Page 1

Sustainability Annual Report 2007–2008


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The enhancement and protection of the natural environment is one way the City will work towards a sustainable future.

Feedback The City encourages ratepayers and residents to provide feedback. If you have a comment you would like to make on this publication or one of the City’s services, please telephone the City’s Customer Contact Centre on (08) 9345 8555, email stirling@stirling.wa.gov.au or write to us at City of Stirling, PO Box 1533, Osborne Park WA 6916.


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PERTH

PERTH CITY

East Perth

Perth Airport

SWAN RIVER

FREMANTLE

City of Stirling 3

1 3

1

M

G

B 4

2

3 B

5

6

4

6 City of Stirling Administration Centre

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5

B

1 2

4 T

B

2 5

T

B


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Where to find the City of Stirling City of Stirling Administration Centre | 25 Cedric Street, Stirling WA 6021 Office hours: Monday–Friday, 8:30 am–5:00 pm Telephone: (08) 9345 8555 | Facsimile: (08) 9345 8822 Email: stirling@stirling.wa.gov.au | Website: www.stirling.wa.gov.au Mail: City of Stirling, PO Box 1533, Osborne Park WA 6916 24-hour Security Patrol: 1300 365 356 | After-hours Emergency: 1300 135 551

COMMUNITY CENTRES

TELEPHONE 81 Camberwell Road, Balga WA 6061

(08) 9344 6461

2 Dianella (Jim Satchell)

Light Street, Dianella WA 6059

(08) 9440 8919

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North Beach

20 Castle Street, North Beach WA 6020

(08) 9344 6461

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Scarborough

173 Gildercliffe Street, Scarborough WA 6019

(08) 9440 8919

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Inglewood (Bob Daniel)

891 Beaufort Street, Inglewood WA 6052

(08) 9344 6461

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Nollamara

72 Sylvia Street, Nollamara WA 6061

(08) 9344 6461

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Balga

LIBRARIES

TELEPHONE (08) 9275 4022

1 Dianella

Waverley Street, Dianella WA 6059

2 Inglewood

Cnr Beaufort Street and Tenth Ave, Inglewood WA 6052 (08) 9370 5366

3 Karrinyup

Davenport Street, Karrinyup WA 6018

(08) 9446 8944

4 Mirrabooka

Sudbury Place, Mirrabooka WA 6061

(08) 9344 5474

5 Osborne

9 Royal Street, Osborne Park WA 6017

(08) 9344 6927

6 Scarborough

173 Gildercliffe Street, Scarborough WA 6019

(08) 9341 1744

MUSEUM

TELEPHONE (08) 9203 6730

M Mount Flora Regional Museum Elvire Street, Watermans Bay WA 6020

RECREATION CENTRES (MAJOR)

TELEPHONE

1 Hamersley

Belvedere Road, Hamersley WA 6022

(08) 9447 0455

2 Herb Graham

Chesterfield Road, Mirrabooka WA 6061

(08) 9344 5200

3 Leisurepark Balga

Cnr Princess & Camberwell Rds, Balga WA 6061

(08) 9247 9900  

4 Terry Tyzack Aquatic Centre

62 Alexander Drive, Inglewood WA 6052

(08) 9376 0900

5 Karrinyup Sports Centre

2 Nerita Way, Karrinyup WA 6018

(08) 9447 0455

G Hamersley Public Golf Course 102 Marmion Avenue, Karrinyup WA 6018

SERVICES

(08) 9447 7137

TELEPHONE

Recycling Centre Balcatta

238 Balcatta Road, Balcatta WA 6021

(08) 9345 8555

Animal Care Facility

Natalie Way, Balcatta WA 6021

(08) 9345 8555

LEGEND

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Train

B Bus

Get TravelSmart! The City’s Administration Centre is just 600 metres (or a 5-minute walk) from the Stirling bus and train station. Buses (402, 414, 423, 424, 425, 427, 435) travel along Cedric Street and stop outside the Administration Centre and Circle Route bus (98 and 99) stops 50 metres further down. Why not try riding? The City has undercover bike parking located at the front of the administration building.


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Introduction The City of Stirling is pleased to present its Sustainability Annual Report 2007–2008. In meeting its statutory obligations, the City is required to produce an annual report that compares its performance against the City’s Strategic Plan 2004–2008 and includes a statement on financial performance. This year, and in future years, the City intends to go beyond its statutory requirements by integrating its sustainability reporting. The City acknowledges that it has a vital role to play in ensuring and promoting sustainable development. This year Council has chosen to commence reporting against guidelines established by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), the current best practice in sustainability reporting. The City’s conformity to the GRI framework will ensure that it provides a comprehensive view of the key aspects of social, environmental and economic performance. This reporting period represents a transition phase for the City, and whilst this year’s publication does not constitute a ‘full’ GRI report, the City believes that it is a vital step towards more holistic and informative reporting. The City of Stirling is confident that this enhancement of the reporting processes will ensure that City stakeholders are better informed of activities, achievements and the challenges faced as a community.

Creating a community where people want to live is a key aim for the City of Stirling.


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Structure of This Report To underpin the new approach the City of Stirling feels it is important to provide a ‘Sustainability Statement’ defining what sustainability means to the City and how this translates to the community, the environment and the economy. This can be found on page 11. This report provides an overview of the City in the ‘at a glance’ section, followed by an outline of the current Strategic Plan 2004–2008 and the objectives the City is working towards. The report also provides a summary of activities and results under four Key Result Areas, namely: • Community. • Natural and Built Environment. • Economic Opportunity. • Organisation. As the strategic planning period is concluded, it is timely to discuss where the City is heading in the future and the approach that will be taken to continue to be the ‘City of Choice’. This information is provided in the section ‘statement about the new strategic plan’ (page 18) and clearly demonstrates the City’s ongoing commitment to embedding sustainability across the organisation for the next four years. The report also presents a snapshot of achievements celebrated, challenges learnt from, and challenges which will be managed in the future (page 24). The City’s performance is covered in the ‘Sustainability Performance Reporting’ section on page 31-47 and the structure of the organisation and governance matters can be found on page 51-53. More information on the Global Reporting Initiative is provided on page 54 and this is followed by financial statements and other statutory reports. This report represents the City’s first step towards the integration of sustainability reporting and it is believed that coupled with the pending Strategic Plan 2009–2012, the City of Stirling will remain the City of Choice well into the future.


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The City is working hard to reduce its carbon footprint.

Mayor’s Report It gives me great pleasure to present the City of Stirling’s Sustainability Annual Report 2007–2008: a year of significant achievement. The 2007–2008 financial year proved to be an exciting one, with the City progressing many strategic, budgeted initiatives and major projects.

‘The Aussies’ attracted around 6,500 competitors and over 100,000 spectators to the 2008 Australian Surf Life Saving Championships. With the 2007 event alone yielding $23 million for the state, well exceeding the original estimation of a $25 million benefit over three years, the championships have been a great success. At the time of printing, it was not yet known what the 2008 event yielded; but suffice to say it will exceed original expectations. Added to this, Scarborough Beach won three awards including the state overall winner in the Keep Australia Beautiful Competition, the Clean Beach Challenge, and is representing Western Australia as finalist in the National Awards to be announced in September 2008. Scarborough Beach Amphitheatre and surrounds received recognition for its design in the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects of Western Australia and was again host to the Tri-Nations Beach Cricket Series, the Beach Volleyball Championships and the 2007 Christmas Carols. The Australian Institute of Landscape Architects of Western Australia awarded the City’s Millet Park in Innaloo for design excellence in landscaping and architectural work, as well as recognising the public art at Edith Cowan University in Churchlands. The Cities of Joondalup, Stirling and Wanneroo joined forces for the first time on Australia Day to host Western Australia’s largest ever Citizenship Ceremony hosted at the Stirling Civic Gardens, when 1,367 new citizens chose to call Australia home.

The City also joined forces with the Cities of Bayswater and Wanneroo in signing a partnership agreement that declares war on vandals involved in graffiti. Entitled 2008 Northern Region Community Safety and Crime Prevention Partnership Agreement, this is the first time three councils have joined together with the State Government to promote the development and implementation of a plan specifically targeted at fighting graffiti in the northern region of Perth. The official opening of the Leisurepark Balga Aquatic Centre took place in April 2008. This state-of-the-art facility, completed at a cost of $9.14 million, offers the community many recreational opportunities that were previously nonexistent. The facility has provided not only a social hub for the community, but also a much-needed economic boost with many of the 35 staff being employed from within the local area. Residential lots in the Mirrabooka Regional Centre were successfully auctioned in December 2007 to provide funds towards revitalising the Centre. The Federal and State Governments provided funding for projects targeting community safety and community spirit in Mirrabooka. This funding enabled the creation of the Reel Connections and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Sport and Recreation projects that have already yielded many success stories for Stirling’s youth.


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The City received $1.6 million under the Australian Government’s Safer Suburbs Plan, to provide additional security patrols and other initiatives to improve community safety. The 10th anniversary of the City’s Security Service was also celebrated in April 2008, which has expanded its services to deter crime in the community. The Local Area Planning program continues to progress, with the finalisation of the Balcatta–Stirling Local Area Plan and Dianella Local Area Implementation Plan. The program received a prestigious Planning Institute of Australia Award in November 2007. The City received the Urban Development Institute of Australia’s 2008 Environmental Excellence Award for its Groundwater Conservation Strategy. The award demonstrates how substantial this strategy is and the numerous challenges the City has overcome through considerable research, innovation and time to improve significant groundwater conservation. It is envisaged that the strategy will be rolled out to all parks and reserves within the City during 2008 and 2009. A new online tool was launched in September 2007 to increase business efficiency. The first of its kind in Western Australia, residents can use the tool to apply for a certificate and submit applications to operate home businesses without the need to visit Council offices.

The City bestowed Honorary Freemanship upon Rodney Allan Constantine PSM in recognition of his 44 years of service to the City. Rod was employed by the City from 1961 to 2006 in various positions until recently taking up a position with the Tamala Park Regional Council. To be selected as an Honorary Freeman of the City is the very highest honour one can receive from local government. Honorary Freemanship is rarely given as recognition of the contribution one has made to the progress of a City. As such it is a lasting symbol of appreciation of the support given to the community within a district. In April 2008, the City delivered its six millionth Meals-on-Wheels meal by a volunteer delivery driver. The meal was delivered by Mr Bruce Jellis of Carine, who received a Paul Harris Fellow Award from the Osborne Park Rotary Club for the tangible and significant assistance he has made to the community. This 85-year-old gentleman has been a long-serving volunteer delivery driver for the City of Stirling’s Meals on Wheels program since 1984. Finally, the City of Stirling has worked hard to reduce energy use, improve efficiency and combat the impacts of climate change in 2008. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all staff in achieving some great results in order to reduce our carbon footprint. Cr David Boothman MAYOR, CITY OF STIRLING


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Continued investment into the City’s parks and reserves are just one way the City maintains the quality of life for our community.

CEO’s Report This Sustainability Annual Report details the performance and achievements of the organisation over the past year as we work together to deliver on our strategic vision for the Stirling community. The City of Stirling is presently in a great era of transformation, planning and change, and we are actively positioning ourselves to be Perth’s second central business district. Stirling is now the third fastest growing local government in Western Australia, and continues to attract massive investment, currently running at over $1 billion per annum. The City of Stirling is committed to integrating and advancing sustainable development. This, our first integrated Sustainability Annual Report is one measure we are undertaking to improve our performance in the environmental, social and economic sustainability of the Stirling region. The report details the performance and achievements of the organisation over the past year as we work together to deliver on our strategic vision for the Stirling community. One way a local government can measure success is through the level of engagement with its community. The results of the 2007 Community Satisfaction Annual Tracking Survey, carried out by an independent research company, revealed that the overall ratepayer satisfaction had increased to a record 82 per cent overall, up from 76 per cent the previous year. I am proud of our strong performance this year in the successful completion of an intensive and ambitious capital works program. Some of the highlights include the completion of a $54.1 million capital works program across the City, the completion and opening of the $9.14 million state-of-the-art Leisurepark Balga Aquatic Centre, the completion of the Northwood Grove Mirrabooka subdivision (netting the record-high result of $905 per square metre, with a projected surplus in excess of $6 million), the commissioning of a feasibility study into a coastal aquatic facility at the Hamersley Public Golf Course, the finalisation of Town Planning Scheme Accounts 31 and 38, and the commencement of the One Million Trees initiative, to name but a few.


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The Western Australian local government sector faces many challenges and we will continue to work hard to position ourselves as a leading financially and environmentally sustainable local government. A ‘Future Fund’ was established in 2007–2008 to ensure the City’s long-term economic sustainability, with an initial contribution of $3.9 million set aside. As part of our commitment to sustainability, we commissioned PricewaterhouseCoopers to complete a long-term financial planning assessment of the implications of infrastructure development, infrastructure renewal and operational costs likely to occur as a result of population growth. The PricewaterhouseCoopers’ report found that ‘in the short term the City is financially sustainable and in most financial indicators equals or exceeds the performance of an average Perth metropolitan council’. Development has continued at a rapid pace in Stirling, with the City issuing building licences worth over $730 million and receiving development applications valued at over $960 million. Importantly, we have worked hard on our turnaround times, with building application turnaround times down from a peak of 42 days to six days, and development application turnaround times down from a peak of 51 days to 27 days. During the year we saw the commencement of the ‘Team Stirling’ range of initiatives for staff, which has proved an outstanding success, with our turnover rate going against the industry trend and reducing from a peak of 32 per cent to 21 per cent within the year. None of the successes of the past 12 months would have been possible without a concentrated team effort. As one of Australia’s leading local governments, I would therefore particularly like to thank the Mayor, Councillors, Executive Team and staff for their commitment and dedication in moving the City forward. 2008–2009 promises to be another outstanding year for the City of Stirling as we invest in a comprehensive and diverse range of programs and projects that will ensure we maintain the quality of life and vitality that our community has come to expect as the City of Choice. Stuart Jardine CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, CITY OF STIRLING


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The City supports the principles of the report to the World Commission on Environment and Development Our Common Future.


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Sustainability Statement At the City of Stirling sustainability means ‘meeting the needs of current and future generations through simultaneous social, environmental and economic improvement’. The City of Stirling supports the principles of the report to the World Commission on Environment and Development, Our Common Future, and believes that sustainable development is one of the most pressing issues of the present time.

The City acknowledges that it has a vital role to play at the local level in promoting and ensuring sustainable development and that it can make a contribution towards meeting the global challenges of creating a sustainable society on Earth. Council will advance and strengthen the three interdependent and mutually reinforcing pillars of sustainability — social development, environmental protection and economic development in the Stirling Local Government Area. The City will work towards a sustainable future by:

Building social development: The City will work to build sustainable communities that are places where people want to live and work, now and in the future. It will create places that meet the diverse needs of existing and future residents, are sensitive to their environment, and contribute to a high quality of life. These are places that are safe and inclusive, well planned, built and run, and that offer equality of opportunity and good services for all. The Stirling community needs public open space where they can relax and interact and the ability to have a say on the way their neighbourhood is run. Ensuring environmental protection and enhancement: The City will work to achieve resource efficiency across its operations and services with emphasis on addressing peak oil and climate change adaptation, water conservation and quality, using and managing waste as a resource and minimising the City’s environmental footprint.

The City will work to protect and restore the integrity of Earth’s ecological systems, with concern for biological diversity and the natural processes that sustain life. Particularly the City’s work will address biodiversity conservation, management of threats and pressures including introduced species, careful and controlled management of non-renewable resources to ensure the rates of regeneration are not exceeded, as well as increase the City’s management and use of renewable resources. All of these will be undertaken within a land-use planning framework that recognises the essential role of the integration of natural resource management.


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The City will ensure that all future development will meet the community’s lifestyle expectations whilst reducing an ecological footprint.


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Building strong economic development:

The City supports the development of an economy that is adaptive, diverse and reflects the true cost of products and services, which will position the City to be competitive and achieve a positive financial and economic future. While maintaining and improving lifestyle and buoyant business activity are key considerations, the City will not pursue or promote activities that are not ecologically sound or environmentally sustainable. This will be achieved through the application of Sustainability Principles to guide decision-making on operational, strategic and governance issues:

Principle One: Interdependence The social, environmental and economic implications of a decision are all interrelated and there is no compromise, only a balanced outcome.

Principle Two: Integrated and long-term decision-making All decisions should reflect and consider the long-term implications on the community, environment and economy as well as achieving short-term goals.

Principle Three: Inter- and intra-generational equity The management and use of resources for the community’s benefit now, ensuring there are sufficient, common, high quality resources for future generations.

Principle Four: Equity and human rights The provision of opportunities for all in the City’s community as well as supporting fair and equal rights and opportunities across the globe.

Principle Five: Settlement efficiency and quality of life Ensuring that all future development achieves a reduced ecological footprint (i.e. reducing the impact on the planet) whilst meeting expectations for quality and lifestyle.

Principle Six: Precaution Action that is required to avoid the possibility of serious or irreversible environmental harm even when scientific knowledge is incomplete or inconclusive and place the burden of proof on those who argue that a proposed activity will not cause significant harm.

Principle Seven: Conserving biological diversity and ecological integrity To protect, retain, enhance and manage the diversity of life that exists in the City of Stirling.

Principle Eight: Internalising environmental costs The reflection of the true cost of services, including life cycle costs and the ‘cradle to grave’ impact of developments, and the implementation of measures to mitigate these impacts.

Principle Nine: Common good The use and planning for resources that support life (i.e. air, water, natural resources) in a manner that is accessible to all and will not deplete them over time.

Principle Ten: Accountability, transparency and engagement Community involvement in sustainability is fundamental to the long-term future. Management should be accountable on the triple bottom line.


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The City’s community is rich in its diversity.

The City of Stirling at a Glance Stirling was established as a City in 1971 and today is Western Australia’s largest metropolitan local government authority by population, covering 109.4 km2 from Trigg in the west, to Balga in the north, Mount Lawley in the east and Wembley in the south. The traditional custodians of the land are the Noongar people, and many of the suburb names such as Balga and Gwelup, are derived from Aboriginal words. One per cent of the City’s community comprises Indigenous people. The City has a multicultural community with people from Australian, Vietnamese, Macedonian, British and Italian backgrounds making up the 189,083 residents usually living in the City. In terms of gender, the City is approximately 48 per cent male and 52 per cent female. The average age of residents is 37 years old with 26 per cent of the community 55 years and over and 16 per cent aged 0–14 years old. A wide range of stakeholders determines the success of the City’s future, with many people and organisations playing a role. These include the City’s employees, the local community, ratepayers, local businesses, educational institutions, Councillors, different interest groups, including environmental, sporting and community groups, the Western Australian Local Government Association and government agencies. The City is known as the ‘City of Choice’ and to meet the diverse needs of this multicultural and varied age community, the City provides a range of services and facilities including libraries, community centres, recreation centres and aquatic centres (see page 3 for contact information). The natural environment is highly valued and the City provides many parks and public open spaces for community gatherings. The City is renowned for six kilometres of coastline in pristine condition.


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Being only 8.5 kilometres from the central business district, combined with public transport and road infrastructure, the City has a wide range of options for making smart travel choices to move around the City. These include the Stirling train station and bus depot on Cedric Street, the Mitchell Freeway Principal Shared Path (PSP) — a major north-south bicycle route, and the circle route buses running throughout the City. Population Rated properties

189,083 86,180

Total area

109.4 sq km

Beaches Roads Paths Active recreation facilities Passive reserves Natural bushland Wetlands/swamps/natural lakes Schools/colleges Libraries Library items borrowed Waste recycled Building approvals Number of employees (Full-time equivalent)

6 kilometres of coastline 1,006 kilometres of roads 760 kilometres of paths 65 700 500 hectares 33 72 6 2,020,289 85,500 tonnes 4,185 792


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Current Strategic Plan Overview The Strategic Plan 2004–2008 is the City’s most important strategic document and was adopted by Council on 22 April 2004 (Item 12.2/A). It was developed in consultation with the Council, staff and the community and is the blueprint for what the City hopes to achieve and how it will be done. The plan incorporates Council’s vision, mission and values, as well as focusing and taking action in three Key Result Areas, supported by a section promoting the effective management of the organisation, which makes up a fourth Key Result Area. THE CITY’S VISION | Stirling — The City of Choice. THE CITY’S MISSION | Creating a quality lifestyle and sustainable development. THE CITY’S VALUES | Community opinions | Community involvement | Equity and fairness | Innovation and leadership | Openness, integrity and accountability | The multicultural mix and diversity of the City’s community | The contribution of volunteers and all who work for the City.


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The City values the contribution of volunteers and all who work for the City.

Key Result Area 1: Community The City, in partnership with the community and other stakeholders, will provide services to meet changing needs. The overall aim is to create a City where people want to live.

Key Result Area 2: Built and Natural Environment The City will provide leadership, vision and the overall long-term strategy to manage the built and natural environment, responding to changing community needs and priorities. The overall aim is to encourage sustainability and enhance choice in the built environment while preserving and enhancing the natural environment.

Key Result Area 3: Economic Opportunity The City will work with local businesses to develop strategic relationships to attract new business and support existing ventures. The overall aim is to enhance choice, opportunity and prosperity by encouraging the sustainable economic development of the City.

Key Result Area 4: Organisation The City will ensure resources are managed effectively and good governance is provided for the benefit of the community. The current Strategic Plan 2004-2008 can be accessed at www.stirling.wa.gov.au > Council > Publications.


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Statement about the new Strategic Plan The City of Stirling is presently developing its new Strategic Plan 2009–2012 due to the expiry of the current Strategic Plan 2004–2008 at the end of 2008. The City’s new Strategic Plan will be developed in consultation with, and with the involvement of, Council, staff, the community and other relevant stakeholders. The City has already begun the process of working with the community to determine the key values and direction to take for the next four years. An engagement campaign was developed to capture the views of the community on what ‘community spirit’ means to them. People were asked what they thought about their community, including their likes, dislikes and values. The campaign included: • Distribution of postcards to all households and businesses as well as community and business organisations during February and March 2008. • Extensive local advertising. • Facilitated sessions with young people and the culturally and linguistically diverse community.


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In developing the new Strategic Plan, the City ensured that the voices of young people were heard through facilitated workshops conducted at events.

The City received a pleasing number of responses to this campaign and the views captured have been integrated into the new draft plan currently being developed. In developing the new Strategic Plan, the City is meeting its obligations under the Local Government Act 1995 Section1.3, which states: ‘(2) This Act is intended to result in:

(a) better decision-making by local governments

(b) greater community participation in the decisions and affairs of local governments

(c) greater accountability of local governments to their communities

(d) more efficient and effective local government.

‘(3) In carrying out its functions, a local government is to use its best endeavours to meet the needs of current and future generations through integration of environmental protection, social advancement and economic prosperity.’ The new Strategic Plan will continue to reflect the City’s management across the triple bottom line with a mission, vision and goals that reflect the desire to lead the community into a sustainable future.


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Stakeholder Consultation and Engagement Community Satisfaction Annual Tracking Survey For the past seven years the City has consulted with local residents through its Community Satisfaction Annual Tracking Survey. In 2007, a new direction was taken to obtain input into the development of the new Strategic Plan. The primary objective was to determine residents’ opinions on the services and facilities currently provided and to establish the level of support for proposed initiatives. A telephone survey was conducted with the cooperation of 700 residents across a range of suburbs within the City between December 2007 and January 2008. The 2007 survey indicated a continuing increase in customer satisfaction with 82 per cent of residents satisfied with the City, its services and facilities. These positive results reinforce the commitment of City staff and Councillors to provide residents, businesses and local community groups with high quality service. The table over the following pages shows the level of satisfaction as a percentage (%) of residents across a range of lifestyle and service aspects, which contributed to the overall 82 per cent satisfaction rating. The table provides benchmarking data from the last four annual surveys.


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The City’s beaches received a 90 per cent satisfaction rating in the 2007 Community Satisfaction Annual Tracking Survey.

overall community Satisfaction 2007 - 08 2006 - 07 2005 - 06 2004 - 05 60%

65%

70%

75%

80%

85%

The community's overall satisfaction level has increased to 82%..

Service

2004

2005

2006

2007

Libraries

87.9

91.7

92.2

93

Parks/reserves

80.4

81.5

86.6

84

Children’s playgrounds

73.6

72

78.2

See parks and reserves

Recreation centres

83

77.9

81

See City provided buildings

Community centres

73.4

76.9

72.9

See City provided buildings

Swimming pools (*Based on Terry Tyzack Aquatic Centre – Leisurepark Balga did not open until April 2008)

88

88.4

93.3

See City provided buildings

Beaches

80.6

85.2

87.2

90

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


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CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

Service

2004

2005

2006

2007

School holiday child care

100

66.7

66.7

See other community development services

After-school child care

85.7

75

100

See other community development services

Child health centres

87.5

79.4

57.9

See child health immunisation

Services for elderly and disabled

79.5

90.2

83.3

75

Balcatta Transfer Station (now known as Recycling Centre Balcatta)

78.5

78.9

81.4

See waste management

Weekly rubbish collection

85.2

86.8

90.5

See waste management

Noise control (e.g. dog act, noise act, follow-up of complaints)

63.2

41.7

55.9

See manage pollution/noise complaints

Dog registration

80.1

83.3

84.5

See ranger services

Dog control

65.9

77.5

65.9

See ranger services

Security patrols

69.1

72.1

70.2

84

Verge pruning pick-ups

81.9

79.1

84.9

See waste management

Verge junk pick-ups

81.9

77.2

88.4

See waste management

Building or planning approvals

43.8

53.9

47.5

48

Graffiti removal

N/A

N/A

56.3

See graffiti management

Parking control

N/A

N/A

71.4

See ranger services

Youth services

N/A

N/A

100

See other community development services

Child health immunisation

Previously child health centres

89

Other community development services

Previously individual services i.e. after-school care, youth services etc.

80

Justice of the Peace

Not previously measured

92

Waste management

Previously individual waste categories i.e. verge collections, weekly collections

81

Stormwater management

Not previously measured

81

City provided buildings

Previously individual centres i.e. community recreation, swimming pools etc.

73

Street lighting

Not previously measured

80

Provision/maintenance of roads

Not previously measured

80

Ranger services

Previously individual categories i.e. dog control, parking etc.

72

Graffiti management

Previously graffiti control

75

Provision/maintenance of pedestrian ways

Not previously measured

74

Environmental management

Not previously measured

75

Provision of facilities for the disabled

Not previously measured

74

Community events

Not previously measured

64

Provision/maintenance of cycleways

Not previously measured

69

Maintenance/quality of bus shelters

Not previously measured

71

Management of pollution/noise complaints

Previously noise control

68

Heritage management

Not previously measured

65

Building or planning approvals

Not previously measured

48

It is important to note that some aspects of the 2007 Community Satisfaction Annual Tracking Survey were revised to ensure the survey was comprehensive in areas underlying the development of the City’s Strategic Plan 2009–2012. The table above indicates those fields that were not benchmarked in the same way as previous years, as well as including those additional areas that were surveyed in 2007.


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The community gave the provision and maintenance of pedestrian ways a 74 per cent satisfaction rating in the 2007 Community Satisfaction Annual Tracking Survey.

Engagement Through Local Area Planning Within the last year, many of the local residents of the Mirrabooka and Karrinyup-Gwelup Local Areas have offered input into the future direction of their areas through the Local Area Planning community engagement process. Mirrabooka is the most culturally diverse Local Area within the City, so several different styles of workshops were used in order to engage the diversity of population and to ensure sufficient and representative input was received. The Community Arts Network Western Australia (CANWA) held a community forum in April, specifically for the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse members of the Mirrabooka community, in which representatives of many cultures were present. A second community forum was held for all Mirrabooka residents during April 2008 with a turnout of 23 participants. CANWA, in conjunction with community artist Aswan, also ran individual hip-hop workshops with Boyare Primary School and Dryandra Primary School where the students created rhymes about their area while discussing hopes for the future. The final component of engagement with the Mirrabooka Local Area community, before the creation of the Mirrabooka Local Area Plan, involves meeting and working with the Indigenous representatives of the area. Two workshops have been held with the residents of the Karrinyup-Gwelup Local Area during June 2008, which were attended by approximately 85 people. The workshops generated many positive ideas and priorities for the area that will be utilised in the upcoming Implementation Plan.


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Achievements and Challenges The City is proud to share its achievements from 2007–2008, which have resulted in an improved natural environment, better-planned communities, safer streets, more public facilities and events to enjoy, solid financial performance and a renewed focus on sustainability. The City has achieved these outstanding results in a complex and demanding environment that brings with it a range of challenges. Some of the challenges, such as climate change, will be present into the future and the City is actively working to adapt and manage for these. Others have arisen over the year due to unforeseen circumstances and from these the City has learnt and adapted its management approaches. A summary of the key achievements and challenges are outlined as follows.


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The opening of the Leisurepark Balga Aquatic Centre was one of many outcomes the City has achieved.

ACHIEVEMENTS: Adapting and managing for climate change The City believes that climate change is the major sustainability challenge to face the community, now and into the future, and one that needs urgent action. There are both direct and indirect risks to the organisation and the communities that it serves. The City performs a number of core functions and some of these activities are directly dependent on oil-based fuel inputs. Some of these functions are vulnerable to the twin dilemmas of peak oil and climate change. The City is working hard to reduce energy use, improve efficiency and combat the impacts of climate change. The introduction of a number of measures to abate production of greenhouse gases include using green power for the City’s Administration Centre; diverting a minimum of 65 per cent of the community’s waste from landfill; using hybrid vehicles; planting over 19,000 trees to offset vehicle emissions; the recovery of landfill gas from Tamala Park Waste Facility to use as power; the distribution of over 13,000 compact fluorescent light globes to low-income households; undertaking energy audits at twenty facilities and making changes to lighting and air conditioning. The City commenced the development of a Peak Oil Strategy in 2008, to prepare the City to operate in a carbonconstrained future. This strategy will be finalised after community consultation, followed by the implementation of actions on climate change. Ongoing implementation of the Local Greenhouse Action Plan is occurring and this will be reviewed in 2008–2009 in line with the new Peak Oil Strategy.


26

The City delivered its second successful Australian Surf Life Saving Championships in March 2008.


27

Local Area Planning takes out award! The exciting Local Area Planning program continues to progress, with actions completed including the finalisation of the Balcatta-Stirling Local Area Plan and Dianella Local Area Implementation Plan. The endorsement for advertising of the draft Carine-Hamersley Local Area Plan and undertaking of community forums for the Mirrabooka and Karrinyup-Gwelup Local Area Planning projects also occurred in 2007–2008. The Local Area Planning Program was recognised by the receipt of a prestigious Planning Institute of Australia Western Australia Division Award in November 2007.

The City’s award-winning beach In February 2008 the City was delighted to announce that Scarborough Beach had been very successful in the Clean Beach Challenge Awards held at Cottesloe Surf Life Saving Club. The awards, organised by the Keep Australia Beautiful WA Council and Surf Life Saving WA, are an important event recognising the hard work and dedication invested in keeping City beaches in prime condition. In addition to picking up Western Australia’s best beach title, Scarborough also took out the awards for litter prevention and the friendliest beach.

Leisurepark Balga Opens The official opening of this state-of-the-art, district-level aquatic centre took place in April 2008. Completed at a cost of $9.14 million, the community now has access to many recreational opportunities that were previously nonexistent. The facility has provided not only a social hub for the community, but also a much-needed economic boost with many of the 35 staff being employed from the local area. Work has commenced on the second stage, which is a significant upgrade to the adjoining recreation centre formerly known as the June Copley Community Centre.

The Aussies The City of Stirling once again delivered a highly successful event with over 6,500 competitors visiting Scarborough Beach to take part in the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships. The event has provided a stimulant for the local and wider community of Stirling and Western Australia in the form of social and economic benefits. Advice from Eventscorp (State Government) was that the event injected over $23 million into the Western Australian economy in the 2006–2007 year alone.

PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Financial Sustainability Study The long-term financial viability of local government is becoming a key issue across Australia. It is increasingly apparent that some segments of the local government sector are facing significant challenges in meeting current and future financial liabilities whilst continuing to fulfil their roles and responsibilities, particularly in local infrastructure provision and service delivery. In late 2007, with these issues in mind, the City of Stirling commissioned financial consultants PricewaterhouseCoopers to conduct a study of the long-term financial planning implications of infrastructure development, infrastructure renewal and operational costs likely to occur as a result of population growth. The City is pleased to announce that the PricewaterhouseCoopers’ report found that in the shortterm the City of Stirling is financially sustainable and in most financial indicators equals or exceeds the performance of an average Perth metropolitan council. In addition, the report found that the City would continue to be financially sustainable in the long term — subject to the forecast revenues and expenses being realised. In undertaking this review, the City has further demonstrated its commitment to sustainability and performance by taking a proactive approach to its longterm financial management.

Excellence in waste management! The City is proud of its Waste Management and Fleet Operations team, which offers exemplary waste management services to the community. With the introduction of the singlebin household waste system, a minimum of 65 per cent of all waste generated is recycled and composted instead of going to landfill. For the environment this means reduced greenhouse gas production; for residents this is the successful provision of over 81,000 weekly residential/commercial general waste collections or 4.2 million per year; and for the economy it equates to the delivery of the broadest range of waste services to the City’s community within budget and at the lowest cost of all comparative councils in the region.


28

Safer Community and Award-winning Ranger and Security Teams! Aiming to keep the Stirling community safe, the City commenced negotiations for a funding agreement of $1.6 million under the Australian Government’s Safer Suburbs Plan, for additional security patrols and other crime prevention initiatives in the City of Stirling. Already patrolling City streets and keeping the community safe, the City of Stirling Rangers were finalists in the Western Australian Rangers’ Association Western Australian Ranger Team of the Year. The Security Patrol Service also received a Commissioner’s Certificate of Appreciation, in recognition of their valuable assistance and support to the WA Police, together achieving a safer community environment!

Financial Management Award In August 2007 the City was proud to receive an award for its financial management during the 2005–2006 financial year. The WA Government’s Financial Management Awards for Local Government were introduced in 2001 to recognise councils that reported their finances most effectively. The City won the award following assessment of its financial documents in terms of presentation, content, effectiveness, compliance with the Local Government Act 1995, associated regulations and the Australian Accounting Standards. This represents a great achievement for the City and demonstrates its firm commitment to sound financial management and public accountability.

Amendment 458 The City of Stirling Council adopted Amendment 458 to District Planning Scheme No. 2 on 19 June 2007. The amendment was subsequently forwarded to the Western Australian Planning Commission and the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure for final approval and publication. A number of discussions have since been held with the Minister to help progress finalisation of the amendment. The amendment is an important implementation measure of the City’s Scarborough Environs Area Strategy.


29

CHALLENGES:

Sump spraying

Planning for less water and providing better parks

In May 2006 weed-spraying activity coupled with low rainfall resulted in loss of vegetation on Council sumps and nearby private land.

The City is facing the challenge of managing its reserves and public open space in a drying environment and taking action by implementing initiatives to use water in a careful and measured manner. Parks and public open space are being watered even more efficiently with the completion of a project that introduced soil moisture monitoring as part of the irrigation control process in 2007–2008. City parks are being planned according to ‘hydrozones’ or areas of landscaping that will require different levels of water, with an increase in those areas where no watering is needed at all. The development of Water Conservation Plans in consultation with the Department of Water will assist in the long-term management of groundwater and scheme water resources. These initiatives, and those facilitated by building management, including the introduction of waterless urinals, are helping to save significant amounts of water. In recognition of the vital role water plays in the community, and the need to manage this resource more efficiently, the City has committed to participation in the Water Campaign, a national program provided by ICLEI (International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives). During 2008–2009 the City will progress through the program’s milestones, including undertaking an inventory of all water consumption across Council operations and the community, as well as assessing water quality.

Special electors’ meeting In March 2008 a special electors’ meeting was held to discuss Amendment 458 to District Planning Scheme No. 2. The meeting was called, following a request by a community group seeking the withdrawal of this amendment by Council. This meeting involved a public vote that was carried out by the normal show of hands and a count by City officers. Whilst this was in accordance with the Local Government Act, after the meeting the result of the vote was challenged as there was a suspicion that some of those who voted may have been ineligible as they were not electors and/or ratepayers of the City. To address this issue, the City called another special electors’ meeting in April 2008 to take another vote on the same issue. At this meeting all electors and/or ratepayers eligible to vote had to register to do so and votes were collected and counted by staff. The result of the vote stood and no action was taken to withdraw Amendment 458. The event did cause the City to change the administration of the second vote and review how the process will be undertaken in the future.

The City’s Security Team took out a Police Commissioner’s Certificate of Appreciation.

The City took action to determine the reason for this loss of vegetation by commissioning an independent scientist to report and test the soil and groundwater in the affected areas. In September 2007 traces of the chemical were found but at levels that posed no threat to public health. The report and action taken have been reviewed by the Department of Environment and Conservation and the City has implemented a program to monitor the groundwater in the areas where residual traces were found. In addition the City has changed its weed management practices in sumps, has rehabilitated affected private and Council property and is undertaking planting of trees and native ground cover.

Stirling City Centre Structure Plan Despite great efforts to provide planning certainty through a Stirling City Centre Structure Plan, the City has been unable to complete this work. This has been mainly due to concern about the form and function of the proposed Stephenson Highway. In order to address these issues and produce a blueprint for the future of the City Centre, the City has formed an alliance with the State Government to work with the various stakeholders to complete this essential task.

Stephenson Highway The City of Stirling has strongly refuted recent claims that the City is seeking for the State Government to build the Stephenson Highway from Stirling to Fremantle. Talk of cash being raised to fund a fight in order to change the route has nothing to do with the City of Stirling. The City has had recent discussions with both the Town of Cambridge and Department of Planning and Infrastructure (DPI), which focused on resolving Stephenson Highway as a connecting road into the Stirling City Centre, to avoid serious traffic gridlock in the future. The proposed road and its route is not a Stirling issue, but rather being assessed by the DPI. A decision on the route and timing of construction rests with the State Government.


30

The City continued to provide more recreation opportunities for community members of all ages.


31

Sustainability Performance Reporting KEY RESULT AREA 1: COMMUNITY Aim: To create a community where people want to live.

Overview During 2007–2008 the City delivered exceptional services to the community and actively pursued ways to enhance services with grant funding and program extension. Providing community services and ensuring safety, as well as offering more opportunities for participation and recreation, the City of Stirling hosted major events and opened new recreation facilities, providing new ways to enjoy the natural and built environment. In line with a better parks focus, the City developed a Public Open Space strategy. The strategy provides a blueprint for better distribution and quality levels for park development now and into the future. Community ownership of parks and recreation areas is also being developed through the exciting introduction of the Adopt-A-Park program to keep City parks clean and safe. The City’s Community Safety Business Unit helps the community to take greater responsibility for pets and their management. To achieve this, the City offered discounted pet microchipping services and undertook awareness campaigns on dog registration and responsible ownership. Services to the City’s minority groups, seniors and youth were expanded in 2007–2008 through funding for the Meals on Wheels extensions, introduction of the Jump Aboard with Stirling program for seniors and implementation of year two of the Access and Inclusion Plan. The City also completed the contract for the National Community Crime Prevention Program funding of $410,000 and implemented year one of the Reel Connections project. A successful funding application under the Settlement Grants Program will deliver a Youth Mentor Program as part of the Community Development Plan for Mirrabooka.

Progress Towards the Strategic Plan Strategic Initiative

Business Unit

Carry out a comprehensive community needs analysis

Marketing and Communications Complete

Develop and implement a community consultation policy

Marketing and Communications Complete

Introduce a comprehensive Communications Strategy for the City, including further developing relationships with the Commonwealth and State Governments

Economic Development and Urban Regeneration

In progress

Introduce innovative volunteer program

Community Services

In progress

Develop networks and partnerships, targeting new alliances and community leaders

Community Services

In progress

Develop appropriate services at neighbourhood level

Recreation and Leisure Services Community Safety

In progress

Extend role of libraries to become community resource centres and the hub of community activities

Libraries

In progress

Deliver extended hours of access to Council services (including via shopping centre and other outlets)

Governance and Council Support

In progress

Review and redevelop customer service standards

Governance and Council Support Community Services

In progress Complete

Community Services

In progress

Further develop a range of initiatives to enhance safety and security

Review and extend youth services and activities Improve services to the elderly to enable them to remain in their own home

Progress

In progress


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Value for money in service provision The City’s success in achieving this outcome is measured by dividing the cost of providing education and welfare, community amenities, and recreation and culture by the number of residential properties.

Cost of providing services per property

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

$663

$690

$788

$891

Key Achievements 2007–2008 The City continued to provide opportunities for community participation Customer service at the libraries was enhanced with the implementation of self-service technology. The Your Tutor Online Homework Help Service went live on the library web site in February when students returned to school. Use has been unprecedented with many school children utilising this free service, particularly those in years seven to twelve. City of Stirling libraries have conducted two Living Libraries during the year, an experience where people with interesting life experiences share their tales. The success of this initiative lead to a partnership with the City of Melville, with funding provided by the Office of Multicultural Interests.

Sustainability and service efficiency were at the forefront of decisions A capital fleet replacement program was completed on time and in its entirety with a saving against budget of six per cent, thereby continuing to ensure that the City’s operations are underpinned by the most modern, well-maintained, cost-effective and fuel-efficient fleet.

Partnerships and alliances were formed to deliver services Visits were made to Canberra to promote local government interests in economic development at the national level and the implementation of specific election promises from the Federal Government. Relationship-building at the State Government level was advanced through a series of Ministerial meetings and visits to the City to raise awareness of City of Stirling issues and seek support for corporate projects.

Enhancement of services to meet community need Charges for overdue library items were introduced to Stirling libraries from March 10, 2008. The successful implementation of the fines system has led to increased book stock availability and an eighty per cent reduction in tax invoices. Increased provision of services to youth and associated youth agencies by commencing a zone model of service delivery. The City developed and supported a range of options for people wanting to volunteer at Stirling e.g. Aussies, Animal Care, and Meals on Wheels and commenced planning for additional recruitment campaigns.

Services recognised through awards The City of Stirling was presented with the ‘Most Outstanding Contribution and Commitment to the Western Australian Road Safety Strategy’ at the Third International Road Safety Conference.

Snapshot of Results

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Number of Meals on Wheels delivered

136,910

142,556

153,615

150,871

Number of volunteers

482

475

541

526

Average response time of City’s community safety service

7.8 mins

7.9 mins

8.6 mins

8.0 mins

Number of library books loaned

2,297,991

2,139,780

2,136,233

2,020,289


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The City now has an extensive community consultation policy to maximise the community’s participation in decision-making.

number of meals on wheels delivered

number of volunteers

0

16

15

0, 00 0 14

13

0, 00 0 12

11

10

0, 00 0

2004 - 05 0, 00 0

2005 - 06

2004 - 05 0, 00 0

2006 - 07

2005 - 06

0, 00 0

2007 - 08

2006 - 07

0, 00 0

2007 - 08

200

400

600

number of library books loaned

avg response time of community Safety Service (mins) 2007 - 08

2007 - 08

2006 - 07

2006 - 07

2005 - 06

2005 - 06

0, 00 0 2, 50

10

0, 00 0

8

2, 00

6

0, 00 0

4

1, 50

2

1, 00

0

0, 00 0

2004 - 05

2004 - 05

Whilst there has been a decline in the number of books loaned the number of visitors to our libraries has remained consistent. Our studies have shown that our community is increasingly IT literate and the demand for online literature is growing.


34

Key Result Area 2: Built and Natural Environment Aim: To encourage sustainability and enhance choice in the built environment while preserving and enhancing the natural environment.

Overview The City has been proactive in managing the use of natural resources and completed a range of initiatives including water efficiency and quality improvements, revegetation works and planting. The development of a Biodiversity Strategy was commenced as was the exciting One Million Trees Initiative to address tree retention and vegetation loss across the City. Stirling’s waste management approach is recognised as leading edge across Australia. The utilisation of the single-bin recycling system as well as recycling of business waste paper, batteries, fluorescent globes, oil and white goods and the mulching of green waste, means the City is well advanced in meeting the zero waste to landfill target set by State Government.


35

The City commenced the One Million Trees Initiative to address tree retention and vegetation loss across the region.

Delivering a well planned and managed built environment, the City has undertaken a wide range of strategic planning initiatives and capital projects including underground power, road works and footpath construction. A number of major strategic development applications were processed, including the Office Towers Complex at 310 Selby Street, Garden Office Park Development, Herdsman, and Mixed Use Development, Innaloo. These types of developments are being introduced to add to the mix of economic opportunities in the City as well as attract greater investment and provide a wider range of employment opportunities. Local Area Planning is the City’s place planning initiative that identifies the need to account for individuality of place through small, defined localities within the City of Stirling. This contemporary approach represents a departure from planning styles that traditionally focus on City-wide projects or particular issues. This process acknowledges that the City is not uniform in its function and structure and that community values and ideas do differ from place to place. The smaller focus allows for the uniqueness of the area to be explored in greater detail in close consultation with the community. In this way sustainability principles are being practised through the integration of community values and ideas towards the future of the area in relation to community development; parks, reserves and the natural environment; activity centres and local economic development; transport and movement; and land use, built form and density. The priorities identified through the engagement process informs the outcomes of the 10–15 year implementation plan for each Local Area which serves to guide all planning and decision-making within the area


36

The City approved over $730 million worth of building licences


37

Progress Towards the Strategic Plan Strategic Initiative

Business Unit

Progress

Use the District Planning Scheme Review to assist in meeting changing community needs

City Planning

In progress

Progress implementation of the Stirling Regional Centre Structure Plan (including completing the redevelopment of the Civic Precinct)

Economic Development In progress and Urban Regeneration

Enhance community enjoyment of the coastline and associated facilities via SEAS implementation

Economic Development In progress and Urban Regeneration

Develop the Mirrabooka Regional Centre as a hub of community activity and involvement

Economic Development In progress and Urban Regeneration

Complete the development of the Inglewood Town Centre

Engineering Design

Complete

Develop standards and encourage mixed use commercial/residential at Main Street and elsewhere in the City

City Planning

In progress

Identify priorities and carry out local centre urban design improvements.

City Planning

In progress

Work with State Government to extend underground power

Engineering Design

In progress

Develop and implement Rights of Way Strategy

City Planning

In progress

Implement Cities for Climate Protection Strategy (greenhouse action plan)

Economic Development In progress and Urban Regeneration

Develop and implement a staged program for Green Plan 2 (Specifically in reference to ‘conservation zones’ within reserves)

Economic Development In progress and Urban Regeneration

Implement street tree renewal program

Parks and Reserves

In progress

Implement road median maintenance program

Engineering Operations

Under revision

Work with State Government. to complete infill sewerage

Engineering Design

Complete

Commence redevelopment of the Balcatta Waste Transfer Station (now known as Recycling Centre Balcatta)

Waste and Fleet

In progress

Develop and implement strategies to enhance sustainable use of water usage

Parks and Reserves

In progress

Develop and implement sustainability agenda

Economic Development Under revision and Urban Regeneration

Implement triple bottom line reporting

Corporate Services

In progress

Investigate the development of an arts and cultural centre for City

Marketing and Communications

In progress

Encourage development of a large retirement village within the City

Community Services

Under revision

Investigate light rail or other forms of transport from Glendalough station and other routes

City Planning

In progress

Redevelop the Balga pool and recreation centre (now known as Leisurepark Balga)

Recreation and Leisure Services

Complete

Redevelop Dianella library, child health centre and community centre

Libraries

In progress

Develop a strategy for the redevelopment of Karrinyup library and community centre

Libraries

In progress

Upgrade streetscapes and street furniture

Engineering Design

In progress

Review and extend City’s Disability Access Plan

Community Services

Complete

Implement Regional Open Space Master Plans, including focusing on priority areas such as Careniup Swamp

Recreation and Leisure Services

In progress

Effectively manage the use of community parks to address changing community needs and environmental requirements

Recreation and Leisure Services /Parks and Reserves

In progress

Further develop and review City’s Heritage Strategy, policies and processes

City Planning

In progress


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State of the Environment Indicators Veldt grass is a cause of concern for native bushland. The City has 500 hectares of bushland and is working to eradicate this invasive weed.

Veldt Grass cover per sq. metre of bushland

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

23%

25%

19%

15%

Veldt grass cover per square metre of bushland 2007 - 08 2006 - 07 2005 - 06 2004 - 05 0%

10%

20%

30%

Key Achievements 2007–2008 Capital works projects and planning to develop key areas and improve services within the City Completed the final stage of the Inglewood Town Centre Urban Design Project to transform the Inglewood Town Centre into a vibrant hub, attracting much new investment and development. Commenced work on the Morris Place Shopping Centre upgrade with the installation of underground power and the inclusion of sustainable design features into the plan. Completion of landscaping works on the Dog Swamp Reserve, as well as works at Millet/Selina Community Park. Upgrading of sports training lights across the City’s reserves continued in 2007-2008, and will progress into future financial years. Commenced implementation of Regional Open Space Master Plans, with community consultation conducted for Dianella Open Space and Charles Riley Memorial Reserve. Ongoing implementation of the Wembley Downs State Underground Power Project, anticipated for completion in October 2008. Secured an agreement from the Public Transport Authority that it would be responsible for funding the upgrade of bus stops to meet universal access standards, saving an estimated $6 million in construction costs over the next ten years. Karrinyup library redevelopment has progressed and is currently awaiting consultant’s reports. The Animal Care Facility in Balcatta was upgraded, with renovations to the kennels, flooring and drainage.

Continuing the City’s environmental focus across a range of services Developed a Waste Supply Agreement for the delivery from the City of up to 22,000 tonnes/year for 20 years of waste, ensuring that ALL the City’s domestic household waste will be processed with minimum diversion from landfill of 65 per cent. Participation and facilitation in the finalisation of a contract with BioVision 2020 for the processing of 100,000 tonnes/year of domestic household waste from within the Mindarie Regional Council region. The completion of a project introducing soil moisture monitoring for irrigation control. Community education seminars on ‘Go Green’ topics including worm farming, organic gardening and ‘Greenhouse Gas Busting on a Budget’ to support the City’s Sustainable City initiative.

Snapshot of Results

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Tonnes of waste recycled

76,573

87,362

83,000

85,500

Litres of motor oil recycled

81,750

86,000

78,000

64,500

Kilometres of road in Stirling

998

1,001

1,001

1,006

Number of properties on the Municipal Inventory

474

474

482

482


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The City upgraded 20 playgrounds.

litres of motor oil recycled

Tonnes of waste recycled

2007 - 08

2007 - 08

2006 - 07

2006 - 07

2005 - 06

2005 - 06

2004 - 05

2004 - 05

50,000

60,000

70,000

80,000

90,000

Oil recycling decreased significantly in 2007-2008 due to a drop in demand for recycled oil. This caused storage issues and recycling was subsequently forced to cease for a period. This was an unfortunate state-wide issue.

70,000

75,000

80,000

85,000

90,000


40

The City has undertaken a wide range of capital works projects including commercial centre upgrades and major road works.

Key Result Area 3: Economic Opportunity Aim: To enhance choice, opportunity and prosperity for Stirling’s community by encouraging the sustainable economic development of the City.

Overview Economic development is an integral component of the community’s ongoing sustainability and the City of Stirling recognises that it plays a role in enhancing the community’s choice and quality of life. A number of key City initiatives aim to stimulate economic activity and improve social conditions. The implementation of the Scarborough Environs Area Strategy has been advanced through submission of Amendment 458 to the Western Australian Planning Commission to facilitate redevelopment of the precinct west of Scarborough Beach Road. The City is pleased to advise that this project has been further advanced by updating project costs, resolving to retain Scarborough Surf Life Saving Club in its current location, and the commencement of a review of the Scarborough Beach Urban Design Masterplan.


41

Another key project, the Mirrabooka Regional Centre Improvement Strategy, has progressed through the sale of the majority of lots in the Northwood Grove subdivision. This initiative promotes redevelopment of Mirrabooka Regional Centre as a hub of community activity. This year the Stirling Regional Centre Structure Plan was advanced through the establishment of a Stirling Alliance. This revised approach involves technical representation from key State Government agencies and the City, community consultation and involvement as well as a joint board to manage the production of this vital Structure Plan. Technologies to streamline processes are always on the agenda. The City’s Approvals Business Unit has implemented an online lodgement and self-assessment tool. Supported by Federal funding, the new system allows the community to quickly research the viability of setting up a new business by providing easy access to property information such as zoning and permissible uses. Finally, the City is pleased to advise that funds have been approved to produce a new Economic Development Plan and Tourism Development Strategy for the City which will involve working with local business associations and other groups.

Progress Towards the Strategic Plan Strategic Initiative

Business Unit

Work with business associations to develop a strategic plan for economic development

Economic Development Complete and Urban Regeneration

Create strong links with Federal and State Governments and parliamentarians based on a clear agenda and priorities for the economic development of the City

Economic Development In progress and Urban Regeneration

Focus on key areas of opportunity and differentiation and develop a marketing strategy for the City, including a prospectus as the basis for competitive bids to attract businesses

Economic Development In progress and Urban Regeneration

Develop a business incubator, in partnership with business associations/ business development organisations

Economic Development Complete and Urban Regeneration

Establish the role of economic development within the organisation

Economic Development Complete and Urban Regeneration

Work with other agencies and schools to carry out analysis and develop programs to address unemployment within the City

Economic Development In progress and Urban Regeneration

Redevelop the Doubleview Commercial Centre

City Planning

In progress

Develop a CCTV system for industrial areas

Community Safety

Under revision

Host the National Surf Life Saving Championships

Recreation and Leisure Services

In progress

Investigate the development of a major business event (e.g. business expo, business week) as a regular event to promote the City

Economic Development Under and Urban Regeneration revision

Create partnerships with universities and other institutions to develop and promote cultural events for the City

Marketing and Communications

Key Performance Indicators

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

Progress

Complete

2007–08

Value of building licences in the City

$471.7m

$567.8m

$690.5m

$730.2m

Average unemployment levels in the City

6.13%

4.87%

3.96%

4.4%

% of rates derived from businesses

24.1%

24.6%

24.9%

24.9%

Value of building licences in the city ($ millions)


42

Key Achievements 2007–2008 Securing grants and establishing partnerships Establishment of a partnership with Edith Cowan University and presented the first WAAPA in the Park. This free concert attracted over 3,000 community members and was widely appreciated by all who attended. Received grant funding under the Australian Government’s National Community Crime Prevention Program for the Be Seen at Nollamara CCTV Project. Entered into a Community Safety and Crime Prevention Partnership Agreement with the State Government, enhancing community safety through partnerships involving the City of Stirling, the Western Australian Police, State Government agencies and the community, and received project funding of $130,000. Provided $4,500 in donations as part of the City’s second annual sterilisation subsidy grants scheme, to charity organisations that provide sterilisation subsidies to City of Stirling residents. Continued to develop new programs and initiatives in conjunction with the Federal and State governments, resulting in a range of increased funding to support programs and reduced costs to ratepayers of the City e.g. Home and Community Care and Financial Counselling.

Maximising revenue and reviewing costs Undertook a review of all library functions to improve efficiencies and economies of scale. The effective implementation of a best-practice Collection Management Plan has led to a centralised collection management system and the use of supplierassisted services for the provision of book stock. Maximised the revenue earning opportunities of both the commercial waste collection and the Recycling Centre Balcatta operations, enabling the City to keep the 2008–2009 waste levy increase to a minimum.

Achievement of recognition and award for services offered Received an Achievement Award by Home Building Society as part of a Community of Local Government initiative for implementing and accepting building applications lodgements electronically.


43

Snapshot of Results

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Number of businesses

3,645

3,648

3,685

8,614*

Gross rental values of business and industrial properties (combined)

$231m

$260m

$267m

$271m

Number of development approvals processed

1,442

2,102

2,813

3,349

Mean processing time to develop approvals

21.9 days

33.8 days

38.7 days

29.8 days

Number of building licences approved

3,917

4,075

3,748

4,185

Mean processing times for building licences

14 days

11 days

14.7 days

13 days

* No official statistics are kept on the number of businesses in each Local Government Area. However, the figure of 8614 businesses is supplied by Sensis Pty Ltd and is reported to be a one per cent increase on the number of businesses in the City in the 2006–2007 financial year. The figure quoted in previous years is based on the number of rateable properties zoned as business, industrial or commercial. In 2007–2008, this corresponding figure was 3706.

Mean processing time of development approvals (days)

Mean processing time of building licences (days)

2007 - 08

2007 - 08

2006 - 07

2006 - 07 2005 - 06

2005 - 06 2004 - 05

2004 - 05 0

10

20

30

40

Processing time for development approvals improved despite a year on year increase in application levels.

0

5

10

15

20

As with development approvals, the volume of building licence approvals increased whilst we saw a pleasing reduction in processing time.

number of building licences approved

number of development approvals processed 2007 - 08

2007 - 08 2006 - 07

2006 - 07

2005 - 06

2005 - 06

2004 - 05

2004 - 05 0

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

0

1000

The City instigated a number of initiatives to stimulate economic activity within the region.

2000

3000

4000

5000


44

Key Result Area 4: Organisation Aim: To effectively manage resources and provide best practice governance for the benefit of the Stirling community.

Overview To improve the City’s responsiveness to operations, as well as reduce its environmental footprint, the City’s Corporate Information Services Business Unit streamlined the existing information technology (IT) infrastructure during 2007–2008. The replacement of 45 physical servers with seven virtual servers means that the City now has a scalable and flexible IT infrastructure that draws less power and subsequently reduces cost. To meet the diverse needs of the community and continue to provide the best customer service possible, the City increased the operating hours of the Customer Contact and Administration Centre. The Centre now operates from 8.30 am to 5.00 pm Monday to Friday, providing an extra half an hour to assist with residents’ queries, process payments and applications and provide a greater service to ratepayers.


45

The City increased the opening hours of the Administration Centre.

Servicing a large and diverse community in this flexible manner requires a varied workforce with an array of skill sets and working patterns. The City’s organisational structure is composed of five directorates and twenty business units (please see page 51 for the City’s organisation chart). As at 30 June 2008 the City’s full-time equivalent (FTE) workforce was 792. This comprises 86 per cent full-time and 14 per cent part-time employees. The City’s workforce gender mix is 58 per cent male and 42 per cent female with an average age of 46 years and 42 years respectively. The City also employs a dynamic casual workforce to meet the changing demands of the organisation and the community. In recent years staffing levels at the City have been affected by factors common to many employers, particularly in Western Australia. Shortages of skilled people in key areas, together with strong economic conditions, are encouraging employees to move between local governments or out of the sector. This has resulted in employee turnover remaining at over 20 per cent this year. To combat this several strategies were put in place including the introduction of an Employee Referral Program and a new advertising campaign. The City’s Occupational Health and Safety record in 2007–2008 was consistent with the performance in 2006–2007 with 66 injuries and 18 lost time injuries sustained compared to 62 and 18 respectively the previous year. Although the number of injuries was similar, the number of days lost due to injury was substantially reduced through an effective Injury Management Program. The City will continue to focus on reducing the number of injuries and promoting a safe working culture. The importance of organisational culture as a driver of continuous improvement led the City to survey staff on this issue. Two hundred and twenty-four employees responded to the survey to establish staff opinion of the City’s current organisational culture and map out their preferred culture. The results of the survey will be used to work towards establishing the preferred culture at the City with implementation starting in 2008–2009.


46

Progress Towards the Strategic Plan Strategic Initiative

Business Unit

Progress

Review and redevelop Customer Service Charter

Governance and Council Support

In progress

Implement customer service training

Governance and Council Support

Under revision

Implement the City of Stirling Information Strategy (CoSINF) to enhance communication, decision-making, customer service and access to information

Corporate Information Services

In progress

Develop and implement a communication strategy for staff

Marketing and Communications

Complete

Develop and implement staff training and development aligned with Strategic Plan outcomes

Human Resources

In progress

Review Council committees

Governance and Council Support

Complete

Streamline decision-making processes, including a code of best practice

Governance and Council Support

Under revision

Review and enhance Council support

Governance and Council Support

In progress

Review and enhance a training program for Councillors (aligned to Strategic Plan outcomes, new legislation and changing requirements)

Governance and Council Support

Under revision

Introduce a Major Issues Communication Strategy to ensure effective communication and public relations in the event of major issues

Marketing and Communications

In progress

Review the organisation’s role and responsibilities in managing emergencies, including resourcing implications

Engineering Operations

In progress

Develop quantifiable and measurable performance indicators for reporting to Council and the community

Corporate Services

In progress

Introduce triple bottom line reporting (encompassing social, environmental and economic indicators)

Corporate Services

In progress

Key Performance Indicators

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Staff turnover rate

13.36%

14.45%

22.15%

21.52%

Variance from budget

1% over

1% under

4% under

4% over

Annual borrowings

$0

$0

$0

$0

Overall customer satisfaction

78%

77%

77%

82%

Net assets

$784m

$805m

$837m

$854m

employee turnover rate

number of employees (FTe)

500

600

700

800

0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

The buoyant economy has meant that employee turnover levels remain high at the City. Appropriate strategies to address this are being developed.


47

Key Achievements 2007–2008 Continual review of services and service delivery to ensure customer and staff satisfaction The Australian Institute of Management reviewed the Community Safety Business Units’s customer service performance to seek opportunities for continuous improvement. Ranger vehicles were installed with custom-designed cages, increasing operator and animal safety as well as the carrying capacity of the vehicles. Further developed mobile computing and business workflow solutions to improve the delivery of ranger and security services. Continued increase in demand for ranger and security services from the previous year: • Rangers — 10,117 reported incidents.

• Security — 7,053 reported incidents.

Achieved an outstanding lost time, injury-free period of 4.5 years in the City’s fleet workshop. Successfully managed to maintain the delivery of high quality waste services and absorb the increased number of services required through increased residential population within existing resources.

Snapshot of Results

2004–05

2005–06

2006–07

2007–08

Total value of the City budget

$172m

$170m

$192m

$193m

Number of staff (FTE)

739

742

758

792

Number of calls answered by the City’s Customer Contact Centre

196,569

197,295

191,343

203,395

Average queue time for customers calling the City’s Customer Contact Centre

61 seconds

69 seconds

110 seconds

23 seconds^

^ The Customer Contact Centre was remodelled during this financial year, and new equipment introduced. These changes significantly reduced the average waiting time of callers to the City.

The Customer Contact Centre was remodelled in 2007-2008 and new equipment introduced. These changes have significantly reduced the average waiting time of callers to the City.

0 21

0,

00

0 00 0, 20

0 00 0, 19

0 00 0, 18

0 00 0, 17

00

120

0,

100

16

80

0

60

00

40

0,

20

15

0

0

number of calls answered by customer contact centre

average queue time for calls to customer contact centre (seconds)


48

A number of parks were redeveloped to make the facilities more accessible.

Statutory Reports Disability Services Overall there has been solid progress against the majority of the actions set out in the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP). The Plan itself has been circulated across the City and is available on the City’s website. The City has improved its communication on services, programs and activities that are suitable for people with disabilities to participate in. Information on how to access the City and its events and services has increased and is readily available at a variety of venues. There have been a number of projects continuing to make progress, such as the upgrade of community facilities and redevelopment of parks and reserves. In addition the City is finalising a Public Open Space Strategy. New buildings and contracts are constructed in accordance with relevant legislation, building codes and so on. The City has completed the Welcome Stirling project, introduced the Fitness for Fun project, and is now the home for Wheelchair Sports. The City is commencing an Accessible Play project.


49

Limitations to some of the actions include the lack of suitable technology and changes in staffing. Technology upgrades have been addressed in budget proposals and future plans for the respective areas. The issue of staff turnover and the requirement to keep new staff up to date with their roles in implementing the plan has slowed progress in some areas. The City has specific strategies in place to reduce turnover and include Access and Inclusion in the induction process for new staff. Since 1 August 2007, the City has been required to ensure that agents and contractors to the City are aware of and must comply with the requirements whilst working for the City. Information on this requirement has been circulated to all relevant areas of the City and in particular the purchasing and contracting areas of the Finance Services Business Unit. These requirements form part of the usual business process when contracting individuals and organisations. The processes will be introduced as new contracts are called and filled. During 2007–2008 the City replaced the Disability Services Advisory Committee with the Disability Services Advisory Panel. The Panel has now met on two occasions and is monitoring the progress of the DAIP.

Competition Policy The City of Stirling has met its obligations relating to competition policy and is continuing to monitor the introduction of Council policies and local laws that may be the subject of anti-competitive practices. No complaints were received by the City in the 2007-2008 financial year regarding anti-competitive practices.

Recordkeeping Report The City of Stirling is committed to ensuring that records are created and kept to properly and adequately record the performance of the City’s functions. These records are consistent with any written law to which the City is subject to when performing its functions. The City’s roles and functions are mandated by government legislation and regulations. While performing these roles and functions, the City participates in a wide range of activities and transactions. Proper and adequate records of these activities are created and kept to ensure sufficient evidence of the City’s performance of these functions. The City’s Recordkeeping Plan (as required under the State Records Act 2000) was submitted to the State Records Commission in March 2004 and was subsequently approved by the commission for a period of five years. A review of the Plan is required to be submitted to the commission for approval by November 2009.

Training and Development The City conducts regular recordkeeping/system training to ensure all current and new employees are made aware of their recordkeeping roles and responsibilities. All new employees attend an induction, which includes a recordkeeping presentation covering an overview of records management and staff recordkeeping responsibilities. Staff members are made aware of the Electronic Document Management System (EDMS) and the training available to assist with usage of the system. The recordkeeping overview also covers information regarding other records management services, including archiving and freedom of information. Regular follow-up is conducted to ensure awareness of employee recordkeeping responsibilities and subsequent compliance with the City’s Recordkeeping Plan, policies and procedures. Employees are also provided with the necessary training and skills to operate the City’s recordkeeping system. Whilst existing training continues, the corporate information services trainer is developing EDMS training sessions as well as a forward training program. Records and Information Services staff and other key users within various business units complete relevant training specific to their roles. Regular feedback is sought from the training courses to ensure the quality of course content and relevance to the workplace.

Recordkeeping System The City’s EDMS auditing process is currently undergoing a review, with new reports being created to satisfy the growing requirements of the business. The reporting will allow management to measure performance and assist with improving data quality on an ongoing basis. Sentencing and destruction of hard copy records is managed by the City’s archivist and carried out annually.

Freedom of Information The Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 1992 gives the public the right to apply for access to information held by the City of Stirling. In the event that a request for information goes beyond the scope of the usual requests received, then the City would consider using the FOI process. The City received 33 freedom of information applications during the financial period 2007–2008. A copy of the City’s Information Statement is available on the City’s website www.stirling.wa.gov.au.


50

Management and Accountability Ward Map and Councillors The City is divided into seven wards: Coastal, Hamersley, Balga, Doubleview, Osborne, Lawley and Inglewood, with two Councillors representing each ward. The elected Councillors represent the interests of the residents, electors and ratepayers, provide leadership and guidance to the community, and facilitate communication between the community and the Council to formulate policies.

Cr Kathryn Thomas Tel: 9245 4134

Cr Bill Stewart Tel: 9448 6080

Mayor

Balga Ward

Hamersley Ward

Coastal Ward

Deputy Mayor

Cr Peter Rose JP Tel: 9343 5280

Cr Ron Sebrechts Tel: 9244 2021

Cr David Boothman Tel: 9207 3033

Cr Leonie Getty JP Tel: 9342 3822

Inglewood Ward

Cr Terry Tyzack Tel: 9444 5381

Cr Robin Furlong Tel: 9272 6690

Cr David Michael Tel: 6210 1444

Cr Stephanie Proud Tel: 9446 6929

Cr Elizabeth Re Tel: 9446 7136

Cr John Italiano Tel: 9244 8355

Lawley Ward

Doubleview Ward

Osborne Ward

Cr Paul Collins Tel: 9443 1492

Cr Rod Willox AM JP Tel: 9271 7332


51

Organisational Structure The City’s organisation is divided into five directorates, namely Planning and Development, Corporate Services, Community Development, Infrastructure and the Office of the CEO. Each is responsible for a range of duties and services to the community delivered though a range of business units. The recent introduction of the new Economic Development and Urban Regeneration Business Unit brings with it an exciting focus for the City and a directive to drive sustainable development across the organisation and into the community.

Governance & Council Support

Chief Executive Officer

Executive Services

Planning & Development Economic Development & Urban Regeneration

City Planning

Infrastructure

Corporate Services

Community Development

Engineering Design

Finance

Marketing & Communications

Engineering Operations

Corporate Information Services

Recreation & Leisure Services

Parks & Reserves Approvals

Asset Management Waste & Fleet

Health & Compliance

Library & Information Services

City Building Operations

Community Services

Human Resources

Community Safety


52

Councillor Attendance at Council Meetings In October 2007, following Council elections, five new Councillors were appointed to represent the City’s various wards. The tables below show the attendance of both sets of Councillors (pre- and post-election) from 1 July 2007 to 20 October 2007 and from 20 October 2007 to 30 June 2008.

1 July 2007 to 20 October 2007 COUNCILLORS

D BOOTHMAN

ORDINARY COUNCIL

SPECIAL COUNCIL

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

RESOURCE INFRASTRUCTURE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE COMMITTEE

(8)

(0)

(4)

(3)

(3)

No. Attd.

No. Attd.

No. Attd.

No. Attd.

No. Attd.

7

0

4*

3

3*

T W CLAREY

8

0

4*

1

2

J COPLEY JP

7

0

2

2*

2

R J DANIEL

8

0

1*

0

3*

B HAM

5

0

3

2

2*

J S MCFARLANE

8

0

3

3*

3

D R MICHAEL

8

0

4*

3

3*

E RE

7

0

2

3*

3

P L ROSE JP

8

0

2*

2

2

R SEBRECHTS

8

0

4

3*

2*

W M STEWART

8

0

4*

3

3

K L THOMAS

7

0

4

2*

2

T J TYZACK

7

0

4*

3*

3*

R M WILLOX AM JP 8

0

3

2*

2*

Figure in brackets represents total number of meetings held for year. Asterisk (*) denotes committee members.


53

Council meetings are held in Council Chambers at the City of Stirling Civic Centre.

20 October 2007 to 30 June 2008 COUNCILLORS

D BOOTHMAN

ORDINARY COUNCIL

SPECIAL COUNCIL

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

RESOURCE INFRASTRUCTURE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE COMMITTEE

(13) No. Attd.

(2) No. Attd.

(8) No. Attd.

(9) No. Attd.

(9) No. Attd.

13

2

6*

5

5*

P J COLLINS

13

2

8

7*

8*

L GETTY JP

12

2

8

9*

9

R FURLONG

13

2

8

9*

9

G ITALIANO

11

2

8*

7

8*

D MICHAEL

9

2

6

7*

7

S PROUD

12

2

8

9*

9*

E RE

12

2

7*

7

7

P L ROSE JP

12

2

8

9*

9

R SEBRECHTS

12

2

8*

7

9*

W M STEWART

12

2

4*

5

9

K THOMAS

12

2

8

6*

6*

T J TYZACK

13

2

8*

7

7*

R M WILLOX AM JP 12

2

8*

6

8

Figure in brackets represents total number of meetings held for year. Asterisk (*) denotes committee members.


54

Global Reporting The vision for the City is to build a sustainable future for the Stirling community. Sustainable development can seem a complex and somewhat aspirational vision with the high levels of economic growth, social complexities and environmental challenges that arise. But these challenges offer opportunities for the City to capitalise and use innovation, technology, policy and management measures in an adaptable way to lead the way in sustainability. As part of adaptive management, the City has adopted the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) as a means to monitor progress towards sustainability and clearly demonstrate how the City is achieving its goals, showing stakeholders a commitment to improve. The GRI process enables the City to deliver on reporting commitments in a transparent, consistent and internationally credible framework. The GRI process encourages balance and honesty in the Sustainability Annual Report 2007–2008, with an inclusive and open approach that reports on the City’s successes in sustainability, challenges faced and the lessons learnt. This process is new for the City and a new direction in reporting. In the following years, the City of Stirling will adapt and progress to a fully integrated Sustainability Annual Report that demonstrates best practice. The GRI framework is founded upon ten principles for open and accountable reporting on sustainability and the City has begun the process to align with these.

Report Quality

Report Content

• Balance.

• Materiality.

• Comparability.

• Stakeholder inclusiveness.

• Accuracy.

• Sustainability context.

• Timeliness.

• Completeness.

• Clarity. • Reliability. The first step involves using the Sustainability Annual Report 2007–2008 as a vehicle to present the traditional budget and report statements as well as appropriate GRI indicators. The GRI Content Index on the next three pages is a mechanism to point the reader to essential components of the Global Reporting Initiative. Information on the GRI can be viewed or downloaded from www.globalreporting.org.

Global Reporting Initiative Index GRI G3 reference number

Page, location, result

Vision and strategy 1.1

Statement from Mayor/CEO including overall vision and commitment to sustainability and strategic priorities

6, 7, 8, 9

1.2

Key impacts, risks, opportunities

24-29

Organisational profile 2.1 & 2.4

Name, location

2

2.2

Nature of the City’s role

15

2.3

Operational structure

51

2.7

Breakdown of stakeholders

15

2.8

Scale of the organisation

2-3, 15

2.10

Awards received

24-28, 32

3.1

Reporting period

cover

3.2

Date of most recent report

4

Report parameters

3.3

Reporting cycle

4

3.4

Contact point and feedback

1

3.5

Process for defining report content

5

3.6

Boundary of report

2-3, 15

3.7

Decisions why not to report all GRI principles

4, 54

3.9

Data management/measurement

21-22

3.11

Significant changes from previous reporting period

4, 22


55

GRI G3 reference number

Page, location, result

Governance, commitments, engagements 4.1

Governance structure

50-51

4.4

Mechanisms for the community to engage with Councillors

50

4.8

Organisational values and approach to reporting social, environmental and economic performance

16-17

PA2

Statement of the definition of sustainable development used, and identification of any statements or principles adopted to guide sustainable development policies

11, 13

4.9

Council’s procedures for identification and management of economic, environmental and social 16-17, 18-19, performance, risk and opportunities 20-22

4.14

List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organisation

14, 18, 23

4.16

Approaches to stakeholder engagement

14, 18, 23

4.17

Key concerns of the community and how the City has responded

18-19, 21-22

GRI Performance Indicators GRI G3 indicator number

Economic (EC) performance

Performance indicators

Economic (EC) performance EC1

Total income broken down into operating costs and revenue

Financials

EC1

Cost of all goods, materials and services purchased

Financials

EC1

Donations to community groups (in cash and in-kind donations)

Financials

EC2

Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the Council’s activities due to climate change

25

EC4

Income derived from grants/subsidies

Financials

PA8

Gross expenditure by type

Financials

Natural and built environment (EN) performance EN14

Biodiversity management plans

34

EN22

Percentage of total community waste recycled Tonnes of green waste diverted from landfill Kilograms of batteries recycled annually Litres of oil recycled by the community

38-39

Social (SO) performance CoS

Number of meals delivered by Meals on Wheels

32-33

CoS

Number of volunteers

32-33

CoS

Average response time of community safety service

32-33

CoS

Number of library books loaned

32-33

Social — labour practices and decent work LA1

Total workforce by employment type

45

LA2

Total number and rate of employee turnover by age, gender and region

45

LA7

Rates of injury and number of claims for worker’s compensation, absenteeism and staff turnover

45

LA14

Breakdown of Councillors and Council employees by gender

45, 50

Social — product responsibility Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction

PR5

21-22

Social — administration efficiency Description of assessments of the efficiency and effectiveness of services provided by Council and actions taken to improve either the efficiency or effectiveness of services (community 21-22 satisfaction survey)

PA15 Legend: PA

Public Agency indicator (from the GRI sector supplements) LA

Labour practices indicator

EN

Environmental indicator

PR

Product Responsibility indicator

SO

Social indicator

GRI G3

Global Reporting Initiative G3 Reporting Guidelines (2006)

EC

Economic indicator

CoS City of Stirling indicator


City of Stirling Annual Report 2007 - 2008  

City of Stirling Annual Report 2007 - 2008

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