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City of Southlake Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan An Element of the Southlake 2030 Comprehensive Plan

Adopted by Southlake City Council Ordinance No. 1060 March 19, 2013 Prepared by Planning & Development Services Department and Community Services Department


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS SOUTHLAKE CITY COUNCIL

PARKS & RECREATION BOARD

John Terrell Mayor Brandon Bledsoe Mayor Pro Tem, Place 3 Pamela A. Muller Deputy Mayor Pro Tem, Place 6 Martin Schelling Place 1 Carolyn Morris Place 2 Al Zito Place 4 Jeff Wang Place 5

John Slocum Chairman, Place 3 Tina Wasserman Vice Chair, Place 2 Sherry Berman Secretary, Place 5 Elaine Cox Place 1 Lori Palmer Place 4 Chad Patton Place 6 Gregg Formella Place 7

CITY STAFF Shana K. Yelverton

Ben Thatcher

City Manager

Assistant City Manager

Caroline Eckel, AICP

Chris Tribble

Assistant to the City Manager

Director of Community Services

Ken Baker, AICP

Kari Happold

Senior Director of Planning & Development Services

Deputy Director of Community Services

Dennis Killough, AICP

Candice Edmondson

Deputy Director of Planning & Development Services

Deputy Director of Community Services

Daniel Cortez, AICP

Linda Carpenter-Elgin

Planner II

Administrative Secretary of Community Services

SPECIAL THANKS TO Margaret Adams Former Parks & Recreation Board Member Tamara McMillan Southlake Parks Development Corporation Senior Advisory Commission Members and Bob Jones Nature Center Organization Board of Directors


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

INTRODUCTION PURPOSE AND RELATIONSHIP TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

2

RELATIONSHIP TO SOUTHLAKE’S STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

2

Exhibit 1: City of Southlake Strategy Map 5

BACKGROUND HISTORY

5

LOCATION, CHARACTER & RESOURCES

7

DEMOGRAPHICS

7

Exhibit 2: Demographic Charts & Graphs 13

8

PARKS, RECREATION & OPEN SPACE GOALS & OBJECTIVES

13

MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

14

CREATION OF PARK RECOMMENDATIONS

15

Prioritization

16

Exhibit 3: Force Ranking Results

16

Plan Implementation

16

PARK CLASSIFICATIONS AND FUNCTIONS Exhibit 4: Inventory of Parks and Acreage

17 20

JOINT USE FACILITIES

21

NEEDS ASSESSMENT

21

Exhibit 5: Parks Inventory Evaluation

23

PARK PLANS AND STANDARDS FOR DEVELOPMENT

24

Individual Park Recommendations and Concept Plans CITY-WIDE RECOMMENDATIONS AND POLICIES

87

4

25 78

City-wide recommendations/policy matrix

78

Park Standards

82

COMMUNITY FACILITIES GOALS & OBJECTIVES

88

MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT

89

COMMUNITY FACILITY INVENTORY

91

COMMUNITY FACILITY NEEDS AND DEMANDS

92


COMMUNITY FACILITY RECOMMENDATIONS Community Facilities recommendations/policy matrix 95

APPENDIX A: Ordinance No. 960: Southlake 2030 Vision, Goals & Objectives

102 APPENDIX B: Southlake 2030: Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Map 103 APPENDIX C: Southlake 2030: Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Process Timeline 104 APPENDIX D: Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve Master Plan

93 94


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INTRODUCTION Southlake prides itself on its numerous parks and open spaces and its offering of recreation activities and resources. Residents use the park and recreational services extensively for active and passive leisure pursuits. As Southlake grows, these parks and recreation programs will continue to play a vital role in the lives of our residents and visitors by providing areas for:     

Active recreational pursuits Passive enjoyment Enhanced quality of life Enhanced community image Increased tourism

Southlake's proximity to Grapevine Lake and abundance of mature trees provides a visual backdrop that greatly adds to the overall aesthetic value of the City. Open spaces provide habitat and protection for threatened and endangered species, unique natural and cultural resources and critical habitat linkages. These open spaces also enable natural outdoor experiences for residents in close proximity to where they live.

Rustin Park

Parks contribute to this network of open spaces and enhance the quality of life for Southlake residents in numerous ways. Green spaces, healthy trees and plant life soften the impact of development and add visual enhancements to the City. Park facilities enable residents to be active and engaged in many recreation activities and outdoor pursuits, from senior citizen fitness classes to youth soccer. Recreation programs provide a focus for youth activities and community facilities such as the Senior Activity Center and the recently opened North Park. These locations serve as focal points for senior citizens and neighborhood activities, reinforcing cohesiveness in the community and attracting neighborhood and City events. Parks can also reflect how a community regards itself and they can be objects of community pride. Distinctive signature parks such as Bicentennial Park, Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve, North Park and Bob Jones Park give Southlake character and a sense of place in the region. Parks can also define neighborhoods throughout the City and serve as buffer zones between new development and residential enclaves and natural preserves. Parks, trails and open space areas add value to the community. For example, parks and especially open space preserves can add to the assessed value of adjacent and nearby properties by making these areas more desirable places to live. Visitation and tourism to City Stars & Stripes events such as Stars & Stripes, Art in the Square and Oktoberfest encourage people to visit and stay in Southlake. These visitors generate revenue by filling hotel rooms, dining out and participating in other activities that support the local Southlake economy. Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Caring for and preserving these resources, as well as adapting to the changing recreation needs of the community, is an essential component of Southlake’s future health and sustainability. As the City changes and develops, the community looks to maintain a balance between the developed environment and natural environment where Southlake residents can relax and recreate. The recommendations, objectives and policies in the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities component of the Southlake 2030 comprehensive plan will focus on the enhancement and appropriate use of Southlake's parks, recreational & community facilities and programs to meet the changing needs of Southlake’s population.

PURPOSE AND RELATIONSHIP TO THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN The Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan is a component of the Southlake 2030 Plan, the city’s comprehensive plan. The comprehensive plan is a reflection of the community’s values and serves as a blueprint for Southlake’s future. More specifically, the comprehensive plan establishes a framework to coordinate the city’s activities and to guide the city’s decision-making for the next 20 years. As such, the comprehensive plan and its components are updated on a regular basis. The last Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan was adopted in September 2005. The city’s park system has undergone significant growth and improvements since that time, so it is necessary to address those changes with an update to the plan as a part of the Southlake 2030 Comprehensive Plan. The Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan is the primary tool that will guide decision-making when addressing physical or programming use changes to the City’s parks, recreation facilities, open spaces and community facilities. Recommendations developed in the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan will also be incorporated into other plan elements, such as the Mobility Master Plan and Sustainability Master Plan, as appropriate. In addition, the plan will be utilized in setting priorities in the Capital Improvement Program (CIP) planning process, updating current park development priorities and creating new park priorities or programs as needed. During initial staff discussions about the Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan and meetings with the Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan Committee it was determined that the significance of a community recreation center within an existing park was great enough and a critical component of Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan that a Community Facilities Master Plan component should be developed concurrently with the plan and as a result the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan was created.

RELATIONSHIP TO SOUTHLAKE’S STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Strategic planning is an ongoing process where resources, critical concerns, community priorities and citizen needs are combined to produce both a plan for the future and a measure for results. More specifically, Southlake’s Strategic Management System links the city’s day-to-day activities to a comprehensive long-term strategy for public policy and management decisions. The Strategic Management System identifies Strategic Focus Areas and Objectives to guide effective and efficient resource allocation and provides benchmarks to assess performance. The Strategic Focus Areas and Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Objectives are driven by the City’s Citizen Survey and are outlined in the City’s Strategy Map (please see Exhibit 1 on the next page). The Strategic Management System guided the development of the Southlake 2030 Plan Vision, Goals and Objectives (VGO), which define a desired direction for growth in the City. As such, all recommendations in the Southlake 2030 Plan are tied to at least one Strategic Focus Area from the Strategic Management System and at least one Objective from the Adopted Vision, Goals and Objectives. These recommendations guide the development of the Capital Improvements Program (a five-year plan for the purchase, construction or replacement of the City’s physical assets) as well as departmental business plans. In turn, the Capital Improvements Program and departmental business plans dictate the city’s day-to-day activities and ensure the city is working to achieve the community’s goals. Further, the Southlake 2030 Comprehensive Plan assists the City Council and Boards and Commissions in decisionmaking by establishing a blueprint for the city’s future. For example, the Parks & Recreation Board, Planning & Zoning Commission and City Council use the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan to evaluate requests related to parks, recreation, open space and community facilities to determine the community’s needs and goals. Using the Plan as a guide helps to secure the community’s vision for parks and community facilities.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Citizen Survey Strategic Management System •Focus Areas •Corporate Objectives

Southlake 2030 Vision, Goals, and Objectives

Plan Elements •Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

City Activities •Capital Improvements Program •Departmental Business Plans •City Council and Board Decisions

Results

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Exhibit 1

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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BACKGROUND The citizens of Southlake, city staff, and the development community take long-range planning and consider it to be one of the most intrinsic functions undertaken by elected and appointed officials in this municipality. The Parks, Recreation and Open Space Master Plan has undergone some significant iterations in the past decade or more, and like any good plan, it has evolved and become more relevant with each examination. In the History section below is a brief outline of the significant plan adoptions and updates of the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Master Plan. This is a long range (20-year) planning document that is frequently updated to reflect changing needs and priorities. The Community Services Department will make periodic reviews and make minor revisions as needed. The Southlake 2025 Plan was the city’s first comprehensive master plan that integrated all the City’s master plans together. As a part of that comprehensive plan the Parks, Recreation and Open Master Plan was an element of that plan that since then has contributed to many improvements to the City’s park system. This master plan laid a foundation to the improvements done to the City’s parks and even eventually led to the creation of master plans for Bicentennial Park and the Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve. As the City’s needs have changed due to population and demographic changes the City’s park system will need to change as well. The Southlake 2030 Comprehensive Master Plan will address those changes and more specifically the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan will address the changes to the park system.

HISTORY The 1992 Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan was the City’s first attempt to look at park and recreation resources in a comprehensive manner. At that time, the city’s population was around 8,000, and the city owned 14 acres of park land, all in Bicentennial Park. The City’s build-out population was projected to be more than 48,000, one-third more than the current projection. The recommended park acreage was six to ten acres per 1,000 residents, which would have yielded 289 to 483 acres at build-out. Schrickel, Rollins and Associates, Inc. of Arlington prepared the plan. The 1996 Parks, Recreation and Open Space Master Plan updated land and facility inventory, planning and design criteria, plan recommendations and implementation sections of the original plan. The focus of the update was “on the preservation, development or enhancement of attributes important to reflect the native condition of the North Texas landscape that attracted residents to the community.” By this time, Bicentennial Park had been expanded to forty-one acres and two neighborhood parks, Koalaty (5 acres) and Lonesome Dove (8 acres), had been acquired. Purchase of 131 acres of land for Bob Jones Park was contemplated. A park and recreation citizen’s survey was designed and administered by Glass & Associates. The park and open space standard was raised to 21 acres per 1,000 residents, almost double the regional standard. The update was prepared by the City of Southlake staff.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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The 2001 Parks, Recreation and Open Space Master Plan update reflected the most comprehensive analysis of the Southlake park system and its potential for orderly development to date. The most important result to emerge from this study was 100% compliance with Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) standards for parks master plans, which assured the maximum points available in that category would be available on any TPWD-sponsored grant submittals. All subsequent plans will conform to TPWD guidelines at a minimum in the future. This plan saw increases in the number of parks, park acreages, park inventories, comprehensive mapping, individual park conceptual planning, and prioritization of projects. The 2005 Parks, Recreation and Open Space Master Plan was adopted and prepared as a part of this comprehensive master plan and also met the guidelines for park and recreation system master plans set forth by the TPWD. TPWD provides a variety of matching grant programs, and approved plans enhance an applicant’s chances of qualifying for matching grants for the implementation of projects. This plan also included a new component that would focus on promoting environmental sustainability and open space preservation within the park system. The Environmental Resource Protection component of the plan addressed areas of concern such as floodplains, wetlands, streams, trees, topography and view sheds, water quality, Bob Jones Preserve Area Trail rural character, air quality and solid waste. This component also led to the creation of the Environmental Resource Protection (ERP) Map. The Southlake 2030 Comprehensive Master Plan will now update the current 2005 Parks, Recreation and Open Space Master Plan. One of the most significant additions to this plan was the inclusion of the Community Facilities element. As mentioned in the introduction, it was determined that the significance of a community recreation center within an existing park was great enough and a critical component of the Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan that a Community Facilities Master Plan component should be included, and as a result the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan was created. In addition, the Environmental Resource Protection component, which was included in the 2005 Parks, Recreation and Open Space Master Plan, has been removed from this plan and will be integrated into a more thorough plan, the Sustainability Master Plan. In terms of the Community Facilities portion of this master plan, the architectural firm of Brinkley Sargent Architects was selected to formulate the projected future space needs for all city departments. The firm was also charged with the evaluation of existing city facilities and their potential adaptive reuse. The report produced by Brinkley Sargent, The Comprehensive Facilities Master Plan, is the final product of an in-depth study into the present and future needs of the various departments of The City of Southlake. Planning horizons for this study were the years 2016 and 2026 with respective population projections of 33,500 and 36,000. The components of this report, adopted in 2008, will be integrated into this Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan and will constitute the Community Facilities section of this plan.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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LOCATION, CHARACTER & RESOURCES Southlake is located in North Central Texas, situated 23 miles northeast of Fort Worth and 25 miles northwest of Dallas. DallasFort Worth International Airport is only a few short miles to the southeast, and Lake Grapevine borders the city to the north. State Highway 114 runs diagonally through the middle of the city, heading east through Las Colinas and into downtown Dallas and west toward the Alliance Airport corridor. The topography is comprised of mostly gently rolling, heavily treed hills and woodland areas, and the area in the north part of the city around the lake is comprised of some of the most prime native Cross Timbers habitat in the region. A ridgeline running just south of S.H. 114 divides the main watersheds of the city south toward Bear Creek and north to Kirkwood Branch of Denton Creek. Southlake can also be characterized by its abundant natural resources in the Lake Grapevine vicinity and within walking distance of many neighborhoods. The City has made a very strong commitment to both natural resource protection and preservation of natural open space. The City of Southlake is also firmly committed to protecting environmental assets in potential private development areas with both existing and proposed ordinances that require developers to design with nature in mind. The enforcement of the city’s Tree Preservation Ordinance, widely recognized statewide as a model ordinance, has resulted in creative development practices and the protection of existing resources. As such, Southlake has been awarded the “Tree City USA” designation for fifteen consecutive years by the National Arbor Day Foundation (NADF). NADF awards the designation only to cities who have demonstrated exceptional local regulations and instructional community outreach and volunteer opportunities in the name of protecting trees and the environment. More recently, the city was awarded with the Gold Certification of the Scenic City Certification Program. The Scenic City Certification Program is a project of Scenic Texas. Scenic Texas has identified a direct correlation between the success of a city’s economic development efforts and the visual appearance of its public spaces. In recognition of this link, Scenic Texas has developed the Scenic City Certification Program to support and recognize municipalities, such as Southlake, that implement high-quality scenic standards for public roadways and public spaces. The program recognizes Texas cities which already have strong scenic standards and will provide an incentive to others to adopt and implement the kind of stringent criteria that has been proven to enhance economic development, improve quality of life and foster a sense of place.

DEMOGRAPHICS Southlake experienced rapid population growth between 1990 and 2000 with a 205 percent increase in population during that period, among the highest in Texas. With economic recession and less land available for residential development, this trend slowed significantly between 2000 and 2010. As a result, the city has developed more slowly in recent years and with less intensity than previously estimated. The ultimate buildout population, estimated at 34,188, could be reached as late as 2050. Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Demographic characteristics can help the city assess current and future needs for parks and recreational facilities. Demographic profiles depicting age, race, and income provide snapshots of Southlake’s current population, illustrate change over the past decade, and suggest trends for the future.

Exhibit 2

City of Southlake

34,188

Population Growth

30,305

29,245

24,900

31,924

29,636 26,575

13,350

21,519

7,065 1990

1995

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

Historical Population (1990 – 2010) Year

Population

5-Year Growth Rate

1990 1995 2000 2005 2010

7,065 13,350 21,519 24,900 26,575

-89% 61% 16% 7%

Source: NCTCOG (www.dfwinfo.com) and US Census Bureau (2000 US Census, 2010 US Census, American Community Survey)

Projected Population (2015 – Build-out) Year

Population

5-Year Growth Rate

2015 2020 2025 2030

29,245 31,717 30,305 31,924 34,188

10% 1% 2% 5% 7%

Build-out

Source: City of Southlake Water System Master Plan and Water Conservation Pla

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Population by Age (2000 – 2010) 2000 Population 21,519

2000 % of Total Population 100%

2010 Population 26,575

2010 % of Total Population 100%

% Growth 2000-2010 23.5%

10,792 10,727

50.2% 49.8%

13,313 13,262

50.1% 49.9%

23.4% 23.6%

Under 5 5 to 9 10 to 14 15 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 54 55 to 64 65 to 74 75 to 84 85 +

1,632 2,523 2,512 1,761 390 1,310 5,198 4,209 1320 417 205 42

8% 12% 12% 8% 2% 6% 24% 20% 6% 2% 1% 0.2%

1,383 2,511 3,186 2,670 625 963 4,029 6,352 3,296 1023 375 162

5% 9% 12% 10% 2% 4% 15% 24% 12% 4% 1% 0.6%

-15% -0.5% 27% 52% 60% -27% -23% 51% 150% 145% 83% 286%

Under 18 65 +

7,978 664

37% 3%

7,080 1,560

27% 6%

14% 135%

Total

Sex Male Female

Age

Source: US Census Bureau (2000 US Census, 2010 US Census)

Population by Age (2000-2010) 85 + 75 to 84 65 to 74

42 162 205 375 417

55 to 64

2000 Population 2010 Population 1023 1320

3,296 4,209

45 to 54 35 to 44

4,029

25 to 34 20 to 24

963

1,310

390 625

15 to 19

1,761

10 to 14

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3,186

2,523 2,511

5 to 9 Under 5

2,670 2,512

1,632 1,383

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6,352 5,198

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Household Income (2000-2010) $200,000 or more

1,529

$150,000 to $199,999

1,129 1,521

3,337

1,691 1,354

$100,000 to $149,999 721

$75,000 to $99,999

386

$50,000 to $74,999

660 426

$35,000 to $49,999

220 174

$25,000 to $34,999

182 83

$15,000 to $24,999

152 152

$10,000 to $14,999

47 128

Less than $10,000

91 135

2000 Households 2010 Households

Household Income (2000-2010) 2000 Households Less than $10,000 $10,000 to $14,999 $15,000 to $24,999 $25,000 to $34,999 $35,000 to $49,999 $50,000 to $74,999 $75,000 to $99,999 $100,000 to $149,999 $150,000 to $199,999 $200,000 or more Median Household Income

91 47 152 182 220 660 721 1,691 1,129 1,529

2000 % of Total Households 1% 0.7% 2% 3% 3% 10% 11% 26% 18% 24%

$131,549

2010 Households 135 128 152 83 174 426 386 1,354 1,521 3,337 $182,237

Source: US Census Bureau (2000 US Census, 2010 US Census)

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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2010 % of Total Households 2% 2% 2% 1% 2% 6% 5% 18% 20% 43%

% Change 2000-2010 48% 172% 0% -54% -21% -36% -47% -20% 35% 118% 39%


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Population by Race (2000 – 2010) 2000 Population White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Other Race More than One Race Hispanic Origin (of any race)

2010 Population

20,345 299

2000 % of Total Population 95% 1%

% Growth 2000-2010

23,454 548

2010 % of Total Population 88% 2%

53

0.2%

92

0.3%

74%

386

2%

1,655

6%

329%

2

0%

9

0%

350%

175 259 789

0.8% 1% 4%

253 564 1,458

1% 2% 6%

45% 118% 85%

15% 83%

Source: US Census Bureau (2000 US Census, 2010 US Census)

The 2010 census identifies 35-44 and 45-54 year olds as predominant age groups in the city of Southlake, while nearly one-third of the population is less than 18 years old. Between 2000 and 2010, the City saw a decrease in the population of children under 10, 25-34 and 35-44 year olds, and an increase in youth 15-19, 45-54 and 5564 year olds. Both the youth and the adult populations in Southlake are generally older than they were a decade ago. This informs park planners that, while families are still the primary audience for park facilities, improved amenities for teenaged youth and adult recreation may be needed. Looking toward the next 10 to 20 years, it is also possible that the number of adults over 65 may increase significantly, depending on patterns of migration. Likewise, as new residential development slows, the number and percentage of young children in the city may continue to decline. Facilities serving the interests of senior adults and passive recreational activities such as wildlife observation, walking, hiking, and biking may become more popular. Southlake is also slowly becoming more racially diverse, while the income distribution remains the same.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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PARKS, RECREATION & OPEN SPACE This Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan is evidence of the City of Southlake’s long-standing commitment to provide area residents with high quality park facilities and recreation programs. The City’s commitment has resulted in an outstanding system of much loved parks and well-attended programs that serve to enrich the lives of the community. The focus of this section of the master plan is to provide direction through the year 2030, ensuring that City parks and programs continue to meet the changing needs of the community. The City’s parks, recreation programs and open spaces contribute significantly to the quality of life in Southlake. With its high-quality park facilities, hiking and riding trails adjacent to Grapevine Lake, and comprehensive recreational programs, Southlake offers many leisure activities and healthy lifestyle choices for residents and visitors. Parks and community-serving facilities enhance the quality of life for residents and are an important component of complete and sustainable neighborhoods. Accessible parks provide a place to play, exercise, spend time with friends and neighbors, or to just relax and recuperate. Trails serve an important recreational function while also creating opportunities Johnson Place Park Trail for connections throughout the community. These walking, hiking, running, biking, and equestrian trails connect neighborhoods, parks, schools, places of employment, and activity centers, and create mobility opportunities for residents of all ages. Recreational programs provide opportunities for residents of all ages to participate in recreational, educational, and sportsrelated classes and activities. Public health benefits accrue in neighborhoods that have access to parks, community facilities, and trails. Access to recreational amenities leads to improved levels of physical activity that have associated physical and mental health benefits on a community-wide basis. Such access also increases opportunities for interaction among all members of the community, which can lead to stronger community ties and an improved sense of connectedness.

GOALS & OBJECTIVES The goals and objectives within this plan are intended to guide all public and private decision making for the development of the city’s parks, recreation, and open space system. The Vision, Goals & Objectives of the Southlake 2030 Comprehensive Master Plan define the values of the community and set both the framework and the tone for the rest of the plan elements including the Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan. The vision, goals and objectives were developed by the Southlake 2030 Plan Vision, Goals and Objectives Committee, using the Southlake 2025 Plan Vision, Goals and Objectives as a foundation. Goals and objectives were added and modified to reflect changes in the community over the last four years and to address new plan elements that are included in the scope of the Southlake 2030 Plan. The Goals & Objectives for Parks, Recreation & Open Space served as the basis behind the recommendations developed for this plan and are as follows: Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Goal 4: Parks, Recreation and Open Space Support a comprehensive integrated parks, recreation and open space system for all ages that creates value and preserves natural assets of the City. Objective 4.1

Ensure that new development incorporates usable open space.

Objective 4.2

Ensure that parkland and open spaces include an integrated mix of developed and natural areas with consideration of protecting the City’s ecosystem and wildlife corridors.

Objective 4.3

Promote water conservation and reuse in the design of parks and open spaces.

Objective 4.4

Utilize partnerships to create open space and recreation facilities.

Objective 4.5

Ensure an even geographic distribution of park facilities and recreation activities—both active and passive—for citizens of all ages.

Objective 4.6

Provide a full range of park facilities and linear linkages that will accommodate the current and future needs of the City’s residents and visitors.

Objective 4.7

Integrate passive recreational opportunities into preserved natural and drainage areas.

Objective 4.8

Incorporate feedback received from the Parks and Recreation Citizen Survey into recreation activities and park facilities.

Objective 4.9

Explore opportunities to promote the City’s historical landmarks within the park system.

Objective 4.10 Determine parkland desirable for dedication as part of the development process based on classification, location and maintenance cost. Objective 4.11 Prioritize investments in existing and established parks understanding that there will be strategic opportunities for land acquisition. Objective 4.12 Incorporate educational and learning opportunities within parks and related facilities. Objective 4.13 Pursue recreational and educational opportunities on Corps of Engineers property compatible with the goal of protecting and preserving the existing ecosystem for future generations. In addition to the goal and objectives noted above, the recommendations of this plan also help implement other goals and objectives of the Vision, Goals & Objectives of the Southlake 2030. A complete version of the Vision, Goals & Objectives component of the comprehensive master plan can be found in Appendix A of this plan.

MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT The Southlake 2030 Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Committee, which included the Parks & Recreation Board as well as City Council members, oversaw the development of the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan. Altogether, the committee held 20 public meetings between September 2011 and March 2013 to discuss, review, and develop park and community facility recommendations for the 19 park areas and community facilities evaluated in Southlake (see Appendix C: Southlake 2030: Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Process Timeline). Included in these 20 meetings were several design charrettes that were utilized in developing the concept plans and recommendations for the parks within the City. All of these meetings were open to the public and advertised on the city’s website. In addition, the committee extended invitations to members of the Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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community affiliated with special interests in specific leisure, recreational and sports acitivities. Once the plan was complete, the committee forwarded the plan to the Parks & Recreation Board for consideration and recommendation. A Southlake Program for the Involvement of Neighborhoods (SPIN) meeting was also held to solicit public input. The SPIN forum fosters open and timely communication between the citizens and city government regarding programs and issues affecting the quality of life in the community in order to provide positive relations and a stronger sense of community. A public hearing was held by both the Planning and Zoning Commission and the City Council before final approval. In summary, the approval process for Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan was as follows: 1. Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Committee meetings 2. SPIN meeting 3. Final Committee recommendation 4. Parks & Recreation Board recommendation 5. Planning & Zoning Commission recommendation 6. City Council 1st reading 7. City Council 2nd reading (final plan approval) In addition, both the Planning & Zoning Commission and the City Council held public hearings for the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan prior to adoption by Ordinance No. 1060 in February and March 2013.

CREATION OF PARK RECOMMENDATIONS Enhancing Southlake’s existing park and recreation facilities, as well as creating new recreational opportunities, will be carried out through the City’s park recommendations. The recommendations for Parks, Recreation & Open Space are listed in a later section of this plan. The City will continue to maintain its existing recreation programs and facilities, as well as making those resources accessible to all Southlake residents. Access to park facilities and connections between open space resources through pedestrian, bicycle and equestrian trails are important to enhancing Southlake’s recreational experiences. These recommendations are based on the analysis of existing facilities and programs compared to the various service objectives and standards defined by the City’s Strategic Management System and the adopted Southlake 2030: Vision, Goals Objectives, as well as input received from the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Committee, City staff and Southlake residents.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

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The recommendations address some key areas of interest in improving the City’s parks consisting of the following main topic areas: Improvements to Existing Parks Connectivity Open Space/Trails Aesthetics Field Functionality

PRIORITIZATION After finishing the drafting of the parks recommendations, it was necessary to formulate a way to prioritize the recommendations of the parks. The committee conducted a forced ranking exercise in which each park was “packaged” together and ranked based on the level of importance as voted on by the committee. The results of the force ranking activity are listed under Exhibit 3 along with the packaged recommendations that they were grouped in. The recommendations that were not in the “package” by park were excluded from this exercise due to no capital costs being associated with the recommendations. These recommendations could be prioritized at the staff level and placed on city department business plans.

Exhibit 3 Force Ranking Exercise Results Park Package Bicentennial Park Southlake Sports Complex Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve – Trails Development Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve – Nature Trail Expansion Bob Jones Park North Park Community Recreation Center Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve – New Building Development Liberty Park at Sheltonwood Noble Oaks Park Koalaty Park Royal & Annie Smith Park Chesapeake Park Kirkwood / Sabre Linear Park The Cliffs Park Oak Pointe Park Safety Town Park Haven Park

Priority Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

PLAN IMPLEMENTATION A plan is only as good as the methods by which it is used as a tool for the ultimate goal: implementation. While several substantial athletic facilities and aesthetic improvements remain, the city is on schedule (compared to population size) and meeting the current needs with its previous and current implementation of the master plan. Those demands that remain, along with several desired non-traditional venues and the ever-conscious Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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need to obtain and/or preserve natural areas, make for some difficult decision making when placed in priority order and weighed against available funding. The next section provides the strategy that was undertaken to determine which recommendations and needs would be addressed earlier rather than later and is the blueprint for plan implementation with the recommendations listing provided under the Park Plans and Standards for Development section. For each specific recommendation, a relative priority (Tier) has been established to assist with the priority of implementation of the recommendation. During the development of this master plan the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Committee conducted a forced ranking activity which determined the priority of the particular park and its recommended improvements. The results of this activity allowed City staff to assign the recommendations based on priority Tiers. The Tiers are divided into three different Tier categories based on timeframe to implement:

Tier 1: 1 to 3 Years Tier 2: 4 to 7 Years Tier 3: 8 Years and beyond

Chesapeake Park

The CIP planning process begins and ends with projects recommended by this master plan. Annually, as part of the City’s budget process, city staff analyzes the adopted master plan and develops a comprehensive list of projects and corresponding details along with preliminary cost estimates for each project to be included in the proposed CIP. The proposed CIP is submitted to the CIP Technical Committee (department directors), who rank them based on set criteria. The Parks & Recreation Board and the Southlake Parks Development Corporation (SPDC) will review the proposed CIP and make a recommendation to the City Council who will approve the CIP as part of the annual budget adoption. The priority list that was developed during this master plan will help guide future members of the City’s boards and City Council when making decisions related to the CIP. While these tiers have provided the order of implementation and priority of which the park recommendations were considered, it should be noted that all recommendations are subject to available funding during the given budget year and will be placed on the Capital Improvements Program (CIP).

PARK CLASSIFICATIONS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS In order to provide the parks, recreation, and open space facilities needed by the City’s residents, a set of standards and criteria should be followed. In the Southlake 2025 Comprehensive Plan, parks were categorized and classified based on park design concepts and standards identified by the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA - http://www.nrpa.org/). After further evaluating the demographics and specific needs of the City and its residents it became evident that many parks exceeded or did not fit within these standard categories. So for the purposes of addressing classification and functions of parks within the City, this master plan will categorize parks on how they function specifically within Southlake.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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For this Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan, the following park categories are being used: NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS COMMUNITY PARKS NATURAL AREAS and / or OPEN SPACE

Neighborhood Parks The neighborhood park is to be one of the most important features of a park system because of its ability to define the character of neighborhoods through its design. Its primary function is the provision of recreational space for the neighborhood that surrounds it. When it is possible to combine an elementary school with this type of park, the two features further enhance the identity of the neighborhood by providing a central location for recreation and education, and by providing a significant open space feature within the neighborhood. A neighborhood park would be preferably located near the center of the neighborhood, but also around the periphery of the neighborhood or as a buffer between major roadways and the neighborhood is also preferable. Safe and convenient pedestrian access (sidewalks or hike-and-bike trails) is important to a neighborhood park location. Facilities normally provided at a neighborhood park may consist of the following: Playground structures Open space for both active & passive uses Pavilion with picnic tables Park amenities such as drinking fountains, benches, signage, grills, trash cans, trees and landscaping Hike/bike trails

Noble Oaks Park

Neighborhood parks are typically designed to serve a small population area. The most critical aspect of acquiring, sizing, locating, and constructing neighborhood parks is that the park is easily accessible from the surrounding neighborhoods. Therefore, trail linkages and familyfriendly amenities take priority.

Community Parks A community park is a large and much more versatile type of park developed to serve the community. These parks can be oriented to provide both active and passive recreational facilities for all ages. A community park can serve several neighborhood areas and can typically be conveniently accessed by automobile. These parks are diverse in nature and may include many different amenities including but not limited to the following: Athletic complexes/field space for baseball, football, lacrosse, soccer, and softball games and practices (lighted and non-lighted) Areas for community events Pavilions/community gathering spaces with picnic tables Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Park restroom facilities Sports courts (such as tennis & basketball) Playground structures Internal park road system & parking Open space for both active & passive uses Hike/bike trails Nature trails and interpretative areas [SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ponds and water features Viewpoints or overlooks

Bicentennial Park

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19

Park amenities such as drinking fountains, benches, signage, grills, trash cans, trees and landscaping

North Park

Natural Area/Open Space These areas are natural and are generally left undisturbed, but are not necessarily characterized as land preservations. No organized, active recreational uses are usually accommodated in these areas; they are primarily intended for passive recreational use. The US Army Corps of Engineers lease area will be considered natural areas for the purpose of the Southlake 2030 plan update.

Bob Jones Park

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Oak Pointe Park

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INVENTORY OF PARKS AND ACREAGE The following exhibits contain a listing of Southlake parks and their acreages as well as the classification type based on the criteria mentioned earlier.

Exhibit 4 PUBLIC PARKS INVENTORY PARK

PARK CLASSIFICATION TYPE

ACREAGE

Bicentennial Park

Community Park

80.9

Bob Jones Park

Community Park

137.7

Natural Area/Open Space Neighborhood Park Natural Area/Open Space Neighborhood Park Neighborhood Park Neighborhood Park Natural Area/Open Space Neighborhood Park Neighborhood Park Natural Area/Open Space Neighborhood Park Community Park Neighborhood Park Neighborhood Park Community Park Neighborhood Park Neighborhood Park Community Park Community Park Neighborhood Park Neighborhood Park

180.7 11.3 4.5 14.5 2.7 2.3 3.7 1.1 7.3 15.1 5.8 19.9 8.0 4.6 19.2 8.2 13.0 0.7 15.9 4.6 10.1

Neighborhood Parks (*Developer Planned Parks)

48.0

Community Parks

8.4

Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve Chesapeake Park Coker Hike & Bike Park The Cliffs Park Cotswold Valley Park Estes Park Gateway Park Haven Park Johnson Place Park Kirkwood/Sabre Linear Park Koalaty Park Liberty Park at Sheltonwood Lonesome Dove Park Noble Oaks Park North Park Oak Pointe Park Royal and Annie Smith Park Safety Town Park Southlake Sports Complex Watermere Parks Winding Creek Park (Planned Dedicated Park) Carillon Parks Enclave Park The Preserve* Villa Park North Corporate Park* Villa Park South* Lake Carillon Park* Village Green* Town Square Parks Frank Edgar McPherson Park Cornish, IV Park Summit Park Rustin Park Central Park Family Park US Army Corps of Engineers Lease Area

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Natural Area/Open Space Total Acreage: [SOUTHLAKE 2030]

577.7 1,205.9


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

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JOINT USE FACILITIES / PARTNERSHIPS The City of Southlake has a partnership with the Carroll Independent School District (CISD) that enables the use of public park facilities by CISD and the use of school facilities such as auditoriums, cafeterias, gymnasiums, and fields by the City for public parks and recreation programs. School facilities are built and maintained with local tax dollars principally for the use of students and they are utilized extensively for the schools’ extracurricular activities and maintenance during non-school hours. However, at times when the buildings or fields are not occupied for school-purposes, the community has been able to enjoy the use of these public facilities. Likewise, park amenities are public investments which can be shared by local schools to make more efficient use of public funds and reduce the need to build redundant facilities. The City of Southlake should continue to consider future joint use partnerships with neighboring communities such as Keller, Grapevine, Colleyville, Westlake, or Trophy Club, as appropriate to meet community needs. When pursuing joint use opportunities it is important to discuss all considerations including, but not limited to the following: Maintenance:

How can we ensure that joint use facilities are respected and maintained? Who is responsible for maintenance, repairs and long-term capital improvements?

Operations:

Who will unlock the gate? Who will run the programs? Who has priority?

Liability:

What if someone gets hurt? Does the property have sufficient liability insurance to cover any issues associated with joint use?

Ownership:

How does joint use affect how decisions are made about the property? Are partners involved in decisions made relative to the improvement, change, or sale of a joint use property? How can the partnership be mutually beneficial?

Cost/Revenue:

What costs might be associated with the joint use partnership? How much should each partner contribute? How will revenues be split?

NEEDS ASSESSMENT According to the 2011 Citizens Survey, over 90% of those surveyed considered that providing sidewalks, trails and a variety of parks was either very important or somewhat important. With this is mind, during the development of this master plan the views and recreation preferences of Southlake residents played an important role in developing the direction of the plan and the amenities needed within the parks and recreation system of the City. An effort was made during the review of the parks of the City to ensure there is connectivity between and within the park system in addition to connections to adjacent neighborhoods and schools. The parks and recreational facilities the City has to offer its residents should generally be in accordance with the current needs of Southlake, as well as with the anticipated or expected needs and demands that may arise in the future. Anticipated needs can be forecasted based on standards and development guidelines that are related to the population to be served and the trends in demand. With the City being at a point in time where the population increase is not expected to increase substantially, it is critical Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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that the City take into considerations the demands of the population. Expectation of needs is usually determined through the analysis of material and data furnished by persons actively engaged in some type of recreational activity, as such was the case in the development of this master plan. The following section below describes the approach taken into accounting for and assessing the needs of the City.

Demand Based Needs The demand based needs approach used to assist in assessing the future needs relies on information and data from user group sources, or other sources familiar with the desires for specific types of facilities. The method generally used to attain input for this phase of the needs assessment is to consider requests from specific user groups separated by respective activities, surveys and public meetings. These sources, in addition to the input and recommendations from the master plan committee formed the basis for which the needs were determined for the City. It is Enclave Park (Carillon) important to note that the demands of the community may change over time. For example, during the evaluation of the current conditions and inventory of the City’s parks, the use of playing fields was taken into account on how they can be managed as multi-purpose in order to accommodate the changing needs and demands in the future. In summary, the following three points must be strongly emphasized, as a result from discussions and evaluation of the information provided during the committee meetings: 1. The City has acquired an adequate amount of park land as the City has developed and only needs small parks or special purpose type parks, such as the Town Square Parks or Carillon Parks, in less-serviced areas as they develop or re-develop. 2. The greatest needs in the City’s park system are aesthetic improvements, build-out of existing parks as recommended in this master plan and connectivity to off-site locations. 3. While the city has an adequate amount of park land, further development of these parks is necessary in order for them to be used to their maximum potential whether that be for active, passive or natural uses.

Conclusions from the Needs Assessment The overall Parks Inventory Evaluation (Needs Assessment) for the Southlake park system is shown under Exhibit 5. As far as park acquisition is concerned, the city currently owns or leases adequate total acreage for a build-out scenario. The community would be open to new opportunities for recreational uses, whether they are active or passive, in order to accommodate and meet the demands of the City’s residents.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

23

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

Exhibit 5

SOUTHLAKE 2030 PARKS, RECREATION & OPEN SPACE MASTER PLAN PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITY INVENTORY PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES 2012 CURRENT 2030 PLANNED Southlake 2030 Standard (Based on 35,000 Population)

Facility Type

2012 Delivery (Based on 35,000 2012 Inventory 2012 Over/Under Population)

2030 Delivery (Based on 35,000 2030 Inventory 2030 Over/Under Population)

Baseball / Softball Field Youth Baseball Game Field

1 per 3,000

1 per 2,917

12

--

1 per 2,917

12

--

Youth Softball Game Field

1 per 7,000

1 per 5,833

6

1

1 per 5,833

6

1

Adult Softball Game Field

1 per 17,500

1 per 17,500

2

--

1 per 17,500

2

--

Baseball Practice Area

1 per 2,500

1 per 1,521

23

9

1 per 1,521

23

9

Softball Practice Area

1 per 7,000

1 per 2,333

15

10

1 per 2,333

15

10

Batting Cage Stall

1 per 4,000

1 per 3,500

10

1

1 per 2,917

12

3

Basketball Court (Outdoor)

1 per 5,000

1 per 1,750

20

13

1 per 1,591

22

15

Dog Park

1 per 35,000

1 per 35,000

1

--

1 per 35,000

1

--

Fishing Pier

1 per 10,000

1 per 7,000

5

1

1 per 7,000

5

1

In-line Hockey Rink

0 per 35,000

1 per 35,000

1

--

0 per 35,000

0

--

Pavilion

1 per 1,225

1 per 875

40

--

1 per 814

43

--

Playground

1 per 2,000

1 per 1,250

28

10

1 per 1,129

31

13

Rectangular Sports Field (Game)

1 per 2,000

1 per 1,522

23

5

1 per 1,522

23

5

Rectangular Sports Field (Practice)

1 per 1,000

1 per 897

39

4

1 per 814

43

8

Sand Volleyball Court

1 per 15,000

1 per 11,667

3

--

1 per 7,000

5

2

Tennis Court

1 per 1,500

1 per 897

39

15

1 per 897

39

15

Notes: Rectangular Sports Field = Sports field utilized for Football, Lacrosse and Soccer 2012 Current = The current inventory of Parks and Recreation Facilities 2030 Planned = The planned inventory based on the implementation of the Southlake 2030 Parks, Recreation & Open Space Master Plan Recommendations

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

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24

PARK PLANS AND STANDARDS FOR DEVELOPMENT Perhaps the most important aspect of the Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Master Plan updates are the changes to the individual park concept plans. Anyone interested about future park development along with the Parks & Recreation Board, Southlake Parks Development Corporation, Planning & Zoning Commission, City Council and City Staff will rely directly on these plans for guidance. This makes the concept plans a critical part of the plan document and necessary of careful consideration when evaluating park improvements. It should be noted however that these plans are guidelines, and are subject to changing conditions and evolution. The actual development of the park may differ from the concept plans.

Rustin & Family Parks (Town Square)

In addition to the individual park concept plans, recommendations have also been drafted to reflect the considerations of the Parks, Recreation & Open Space/Community Facilities Master Plan Committee. The recommendations are intended to be more descriptive and provide supplemental information of the intent of the individual park concept plans of the City’s parks and should be considered when looking at the graphic illustrations of the concept plans developed by the committee.

North Park

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

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Individual Park Recommendations and Concept Plans Bicentennial Park Bicentennial Park is a community park comprised of the first land ever assembled for park purposes in Southlake, with initial purchases and donations beginning in the 1970s. It is located north of Southlake Blvd. (F.M. 1709), west of White Chapel Blvd., and east of Shady Oaks Drive. As additional land was purchased, the park became the center of athletic facilities in the city, and largely remains that way today, with baseball facilities outnumbering all other uses. The park also includes basketball goals, an in-line hockey rink, a Tennis Center with pro shop, a maintenance building and yard, a large playground (removed May 2012), two small community buildings, the Liberty Garden demonstration garden, and support facilities. In 2004, the city purchased 6.5 acres adjacent to Shady Oaks, which provides roughly 82 acres of contiguous land for park uses. In February 2007, the City Council adopted the Bicentennial Park Schematic Design. The first phase of the park improvements detailed in the Schematic Design was completed in September 2011 which included a new Bicentennial (American flags) theme for the park, four new youth baseball fields, a new park entry feature off FM 1709, a third park entry drive off Shady

Oaks Blvd, additional trails, the development of a large pond with signature vehicular bridge and increased drainage retention, a roundabout intersection, additional trees and landscaping, park amenities, as well as many other aesthetic improvements. The second phase of improvements approved by the City Council in September 2012 is currently in design with construction planned for 2013-14. A new playground, park boulevard connection to White Chapel Blvd including a new park entry feature, Parks Division offices and maintenance yard, concession/restroom building, Miracle Field, a highschool (60/90) size baseball field, trails, additional trees and landscaping, and additional aesthetic improvements are currently planned for the second phase. During the Parks, Recreation & Open Space/Community Facilities Master Plan process serious consideration was given to the addition of a community recreation center at Bicentennial Park. As a result a revised Bicentennial Park Master Plan which includes a Community Recreation Center was developed and adopted by the City Council in September 2012.

Bicentennial Park Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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BICENTENNIAL PARK Recommendation 1. Conduct a feasibility study and consider the expansion of the Tennis Center facility including covered tennis courts. 2. Maintain the log cabin at Bicentennial Park as it exists today with continued exploration of educational programs with historical emphasis. 3. Removal of “The Lodge� at Bicentennial Park as a part of Phase II. 4. Provide pedestrian connectivity within the park through the installation of sidewalks or trails. 5. Implement and prioritize architectural improvements and field improvements at the park for existing and future buildings, structures and fields.

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

1

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

1

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

1

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

1

Tier 1

CS

Mobility, C2

1

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

6. Provide a Multipurpose-Facility with an amphitheater on the southwest portion of the park.

7

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, Partnerships & Volunteerism, Performance Management & Service Delivery, C3, C5, B4, F2

7. Promote dual frontage on retail buildings adjacent to Bicentennial Park if redevelopment occurs.

1

Tier 2

CS, PDS

Quality Development, C3

x = Not included in Forced Ranking Activity CS = Community Services Department PDS = Planning & Development Services Department PW = Public Works Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

1.5, 1.8, 1.9, 4.1, 4.4, 4.5, 4.12, 8.1


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

27


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

28

Bob Jones Park and Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve Bob Jones Park began as a series of purchases, a large portion coming from an underdeveloped, small-lot mobile home park that had fallen into disarray. Eventually, with other acquisitions and the Corps of Engineers lease, the park grew to total nearly 500 acres – most of which is prime native Cross Timbers habitat. The first major construction at the park involved completion of 13 soccer fields (several subsequently lighted) and parking, followed by support facilities. The nearby six-acre pond with the bat-wing pavilion serves to collect drainage for use as field irrigation, not to mention a first-class fishing area. On the far north drive entrance, an equestrian parking lot houses trailer parking, corral pens, hitching posts, a picnic area, and a ranch faucet.

In 2004 the six practice backstops were retrofitted with lights to create a Girls’ Softball Complex, which also includes support facilities, buildings, and another pond. Additional parking south of the complex near the pond was added in 2007. Bob Jones Park and the Corps lease were also officially recognized by the City Council in 2002 as the location for the Bob Jones Nature Center. To provide an immediate location, the ranch house on the 60-acre Tucker property purchase was designated to serve as the center. In April 2008, the Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve was officially opened following major renovations to the Tucker home, and development of the grounds near the facility. In 2011, the Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve Master Plan was adopted by the City Council and many recommendations for improvements to Nature Center & Preserve were suggested.

Bob Jones Park

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Bob Jones Park Equestrian Parking Area

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BOB JONES PARK Recommendation 1. Partner with the Carroll Independent School District (CISD) to locate jogging/cross-country trails appropriately in Bob Jones Park and the Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers properties through appropriate signage and designated routes. 2. Work with the Department of Public Safety Fire Services to develop a fire prevention and maintenance plan. 3. Provide additional amenities at the park such as benches, bike racks, shade structures and restrooms to the park. 4. Provide updated aesthetic improvements to the existing softball fields shade structures and pavilion in the park. 5. Provide more shade in the form of trees and shade structures throughout the park along walkways, paths, parking lots, sports fields, N. White Chapel Boulevard and the roadway to the Bob Jones Nature Center as appropriate. 6. Install a fountain on the east pond of the park. 7. Provide improvements to the playground area in the form of new playground equipment and installation of a shade structure. 8. Provide additional parking on the south end of the park adjacent to the south pond and existing parking. 9. Install additional sidewalks and trails throughout the park and adjacent to N. White Chapel Boulevard providing connectivity to The Cliffs Park and the Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve area where appropriate. 10. Explore the opportunity to add a water element/pond to the dog park area.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

5

Tier 1

CS

Partnerships & Volunteerism, C5

5

Tier 1

CS, DPS

Safety & Security, C1

5

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

1.5, 1.9, 3.2, 4.2, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.13, 5.1, 8.1, 9.3


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

BOB JONES PARK Recommendation 11. Improve the equestrian area to the north end of the park to include shaded areas, fencing, picnic areas, equestrian friendly parking and other park amenities as appropriate. Work with Southlake Mounted Patrol and equestrian stakeholders for these improvements. 12. Reconfigure the equestrian parking area to direct loading and unloading of horses on the north side. 13. Improve the parking lot adjacent to the equestrian area by ensuring separation from the equestrian parking area and the practice fields by way of landscaping and fencing as a buffer. 14. Add shade structures and landscape improvements to the existing multipurpose fields. 15. Add practice fields adjacent to the equestrian area on the north side of the park. Parking will be provided by the existing parking lot located to the south. 16. Consider the addition of synthetic turf at the fields as appropriate. 17. Install lighting and additional landscaping within the parking lots of the park. 18. Provide shade structures, landscaping and trees around the perimeter of the parking lots and sports fields within the park. 19. Consider the expansion of the maintenance facility if it becomes necessary. 20. Construct a roadway from N. White Chapel Boulevard to the existing nature center; the roadway should be constructed in a manner that is sensitive to the existing natural environment. 21. Re-align the equestrian trails when the roadway to the Bob Jones Nature Center Building is installed.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS

Safety & Security, Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

5

Tier 3

CS

5

Tier 3

CS

5

Tier 3

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

5

Tier 3

CS

Mobility, C2

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Quality Development, C3 Performance Management & Service Delivery, B5

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

30


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

BOB JONES PARK Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

22. Install an entry gateway feature into the Bob Jones Park and Bob Jones Nature Center Preserve.

5

Tier 3

CS

23. Provide a watering hole in the equestrian area in the north.

5

Tier 3

CS

Recommendation

CS = Community Services Department DPS = Department of Public Safety PDS = Planning & Development Services Department PW = Public Works Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Strategic Link Quality Development, C3 Quality Development, C3

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

31


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

32


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

33

Chesapeake Park As one of the only public parks in the southwest area of the city, Chesapeake Park is an under developed neighborhood park that has much potential to further provide enjoyment to the area residents. During the master plan process many concerns were raised about the park as to its maintenance and potential to serve the surrounding neighborhood, namely Chesapeake Place. Some of the concerns were

related to debris, outdated playground equipment, drainage and lack of additional amenities. Residents of the surrounding community attended the public meetings and addressed the same concerns; therefore, several recommendations were made to address some of the areas and are included in the concept plan.

Chesapeake Park

CHESAPEAKE PARK Recommendation

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

1.

Install boulders and landscaping along the southern boundary of the park.

13

Tier 1

CS

2.

Remove the addition of the fishing pier from the Southlake 2025 Comprehensive Plan concept plan for Chesapeake Park. Install additional landscaping and trash receptacles around and adjacent to the pond area.

13

Tier 1

CS, PDS

13

Tier 1

CS

3.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Strategic Link

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

Quality Development, C3 Quality Development, C3 Quality Development, C3

1.5, 1.9, 3.2, 4.4, 4.6


[SOUTHLAKE 2030] 4.

Provide additional amenities at the park such as but not limited to a picnic area, shade structures, pavilion, benches, tennis courts, basketball courts and new larger playground equipment while prioritizing the installation of the playground and pavilion. Provide a restroom if and when the basketball courts, tennis courts and pavilion are built. Provide pedestrian connectivity to the church parking lot located to the north. Install appropriate signage in addition to a monument sign(s) that is scaled appropriately for the park. Evaluate the need for and implement the installation of a well at the park if necessary. Explore and prioritize the opportunity to have a joint parking agreement with the church located to the north before constructing any additional parking.

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

13

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

13

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

13

Tier 3

CS

Mobility, C2

13

Tier 3

CS

13

Tier 3

CS

13

Tier 3

CS

10. Provide additional parking for the park at the northeast portion of the park.

13

Tier 3

CS

11. Prioritize the installation of a sidewalk along Union Church adjacent to the park.

13

Tier 3

CS, PW

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Quality Development, C3 Quality Development, C3 Partnerships & Volunteerism, C5 Quality Development, C3 Mobility, C2

34


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

35


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

36

Coker Hike & Bike Park The Coker Hike & Bike Park is the only park that is not within the City of Southlake boundaries. This park is located in Grapevine immediately adjacent to the City. The potential to improve the park is minimal due

to a portion of the park being in a floodplain and utility power lines with easements running diagonally through the park.

COKER HIKE & BIKE PARK

1. 2.

Recommendation

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Explore and consider opportunities to sell the property or use the property for other purposes.

x

Tier 1

CS

Provide an access with natural surface parking if city retains park.

x

Tier 3

CS

x = Not included in Forced Ranking Activity CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Strategic Link

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

Performance Management & Service Delivery, B5, F2 Quality Development, C3

4.6, 8.1


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

37


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

38

The Cliffs Park The Cliffs Park was dedicated parkland during the development of the Cliffs of Clariden Ranch. The approximately 15 acres of open space area is mostly unimproved with the exception of the portion of the park that is on the interior of the Cliffs of Clariden Ranch development. The larger portion of the park between the development and N. White

Chapel Boulevard is mostly flat open space with minimal tree cover, particularly on the interior of the lot. The committee’s desire is to capitalize on the parks adjacency to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers property and preserve as much of the natural area as possible.

The Cliffs Park

THE CLIFFS PARK Recommendation 1. 2. 3. 4.

Provide additional amenities at the park such as benches to the park. Explore the opportunity to add a drive aisle connection to N. White Chapel Boulevard and provide a natural surface parking area. Provide connectivity to the Bob Jones Trail System. Provide map signage to indicate distance of the trails and provide distance markers along the trails.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

15

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

15

Tier 3

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

15

Tier 3

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

15

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

1.5, 1.9, 3.2, 4.2, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.13, 8.1


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

39

THE CLIFFS PARK Recommendation 5.

6.

7. 8. 9.

Explore the opportunity to add passive walking trails with boardwalks in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers property to the south connecting them to The Cliffs Park trails. Sell the property located north of the telecommunications tower or provide this area as overflow parking for The Cliffs Park or Bob Jones Park. Install additional screening in the form of landscaping along the property line for the residences in the Clariden Ranch subdivision. Evaluate the need and implement the addition (if necessary) of multi-purpose field(s) at the park. Ensure no bollard lighting on the trails or parking lot lighting is installed.

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

15

Tier 3

CS

Mobility, C2

15

Tier 3

CS

Performance Management & Service Delivery, B5, F2

15

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

15

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

15

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

CS = Community Services Department PDS = Planning & Development Services Department PW = Public Works Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

40


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

41

Gateway Park This unimproved park area was dedicated to the City with the development of the new Gateway Church facility. This lot has no improvements on it and has a wetlands area occupying the majority of the property. The committee has considered and recommended

working with adjacent property owners in order to help in protecting the wetlands area when the adjacent properties develop and also recommended selling the property as it does not increase the value of the City’s parks system.

GATEWAY PARK Recommendation

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

1.

Work with the developer of the adjacent property to protect and enhance the park as natural wetlands preserve.

x

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

2.

Consider and evaluate selling the park property.

x

Tier 3

CS

Performance Management & Service Delivery, B5, F2

x = Not included in Forced Ranking Activity CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

4.6, 8.1


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

42


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

43

Haven Park Haven Park is a narrow linear park area that mainly serves the residents of Haven Circle. Due to its limited size and physical development constraints, no additional development is recommended.

HAVEN PARK

1. 2. 3.

Recommendation

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

Install pet waste dispensers within the park. Provide connectivity from the south end of the park to the road. Install appropriate signage to indicate this is a public park.

18 18 18

Tier 3 Tier 3 Tier 3

CS CS CS

Quality Development, C3 Quality Development, C3 Quality Development, C3

1.1, 1.5, 1.13, 4.6

CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

44


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

Johnson Place Park Johnson Place Park was dedicated as a City park during the development of Johnson Place Estates. This park, similarly to Haven Park, primarily serves the residents within the development. There are existing trails within the park and a few sitting areas. The park contains the development’s three retention ponds and serves primarily as a walking/jogging and aesthetic amenity to the development and surrounding area. The primary focus of the committee was connectivity from this park to adjacent properties and the future sidewalks along Randol Mill Road when F.M. 1938 is extended and widened along the east side of the park.

Johnson Place Park

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

45


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

46

JOHNSON PLACE PARK Recommendation 1. Evaluate the possibility of providing additional connectivity to the west by working with the Trailhead Addition Home Owners Association to install a trail into the Trailhead Addition private open space. 2. Provide additional connectivity to the future trail along Randol Mill Avenue. 3. Install crosswalks at appropriate road intersections to connect to future pathways. 4. Explore options of trail connectivity to the northwest of the park if the property develops.

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

x

Tier 3

CS

Mobility, C2

x

Tier 3

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

x

Tier 3

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

x

Tier 3

CS, PDS

Mobility, C2

x = Not included in Forced Ranking Activity CS = Community Services Department PDS = Planning & Development Services Department PW = Public Works Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

3.2, 4.6


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

47


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

48

Kirkwood/Sabre Linear Park This small, triangular and linear site is on the west side of North White Chapel Boulevard near Kirkwood Boulevard at the Sabre Campus property. It is a linear park that connects to the other linear private parks throughout the area, including the parks adjacent to the Kirkwood Hollow neighborhood. This site, when the North White

Chapel trail is constructed, would make an ideal rest area and picnic spot. In order to achieve full potential of the site connectivity is key in development of this park, and as such, has been recommended by the committee.

KIRKWOOD/SABRE LINEAR PARK Recommendation 1. Provide a pedestrian connectivity through the existing utility easement from N. White Chapel to Kirkwood Boulevard. 2. Provide connectivity from Kirkwood/Sabre Linear Park to Bob Jones Park and The Cliffs Park.

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

14

Tier 3

CS

Mobility, C2

14

Tier 3

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

3.2, 3.3

CS = Community Services Department PW = Public Works Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

49


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

50

Koalaty Park Koalaty Park is a mostly open neighborhood park with a small stand of trees in the southern end. It currently contains four backstops and is heavily used by local youth sports teams. Due to its strategic location and frequency of use, the committee determined that further

expansion of the parks uses is possible. Several recommendations have been made regarding this park including trail expansion, a restroom facility and lighted fields to name a few.

Koalaty Park

KOALATY PARK Recommendation 1. Explore the opportunity with Carroll Independent School District to have a parking agreement for joint use of the parking lot at the elementary school. 2. Provide additional amenities at the park such as shade structures, benches, bike racks, picnic area and restrooms at various locations in the park. 3. Consider the addition of lighting to the park where appropriate.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

11

Tier 1

CS

Partnerships & Volunteerism, C5

11

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

11

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

1.5, 1.9, 4.4, 4.6


[SOUTHLAKE 2030] 4. Expand the trails in the park to include a “nature trail� through the south end of the park. 5. Provide a vehicle drop off area adjacent to the drive aisle at the elementary school.

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

11

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

11

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, Mobility, C3

CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

51


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

52


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

53

Liberty Park at Sheltonwood This park, on the north side of Dove Road at Ridgecrest, is a relatively large underdeveloped park. It was formerly the site of a “summer camp� area, complete with a pavilion and swimming pool, and during the Southlake 2025 process was mostly undeveloped. In 2009 the first phase of development of the park was completed to include a new, large pavilion structure over the original pavilion slab, trails,

landscaping, park amenities, a restroom facility, pond, and parking. Considerations by the committee for the park consisted of but were not limited to the potential purchase of the adjacent property to the south (which was purchased in December 2012, prior to the adoption of the 2030 plan), additional parking and amenities to the park, historical and educational markers and park accessibility.

Liberty Park at Sheltonwood

LIBERTY PARK AT SHELTONWOOD Recommendation

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

1. Explore and evaluate the purchase of properties adjacent to the park along Dove Road and the potential to convert existing structures into community/meeting rooms in the future.

9

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, Performance Management & Service Delivery, C3, F2

2. Evaluate vehicle accessibility during events that are leased at the pavilion.

9

Tier 1

CS

Mobility, C2

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie 1.2, 3.3, 4.4, 4.11, 4.12, 8.1, 10.1


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

54

LIBERTY PARK AT SHELTONWOOD Recommendation

3. Consider the creation of a pavilion/park policy for leased events. 4. Conduct a study to determine the future use of the Shelton Residence. 5. Drill a water well for the pond to serve as a year round amenity. 6. Consider adding amenities to the park, such as but not limited to, benches along the paved pathways, a sand volleyball court and tetherball. 7. Evaluate and implement the installation of a children’s playground within the park. 8. Consider opportunities to add reference markers, such as but not limited, to informational and historical markers throughout the park. 9. Evaluate the ability to expand/add parking for the park.

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

9

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, Performance Management & Service Delivery, C3, F2

x

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

9

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

9

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

9

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

9

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

9

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

55


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

56

Lonesome Dove Park Lonesome Dove Park, one of the first neighborhood parks, was dedicated and constructed by the developer of the subdivision. This park is completely developed and major improvements were made in 2008 as per the recommendations of the 2005 Parks Master Plan.

Lonesome Dove Park

LONESOME DOVE PARK Recommendation 1. Preserve drainage area at the park as it exists today. 2. Evaluate the need for picnic tables and benches along the trail. 3. Provide wayfinding signage to the park.

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

x x x

Tier 1 Tier 1 Tier 3

CS CS CS, PDS

Quality Development, C3 Quality Development, C3 Quality Development, C3

3.2, 3.3

x = Not included in Forced Ranking Activity CS = Community Services Department PDS = Planning & Development Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

57


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

58

Noble Oaks Park Noble Oaks Park is an approximately 4.6 acre park in one of the more densely populated areas of the city, located adjacent to Old Union Elementary School. Residents have long enjoyed its simple open space and shade trees for impromptu events and youth sports practice. Improvements in the form of monument signs and a small pavilion

have been completed since the last master plan update. During the committee’s review of the park it was determined that the priority for the park was primarily connectivity and introducing additional tree species to the park.

Noble Oaks Park

NOBLE OAKS PARK Recommendation 1. Evaluate the feasibility of adding lighting to the gazebo.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

10

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie 3.2, 3.3


[SOUTHLAKE 2030] 2. Explore the opportunity with Carroll Independent School District to have a parking agreement for joint use of the parking lot at the elementary school. 3. Implement the installation of a variety of tree species at the park. 4. Provide connectivity from the gazebo and pond area at the park to the north end of the park. 5. Provide additional amenities at the park such as benches, bike racks and picnic area throughout the park.

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

10

Tier 1

CS

Partnerships & Volunteerism, C5

10

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

10

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

10

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

59


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

60


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

61

North Park This park was recently developed and opened in September 2012 as the City’s newest park. The park includes three lighted multi-purpose sports fields, a concession/restroom building, multi-use trails, playground, large pond, landscaping and open play space. The park

represents the level of quality that should be used in development of other City parks that are similar in nature. The park serves as a great amenity to the surrounding neighborhoods, such as Estes Park and Oak Pointe, but also the City as whole due to its flexibility in field use.

North Park

NORTH PARK Recommendation 1. Implement the construction of additional parking at the new DPS North facility. 2. Consider the purchasing of properties to the east for future expansion of the park facility to Ridgecrest Drive. 3. Provide the installation of a shade structure by the pond where it will not interfere with the area where a potential fourth field may be added. Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

6

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

6

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

6

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

3.3, 4.11, 8.1


[SOUTHLAKE 2030] 4. Evaluate the ability to add a fourth field to the park. 5. Explore opportunities for connectivity in the form of pathways to the west to N. White Chapel Blvd.

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

6

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

6

Tier 3

CS

Mobility, C2

CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

62


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

63


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

64

Oak Pointe Park This public neighborhood park on the west side of Ridgecrest just north of Dove Road consists of a series of “pocket park� areas totaling 8.2 acres within the residential development of Oak Pointe linked by a public pathway system. The areas are to be kept in a relatively natural state, and area residents can enjoy the public pond and a number of

shaded areas with benches and tables. No additional development is recommended for this park. The committee recommended connectivity as the primary focus for the park, providing links between North Park, Liberty Park at Sheltonwood and the newly constructed Walnut Grove Elementary School along North White Chapel Boulevard.

Oak Pointe Park

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

65

OAK POINTE PARK Recommendation 1. The City will only maintain the park at the same frequency as described in the Developers Agreement. The park may be maintained in more of a manicured state if desired by the Oak Pointe HOA, however, any additional maintenance beyond current levels shall continue to be the responsibility of the Oak Pointe HOA. 2. Consider in the future connectivity to North Park. 3. Evaluate and consider the ability to create a pathway connection to North White Chapel Boulevard / Walnut Grove Elementary School.

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

16

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3 1.1, 1.5, 3.3, 4.11

16

Tier 1

CS

Mobility, C2

16

Tier 3

CS

Mobility, C2

CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

66


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

67

Royal and Annie Smith Park Royal and Annie Smith Park was purchased from the Smith family, who had long occupied the premises. The property has a significant bit of history, and includes a hand-dug well, rumored to be the final resting place of a notorious gangster named “Pinky�. The history and abundant natural area suggested very minor improvements during the last master plan update. Since that time, amenities such as a playground and play area, pavilion, picnic benches, walking trails, drinking fountain and parking lot have been added to the park. The developed area and

the area adjacent to Johnson Road is maintained in a more manicured state, however the undeveloped portions of the park are left in a more natural state per the request of the surrounding neighbors. It is suited for a number of mid- to low-impact activities due to its size but during the review by the committee was not recommended for any significant improvements other than parking lot expansion and linking trails within the park.

Royal and Annie Smith Park

ROYAL AND ANNIE SMITH PARK Recommendation 1. 2.

Install additional parking adjacent to the existing parking lot and provide a turnaround. Provide additional park amenities such as swing sets in the playground and benches.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

12

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

12

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie 1.5, 1.9, 4.4, 4.6


[SOUTHLAKE 2030] 3. 4.

5.

6.

Evaluate the need for and implement the installation of a well at the park if necessary. The City shall work with Keller Independent School District to provide additional connectivity to the west crossing the Florence Elementary property onto Harrell Drive. Maintain the southern portion of the lot in its natural state to provide flexibility of use for this area and evaluate potential passive activities such as Frisbee golf. Add interpretive signage to the existing well at the park.

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

12

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

12

Tier 3

CS

Mobility, Partnerships & Volunteerism, C2

12

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

12

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

68


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

69


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

70

Southlake Sports Complex This approximately 16-acre park was constructed as a private baseball instructional facility and was purchased from the original owners. The property contains three lighted baseball fields (one high school size and two youth size), roughly 100 parking spaces, a 20,000 sq. ft. indoor training facility (currently leased to a private gymnastics instruction group), and approximately six acres of undeveloped property north of the drive entrance. This facility will require substantial material upgrades for use as anything other than its original purpose. The

committee has determined there is significant potential to retrofit this park to become a more prominent park in the City. There are numerous recommendations for this park including significant aesthetic and circulation (mobility) improvements to the park. The level of park development will also be determined by the future of the City’s Service Center (Public Works Operations Center). A recommendation has been made to conduct a study on the long-term use of the facility or if relocation would be appropriate at a future date.

Southlake Sports Complex

SOUTHLAKE SPORTS COMPLEX Recommendation 1. Provide additional amenities at the park such as batting cages, shade structures, playground, vending machines, picnic area and restrooms. 2. Expand the walking trails throughout the park including a sidewalk along Crooked Lane. 3. Install an entry feature (monument sign) at the park. Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie 1.2, 1.5, 1.7, 3.2, 3.9, 3.10, 4.7, 4.11, 8.1, 8.3, 10.1


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

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71

SOUTHLAKE SPORTS COMPLEX Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

2

Tier 2

CS

Mobility, C2

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

2

Tier 2

CS, PW

Mobility, C2

15. Conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of relocating the Public Works Operations center.

2

Tier 2

PW

Performance Management & Service Delivery, B5

16. Explore the possibility of adding a practice field south of the exiting leased building at the park.

2

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

CS

Quality Development, Performance Management & Service Delivery, C3, B5

Recommendation 4. Remove the fencing along the eastern boundary along Crooked Lane and replace the fencing around the perimeter of the park with ornamental fencing on the south, west and north boundaries. 5. Provide additional tree and landscape screening around the perimeter of the park. 6. Install crosswalks for pedestrians crossing Crooked Lane. 7. Modify the practice fields to have multiple fields in order to maximize use and flexibility of this area. 8. Prioritize the installation of field turf at this park. 9. Explore the opportunity to provide pedestrian connectivity to the neighborhood Cambridge Place to the west. 10. Evaluate the need for right turn deceleration lane and left hand turn lane along Crooked Lane into the park with a Traffic Impact Analysis. 11. Conduct a circulation study of the park to assess the need for additional parking, widening of the existing drive from Crooked Lane, additional access to Crooked Lane and possibility of access to Continental Boulevard if property is acquired to the south or the west. 12. Evaluate the need for and implement the installation of a well at the park for irrigation. 13. Provide aesthetic improvements to the existing building and park features, such as but not limited to, the dugouts on site. 14. Evaluate the feasibility of having connectivity between the City’s Public Works Operations center and the park.

17. Explore the possibility of adding a storage yard area to store maintenance equipment. CS = Community Services Department Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

2

Tier 2

PW = Public Works Department

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

72


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

Town Square Parks

Central Park

Rustin Park

Summit Park

McPherson Park

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

73


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

74

TOWN SQUARE PARKS Recommendation 1. Work with property management at the Shops of Southlake to encourage the development of a kiosk with a food vender at Central Park. 2. Consider the addition of monuments or statues at all four corners of Family Park. 3. Consider the addition of decorative interactive large scale chess pieces for children at Central Park.

Forced Ranking

x

Priority Tier

Tier 1

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

PDS

Partnerships and Volunteerism & Performance Management and Service Delivery, C3, C5

x

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

x

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

x = Not included in Forced Ranking Activity CS = Community Services Department PDS = Planning & Development Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

1.5, 1.9, 4.6


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

75


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

76

Carillon Parks

Enclave Park

CARILLON PARKS Recommendation 1.

Work with Hines and the Home Owners Association in development of the parks.

Forced Ranking

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

x

Tier 1

CS

Partnerships and Volunteerism, C5

9.3

x = Not included in Forced Ranking Activity CS = Community Services Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

77


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

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78

CITY-WIDE RECOMMENDATIONS AND POLICIES Many park specific issues arose during the development of this master plan update. However, there were some recommendations that seemed to be consistent throughout a majority of the City’s parks. These recommendations came from public input, the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Committee and the Community Services department’s internal policies and recommendations. Together, they shape the city-wide recommendations of this plan and are not specific to any one park, but are to be applied throughout the City’s park system as appropriate.

As a result from the city-wide recommendations, as shown in the CITYWIDE RECOMMENDATIONS/POLICY MATRIX in this section, the committee determined it was necessary to address aesthetic improvements in all City parks as it pertained to benches, tables, trash bins etc. in order to retain consistency throughout the parks. This plan now contains a standard for which any private developer that wishes to be consistent with the quality of City park amenities can follow, in addition to minimum standards the City should follow when improving current parks or developing new parks. These standards are addressed in the PARK STANDARDS in this section of the plan.

CITY-WIDE RECOMMENDATIONS/POLICY MATRIX Park Policy No.

Recommendation / Policy

P1

Develop internal park signage plans for all parks. Consideration should be given to both active use signage, such as directional signs to sports fields, and to passive use signage, such as trail head signs and directional signs at trail forks.

Prepare a Park Sign Plan that addresses signage in all parks.

Tier 1

CS, PDS

P2

Explore opportunities to lease the pavilions and parks for corporate events at appropriate park locations.

Develop a lease agreement standard for park facilities.

Tier 1

CS

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Implementation Metric

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Strategic Link Quality Development, Safety and Security, Performance Management and Service Delivery, C3, B4, L5 Partnerships and Volunteerism & Performance Management and Service Delivery, C3, C5

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

1.12, 10.8

4.4, 8.1


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Park Policy No.

Recommendation / Policy

P3

Consider the development and implementation of a recycling program throughout all city owned parks.

P4

P5

P6

P7

P8

P9

P10

Consider the installation of distance markers along park trails, possibly in the form of medallions in the ground, at appropriate park locations. Explore the possibility of creating a uniform city amenity policy for the public right of way such as benches and trash cans for Home Owners Associations to purchase and maintain themselves. Create a uniform park amenity program for consistency of benches, trash bins, etc., at city owned parks. Consider the installation of artificial turf on playing fields throughout the City where appropriate. Develop a use policy for the artificial turf fields in conjunction with installation. Explore opportunities of adding exercise stations along trails in City parks where appropriate. Work with the adjacent property owners in order to create connectivity in the form of pathways between North Park, Ridgecrest Drive, Liberty Park at Sheltonwood and Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve. Provide bollard lighting where appropriate along trails in City parks.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

Implementation Metric

Priority Tier

79

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie 1.4, 7.2, 7.3, 10.7

Develop a recycling program for City parks.

Tier 2

CS

Performance Management and Service Delivery, B4, B5

Install distance markers at appropriate park locations.

Tier 2

CS

Quality Development, C3

1.2, 1.5

Develop a uniform city amenity policy/standard for the public right of way.

Tier 1

CS, PW

Quality Development, C3

1.8, 1.12, 1.13

Develop a uniform city amenity policy/standard.

Tier 1

CS

Quality Development, C3

1.8, 1.12

Install artificial turf where appropriate in City Parks as funding becomes available.

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

4.5, 4.6

Add exercise stations along trails where appropriate.

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

4.5, 4.6

Acquire right-of-way or easements to construct a sidewalk.

Tier 3

CS

Infrastructure, C2

3.3, 3.4, 3.9

Install bollard lighting in City parks as funding becomes available.

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

1.5, 4.5, 4.6

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Park Policy No.

Recommendation / Policy

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

Implementation Metric Develop methods and policies for traffic calming measures for roadways/drive aisles within City parks Install appropriate park amenities as funding becomes available.

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

Tier 1

CS

Safety & Security, C1

3.2

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

4.5, 4.6

P11

Develop pedestrian safety measures and traffic calming measures at City parks.

P12

Add park amenities as appropriate to all the parks within the City.

P13

Connect City sidewalks to park trails to provide a continuous pedestrian system.

Install sidewalks where necessary

Tier 3

CS, PW

Mobility

3.2

P14

Continue to explore opportunities in partnerships with Carroll Independent School District (CISD) in order to create programs and share facilities to maximize financial benefits to both organizations and the residents of the City.

Create partnerships for various purposes with CISD.

Tier 1

CS

Partnerships and Volunteerism

4.4, 8.1

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

4.9

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

4.5

Tier 3

CS

Quality Development, C3

4.5

P15

Explore opportunities to reference or incorporate natural history, heritage and historical landmarks in the City’s parks.

P16

Explore opportunities to implement the operation of a community garden in the City where appropriate.

P17

City would be receptive to a skate park if operated privately.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Incorporate natural history, heritage and historical landmarks into the City’s parks during development or when improvements are done. Evaluate potential sites and co-operation opportunities to operate a community garden Consider the installation of a skate park if proposed by a private owner and operator.

80

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

Park Policy No.

P18

Recommendation / Policy

Conduct further research to gather additional facts and figures related to synthetic turf prior to any installations within the park system.

Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan

Implementation Metric

Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Strategic Link

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie

Conduct further studies on the advantages and disadvantages of artificial synthetic turf.

3

CS

Quality Development, C3

4.5, 4.6

CS = Community Services Department PDS = Planning & Development Services Department PW = Public Works Department

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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PARK STANDARDS Monument Signs Monument signs in City parks should consist of masonry material and generally follow the City’s Urban Design Plan unless there is a general theme of architecture or materials within the park that should be complimentary. The design objectives for monument signs are as follows:  Versatile  

Multiple configurations Various stone or brick options to match park appearance or theme

 Timeless & classic design to symbolize a Southlake park  Standardization of design to eliminate recurring design & engineering costs  Maximum visibility of park name with lighting

Sample of Existing City Park Monument Signs

The configurations of the signs should also retain some level of consistency throughout the City. The following are some examples of configurations and should be used as guidelines only. Actual configuration may have to vary depending on physical constraints on individual park sites.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Park Amenities The City has informally adopted some level of standards when doing amenity improvements to the City’s parks. With this master plan, the City will have formalized guidelines as to what level of quality the amenities should contain. A majority of the improvements consisting of benches, picnic tables, trash bins and drinking fountains have been installed with a black coating or finish. This trend should continue throughout all the City’s parks, and the standards provided below indicate the minimum level of quality to be provided whenever amenity improvements are considered.

Picnic Tables

Trash Bins

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

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Benches, Drinking Fountains & Pet Waste Stations

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There are also some higher quality amenities that have been installed at various City parks such as Bicentennial Park, North Park and throughout the Town Square Parks. This level of quality should be aimed for, but should only be implemented if funding permits and if the use and character of the park calls for it. The Victor Stanley and Dumor designs are examples of these higher quality park amenities.

Higher Quality Amenties Examples

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

[SOUTHLAKE 2030]


[SOUTHLAKE 2030]

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Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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COMMUNITY FACILITIES The Community Facilities Master Plan was developed as a result of the update to the City’s comprehensive plan, Southlake 2030. This particular component of the comprehensive plan is developed to address optimum and efficient responses of City services brought on by growth. The City of Southlake recognizes the need for proactive, futuristic planning to ensure the level of services will be maintained as it grows in population. The Community Facilities Master Plan is an essential part of the City’s effort to keep pace with this growth and maintain a high level of service delivery. It is intended to establish a process for coordinated development and use of city facilities. The Community Facilities Master Plan provides a guide for both long-term and near-term needs and demands of the community.

Brief History of Southlake One of the City’s first establishments was the Lonesome Dove Baptist Church that was organized in 1846 and built on land donated by church members, although it burned in 1863. In 1866, the first land within present day Southlake was homesteaded. It was located on what is now Dove Road and consisted of 360 acres. Settlers from Dade County, Georgia founded White’s Chapel Church, located at Southlake Boulevard and White Chapel Boulevard, in 1871. The first superintendent of schools was appointed in 1872, making Lonesome Dove one of the first public schools in Tarrant County, which was organized in 1849. Three local schools that included Lonesome Dove, White’s Chapel, and Sam’s Schoolhouse, consolidated to form the Carroll School District in 1919. This district was named after Tarrant County Superintendent B.H. Carroll. The first school building in the District was built in 1919, and is located on North Carroll Avenue next to Carroll Intermediate School. By 1890, Old Union boasted a school, a lodge, two churches, and a lop-up-n-hitch. The community’s Southlake Town Hall name came from the Old Union Primitive Baptist Church that met in the school building room from 1903 to 1910. In 1957, students adopted the Carroll Dragons as their school mascot. Old Union Community existed in the late 1800s and early 1900s in the present day location of State Highway 26 and Brumlow Avenue. Jellico Community was located at the present day intersection of Southlake Boulevard and Davis Boulevard. Robert Emmett Wilson, who came to the area during the 1880s and built a general store, founded Jellico. Jellico’s post office was established in 1898. Jellico, Tennessee was the prior home of many of its residents. The declining commercial importance of Jellico beginning in 1907 led to the eventual end of the entire town. The town of Southlake incorporated on September 25, 1956 and consisted of 1.62 square miles of land. It officially became the city of Southlake on December 7, 1965. On April 4, 1987, Southlake citizens adopted a home-rule charter creating the current council-manager form of government.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Southlake Today The City of Southlake now consists of approximately 22 square miles of land and has just over 27,000 residents. Throughout this time the City has grown and become a premier community in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area. The City’s dedication to quality development, sound fiscal policies and effective strategic management has made it an exemplary community. These attributes have led to the development of several high quality facilities within the City such as Town Hall, Department of Public Safety (DPS) Headquarters and more recently, the DPS North facility currently under construction. In order to continue this level of quality and development it is important to have a plan in place in order to guide the City and meet the needs and demands of its residents.

GOALS & OBJECTIVES The goals and objectives within this master plan are intended to guide the City as it pertains to the City’s Community Facilities. The Vision, Goals & Objectives of the Southlake 2030 Comprehensive Master Plan developed and defined the values of the community and set both the framework and the tone for the rest of the plan elements including the Community Facilities Master Plan. The vision, goals and objectives were developed by the Southlake 2030 Plan Vision, Goals and Objectives Committee, using the Southlake 2025 Plan Vision, Goals and Objectives as a foundation. Goals and objectives were added and modified to reflect changes in the community since the last comprehensive plan update and to address new plan elements that are included in the scope of the Southlake 2030 Plan. The Goals & Objectives for Community Facilities serve as the basis behind the recommendations developed for this componenet of the plan and are as follows: Goal 8: Community Facilities Plan and provide quality community facilities and services that effectively meet the service needs of Southlake’s residents and businesses. Objective 8.1

Provide a level of community facilities that meet the needs of both the existing and projected population.

Objective 8.2

Encourage cooperation with the school districts in planning for and financing community facilities to encourage the cost-effective provision of resources.

Objective 8.3

Systematically evaluate City-owned buildings in terms of their quality of service delivery and prioritize maintenance and renovation accordingly.

Objective 8.4

Incorporate new computer and telecommunications technologies into public buildings and designated areas in order to improve time and cost efficiency of service delivery and to meet increasing demands of information access and sharing.

The full version of the Vision, Goals & Objectives component of the comprehensive master plan can be found in Appendix A of this plan. This Community Facilties Master Plan is also taking into account the objectives from the Facilities Master Plan report that was done by the consultants Brinkley Sargent Architects. This report outlined the following goals during its process: Analyze Departments and Determine Space Needs Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

Two Planning Horizons (2016 and 2026) [SOUTHLAKE 2030]


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Determine Condition and Constraints of Existing Facilities Identify Facility Utilization Options Establish Priorities

89

Determine Budget Options Create Facility Phasing Timeline Create a Living Document

MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT The development of this component of the master plan is based on data gathered within the facilities master plan report conducted by Brinkley Sargent Architects in 2008 and by City staff from each department. This information includes current and future population, staffing, staff ratios, organizational charts, and department and public parking requirements. After reviewing the preliminary data, on-site meetings were held with representatives from each of the departments studied. Interactive onscreen projections were used to do live updates during most meetings. Each participant was encouraged to think about the long-term goals and needs of their departments. These numbers (future Department of Public Safety Headquarters population, staffing, staff ratios, organizational charts, and department and public parking requirements) were then compared to cities of similar demographic composition. Adjustments were made as required and reviewed with key departmental staff members. From these discussions and comparisons, a report identifying staff and square footage requirements for each department were developed for the years 2016 and 2026 based on population estimates. Since population estimates can differ from sources a variety of sources were used to obtain the best estimate for the purposes of that plan. Southlake Population Comparisons 60,000 40,000 20,000 0

2000

2005

2006

2010

2015

2016

2017

2020

2025

2026

2030

NCTCOG 21,532 26,765 27,016 28,019 28,787 28,957 29,127 29,636 30,107 30,372 31,433 25,654 27,934 30,784 31,354 31,924 32,446 33,316 33,490 34,188 City data 21,519 29,954 35,578 39,561 40,357 41,154 43,543 45,841 46,300 48,138 TWDB Average 21,526 26,765 27,541 30,510 33,044 33,556 34,068 35,208 36,421 36,721 37,920

The strategies implemented in the Brinkley Sargent report were driven by a strong central concept of planning addressing several issues commonly encountered in the planning field. Those issues were addressed in that report with the following strategies: Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Location of Current Facilities and Existing Land The City’s facilities are spread across the city, with Town Hall located near the center of town, the Service Center (Public Works Operations) in the extreme south and Public Safety facilities located for appropriate service coverage on the east (DPS Headquarters) and west (DPS West) sides of town and soon to be on the north (DPS North) side. Philosophies of Citizen Services The City of Southlake places a high premium on service to its citizens, visitors, and business community. Because of this, the strategy was one of planning “user friendly facilities” that will meet the needs of staff and visitors. Specific results of this philosophy included renovating Town Hall to bring Development Services together on one floor, expanding the Service Center to accommodate multiple department needs, combining key quality of life facilities on one site to benefit a wide range of ages and interests in the community, and renovating existing facilities to maximize their utilization for the City. With this master plan however, further analysis was considered by the committee and it was determined that the expansion of the Service Center may not be a feasible solution, thus providing further study on this issue as a recommendation. Maintaining Efficient Work Environments This factor addressed the requirements to consider how the movement of departments from one area to another can be done with minimal disruption to city services. Some refer to this as “the domino effect”. In developing the report, the consultants applied this principle to every strategy to ensure minimal effect to departments. This did, in some cases, influence the timing of events over the priorities that had already been developed. Process and Public Involvement As mentioned in the Parks, Recreation & Open Space portion of this master plan, a significant result from evaualting the City’s parks was the need for a community multi-puprose recreation center during the review of Bicentennial Park. This lead into the integration of both master plans into one and therefore the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Committee oversaw the development of both master plans. Once the plan was complete, the committee forwarded the plan to Parks & Recreation Board for consideration and recommendation. A Southlake Program for the Involvement of Neighborhoods (SPIN) meeting was also held for the plan to solicit public input. The SPIN forum fosters open and timely communication between the citizens and city government regarding programs and issues affecting the quality of life in the community in order to provide positive relations and a stronger sense of community. A public hearing was held by both the Planning and Zoning Commission and the City Council before final approval.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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In summary, the approval process for Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan was as follows: 1. Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan Committee meetings 2. SPIN meeting 3. Parks & Recreation Board public hearing 4. Planning & Zoning Commission public hearing 5. City Council 1st reading 6. City Council 2nd reading and public hearing (final plan approval) In addition, both the Planning & Zoning Commission and the City Council held public hearings for the Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan prior to adoption by Ordinance No. 1060 in February and March of 2013.

COMMUNITY FACILITY INVENTORY The City of Southlake has facilities located at various locations throughout the City. Three of these facilities are dedicated to the City’s Department of Public Safety. When Brinkley Sargent conducted their study for the City, these facilities were excluded mainly because the type of study they were conducting was not intended to address police and fire coverage requirements or needs of the City. However, with the current construction of the DPS North facility, there will be sufficient public safety coverage through the entire City, including the projected population build out of the City. For the purposes of this master plan, the facilities that were taken into account were as follows:

Town Hall Town Hall was completed in 2001 as part of the development of Southlake Town Square. The 4-story building contains the majority of the City’s departments and serves as the administration center for the City. The City departments within the facility consist of Community Services, Planning & Development Services, Finance, Utility Billing, Public Works Administration, Facilities Services, Council Offices and Chamber, City Secretary’s Office, City Manager’s Office, Human Resources, Economic Development, the Public Library and includes several Tarrant County offices.

Service Center

Service Center (Public Works Operations) The Service Center was acquired by the City in 1996 and is located on the north side of Continental Boulevard between Kimball Avenue and South Carroll Avenue. It currently contains all of the Public Works Departments’ operational service divisions consisting of Drainage, Streets, Water and Wastewater. Residential development has occurred all around the facility and the centers long term use at its current location may not be feasible. Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Senior Activity Center The Senior Activity Center is located at the site where a formal municipal complex had been planned for in the City’s earlier master plans along the south side of Southlake Boulevard (F.M. 1709) between Byron Nelson Parkway and Parkwood Drive. The facility is currently 4,200 square feet and is heavily used for many activities. The Senior Activity Center is a former residential structure that has had an addition and converted for its current use. With the three facilities just mentioned and the three public safety facilities, the City operates six facilities. This Community Facilities component of this master plan is intended to address those needs and demands that otherwise may not have been addressed within the Brinkley Sargent report and provide guidance and direction to City staff and future elected and appointed officials. Bob Jones Nature Center The Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve is located at 355 E. Bob Jones Road on the north end of the City adjacent to Grapevine Lake. The Center is an approximately 4,000 square foot building on 758 acres of U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and City Property. The Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve is owned by the City of Southlake and managed by the Bob Jones Nature Center Organization whose mission is the preservation of local natural resources and history; accomplished by providing places of compatible recreation, and fostering education about our natural environment. Southlake Tennis Center (at Bicentennial Park) The Southlake Tennis Center is an approximately 2,500 square foot building and also consists of 19 tennis courts, office space, pro shop, and ample parking for tennis center and park patrons. The center is owned by the City of Southlake managed under a contractor whose goal is to operate a first class facility that provides top quality tennis programs and excellent customer service.

COMMUNITY FACILITY NEEDS AND DEMANDS According to the Brinkley Sargent report facilities for a city can be categorized as either “Staff/Population” driven or “Quality of Life” driven. Staff or Population driven facilities include such departments as Courts, City Manager, Public Safety, Fire and Public Works. These departments provide for the core needs of the community and can be directly compared to what other cities of similar population and demographics may be providing. The “Quality of Life” driven facilities can be compared to state and national recommendations for facilities as well as comparable facilities within the area. Facilities falling into this category may include; Parks and Recreation Centers, Parks, Libraries, Cultural Arts, and Senior Centers. The amount and size of these facilities is dependent upon the expectations of the citizens and on how the City chooses to respond to those expectations. They are not critical to the level of service to the community but do add to the “quality of life” for the citizens. In this master plan, those “quality of life” facilities are intended to be addressed by providing recommendations as provided at the end of this section under Community Facilities Recommendations/Policy Matrix.

Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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The needs assessed for the purposes of this plan addressed the internal configuration of Town Hall as it pertained to location of City departments and uses of spaces. Brinkley Sargent developed from their analysis the following action items (recommendations) for Town Hall: • • • • •

Move Municipal Court and Teen Court to DPS headquarters (completed) Utility Billing to serve as reception point Relocate the Library (Approx. 30,000 square foot facility) Place Development Services on 1st Floor Move Economic Development to 2nd level

• • •

Move Human Resources to vacated Planning area on 3rd Floor Place Copy Area with Utility Billing Possible relocation of Break; locate Library Reading Room in current Break area space Expand Training – add dedicated computer training

Since these action items were based on a report conducted five years ago, some circumstances have changed and will continue to do so. The need to address these demands and current needs of the City will change when this component of the master plan is updated.

COMMUNITY FACILITY RECOMMENDATIONS During the process of this master plan a few items relating to community facilities were discussed and deemed important enough to include them as a part of the plan. These items eventually led to the consolidated Parks, Recreation & Open Space / Community Facilities Master Plan. The areas of focus during these disucssions were: The need for a community recreation center with a senior center area programmed within the facility An expanded or new facility for the Senior Center The long term feasibility of the Service Center at its current location The location and size of the City library due to changing demands and innovation in technology Implementation of the Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve Master Plan recommendation to construct a new nature center facility During the process it was determined that in order to address some of the facilities, additional analysis of these facilities with more information would be needed, such as the Service Center and Library location. Based on the recommendations of the Brinkley Sargent report, and the public meetings held with the committee, SPIN, Planning & Zoning Commission and City Council, the recommendations that were produced from this master plan process are located on the following page and address the items noted above.

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COMMUNITY FACILITIES RECOMMENDATIONS MATRIX Priority Tier

Department Responsible

Develop a multipurpose Community Recreation 1 Center at Bicentennial Park.

Tier 1

CS

City Library

Conduct a site analysis study to determine the longterm location of the City’s library.

Tier 1

CS

Town Hall

Incorporate and implement the recommendations of the Brinkley Sargent report as outlined in the Community Facilities section of this master plan.

Tier 2

CS, PW

Service Center (Public Works Operations)

Conduct a site analysis study to determine the longterm location of the City’s service center.

Tier 3

CS, PW

Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve Building

Construct a new Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve facility as recommended in the Bob Jones Nature Center & Preserve Master Plan.

Tier 3

CS

Safety Town

Explore opportunities to incorporate a Safety Town at an existing City facility or park.

Tier 3

DPS, CS

Community Facility

Community Recreation Center

Recommendation

CS = Community Services Department DPS = Department of Public Safety PDS = Planning & Development Services Department PW = Public Works Department 1

=Recommendation carried over from the Park Recommendations

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Strategic Link Performance Management & Service Delivery Performance Management & Service Delivery Performance Management & Service Delivery Performance Management & Service Delivery Performance Management & Service Delivery Performance Management & Service Delivery

Vision, Goals & Objectives Tie 4.5, 4.8, 8.1, 10.2 8.1, 8.3, 10.1 8.1, 8.3, 10.1 8.1, 8.3, 10.1 4.13, 8.1, 8.3, 9.3, 10.1 8.1, 8.3, 10.1


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APPENDIX A ORDINANCE NO. 960: SOUTHLAKE 2030 VISION, GOALS & OBJECTIVES

Vision, Goals & Objectives Adopted by City Council on November 17, 2009 Ordinance No. 960

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SOUTHLAKE 2030 VISION STATEMENT Southlake will continue to enhance its status as a desirable, attractive, safe, healthy and fiscally-sound community with quality neighborhoods, while maintaining a high standard of living, learning, shopping, working, recreation, and open spaces. Southlake will continue to be a vibrant community that epitomizes both economic and environmental sustainability.

SOUTHLAKE 2030 GOALS & OBJECTIVES Goal 1: Quality Development Promote quality development that is consistent with the Urban Design Plan, well- maintained, attractive, pedestrian-friendly, safe, contributes to an overall sense of place and meet the needs of a vibrant and diverse community. Objective 1.1

Encourage the maintenance of existing neighborhoods, features and amenities in order to preserve property values and a unique sense of place.

Objective 1.2

Create and preserve attractive pedestrian-friendly streets and pathways to encourage transportation alternatives to the automobile.

Objective 1.3

Encourage appropriately-scaled neighborhood design that compliments existing development patterns while creating unique places, recognizing that quality residential neighborhoods are the cornerstone of our community.

Objective 1.4

Emphasize creativity and ensure environmental stewardship in the design of all development and public infrastructure, maximizing the preservation of desirable natural features such as trees, topography, streams, wildlife corridors and habitat.

Objective 1.5

Promote unique community character through a cohesive theme by emphasizing urban design detail and performance standards for structures, streets, street lighting, landscaping, entry features, wayfinding signs, open spaces, amenities, pedestrian/automobile orientation and transition to adjacent uses.

Objective 1.6

Consider high-quality single-family residential uses as part of a planned mixed-use development at appropriate transitional locations.

Objective 1.7

Explore and encourage opportunities for redevelopment when appropriate.

Objective 1.8

Ensure high-quality design and a heightened sensitivity towards the integration of new development with the existing development and urban design pattern.

Objective 1.9

Strengthen street and landscape design standards to enhance the visual quality along major corridors.

Objective 1.10 Continue to promote a strong working relationship with the Texas Department of Transportation to improve the appearance of bridges, embankments and entryways into the City. Objective 1.11 Ensure that city- and developer-provided infrastructure is functional, aesthetically well-designed, and integrated with the natural environment. Objective 1.12 Continue to strengthen the City’s regulations to encourage effective signage that is appropriately designed and scaled to minimize adverse impacts on community aesthetics. Ordinance No. 1060, Adopted March 19, 2013

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Objective 1.13 Explore creating participation programs with home owner associations and subdivision groups to enhance the long-term viability of neighborhood features and amenities.

Goal 2: Balance Maintain a balanced approach to growth and development in order to preserve the City’s assets (schools, public safety, and competitive edge in the region) and fiscal health. Objective 2.1

Encourage a balance of uses, including retail, office, medical, hospitality, entertainment, institutional, industrial and residential that is both responsive to and sustainable within changing market conditions and sustains growth in property values for the future.

Objective 2.2

Support appropriate public-private financial partnerships that will help retain and enhance the City’s economic base.

Objective 2.3

Ensure the City’s built environment fosters a positive relationship between the taxable value of real property and the corresponding cost of municipal services.

Goal 3: Mobility Develop an innovative mobility system that provides for the safe, convenient, efficient movement of people and goods, reduces traffic congestion, promotes energy and transportation efficiency and promotes expanded opportunities for citizens to meet some routine needs by walking or bicycling. Objective 3.1

Provide a safe and efficient streets and pathways network that allows travel to shopping areas, schools, parks and places of employment, reducing the need to travel on the City’s major arterials (FM 1709, FM 1938, or SH 114) and minimizes cut-through traffic in residential neighborhoods.

Objective 3.2

Implement and promote a mobility system that addresses safety, design, comfort and aesthetic elements such as landscaping, crosswalks, railing, lighting, traffic-calming and signage in order to provide distinct character and functionality for the City.

Objective 3.3

In accordance with a need identified by the Citizen Survey, provide and promote a continuous pedestrian pathways system that is user-friendly, efficient, safe, economical, and connect parks, shopping, schools, work and residential areas.

Objective 3.4

Pursue opportunities to link Southlake’s pathways to systems in adjacent cities and trails on the Corps of Engineers property.

Objective 3.5

Develop a program to encourage the dedication of easements for pathway construction in accordance with the sidewalk priority plan and Capital Improvements Plan.

Objective 3.6

Identify and prioritize the funding and construction of mobility system capital improvements projects according to the impacts on safety, system efficiency, costs, and maintaining acceptable levels of service.

Objective 3.7

Increase safe bicycle mobility when reasonably possible.

Objective 3.8

Continue to promote a strong working relationship with the Texas Department of Transportation to identify, design and implement projects that prevent or relieve congestion in the area.

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Continue to evaluate and improve upon the existing mobility system within the City, maintaining existing infrastructure, making required improvements and evaluating innovative ways to integrate transportation and land use.

Objective 3.10 Obtain adequate right-of-way for future roadway corridors and improvements.

Goal 4: Parks, Recreation and Open Space Support a comprehensive integrated parks, recreation and open space system for all ages that creates value and preserves natural assets of the City. Objective 4.1

Ensure that new development incorporates usable open space.

Objective 4.2

Ensure that parkland and open spaces include an integrated mix of developed and natural areas with consideration of protecting the City’s ecosystem and wildlife corridors.

Objective 4.3

Promote water conservation and reuse in the design of parks and open spaces.

Objective 4.4

Utilize partnerships to create open space and recreation facilities.

Objective 4.5

Ensure an even geographic distribution of park facilities and recreation activities— both active and passive—for citizens of all ages.

Objective 4.6

Provide a full range of park facilities and linear linkages that will accommodate the current and future needs of the City’s residents and visitors.

Objective 4.7

Integrate passive recreational opportunities into preserved natural and drainage areas.

Objective 4.8

Incorporate feedback received from the Parks and Recreation Citizen Survey into recreation activities and park facilities.

Objective 4.9

Acknowledge the City’s rich natural history, heritage and historical landmarks.

Objective 4.10 Determine parkland desirable for dedication as part of the development process based on classification, location and maintenance cost. Objective 4.11 Prioritize investments in existing and established parks understanding that there will be strategic opportunities for land acquisition. Objective 4.12 Incorporate educational and learning opportunities within parks and related facilities. Objective 4.13 Pursue recreational and educational opportunities on Corps of Engineers property compatible with the goal of protecting and preserving the existing ecosystem for future generations.

Goal 5: Public Safety Establish and maintain protective measures and policies that reduce danger, risk or injury to property and individuals who live, work or visit the City. Objective 5.1

Maintain a level of police, fire and ambulance services commensurate with population and business needs.

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Objective 5.2

Provide effective and efficient professional public safety services in partnership with the citizens we serve, encouraging mutual respect and innovative problem-solving, thereby improving the quality of life in our community.

Objective 5.3

Ensure compliance with the stated standard of response coverage and industry guidelines through the provision of facilities, equipment, personnel and roadways.

Objective 5.4

Ensure that all buildings and public facilities are constructed in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local safety regulations and standards.

Objective 5.5

Maintain the continued compliance with national standard of excellence through the accreditation process.

Objective 5.6

Enhance and promote public safety through public-private partnerships and utilization and training of volunteers.

Objective 5.7

Maintain a high level of community readiness through training and communications among neighborhood and volunteer groups and city, county, state, and federal entities.

Objective 5.8

Develop and implement safety education programs that enhance the quality of life and safety in the community.

Objective 5.9

Promote security of public buildings and infrastructure.

Objective 5.10 Ensure safe and healthy working conditions for city staff, volunteers and officials by providing security, facility, vehicular and equipment maintenance, information, education and training.

Goal 6: Economic Development Create a diversified, vibrant and sustainable economy through the attraction and support of business enterprises and tourism meeting the vision and standards desired by City leaders. Objective 6.1

Promote the City both nationally and regionally as a great place to live, work, visit, shop and recreate.

Objective 6.2

Provide necessary, desirable and diverse goods and services for residents of the City.

Objective 6.3

Foster an environment that retains and supports existing businesses to ensure the sustainability of our existing tax base.

Objective 6.4

Attract desired businesses to ensure economic growth as well as continued employment and services for residents of the City.

Objective 6.5

Enhance the quality of life for residents and the sustainability of City business through the promotion of the tourism, convention and hotel industry in the City.

Objective 6.6

Develop a clear and understandable incentive policy that accomplishes the business attraction and retention goals of the City and is based on factors such as job creation, investment, quality of business, return on investment and overall value to the community.

Objective 6.7

Foster communication between the public and private sectors.

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Goal 7: Sustainability Encourage the conservation, protection, enhancement and proper management of the natural and built environment. Objective 7.1

Maintain and implement policies to reduce the use of nonrenewable resources, such as energy in the heating, cooling, and operation and maintenance of city facilities.

Objective 7.2

Promote public awareness and education on such sustainability issues as public health, energy and water conservation and overall environmental stewardship.

Objective 7.3

Promote sustainable public and private development practices and patterns, building design, water-use reduction and waste reduction while maintaining the existing character of the city.

Objective 7.4

Protect surface, storm, and groundwater quality from septic discharge, impervious surface runoff, improper waste disposal and other potential contaminant sources.

Objective 7.5

Conserve, restore and promote tree and plant cover that is native or adaptive to the City and region while also protecting existing significant vegetation and maintaining the existing character of the City.

Objective 7.6

Protect and enhance air quality in coordination with federal, regional and local agencies.

Objective 7.7

Recognize the importance of and protect the biological diversity for the ecological and aesthetic benefits to the community.

Objective 7.8

Define, protect, and celebrate the local Cross Timbers Ecosystem as a community asset for future generations.

Objective 7.9

Assess and minimize the ecological impact of any new trails provided on Corps of Engineers property.

Goal 8: Community Facilities Plan and provide quality community facilities and services that effectively meet the service needs of Southlake’s residents and businesses. Objective 8.1

Provide a level of community facilities that meet the needs of both the existing and projected population.

Objective 8.2

Encourage cooperation with the school districts in planning for and financing community facilities to encourage the cost-effective provision of resources.

Objective 8.3

Systematically evaluate City-owned buildings in terms of their quality of service delivery and prioritize maintenance and renovation accordingly.

Objective 8.4

Incorporate new computer and telecommunications technologies into public buildings and designated areas in order to improve time and cost efficiency of service delivery and to meet increasing demands of information access and sharing.

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Goal 9: Partnerships Fully utilize and coordinate with the City’s many partners to address issues facing the area, provide services and facilities, promote volunteerism, support events and programs and encourage economic growth. Objective 9.1

Partner with other government entities, non-governmental organizations and the North Central Texas Council of Governments to address regional and local issues.

Objective 9.2

Continue mutually beneficial partnerships between the City and local school districts to explore the provision of facilities, services, technology, and other opportunities through open communication and close coordination.

Objective 9.3

Continue active partnerships with non-profit organizations, civic groups and local businesses to create opportunities that benefit the community.

Objective 9.4

Partner with local school districts to educate Southlake’s youth in their municipality and seek youth input when planning the future of our community.

Goal 10: Infrastructure Through sound management and strategic investment, develop, maintain, improve and operate public infrastructure that promotes health, safety and an enhanced quality of life for all members of the community. Objective 10.1 Ensure equitably-distributed and adequate services and facilities. Objective 10.2 Plan and program land acquisition and the installation of all essential public facilities to reasonably coincide with the need for such facilities. Objective 10.3 Identify and implement programs where costs may be shared by multiple agencies and/or developers. Objective 10.4 Provide for adequate public water and sewer services in appropriate City.

areas of the

Objective 10.5 Provide and maintain an effective stormwater management system throughout the City. Objective 10.6 Maintain and enhance existing infrastructure and levels of service through the provision of timely maintenance, repair and replacement as needed. Objective 10.7 Provide and maintain effective solid waste collection and recycling programs for residents. Objective 10.8 Provide a streetlight system for adequate illumination and a wayfinding signage system for pedestrian and driver safety where appropriate.

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City of Southlake Parks and Recreation Master Plan  
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