Wilroy Rd Flyover

-

-

-

-

-

Miscellaneous Roadway Improvements

-

-

-

-

-

Relocation of Zone C Headquarters

-

-

-

-

-

Pruden Blvd Culvert Improvements

-

-

-

-

-

Kimberly Bridge

-

-

-

-

-

Wilroy Rd/Progress Rd Intersection

-

-

-

-

-

Washington St/White Marsh Rd Intersection Constance Rd/Wilroy Rd Intersection

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Local Urban Intersection Construction-Comp Plan

29


Transportation Local Urban Roadway Construction Comprehensive Plan City Council Goal - Transportation The project will provide funding for various roadway construction projects recommended in the City’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan. FY20 & FY21 project funding is for the completion of the Holland Road/Route 58 Widening project. Future projects may include the Mills Godwin Bridge Widening, Kings Highway Bridge, Route 17 Widening, and Route 58 Safety Improvements between Centerpoint Drive and the village of Holland. Projects are anticipated to be funded by a combination of state, federal, and local funds.

FY 20 FY 21 FY 22 FY 23 FY 24 FY 25-29 $12,500,000 $12,500,000 $10,000,000 $10,000,000 $10,000,000 $50,000,000

Total $105,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Local Urban Intersection Construction Comprehensive Plan City Council Goal - Transportation The project will provide for various intersection improvements to enhance traffic flow and safety as recommended in the City’s 2035 Comprehensive Plan. Priority intersection improvements for FY20 include Nansemond Parkway/Bennetts Pasture Road, Route 17/Crittenden Road and Kenyon Road Connector. Projects are anticipated to be funded through State Revenue Share and local funds.

FY 20 $6,000,000

FY 21 $2,000,000

FY 22 $2,000,000

FY 23 $2,372,530

FY 24 $3,500,000

FY 25-29 $12,038,425

Total $27,910,955

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

30


Transportation Pitchkettle Road Improvements City Council Goal - Transportation The project will provide for the realignment and upgrade of Pitchkettle Road from Constance Road to the Lake Meade Bridge. The project will provide a link for pedestrians to the Boston Community and Prentis Street to downtown. Improvements will include storm drainage, concrete curb and gutter, sidewalk, and landscaping. The project is anticipated to be funded with 50% State Revenue Share and 50% local funds. FY 20 $5,796,698

FY 21 $1,778,302

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $7,575,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

North Suffolk Connector City Council Goal - Transportation This project will provide for a new roadway and alignment between Nansemond Parkway and Shoulders Hill Road bypassing two at-grade rail crossings. Funding was allocated in FY17 to conduct a study of this project. The project is anticipated to be funded with federal and local funding.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $33,000,000

Total $33,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

31


Transportation Bennetts Creek Channel Dredging City Council Goal - Transportation This project will provide for maintenance dredging of the mouth of Bennetts Creek to allow for passage through the channel by commercial and recreational boaters. Funding will provide for the cost of the dredge as well as toll fees for the disposal of dredged material at Craney Island. The project will be funded by 100% local funds.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $655,636

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $1,499,295

Total $2,154,931

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Rail Crossing Improvements City Council Goal - Transportation This project provides for improvements to the quality of a select group of at-grade crossings while working collectively with different railroad companies. Asphalt or wood flange crossings would be replaced with concrete panel sections resulting in a smoother ride and reducing traffic backups due to vehicles slowing in order to traverse the crossings. Elevated crossings at Suburban Drive, Wellons Street, and Harvest Drive would be replaced with concrete panels and have additional improvements made to reduce or eliminate the steep approaches to the rail crossing. Additional projects may include eliminating the ability to drive around crossing gates at crossings where it has been demonstrated to pose a risk. Project also includes a Highway Safety Improvement Project located at Main and Prentis to adjust traffic signals and rail crossing signals to improve safety. FY 20 $95,000

FY 21 $156,800

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $694,440

FY 24 $65,000

FY 25-29 $400,000

Total $1,411,240

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City

32


Transportation Pruden Center Turn Lanes City Council Goal - Transportation This project will address safety concerns related to vehicles entering and exiting the College and Career Academy at Pruden. The project will provide for the installation of left and right turn lanes on Route 460 at the entrance of this Suffolk Public School facility. Approximately $4.0M state and local funding has already been appropriated for this project. FY21 and FY22 funding is anticipated to be funded with 50% State Revenue Share funds and 50% local funds.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $500,000

FY 22 $500,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Shoulders Hill Rd/Rt. 17 Intersection City Council Goal - Transportation This project provides for improvements to the intersection of Route 17 and Shoulders Hill Road to tie into recently completed improvements south of the intersection. Approximately $17.1M in state, federal, and local funding has already been appropriated for this project. An additional $1.1M in federal funding is programmed in FY20.

FY 20 $1,101,779

FY 21 $6,543,452

FY 22 $3,765,275

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $11,410,506

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

33


Transportation . Shoulders Hill Road Widening City Council Goal - Transportation The project provides for the widening of Shoulders Hill Road from approximately 0.3 miles south of Bridge Road to Pughsville Road. The total length is approximately 1.33 miles. The project will widen the corridor from two lanes to a four lane divided roadway with turn lanes, sidewalks, multi-use path and stormwater improvements. The project will continue the roadway section as established at the recently completed Nansemond Parkway/Shoulders Hill Road intersection and is currently under design at the Bridge Road/Shoulders Hill Road intersection. The project is anticipated to be funded with 50% State Revenue Share funds and 50% local funds. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $46,000,000

Total $46,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Nansemond Parkway/Wilroy Road Flyover City Council Goal - Transportation The project will provide for a flyover of Nansemond Parkway over the Commonwealth Railway at the intersection of Wilroy Road and Nansemond Parkway. The project will alleviate the conflict between vehicular and rail traffic at this intersection and greatly improve safety. Previous funding of $20.5M has been approved for this project. Federal funds of $8.1M are programmed in FY20, FY21 and FY22.

FY 20 $4,583,162

FY 21 $1,430,050

FY 22 $2,079,488

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $8,092,700

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

34


Transportation Miscellaneous Roadway. Improvements City Council Goal - Transportation The project will provide for miscellaneous roadway improvements that are not eligible for completion with state maintenance funds.

FY 20 $80,000

FY 21 $80,000

FY 22 $80,000

FY 23 $80,000

FY 24 $80,000

FY 25-29 $400,000

Total $800,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Relocation of Zone C Headquarters City Council Goal – City Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will relocate Public Works Zone C headquarters, which serves North Suffolk, from the existing location at the entrance of Lone Star Lakes, to a more north-eastern location to accommodate the need for that area. Project includes land purchase, site development and construction of a parking area with some covered parking and a 4,000 square feet small office and locker space. The project also includes storage of sand and salt along with an incinerator . FY 20 $1,980,000

FY 21 $1,650,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $3,630,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

35


Transportation Pruden Blvd Culvert Improvements City Council Goal .– Transportation The project will provide for the installation of double concrete box culverts across Route 460 connecting Sadler Pond and Lake Meade. The improvement will address flooding concerns on Route 460. FY20 funding is anticipated at 50% State Revenue Share and 50% local funding.

FY 20 $1,000,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Kimberly Bridge City Council Goal – Transportation The project will address a recurring flooding problem on North Main Street at the Kimberly Bridge over the Nansemond River. The project will raise the North Main Street roadway, north of the Kimberly Bridge, to an elevation that would be clear of the 100 year flood elevation. Funding is needed for design, right-of-way and construction.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $10,034,208

Total $10,034,208

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

36


Transportation Wilroy Road/Progress Road Intersection City Council Goal – Transportation The project will address traffic delays and congestion due to inadequate turn lane capacity and existing traffic control equipment at the intersection of Wilroy Road and Progress Road. The intersection is located at the entrance to an industrial park and is used heavily by intermodal trucks. The project will provide for signal equipment replacement, turn lane improvements, and retiming of the traffic signals.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $1,300,000

Total $1,300,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Washington St/White Marsh Rd Intersection City Council Goal – Transportation The project will address traffic delays and congestion due to inadequate turn lane capacity and existing traffic control equipment at the intersection of Washington Street and White Marsh Road. The project will provide for signal equipment replacement, turn lane improvements, and retiming of the traffic signals.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $600,000

Total $600,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

37


Transportation Constance Rd/Wilroy Road Intersection City Council Goal. – Transportation The project will address traffic delays and congestion due to inadequate turn lane capacity and existing traffic control equipment at the intersection of Constance Road and Wilroy Road. The project will provide for signal equipment replacement, turn lane improvements, and retiming of the traffic signals.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $600,000

Total $600,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

38


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS FY 2020 - 2029

Public Schools Planned Expenditures Hazardous Material Management Schools Major Repairs/Systems Replacement Northern Shores Elementary Addition College and Career Academy at Pruden Excel Academy at Driver Operations Facility JFK Middle Replacement - 800 student Forest Glenn Mid Sch Replacement- 800 student John Yeates Mid Sch Replacement- 800 student Kilby Shores Elem. Replacement - 800 student New Downtown Elementary School - 800 New High School - 2,000 student

5 Year Summary Previous Funding * 550,000 5,500,000 4,000,000 -

Total

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

75,000 2,500,000 -

75,000 2,500,000 1,000,000 -

75,000 2,500,000 5,360,000 -

75,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 -

75,000 2,500,000 3,380,000 10,000,000 -

375,000 12,500,000 6,360,000 2,000,000 3,380,000 10,000,000 -

375,000 12,500,000 5,000,000 8,480,000 35,500,000 42,400,000 45,500,000 30,700,000 26,500,000 56,000,000

750,000 25,000,000 6,360,000 2,000,000 5,000,000 11,860,000 45,500,000 42,400,000 45,500,000 30,700,000 26,500,000 56,000,000

2,575,000

3,575,000

7,935,000

4,575,000

15,955,000

34,615,000

262,955,000

297,570,000

Public Schools Funding Sources New High School - 2,000 student Cash Proffers Hazardous Material Management Transfer from General Fund Schools Major Repairs/Systems Replacement Northern Shores Elementary Addition College and Career Academy at Pruden Excel Academy at Driver Operations Facility

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

New High School - 2,000 student General Obligation Bonds

75,000 75,000 2,500,000 2,500,000

75,000 75,000 2,500,000 1,000,000 3,500,000

75,000 75,000 2,500,000 5,360,000 7,860,000

75,000 75,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 4,500,000

75,000 75,000 2,500,000 3,380,000 10,000,000 15,880,000

Total

2,575,000

3,575,000

7,935,000

4,575,000

15,955,000

JFK Middle Replacement - 800 student Forest Glenn Mid Sch Replacement- 800 student John Yeates Mid Sch Replacement- 800 student Kilby Shores Elem. Replacement - 800 student New Downtown Elementary School - 800 student

Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

Hazardous Material Management Schools Major Repairs/Systems Replacement Northern Shores Elementary Addition College and Career Academy at Pruden Excel Academy at Driver Operations Facility JFK Middle Replacement - 800 student Forest Glenn Mid Sch Replacement- 800 student John Yeates Mid Sch Replacement- 800 student Kilby Shores Elem. Replacement - 800 student New Downtown Elementary School - 800 student New High School - 2,000 student

-

-

-

750,000 -

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

750,000

-

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

-

10 Year Total

1,137,364

1,137,364

375,000

375,000

750,000

34,240,000

261,442,636

295,682,636

34,615,000

262,955,000

297,570,000

2023-2024

39


Public Schools Hazardous Materials Management City Council Goal - Education Funding is programmed each year to test and abate harmful substances as identified as potential problems to students and staff in school facilities.

FY 20 $75,000

FY 21 $75,000

FY 22 $75,000

FY 23 $75,000

FY 24 $75,000

FY 25-29 $375,000

Total $750,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on Suffolk Public Schools.

Schools Major Repairs/Systems Replacement City Council Goal - Education This project will provide for major repairs and systems replacements such as the replacement of heating, ventilation, air, and cooling systems, roofs, and stormwater drainage infrastructure that are failing or inefficient in Suffolk Public School facilities.

FY 20 $2,500,000

FY 21 $2,500,000

FY 22 $2,500,000

FY 23 $2,500,000

FY 24 $2,500,000

FY 25-29 $12,500,000

Total $25,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on Suffolk Public Schools.

40


Public Schools Northern Shores Elementary Addition City Council Goal - Education The project will provide for the design and construction of an additional wing adding 12 classrooms to eliminate overcrowding and use of mobile units. Funding is programmed in FY21 for design with construction funding in FY22.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $1,000,000

FY 22 $5,360,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $6,360,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating costs for this project is $750,000 for additional staffing and utilities beginning in FY23.

College and Career Academy at Pruden City Council Goal - Education The project will integrate mechanical systems at the facility with Suffolk Public Schools systems and provide for infrastructure repairs to modernize and upgrade the appearance of the building. The project is part of an overall effort by Suffolk Public Schools to enhance the facility and its programs.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $2,000,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $2,000,000

Operating Costs: The project is not anticipated to result in significant new operating costs.

41


Public Schools Excel Academy at Driver City Council Goal - Education The project will repurpose Driver Elementary School into an academy to accelerate learning and achievement for students that have not met success in a traditional classroom environment. Funding will be used to replace the heating, ventilation, air, and cooling system, repair underground sewer, upgrade bathrooms and lighting, paint the interior and exterior of the building, and replace ceiling tiles and pavement.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $5,000,000

Total $5,000,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost is $1,500,000 for staffing and utilities beginning in FY 26.

Operations Facility City Council Goal - Education The project will provide for Phase 2 of the Suffolk Public Schools operations center at the former Mt. Zion Elementary School property. $4M was appropriated in the FY 18 Capital Budget to construct space for the Schools print shop, textbook center, and food services administration. Phase 2 will provide for warehouse space and trades worker shops for a total of 87,600 square feet.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $3,380,000

FY 25-29 $8,480,000

Total $11,860,000

Operating Costs: The project is not anticipated to result in significant new operating costs.

42


Public Schools John F. Kennedy Middle School Replacement City Council Goal - Education The project will replace John F. Kennedy Middle School with a new 800 student school. The current facility was constructed in 1965 and will be over 60 years old upon replacement. The new school will provide a modern learning environment for Suffolk students. Funding is programmed in FY24 for land acquisition and design with construction funding included in FY25 and FY26.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 FY 25-29 $10,000,000 $35,500,000

Total $45,500,000

Operating Costs: The project is not anticipated to result in significant new operating costs.

Forest Glenn Middle School Replacement City Council Goal - Education The project will replace Forest Glenn Middle School with a new 800 student school. Forest Glenn Middle School was constructed in 1965 and will be over 60 years old upon replacement. The new school will provide a modern learning environment for Suffolk students. Funding is programmed in FY25 for land acquisition and design with construction funding in FY26 and FY27. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $42,400,000

Total $42,400,000

Operating Costs: The project is not anticipated to result in significant new operating costs.

43


Public Schools John Yeates Middle School Replacement City Council Goal - Education The project will replace John Yeates Middle School with a new 800 student school. John Yeates Middle School was constructed in 1965 and will be over 60 years old upon replacement. The new school will provide a modern learning environment for Suffolk students. Funding is programmed in FY26 for land acquisition and design with construction funding in FY27 and FY28. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $45,500,000

Total $45,500,000

Operating Costs: The project is not anticipated to result in significant new operating costs.

Kilby Shores Elementary School Replacement City Council Goal - Education This project will replace Kilby Shores Elementary School with a new 800 student school. Kilby Shores Elementary School was constructed in 1979 and will be nearly 50 years old upon replacement. The new school will provide a modern learning environment for Suffolk students. Funding for land acquisition and design is programmed in FY26 with construction funding in FY27. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $30,700,000

Total $30,700,000

Operating Costs: The project is not anticipated to result in significant new operating costs.

44


Public Schools New Downtown Elementary School

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

City Council Goal - Education This project will provide for the construction of a new 800 student downtown elementary school. The new elementary school would potentially allow students from Booker T. Washington, Hillpoint, Mack Benn, Elephants Fork, and Nansemond Parkway elementary schools to attend a school closer to their home. It would also help to eliminate mobile units and prepare these schools for future growth. FY 23 FY 24 FY 25-29 Total $0 $0 $26,500,000 $26,500,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the new downtown elementary school is $3.5M for staffing, utilities, and operations beginning in FY 29.

New High School City Council Goal - Education A fourth high school is proposed to accommodate citywide growth of students in grades 9-12. The new high school is proposed to be a 2,000 student school.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $56,000,000

Total $56,000,000

Operating Costs: The projected annual operating cost of the new high school is $4.5M for staffing, utilities, and operations beginning in FY29.

45


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN VILLAGE & NEIGHBORHOOD INITIATIVES FY 2020 - 2029

Village & Neighborhood Initiatives Planned Expenditures Village & Neighborhood Improvements ** Open Space Improvements Downtown Implementation Plan Initiatives

5 Year Summary Previous Funding 5,788,329 1,215,000

Total

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

1,204,750 250,000 250,000

904,750 250,000 260,000

904,750 250,000 815,000

904,750 250,000 1,025,000

1,372,400 250,000 1,075,000

5,291,400 1,250,000 3,425,000

6,862,000 1,250,000 7,600,000

12,153,400 2,500,000 11,025,000

1,704,750

1,414,750

1,969,750

2,179,750

2,697,400

9,966,400

15,712,000

25,678,400

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

**Project includes consolidated funding to address all neighborhood issues to include curb, gutter, and sidewalk improvements.

Village & Neighborhood Initiatives Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

Village & Neighborhood Improvements ** Open Space Improvements Downtown Implementation Plan Initiatives Transfer from General Fund

1,204,750 250,000 250,000 1,704,750

904,750 250,000 260,000 1,414,750

904,750 250,000 815,000 1,969,750

904,750 250,000 1,025,000 2,179,750

1,372,400 250,000 1,075,000 2,697,400

9,966,400

15,712,000

25,678,400

Total

1,704,750

1,414,750

1,969,750

2,179,750

2,697,400

9,966,400

15,712,000

25,678,400

Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

Village & Neighborhood Improvements ** Open Space Improvements Downtown Implementation Plan Initiatives

-

-

-

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

46


Village and Neighborhood Initiatives Village & Neighborhood Improvements City Council Goal – Growth Management and Comprehensive Planning The project will provide for the systematic implementation of short and long term strategies and initiatives specified in the 2035 Comprehensive Plan including the adopted Village and Neighborhood Initiatives Plans and other documented neighborhood needs assessments. The funding request represents the continuation of multi-year implementation strategy to prioritize, fund, and complete safety and drainage related projects that are currently underway and new initiatives subject to the objective analysis and evaluation of the Neighborhood Needs Assessment Tool. FY 20 $1,204,750

FY 21 $904,750

FY 22 $904,750

FY 23 $904,750

FY 24 $1,372,400

FY 25-29 $6,862,000

Total $12,153,400

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Open Space Improvements

FY 20 $250,000

FY 21 $250,000

FY 22 $250,000

City Council Goal – Growth Management and Comprehensive Planning This project provides for the systematic and ongoing implementation of both short and long term strategies and initiatives as specified in the 2035 Comprehensive Plan, including the adopted Village and Neighborhood Initiatives Plans and other documented neighborhood needs assessments. The funding request represents the continuation of a multi-year implementation strategy, the principal focus of which is to acquire lands and construct improvements for the development of neighborhood parks and other similar quality of life improvements. FY 23 FY 24 FY 25-29 Total $250,000 $250,000 $1,250,000 $2,500,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

47


48

Project

904,750

-

-

-

-

-

407,140

-

-

-

497,610

2020-2021

904,750

-

-

-

-

38,420

368,720

-

-

467,830

29,780

2021-2022

-

904,750

-

-

-

-

407,140

-

-

-

497,610

2022-2023

-

1,372,400

-

-

-

-

617,580

-

-

-

754,820

2023-2024

5,291,400

300,000

-

-

-

1,063,140

1,183,000

-

-

1,720,260

1,025,000

5 Year Subtotal 2020-2024

-

6,862,000

-

-

-

2,280,000

238,860

-

2,642,400

750,000

950,740

5 Year Subtotal 2025-2029

12,153,400

300,000

-

-

2,280,000

1,302,000

1,183,000

2,642,400

750,000

2,671,000

1,025,000

10 Year Total 2020-2029

Note 1: As proposed, this project extends beyond the 10-year plan horizon of FY2028/2029. The estimated total project costs is $3,780,000. As such, $1,137,600 of additional funds

1,204,750

300,000

Future Projects (As yet to be Determined per Neighborhood Assessment Tool and Assessment of Other Specified Needs)

Future Projects

TOTALS

-

Sidewalk, Closed Drainage, and Intersection & Street Improvements - (Nansemond Parkway at Portsmouth Blvd.)

Nansemond Parkway and Portsmouth Boulevard Improvements

-

-

Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - Area 3 -(S. 8th Street, S. 9th Street, S. 10th Street, S. 11th Street, S. 12th Street, and Rosemont Avenue)

Sidewalk, Closed Drainage, and Intersection & Street Improvements - (Suburban Dr. at Portsmouth Blvd.)

-

Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - Area 2 -(S. 4th Street, S. 5th Street, S. 6th Street, and S. 7th Street)

407,140

-

Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - Area 4 -(Beech Street and Oak Street, HalifaxStreet and Bank Street, Collie Street, Sunset Street, Willow Street, and Railroad Avenue) (See Note 1 )

Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - Area 1 -(S. Division Street, Camp Avenue, S. Lloyd Street,S. Capital Street, and Freeney Avenue )

-

Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - Area 3 -(N. 8th Street, N. 9th Street, N. 10th Street, and N. 11th Street)

Suburban Drive and Portsmouth Boulevard Improvements

Rosemont Neighborhood Improvements

-

497,610

2019-2020

Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - Area 2 -(N. 4th Street, N. 5th Street, N. 6th Street, N. 7th Street, and Bank Street)

Lloyd Place Neighborhood Closed Drainage & Street Improvements - Area 1 -(N. Improvements Capital Street, and Bank Street)

FUTURE / PROPOSED VILLAGE & NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS (As Determined per Neighborhood Assessment Tool and Assessment of Other Specified Needs)

Community

FY 2019 / 2020 Proposed Budget Request

VILLAGE & NEIGHBORHOOD IMPROVEMENTS

FY 2020 - 2029 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN


µ ROSEMONT NEIGHBORHOOD

O

NT

E V A

RO

M E S

E V A T N O

3

H T 9

ST

S TO

N

T S H T N8

G N I H S E

T

2

S H T 6 N

T S H T S6

T S H T S5

T S H T N5

T SC

LS A T I P A C N

L L S

1

D ST

RAI

S

N DI

AVE SUN SET

T S D Y O

O I S I V I D

T S N IT H W

A M E

H S R

R

T S N O VISI

4

E V A D LROA

N

LLOY

ST L A APIT

T

BA

TE S K N

X

S H T 4 N

ST H T S4

D

T

A W

HS T 7 N

ST H T S7

BE E C H S T

LLOYD PLACE NEIGHBORHOOD

H T 8

ST

1

S

ST

2

T S H N 9T

RO

3

E R F

M E S

Y E EN

E V A

T S H N 10T

ST

Neighborhood Improvement Project Areas

S

1

T

S

H T 0

ST

OA K S

T S H T

H T 11

ST

HALIF A X S T

N 11

1

WILLOW

S

H T 2

ST

49


50

Project

Future Projects

TOTALS

Future Projects (As yet to be Determined per Neighborhood Assessment Tool and Assessment of Other Specified Quality of Life Needs)

FUTURE / PROPOSED OPEN SPASE & QUALITY of LIFE IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS (As Determined per Neighborhood Assessment Tool and Assessment of Other Specified Needs)

Community

FY 2020 - 2029 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN

250,000

250,000

2019-2020

250,000

250,000

2020-2021

250,000

250,000

2021-2022

250,000

250,000

2022-2023

FY 2019 / 2020 Proposed Budget Request

OPEN SPACE and QUALITY OF LIFE IMPROVEMENTS

250,000

250,000

2023-2024

1,250,000

1,250,000

5 Year Subtotal 2020-2024

1,250,000

1,250,000

5 Year Subtotal 2025-2029

2,500,000

2,500,000

10 Year Total 2020-2029


51

Downtown Master Plan Implementation Improvements

City of Suffolk Village, Neighborhood, Open Space, and Quality of Life Improvements 2019-2020

²

E. Washington Street Neighborhoods Closed Drainage and Street Improvements


Village and Neighborhood Initiatives Downtown Implementation Plan Initiatives City Council Goal – Growth Management and Comprehensive Planning The project will provide for the systematic and ongoing implementation of short and long term strategies and initiatives specified in the adopted Downtown Master Plan. The funding request represents the continuation of a multi-year implementation strategy, the principle focus of which is to construct major development projects and implement effective management projects as outlined in the Downtown Master Plan. FY 20 $250,000

FY 21 $260,000

FY 22 $815,000

FY 23 $1,025,000

FY 24 $1,075,000

FY 25-29 $7,600,000

Total $11,025,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

.

52


53

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal 2020-2024

-

-

-

Retail Market Study and Recruitment Strategy

Long-Term Opportunity Sites - To be determined based on future analysis of sites identified in Downtown Master Plan.

Future Projects - (To be determined)

250,000

-

Gateway Improvements - Study potential locations for new gateways into downtown on all the major corridors of entry Years 1-2 ; install new gateways Years 3-4.

TOTALS

-

100,000

Phoenix Bank Block - Detailed surveys, Phase 1-2 environmental assessments, parcel assembly, clear deeds/titles Years 1-3; redevelopemnt Years 4-5 (See Note 1 )

Downtown Wayfinding System - Installation of integrated permanent wayfinding system

150,000

-

Festival/Events Venue and Market Hall - Begin funding, strategy development in Years 1-2; temporary site/events Years 1-3; begin permanent construction Years 4-5

Main Street Streetscape - Begin funding, strategy development, engineering and design in Years 1-3; construction Years 4-5

260,000

-

-

-

10,000

-

100,000

150,000

-

815,000

-

-

40,000

25,000

-

100,000

150,000

500,000

1,025,000

-

-

-

25,000

-

250,000

250,000

500,000

1,075,000

-

-

-

25,000

-

250,000

300,000

500,000

3,425,000

-

-

40,000

85,000

-

800,000

1,000,000

1,500,000

FUTURE / PROPOSED DOWNTOWN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN PROJECTS (As identified in the Downtown Suffolk Master Plan, adopted June 2018)

Project

Note 1: This line item is supplemented by $500,000 in existing Village & Neighborhood funds.

Combined Projects

Management Projects

Major Development Projects

Community

FY 2019 / 2020 Proposed Budget Request

FY 2020 - 2029 CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PLAN DOWNTOWN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN INITIATIVES

7,600,000

1,000,000

5,000,000

-

-

100,000

-

-

1,500,000

5 Year Subtotal 2025-2029

11,025,000

1,000,000

5,000,000

40,000

85,000

100,000

800,000

1,000,000

3,000,000

10 Year Total 2020-2029


Utility Fund


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN PUBLIC UTILITIES FUND FY 2020 - 2029

Public Utilities Fund Planned Expenditures Water Projects Water Source Development and Water Treatment Plant Expansion Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion Water System Upgrades

5 Year Summary Previous Funding

Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades

2020-2021

2021-2022

55,632,000

850,000

5,110,000

1,590,000

23,125,000

5,000,000

100,000

700,000

9,200,000

1,525,000

1,540,000

2,010,000

7,375,000

6,750,000

4,300,000

Subtotal Water Projects: Sewer Projects Sanitary Sewer Extensions

2019-2020

5,500,000

550,000

300,000

52,481,000

4,900,000

6,250,000

5,450,000

Subtotal Sewer Projects: Total Public Utilities Fund

6,550,000

7,200,000 7,200,000

12,825,000

13,300,000

11,500,000

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

810,000

2023-2024

5 Year

6-10 Year

10 Year

Subtotal

Subtotal

Total

730,000

9,090,000

48,600,000

57,690,000

9,000,000

14,800,000

21,800,000

36,600,000

1,875,000

1,525,000

8,475,000

8,355,000

16,830,000

2,685,000

11,255,000

32,365,000

78,755,000

111,120,000

-

300,000 4,300,000 4,600,000 7,285,000

6,950,000 6,950,000 18,205,000

1,150,000

900,000

2,050,000

29,600,000

34,750,000

64,350,000

30,750,000 63,115,000

35,650,000

66,400,000

114,405,000

177,520,000

5 Year

6-10 Year

10 Year

Subtotal

Subtotal

Total

Public Utilities Fund Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2022-2023

2023-2024

Public Utilities Revenue Bonds

5,550,000

7,840,000

6,010,000

1,875,000

12,875,000

34,150,000

87,955,000

122,105,000

Transfer from Public Utilities Fund

7,275,000

5,460,000

5,490,000

5,410,000

5,330,000

28,965,000

26,450,000

55,415,000

12,825,000

13,300,000

11,500,000

7,285,000

18,205,000

63,115,000

114,405,000

177,520,000

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

Total Public Utilities Fund

Annual Operating Impact

2022-2023

2023-2024

Water Projects Water Source Development and Water Treatment Plant Expansion Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion Water System Upgrades Subtotal Water Projects: Sewer Projects Sanitary Sewer Extensions Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades Subtotal Sewer Projects: Utility Fund - Capital Cash: Estimated Debt Service: Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

(225,000) (225,000)

(1,815,000) 444,000 (1,371,000)

-

-

-

30,000

(80,000)

(80,000)

627,200

480,800

150,000

657,200

400,800

70,000

54


Water Projects Water Source Development and Water Treatment Plant Expansion City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project provides for the development, upgrades, and expansion of the City’s public water supply sources and treatment plant facilities. Projects include upgrades to the Lonestar Lakes & Chuckatuck Creek dam, Crumps Mill Pond surface dam upgrades, upgrades to surface water plant and water source development charges. Funding in FY 20 is programmed for water source development reservation charges.

FY 20 $850,000

FY 21 $5,110,000

FY 22 $1,590,000

FY 23 $810,000

FY 24 $730,000

FY 25-29 $48,600,000

Total $57,690,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion City Council Goal – City Engagement and Responsive City Services The project provides for the expansion of the City’s water distribution and transmission systems, inclusive of system storage. Future projects include the southern transmission main from the G. Robert House Water Treatment Plant to Route 460, the Route 460 to Kenyon Road transmission main, and Wilroy Road 12-inch Main from QVC Drive to Old Mill Creek. Funding in FY20 is programed for the construction of the Phase G section of the Southern Transmission Main from the water plant to Route 10. FY 20 $5,000,000

FY 21 $100,000

FY 22 $700,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $9,000,000

FY 25-29 $21,800,000

Total $36,600,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

55


Water Projects Water System Upgrades City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for the replacement and rehabilitation of aging or undersized water distribution system infrastructure, replacement of aging water meters and water service lines, and the rehabilitation of the City’s water storage tanks. FY20 funding continues the small water main replacement program, water service line replacements, and provides supplemental funding for the Lakeside Phase II water distribution system replacement.

FY 20 $1,525,000

FY 21 $1,540,000

FY 22 $2,010,000

FY 23 $1,875,000

FY 24 $1,525,000

FY 25-29 $8,355,000

Total $16,830,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

56


Water System Upgrades

Programmed Water Projects

Water Distribution & Transmission System Expansion

Programmed Water Projects

Water Source Development & Water Treatment Plant Upgrades

Programmed Water Projects

57

Projects

Projects

Projects

Water Tank Demolition (County St Tank) $250,000

Meter Upgrades $200,000

Meter Upgrades $250,000

Meter Upgrades $250,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Meter Upgrades $300,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

$1,875,000

2022-2023

Projects

$0

2022-2023

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $810,000

$810,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

$2,010,000

2021-2022

Projects

Wilroy Rd. 12-inch Main (QVC Dr. to Old Mill Creek) (C) $700,000

$700,000

2021-2022

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $790,000

Crumps Mill Pond Dam & Impoundment Improvements (D) $800,000

$1,590,000

Projects 2022-2023

Neighborhood Replacements Neighborhood Replacements Neighborhood Replacements Peanut Park Area Ph2 (C), Old Town Water Improvements Forrest St. (C), Mahan St./Day Third Ave. (C) and Old Town (C), Mahan St./Day St. (D) and St. (C), and Downtown Water area (D) Forrest St. (D) Improvements (C) $940,000 $1,610,000 $1,475,000

$1,540,000

2020-2021

Projects

Wilroy Rd. 12-inch Main (QVC Dr. to Old Mill Creek) (D) $100,000

$100,000

Projects 2021-2022

Neighborhood Replacements Lakeside Ph2 (C), Third Ave. (D) $1,075,000

$1,525,000

2019-2020

Projects

Southern Transmission Main Ph. G (Water Plant to Everett's Rd.) (C) $5,000,000

$5,000,000

2020-2021

Projects

2019-2020

Water Source Development Charge $860,000

Lake I & Chuckatuck Creek Impoundment Improvements (C) $4,250,000

$5,110,000

2020-2021

Water Source Development Charge $850,000

$850,000

2019-2020

Meter Upgrades $300,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Neighborhood Replacements Adams/Maple/Mulberry St. Upgrades (D) and Downtown Water Improvements (C) $1,075,000

$1,525,000

2023-2024

Projects

Southern Transmission Main Ph. I (Moores Farm Ln to Exeter Dr.) (C) $9,000,000

$9,000,000

2023-2024

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $730,000

$730,000

2023-2024

Projects

Projects

$8,750,000

2024-2025

Meter Upgrades $300,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $150,000

Neighborhood Replacements Adams/Maple/Mulberry St. Upgrades (C) and Downtown Water Improvements (C) $1,575,000

$2,025,000

2024-2025

Projects

RT 58 Supply Transmission Main (Rt. 460 to Kenyon Rd. (D) $1,200,000

$1,200,000

2024-2025

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $750,000

Crumps Mill Pond Dam & Impoundment Improvements (C) $8,000,000

Capital Improvements Program & Plan Utility Fund FY 2019-2020 through FY 2028-2029 Programmed Water Projects Projects

Meter Upgrades $280,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $250,000

Neighborhood Replacements Harrell Dr. Area Upgrades (D) and Downtown Water Improvements (C) $1,050,000

$1,580,000

2025-2026

Projects

$0

2025-2026

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $660,000

$660,000

2025-2026

Projects

Projects

$740,000

2027-2028

$9,500,000

2027-2028

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $590,000

Meter Upgrades $200,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $250,000

Neighborhood Replacements Harrell Dr. Area Upgrades (C) and Downtown Water Improvements (C) $1,400,000

$1,850,000

2026-2027

Projects

Meter Upgrades $200,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $250,000

Neighborhood Replacements Downtown Water Improvements (C) $1,000,000

$1,450,000

2027-2028

Projects

RT 58 Supply Transmission RT 58 Supply Transmission Main (Rt. 460 to Kenyon Rd. (C) Main (Rt. 460 to Kenyon Rd. (C) $10,000,000 $9,500,000

Southern Transmission Main Ph. H (Rt. 10 to Moores Farm Ln.) (D) $200,000

Southern Transmission Main Ph. J (Exeter Dr./Gardner Ln. to Rt. 460) (D) $600,000

$10,800,000

2026-2027

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $690,000

WTWA Ground Water Permit WTWA Ground Water Permit Renewal (Permit Development) Renewal (Permit Development) $150,000 $150,000

Surface Water Treatment Plant 8 MGD Phase III C Expansion (D) $1,000,000

$1,840,000

2026-2027

Projects

Meter Upgrades $200,000

Water Service Line Upgrades $250,000

Neighborhood Replacements Downtown Water Improvements (C) $1,000,000

$1,450,000

2028-2029

Projects

Southern Transmission Main Ph. H (Rt. 10 to Moores Farm Ln.) (LA) $150,000

Southern Transmission Main Ph. J (Exeter Dr./Gardner Ln. to Rt. 460) (LA) $150,000

$300,000

2028-2029

Projects

Water Source Development Charge $610,000

Surface Water Treatment Plant 8 MGD Phase III C Expansion (C) $36,000,000

$36,610,000

2028-2029


Sewer Projects Sanitary Sewer Extensions City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will continue efforts to extend sanitary sewer into existing developed areas that are currently without sewer service. Identified funding is for minor extensions of sewer service or potential partnerships in pro rata agreements. FY 20 funding provides for the extension of gravity sewer within the 3800 block of Pughsville Road to allow for the abandonment of the City’s Pump Station No. 1 which requires replacement. FY 20 $550,000

FY 21 $300,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $300,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $900,000

Total $2,050,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for the renovation, rehabilitation, and replacement of the City’s sanitary sewer system. The system currently consists of 150 pump stations and 352 miles of gravity sewer mains and force mains. In 2007, the Hampton Roads region, inclusive of the City of Suffolk, entered into a Special Order by Consent with the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. This Order was replaced with a new Order in 2015 to align with Hampton Roads Sanitation District’s (HRSD) amendment to their Federal Consent Decree. As part of the new Consent Order, the City is required to continue its Management Operations and Maintenance (MOM) program to protect against sanitary sewer overflows. FY 20 funding and future funding continues the MOM program, immediate find and fix repairs, electrical/control upgrades to various pump stations, and funds the construction of the Lakeside Phase II sewer improvements which is coordinated with water distribution improvements. FY 20 $4,900,000

FY 21 $6,250,000

FY 22 $7,200,000

FY 23 $4,300,000

FY 24 $6,950,000

FY 25-29 $34,750,000

Total $64,350,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

58


Sanitary Sewer System Upgrades

Programmed Sewer Projects

Sanitary Sewer Extension Projects

Programmed Sewer Projects

59

Projects

Projects

Projects

Projects

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

$7,200,000

2021-2022

Projects

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

$4,300,000

2022-2023

Projects

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

$6,950,000

2023-2024

Projects

$0

2023-2024

Projects

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

$6,950,000

2024-2025

Projects

$300,000

Misc. Extensions (C)

$300,000

2024-2025

Projects

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

$6,950,000

2025-2026

Projects

$0

2025-2026

Projects

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

$6,950,000

2026-2027

Projects

$300,000

Misc. Extensions (C)

$300,000

2026-2027

Projects

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring) $3,200,000

$6,950,000

2027-2028

Projects

$0

2027-2028

Projects

$3,200,000

MOM Program (System Maintenance Find & Fix Upgrades; Flow Monitoring)

$6,950,000

2028-2029

Projects

$300,000

Misc. Extensions (C)

$300,000

2028-2029

Pump Station Electrical & Pump Station Electrical & Pump Station Electrical & Pump Station Electrical & Pump Station Electrical & Pump Station Electrical & Pump Station Electrical & Pump Station Electrical & Pump Station Electrical & Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Pump Station Electrical & Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Downtown Sewer System Downtown Sewer System Downtown Sewer System Downtown Sewer System Downtown Sewer System Downtown Sewer System Control Cabinet Upgrades (C); Peanut Park/Hall Pl. Gravity Downtown Sewer System Old Town Sewer System Upgrades (C) & (D) and Pump Upgrades (C) & (D) and Pump Upgrades (C) & (D) and Pump Upgrades (C) & (D) and Pump Upgrades (C) & (D) and Pump Upgrades (C) & (D) and Pump Sewer System Phase II Lakeside Phase II Gravity Upgrades (D) and Pump Station Upgrades (C); and Pump Station Maintenance Upgrades Station Maintenance Upgrades Station Maintenance Upgrades Station Maintenance Upgrades Station Maintenance Upgrades Station Maintenance Upgrades Sewer System Upgrades (D) Upgrades (C); Old Town Sewer Maintenance Upgrades (C) Station 17 Relocation (C) (C) (C) (C) (C) (C) (C) System Upgrades (D) $1,700,000 $1,100,000 $4,000,000 $3,750,000 $3,750,000 $3,750,000 $3,750,000 $3,750,000 $3,750,000 $3,050,000

$6,250,000

2020-2021

Projects

$300,000

Projects

Misc. Extensions (C)

$300,000

2022-2023

$300,000

$0

2021-2022

Misc. Extensions (C)

$300,000

2020-2021

$4,900,000

2019-2020

Projects

3800 Blk Pughsville Road Extension (C) $550,000

$550,000

2019-2020

Capital Improvements Program & Plan Utility Fund FY 2019-2020 through FY 2028-2029 Programmed Sewer Projects


Stormwater


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN STORMWATER FUND FY 2020 - 2029

Stormwater Fund Planned Expenditures Olde Towne Drainage Improvements Rural Stormwater Improvements Pughsville Drainage Improvements Neighborhood Drainage Improvements Seaboard Trail Ponding (Driver)

5 Year Summary Previous Funding 350,000 1,000,000 1,250,000 270,000 75,000

Total Stormwater Fund

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

400,000 -

1,400,000 1,200,000 400,000 -

700,000 400,000 400,000 -

2,500,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 -

2,500,000 400,000 400,000 400,000 -

7,100,000 1,200,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 -

3,825,000 2,000,000 1,200,000 2,000,000 1,100,000

10,925,000 3,200,000 3,200,000 4,000,000 1,100,000

400,000

3,000,000

1,500,000

3,700,000

3,700,000

12,300,000

10,125,000

22,425,000

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Stormwater Fund Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

Pughsville Drainage Improvements Seaboard Trail Ponding (Driver) State Transportation Funds Olde Towne Drainage Improvements Rural Stormwater Improvements Pughsville Drainage Improvements Neighborhood Drainage Improvements Seaboard Trail Ponding (Driver) Transfer from Stormwater Fund Neighborhood Drainage Improvements General Obligation Bonds

400,000 400,000

1,400,000 1,200,000 400,000 3,000,000 -

700,000 400,000 400,000 1,500,000 -

200,000 200,000 2,500,000 400,000 200,000 400,000 3,500,000 -

200,000 200,000 2,500,000 400,000 200,000 400,000 3,500,000 -

Total Stormwater Fund

400,000

3,000,000

1,500,000

3,700,000

3,700,000

Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

400,000

1,150,000

1,550,000

11,500,000

8,975,000

20,475,000

400,000 12,300,000

10,125,000

400,000 22,425,000

2023-2024

Olde Towne Drainage Improvements Rural Stormwater Improvements Pughsville Drainage Improvements Neighborhood Drainage Improvements Seaboard Trail Ponding (Driver)

-

-

-

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

60


Stormwater Olde Towne Drainage Improvements City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide a comprehensive drainage analysis of the Olde Towne area to address ongoing drainage issues in the neighborhood and possible implementation of priority improvements. The study will also be used as a guide for future stormwater retrofit projects implemented in support of the City’s Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) reduction requirements. FY20 funding will relocate storm drainage from private property to Right-of-Way. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $1,400,000

FY 22 $700,000

FY 23 $2,500,000

FY 24 $2,500,000

FY 25-29 $3,825,000

Total $10,925,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Rural Stormwater Improvements City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for various drainage/roadway improvements on rural roads to prevent nuisance flooding and safety concerns. The project will provide for raised roadway elevations and/or drainage improvements at five locations along Copeland Road, three locations on Mineral Spring Road, and one location on Glen Haven Drive. FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $400,000

FY 23 $400,000

FY 24 $400,000

FY 25-29 $2,000,000

Total $3,200,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

61


Stormwater Pughsville Drainage Improvements City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for the continuation of drainage improvements in the Pughsville area based on the recommendations of the 2012 drainage study including closed drainage along John Street and a stormwater management facility to attenuate the flow in the southern drainage area.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $1,200,000

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $400,000

FY 24 $400,000

FY 25-29 $1,200,000

Total $3,200,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Neighborhood Drainage Improvements City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for the design and construction of drainage improvements to relieve flooding in various streets and neighborhoods over a five year period. Anticipated projects include the Saddlebrook neighborhood in the vicinity of Indian Point Road and Appaloosa Court, Olde Mill Creek, Heron’s Point, Steeple Drive in the Eclipse portion of the City, the 500 block of Highland Avenue, Pughsville Road near the intersection of Shoulders Hill Road and the 100 block of Maple Street.

FY 20 $400,000

FY 21 $400,000

FY 22 $400,000

FY 23 $400,000

FY 24 $400,000

FY 25-29 $2,000,000

Total $4,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

62


Stormwater Seaboard Trail Ponding (Driver) City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for the design and construction of drainage improvements to relieve ponding alongside the recently completed Seaboard Coastline Trail. Previous year funding is being used to conduct a stormwater drainage study.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $1,100,000

Total $1,100,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

63


Transit Fund


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN TRANSIT FUND FY 2020 - 2029

TRANSIT Planned Expenditures

5 Year Summary Previous Funding *

2019-2020

2020-2021

-

-

160,494

-

-

160,494

2019-2020

2020-2021

Transit Operations Facility State/Federal Grant Funds Transit Operations Facility Transfer from Transit Fund

-

-

16,050 16,050 144,444 144,444

-

1,890,066 1,890,066 -

Total Transit Fund

-

-

160,494

-

1,890,066

2019-2020

2020-2021

Transit Operations Facility

-

-

-

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

Transit Operations Facility

-

Total Transit Fund

2021-2022

2022-2023 -

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

1,890,066

2,050,560

-

2,050,560

1,890,066

2,050,560

-

2,050,560

TRANSIT Funding Sources

Annual Operating Impact

Previous Funding

2021-2022

2021-2022

2022-2023

2018-2019

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

1,906,116

-

144,444

-

2,050,560

-

10 Year Total

1,906,116 144,444 2,050,560

2023-2024

64


Transit Fund Transit Operations Facility City Council Goal - Transportation This project provides for the construction of an operations facility where transit vehicles can be stored and cleaned. The project will include office space of approximately 4,000 square feet, a heated garage and storage of approximately 2,000 square feet, and outside fenced and gated parking for 20 large vehicles. The project will be funded through a combination of local, state, and federal dollars.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $160,494

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $1,890,066

FY 25-29 $0

Total $2,050,560

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

65


Fleet Fund


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN FLEET FUND FY 2020 - 2029

Fleet Fund Planned Expenditures Replacement of Fleet Facilities

5 Year Summary Previous Funding -

Total Fleet Fund

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

125,000

-

2,175,000

-

6,000,000

8,300,000

6,325,000

14,625,000

125,000

-

2,175,000

-

6,000,000

8,300,000

6,325,000

14,625,000

Fleet Fund Funding Sources

Previous Funding

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

Replacement of Fleet Facilities Transfer from Fleet Fund Replacement of Fleet Facilities General Obligation Bonds

125,000 125,000 -

-

2,175,000 2,175,000

-

6,000,000 6,000,000

8,175,000

6,325,000

14,500,000

Total Fleet Fund

125,000

-

2,175,000

-

6,000,000

8,300,000

6,325,000

14,625,000

Annual Operating Impact

2019-2020

2020-2021

2021-2022

2022-2023

125,000

-

125,000

2023-2024

Replacement of Fleet Facilities

-

-

-

-

-

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

-

66


Fleet Fund Replacement of Fleet Facilities City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for the relocation of the City’s fleet facilities which are currently located in a shared facility with Suffolk Public Schools on Kenyon Road. The project includes the design and construction of a building with additional parking and storage areas necessary to accommodate this facility and the purchase of necessary equipment and furnishings required to operate the facility. FY20 funds are programmed to complete a feasibility study and to identify a potential site and the facility scope. FY 20 $125,000

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $2,175,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $6,000,000

FY 25-29 $6,325,000

Total $14,625,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

67


Information Technology Fund


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM & PLAN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FUND FY 2020 - 2029

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Planned Expenditures Data Center Refresh Disaster Recovery-Data Center Backup City Fiber Project Records & Document Management Upgrade RFID for City and Library CAD System-Replacement

5 Year Summary Previous Funding * -

Total Information Technology Fund

2021-2022

2022-2023

2023-2024

5 Year Subtotal

6-10 Year Subtotal

10 Year Total

2019-2020

2020-2021

-

-

2,144,000 1,250,000 2,500,000 1,000,000

600,000 1,000,000

-

2,144,000 1,250,000 2,500,000 600,000 2,000,000

1,200,000 -

2,144,000 1,250,000 2,500,000 600,000 1,200,000 2,000,000

-

-

6,894,000

1,600,000

-

8,494,000

1,200,000

9,694,000

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Funding Sources

Previous Funding

-

-

2,144,000 1,250,000 2,500,000 1,000,000 6,894,000

600,000 1,000,000 1,600,000

-

8,494,000

1,200,000

9,694,000

Total Information Technology Fund

-

-

6,894,000

1,600,000

-

8,494,000

1,200,000

9,694,000

2018-2019

2023-2024

10 Year Total

Data Center Refresh Disaster Recovery-Data Center Backup City Fiber Project Records & Document Management Upgrade RFID for City and Library CAD System-Replacement General Obligation Bonds

2021-2022

2022-2023

6-10 Year Subtotal

2020-2021

Annual Operating Impact

2021-2022

5 Year Subtotal

2019-2020

2019-2020

2020-2021

2023-2024

Data Center Refresh Disaster Recovery-Data Center Backup City Fiber Project Records & Document Management Upgrade RFID for City and Library CAD System-Replacement

-

-

-

-

100,000 -

Total Operating Cost

-

-

-

-

100,000

68


Information Technology Fund Data Center Refresh City Council Goal – Public Safety/Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for an upgrade of data center equipment that has reached its useful life. The Data Center Refresh will improve system efficiency and the management and dissemination of data utilized by city departments.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $2,144,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $2,144,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Disaster Recovery-Data Center Backup City Council Goal – Public Safety/Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for a new backup data center which is necessary to ensure business continuity if the City’s primary data center is lost due to a disaster or other failure. The funding will provide a location to install redundant, backup hardware such as servers, desktop and networking devices, and internet connection.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $1,250,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $1,250,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

69


Information Technology Fund City Fiber Project City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for the installation of City owned fiber to connect various City facilities and locations throughout the City. The project will eliminate the City’s reliance on leased fiber for internet connectivity and data communication.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $2,500,000

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $2,500,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

Records & Document Management Upgrade City Council Goal – Civic Engagement and Responsive City Services The project will provide for an upgrade to the records and management system to ensure compliance with the Commonwealth of Virginia retention and destruction policy.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $600,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $600,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

70


Information Technology Fund RFID for City and Library City Council Goal – Financial Stability The project will provide for a Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) system to provide for improvements and accuracy of City asset inventory and management to include books, computers, laptops and iPads.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $0

FY 23 $0

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $1,200,000

Total $1,200,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

CAD System -Replacement City Council Goal – Public Safety The project will provide for the replacement of the current CAD system which is used for public safety emergency communications. The system has reached its useful life and cannot support updated applications.

FY 20 $0

FY 21 $0

FY 22 $1,000,000

FY 23 $1,000,000

FY 24 $0

FY 25-29 $0

Total $2,000,000

Operating Costs: The project will not have an operational impact on the City.

71


Cash Proffer Report


_____________________________________________________________________________________Â

THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY BLANK


Cash Proffer Report This report reflects cash proffers received by the City of Suffolk pursuant to Section 15.2-2303.2 of the Code of Virginia. In FY 2017-2018, the City appropriated $1,506,774 in previously received cash proffers for the new northern middle school capital project. No funding was expended in FY 2017-2018. The City also received additional cash proffers totaling $501,316.40 in FY 2017-2018 for public safety, schools, and transportation capital improvements.

Schools Public Safety Transportation

Amount Previous            Received           Years FY 18  $               1,892,694 $                397,316                      52,000                      52,000 $               1,892,694 $                501,316

Amount Appropriated       FY 18 $            1,506,774                                 ‐                                 ‐ $            1,506,774

Amount Expended          FY 18 $                             ‐                                ‐                                ‐ $                             ‐

72

Profile for City of Suffolk, Virginia

FY20-29 Planning Commission Recommended CIP  

FY20-29 Planning Commission Recommended CIP