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2013-2014 Annual Budget

www.ci.saginaw.tx.us 333 West McLeroy Blvd P.O. Box 79070 Saginaw, TX 76179-0070 817-232-4640


City of Saginaw Fiscal Year 2013-2014 Budget Cover Page September 17, 2013 This budget will raise more revenue from property taxes than last year's budget by an amount of $487,071, which is a 8.48 percent increase from last year's budget. The property tax revenue to be raised from new property added to the tax roll this year is $36,021. The members of the governing body voted on the budget as follows: FOR:

Gary Brinkley Todd Flippo Chris Barngrover

Ed Larson Delbert Sedberry Jackie D. Nethery

AGAINST: PRESENT and not voting: ABSENT:

David Flory

Property Tax Rate Comparison Property Tax Rate: Effective Tax Rate: Effective Maintenance & Operations Tax Rate: Rollback Tax Rate: Debt Rate:

2013-2014 $0.510000/100 $0.472327/100 $0.287372/100 $0.540519/100 $0.220976/100

2012-2013 $0.490000/100 $0.490989/100 $0.291353/100 $0.513578/100 $0.189925/100

Total debt obligation for Saginaw secured by property taxes: $33,753,772 Debt Obligation for FY2013/2014 is $2,921,182

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CITY OF SAGINAW TEXAS ANNUAL BUDGET FOR THE FISCAL YEAR OCTOBER 1, 2013 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 2014 AS APPROVED BY

THE SAGINAW CITY COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 17, 2013

Nan Stanford, City Manager Dolph Johnson, Asst City Mgr/Finance Director Kim Quin, Asst Finance Dir/Budget Analyst

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CITY OF SAGINAW MAYOR AND COUNCIL Mayor Gary Brinkley Term Expires in 2015

Mayor Pro Tem David Flory Term Expires in 2016

Councilmember, Place 2 Ed Larson Term Expires in 2015

Councilmember, Place 3 Todd Flippo Term Expires in 2016

Councilmember, Place 4 Delbert Sedberry Term Expires in 2014

Councilmember, Place 5 Chris Barngrover Term Expires in 2016

Councilmember, Place 6 Jackie D. Nethery Term Expires in 2014 City Manager, Nan Stanford Asst City Manager/Finance Director, Dolph Johnson Assistant Finance Director/Budget Analyst, Kim Quin

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1 2 3 4

Truth in Taxation Cover Page Title Page Elected and City Officials Table of Contents INTRODUCTION: GFOA Recognition Long Range Planning Strategic Plan Organizational Chart City Manager’s Budget Message Budget Highlights Budget Process Budget Calendar

8 9 11 14 15 23 29 32

BUDGET SUMMARIES: Description of Funds Fund Structure Schedule of Sources and Uses of Funds and Changes in Fund Balance 5-Year Fund Summary All Funds Distribution of Revenues All Funds Distribution of Expenditures/Expenses Schedule of Capital Outlay by Fund/Department

34 36 37 40 42 43 44

GENERAL FUND: Summary of Revenues and Expenditures Revenues by Source Overview of Revenues Sales Tax Revenue Expenditures by Department Expenditures by Category Overview of Expenditures General Administrative Office Municipal Court Fire Police Public Services Parks Recreation & Community Services Library Inspections/Code Enforcement Fleet Maintenance Economic Development

47 48 49 53 54 55 56 58 64 69 76 82 88 93 100 108 115 120

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

DEBT SERVICE FUND: Summary of Revenues and Expenditures Debt Service Fund Description Summary of Debt Service Expenditures General Long Term Debt Service Requirements General Long Term Debt Outstanding General Long Term Debt Requirements Future Years

PAGE 126 127 129 130 131 132

ENTERPRISE FUND: Summary of Revenues and Expenses Revenues Graph Overview of Revenues Water and Wastewater Water and Wastewater Debt Service Expenditures Water and Wastewater Debt Service Requirements Water and Wastewater Debt Outstanding Water and Wastewater Debt Requirements Future Years

134 135 136 137 143 144 145 146

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND: Summary of Revenues and Expenditures Capital Projects Fund Overview Population Projections Capital Improvements Plan CIP – Streets Map and Project Descriptions CIP – Facilities Map and Project Descriptions CIP – Water Map and Project Descriptions CIP- Wastewater Map and Project Descriptions CIP - Drainage Map and Project Descriptions Existing Land Use Plan Ultimate Land Use Plan

148 149 150 151 155 160 163 167 171 174 175

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS: CCPD Fund Drainage Utility Fund Street Maintenance Fund Donations Fund

176 181 186 198

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE

POLICIES, RESOLUTIONS, AND ORDINANCES: Budget Adoption Resolution Tax Rate Ordinance . Water Rate Ordinance Financial Policies Debt Management Policy Capitalization Policy General Fund Emergency Reserve Policy Policy on Salaries and Compensation Job Classification List Incentive Pay Summary Schedule of Personnel by Department Personnel Graphs

204 205 207 211 216 219 222 223 224 225 214 226 215 227

GENERAL INFORMATION: Miscellaneous Statistics Map of Tarrant County Demographics Assessed Value and Tax Levy Graphs Community Profile and Information

229 231 232 222 234 235

LIST OF ACRONYMS BUDGET GLOSSARY BUDGET INDEX

246 248 261

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INTRODUCTION

City of Saginaw

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“DISTINGUISHED BUDGET PRESENTATION AWARD� The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented an award for Distinguished Budget Presentation to the City of Saginaw, Texas for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2012. This was the twenty-sixth consecutive year that the City has received this prestigious award. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, as an operations guide, as a financial plan and as a communications device. The award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements, and we are submitting it to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. 8


LONG RANGE PLANNING Long-range planning at the City of Saginaw begins with the Comprehensive Master Plan. This document provides a statement about the community’s growth patterns, the general distribution and location of land use, a detailed thoroughfare plan, and other general guidelines for the various plan elements. The plan provides a written consensus to guide future growth and development while allowing flexibility to respond to new ideas and direction as the City progresses, changes, and grows. The Comprehensive Master Plan was most recently updated in 2011 and is the fourth update. Master Plans have incorporated the following themes: 1989 Comprehensive Master Plan

Preparing for Growth and Development

1995 Comprehensive Master Plan

Building Infrastructure

2000 Comprehensive Master Plan

Creating Community Facilities

2006 Comprehensive Master Plan

Completing Infrastructure

2011 Comprehensive Master Plan

Back to the Basics

The basis for long range planning is population growth. Prior to the economic downturn, Saginaw was one of the fastest growing cities in all of Tarrant County. The growth rate has slowed considerably with a population increase of 1% since the 2010 census. Based on available land and current densities, Saginaw is expected to reach its build out population of 29,040 in 2033.

Population 35,000 30,000 Estimated 2012

25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000

Actual Census Data 1960-2010

Projected 2015-2033

5,000 0 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2012 2015 2020 2025 2030 2033

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The City of Saginaw prepared for the growth projected in the 1990’s by constructing infrastructure to meet the demand. As the City approaches build-out, the new plan focuses on strengthening the infrastructure system and maintaining existing infrastructure. This return to basics of operating and maintaining infrastructure is the theme for the next five years. Because the City of Saginaw is a mature city with a stable political and financial base, Council is able to prepare formal long range financial plans every five years with a review of priorities on an annual basis that is translated into the annual budget by Staff. The annual budget is developed within the context of the long-range plans adopted by Council. These plans anticipate funding needs and available revenues and forecast methods for matching future revenues and expenditures. Due to conservative planning on the part of the City Council and Staff, the City has been able to absorb the impact of economic swings. The City of Saginaw was fiscally conservative during the economic expansion from 1990 to 2005. Record growth allowed the City to reduce their property tax rate from 0.54 in 2003 to the current rate of 0.51 and to grow the General Fund Balance from $4.5 million in 2003 to $11.3 million in 2012. Fund balances built up during the economic expansion have been available for one time expenditures during the current economic downturn. One time expenditures include capital purchases and special requests that are not of a recurring nature. In FY2012/2013 the City funded the reconstruction of City Hall using cash fund balance. The City is slowly emerging from the economic downturn of the past three years that was associated with the national economic recession. However, the growth in economic activity is tepid with property and sales tax revenues expected to remain flat or increase only slightly over the next five years. In connection with the Comprehensive Master Plan, the City has adopted the following strategies to meet the challenges for the next five years.  Maintain service and staffing levels  Seek alternative sources of funding and use interlocal agreements to increase levels of service or cost savings  Maintain adequate reserve funds to operate the City in case of financial emergency  Maintain and upgrade the City’s infrastructure to assure quality services The following pages present the City’s goals, achievements and objectives within the framework of the strategies developed through the City’s long range planning initiative. Departmental goals, achievements, and objectives and how those relate to the overall City long range planning are included with each department’s budget.

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CITY OF SAGINAW STRATEGIC PLAN 2013-2014 City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal Annually seek alternative sources of funding to maintain and/or increase service Fire Department received a County ESD capabilities and utilize interlocal grant for $20,000 of equipment agreements to increase service with minimal financial impact. Police Department is currently participating in the Bullet Proof Vests and Justice Apply for at least one grant to assist in Assistance Grant programs and receive providing personnel and equipment for the 80% funding for an officer assigned to the department. Auto Crimes Task Force.

Continue to seek grants and maintain interlocal agreements to reduce costs Seek alternate sources of funding and use interlocal agreements to increase levels of service or cost savings

Renewed interlocal agreement with EMSRenewed interlocal agreement with EMSISD for School Resource Officer funding of ISD for School Resource Officer $74,477 Solicit grants, sponsorships and donations Recreation and Community Services raised to help offset the annual budget. Increase over $15,195 in sponsorships and facility and pavilion rental revenues through donations increased marketing. Library received $6,776 in grants and donations and volunteers donated 2,428 hours Completed construction of intersection improvements for Western Center/156 with TxDOT

Apply for at least two grants and two other donations each year. City will share cost of Old Decatur Rd. project with City of Fort Worth.

Tarrant County cost share sewer line Tarrant County interlocal agreement for replacement at Bluebonnet St & Franklin Bailey Boswell- construction completed Ave. Complete Bailey Boswell Road using Substantially completed E Bailey Boswell existing bond funds. reconstruction with matching funds from Tarrant County. Construction of City Hall using General Complete infrastructure improvements with Fund reserves is substantially complete. available bond funds and special revenue funding Completed Fleet Facility improvements using existing bond funds Replaced 660 water meters using existing bond funds. Completed animal shelter renovations using donated funds.

City Strategy

Maintain adequate reserve funds to operate the city in case of a financial emergency

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

Purchase and install community sign. Complete Water projects using Enterprise Fund reserves Complete Wastewater projects using Enterprise Fund reserves Complete Drainage projects using Drainage Fund reserves

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Maintain emergency reserves per the adopted policies

Added $100,000 to General Fund Add $100,000 to General Fund Emergency Emergency Reserves and $100,000 to Reserves and $100,000 to Enterprise Fund Enterprise Fund Emergency Reserves. Emergency Reserves as necessary.

Maintain the city's bond ratings and legal debt margin per the adopted policies

Received a bond rating of Aa3 from Moody's and AA-/Stable from Standard Maintain Moody's rating of Aa3 and and Poor's for bond refunding; W/WW Standard and Poor's raging of AA-/Stable. revenue bond rating upgraded to AA.

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CITY OF SAGINAW STRATEGIC PLAN 2013-2014 City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

Maintain and upgrade City Facilities

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Substantially completed construction of Improvements to Fire Station 1, flooring at City Hall the Log Cabin (Senior Center), and office renovation at Public Works. Completed improvements to the Library.

Substantially completed East Boswell Road reconstruction.

Bailey Design and begin construction of West Bailey Boswell Ph 1 bond project.

Maintain and upgrade City Streets

Completed Western Center and Hwy 156 paving and signal project. Maintain and Street repairs to various locations along: upgrade the Roberts, Bristol, Westcliff, Reed Ave., City's Taos Ct., West Hills, and Normandy. Reconstructed E McLeroy, Mustang and infrastructure portions of Knowles. to assure quality services Maintain and upgrade the City's Water Saginaw Blvd 12 " Phase 1. Replaced 660 water meters. System Replace 128 Commercial Water Meters

Maintain and upgrade Wastewater System

the

City's

Reconstructed 24" and 18" sewer trunk Complete Inflow & Infiltration Study Phase mains in Little Fossil Creek. 1. Complete construction of South East 24" Completed South Hampshire, Rudioso, Trunk Main replacement project Phases 1 and Thompson sewer rehab prjoects. and 3.

Maintain and upgrade the City's Drainage Completed W McLeroy and Bailey Boswell Saginaw Blvd System #2 Phase IV. System Rd. drainage improvements. East Cement Creek Improvements (Opal Street)

City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Adopt a property tax rate that maintains Adopt tax rate that allows us to maintain Adopted a property tax rate that generated current service and staffing levels and current service and staffing levels the same amount in property tax revenue. covers voter approved debt service requirements. Continue to offer competitive salary and Provided step increases of up to 5% and Maintain Step increases of up to 5% and a 3% service and benefits in order to hire and retain quality $800 stimulus payment to all full time increase in the salary plan. employees in all departments permanent employees staffing levels Control the cost of employee health insurance by continuing to take competitive bids for these services and evaluate plan options

Provided health insurance for a 1.9% increase instead of 9% with previous Take bids for health insurance to maintain provider. Negotiated a two year dental competitive rates. plan.

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FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

Maintain service and staffing levels

CITY OF SAGINAW STRATEGIC PLAN 2013-2014

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Process and administer all Court matters in an efficient, timely manner while establishing, maintaining, observing, and enforcing high standards of conduct.

Warrants were issued monthly, magisterial Continue processing citations daily, warnings and EPO's were issued within 48 warrants monthly, and magisterial warnings hours of arrest, and citations were entered and EPO's within 48 hours of arrest. daily.

Deliver professional level emergency response, management services to efficiently safeguard the community.

Saved 93% of property values involved in a fire, partnered with Tarrant County to implement a County Wide Emergency Management Plan, test outdoor warning sirens monthly, completed 100% of inspections within 2 weeks and provide smoke alarms to residents free of charge.

Achieve state ratio of 1.5 firefighters per 1,000 residents, maintain national average of 1 fire station per 10,000 residents, maintain average emergency response time standard of 4 minutes, train firefighters in latest methods, and provide and maintain necessary equipment.

Deliver professional level police services by balancing patrol, community service, and investigative services to effectively and efficiently safeguard the citizens of the community.

Provided Neighborhood Watch, Fingerprinting, Operation ID, National Night Out, Citizen's Police Academy and Project Child Safe programs. Achieved offense clearance rateof 64.6%.

Continue community programs, employ 2 officers per 1,000 residents, standardize 100% of departments weapons, have 100% of officers and dispatchers obtain Intermediate, Advanced, or Master Certification.

Improve the quality of life for citizens of all ages by providing a variety of recreational and leisure activities, special events, and programs that encourage life enrichment, health, fitness and fun.

Streamlined aquatics programs, increased senior activittes, increase participation in Run the Rails 5K race, and enhanced email alert system.

Enhance swimming programs, increase participation in senior activities, expand and enhance performing arts programs, establish community involvement programs, and effectively communicate programs and activities to citizens

Provide library services programs, and materials in a variety of formats that encourage citizens to educate themselves, develop an appreciation of arts and literature, and increase the enjoyment of reading.

Patron visists increased 12% and program attenance has 13%. Provided materials at Recreation Center, the site of the Summer Reading Programs.

Meet and exceed the state average material per capita, increase patron visits and program attendance, add staff, increase hours, and add computers for public use, offer children's reading programs after school at remote locations.

Provide prompt, courteous, and professional service and minimize the risk to lives, public welfare, and property value through quality inspections, code enforcement, and animal control services.

Held monthly Development Review Committee meetings with developers, reviewed residential building plans, conducted inspections, issued code violations, held animal vaccination clinics, and microchipped animals.

Update and standardize building codes, increase number of inspections per inspector, increase code enforcement calls per employee, register and microchip animals, provide low cost vaccination clinics, and update permit process.

Provide quality repair and maintenance services using the most up-to-date diagnostic and repair equipment and coordinate outside repairs for timely and cost-effective completion.

Completed majority of maintenance and repairs in house, performed preventive Seek alternate fuel options when adding maintenance as scheduled, maintained new vehicles to fleet, begin implementing a current staff certifications, and updated Capital Replacement Plan. Motor All Data System.

fire prevention, and disaster effectively and citizens of our

Provide professional level Economic Processed 1 industrial tax abatement, 1 Development Services in an effort to bring planned development with 161 single family in new businesses and retain existing lots and 1 single family development. businesses.

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Aggressively seek prospective new businesses, increase industrial development to balance tax base, establish retention plan for existing businesses, and consider economic development incentives allowed by state law.


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 2013-2014 Citizens of Saginaw

Boards and Commissions

Mayor and City Council

City Attorney

City Secretary

City Manager

City Engineer

Assistant City Manager/ Finance Director

General Administration Accounting Purchasing Human Resources Utility Billing and Collections Risk Management Information Services Municipal Court

Municipal Court Judge

Police Chief Patrol Criminal Investigations Crime Prevention Communications School Crossings Community Services

Fire Chief Fire Suppression Emergency Medical Fire Prevention Hazardous Materials Emergency Management

Director of Public Works/ Economic Development

Recreation/ Community Services Director Recreation Aquatic Center Senior Citizens Center

Library Director Technical Services Children’s Services Circulation Services

Fleet Maintenance Vehicle Maintenance Equipment Maintenance

Public Services Street Maintenance Building Maintenance Parks Maintenance

Inspections/ Code Enforcement Permits Inspections Code Enforcement Animal Control

Economic Development

Water and Wastewater/ Field Operations Water Service Wastewater Service Environmental Specialist Drainage Utility Meter Reading

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City of Saginaw

333 West McLeroy P.O. Box 79070 Saginaw, Texas 76179 817-232-4640 Fax 817-232-4644 www.ci.saginaw.tx.us

CITY MANAGER’S BUDGET MESSAGE September 2013 Honorable Mayor Gary Brinkley, City Councilmembers, and Citizens of Saginaw: In compliance with the State Statutes and the Charter of the City of Saginaw, I submit to you the annual operating budget for fiscal year 2013-2014. This budget presents the sources of revenue and the plan of expenditures for all areas of the Saginaw City Government for the year beginning October 1, 2013, and concluding September 30, 2014. This budget is presented after many hours of study and review by the Department Heads, Superintendents and Supervisors along with the Mayor and Council budget review sessions. Staff was asked to budget for what is necessary to maintain the current level of service provided and to make recommendations for what would be needed to meet the anticipated level of services required, both short term and long term. Long-range planning at the City of Saginaw begins with the Comprehensive Master Plan that provides a written consensus to guide future growth and development while allowing flexibility to respond to new ideas and direction as the City progresses, changes, and grows. The Comprehensive Master Plan was most recently updated in 2011 and included a Five Year Capital Improvement Plan (2011-2016) that will provide for continued additions and improvements to the City’s infrastructure as well as continuing to improve the quality of life for our citizens. The emphasis of the new Capital Improvement Plan is completing projects that can be funded with existing reserves and expected revenues without the need to take on additional debt. Prior to the economic slow down, Saginaw was one of the fastest growing cities in all of Tarrant County. The growth rate has slowed considerably with a population increase of only 3.3% since 2010.

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POPULATION 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 1960 1970 1980 1990 1995 2000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

The City of Saginaw prepared for the growth projected in the 1990’s by constructing infrastructure to meet the demand. As the City approaches build-out, the new plan focuses on strengthening the infrastructure system and maintaining existing infrastructure. This return to basics of operating and maintaining infrastructure is the theme for the next five years. Because the City of Saginaw is a mature city with a stable political and financial base, Council is able to prepare formal long range financial plans every five years with a review of priorities on an annual basis that is translated into the annual budget by Staff. The annual budget is developed within the context of the long-range plans adopted by Council. These plans anticipate funding needs and available revenues and forecast methods for matching future revenues and expenditures. Due to conservative planning on the part of the City Council and Staff, the City has been able to absorb the impact of economic swings. The City of Saginaw was fiscally conservative during the economic expansion from 1990 to 2005. Record growth allowed the City to reduce their property tax rates from 0.54 in 2003 to the current rate of 0.51 and to grow the General Fund Balance from $4.5 million in 2003 to an estimated $8.9 million at the end of 2013. Fund balances built up during the economic expansion have been available for one time expenditures during the current economic downturn. One time expenditures include capital purchases and special requests that are not of a recurring nature. The main attractions to Saginaw are location, land availability, easy freeway access, good schools, low tax rates, and the general quality of life. Alliance Airport, Meacham Airport, Eagle Mountain Lake, the United States Currency Plant, Texas Motor Speedway and the Fort Worth Stockyards are all within fourteen miles of Saginaw’s city limits.

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The challenges the City faces this year include maintaining current facilities, current service levels and completing infrastructure improvements. Key issues to be addressed include: 

Adopting a tax rate that allows us to maintain current service and staffing levels, as well as meet voter approved debt service requirements.

Maintenance and upgrade of the existing infrastructure (water, wastewater, paving, drainage, and community facilities): We will perform an infiltration and inflow (I&I) study for the Little Fossil Creek basin, replace a portions of the S.E. 24” sewer trunk main from impact fees and undesignated surplus. We will replace water lines along Saginaw Blvd and Lawson Road. The Opal Street Bridge over East Cement Creek drainage project will be completed as well as the Saginaw Blvd phase IV drainage project. The City will continue to maintain facilities by remodeling the Water/Wastewater field operations office, renovate Fire Station 1, replace flooring at the Senior Center (Log Cabin), and replace the score board at the ball field at Willow Creek Park. Street repairs at multiple locations will continue as well as engineering for the West Bailey Boswell Road project. Construction for Phase 1 of the West Bailey Boswell project will begin this fiscal year.

Retaining quality employees in all departments: The City’s most valuable asset is its employees. Over 21% of our employees have been with the City twenty years or more and are eligible for retirement under the City’s retirement plan. Another 7% have been with the City a minimum of fifteen years and will be eligible for retirement in five years or less. A considerable amount of knowledge about the City, its history and operations will be lost. It is extremely important that the City continue to offer competitive salary and benefits in order to hire and retain quality employees.

Controlling the cost of employee health insurance: Steadily increasing insurance rates will require serious consideration by the Mayor and Council. The City has an Insurance Committee comprised of an employee from each department who works with the administrative staff to seek affordable quality insurance. The City will continue to take competitive bids for these services and evaluate plan options.

Each of these issues is addressed under the individual department sections of this budget. Major changes in each of the operating funds of the City are outlined as follows. GENERAL FUND This year our estimated General Fund Revenues total $12,065,145. Expenditures total $12,448,515. The difference of $363,920 will be funded using existing fund balance. Our ending balance on September 30, 2013 is estimated at $8,896,125. This includes

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the $2,250,000 Emergency Reserve set up for the General Fund. Per the policy of the City of Saginaw, the City maintains an Emergency Reserve Fund Balance in the General Fund between 15% and 20% of the operating budget. This would enable the City to operate the General Fund for two to three months. These funds would only be used in an emergency and only with Council approval. We will have this on hand during the 2013-2014 fiscal year as well as the Undesignated Surplus Fund balance. The two major sources of revenue consist of $3,497,300 from ad valorem tax revenue and $4,015,000 from sales tax revenue. The 2013 taxable value is $1,222,259,646 and reflects $5,782,963 in new construction. The taxable value increased by 5% this fiscal year. The approved budget is based on a 2013 tax rate of $0.510000, 0.02 cents higher than the 2012 rate, with $0.289024 for maintenance and operations, and $0.220976 for debt service. Sales tax revenues have increased, however due to retail growth surrounding the City we are budgeting less than FY 2012-2013 revised budget. We estimate that we will receive $4,015,000 in sales tax revenue, a 3% decrease from the FY2012-2013 revised budget amount of $4,150,000. The cost of employee health coverage continues to be a budget challenge for employers nationwide. The current health insurance provider, Aetna, offered to renew our current plan with a 9% increase based on claims history. We advertised for bids and after review of the bids, the Employee Health Insurance Committee recommended the City change carriers to United Health Care under a plan which most resembles our current benefit plan. This will result in a 1.9% increase on the employee rate. Our dental insurance provider, Dearborn National, proposed an 34% increase over the rates we currently pay. After reviewing the bids the Employee Health Insurance Committee recommended the City change carriers to Delta Dental which will result in a 7.7% increase and will set the rate for a two year period In order to stay competitive and retain the employees we have invested in, the proposed budget includes 5% step increases for those employees not already at the mid-point (City Goal) of the pay plan. For those with more than five years’ experience the raise would be effective October 1 and for those with less, it would be effective on the anniversary of the employee’s hire date or promotion date. Also, a 3% increase in the pay plan is budgeted. General Fund expenditures decreased by $2,259,005 or 15% when compared to the previous year’s revised budget. The decrease is mainly due to the city hall expansion project being substantially completed in FY12/13 and other one-time capital purchases. A separate document (Budget Guidelines) is prepared for Department Heads and identifies the expenditures by account number with explanations for each. The FY 2012-2013 General Fund Revised Budget is $14,707,520. The approved 2013-2014 budget is $12,448,515. Capital outlays total $375,370. The following chart shows the changes in expenditures for each department in the General Fund.

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GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES

Department General Admin. and Non-Departmental Municipal Court

Actual

Revised

Adopted

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

$ 2,267,349

$ 4,385,865

% Change

$ 1,878,225

-57%

(1)

191,515

177,500

199,765

13%

(2)

Fire

2,615,169

2,644,550

2,981,525

13%

(3)

Police

3,444,158

3,452,500

3,673,795

6%

(4)

Public Services

1,353,297

1,368,600

1,041,275

-24%

(5) (6)

Parks

-

256,180

247,560

-3%

Recreation and Community Services

848,831

722,250

727,470

1%

Library

470,013

474,390

520,290

10%

(7)

Inspections/Code Enforcement

554,907

609,650

583,230

-4%

(8)

Fleet Maintenance

525,905

532,000

543,930

2%

14,504

84,035

51,450

-39%

$ 12,285,648

$ 14,707,520

$ 12,448,515

-15%

Economic Development

Totals

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9)

Included City Hall construction in FY11-12 and FY12-13. Municipal Court became a court of record with the Judge paid out of contract services in FY12/13. FY13/14 includes capital outlay and increased cost of anticipated trials that are back logged due to the City Hall construction. Includes $250,000 down payment for new fire truck and $20,000 household hazardous waste fee previously budgeted in non-departmental. Salary increases and liability insurance previously budget in non-departmental. Western Center /156 project budgeted in FY12/13. There are no capital projects transfers in FY13/14. Fewer capital outlay items budgeted in FY13/14. Includes liability insurance previously budgeted in non-departmental and 6 months funding for a PT position to become FT with benefits. Replacement vehicle and animal control renovations included in FY12/13. Economic incentives vary from year to year.

General Administrative Office – $25,000 (one third the total cost) of the community sign budgeted in General Administrative Office. The remaining funding for the sign is in the Donations Fund and Enterprise Fund. Municipal Court- Funding is included for 4 ticket writers and the cost of trials that were on hold pending completion of city hall construction. Fire – Includes the down payment for fire truck replacement. The remaining $700,000 will be financed. Includes funding for Station 1 repairs and renovations. Public Services – The Public Services Department budget includes a trailer mounted boom lift and the painting of 20 street light poles.

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(9)


Parks – Includes funding for a ½ ton service truck and a score board at the ball field in Willow Creek Park. Recreation and Community Services – Includes funding for lobby furniture and the replacement of 24 multi-purpose tables at the Recreation Center, and flooring replacement and 8 ceiling fans at the Senior Center. Library – A children’s library assistant will be converted from part-time to full-time at mid-year. Inspections/Code Enforcement – Capital purchases include the replacement of 3 desk top computers. Economic Development – Includes $50,000 for reimbursements paid to businesses per a signed economic development agreement. These agreements are designed to promote development within the City.

SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Special Revenue Funds consist of the Crime Control and Prevention District (CCPD) Fund, the Drainage Utility Fund, the Street Maintenance Fund and the Donations Fund. The CCPD Fund represents revenues and expenditures associated with the additional half-cent sales tax first approved by the voters in November 1997 to fund a Crime Control and Prevention District. Voters continued the district for five years in May of 2002. The district was continued for ten more years in May of 2007 and the rate reduced to three eighths of one percent. The Board of Directors, which consists of the Mayor and Council members, governs the District. The goals of the Crime Control and Prevention District are to increase patrol officer visibility, enhance crime fighting ability by acquiring new equipment, provide additional training and updated technology and to reduce the number of juvenile offenders involved in repeated criminal and/or gang related activity. This fund provides for salaries and benefits for ten patrol officers, a public services officer, one dispatcher and one half the salary and benefits of a school resource officer. Capital purchases include two patrol vehicles, ten portable radios, and 3 bikes. We are projecting revenues of $950,500 and expenditures of $1,037,010. The fund is balanced with $86,510 from the fund surplus. Capital Outlay for the CCPD Fund totals $110,500. The Drainage Utility Fund was established by the City Council on January 1, 2005 as an additional revenue source to offset the growing costs of operating the storm drainage system. These costs include maintenance of the existing system, federal mandates to control storm water runoff, floodplain management and planning and construction of new drainage facilities. This fund will continue to pay for the two drainage utility maintenance workers, one half the costs of the environmental specialist position, a replacement mower and construction costs for Opal Street Bridge at East Cement

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Creek project and Saginaw Blvd System 2 Phase IV project. We are anticipating revenues of $550,800 and expenditures of $1,324,155 using $773,355 of fund balance. Capital Outlay totals $19,995 and transfers for drainage projects total $1,040,000. The Street Maintenance Fund was approved on May 12, 2007 by the voters which imposes a one-eighth of one percent sales and use tax for the maintenance and repair of existing municipal streets. This Street Maintenance Tax was valid for a four year period and was continued with voter approval in November of 2011. The tax went into effect in April 2008 and revenues were received starting in June 2008. We anticipate revenues of $320,500 and expenditures of $300,000. These funds will be used to repair seven city streets. The Donations Fund was created in May 2009 to better track funds received through water bill donations as well as direct donations to the City for specific purposes. Currently, Animal Control, Parks, Library, Beautification, Police, Fire, and Senior Center have donation funds available for expenditure. We anticipate revenues of $145,300 and expenditures of $187,900 which includes the use of $70,000 from Beautification for Old Decatur Road landscaping phase 2. $25,000 (one third the total cost) of the community sign budgeted is budgeted in the Donations Fund (Beautification). The remaining funding for the sign is in the General Fund and Enterprise Fund.

DEBT SERVICE FUND Debt service requirements for outstanding general obligation and certificates of obligation bonds are $3,173,830 with $2,211,970 for principal and $954,860 for interest expense. The tax rate to meet these obligations is $0.220976 per $100 valuation. We have budgeted $184,080 from the debt fund balance to lower the debt portion of the tax rate. Funds for lease and loan payments are transferred from the Enterprise Fund and the Drainage Utility Fund. CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND The Capital Projects Fund consists of projects as recommended by our staff and engineers and approved by the City Council. Projects for 2013-2014 will be constructed with the proceeds from the 2013 bond sale and with transfers from other funds. In May 2013, Saginaw voters approved a $24 million bond issue for East Bailey Boswell bridge and road project. Bailey Boswell Road will be designed as a six lane divided road from Saginaw Boulevard (287) to Jarvis Road. It will be reduced to a four lane divided road from Jarvis Road to Blue Mound Road (156). Traffic will be able to stay at ground level from Jarvis Road to Saginaw Boulevard or take the bridge which will go over two sets of railroad tracks and over Saginaw Boulevard giving access to the

21


existing commercial developments on the west side. Engineering will continue and Phase 1 construction will begin in FY 2013-2014. Water and Wastewater projects will be completed using transfers from the Enterprise Fund. Projects include: Saginaw Blvd 12� Phase 1, Inflow and Infiltration Study, SE 24� wastewater trunk main Phases 1 and 3. Drainage projects will be completed using transfers from the Drainage Utility Fund. Projects include: Saginaw Blvd. System 2 and East Cement Creek (Opal Street). ENTERPRISE FUND The total revenues projected for this fund are $8,380,705. Water rates will increase 15% and Wastewater rates will remain the same due to changes in the rates paid to the City of Fort Worth for purchases of water and wastewater treatment costs. Budgeted expenses total $9,769,925. The budgeted use of balance is $1,389,220 and will be used for capital projects. The Enterprise Emergency Reserve has a balance of $1,700,000. The Enterprise Fund Emergency Reserve needs to be sufficient enough to operate the Water Department for three months. As with the General Fund, these funds would only be used in an emergency and only with Council approval. The debt service for outstanding revenue bonds is $599,055 with $455,000 for principal and $144,055 for interest expense. CONCLUSION I want to thank the Mayor and City Council for their guidance and decisions made during the budget work sessions. I appreciate their cooperation to fund and improve the level of services for the City. I believe this budget establishes a sound plan of municipal services and is a very informative document for all of our citizens. Respectfully submitted,

Nan Stanford City Manager

22


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 2013-2014 The following is a brief overview of the 2013-2014 budget:

GENERAL FUND: 

This year’s budget reflects the changes made to allocate expenses previously classified as non-departmental to the various departments in the general fund. The majority of these expenses have been assigned to General Administration including utility costs, bank charges, and audit/special services. Other costs like worker’s compensation and liability insurance have been allocated to each department. These changes will help streamline the audit process.

Saginaw continues to see some growth in population and the tax base has increased by 5%. We are anticipating 50 new home starts during the 20132014 fiscal year. Saginaw’s population has grown from 12,374 in 2000 to 19,806 per the 2010 census. The estimated 2013 population is 20,140.

Property tax values are up. The July certified taxable value from TAD is $1,222,259,646. This is an increase of $58,125,128 from last year’s adjusted taxable value of $1,164,134,528. We had a total of $7,062,927 in added value from new construction. New construction for 2012-2013 was valued at $5,782,963.

The budget is balanced with a tax rate of 0.51, 0.02 more than last year’s tax rate of 0.49 and 0.04 cents over the effective tax rate. The effective tax rate is .472327 and the rollback rate is .540519. The voters approved a four cent tax rate increase for the first year of the East Bailey Boswell Road and Bridge Projects. During the past ten years Saginaw’s tax rate has been as high as 0.54 during the three budget years from 2002-2003 to 2004-2005.

TAX DEBT M&O SALES TAX YEAR RATE RATE ADJUSTMENT 2012 .189925 .300075 (.112400) 2013 .220976 .289024 (.114766) DIFFERENCE OVER (UNDER) LAST YEAR

The average home value in 2012 was $104,488 and the tax was $511.99. The average home value in 2013 is $108,831 and the estimated tax is $555.04. This results in an increase of $43.05 on the average home.

Sales tax revenues are currently increasing. However, due to commercial growth north of the City we anticipate some loss will occur. We estimate that we will receive $4,015,000 in sales tax revenue. The current sales tax rate is 8.25%, which is the maximum rate allowed. Of this, 6.25% goes to the State, 1.5% to the General Fund, 0.375% to the CCPD Fund, and 0.125% to the Street Maintenance Fund. 23

TOTAL .490000 .510000 .020000


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 2013-2014 

Interest income remains down. We anticipate revenues of only $10,000, the same amount that was budgeted in 2012-2013. Interest rates remain historically low at around 0.10%. This still exceeds the average rate of return on three month U.S. Treasury Bills. We continue to invest city funds per the City’s Investment Policy with its four objectives, listed in order of priority: safety, liquidity, yield, and public trust.

Our current employee health insurance provider, Aetna, offered to renew our current policy with a 9% increase. We advertised and solicited bids which were opened on July 30th. We received a total of four bids including United Healthcare, Aetna, Blue Cross/Blue Shield and the Texas Municipal League. By switching to United Healthcare’s T5L-P/2V plan, which matches our current benefit plan, we will only have a 1.9% increase in employee coverage rates. We had United Healthcare coverage for the two years prior to switching to Aetna and had no problems with the service. Employees will pay an additional $16 per month for spouse only coverage, an additional $13 per month for coverage of children only, or an additional $26 per month for full family coverage.

Our current dental insurance carrier, Dearborn National, offered a renewal rate that is 34% per month higher than our current rate. We received quotes from eight other carriers and Delta Dental offered coverage that has the same benefits and is only 7.7% higher with a two year rate guarantee.

This budget includes a 3% increase in the salary plan. Department heads will have the option of awarding up to 3% increases based on each employee’s performance. This is the first increase in the salary plan since 2010. In order to stay competitive and retain the employees we have invested in, the proposed budget also includes 5% step increases for those employees not already at the mid-point (City Goal) of the pay plan with department head approval. For those with more than five years’ experience the raise would be effective October 1 and for those with less, it would be effective on the anniversary of the employee’s hire date or promotion date. Changes to the Job Classifications include eliminating Grade 5 and shifting the maintenance positions up one grade.

Capital items for the Administrative offices include four replacement i-Pads for Council members and a digital community sign to be placed on Saginaw Boulevard to help inform citizens of local events. The sign will be equally funded from the General Fund, Beautification Donations Fund, and Enterprise Fund.

Court technology funds collected by the Municipal Court will pay to replace four electronic ticket writers for the Police Department. 24


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 2013-2014 

The Fire Department will be purchasing a $950,000 ladder truck to replace a 1981 model and keep the 2001 model ladder truck for a reserve. The truck will be purchased through a lease/purchase agreement with a $250,000 down payment for financing over five years. Renovations to Station One are also included in the budget.

Public services will be purchasing a trailer mounted boom lift for working on traffic signals, building and parking light replacements and tree trimming.

Capital purchases for the Parks Department include a replacement pick-up truck and a new score board for the ball field in Willow Creek Park.

Capital purchases for the Recreation Department include new lobby furniture and replacement tables for the recreation center and new flooring and ceiling fans for the Senior Citizen’s Center.

The Children’s Assistant position at the Library is currently part time but will become a full time position (35 hours to 40 hours) at mid-year of the budget to address the increase in demand for children’s programming.

Capital purchases for the Inspections/Code Enforcement department will include three replacement laptop computers for field inspection work.

The General Fund has been balanced with $363,920 of reserves for one time capital purchases and the down payment for the ladder truck. Court escrow funds will be used for ($8,000) bailiff overtime and ($11,450) for four electronic ticket writers.

DEBT SERVICE FUND: 

The budget includes the use of $184,080 in surplus from the Debt Service Fund. The fund balance in the debt service fund has grown to a point that we are able to use a portion of it over the next few years to lower the debt service portion of the tax rate.

ENTERPRISE FUND: 

The City of Saginaw purchases water from the City of Fort Worth. Fort Worth has proposed a 16.2% increase in wholesale water rates. This budget proposes a 15% increase in our water rates.

The City of Fort Worth bills the City of Saginaw for wastewater treatment based on the strengths and volume that pass through the system. Fort Worth has proposed a 3.8% decrease in wastewater rates. This budget proposes no change in our wastewater rates. 25


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 2013-2014 

The results on the average residential bill using 8,000 gallons of water would be an increase of $ 5.19 per month. A minimum bill of 2,000 gallons of water would increase $1.82 per month.

Capital purchases for the Enterprise Fund include a replacement pick-up truck, remodeling of the field operations office, and replacement of manually read commercial water meters with radio read meters.

Wastewater Capital Improvement Projects include an I&I study for the Little Fossil Creek basin and Phases 1 and 3 of the S.E. 24” trunk main (East Meter Station to west of 156 by bore and Kennedy to East McLeroy across the National Guard property by open cut) to replace and upsize an old line that is a recurring maintenance and I&I problem. The sewer line on Burlington Road will also be replaced.

Water Capital Improvement Projects include the design and construction of the Saginaw Boulevard water line Phase 1 (from McLeroy to Palomino) to replace and upsize an old line that is a recurring maintenance problem. The Lawson Road water line will also be replaced.

The Enterprise Fund has been balanced with $224,220 of reserves for one time capital purchases. A transfer of $1,165,000 from fund balance/impact fees to the Capital Projects Fund is also included for the Saginaw Blvd. 12” water line, Inflow/Infiltration work and the SE 24” Trunk Main Replacement.

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND: 

Engineers will begin the preliminary design work on Phases 2, 3 and 4 of the E. Bailey Boswell Road project and the bridge over Bus. 287 with the 2013 General Obligation bonds approved by voters in the May election.

CCPD FUND: 

The voters approved an additional one-half cent sales tax for use by the Crime Control and Prevention District (CCPD) in November 1997. The additional sales tax went into effect on April 1, 1998, and revenues were received beginning in June 1998. The district was continued for five years in 2002. In 2007, the tax was continued for ten years and reduced to three eighths (3/8) of one percent with the remaining eighth used for street maintenance.

We estimate CCPD tax revenues of $950,000 for the 2013-2014 fiscal year. 26


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 2013-2014 

The Crime Control and Prevention District will provide for the salaries and benefits of ten patrol officers, a public services officer, a dispatcher and onehalf the costs for a school resource officer. Also included in this fund’s budget are police protection vests, supplies, equipment, training for officers and crime prevention educational material. Capital purchases from this fund include two patrol car replacements, portable radio replacements and five new bicycles for the bicycle patrol.

The CCPD Fund has been balanced with $86,510 of reserves for capital purchases.

DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND: 

In January 2005 the Saginaw City Council approved the necessary ordinances to establish a drainage utility within the city and adopted the utility’s rates. Fees are assessed on properties based on the amount of storm water runoff they produce. Single family residences are assessed a uniform base fee of $4.00 per month. Other properties, including multifamily, commercial and industrial, produce more storm water runoff at a higher rate and are charged a fee based on the number of equivalent base (residential) units adjusted for the use of the property. This budget proposes no change in the monthly residential rate of $4.00. We are estimating revenues of $550,000 for the 2013-2014 fiscal year.

The Drainage Utility Fund pays the salaries of two maintenance workers and one-half the salary of the environmental specialist. It also funds the debt service on equipment and drainage system improvements. This fund will pay for the completion of the Opal Street Bridge over East Cement Creek and construction of Saginaw Boulevard Phase IV drainage improvements from Lemon to Northern.

The Drainage Utility fund has been balanced with $773,355 of reserves for drainage capital projects.

STREET MAINTENANCE FUND: 

On May 12, 2007 the voters approved the ballot proposition imposing a oneeighth (1/8) of one percent sales and use tax for the maintenance and repair of existing municipal streets. This tax was effective in April 2008, and revenues were received beginning in June 2008. We anticipate revenues of $320,500 for the 2013-2014 fiscal year. These revenues will be be used for general street repairs, the reconstruction of Roberts (from Lottie to Norton), Bristol, Westcliff (from Landscale to White Rock), West Hills (from Old Decatur to Westcliff), and Reed Avenue (from Lottie to Knowles). 27


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 2013-2014 DONATIONS FUND: 

The Donations Fund was created in May 2009 to better track funds received through water bill donations as well as direct donations to the City for specific purposes. Currently, Animal Control, Parks, Library, Senior Center, Fire, Police and Beautification have donation funds available for expenditure.

28


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET PROCESS Budgeting is an essential element of the financial planning, control, and evaluation process of municipal government. The City Charter requires the City Manager to prepare and submit to the City Council a proposed budget at least forty-five days prior to the beginning of the fiscal year PREPARATON The budget process begins in May with the distribution of the budget calendar and budget preparation instructions from the City Manager. In keeping with the goals of the City, department heads are asked to prepare budgets that provide for the effective operation of their department, without major increases to expenditures/expenses, and continue to provide for the necessary safety and quality of life for our citizens. All requests for additional personnel and capital outlay purchases are not included in the individual departments’ budget. Those items are prioritized and listed as special requests. Special requests are submitted, in priority order, as separate items and are not included in the proposed budget. Detailed support is prepared and presented for each request. PROPOSED BUDGET Using the above guidelines, each department head prepares a basic line-item budget that maintains the current level of service. In June, department heads submit the following budget reports to the Asst. City Manager/Finance Director.       

Prior year actual, current year budget, actual to date, projected year-end, and proposed budget. Estimated revenue for new fiscal year based on historical figures and carefully researched expectations of future trends. Special requests, prioritized and with extensive documentation. Goals and strategies for the new fiscal year. Performance measures, prior year actual, current year, and budget year. Five Year Plan. Update of departmental descriptions and activities.

Each department’s budget is reviewed by the administrative staff (City Manager, Asst. City Manager/Finance Director and the Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst). The administrative staff makes changes, if necessary, to these budgets based on estimates of anticipated revenues to fund the budget and what services they believe are necessary to run the city effectively. After the administrative staff reviews the departments’ budgets they meet with the department heads again to review any changes. This gives the department heads a chance to discuss their requests with the administrative staff and present any further documentation that might be needed. After these meetings the administrative staff prepares a draft copy of the budget. It is at this time that the administrative staff decides whether to include cost of living raises, increase benefits, etc. 29


In July certified property tax values are received from the appraisal district. Based on the certified taxable value received from the appraisal district, the estimated tax revenue is adjusted if needed. The effective tax rate is calculated and the tax rate needed to meet budget requirements is determined. The Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst, under the direction of the City Manager and Asst. City Manager/Finance Director, then prepares the proposed budget document, posts, and publishes the required notices. The proposed budget is given to the Mayor and Council to review before the budget retreat. ADOPTION In August the City holds a Budget Retreat to work on the Proposed Budget. Persons in attendance at the Budget Retreat include the Mayor and City Council, City Manager, Asst. City Manager/Finance Director, Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst, City Secretary, Department Heads, and City Engineer. At the Budget Retreat, the Council reviews the support for the special requests and speaks with each Department Head. At this point the Council decides what items will be included in the budget and what type of funding will be needed. The council must decide if they are going to increase the tax rate, use undesignated surplus, increase fees, incur debt, seek grants, etc. to fund the budget. They may increase or decrease the cost of living raises, benefits, etc. added to the budget by administrative staff. After the Budget Retreat, the Proposed Budget is revised. The Proposed Budget is filed with the City Secretary and is made available for inspection by any interested person during office hours. The City Council holds a Public Hearing on the proposed budget and gives at least ten days notice of the Public Hearing in the official newspaper. The Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst is responsible for posting and publishing the required notices. After the Public Hearing, and before October 1st, the Council must vote to adopt the budget and set the tax rate. The budget is adopted by resolution approved by the favorable votes of at least four-sevenths (4/7) of the Council. The adopted budget is a public record and a copy is on file in the office of the City Secretary. A copy of the adopted budget is also filed with the County Clerk. IMPLEMENTATION Once the budget is adopted, detailed account information is compiled in the Budget Guidelines document. The Budget Guidelines document lists each line item and includes detailed support because it is used by the departments as a guide for operating their department. The City Manager is required to furnish the Council with monthly reports which show the prior month's expenditures and total expenditures to date for each budgeted activity. At mid-year the City Manager and Department Heads review the monthly reports to see how the revenue and expenditure predictions have faired, how well the departments have performed, and whether budget revisions are in order. The budget revisions are normally revisions to individual line items. This allows for a better year end projection for use in the next year’s budget work session. Usually the departments’ overall totals remain the same or are reduced. Only if there is a very unusual circumstance is a department's overall budget total increased.

30


BUDGETARY CONTROL AND AMENDMENT The level of budgetary control is the department level in all funds. When budget adjustments among departments and/or funds are necessary, they must be approved by the City Council. If budget revisions are needed, a public hearing is set and a detailed report describing the amendments is presented to the City Council for discussion at a Council Workshop. Amendments are then presented at a regular Council Meeting and adopted by a City Council vote. At this point the revisions replace the original budget. The City Council can amend the total appropriations for an individual fund. To guarantee compliance with the expenditure limitation, however, when one fund’s total appropriation is increased, another fund’s appropriation must be reduced by an equal amount. The City Council may also approve the transfer of appropriations within funds. This occurs most often in the case of capital improvement projects, where savings in one project are transferred to another project. These amendments, as well as uses of any contingency accounts also require Council approval.

31


City of Saginaw Budget Calendar 2013-2014 Date

Activity

April 30

1st Estimate of 2013 taxable values received from TAD.

May 15

2nd Estimate of 2013 taxable values received from TAD.

May 29

Distribute budget instructions and worksheets to Department Heads.

May 31

Prepare preliminary revenue estimates

June 7

3rd Estimate of 2013 taxable values received from TAD.

June 12

Department Heads submit 2013-2014 budget requests to Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst

July 2

Budget submitted to City Manager and Assistant City Manager/Finance Director

July 10

Pre-Budget Conferences held between City Manager, Asst. City Manager/Finance Director, Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst and Department Heads and budget updated.

July 25

Receive 2013 certified appraisal roll from TAD and calculate Effective and Rollback Tax Rates

August 7

Publish Notice of Effective and Rollback Tax Rates.

August 10

Budget Retreat for City Council, City Management, Department Heads and City Engineer. This is a public meeting and is posted as such.

August 20

Present Proposed Budget and Tax Rate to the City Council and call for required two Public Hearings.

September 3

Council Meeting - 1st Public Hearing on Tax Rate and Proposed Budget

September 10 Special Council Meeting - 2nd Public Hearing on Tax Rate and Proposed Budget. September 17 Council Meeting - Public Hearing to adopt 2012-2013 Revised Budget, Public Hearing to adopt 2013-2014 Budget, Vote to adopt Tax Rates, Water Rates, and Wastewater Rates 32


BUDGET SUMMARIES

City of Saginaw The following summaries provide an overview of revenues and expenditures/expenses for all departments.

33


CITY OF SAGINAW DESCRIPTION OF FUNDS The City of Saginaw budget is made up of various funds. A fund is a grouping of related accounts that is used to maintain control over resources that have been segregated for specific activities or objectives. Funds are used to track revenues and expenditures/expenses for different programs and functions. All of the funds of the City can be divided into two categories – governmental funds and proprietary funds. Governmental funds include the General Fund, Debt Service Fund, and Capital Projects Fund. Special revenues are accounted for in the Special Revenue Funds and are a type of Governmental fund. The City of Saginaw operates and maintains its own water and sewer utility system. The Enterprise Fund, a proprietary fund, is used to account for water and sewer utility system funds. The City’s budgets of governmental funds (General Fund, Debt Service Fund, Capital Projects Fund and Special Revenue Funds) are prepared on a modified accrual basis. This means that obligations of the City such as outstanding purchase orders are budgeted as expenditures. However, revenues are recognized only when they are measurable and available. The budget of the City’s proprietary fund (Enterprise Fund) is prepared using a full accrual basis. This means it recognizes expenses as encumbrances when a commitment is made, such as through a purchase order. Revenues, on the other hand, are recognized when they are earned by and due to the City (for example water user fees are recognized as revenue when bills are produced). The Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) shows the status of the City’s finances on a basis of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). In most cases, this conforms to the way the City prepares its budget. One exception is compensated absences (accrued but unused vacation/sick leave and compensatory time) which are treated slightly different in the budget and the CAFR. The CAFR shows fund revenues and expenditures/expenses on both a GAAP basis and Budget basis for comparison purposes. All of the City’s funds that are included in the CAFR and audited by the independent auditors are appropriated. Each of the funds is listed and described below. GENERAL FUND The General Fund is the major operating fund of the City. It is used to account for all revenues and expenditures except those required to be accounted for in another fund. Expenditures for the General Administrative Office, the Municipal Court, the Fire Department, the Police Department, the Public Services Department, Park Maintenance, the Recreation and Community Services Department, the Library, the Inspections/Code Enforcement Department, the Fleet Maintenance Department, and the Economic Development Department are included in the City’s General Fund. DEBT SERVICE FUND The Debt Service Fund is used to account for the accumulation of resources for, and the payment of, general obligation long-term debt principal and interest. CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND The Capital Projects Fund is used to account for the financing and construction of Governmental Fund type projects and Enterprise Fund projects funded through general obligation bonds and certificates of obligation bonds, other than those recorded in the proprietary funds. 34


ENTERPRISE FUND The Enterprise Fund is used to account for operations of the City’s water and sewer activities that are financed and operated in a manner similar to those of private business enterprises. Services of the Fund are intended to be self-supporting through user charges. The Enterprise Fund reimburses the General Fund for operating expenses such as building rental, utilities, data processing, and other administrative expenses. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Special Revenue Funds account for resources restricted for specific purposes. This restriction may be legal or administrative. Saginaw’s Special Revenue Funds consist of the CCPD (Crime Control and Prevention District) Fund, the Drainage Utility Fund, the Street Maintenance Fund and the Donations Fund. 

The CCPD Fund is used to track revenues from sales tax designated for this fund and expenditures related to the CCPD. The General Fund will be reimbursed for a portion of police officer salaries from this fund.

The Drainage Utility Fund is used to account for operation of the City’s drainage facilities. Services of the Fund are intended to be self-supporting through fees assessed on properties based on the storm water runoff they produce. The Drainage Utility Fund reimburses the General Fund for the salary and benefits of two maintenance workers and one half the salary and benefits of the Environmental Specialist.

The Street Maintenance Fund tracks the revenues and expenditures from sales tax designated for street maintenance. Voters approved the adoption of a local sales and use tax at the rate of one-eighth of one percent to provide revenue for maintenance and repairs of existing municipal streets. These revenues cannot be used for building new streets. The City began receiving revenues in the latter part of 2008.

The Donations Fund is used to track revenues received through donations for specific purposes and the expenditure of these funds. Currently, donations are received for the Animal Shelter, Library, Parks, Beautification, the Senior Center, Police, and Fire.

USE OF FUND BALANCE Fund General Fund Debt Service Fund CCPD Fund Drainage Utility Fund Donations Fund Enterprise Fund

Amount $ 363,920 $ 184,080 $ 86,510 $ 773,355 $ 82,150 $ 1,389,220

35

Explanation of Fund Balance Use For one time capital outlay To lower the debt portion of the tax rate For one time capital outlay For one time capital projects For one time capital outlay For one time capital outlay and capital projects


CITY OF SAGINAW FUND STRUCTURE 2013-2014 Total Budget $31,246,335

Governmental Funds

Proprietary Fund

$21,476,410

$9,769,925

General Fund $12,448,515 Debt Service Fund $3,173,830 Capital Projects Fund $3,005,000

Special Revenue Funds

Enterprise Fund

$2,849,065

$9,769,925

Crime Control and Prevention District Fund $1,037,010

Water/Wastewater Fund

General Administrative $1,878,225

Drainage Utiltiy Fund

Municipal Court $199,765

Street Maintenance Fund

Fire

Donations Fund

$2,981,525

$187,900

$1,324,155

$300,000

Police $3,673,795 Public Services $1,041,275 Parks Maintenance $247,560 Recreation & Community Serv. $727,470 Library $520,290 Inspections/Code Enforcement $583,230 Fleet Maintenance $543,930 Economic Development $51,450

36

$9,769,925


CITY OF SAGINAW CONSOLIDATED BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND SCHEDULE OF SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS Debt Capital Service Projects Fund Fund

General Fund Revenues Property Taxes Sales Taxes Other Taxes Franchise Fees Licenses, Permits, Fines, and Fees Grant Assistance Interest Income Other Income Charges for Services Total Revenues Other Financing Sources Transfers from other funds Bond Proceeds Use of Bond Funds Use of Escrow Funds Use of Beginning Fund Balance Total Other Financing Sources Total Available Resources Operating Expenditures General Government Municipal Court Fire Police Recreation & Community Services Library Public Works Total Operating Expenditures Other Financing Uses Capital Outlay General Government Municipal Court Fire Police Recreation & Community Services Library Public Works

$

3,497,300 4,015,000 33,000 1,460,000 1,229,795 55,000 10,000 263,185

$

$

10,563,280

$

2,706,890

$

7,500

$

950,500

$

1,501,865

$

282,860

$

2,205,000

$

-

$

-

$

25,000 6,000 2,000

950,000

500

7,500 -

800,000

19,450 363,920

184,080

86,510

$

1,885,235

$

466,940

$

3,005,000

$

86,510

$

12,448,515

$

3,173,830

$

3,012,500

$

1,037,010

$

1,850,825 188,315 2,724,625 3,673,795 707,470 520,290 2,407,825

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

12,073,145

$

-

$

-

$

104,800

$

27,400 11,450 256,900 20,000 59,620

$

-

$

-

$

-

Total Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfer to Other Funds Total Other Financing Uses

2,673,890

CCPD Fund

104,800

110,500 3,005,000

375,370

3,173,830 -

-

3,005,000

110,500

-

821,710

$

375,370

$

3,173,830

$

3,005,000

$

932,210

Total Uses of Resources

$

12,448,515

$

3,173,830

$

3,005,000

$

1,037,010

Change in Fund Balance

$

Beginning Fund Balance

$

8,896,125

$

1,229,334

$

Ending Fund Balance

$

8,532,205

$

1,045,254

$

(363,920)

$

(184,080)

37

$

(792,500)

$

(86,510)

8,151,022

$

720,330

7,358,522

$

633,820


CITY OF SAGINAW CONSOLIDATED BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND SCHEDULE OF SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE

Drainage Utility Fund Revenues Property Taxes Sales Taxes Other Taxes Franchise Fees Licenses, Permits, Fines, and Fees Grant Assistance Interest Income Other Income Charges for Services Total Revenues Other Financing Sources Transfers from other funds Bond Proceeds Use of Bond Funds Use of Escrow Funds Use of Beginning Fund Balance Total Other Financing Sources Total Available Resources Operating Expenditures General Government Municipal Court Fire Police Recreation & Community Services Library Public Works Total Operating Expenditures Other Financing Uses Capital Outlay General Government Municipal Court Fire Police Recreation & Community Services Library Public Works

$

-

$

320,000

800 550,000

Donations Fund $

500

Enterprise Fund -

$

300 145,000

-

7,000 195,000 8,129,500

$

550,800

$

320,500

$

145,300

$

8,331,500

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

49,205

773,355

82,150

1,389,220

$

773,355

$

-

$

82,150

$

1,438,425

$

1,324,155

$

320,500

$

227,450

$

9,769,925

$

-

$

-

$

37,500

$

-

102,000

5,200 2,000 950 41,000 -

300,000

6,716,810

$

102,000

$

300,000

$

86,650

$

6,716,810

$

-

$

-

$

97,250

$

-

19,995

Total Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfer to Other Funds Total Other Financing Uses

PROPRIETARY FUND

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS Street Maintenance Fund

4,000

439,000 439,000 599,055 2,015,060

19,995

-

101,250

1,202,160

-

-

$

1,222,155

$

-

$

101,250

$

3,053,115

Total Uses of Resources

$

1,324,155

$

300,000

$

187,900

$

9,769,925

Change in Fund Balance

$

$

20,500

$

(42,600)

$

(1,389,220)

Beginning Fund Balance

$

1,038,369

$

297,275

$

269,682

$

5,982,446

Ending Fund Balance

$

265,014

$

317,775

$

227,082

$

4,593,226

(773,355)

38


CITY OF SAGINAW CONSOLIDATED BUDGET SUMMARY BY FUND SCHEDULE OF SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE

Revenues Property Taxes Sales Taxes Other Taxes Franchise Fees Licenses, Permits, Fines, and Fees Grant Assistance Interest Income Other Income Charges for Services Total Revenues Other Financing Sources Transfers from other funds Bond Proceeds Use of Bond Funds Use of Escrow Funds Use of Beginning Fund Balance Total Other Financing Sources Total Available Resources Operating Expenditures General Government Municipal Court Fire Police Recreation & Community Services Library Public Works Total Operating Expenditures Other Financing Uses Capital Outlay General Government Municipal Court Fire Police Recreation & Community Services Library Public Works

Total All Funds 2012-2013

Total All Funds 2011-2012

(Adopted)

(Revised)

(Actual)

$

6,171,190 5,285,000 58,000 1,460,000 1,235,795 55,000 28,600 603,185 8,679,500

$

5,707,000 5,370,000 59,000 1,470,000 1,261,000 60,000 22,700 1,549,831 8,762,500

$

5,734,340 5,365,461 43,597 1,552,095 1,111,824 248,441 26,271 1,379,530 8,809,894

$

23,576,270

$

24,262,031

$

24,271,453

$

4,038,930 800,000 19,450 2,879,235

$

5,890,750 9,378,000 400,219 4,156,824

$

1,875,510 114,255

$

7,737,615

$

19,825,793

$

1,989,765

$

31,313,885

$

44,087,824

$

26,261,218

$

1,888,325 188,315 2,729,825 3,780,595 708,420 561,290 9,526,635

$

2,055,865 177,500 2,648,050 3,527,800 687,200 515,080 9,403,135

$

1,859,822 191,515 2,609,418 3,563,149 752,466 510,761 8,601,595

$

19,383,405

$

19,014,630

$

18,088,726

$

124,650 11,450 256,900 110,500 20,000 3,527,615

$

2,007,000 27,000 117,600 36,000 39,910 6,051,370

$

407,527 13,625 199,867 96,732 1,054,978

Total Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfer to Other Funds Total Other Financing Uses

Total All Funds 2013-2014

4,051,115 3,772,885 4,038,930

8,278,880 4,786,114 5,545,750

1,772,729 2,527,132 1,860,055

$

11,862,930

$

18,610,744

$

6,159,916

Total Uses of Resources

$

31,246,335

$

37,625,374

$

24,248,642

Change in Fund Balance

$

(2,811,685)

$

1,905,407

$

1,898,321

Beginning Fund Balance

$

26,584,583

$

24,679,176

$

22,780,855

Ending Fund Balance

$

23,772,898

$

26,584,583

$

24,679,176

39


CITY OF SAGINAW 5-YEAR FUND SUMMARY 2013 - 2014 ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

$ 11,968,101

$ 11,859,867

$ 12,323,614

$ 14,707,520

$ 12,448,515

-15.36%

DEBT SERVICE

2,671,602

2,569,747

2,624,287

$ 3,889,465

3,173,830

-18.40%

CAPITAL PROJECTS

4,408,734

3,084,493

627,070

13,075,050

3,012,500

-76.96%

CCPD

827,941

910,242

1,131,033

1,005,400

1,037,010

3.14%

DRAINAGE UTILITY

423,072

429,342

436,617

551,000

1,324,155

140.32%

STREET MAINTENANCE

322,122

318,836

341,157

689,700

320,500

-53.53%

DONATIONS

153,614

133,186

139,865

243,300

227,450

-6.51%

7,129,120

7,773,977

8,637,575

9,926,389

9,769,925

-1.58%

TOTAL RESOURCES

$ 27,904,306

$ 27,079,690

$ 26,261,218

$ 44,087,824

$ 31,313,885

-28.97%

USE OF RESOURCES

ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

$ 11,229,442

$ 11,437,359

$ 12,285,649

$ 14,707,520

$ 12,448,515

-15.36%

DEBT SERVICE

2,450,509

2,507,338

2,335,288

3,889,465

3,173,830

-18.40%

CAPITAL PROJECTS

4,361,069

5,565,840

620,650

6,726,100

3,005,000

-55.32%

CCPD

894,919

910,242

1,131,033

1,005,400

1,037,010

3.14%

DRAINAGE UTILITY

342,301

220,751

436,617

437,500

1,324,155

202.66%

STREET MAINTENANCE

369,594

240,150

157,151

689,700

300,000

-56.50%

89,040

108,466

101,421

243,300

187,900

-22.77%

7,608,826

7,540,386

7,180,833

9,926,389

9,769,925

-1.58%

TOTAL USE OF RESOURCES

$ 27,345,700

$ 28,530,532

$ 24,248,642

$ 37,625,374

$ 31,246,335

-16.95%

SURPLUS (DEFICIT)

$

$ (1,450,842) Note 1

$ 2,012,576 Note 2

$ 6,462,450 Note 3

$

RESOURCES GENERAL

ENTERPRISE

GENERAL

DONATIONS ENTERPRISE

558,606

Please see next page for Notes and explanation of variances

40

67,550 Note 4

% CHANGE FROM LAST YEAR

% CHANGE FROM LAST YEAR


CITY OF SAGINAW 5-YEAR FUND SUMMARY 2013 - 2014 Explanation of Variances Note 1 - Capital Projects Fund Deficit was $2,481,347 for the Fiscal Year due to construction of projects using bonds issued in a previous fiscal year. Total Surplus for all other funds was $1,030,505. Note 2 - The majority of this surplus comes from the Enterprise Fund and is due to an exceptionally hot, dry year. Note 3 - The $2,411,289 deficit in General Fund represents the expense for the City Hall project that was funded with cash balance. The $6,348,950 surplus in Capital Projects Fund is due to the bond sale revenue that will be spent over the coming years. The $1,463,389 deficit in the Enterprise Fund represents water and wastewater project expenditures from cash balance.

Note 4 - The General Fund deficit of $363,920 represents one time capital purchases funded with cash. The Debt Service Fund Deficit of $184,080 represents a planned draw down of previous years' excess tax revenue colletions. The $792,500 deficit in Capital Projects represents the use of bond funds issued in the previous year. The $86,510 deficit in the CCPD Fund represents one time capital expenses. The $773,355 deficit in the Drainage Utility Fund represents planned drainage projects that will be funded with previous years' collections. The $1,389,220 deficit in the Enterprise Fund represents the use of fund balance for planned water and wastewater capital projects. % Change From Last Year General Fund The 15% change represents the one time City Hall project in FY 12/13. Debt Service Fund The 18% change represents the refunding of debt in FY 12/13. Capital Projects Fund The 76% change in resources is due to the the $8,000,000 bond sale in FY12/13 that will be spent in the coming years on the Bailey Boswell Project and the $2,000,000 transfer from General Fund for the City Hall project. The 55% change in use of resources is due to fewer projects budget in FY 13/14.

Drainage Utility Fund The 140% change in resources is the use of fund balance for the East Cement Creek Improvements for Opal Street bridge and the Saginaw Blvd System 2, phase IV drainage improvements. The 202% increase in uses of resources represent the planned expenditures for these projects.

Street Maintenance Fund The 53% change in resources and the 56% change in the uses of resources reflects the use of fund balance in FY 12/13 for street maintenance projects.

Donations Fund The 6% change in resources and the 22% change in uses of resources represents one time projects in FY12/13 with the use of fund balance that will not be necessary in FY 13/14.

41


CITY OF SAGINAW 2013-2014 ALL FUNDS DISTRIBUTION OF REVENUES/RESOURCES

Use of Escrow Funds 19,450 0%

Use of Beginning Fund Balance 2,879,235 9%

Property Taxes 6,171,190 20%

Use of Bond Funds 800,000 2%

Sales Taxes 5,285,000 17%

Transfers from other funds 4,038,930 13%

Transfers from other funds Bond Proceeds Use of Bond Funds Use of Escrow Funds Use of Beginning Fund Balance

Other Taxes 58,000 0%

Charges for Services 8,679,500 28%

Other Income 603,185 2%

Interest Income 28,600 0%

Franchise Fees 1,460,000 5% Licenses, Permits, Fines, and Fees 1,235,795 4% Grant Assistance 55,000 0%

REVENUE/RESOURCES AS A PERCENT OF TOTAL 100%

Use of Beginning Fund Balance

80%

Use of Escrow Funds Use of Bond Funds Bond Proceeds 60%

Transfers from other funds Charges for Services Other Income Interest Income

40%

Grant Assistance Licenses, Permits, Fines, and Fees

Franchise Fees

20%

Other Taxes Sales Taxes Property Taxes

0% 2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

42

Other Income Charges for Services Transfers from other funds Bond Proceeds Use of Bond Funds Use of Escrow Funds Use of Beginning Fund Balance


CITY OF SAGINAW 2013-2014 ALL FUNDS DISTRIBUTION OF EXPENDITURES/USE OF RESOURCES General Government 1,888,325 6%

Transfer to Other Funds 4,038,930 13%

Municipal Court 188,315 1% Fire 2,729,825 9%

31,24

Police 3,780,595 12%

Debt Service 3,772,885 12%

Community Services 708,420 2% Capital Outlay 4,051,115 13% Public Works 9,526,635 30%

Library 561,290 2%

EXPENDITURES/USE OF RESOURCES AS A PERCENT OF TOTAL

100%

80% Transfer to Other Funds Debt Service Capital Outlay 60%

Public Works Library Community Services Police

40%

Fire

Municipal Court General Government 20%

0% 2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

43

Police Community Services Library Public Works Capital Outlay Debt Service Transfer to Other Funds


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL OULAY / SPECIAL REQUESTS APPROVED FOR FY 2013-2014 FUNDING SOURCE GENERAL FUND ENTERPRISE FUND CCPD FUND General Administrative Office 1 Replace 4 Ipads for the City Council 2 Community Sign

TOTAL $

TOTAL $

-

TOTAL $

6,900 6,900

TOTAL $

-

TOTAL $

24,620 4,500 29,120

TOTAL $

10,000 7,500 17,500

Recreation & Community Services Increase contract services acct for pay increase for 2 referees, umpires,scorekeepers 3 Lobby furniture for Recreation Center 4 Replace 24 multi-purpose tables at Recreation Center 5 Replace flooring at Senior Center TOTAL $

3,500 1,500 2,600 15,000 22,600

Fire 1 Replace "Quint 14" - 75' Aerial Apparatus 4 Repairs & Renovations for Fire Admin. Building Police None. See CCPD Public Services 1 Trailer Mounted Boom Lift 4 Painting Street Lights Poles Parks 1 Replacement - 1/2 Ton Service Truck 3 Ballfield Score Board

ESCROW FB

FUNDED

$

25,000 25,000

$

-

$

2,400 75,000 77,400

$

-

$

11,450 11,450

$

11,450 11,450

$

250,000 6,900 256,900

$

24,620 6,750 31,370

$

20,000 7,500 27,500

$

3,500 1,500 2,600 15,000 22,600

2,400 25,000 27,400

Municipal Court 1 Replace 4 ticket writers

TOTAL

DRAINAGE UTILITY DONATIONS FUND

$

25,000 25,000

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

***Balance of $700,000 to be financed.***

250,000

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

250,000

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

2,250 2,250

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

10,000

$

-

$

-

$

$

-

-

$

$

-

-

$

$

-

-

$

$

10,000

-

Library 1 Increase the Children's Asst (Library Asst.) position to FT 3 Increase salary for the 3 Circulation Assistants to $10 per hour TOTAL $ Inspections/Code Enforcement 2 Create a Sr. Code Enforcement Officer 3 Replace three desk top computers

11,350

11,350

***funding for 6 months - April*** $

9,000 20,350

9,000 20,350

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

TOTAL $

2,625 3,000 5,625

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

2,625 3,000 5,625

TOTAL $

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

TOTAL $

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

129,495

$

25,000

$

-

$

-

$

27,250

$

271,450

$

453,195

$

95,500 10,000 35,000 7,000 5,000 152,500

$

20,000 6,500 327,500 16,000 5,000 60,000 435,000

Fleet Maintenance None

Economic Development

General Fund Total Crime Control and Prevention District Fund 1 Replace two patrol cars 2 Replace 10 to 12 portable radios including microphones 3 Information Technology Technician 6 Lexipol General Orders Manual 9 Bike Patrol Equipment - replace three bikes TOTAL Water & Wastewater 1 Replacement 1/2 ton Pick Up Truck (Public Works SUV) 4 Office remodel - field operations area 5 Sewer Main Replacement - 4 locations 6 Water System Maintenance & Supplies 7 Add line item for spoils disposal for W/WW repair projects 8 commercial meters TOTAL

95,500 10,000 35,000 7,000 5,000 152,500 20,000 6,500 16,000 5,000 60,000 107,500

44

327,500

327,500


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL OULAY / SPECIAL REQUESTS APPROVED FOR FY 2013-2014 FUNDING SOURCE GENERAL FUND ENTERPRISE FUND CCPD FUND DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND 1 Replacement - 72" Toro Mower

TOTAL

DRAINAGE UTILITY DONATIONS FUND

ESCROW FB

FUNDED

19,995

TOTAL

$

19,995

19,995 19,995

STREET MAINTENANCE FUND None TOTAL DONATIONS FUND Animal Control Surveillance System

4,000

4,000

70,000

70,000

Parks None Library None Beautification Old Decatur Rd. Landscaping Phase 2 Senior Center Replace 8 ceiling fans Fire Department None

900

TOTAL

900

900

-

TOTAL ALL FUNDS $

130,395

$

132,500

PLUS ESCROW/FUND BALANCE $

271,450

$

327,500

LESS OPERATING: Game Official Pay Children's Library Asst Circulation Asst Code Officer Pay Water Maint. Supplies Spoils Disposal IT Study Lexipol Manual

$

152,500

$

19,995

74,000 $

101,250

$

598,950

$

16,000 5,000

$

26,475

$

21,000

$

35,000 7,000 42,000

CAPITAL ITEMS $

375,370

$

439,000

$

110,500

OT for M Court Bailiff $

8,000

USE OF FB TOTAL $

383,370

$

19,995

$

101,250

74,900

$ 1,135,590 $

3,500 11,350 9,000 2,625

45

-

598,950


GENERAL FUND

City of Saginaw

The General Fund is used to account for all revenues and expenditures except those required to be accounted for in another fund. Expenditures for the General Administrative Office, Municipal Court, Fire, Police, Public Services, Parks, Inspections/Code Enforcement, Recreation and Community Services, Library, Fleet Maintenance, and Economic Development are included in the City’s General Fund. 46


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL FUND SUMMARY OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES YEAR-END ACTUAL 2011-2012 REVENUES Current Property Taxes Sales Tax Other Taxes, Fees, & Fines Interest on Investments Grant Assistance Other Revenue Transfers from Other Funds Use of Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES

EXPENDITURES General Administrative Office Municipal Court Fire Police Public Services Parks Recreation and Community Services Library Inspections/Code Enforcement Fleet Maintenance Economic Development Non-Departmental City Hall TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

3,430,834 4,088,208 2,908,293 13,386 76,328 283,718 1,522,850 -

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013 $

3,500,000 4,150,000 2,759,000 10,000 60,000 244,481 1,572,750 2,411,289

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014 $

3,497,300 4,015,000 2,722,795 10,000 55,000 263,185 1,501,865 383,370

$ 12,323,616

$ 14,707,520

$ 12,448,515

$

$

$

1,859,822 191,515 2,615,169 3,444,158 1,353,297 848,831 470,013 554,907 525,905 14,504 407,527

$ 12,285,647

47

1,154,415 177,500 2,644,550 3,452,500 1,368,600 256,180 722,250 474,390 609,650 532,000 84,035 1,081,450 2,150,000

$ 14,707,520

1,878,225 199,765 2,981,525 3,673,795 1,041,275 247,560 727,470 520,290 583,230 543,930 51,450 -

$ 12,448,515


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET DETAIL 2013-2014

General Fund Major Revenue Sources Use of Fund Balance, 383,370

In, 1,501,865 InterestTransfers on Investments, 10,000 Grant Assistance, 55,000

Current Property Taxes, 3,497,300

Other Income, 263,185 License, Permits, Fines, and Fees, 1,262,795

Franchise Fees, 1,460,000 Sales Tax, 4,015,000

DESCRIPTION Current Property Taxes Sales Tax Franchise Fees License, Permits, Fines, and Fees Other Income Grant Assistance Interest on Investments Transfers In Use of Fund Balance

ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

3,193,651 3,855,951 1,256,027 1,348,316 371,955 310,411 20,762 1,611,025 11,968,099

3,193,645 3,819,913 1,332,768 1,312,205 367,068 151,412 14,235 1,668,620 11,859,867

3,430,834 4,088,208 1,552,098 1,356,195 283,718 76,328 13,386 1,522,850 12,323,616

3,500,000 4,150,000 1,470,000 1,289,000 244,481 60,000 10,000 1,572,750 2,411,289 14,707,520

3,497,300 4,015,000 1,460,000 1,262,795 263,185 55,000 10,000 1,501,865 383,370 12,448,515

48


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL FUND OVERVIEW OF REVENUES 2013-2014 The City of Saginaw's General Fund accounts for resources that are traditionally associated with governmental activity and which are not required to be accounted for in another fund. Expenditures for the General Administrative Office, Municipal Court, Fire, Police, Public Services, Parks, Recreation & Community Services, Library, Inspections/Code Enforcement, Fleet Maintenance, and Economic Development are included in the General Fund. Below is an overview of the General Fund Revenues. The City's revenues are reviewed individually and are based on trend analysis. CURRENT PROPERTY TAXES: Taxable values have begun to level off as a result of the current economic conditions and slowed growth throughout the City. The July certified taxable value from TAD is $1,222,259,646. This is $58,125,128 more than last year's adjusted taxable value of $1,164,134,528. The taxable value of new construction is $7,062,927.

TAXABLE VALUE

In Millions

$2,000 $1,500 $1,000

$789

$914

$1,025

$1,117

$1,128

$1,138

$1,112

$1,193

$1,164

$1,222

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

$500 $0

04-05

The 2012 tax rate was .49. The 2013 effective tax rate is .472327. The effective tax rate is the rate required to generate the same tax dollars as last year. The rollback rate is .540519. A tax rate of .510000 has been used for the 2013-2014 budget. The estimated General Fund tax revenue is $3,497,300 with a 99% collection rate. TAX YEAR 2012 2013

DEBT RATE 0.189925 0.220976

M&O RATE 0.300075 0.289024

SALES TAX ADJUSTMENT (.112400) (.114766)

DIFFERENCE OVER/(UNDER) LAST YEAR Taxable Value Total Rate Total Revenue

$ $

1,222,259,646 0.510000 6,233,524

Debt Rate Debt Revenue

$

0.220976 2,700,900

M&O Rate M&O Revenue

$

0.289024 3,532,624 49

TOTAL RATE 0.490000 0.510000 .020000


With a tax rate of .510000, the maintenance and operation rate for the General Fund will be 56.67% of the total tax rate and the portion for the Interest and Sinking Fund will be 43.33% of the total tax rate.

In 1995 the City of Saginaw contracted with Tarrant County for the billing and collection of current and delinquent property taxes. The fee for this service is $1.10 per account.

PROPERTY TAX REVENUE

In Thousands

$4,000 $3,000

$2,000

$1,918

$2,356

$2,463

05-06

06-07

$2,281

$2,610

$3,194

$3,194

$3,431

$3,500

$3,497

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

$1,000 $0

04-05

07-08

08-09

SALES TAX The total sales tax rate for the City of Saginaw is two percent (2%). The tax is split as follows; one-eighth of one percent to provide revenue for maintenance and repairs of existing municipal streets (Street Maintenance Fund), three-eighths of one percent for the Crime Control and Prevention District (CCPD Fund), one-half of one percent to reduce property taxes and one percent for General Fund revenues. These graphs represent the one cent sales tax that is collected for the General Fund and the citizenapproved one-half cent sales tax that is collected to reduce the property tax In Thousands $5,000 $4,000 $3,000

SALES TAX REVENUES

$4,093

$4,059

$4,414

05-06

06-07

07-08

$3,852

$3,856

$3,820

$4,088

$4,150

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

$4,015

$2,891

$2,000

$1,000 $0

04-05

13-14

FRANCHISE FEES - UTILITIES Franchise taxes are fees paid by utilities and other industries for the use of streets, right-of-ways and other city property to distribute their services. Utility companies that pay the City franchise taxes include TXU Electric, Atmos Gas and AT&T. Revenue estimates were are explected to be the same as current collections.

FRANCHISE FEE REVENUES - UTILITIES

In Thousands $1,500 $1,000

$811

$985

$993

05-06

06-07

$1,009

$974

$886

08-09

09-10

$927

$1,109

$1,020

$1,020

12-13

13-14

$500 $0

04-05

07-08

50

10-11

11-12


FRANCHISE FEES - WASTE DISPOSAL The City of Saginaw bills and collects residential garbage fees. The City retains 10% of the residential billing and receives 8% of the commercial billing. This is the net amount of collections after payments to our contractor. This is based on prior year’s actual revenues plus estimated revenues.

FRANCHISE FEE REVENUES - WASTE DISPOSAL

In Thousands $250 $200 $150

$143

$142

04-05

05-06

$152

$156

07-08

08-09

$95

$150

$161

09-10

10-11

$184

$200

11-12

12-13

$180

$100 $50 $0

06-07

13-14

FRANCHISE TAX - CABLE TV This is based on anticipated year-end actual revenues.

FRANCHISE FEE REVENUES - CABLE TV

In Thousands $400 $300

$167

$200 $100 $0

$55

$64

$83

$97

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

$219

$245

09-10

10-11

$259

$250

11-12

12-13

$360

13-14

LICENSE, PERMIT, FINE, AND FEE REVENUE These revenues include Municipal Court Fines and Fees, Recreation Fees, Permits and Library Fines and Fees. In Thousands $1,600

$1,382

$1,255

04-05

05-06

$1,378

LICENSE, PERMIT, FINES AND FEES REVENUE $1,326

$1,379

$1,302

$1,268

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

$1,200

$1,112.0

$1,255.0

$1,230.0

11-12

12-13

13-14

$800 $400 $0

06-07

51


CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET SUMMARY - ALL FUNDS 2013-2014

DESCRIPTION TRANSFERS IN From General Fund From Enterprise Fund From CCPD Fund From Drainage Fund From Donations Fund From Bond Fund TOTAL TRANSFERS IN

$

$

TRANSFERS OUT To General Fund To Debt Service Fund To Enterprise Fund To Capital Projects Fund

TOTAL TRANSFERS OUT

DEBT SERVICE FUND

GENERAL FUND

567,200 821,710 112,955 -

$

1,501,865

$

282,860

$

49,205

$

-

$ $

567,200 282,860

-

282,860

$

-

-

$

-

2,015,060

STREET MAINTENANCE FUND

DONATIONS FUND

TOTAL ALL FUNDS

1,165,000 1,040,000 -

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

2,015,060 821,710 1,202,160 -

$

2,205,000

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

4,038,930

$

821,710

$ $ $

112,955 49,205 1,040,000

$

-

$ $ $

1,501,865 282,860 49,205 2,205,000

$

1,202,160

$

4,038,930

1,165,000

$

DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND

CCPD FUND

$

49,205

-

$

CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND

ENTERPRISE FUND

-

$

-

52

-

$

821,710

-

$

-

-

$

-


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL FUND SALES TAX REVENUE 2013-2014 The Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts is responsible for collecting sales tax revenues and disbursing sales tax revenues to the various taxing jurisdictions. The Texas state sales and use tax rate is 6.25%, but local taxing jurisdictions (cities, counties, special purpose districts, and transit authorities) may also impose sales and use tax up to 2% for a total maximum combined rate of 8.25%. The City of Saginaw imposes the maximum rate of two percent (2%). One and one-half percent goes into the General Fund. One third of that is used to offset the property tax rate and reduce property taxes. In Thousands

$2,943

$3,000

$2,729

$2,706

05-06

06-07

$2,568

$2,571

$2,547

08-09

09-10

10-11

$2,725

$2,767

$2,677

11-12

12-13

13-14

$2,500 $2,000

$1,927

$1,500 $1,000 $500 $0

04-05

07-08

SALES TAX GENERAL FUND REVENUES 1.5% In Thousands $1,600

$1,353

05-06

06-07

$1,400 $1,200

$1,471

$1,364

$1,284

$1,285

$1,273

08-09

09-10

10-11

$1,363

$1,383

$1,338

11-12

12-13

13-14

$964

$1,000 $800 $600 $400

$200 $0 04-05

07-08

SALES TAX USED TO REDUCE PROPERTY TAX 0.5% 53


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES BY DEPARTMENT 2013-2014 Library 520,290 4%

Recreation and Community Services 727,470 6%

Inspections/Code Enforcement 583,230 5%

General and Non Fleet Maintenance Departmental 543,930 4% Economic Development $1,878,225 15% 51,450 0%

Municipal Court 199,765 2%

Parks 247,560 2%

Public Services 1,041,275 8% Fire 2,981,525 24% Police 3,673,795 30%

DEPARTMENT General and Non Departmental Municipal Court Fire Police Public Services Parks Recreation and Community Services Library Inspections/Code Enforcement Fleet Maintenance Economic Development TOTAL EXPENDITURES

ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

$ 1,732,291 219,898 2,540,633 3,330,044 890,698

$ 1,985,161 196,850 2,419,815 3,347,094 973,764

841,510 512,830 555,629 435,274 12,438

927,059 501,275 572,153 522,761 143

$ 2,267,349 191,515 2,615,169 3,444,158 1,353,297 848,831 470,013 554,907 525,905 14,504

$ 4,385,865 177,500 2,644,550 3,452,500 1,368,600 256,180 722,250 474,390 609,650 532,000 84,035

$ 1,878,225 199,765 2,981,525 3,673,795 1,041,275 247,560 727,470 520,290 583,230 543,930 51,450

$ 11,071,245

$ 11,446,075

$ 12,285,648

$ 14,707,520

$ 12,448,515

54


By Function

CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES 2013-2014 $10,000,000

$8,000,000

$6,000,000

Personal Services Supplies and Services

$4,000,000

Capital and Transfers

$2,000,000

2013-2014 ADOPTED

2012-2013 REVISED

2011-2012 ACTUAL

2010-2011 ACTUAL

2009-2010 ACTUAL

$-

ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

BUDGET REVISED 2012-2013

BUDGET ADOPTED 2013-2014

Personal Services Supplies and Services Capital and Transfers

$ 8,458,537 2,294,854 317,854

$ 8,579,917 2,493,920 372,238

$ 8,831,535 2,555,969 898,143

$ 9,014,500 2,786,070 2,906,950

$ 9,419,875 2,653,270 375,370

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$ 11,071,245

$ 11,446,075

$ 12,285,647

$ 14,707,520

$ 12,448,515

EXPENDITURE

55


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL FUND OVERVIEW OF EXPENDITURES 2013-2014 The Department Heads and Supervisors were asked to budget for what is necessary to maintain the current level of service and to make recommendations for what would be needed to achieve the City’s goals within the framework of the strategies developed through the City’s long range planning initiative. The current health insurance provider, Aetna, offered to renew our current plan with a 9% increase. We advertised for bids and those bids were opened on July 30th. After review of the bids, the Employee Health Insurance Committee recommended the City change carriers to United Health Care under the T5L-P/2V plan which most resembles our current benefit plan. This will result in a 1.9% increase. The City changed the dental insurance provider to Delta Dental which will result in a 7.7% increase compared to the proposed 34% increase with the previous provider. Total cost of the increase to the General Fund is $12,205. This budget includes a 3% increase in the salary plan. Department heads will have the option of awarding up to a 3% increase based on each employee’s performance. Total cost to the General Fund is $214,370. In order to stay competitive and retain the employees we have invested in, the budget includes 5% step increases for those employees not already at the midpoint (City Goal) of the pay plan. For those with more than five years’ experience the raise would be effective October 1 and for those with less, it would be effective on the anniversary of the employee’s hire date or promotion date. Total cost to General Fund is $190,415. The following is an overview of the major changes by department. Each Department’s budget has increased because the City will no longer budget for workers’ compensation and liability insurance in a Non-Departmental budget. All budgeted expenses will be assigned or distributed to a departmental budget in FY 13/14. GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE: This department's budget, which also includes Non-Departmental expenses in FY12/13, decreased from $4,385,865 to $1,878,225 for a 133% decrease from last year’s revised budget. This decrease is primarily due to the one time capital transfer for construction of the City Hall Expansion project in the previous year. There is also a savings ($20,000) in legal advertising because there are no special elections anticipated and a savings ($15,000) due to a change in banking institutions and credit card processing companies. Finally Non-Departmental expense budgets are being distributed to departmental budgets. MUNICIPAL COURT: This department's budget increased 13% from $177,500 to $199,765. The increases are due to the salary adjustment and related benefits, workers’ compensation and liability insurance (now being budgeted by department), the planned purchase of 4 new ticket writers for the Police Department, and an increase in contract services for the prosecutor for anticipated trials in the coming year.

56


FIRE: This department's budget increased 13% from $2,644,550 to $2,981,525. The increases are due to the salary adjustment and related benefits, workers’ compensation and liability insurance (now being budgeted by department), and the $250,000 down payment for the purchase of a new fire truck. POLICE: This department's budget increased 6% from $3,452,500 to $3,673,795. The increase is due to the salary adjustment and related benefits, workers’ compensation and liability insurance (now being budgeted by department). PUBLIC SERVICES: This department's budget decreased from $1,668,600 to $1,041,275 or 38% due to capital expenses/transfers for the intersection improvements at Western Center and 156 and the reconstruction of East McLeroy that are not necessary in FY 13/14. PARKS The Parks Department budget decreased from $256,180 to $247,560 or 3%. The FY 13/14 budget does not include expenses for the Parks Master Plan which were budgeted in FY 12/13. RECREATION & COMMUNITY SERVICES: This department's budget increased by less than 1% from $722,250 to $727,470. The increases due to the salary adjustment and related benefits, workers’ compensation and liability insurance (now being budgeted by department) are offset by capital purchases for the Recreation Center that are not budget in FY 13/14. LIBRARY: This department's budget increased 10% from $474,390 to $520,290 due to the salary adjustment and related benefits, workers’ compensation and liability insurance (now being budgeted by department), and a part-time Library Assistant is funded for full-time for six months. INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT: This department’s budget decreased by 4% from $609,656 to $583,230. The increases due to the salary adjustment and related benefits, workers’ compensation and liability insurance (now being budgeted by department) are offset by capital purchases and Animal Control building renovations that are not budget in FY 13/14. FLEET MAINTENANCE: This department's budget increased from $532,000 to $543,930 for a 2% increase. The increases are due to the salary adjustment and related benefits, workers’ compensation and liability insurance (now being budgeted by department) and an increase in the gasoline budget which was reduced during FY12/13 due to prices not being as high as anticipated. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: This department's budget decreased from $84,035 to $51,450 or 39%. This decrease is due to a reduction in the anticipated cost of an economic development incentive agreement.

57


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Secretary (1)

City Manager (1)

Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1)

Information Services Manager (1)

Administrative Assistant/Human Resources Manager (1)

Administrative Assistant/Office Coordinator (1)

*Administrative Technician Court (1)

**Administrative Technician W/WW (1) *Court Clerk (1)

**Administrative Clerk (2)

FISCAL YEAR 09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

City Manager

1

1

1

1

1

Asst. City Manager/Finance Director

1

1

1

1

1

Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst

1

1

1

1

1

City Secretary

1

1

1

1

1

Administrative Assistant/Human Resources Manager

0

1

1

1

1

Administrative Assistant & HR

1

0

0

0

0

Administrative Assistant/Office Manager

0

1

1

1

1

Administrative Technician - Adm.

1

0

0

0

0

Information Services Manager

1

1

1

1

1

7

7

7

7

7

TITLE

TOTAL:

The General Administrative Office Department houses the offices listed above. Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the General Administrative Office budget. *These positions are paid out of the Municipal Court budget. **These positions are paid out of the Water & Wastewater budget.

58


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE The General Administrative Office includes the Mayor, six Councilmembers and the staff listed below. The City Council is responsible for making policy decisions relative to the types and level of services provided, adopting ordinances, approving major purchases and contractual agreements, adopting the Annual Budget and making appointments to various positions. Among the appointments made by the City Council are the City Manager, City Secretary, Municipal Judge, City Attorney and City Engineer. The General Administrative Office provides computer-related services for the City. This includes training, development of system software to suit the needs of various activities, technical assistance for all departments and prioritizing computer hardware and software needs. The City Manager is the Chief Administrative Officer of the City. Responsibilities of the City Manager include the general administration of all City Departments, reviewing and updating all management policies and regulations and enforcing the ordinances and laws of the City. The Assistant City Manager/Finance Director is responsible for the financial administration of the City. This includes recording and reporting financial transactions, maintaining the permanent accounting records, assisting with the preparation of the Annual Budget and investing any idle funds. The Assistant Finance Director/Budget Analyst is responsible for completing monthly bank reconciliations, as well as other general ledger reconciliations, serves as the City's contact with outside agencies including the Tarrant County Tax Office, preparation of the Annual Budget, coordinating the annual audit, preparation of the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) and the annual Truth-in-Taxation requirements. The City Secretary is also the Records Management Officer. The City Secretary is responsible for recording and maintaining the City Council minutes, agendas, ordinances, resolutions and other official City records. The City Secretary is responsilbe for tracking open records requests and issuing solitors' permits. This office is also responsible for municipal elections, monthly reports, records management and all administrative and clerical duties as prescribed by the City Council and/or the City Manager. The Administrative Assistant/HR Manager is responsible for preparing the daily deposits, personnel and payroll, benefits administration, testing applicants, and insurance and workers' compensation claims. The Information Services Manager assists all departments with computer and telephone problems. The Administrative Assistant/Office Coordinator is responsible for directing incoming calls, accounts payable, assisting customers and supervising the activities of the front office clerical staff. In addition to the seven listed above there are five more employees in this office. They are responsible for utility billing and collection, daily accounts receivable collection and posting, garage sale permits, and assisting the Municipal Court by answering calls and taking payments for citations. They are listed in the Municipal Court and Water & Wastewater budgets.

59


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay and Transfers Non Departmental* TOTALS

ACTUAL 2010-2011 $

$ $

698,170 752,302 223,324 311,367 1,985,163

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012 $

$ $

774,381 729,979 355,462 407,527 2,267,349

$

$ $

800,000 124,415 223,000 2,157,000 1,081,450 4,385,865

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014 $

$ $

817,145 763,580 270,100 27,400 1,878,225

* Non-Departmental is included in this summary for totals to reconcile. Non-Departmental expense budgets are now distributed to departmental budgets. In Thousands

$2,500 $2,250 Personal Services

$2,000

Operating

$1,750

Contract Services

$1,500

Capital Outlay and Transfers

$1,250

Non Departmental*

$1,000 $750 $500

$250 $0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013 60

2013-2014


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE GOAL: To improve the quality of life for all citizens by providing municipal services in a timely, efficient, professional and fiscally responsible manner. City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Adopt a property tax rate that allows a Adoopted a tax rate that allows for funding Adopt a tax rate that allows us to maintain slight increase in both the property tax rate of current service and staffing levels and current services and staffing levels. and property tax revenue covers cost of voter approved debt.

Step increases of up to 5% and $800 Provided step increases of up to 5% and Maintain service stimulus payment to all full time permanent one time $800 stimulus payment to all full and staffing employees time permanent employees. levels

Take bids for both health and dental insurance to maintain competitive rates

Took bids and held health insurance rate increase to 1.9% over previous year. Accepted a two year agreement for dental coverage that increases rate by 7.7% over previous year.

Seek alternate City of Fort Worth interlocal agreement for Signal is complete with matching funding Western Center/156 from TXDOT. sources of funding and use interlocal Tarrant County interlocal agreement for Roadway is complete with matching agreements to Bailey Boswell funding from Tarrant County. increase levels Construction of City Hall is substantially of service or Complete construction of City Hall using complete. Expected move in date in cost savings General Fund reserves October 2013.

Maintain adequate reserve funds to operate the city in case of a financial emergency

Maintain and upgrade the City's infrastructure to assure quality services

Continue to offer competitive salary and benefits in order to hire and retain quality employees in all departments.

Control the cost of employee health insurance by continuing to take competitive bids for these services and evlaluate plan options. Ctiy will share cost of Old Decatur Road project. City will share cost of sewer line replacement at Bluebonnet St. and Franklin Ave. Have new processes and procedures in place at new city hall to maintain or increase customer service levels.

Add $100,000 to General Fund Emergency Reserves and $100,000 to Enterprise Fund Emergency Reserves

Added $100,000 to General Fund Emergency Reserves and $100,000 to Enterprise Fund Emergency Reserves

Add $100,000 to General Fund Emergency Reserves and $100,000 to Enterprise Fund Emergency Reserves

Maintain Moody's rating of Aa3 and Standard and Poor's rating of AA-/Stable

Maintained Moody's rating of Aa3 and Standard and Poor's rating of AA-/Stable. Increase revenue bond rating from Standard and Poor's to AA from AA-.

Maintain Moody's rating of Aa3 and Standard and Poor's rating of AA-/Stable

Complete construction of City Hall

Construction of City Hall is substantially complete. Expected move in date in October 2013.

61

Partner with Tarrant County for street repairs: Roberts, Bristol, Westcliff, Reed Ave., Taos Ct., West Hills, Normandy, E. Bailey Boswell.


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE LONG TERM OBJECTIVES To receive the GFOA’s Distinguished Budget Presentation Award every year. To maintain financial records that receive the GFOA’s Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting every year Perform all Truth-In-Taxation requirements before September 30th Distribute agenda packets within four days before each council meeting Process 95% of all open record requests within five days of receipt and all requests within state law Pull all inactive records scheduled for destruction and have them shredded and recycled Pay 100% of invoices within 30 days of receipt

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

BUDGET

Elections Held

1

0

2

2

1

Council Meetings

20

22

24

23

20

Ordinances and Resolutions Prepared

34

38

41

37

40

Open Records Requests

53

72

100

310

150

Open Records Copies Made

688

298

697

1,103

700

Water and Sewer Deposits

661

639

649

808

700

Garage Sale Permits Issued

1,359

1,297

1,311

1,222

1,300

Accounts Payable Checks

3,201

3,305

2,945

2,954

2,950

62


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE

CITY SECRETARY'S OFFICE Performance Measures 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 2009-2010

2010-2011

Council Meetings

2011-2012

Ordinances and Resolutions Prepared

2012-2013

2013-2014

Open Records Requests

CUSTOMER SERVICE OFFICE Performance Measures 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0

2009-2010

2010-2011

Water and Sewer Deposits

2011-2012 Garage Sale Permits Issued

63

2012-2013 Accounts Payable Checks

2013-2014


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 MUNICIPAL COURT Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Secretary (1)

City Manager (1)

Asst. Finance Director/Budget Analyst (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1)

Information Services Manager (1)

Administrative Assistant/Human Resources Manager (1)

Administrative Assistant/Office Coordinator(1)

*Administrative Technician Court (1)

**Administrative Technician W/WW (1) *Court Clerk (1)

**Administrative Clerk (2)

09-10 1 1 0 1

TITLE Municipal Court Judge *** Administrative Supervisor Administrative Technician - Court Court Clerk

3

TOTAL:

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 3

3

12-13 0 0 1 1

13-14 0 0 1 1

2

2

The General Administrative Office Department houses the offices listed above. Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Municipal Court budget.

*These positions are paid out of the Water & Wastewater budget. **These positions are paid out of the General Administrative Office budget. ***The Municipal Court Judge became a contract position when the Municipal Court became a Court of Record.

64


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 MUNICIPAL COURT The Municipal Court is located at City Hall and is staffed with an Admin Technician-Court and a Court Clerk. Three clerks in the Water & Wastewater Department assist the Municipal Court and are paid from the Enterprise Fund. Another clerk also assists and is paid from the General Fund. This office is responsible for maintaining court records, processing clerical work, and administering daily operations of the court such as issuing warrants, subpoenas, notices, receiving and maintaining court dockets, perfecting appeal bonds, attending trials, and performing all duties prescribed by State Law. An automated phone attendant is available to request basic information about citations. This service is currently available in English and Spanish and is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Municipal Court accepts payments in the form of cash, check, money order, debit card and credit card. Citations may also be paid online. The Municipal Court has original and exclusive jurisdiction over violations of city ordinances. The Municipal Court also has concurrent jurisdiction with justice of the peace courts over Class C misdemeanor criminal cases within the City where the punishment, upon conviction, is by fine only. This court does not have jurisdiction in most civil cases but does have limited civil jurisdiction in cases that involve owners of dangerous dogs. The Municipal Court Judge helps citizens understand what their options are regarding their citation. If they want to offer explanations or defenses regarding their citation they must see the prosecutor. The prosecutor is an attorney with the law firm of Taylor, Olson, Adkins, Sralla and Elam. Trials are held once a month. There are two types of trials, a jury trial and a bench trial. A bench trial is held before the Municipal Court Judge and a jury trial is held before a panel of the defendant's peers. The Municipal Court is required to use certified interpreters when dealing with non-English speaking citizens that appear before the court. Juveniles that commit non-traffic violations are ordered to perform community service in lieu of paying their citation. It is believed that juveniles are better held accountable for their actions by paying their debt through community service. This department has taken advantage of the availability of the Court Technology Fund and the Court Security Fund to purchase items not budgeted in the General Fund. Revenues for these funds come from fees collected on citations. Purchases from these Special Revenue Funds must be approved by the Mayor and Council as required by ordinance and State law.

65


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 MUNICIPAL COURT EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

179,357 13,713 3,780 -

$

126,214 35,552 29,750 -

$

104,000 9,500 64,000 -

$

112,035 8,280 68,000 11,450

TOTALS

$

196,850

$

191,515

$

177,500

$

199,765

In Thousands

$200

$160

Personal Services

Operating

$120

Contract Services

$80 Capital Outlay

$40

$0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

66

2013-2014

Person Opera Contra Capita


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 MUNICIPAL COURT

GOAL: To process and administer all Court matters in an efficient, timely manner while establishing, maintaining, observing and enforcing high standards of conduct so that the integrity and independence of the judiciary is preserved. To follow established safeguards to insure the financial credibility of the Court. City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

Continue processing citations daily, Maintain service warrants monthly, and magisterial and staffing levels warnings and EPO's within 48 hours of arrest.

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Processed citations daily, warrants monthly, and magistial warnings and EPO's within 48 hours of arrest.

Continue processing citations daily, warrants monthly, and magisterial warnings and EPO's within 48 hours of arrest.

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Improve the quality of work performed by court personnel through individual training and adhering to standing orders for clerks to follow when assisting defendants at the counter. Get two clerks certified as Court Interpreters. Develop written guidelines for setting court dockets to improve Improve the collection rate of warrants by holding warrant roundups and increase warrant collection rate.

2009-2010 ACTUAL

2010-2011 ACTUAL

2011-2012 ACTUAL

2012-2013 ACTUAL

2013-2014 BUDGET

Warrants and Capias Issued

2,481

2,541

4,363

3,312

3,300

Warrants and Capias Closed

2,264

3,777

2,732

3,018

3,100

Citations Closed

6,701

9,515

7,708

7,167

7,200

Violations issued by Saginaw

7,425

9,368

9,409

8,173

8,200

$594,263

$659,786

$755,410

$744,435

$750,000

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

Fines and Fees Collected

67


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 MUNICIPAL COURT

Municipal Court Performance Measures 10,000 9,000 8,000 7,000 Warrants and Capias Issued

6,000

Warrants and Capias Closed

5,000

Citations Closed

4,000

Violations issued by Saginaw

3,000 2,000 1,000 0 2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

Fines and Fees Collected $755,410 $800,000 $700,000

$594,263

$744,435

$750,000

$659,786

$600,000 $500,000 $400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000

$0 2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012 Fines and Fees Collected

68

2012-2013

2013-2014


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 FIRE Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1)

Fire Chief (1)

Fire Operations Division Division Chief (1)

Station #1 Fire Lieutenant (3) Apparatus Operator (3) Firefighter (9)

Station #2 Fire Lieutenant (3) Apparatus Operator (3) Firefighter (3)

09-10 1 1 1 6

TITLE Fire Chief Fire Operations Division Chief Fire Services Division Chief (Fire Marshal) Fire Lieutenant Apparatus Operator

0 18 27

Firefighter TOTAL:

Fire Services Division Division Chief / Fire Marshal (1)

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 6 0 18 27

6 12 27

12-13 1 1 1 6

13-14 1 1 1 6

6 12 27

6 12 27

The Fire Department has two fire stations. Both stations are budgeted together. Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Fire budget.

69


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 FIRE The Fire Department is responsible for a wide range of services that draw from the multi-faceted training, skills and capabilities of its personnel to effectively and professionally perform fire prevention, code application and enforcement, fire suppression, rescue, emergency medical services, hazardous material mitigation, disaster planning coordination and emergency management. The Department is organized into two divisions, both under the direction of the Fire Chief: the Fire Operations Division and the Fire Services Division. Each division is under the direction of a Division Chief with established duties and responsibilities however, to provide effective, efficient and seamless operation of the Department, both Divisions have some overlapping duties, responsibilities and supervisory authority. The Fire Department currently has a total of 27 employees and operates from two fire stations. Fire Station #1, located at 400 S. Saginaw Blvd., is staffed by a Fire Lieutenant, an Apparatus Operator and three firefighters as normal staffing. Approved minimum staffing is four. Adjacent to Fire Station #1 is the Department’s administrative facility housing the offices of the Fire Chief, the Fire Operations Division Chief, and the Fire Services Division Chief / Fire Marshal. The administrative facility also houses the Tarrant County Fire Alarm Center and the City's “Emergency Operations Center” or EOC. Fire Station #2, located at 801 Basswood Blvd., is staffed by a Fire Lieutenant, an Apparatus Operator and one firefighter at all times. The Department aggressively participates in “Automatic Aid” with the Lake Worth, Haslet, Blue Mound and Eagle Mountain Fire Departments. This essentially means that for structure fires and other major incidents, an automatic response to the incident from participating departments takes place simultaneously consisting of pre-determined apparatus and personnel. The Fire Department also aggressively participates in "Mutual Aid" with other fire departments in the area to both provide and receive aid for incidents that extend beyond normal response capabilities. A "mutual aid" response is typically initiated by request on an incident by incident basis. The Department is also contracted by the Tarrant County Emergency Services District to serve the unincorporated areas outside our city limits. The Department is responsible for providing the following emergency services and specialized functions: FIRE SUPPRESSION: Responsible for rapid response to any explosion, fire or fire-related emergency for the purposes of rescue, control, extinguishment and mitigation. EMERGENCY MEDICAL (FIRST RESPONDER): Responsible for immediate response to any medical emergency or injury for evaluation, treatment and stabilization, providing both basic and advanced lifesupport level care. All Saginaw firefighter personnel are certified as Emergency Medical Technician Paramedics.

70


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 FIRE FIRE SERVICES: Responsible for Fire Code and City Code application to include regular life and fire safety inspections of businesses, schools, daycare centers and government facilities. Fire Services also coordinates and provides life and fire safety education training and conducts fire origin and cause investigations and prosecution. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS RESPONSE: Specific training, skills and certification of personnel in order to conduct effective and safe operations involving hazardous materials. RESCUE OPERATIONS: Provides numerous personnel trained in various rescue disciplines for effective operations of complex incidents or disaster type events. TRAINING AND PERSONNEL STANDARDS: Devoted entirely to the continuous training of existing and new personnel in all facets of fire service. Maintains all personnel, educational and training records and monitors the performance standards for efficiency and recommendations for enhancement. Responsible for ensuring compliance of State and Federal regulations relating to firefighting and emergency medical service. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: The Fire Department is responsible for developing and administering a master plan for the management of a major disaster in which more than one department must respond. The Fire Department is responsible for the operation of the “Emergency Operations Center” (EOC) located at Fire Station #1, maintenance and operation of the outdoor warning sirens and for the “CodeRed” emergency notification system. Also responsible for ensuring compliance with State and Federal regulations regarding training, preparation and operational requirements relating to Emergency Management. MANAGEMENT OF THE TARRANT COUNTY FIRE ALARM CENTER: By contract, Department Chief Officers provide senior management and supervisory duties of the emergency dispatch center located within the Department administration facility.

71


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 FIRE EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

2,245,389 159,866 14,560 (0)

$

2,411,159 149,756 12,477 41,777

$

2,479,000 138,550 27,000

$

2,543,395 161,230 20,000 256,900

TOTALS

$

2,419,815

$

2,615,169

$

2,644,550

$

2,981,525

In Thousands

$3,000

$2,500 Personal Services

$2,000

Operating

$1,500

Contract Services

Capital Outlay

$1,000

$500

$0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

72

2013-2014

P O C C


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 FIRE GOAL: To perform fire prevention, fire suppression, rescue, emergency medical services, hazardous materials mitigation, disaster planning coordination, and emergency management. We will accomplish this by providing a team of efficient, professional, and dedicated personnel who will be prepared by utilizing the most appropriate equipment, resources, and training. City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Maintain state ratio of 1.5 firefighters per 1,000 residents, maintain national average Maintain service of 1 fire station per 10,000 residents, and staffing maintain average emergency response levels time standard of 4 minutes, train firefighters in latest methods, and provide and maintain necessary equipment.

Saved 93% of property values involved in a fire, continued partnership with Tarrant County to maintain an up to date County Wide Emergency Management Plan, tested outdoor warning sirens monthly, completed 100% of inspections within 2 weeks and provided smoke alarms to residents free of charge. 4,264 hours of training conducted.

Achieve state ratio of 1.5 firefighters per 1,000 residents, maintain national average of 1 fire station per 10,000 residents, achieve average emergency response time standard of 4 minutes, continue to train firefighters in latest methods, and provide and maintain necessary equipment.

Seek alternate sources of funding and use interlocal agreements to increase levels

Fire Department received a County ESD grant for $20,000 of equipment. The Fire Department established a mutual-aid agreement with the City of Ft. Worth Fire Department.

Annually seek alternative sources of funding to maintain and/or increase service capabilities and utilize interlocal agreements to increase service with minimal financial impact.

Annually seek alternative sources of funding to maintain and/or increase service capabilities and utilize interlocal agreements to increase service with minimal financial impact.

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Provide timely fire inspections of new businesses and provide annual fire inspections of existing businesses to assist in preventing fires, saving lives, eliminating injuries and assist in lowering our insurance rating. Continue to seek alternate sources of funding through the Department of Homeland Security, Texas Department of Health, and Tarrant County Emergency Services District. Establish standard operating procedures for the Emergency Operation Center (EOC). Add additional weather siren in East McLeroy Blvd area. Continue installing the Opticom system to traffic lights throughout the City. 150 100 50 0 03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

Mutual/Automatic Aid Given

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Mutual/Automatic Aid Received

Mutual-Aid - agreements between agencies, organizations, and jurisdictions that provide a mechanism to quickly obtain emergency assistance in the form of personnel, equipment, and other associated items and services. This is usually accomplished through contractual agreement. The primary objective is to facilitate rapid, short-term deployment of emergency support prior to, during, and after an incident. Typically implemented by formal request on an incident by incident basis. Automatic-Aid - emergency assistance between agencies, organizations and jurisdictions that is pre-arranged and dispatched automatically by contractual agreement. Differs from mutual-aid which is typically implemented by a formal request. Automatic-aid is as the name implies, it happens automatically without request. Automatic-aid is primarily pre-arranged and utilized for the initial alarm assignment on structure fires and is in place 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

73


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 FIRE ANNUAL OBJECTIVES

2012-2013 PERFORMANCE

To train firefighters in the latest methods of firefighting and EMS, provide and maintain the equipment necessary for them to do their job and provide for the safety of firefighters.

In 2012-13 we had a combined total of 4,264 training hours for all 27 personnel covering multiple aspects of job responsibilities and duties. Our Standard Operating Guidelines were reviewed in 2012-13 and continue to be reviewed and revised to to ensure operational safety for our personnel remains the highest priority.

To save 90% of the value of properties involved in a fire.

93% of the total value of properties ($1.74 million) involved in a fire was saved. To maintain an all EMT-Paramedic level fire department 100% of Saginaw Fire Department personnel are staff. paramedics.

Maintain the State recommended ratio of 1.5 firefighters per 1,000 residents. Maintain the national average of 1 fire station per 10,000 in population. To maintain an average emergency response time standard of four minutes within city limits.

Our current ratio is 1.2 firefighters per 1,000 residents.

Our current ratio is 1 fire station per 10,070 (most recent estimate) in population. Our average response time for 2012-13 was 4 minutes and 49 seconds. In 2006, we partnered with Tarrant County implementing a County-wide Emergency Management Plan that is updated Update Emergency Management Plan every five years. annually or more frequently as needed. Annually seek alternative sources of funding to maintain For 12-13 we were awarded a County ESD member grant and/or increase service capabilities and utilize interlocal for equipment totaling $20,000. We continue to frequently agreements to increase service capabilities with minimal utilize interlocal "aid" agreements to the fullest extent financial impact. practical. Test 100% of outdoor warning sirens monthly and upgrade components as necessary to maintain reliability and functionality. Complete plan reviews and fire inspections of new businesses within two weeks. Provide and install free of charge, smoke alarms to residents found to have non-working smoke alarms. Reduce workers compensation claims by promoting safety on the job and promoting and implementing a fitness and wellness program.

100% of sirens were tested monthly.

100% of inspections were completed within two weeks in 2012-13. Numerous smoke alarms were provided and installed in 201213. There were 4 workers’ compensation claims in 2012-13 with none resulting in a loss of duty time. Our fitness and wellness program continues to be promoted as a high priority with 100% employee participation.

74


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 FIRE PERFORMANCE MEASURES Calls for Service Average Response Time (Minutes) # of Fire Inspections Conducted # of Firefighters % of Firefighters That are Paramedics % of Firefighters Completing Required CEU's # of Outdoor Warning Siren Tests Conducted # of Fire Safety Educational Programs # of Participants in Fire Safety Programs # of Opticom Systems Installed

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET 2037 2151 2029 1934 2000 4.5 5.18 4.51 4.49 4.5 300 259 479 293 300 27 27 27 27 27 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 12 12 12 12 12 30 50 71 31 50 Est. 3000 2336 3846 4540 3000 13 15 18 21 22

FIRE DEPARTMENT INCIDENT TYPES 2012-2013 3%

4%

14%

Rescue & Emergency Medical Service (Public Assist)

Other (False Alarm/Good Intent) Hazardous/Explosion (No Fire)

7%

Fire

72%

75


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 POLICE Citizens of Saginaw Mayor and City Council City Manager (1) Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1) Police Chief (1)

Operations Division Police Captain (1) Patrol Police Sergeant (4) Police Corporal (4) Police Officer (17)

Services Division Police Captain (1)

Communications Supervisor (1) Dispatchers (5)

Community Services Police Sergeant (1) Police Officer (1)

Criminal Investigations Police Sergeant (1) Police Corporal (2) Police Officer (1)

Dispatcher (5) School Resource Officer (2) Police Department Part Time (1)

Auto Crimes Task Force Police Officer (1)

Public Services Officer (1) School Crossing Guards (3)

09-10 1 2 1 5 0 26 2 1 1 5 1 3

TITLE Police Chief Police Captain Professional Standards Lieutenant Police Sergeant Police Corporal Police Officer School Resource Officer Public Services Officer Communications Supervisor Dispatcher Police Department Part Time School Crossing Guard

48

TOTAL: In FY 13-14, 6 Police Officer positions became Police Corporals

76

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 2 2 1 0 5 6 0 0 26 26 2 2 1 1 1 1 5 5 1 1 3 3 48

48

12-13 1 2 0 6 0 26 2 1 1 5 1 3

13-14 1 2 0 6 6 20 2 1 1 5 1 3

48

48


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 POLICE The primary objective of the Saginaw Police Department is to provide our citizens with courteous, professional, impartial and cost effective police services. We are charged with enforcing city, state and federal laws while protecting the lives and property of those who live, work and travel through the City of Saginaw. The Department is separated into two divisions under the direction of the Chief of Police. The POLICE OPERATIONS DIVISION is under the command of a POLICE CAPTAIN, and includes: PATROL: Patrol officers are the first line of defense for the citizens of Saginaw. These officers are on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week. They respond to a wide variety of calls for service and patrol city streets. The patrol unit is the largest element of the department. The POLICE SERVICES DIVISION in under the command of a POLICE CAPTAIN, and includes: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS: Commonly referred to as "CID". These officers are responsible for investigating criminal offenses that have occurred in the City of Saginaw. Once it is determined that an offense has occurred and a suspect identified, a detective files the case in the appropriate court (municipal, juvenile, or county). The Criminal Investigations Division is also responsible for major crime scene coordination, property management, training and background investigations of police personnel and crime victim assistance. COMMUNICATIONS & RECORDS: Dispatchers are responsible for the coordination of all calls for service received by telephone, radio or walk-in complainants. On a daily basis, these employees work with police, fire, emergency medical, public works, and city personnel, as well as, the general public. They are often the first person a citizen contacts in a time of need. ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES: This unit is staffed by a sergeant, who oversees the department's school crossing guards, school resource officers, community services programs, property and evidence functions, as well as the hiring and integrity functions. POLICE RESERVES: These volunteers are licensed as peace officers by the State of Texas, and require the same training and hiring strategies as full-time police officers. They may be used to augment the patrol or criminal investigations staff. One of our reserves serves as a department liaison to the Tarrant County Auto Crimes Task Force, the other is an assistant training coordinator at a local police academy.

77


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 POLICE EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

APPROVED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

3,206,519 133,526 7,048 -

$

3,300,922 134,697 8,538 -

$

3,349,000 95,500 8,000 -

$

3,513,335 152,460 8,000 -

TOTALS

$

3,347,094

$

3,444,158

$

3,452,500

$

3,673,795

In Thousands

$4,000 $3,500 Personal Services

$3,000 $2,500

Operating

$2,000 Contract Services

$1,500 $1,000

Capital Outlay

$500 $0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

78

2013-2014

Pe O Co Ca


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 POLICE GOAL: To provide citizens with courteous, professional, impartial, and cost-effective police services twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, while enforcing City ordinances, State and federal laws and protecting the lives and property of those who live, work, and travel through the City of Saginaw. City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Maintain service and staffing levels

Continue community programs, employ 2 officers per 1,000 residents, standardize 100% of departments weapons, have 100% of officers and dispatchers obtain Intermediate, Advanced, or Master Certification.

Held one Citizens Police Academy and one CERT class. Currently staff at 1.85 officers per 1,000 residents. 71% of officers and 83% of dispatchers have certification levels above state minimums.

Continue community programs, employ 2 officers per 1,000 residents, standardize 100% of departments weapons, have 100% of officers and dispatchers obtain Intermediate, Advanced, or Master Certification.

Seek alternate sources of funding and use interlocal agreements to increase levels of service or cost savings

Apply for at least one grant to assist in providing personnel and equipment for the department.

Apply for and received grants for LiveScan fingerprint system and two mobile thermal imaging systems.

Apply for at least one grant to assist in providing personnel and equipment for the department.

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Utilize the law enforcement facility to improve operations and increase service to the citizens. Replace two (2) to three (3) vehicles per year in order to provide reliable, safe and updated vehicles for patrol officers. Change from in-car video tape to a digital recording system when a new vehicle is purchased. Audit sex offender files by comparing them with the Texas Department of Public Safety’s website every 90 days. Fill vacant positions with highly qualified officers as soon as possible. Sponsor Citizen’s Police Academy, CERT training, and continue volunteer based programs. Reduce auto theft by assigning an officer to the Auto Crimes Task Force. Have one PSO assigned to each patrol platoon, allowing for 24 hour staffing of the jail.

79


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 POLICE ANNUAL OBJECTIVES

2012-2013 PERFORMANCE

To provide crime prevention and drug resistance Neighborhood Watch, fingerprinting, Operation ID, National education to the public. Promote community awareness Night Out, Citizens Police Academy and Project Child Safe. and child safety. 71% of officers hold Intermediate, Advanced or Master To have 100% of officers obtain Intermediate, Advanced Certification. Most new hires possess entry level or Basic or Master Certification. certifications. To have 100% of dispatchers obtain Intermediate or 83% of dispatchers hold Intermediate or Advanced Communication Certifications. Advanced Certification. Continue training on new and improved crime scene The 2012 total offense clearance rate is 64.6%. techniques, ensure that all leads are followed and maintain an offense clearance rate of 50%. To receive no complaints against Saginaw police officers No complaints for violation of racial profiling laws were received in 12-13. for violating racial profiling laws. 100% of the department’s weapons have been standardized. To standardize 100% of department’s weapons. We currently have 1.92 officers for every 1,000 residents. However, we only have 1.31 patrol officers per every 1,000 residents. 99% of requests for reports and records were processed Process requests for accident reports and open records within 10 days. The remaining 1% was forwarded to the within 10 days or less. Attorney General for an opinion. We are currently participating in the Bullet Proof Vest and Apply for and receive at least one (1) grant each year to Justice Assistance Grant programs, and receive 80% funding assist in providing personnel and equipment for the for one officer assigned to the Auto Crimes Task Force. department. To employ two officers for every 1,000 residents.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Calls for Service Calls Per Dispatcher Patrol Officers Per 1,000 Residents Accident Reports Filed Car Thefts Total Offenses Reported Total Offenses Cleared Clearance Rate Crime Rate Per 10,000 Residents

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET 41,794 48,269 27,796 21,181 22,000 8,359 9,654 6,949 4,236 4,400 1.25 1.25 1.25 1.35 1.35 443 469 547 406 400 39 40 29 40 35 1,465 1,421 1,614 1,441 1,500 746 847 949 931 975 50.92% 59.61% 58.80% 64.61% 65.00% 296.5 241.5 241.6 265.1 250.0

80


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 POLICE OFFENSE CLEARANCE RATES 09-10 Actual

10-11 Actual

11-12 Actual

12-13 Actual

Percent Change

Total Offenses Reported Total Offenses Cleared Clearance Rate

1400 765 54.6%

1421 847 59.6%

1614 949 58.8%

1441 931 64.6%

-11% -2% 10%

Felonies Reported Felonies Cleared Felony Clearance Rate Felony Arrests

375 210 56.0% 100

455 249 54.7% 133

476 273 57.4% 143

455 320 70.3% 152

-4% 17% 23% 6%

Misdemeanors Reported Misdemeanors Cleared Misdemeanor Clearance Rate Misdemeanor Arrests

1025 550 53.7% 549

976 598 61.3% 694

1138 664 58.3% 792

986 601 61.0% 672

-13% -9% 4% -15%

Category

Theft, Burglary, & Robbery History 600 500

400 300 Theft

200

Burglary

100

Robbery

0 03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Other Crimes History 350 300 250

200

Simple Assault

150

Domestic Violence

Sex O ffe

100

Sex Offenses

Crim inal

Criminal Mischief

50

DWI/Drugs

0

03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

81

10-11

11-12

12-13

Vehicles Stolen

DW I/Dru Vehicles


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 PUBLIC SERVICES Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1) Director of Public Works/Economic Development (1) Clerical Support Administrative Assistant - W/WW (1) Administrative Clerk (1)

Fleet Maintenance Chief Mechanic (1) Senior Mechanic (1)

Economic Development

Superintendent of Field Operations (1)

Public Services Streets and Parks Manager (1)

Drainage Operator - Drainage (1) Maintenance Worker (1)

Streets Inspector - Public Services (1) Sr. Maintenance Worker - Public Services (2) Maintenance Worker Public Services (5)

Parks Sr. Maintenance Worker (1) Maintenance Worker (2)

Water & Wastewater Crew Supervisor W/WW (2) Senior Maintenance Worker - W/WW (2) Maintenance Worker W/WW (3) Meter Reader/Maintenance (1) Environmental Specialist (1)

09-10 1 1 1 8 0 0 11

TITLE Streets and Parks Manager Inspector - Public Services Sr. Maintenance Worker - Public Services Maintenance Worker - Public Services Operator - Drainage Maintenance Worker - Drainage TOTAL:

Inspections/ Code Enforcement Chief Building Official (1) Senior Inspector (1) Code Enforcement Officer (2) Animal Control Officer (2) Administrative Clerk (1) Animal Shelter Attendant - Part Time (2)

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 1 1 1 2 8 5 0 1 0 1 11 11

The Public Works Department houses the offices listed above. Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Public Services budget. *The Drainage Utility Fund reimburses this fund for the salaries and benefits of two Maintenance Workers.

82

12-13 1 1 2 5 1 1 11

13-14 1 1 2 5 1 1 11


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 PUBLIC SERVICES The Public Services Department is divided into three divisions, Streets, Drainage and Building Maintenance. The Crew Supervisor-Public Services oversees this department. The Drainage Utility Fund reimburses this department for the salary and benefits of two maintenance workers. This department provides support to other departments requiring equipment or personnel. The Streets division of Public Services is responsible for maintenance of streets, sidewalks, right-of-ways and some landscaping of City owned land. They are also responsible for the maintenance and installation of traffic signs and street signs, placing barricades, striping crosswalks, weed control and mosquito control. Six (6) employees have their Pesticide and Herbicide Licenses. The Inspector-Public Services oversees road and street construction, as well as, utility projects to ensure construction codes are met. The Drainage division of Public Services is funded through the Drainage Utility Fund that was established in 2005. This division consists of two drainage utility maintenance workers. They are responsible for cleaning and maintaining the existing drainage infrastructure. They are responsible for cleaning culverts and storm drains to improve drainage, prevent flooding and protect the environment. The City has four (4) drainage basins that contain 27 miles of open channel that must be maintained. The Building Maintenance division of Public Services is responsible for the facilities and buildings (11 buildings). This includes minor remodeling and painting, light bulb replacement, minor electrical problems, air conditioning and controlling insects and rodents. They also assist the City Secretary moving records to storage.

83

maintenance of all City owned construction, moving furniture, and heating unit maintenance with records management by


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 PUBLIC SERVICES EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

APPROVED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay and Transfers

$

549,865 200,702 178,879 44,317

$

628,118 229,187 170,594 325,397

$

583,500 108,400 79,250 597,450

$

669,885 205,640 136,630 29,120

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

973,764

$

1,353,297

$

1,368,600

$

1,041,275

In Thousands

$800 $700 Personal Services

$600

Operating

$500 $400

Contract Services

$300

Capital Outlay and Transfers

$200

$100 $0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

84

2013-2014

Person Operat Contra


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 PUBLIC SERVICES GOAL: To provide for the convenience and safety of the citizens by maintaining public buildings, roadways, signs, signal lights and drainage facilities in a cost effective, courteous and timely manner while stressing teamwork and safety on the job. City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

City of Fort W orth interlocal agreement for W estern Center/156

Completed construction of these intersection improvements

Share cost of Old Decatur Road project phase 2 with the City of Fort W orth.

Seek alternate sources of Completed construction of this section of funding and use Tarrant County interlocal agreement for W Bailey Boswell - cost shared with Bailey Boswell interlocal Tarrrant County as well as received a agreements to developer contribution for drainage Complete Bailey Boswell Road using increase levels improvements. existing bond funds of service or cost savings Complete W estern Center/156 paving and These improvements were completed Signal design using General Fund using multiple funding sources. reserves

Maintain and upgrade the City's infrastructure to assure quality services

CDBG adminisstered by Tarrant County for cost sharing of sewer line replacement at Bluebonnet Street and Franklin Aveneue Contract with Tarrant County for road improvements; County provides labor and City provides materials

Complete construction of Bailey Boswell Ph. 1 Reconstruction

Completed construction of these intersection improvements

Continue engineering and begin construction on phase1 of East Bailey Boswell Road improvements.

Complete W estern Center/Hwy 156 Paving and Signal Design

Completed construction of these intersection improvements

Complete approved paving prijects with Tarrant County Precint#4.

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Maintain a safe work environment so that there are no serious accidents on the job. Continue the crack seal program and the sprinkler system maintenance program. Continue the city-wide sidewalk replacement program. Identify new areas that need drainage improvements and improve them before they become a problem. Monitor jobs that have been outsourced to verify work is being done properly and in a timely manner. Perform more preventative maintenance on City buildings to reduce major maintenance problems.

85


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 PUBLIC SERVICES ANNUAL OBJECTIVES

2012-2013 PERFORMANCE

On call personnel will respond to calls within 30 minutes Personnel responded within 30 minutes of call 100% of the after receiving the call 100% of the time. time. Replace stolen or damaged signs within 7 days. Repair 75% of the pot holes within 7 days. Replace broken sidewalks as scheduled. Clean debris from all streets twice a year.

100% of signs were replaced within 7 days. 100% of potholes were repaired within 7 days. 100% of sidewalks on the schedule were replaced. Completed scheduled cleaning of streets twice during the year.

Respond to weather emergencies (sand streets, set up Personnel are on call to respond to weather emergencies as barricades, etc.) in a timely manner. needed during inclement weather. Check storm drains monthly.

100% of the 32 storm drains were checked monthly.

Clean the six (6) main drainage channels twice a year.

100% of the 6 drainage channels were cleaned two times in FY12/13.

Reduce workers compensation claims by promoting We contiune to promote workplace safety. safety on the job.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES STREETS Scheduled Sidewalk Repairs Completed Linear Feet of Concrete Paving Installed Pot Holes Repaired Crack Seal Streets (Linear Feet) DRAINAGE Culverts Cleaned (Feet) Percent of Storm Drains Checked Monthly (32) BUILDING MAINTENANCE Building Maintenance Jobs Completed Sprinkler System Maintenance/Repair Jobs OTHER Contract Mowing Expenditures Workers Compensation Claims

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET 100% 0 207 0

100% 432 65 6505

100% 1769 120 2300

100% 11491 40 0

100% 1500 100 3000

6730 100%

3960 100%

3,460 100%

3,701 100%

4,000 100%

221 39

218 51

250 32

326 39

250 40

$130,000 0

$112,000 2

$115,000 2

$80,760 0

$81,630 0

86


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 PUBLIC SERVICES

STREETS 500 400

301

300

250

254 213

199

200

132

122

108

100

89

54

Street Patch/Poth

0 08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

Street Patch/Pothole Repairs

12-13

Signs Installed, Replaced, Repaired

Signs Installed, R

Ditches/Creeks C

Ditches Restored/

DRAINAGE 10,000 8,000

6,930 6,000

4,000

5360

4820

4362

2,900

2,000 0

300 08-09

450

360

09-10

10-11

Ditches/Creeks Cleaned (Ft.)

0 11-12

Ditches Restored/Regraded (Ft.)

87

200

12-13


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 PARKS Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1)

Director of Public Works/Economic Development (1) Clerical Support Administrative Assistant - W/WW (1) Administrative Clerk (1)

Fleet Maintenance Chief Mechanic (1) Senior Mechanic (1)

Economic Development

Superintendent of Field Operations (1)

Public Services Streets and Parks Manager (1)

Drainage Operator - Drainage (1) Maintenance Worker (1)

Streets Inspector - Public Services (1) Sr. Maintenance Worker - Public Services (2) Maintenance Worker Public Services (5)

Parks Sr. Maintenance Worker (1) Maintenance Worker (1)

Water & Wastewater Crew Supervisor W/WW (2) Senior Maintenance Worker - W/WW (2) Maintenance Worker W/WW (3) Meter Reader/Maintenance (1) Environmental Specialist (1)

09-10

TITLE

Inspections/ Code Enforcement Chief Building Official (1) Senior Inspector (1) Code Enforcement Officer (2) Animal Control Officer (2) Administrative Clerk (1) Animal Shelter Attendant - Part Time (2)

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12

Sr. Maintenance Worker - Parks Maintenance Worker - Parks 0

TOTAL:

0

0

The Public Works Department houses the offices listed above. Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Parks budget. In FY 12-13 the Parks Department was created by transferring 2 positions from Recreation and Community Services

88

12-13

13-14

1 1 2

1 1 2


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 PARKS DEPARTMENT The Parks Division is located at the Public Works facility. This Division is staffed by a Senior Maintenance Worker and one Maintenance Worker. The Parks Division is responsible for maintaining the City's seven parks totaling 112 acres. This includes all playground equipment, trail systems, pavillions, lighting, and the ball field complex.

89


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 PARKS DEPARTMENT EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

APPROVED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

-

$

-

$

96,000 52,680 60,000 47,500

$

95,700 64,360 60,000 27,500

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

-

$

-

$

256,180

$

247,560

In Thousands

$100 $90 $80

Personal Services

$70 Operating

$60 $50

Contract Services

$40 Capital Outlay

$30 $20 $10 $0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

90

2013-2014

Person Operat Contra Capita


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 PARKS

GOAL: To provide the needed upkeep and maintenance for the City's Parks system to ensure our citizens and visitors a safe and enjoyable park experience.

City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Maintain service and staffing levels

There were no goals established.

Park land was mowed and maintained, Maintain the mowing and maintenance playgrounds were kept in good repair, schedules. and ball fields were prepared for play.

Maintain and upgrade the City's infrastructure to assure quality services

There were no goals established.

Began updating the Parks Master Plan Adopt the updated Parks Master Plan process

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES

Adopt and updated Parks Master Plan. Acquire new property per the master plan. Identify funding sources and increase personnel.

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

BUDGET

Park Maintenance work orders

0

0

1,382

909

1,000

Ballfield preparation

0

0

42

36

40

Spriinkler system repairs/maintenance

0

0

32

39

25

PERFORMANCE MEASURES

91


Parks Maintenance Activity

45 40 35 30 25

20 15 10 5 0 FY 11-12

FY 12-13 Ballfield Prep

Sprinkler Repair

Park Maintenance Work Orders

1400 1200

1000 800 600

400 200 0

FY 11-12

FY 12-13

92

P


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 RECREATION & COMMUNITY SERVICES Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1) Recreation & Community Services Director (1)

Recreation Division Recreation Supervisor (1)

Athletics

Senior Center Division Senior Center Supervisor PT (1)

Special Events

Recreation and Aquatic Center Recreation & Aquatic Coordinator (1) Recreation/Community Center Customer Service Staff - Part Time (5) Pool Manager - Seasonal (1) Head Lifeguard - Seasonal (2) Lifeguard - Seasonal (27) Aquatic Center Customer Service (Front Desk /Concession) (8) Summer Camp Counselor - Seasonal (16)

09-10 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 2 1 1 2 8 27 0 52

TITLE Recreation & Community Services Director Recreation Supervisor Recreation & Aquatic Coordinator Senior Center Supervisor- PT beginning FY 11/12 Park Crew Supervisor Senior Maintenance Worker - Parks Maintenance Worker - Parks Recreation Center - Part Time Community Center - Part Time Maintenance Worker - Parks - Part Time Pool Manager - Seasonal Head Lifeguard - Seasonal Pool Customer Service - Seasonal Lifeguard - Seasonal Summer Camp Counselors - Seasonal TOTAL: Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Recreation and Community Services budget. The Parks Maintenance positions were moved to Public Services to create its own Department.

93

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 3 5 2 0 1 0 1 1 2 2 8 8 27 27 0 16 52 63

12-13 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 2 8 27 16 63

13-14 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 5 0 0 1 2 8 27 16 63


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 RECREATION & COMMUNITY SERVICES The Recreation & Community Services Department is responsible for the promotion, organization, implementation and evaluation of a wide variety of recreational and leisure programs for youth, adults and senior adults in the community. These programs and facilities include: the operation of the Recreation Center, Community Center, Senior Citizen's Center (Log Cabin), Aquatic Center, educational/recreational programs, health/fitness programs, special events/concerts, adult athletics, youth camps, field usage agreements with youth associations and facility reservations. The Recreation Center includes four multi-purpose activity rooms, a full-size gymnasium, a performance area, a fully equipped fitness center and weight room, restroom/locker/shower facilities and a racquetball court. The Recreation Center also offers room rentals and very low-cost annual membership opportunities.

The Aquatic Center includes a six-lane lap pool, a large water slide, a zero-grade children’s play area with a water playground, a small train slide, several spray features, two group pavilions, showers/lockers/restroom facilities, a concession stand and plenty of shade. The Aquatic Center also offers pool and pavilion rentals and very low-cost annual membership opportunities. The Recreation & Community Services Department is staffed by the Director of Recreation & Community Services, a Recreation Supervisor, a Senior Center Supervisor, a Recreation/Aquatic Coordinator, one parttime Senior Center Supervisor, five part-time Customer Service Associates at the Recreation Center, 38 seasonal Aquatic Center employees (1 pool manager, 2 head lifeguards, 27 lifeguards and 8 customer service associates), and 16 seasonal Summer Camp Counselors. The Director of Recreation & Community Services is responsible for the administration and long/short range planning for the department. This position is an Ex-Officio Board of Director with the Saginaw Chamber of Commerce and is the liaison between the Chamber of Commerce and the City of Saginaw. The Director also manages the City web site, city newsletter, employee newsletter, is the City of Saginaw Wellness Coordinator, and manages and distributes communication releases to both the media/press and to our residents who subscribe to the email alert system. The Director also manages the City janitorial contract. The Recreation Supervisor manages the Recreation Services Division which includes all recreation programs, special events, youth recreation camps and aquatic activities, programs and services. This position is responsible for the supervision of the Recreation Center, Aquatic Center and Community Center. This position also plans and manages all athletic leagues and tournaments which include adult softball, adult basketball and adult volleyball. The Recreation/Aquatic Coordinator plans all recreational/leisure programs and classes, special events, youth recreation camps and all aquatic activities, programs and services. This position is also responsible for the personnel management of all class instructors, contract labor, camp counselors, and seasonal aquatic staff. The part-time Senior Center Supervisor manages the Senior Services Division which includes all senior center programs/classes, special events, luncheons and activities for our senior adult community. 94


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 RECREATION & COMMUNITY SERVICES EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

APPROVED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

582,931 200,696 143,432 (0)

$

512,130 97,947 123,812 114,942

$

484,000 84,250 118,000 36,000

$

499,200 86,770 121,500 20,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

927,059

$

848,831

$

722,250

$

727,470

In Thousands

$700 $600 Personal Services

$500

Operating

$400 $300

Contract Services

$200

Capital Outlay

$100 $0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

($100)

95

2013-2014

Persona Operatin Contrac Capital O


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 RECREATION & COMMUNITY SERVICES GOAL: To improve the quality of life for citizens of all ages by providing a variety of recreational and leisure activities, special events, aquatic and athletic programs, visual and performing arts programs, facilities and services that encourage life enrichment, health, fitness and enjoyment. City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Maintain service and staffing levels

Enhance swimming programs, increase participation in senior activities, expand and enhance performing arts programs, establish community involvement programs, and effectively communicate programs and activities to citizens

Streamlined aquatic programs, increased participation in senior activities with only part-time hours, increased participation in Run the Rails 5k from 500+ to almost 800 runners, enhanced email alert system for residents, and increased communication releases to both the media/press and to residents.

Enhance swimming programs, increase participation in senior activities, expand and enhance performing arts programs, establish community involvement programs, and effectively communicate programs and activities to citizens

Seek alternate sources of funding and use Solicit grants, sponsorships and donations Solicit grants, sponsorships and donations Raised $9,818 in donations and interlocal to help offset the annual budget. Increase to help offset the annual budget. Increase sponsorships for the department through agreements to facility and pavilion rental revenues facility and pavilion rental revenues May 31, 2013. increase levels through increased marketing. through increased marketing. of service or cost savings Reclassify Senior Center Supervisor from Maintain and Replaced carpet in fitness room, offices, part-time to full-time. The center upgrade the Replace carpet in fitness room, offices, kid's room and wall sconces; replace gym participation has increased dramatically City's and wall sconces, replace gym bleachers, bleachers; replace 3 elliptical machines, 3 with the reduced hours the past two years. infrastructure to 3 elliptical machines, 3 recumbent bikes, recumbent bikes, and 2 upright bikes; This change will increase the hours at the assure quality and 2 upright bikes. replaced chemical distribution computer at center and allow for increased services aquatic center. programming for our senior adult population.

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Consider moving the Senior Center Supervisor from part-time to full-time. Plan, develop, and successfully manage the Aquatic Center. Develop a Youth & Adult swimming program that includes: swim team, swim lessons, water aerobics, outdoor movie night, teen nights, special resident only days, etc. Consider building a multi-field, multi-use athletic facility for youth and adult sports. Add additional classes and activities at the Recreation Center, Senior Center and Community Center. Establish new (large) outdoor performing and visual arts festivals. Open the Recreaction Center on Friday evenings for increased patron usage/programs offered, thus increased revenues.

96


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 RECREATION & COMMUNITY SERVICES GOAL: To theCenter quality by of increasing life for citizens of all by providing a variety recreational leisure courts. activities, Expand the improve Recreation the size of ages the fitness center and addingoftwo additional and racquetball special events, aquatic and athletic programs, visual and performing arts programs, facilities and services that encourage life enrichment, health, fitness and enjoyment. Consider developing a community involvement photography program/contest titled "Images of Saginaw". Consider developing a department promotional brochure that promotes all programs, activities, and classes. Consider replacing the flooring in the Senior Center. Consider purchasing and installing a digital display sign in front of the recreation/aquatic center. Consider expansion of the Aquatic Center to enhance and increase play structures, slides (small child and older children/adults), a lazy river, spray features and splash pads. Consider adding an additional room to the Senior Citizen’s Center. Consider adding a transportation vehicle (van) for the Senior Citizen’s Center or increasing the number of days the transportation service takes seniors to appointments and to and from home.

2013-2014 REVENUE SOURCES

Day Use Passes $80,826 16%

Facility Rentals $64,385 13%

Swimming/Aquatic Center $36,835 7%

Pool/Rec Memberships $64,435 13%

Athletic Leagues $49,000 10%

Pavilion Rentals $11,437 2%

Vending & Concessions $10,030 2%

Classes $183,359 37%

97


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 RECREATION & COMMUNITY SERVICES ANNUAL OBJECTIVES

2012-2013 PERFORMANCE

Renovate and enhance recreation facilities to better meet the needs of the citizens.

Replaced carpet in fitness room, offices, kid's room and wall sconces; replaced gym bleachers; replaced 3 elliptical machines, 3 recumbent bikes, and 2 upright bikes; replaced chemical distribution computer at aquatic center; purchased two tv's for fitness room. Painted walls/doors at Senior Center; Painted doors and walls and replaced slide awning and installed new sound/audio system at Aquatic Center;

Establish community involvement programs with residents and business owners.

Expanded "Saginaw FYI" email alert program; increased press releases for all city programs activities and announcements; Partnered with "Faith in Action" (local churches) for community service projects; Partnered with Library for on-going programs throughout the year; Continued promotion of Adopt-A Spot Program with new adoptions (flag pole flower bed at recreation center);

Enhance the youth & adult swimming programs.

Continued to monitor, modify and make changes to improve the program

Solicit grants, sponsorships and donations to help offset the annual budget.

Raised $15,195 in donations and sponsorships for the department.

Increase participation in Senior activities by updating the building, improving programs, meals and/or transportation.

On pace to have an increase in senior center participation of over 1500 from previous year (at part-time hours/only 30 hours per week). On pace for 2500 more participants from two years ago when program was open full-time (40 hours per week)

Increase awareness and usage of municipal rental facilities.

Increased public awareness through marketing and communications

Expand and enhance performing arts program.

Partnered with Boswell High School for Summer Jazz Concert

Increase membership and program participation by 5%, while retaining current members.

On pace to have an increase

Maintain a safe recreational environment by being accident free.

100%

Increase revenues by 5% and maintain a stable revenue base.

On pace to maintain revenue stream compared to previous year

Communicate more effectively with citizens by using the website, newsletter and e-mail alerts.

Expanded "Saginaw FYI" email alert program by increasing alerts sent; increased press releases for all city programs activities and announcements;

98


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 RECREATION & COMMUNITY SERVICES

2009-2010 ACTUAL 100.00% 10,698 17,075 22,096 5,546 57,327 244 111,568 N/A $484,557

PERFORMANCE MEASURES % of Self-Supported Recreation Programs Total # of Senior Center Participants Total # of Recreation Program Participants Total # of Aquatic Center Daily Participation Total # of Special Event Participants Total # of Recreation Center Daily Participation Total # of Athletic Teams Web Site Usage Email Alerts and Press Releases Recreation Revenues

2010-2011 ACTUAL 100.00% 10,352 18,127 17,729 5,678 57,000 209 120,110 N/A $510,344

2011-2012 ACTUAL 100.00% 11,400 17,250 18,053 4,788 50,249 196 212,844 122 515,298

2012-2013 ACTUAL 100.00% 13,458 21,355 18,053 9,062 50,249 190 231,980 276 $501,849

2013-2014 BUDGET 100.00% 13,500 21,000 18,250 9,000 52,000 200 235,000 300 $515,000

25,000 20,000 2009-2010

15,000

2010-2011 2011-2012

10,000

2012-2013

2013-2014

5,000 0 Total # of Senior Center Participants

Total # of Recreation Program Participants

Total # of Aquatic Center Daily Participation

Total # of Special Event Participants

Exp

Web Site Usage 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

99

2012-2013

2013-2014


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 LIBRARY Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1)

Library Director (1)

Children's Services Asst. Library Director/Children's Services Librarian (1) Library Assistant - (1)

Circulation Library Assistant - Part Time (4)

Public Services Library Assistant (2) Library Assistant - Part Time (2)

09-10 1 1 2 7 11

TITLE Library Director Asst. Library Director/Children's Services Librarian Library Assistant Library Assistant - Part Time TOTAL:

Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Library budget. The Children's Library Assistant will become a FT poisition at mid-year in FY 13-14.

100

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 1 1 2 2 7 7 11 11

12-13 1 1 2 7 11

13-14 1 1 3 6 11


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 LIBRARY The Library is responsible for fulfilling the informational, educational, cultural and recreational needs of the community by providing free access to library materials in a variety of formats appropriate for the community. The Library cooperates with other libraries, educational institutions, and community agencies in order to provide optimum services. These services have been broadened by participation in the North Texas Library Consortium, the North Texas Library Partners, the Texas Interlibrary Loan Pilot Project, the TexShare program, the OverDrive electronic book and audio collection, and the children's TumbleBook electronic book collection. Library materials are selected in conformance with selection policies set forth by the Library Board and approved by the City Council with the goal of building a balanced collection based on the needs, interests and demands of the community. The Library Director plans, organizes, develops, coordinates and supervises the library program, represents the Library before the Library Board, various officials, community organizations and the general public, recommends policies to the Board and implements policies set by the Board. The Director orders all adult materials and assists in all operational areas of the Library as needed. The Assistant Library Director/Children's Services Librarian selects, orders, and reviews the juvenile collections periodically. The part-time Children's Library Assistant catalogs and processes the children materials. They assist young patrons with reference work and assist at the circulation desk. The Assistant Library Director/Children's Services Librarian prepares and presents children and teen programs that are educational and entertaining with the goal of stimulating interest in reading and learning. The Public Services division staff classify and catalog materials, process and make materials shelf-ready, keep records on delinquent accounts, send fine notices, place overdue names on the phone tree, maintain records on lost or damaged materials, assist patrons with reference work and maintain the inventory of library materials, which are all computerized. Two of these library assistants serve both in Public Services and Circulation. One of the two library assistants is also in charge of scheduling meeting room and study room usage. This assistant schedules all Literacy and ESL classes. Circulation division employees check out materials to patrons, serve as reference assistants by helping patrons locate materials on the computer and on the shelves, receive returned materials and re-shelve them, assess and collect fines for overdue items, order interlibrary loan items for patrons and assist with programs and other duties as needed. All staff members take turns helping with circulation when demand requires. The Library Board exercises advisory supervision over the Library through cooperation with the Library Director. The Board has the duty and power of making, adopting and enforcing all policies, rules and regulations governing the use of the Library and library materials and may exercise the authority to contract with County or other governmental authorities for the extension of library services. The Board administers gifts and donations to the Library; however, Board decisions are subject to approval or veto by the City Manager and the City Council.

101


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 LIBRARY EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

APPROVED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

422,268 79,007 -

$

396,151 73,862 -

$

406,000 68,390 -

$

444,580 75,710 -

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

501,275

$

470,013

$

474,390

$

520,290

In Thousands

$500

$400

Personal Services

Operating

$300 Contract Services

$200 Capital Outlay

$100

$0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

102

2013-2014

Pe O Co Ca


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 LIBRARY GOAL: To fulfill the informational, educational, cultural and recreational needs of the community by providing access to library materials in a variety of formats and by building a balanced collection of materials based on the needs, interests and demands of the community. To offer the opportunity and encouragement for citizens to educate themselves, keep abreast of progress in all fields of knowledge, discover and develop an appreciation of arts and literature and develop and increase enjoyment of reading. City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

Meet and exceed the state average material per capita, increase patron Maintain visits and program attendance, add service and staff, increase hours, and add staffing computers for public use, offer children's levels reading programs after school at remote locations.

Seek alternate sources of funding and use interlocal agreements to increase levels of service or cost savings

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

The State Library requirement for per capita support is $1.50 and the library's is $2.37, which is 58% more than required. Patron visits have increased by 12% over last year. Program attendance has increased by 13% over last year. The Children's Assistant position was increased by 5 hours per week over the previous year which has helped to the increase in services and programs resulting in the increased program attendance. Thanks to the Best Buy Grant, 2 new computers were added to the Teen Area. In addition, thanks to the North Texas Library Partners donation, the library has 5 additional new laptops and 1 iMac computer for the public to use. Summer Reading Club main event presentations continue to be offered at the Saginaw Recreation Center on Wednesdays. The first SRC program brought in over 300 attendees and more than 500 children were registered that first day of SRC (more than any other year).

Meet and exceed the state average material per capita, increase patron visits and program attendance, add staff, increase hours, and add computers for public use, offer children's reading programs after school at remote locations.

The library has applied for 4 grants and has received 1 grant from CargillHorizon Milling in the amount of $1,000 as of June and are awaiting responses for 3 of the other grants still. The library applied for 5 donations and received 3 separate monetary donations from the Saginaw Library Boosters (total of $2,000) and Wal-Mart ($100). In addition, the library received item donations from Lowe's (more than 2,000 Apply for at least two grants and two Apply for at least two grants and two toys as a promotion for Summer other donations each year. other donations each year. Reading Club), North Texas Library Partners (1 iMac, 5 Laptops, over $1,000 worth of supplies and furniture), Saginaw Library Boosters (a new Public Announcement Speaker System for Summer Reading Club). Also, there have been 4 large anonymous donations to the library: 3 from Truist (total amount of $675) and 1 for the Summer Reading Club Program 2013 (cash donation of $300).

103


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 LIBRARY cont. LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Increase operating hours and other services in an effort to meet the needs of the citizens. Add more internet computers. Continue to inventory materials and weed out unused and outdated materials annually. Increase the online e-book and audiobook collection and provide opportunities for patrons to learn more about the current e-Book and audiobook subscriptions and how to use their digial devices with them. Begin to provide streaming videos to patrons to check-out from the library. Provide more remote access to the library's physical collection. Consider a library addition, branch location, or expansion in order to provide one square foot of space per capita.

Online Books & Resources 23%

CIRCULATION

Adult 20%

Internet 12% Junior 32%

Audios/CD 2%

104

Videos/DVD 11%


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 LIBRARY ANNUAL OBJECTIVES

2012-2013 PERFORMANCE

To meet and exceed the State average materials per capita as our population increases. To increase patron visits and program attendance by 10%.

The State average materials per capita is 1.5, and the City's average is 2.37. Patron visits have increased 12% over last year. Program attendance has increased 13% over last year. Volunteers donated 2,428 hours, a decrease of 22% from Increase the number of hours donated by volunteers and last year. Part of the decrease is due to one of the most use only capable volunteers. active volunteers becoming a library employee. The library performed a full inventory of the collection on October 5th (a week after fiscal year) due to limited time in August and September to perform the partial inventory after Summer Reading Club. In addition, the collection ended up Take a full inventory of materials every other year and a needing a full inventory versus a partial since many items partial inventory the alternate year. were discarded throughout the year and other items ewere shifted to new collections. These changes required a better report on where each item was in the collection and verification of the status. The library has applied for 4 grants and has received 1 grant from Cargill-Horizon Milling in the amount of $1,000 and 1 from Atmos in the amount of $1,000 that will be used in the 2014 Summer Reading Club Program (this grant was submitted through the Saginaw Library Booseters by the Library with permission to use their non-profit status). The library applied for 5 donations and received 3 separate monetary donations from the Saginaw Library Boosters (total Apply for and receive at least two (2) grants and two (2) of $2,000) and Wal-Mart ($100). In addition, the library other donations each year. received item donations from Lowe's (more than 2,000 toys as a promotion for Summer Reading Club), North Texas Library Partners (1 iMac, 5 Laptops, over $1,000 worth of supplies and furniture), Saginaw Library Boosters (a new Public Announcement Speaker System for Summer Reading Club). Also, there have been 4 large anonymous donations to the library: 3 through Truist (total amount of $1,376) and 1 for the Summer Reading Club Program 2013 (cash donation of $300).

105


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 LIBRARY The Children's Assistant position was increased by 5 hours per week over the previous year which has helped to increase services and programs resulting in the increased program attendance. In addition, the Library Board increased the hours of the Children's assistant during the summer by 4 To meet the demand for increased library services by for a total of 39 hours. Thanks to the Best Buy Grant, 2 new adding staff, increasing hours and adding computers for computers were added to the Teen Area. In addition, thanks public use. to the North Texas Library Partners donation, the library has 5 additional new laptops and 1 iMac computer for the public to use. In September, the library purchased and installed 10 new Windows 7 Dell computers for patrons to use and moved the older computers to the children's area. Increase access to library materials by reshelving 100 % of materials returned from circulation were reshelved materials returned from circulation within 24 hrs. within 24 hours. Summer Reading Club main event presentations continue to be offered at the Saginaw Recreation Center on Wednesdays. The first SRC program brought in over 300 attendees and more than 500 children were registered that first day of SRC (more than any other year). The library also began providing children's books to checkout at the Saginaw Recreation Center during the SRC main event presentations. Help children develop an interest in reading by making About 90% of the books that were taken to the Recreation reading fun and offering programs after school at remote Center during SRC were checked out. The library locations in an effort to involve more children in reading. understands that when children go to a reading program event, they are extremely eager to begin reading right after the event. The library aims to one day have ALL the SRC events held at the library versus the Recreation Center in order to meet the demands and needs of all the children that attend the event and want to read a book. A new SRC program this year is the Lego Club which has already received rave reviews from families.

106


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 LIBRARY 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET 11,500 12,200 9,877 11,590 12,000 53,358 54,830 55,838 56,420 57,200 2.75 2.74 3 3 3 1,585 1,693 1,177 1,146 1,000 20,358 22,300 29,516 33446 34000 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 10,568 9,354 8,465 7,694 7,750

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Average Monthly Circulation Holdings/Materials Holdings Per Capita New Patrons Program Attendance % Materials Reshelved within 24 hours Donated Materials

1,500

1,341

NEW PATRONS 1,178

1,182

1,000

779

436

500

441

504

582

1,186

1,066

1111 651

1,012

965 648

965

430 200

165

181

0 03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08 Residents

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Non-Residents

The above chart compares the number of new patrons that are residents and non-residents.

POPULATION/TOTAL PATRONS

25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08 Patrons

107

08-09

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1)

Director of Public Works/Economic Development (1) Clerical Support Administrative Assistant - W/WW (1) Administrative Clerk (1)

Fleet Maintenance Chief Mechanic (1) Senior Mechanic (1)

Economic Development

Superintendent of Field Operations (1)

Public Services Streets and Parks Manager (1)

Drainage Operator - Drainage (1) Maintenance Worker (1)

Streets Inspector - Public Services (1) Sr. Maintenance Worker - Public Services (2) Maintenance Worker Public Services (5)

Parks Sr. Maintenance Worker (1) Maintenance Worker (2)

Water & Wastewater Crew Supervisor W/WW (2) Senior Maintenance Worker - W/WW (2) Maintenance Worker W/WW (3) Meter Reader/Maintenance (1) Environmental Specialist (1)

09-10 1 2 2 1 1 2 9

TITLE Chief Building Official Senior Inspector Animal Control Officer Code Enforcement Officer Administrative Clerk Animal Shelter Attendant - Part Time TOTAL:

Inspections/ Code Enforcement Chief Building Official (1) Senior Inspector (1) Code Enforcement Officer (2) Animal Control Officer (2) Administrative Clerk (1) Animal Shelter Attendant - Part Time (2)

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 9 9

12-13 1 1 2 2 1 2 9

The Public Works Department houses the offices listed above. Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Inspections/Code Enforcement budget.

108

13-14 1 1 2 2 1 2 9


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT The Inspections/Code Enforcement Department is located at the Public Works facility. This department is staffed by the Chief Building Official, one Senior Inspector, two Code Enforcement Officers, two Animal Control Officers, two Animal Shelter Attendants-Part Time and an Administrative Clerk. BUILDING INSPECTION DIVISION: This division is responsible for Building Code compliance on all construction, building additions, remodeling and signs. Other duties include registering contractors, issuing permits and inspecting buildings for structural integrity, electrical, mechanical and plumbing code compliance. The Chief Building Official is responsible for attending Development Review Committee (DRC) meetings and is the staff liaison to the Board of Adjustment (BOA). The Chief Building Official and Senior Inspector also provide technical assistance and City Code information to property owners, contractors, engineers and developers on a daily basis. This department maintains a database related to permits, construction, contractor registration, business licenses and code enforcement. CODE ENFORCEMENT DIVISION: This division ensures code compliance through enforcement of the City performance standards, ordinances and nuisance abatement. They are responsible for notifying owners of high grass violations, following up to see that the property has been mowed and, if not, issuing a work order for mowing by contract service providers. They are also responsible for the abatement of unsafe or hazardous structures. ANIMAL CONTROL DIVISION: This division maintains the animal shelter and is responsible for controlling stray animals and investigating reports of loose livestock, wild animals and barking dogs. They also have traps that residents can borrow to catch nuisance animals such as skunks, raccoons, armadillos and stray/feral cats. They respond to reports of animal bites and insure that the biting animal is quarantined according to state laws. They investigate reports of “vicious animals” and conduct the necessary hearings. The animal shelter has 40 kennels and four quarantine pens for holding animals. Once an animal has been impounded, it is assigned to a pen (one animal per pen) with a corresponding pen number. Animals can be viewed from their pens on the City’s web page. Citizens can also list lost and found animals on the web page.

109


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

APPROVED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

525,757 42,080 4,316 -

$

499,897 42,963 12,047 -

$

530,000 30,650 7,000 42,000

$

536,350 36,880 7,000 3,000

TOTALS

$

572,153

$

554,907

$

609,650

$

583,230

In Thousands

$600

Personal Services

$400

Operating

Contract Services Capital Outlay

$200

$0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

110

2013-2014

Perso Oper Cont Capit


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

Update and standardize building codes, increase number of inspections per Maintain service inspector, increase code enforcement and staffing calls per employee, register and microchip levels animals, provide low cost vaccination clinics, and update Building Department website.

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

The building code was updated, the number of calls per employee increased Update permit program to allow for credit for both code enforcement and animal card payment and make it possible to view control, 7 low cost vaccination clinics inspection results online. were held and 74 animals were microchipped.

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Achieve a higher level of code compliance through Building Code training and standardization. Update building codes as needed. Create online inspection service for requesting permits and obtaining results. Start an aggressive abatement program. Utilize the new animal shelter to house animals longer and therefore provide more opportunities for adoption and animals being returned to their owners. Provide low cost vaccination clinics in order to increase the number of animals that are vaccinated which will help prevent rabies and lower the chances of someone having to take rabies shots if bitten. Update Building Department web site.

Inspections/Code Enforcement Performance Measures 7,000

6,097

6,000

6,000

5,638

5,505

5,000

4,446

4,000 2,971

3,000 2,068

2,155

2,000

2,050 1,450

1,000 0 2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

Average Inspections Per Inspector

2012-2013

Code Enforcement Calls Per Employee

111

2013-2014


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT GOALS: To minimize the risk to lives, public welfare and property values through quality inspections, code enforcement and animal control. To provide prompt, courteous, and professional service to the citizens and provide humane treatment of animals. ANNUAL OBJECTIVES

2012-2013 PERFORMANCE

To hold Development Review Committee (DRC) meetings with developers monthly. Review 95% of residential building plans within 5 working days. Respond to 95% of inspection requests within 24 hours.

Meetings were are held on an as needed basis. There were 7 meetings held in FY12/13. 100% of residential building plans were reviewed within 7 days.

Send code violation notices within 24 hours of verification of violation. Process billing for high grass work orders within 7 days of completion. Sponsor four low cost animal vaccination clinics per year.

Code violation notices were sent within 24 hours 95% of the time. 100% of high grass work orders were processed for billing within 7 days.

Implant 25 additional animals with microchips each year.

95% of of inspections were responded to within 24 hours

7 low cost vaccination clinics were held. 74 animals received microchip implants.

Reduce workers compensation claims by promoting There was one workers compensation claim safety on the job.

Building Inspections 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

Other Inspections 500

0 Electrical

Mechanical

112

Plumbing

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET

PERFORMANCE MEASURES BUILDING INSPECTION New SF Construction Permits # Inspections % Inspections Made Within 24 Hours Average Inspections Per Inspector CODE ENFORCEMENT # High Grass Inspections Work Orders Processed for Billing in 7 Days Total Code Enforcement Calls Code Enforcement Calls Per Employee ANIMAL CONTROL Animals Registered Animals Microchipped Each Year Number of Animals Saved From Euthaniza

55 4,136 100% 2,068

38 4,309 98% 2,155

51 2,900 95% 1,450

35 3,127 95% 2,971

35 4,100 95% 2,050

1,464 100% 5,505 5,505

1,124 100% 6,097 6,097

1,862 100% 8,891 4,446

1,704 100% 11,276 5,638

1,500 100% 12,000 6,000

1,338 29 622

1,423 47 616

1,414 79 709

1,368 74 756

1,500 75 700

Building Permits Issued 800 600 400

200 0 03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

Types of Bldg Permits Issued 2013 Industrial 0

Commercial 2

Remodel 107

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Code Violations 2013 Zoning

Pool 7

Refer to Other Dept

Sign 23

Health & Safety

Single Family 35

Property Maintenance

Other

Other 559

113


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT

Animals Registered

Animal Disposition 2013

1,550

1,500

C

C C

1,450

1,400 1,350

1,300 Returned to Owner

Euthanized

Transfer to Rescue Group

Adopted

1,250

Number of Animals Saved From Euthaniza

Animals Microchipped Each Year 90

800

80

700

70

600

60

500

50

400

40

300

30 20

200

10

100

0

0

114

A

A

A


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 FLEET MAINTENANCE Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1) Director of Public Works/Economic Development (1) Clerical Support Administrative Assistant - W/WW (1) Administrative Clerk (1)

Fleet Maintenance Chief Mechanic (1) Senior Mechanic (1)

Economic Development

Superintendent of Field Operations (1)

Public Services Streets and Parks Manager (1)

Drainage Operator - Drainage (1) Maintenance Worker (1)

Streets Inspector - Public Services (1) Sr. Maintenance Worker - Public Services (2) Maintenance Worker Public Services (5)

Parks Sr. Maintenance Worker (1) Maintenance Worker (2)

Water & Wastewater Crew Supervisor W/WW (2) Senior Maintenance Worker - W/WW (2) Maintenance Worker W/WW (3) Meter Reader/Maintenance (1) Environmental Specialist (1)

09-10 1 1 2

TITLE Chief Mechanic Senior Mechanic TOTAL:

Inspections/ Code Enforcement Chief Building Official (1) Senior Inspector (1) Code Enforcement Officer (2) Animal Control Officer (2) Administrative Clerk (1) Animal Shelter Attendant - Part Time (2)

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 1 1 2 2

12-13 1 1 2

The Public Works Department houses the offices listed above. Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Fleet Maintenance budget.

115

13-14 1 1 2


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 FLEET MAINTENANCE This department currently operates with a full-time Chief Mechanic and a full-time Senior Mechanic. The mechanics provide maintenance and repairs to City vehicles and equipment. Gasoline, tires, parts and contract repairs for all vehicles are budgeted in this department. The City has 94 pieces of rolling stock as well as numerous trailers, small motorized equipment and tools that the mechanics maintain. Vehicles are sent out for maintenance only when they cannot be repaired by in-house mechanics due to lack of proper equipment or technical expertise. The Chief Mechanic is responsible for the day-to-day management of the garage, trains new employees on proper operation of equipment and works with other departments to control costs of vehicle and equipment repairs and maintenance. He also assists processing insurance claims when City equipment is damaged. It is the responsibility of this department to place all vehicles and equipment on a regular maintenance schedule in order to extend their useful life and insure warranty coverage. This department is also responsible for following the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) guidelines for waste disposal. The Chief Mechanic coordinates the disposal of surplus equipment through an auctioneering service. He also provides recommendations to City staff for the purchase of new equipment.

116


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 FLEET MAINTENANCE EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

170,368 277,185 58,653 16,555

$

182,563 299,485 43,858 -

$

183,000 304,000 45,000 -

$

188,250 310,680 45,000 -

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

522,761

$

525,905

$

532,000

$

543,930

In Thousands

$350

$300 Personal Services

$250 Operating

$200 Contract Services

$150

Capital Outlay

$100

$50

$0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

117

2013-2014

Person Opera Contra Capita


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 FLEET MAINTENANCE GOAL: To provide quality in-house maintenance and repairs to all City vehicles and motorized equipment in a timely and environmentally safe manner utilizing up-to-date diagnostic and repair equipment and coordinate repairs performed by outside vendors to ensure timely and cost-effective completion. City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Seek alternate sources of funding and use interlocal agreements to increase levels of service or cost savings

Complete Fleet Facility improvements using existing bond funds

Additional concrete parking installed. Built awning to cover Public W orks Equipment and Vehicles.

Look for and implement ways to make fleet facility more economical, efficieint, and productive.

Renew certifications, seek alternate fuel Maintain service options when adding new vehicles to fleet, Begin implementation and staffing begin implementing a Capital replacement program. levels Replacement Plan.

of

the

capital

Carry out capital replacement plan. Continue search to implement alternative fuel vehicles.

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Renew ASE certifications and obtain certifications in other categories. Attend school for Pierce fire trucks. Seek alternate fuel options when adding new vehicles to the fleet. Implement Capital Replacement Plan. 100%

95%

90%

85%

80%

75% 2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

% In-House Repairs Completed in 24 hours

2012-2013

% Maintenance % Repairs done In-House

118


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 FLEET MAINTENANCE ANNUAL OBJECTIVES

2012-2013 PERFORMANCE

Perform 90% of maintenance and repairs in-house. To complete in-house minor repairs to vehicles and equipment within 24 hours.

Performed 95% of maintenance and repairs in-house. Completed 95% of in-house minor repairs to vehicles in equipement within 24 hours.

Perform preventative maintenance on vehicles and equipment as scheduled.

Performed preventative maintenance on vehicles and equipment as scheduled.

Update Chief Mechanic’s certifications every 5 years.

and

Senior

Mechanic’s

Chief Mechanic's and Senior Mechanic's certifications are current.

Update Motor All Data System annually. To comply with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) guidelines.

Updated Motor All Data System. Complied with TCEQ's guidelines.

Reduce workers compensation claims by promoting safety on the job.

Even though safety was a high priority, we had 2 workers compensation claims.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Vehicles/Equipment in Fleet In-house Repairs Per Mechanic % Maintenance & Repair Done In-House % In-House Repairs Completed in 24 Hours Automotive Service Excellence Certifications Workers Compensation Claims

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET 204 218 219 218 221 820 896 825 860 960 97% 98% 90% 95% 98% 90% 92% 92% 94% 93% 15 18 18 17 18 1 0 1 2 0

In-house Repairs Per Mechanic

Vehicles/Equipment in Fleet 1000 950 900 850 800 750

225 220 215 210 205 200 195

20

20

2

119


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1) Director of Public Works/Economic Development (1) Clerical Support Administrative Assistant - W/WW (1) Administrative Clerk (1)

Fleet Maintenance Chief Mechanic (1) Senior Mechanic (1)

Economic Development

Superintendent of Field Operations (1)

Public Services Streets and Parks Manager (1)

Drainage Operator - Drainage (1) Maintenance Worker (1)

Streets Inspector - Public Services (1) Sr. Maintenance Worker - Public Services (2) Maintenance Worker Public Services (5)

Parks Sr. Maintenance Worker (1) Maintenance Worker (2)

Water & Wastewater Crew Supervisor W/WW (2) Senior Maintenance Worker - W/WW (2) Maintenance Worker W/WW (3) Meter Reader/Maintenance (1) Environmental Specialist (1)

09-10 1 1 2

TITLE Economic Development Coordinator Secreatary - Part Time TOTAL:

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 10-12 1 0 1 0 2 0

The Public Works Department houses the offices listed above. There are no positions in the Economic Development budget.

120

Inspections/ Code Enforcement Chief Building Official (1) Senior Inspector (1) Code Enforcement Officer (2) Animal Control Officer (2) Administrative Clerk (1) Animal Shelter Attendant - Part Time (2)

12-13 0 0 0

13-14 0 0 0


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The Economic Development Division of Public Works administers the areas of Economic and Industrial Development, including development proposals, site plans and reinvestment zones. It provides assistance to property owners, contractors, engineers and developers. This department works with companies requesting tax abatements and is also responsible for monitoring those companies after the abatement is approved for compliance with the terms of the tax abatement. It provides demographic and other pertinent information in an effort to recruit new businesses. The Director of Public Works/Economic Development is responsible for preparing support documents and attending meetings of various boards, the City Council, and the Development Review Committee (DRC). The Director of Public Works/Economic Development strives to encourage growth that is consistent with the City’s economic development goals. This department serves as the main link between the City of Saginaw and prospective developers.

121


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay

$

(706) 849 -

$

6,004 8,500

$

84,035 -

$

51,450 -

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

143

$

14,504

$

84,035

$

51,450

In Thousands

$100 $95 $90 $85 $80 $75 $70 $65 $60 $55 $50 $45 $40 $35 $30 $25 $20 $15 $10 $5 $0

Personal Services

Operating

Contract Services

Capital Outlay

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

122

2013-2014

Per Ope Con Cap


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

GOAL: To provide a positive, informed and obtainable link between the City, citizens and prospective developers in an effort to bring new businesses to the City of Saginaw and retain existing businesses while maintaining the integrity of the City’s overall plan.

City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Maintain service and staffing levels

Aggressively seek prospective new businesses, increase industrial development to balance tax base, establish retention plan for existing businesses, and consider economic development incentives allowed by state law.

Processed 1 industrial tax abatement, 1 planned development with 161 Single Family lots and 1 Single Family Development

Promote vacant land near new Overpass location as well as other desirable lots on Saginaw Blvd.

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Acquire additional sit-down restaurants within the City. Increase industrial development to help balance the tax base. Consider economic development incentives allowed by state law and develop a policy to offer such incentives. Promote the vacant property at the NE corner of Business 287 & Bailey Boswell, near new overpass. Establish a plan for retaining existing businesses.

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

BUDGET

21

25

25

21

27

15%

20%

20%

20%

15%

6

8

7

7

10

50

200

220

167

175

Traffic Count Bailey Boswell & Saginaw Blvd.

37,896

42,000

42,000

42,000

42,000

% of New Businesses Retained For 3 Years

75%

75%

75%

75%

75%

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Estimated # of Meetings with Prospects % Successful Results from Meetings DRC Meetings Attended Estimated New Jobs Created

123


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

New Businesses 30 25 20 15

10 5

0 03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09 Commercial

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13

Industrial

Personal Property Accounts 700

P

600

500 400 300

200 100 0 03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

124

09-10

10-11

11-12

12-13


DEBT SERVICE FUND

City of Saginaw

The Debt Service Fund, also known as the Interest and Sinking Fund, is used to account for the accumulation of resources for, and the payment of, general obligation longterm debt principal and interest. 125


CITY OF SAGINAW DEBT SERVICE FUND SUMMARY OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES YEAR-END ACTUAL 2011-2012 REVENUES Current Property Taxes Other Taxes and Fees Bond Premium Interest on Investments Other Financing Sources-Refunding Transfers from Other Funds Use of Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES

EXPENDITURES Principal Retirement Interest Debt Issuance Cost Other Financing Uses-Refunding Arbitrage Expenses Agent Fees TOTAL EXPENDITURES

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

$

2,303,506 12,511 2,305 305,965 -

$

2,207,000 31,000 40,000 2,000 1,180,000 308,500 120,965

$

2,673,890 31,000 2,000 282,860 184,080

$

2,624,287

$

3,889,465

$

3,173,830

$

1,610,000 620,661 91,407 9,586 3,633

$

1,928,604 696,506 22,610 1,221,745 15,000 5,000

$

2,211,970 954,860 2,000 5,000

$

2,335,288

$

3,889,465

$

3,173,830

126


CITY OF SAGINAW FUND DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 DEBT SERVICE FUND The City of Saginaw's Debt Service Fund accounts for the property tax collections and transfers into the fund for the payment of principal and interest on general long term liabilities and the actual payments of that principal and interest on those general long term liabilities. The Debt Service Fund, also known as the Interest and Sinking Fund, is established by ordinances authorizing the issuance of bonds and providing for the payment of bond principal and interest as they come due. Certificates of Obligation (C.O.) are securities issued by the City for the purpose of paying contractual obligations incurred through construction projects or purchasing equipment. Certificates of Obligation do not require voter approval. They may be secured by property tax revenue or from other revenue. General Obligation (G.O.) debt must be approved by the voters. It may be secured by the ad valorem, or property tax, revenue. A tax rate is adopted that will produce the money necessary to satisfy annual debt service requirements. The 2013-2014 property tax rate is .510000 per one hundred dollars of value. The Debt Rate is .220976, or 43.33%, of the total tax rate. The Texas Comptroller’s Office issues guidelines (Truth-in-Taxation) for calculating a city’s tax rate. A taxing entity must adopt its rate in two separate components - one rate for maintenance and operations and one rate for debt service. The debt service rate is the tax rate necessary to pay the unit’s debt payments in the coming year. The Texas Constitution prohibits any Texas political subdivision from incurring “debt” except in certain ways provided by statute. Texas law defines “debt” as any obligation that cannot be repaid during the current fiscal year. Therefore, a Texas city may only enter into obligations that may be paid from current fiscal year funds or are subject to annual appropriation. A Texas city may only pledge future funds to the payment of the following types of obligations, as provided by statute: bonds, certificates of obligation, and tax notes. Bank loans that extend beyond the current fiscal year and/or that are not subject to appropriation are likely not permitted for cities operating under the general laws of Texas. Saginaw is a Home Rule city. As a Texas home rule city, the City of Saginaw is not limited by State Law in the amount of debt it may issue. The City Charter places a limit of $1.50 on the total ad valorem tax rate which may be levied for both operating and debt purposes. With a combined tax rate of $.510000 the City is well within this limit. Of the $.510000 tax rate 43.33% is allocated for debt service. The remaining 56.67% is allocated for maintenance and operations. In 2012, Moody’s Investors Service improved the City’s bond rating to Aa3, and Standard and Poor’s rated the City at AA-. The City’s waterworks and sewer system revenue bond ratings are Aa3 by Moody's and AA by Standard and Poor's. The City of Saginaw invests the money held in this fund. The interest earned on these investments generates additional revenue for this fund. Due to a higher than budgeted collection rate, the Debt Service Fund balance has increased. The 2013-2014 budget includes the use of $184,080 of the Debt Service Fund fund balance for the payment of long-term debt. 127


CITY OF SAGINAW FUND DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 DEBT SERVICE FUND

DEBT PAYMENTS $3,500,000

$2,500,000

$2,359,915

$2,366,178

04-05

05-06

$3,166,830

$2,922,215

$2,906,637

$3,000,000

$2,546,410

$2,445,985

$2,500,603

$2,446,587

09-10

10-11

11-12

$2,625,110

$2,000,000

$1,500,000 $1,000,000

$500,000 $0

06-07

07-08

08-09

12-13

13-14

COMPARISON OF 2012-2013 GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND INDEBTEDNESS CITY Azle White Settlement Watauga Saginaw Keller Ennis Cleburne

Population 11,170 16,543 24,350 19,995 40,530 19,795 30,400

GO Bond Indebtedness

Net Taxable Value $ $ $ $ $ $ $

625,070,821 613,199,784 962,035,602 1,164,124,528 4,125,712,162 1,375,246,813 1,725,310,746

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

3,445,000 5,985,000 13,085,000 10,925,000 39,375,000 20,042,451 33,197,413

Bond Debt Per Capita $308 $362 $537 $546 $972 $1,013 $1,092

These are comparable cities in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. Information was obtained from the 2013 TML Taxation and Debt Survey.

128


CITY OF SAGINAW SUMMARY OF DEBT SERVICE EXPENDITURES 2013-2014 BUDGET 2012-2013

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION Bond Principal Payment

$

Principal Payment - Meter Change-out Project Principal Payment - Vactor Truck Bond Interest Payment

1,700,000

BUDGET 2013-2014 $

1,975,000 (1)

170,931

177,280 (2)

57,673

59,690 (3)

679,462

946,183

12,936

6,585

Interest Payment - Vactor Truck

4,108

2,090

Paying Agent Fees

5,000

5,000

Arbitrage Expense

15,000

2,000

Debt Issuance Cost

22,610

-

1,221,745

-

Interest Payment - Meter Change-out Project

Other Financing Uses - Refunding TOTALS

$

3,889,465

(1) This represents the scheduled bond principal payment for the fiscal year. Outstanding principal balance at 9-30-14

$

3,173,828

$23,795,000

(2) This represents the scheduled payment for the meter change-out project. The original principal amount was $848,700 and the final payment is due November 1, 2013. Outstanding principal balance at 9-30-14

(0)

(3) This represents the scheduled payment for the vactor truck. The original principal amount was $287,934 and the final payment is due December 15, 2013. Outstanding principal balance at 9-30-14

129

0


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL LONG TERM DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS 2013-2014 DISBURSEMENT 2004 General Obligation Bonds Principal $ Interest Total $

AMOUNT

DISBURSEMENT

AMOUNT

165,000 97,693 262,693

2009 Certificate of Obligation Bonds Principal $ 65,000 Interest 44,978 Total $ 109,978

2006 General Obligation Refunding Bonds Principal $ 425,000 Interest 139,298 Total $ 564,298

2010 Certificate of Obligation Bonds Principal $ 65,000 Interest 55,575 Total $ 120,575

2006 Certificate of Obligation Bonds Principal $ 80,000 Interest 64,075 Total $ 144,075

2012 General Obligation Refunding Bonds Principal $ 480,000 Interest 92,725 Total $ 572,725

2007 Certificate of Obligation Bonds Principal $ 160,000 Interest 128,188 Total $ 288,188

2013 General Obligation&Refunding Bonds Principal $ 535,000 Interest 323,653 Total $ 858,653 TOTAL REQUIREMENTS Principal Interest Fees TOTAL

130

$ $ $

1,975,000 946,183 7,000 2,928,183


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL LONG TERM DEBT OUTSTANDING 2013-2014 Description Interest Rate Range Redemption Dates

Original Issue

Bonds Outstanding 10/1/2013

FY 2013-2014 Payments Principal Interest

Bonds Outstanding 9/30/2014

2004 General Obligation Bonds 3.500% to 4.700% March 1, 2005 to September 1, 2024

$3,460,000

$

2,250,000

$

165,000

$

97,693

$

2,085,000

2006 General Obligation Refunding Bonds 3.900% to 4.250% September 1, 2006 to September 1, 2026

$4,995,000

$

3,485,000

$

425,000

$

139,298

$

3,060,000

2006 Certificate of Obligation Bonds 4.000% to 5.000% March 1, 2007 to September 1, 2027

$1,940,000

$

1,525,000

$

80,000

$

64,075

$

1,445,000

2007 Certificate of Obligation Bonds 4.000% to 4.375% March 1, 2008 to September 1, 2027

$3,815,000

$

3,000,000

$

160,000

$

128,188

$

2,840,000

2009 Certificate of Obligation Bonds 3.750% to 4.600% September 1, 2011 to September 1, 2025

$1,240,000

$

1,065,000

$

65,000

$

44,978

$

1,000,000

2010 Certificate of Obligation Bonds 2.500% to 4.000% September 1, 2011 to September 1, 2030

$1,790,000

$

1,610,000

$

65,000

$

55,575

$

1,545,000

2012 Certificate of Obligation Bonds 2.000% to 3.000% September 1, 2012 to September 1, 2030

$4,445,000

$

3,760,000

$

480,000

$

92,725

$

3,280,000

2013 General Obligation & Refunding Bonds 2.000% to 4.125% September 1, 2013 to September 1, 2033

$9,075,000

$

9,075,000

$

535,000

$

323,653

$

8,540,000

TOTALS

$30,760,000

131

$25,770,000

$1,975,000

$946,183

$23,795,000


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL LONG TERM DEBT REQUIREMENTS FUTURE YEARS 2013-2014 SEPTEMBER 30,

PRINCIPAL

INTEREST

TOTAL

2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029 2030 2031 2032 2033 TOTALS

1,975,000 1,875,000 1,950,000 1,890,000 1,730,000 1,800,000 1,845,000 1,565,000 1,620,000 1,675,000 1,420,000 1,100,000 1,025,000 970,000 565,000 585,000 610,000 500,000 525,000 545,000 $ 25,770,000

946,183 862,854 805,141 744,504 684,769 625,929 564,651 497,634 441,381 382,824 321,451 264,304 220,899 178,776 138,781 116,181 92,781 65,981 43,481 22,481 $ 8,020,987

2,921,183 2,737,854 2,755,141 2,634,504 2,414,769 2,425,929 2,409,651 2,062,634 2,061,381 2,057,824 1,741,451 1,364,304 1,245,899 1,148,776 703,781 701,181 702,781 565,981 568,481 567,481 $ 33,790,987

The debt of the General Fund reflects a twenty-year payout with interest costs primarily carried in the first half of the overall life of the debt. The major decline in debt service is evident and reflects a point where a major issue is retired. The retirement should be looked upon as an opportunity to issue new debt for the continuing infrastructure and capital needs of the community while at the same time having little or no impact on the total tax rate. This debt schedule reflects all General Fund debts except the capital lease and loan payments and the water and wastewater portion of the debt.

132


ENTERPRISE FUND

City of Saginaw

The Enterprise Fund is used to account for operations of the City’s water and wastewater activities which are financed and operated in a manner similar to private business enterprises. Services of the Enterprise Fund are intended to be self-supporting through user charges and fees. 133


CITY OF SAGINAW ENTERPRISE FUND SUMMARY OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES YEAR-END ACTUAL 2011-2012 REVENUES Bond Proceeds Tsf. From Drainage Utility-Reimb Salaries Tsf. From Drainage Utility-Reimb GLTD Water Sales Wastewater Service Water Tap Fees Wastewater Tap Fees Wastewater Surcharge Water Impact Fees Wastewater Impact Fees Penalties Other Income Proceeds from Loan Interest on Investments Interest on Investments-2006 W&WW Use of Fund Balance

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

$

36,695 10,000 4,633,761 2,247,218 27,920 11,950 1,374,527 69,275 13,679 119,404 84,419 2,835 5,892 -

$

38,500 10,000 4,250,000 2,702,500 20,000 7,000 1,200,000 30,000 3,000 120,000 75,000 7,000 1,463,390

$

39,205 10,000 4,300,000 2,702,500 20,000 7,000 1,100,000 120,000 75,000 7,000 1,389,220

$

8,637,575

$

9,926,390

$

9,769,925

$

$

1,128,000 451,920 738,650 2,200,000 2,460,000 592,320 7,570,890

$

$

1,091,723 396,328 191,844 2,283,723 2,175,859 148,391 6,287,867

1,117,020 497,540 601,305 2,500,000 2,600,000 439,000 7,754,865

$

892,965

$

939,500 1,416,000

$

850,060 1,165,000

TOTAL EXPENSES

$

7,180,832

$

9,926,390

$

9,769,925

Surplus (Deficit)

$

1,456,743

$

-

$

-

TOTAL REVENUES

EXPENSES Salaries & Benefits Operating Debt Payments Water Purchase from Fort Worth Wastewater Service from Fort Worth Capital Outlay Water Department Total Transfers W&WW Bond Projects

134

$

$


CITY OF SAGINAW ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES SOURCE OF FUNDS Transfers In 0.50%

Other Income 2.07% Use of Fund Balance 14.22%

Water Revenues 44.22%

Wastewater Revenues 38.99%

DESCRIPTION

ACTUAL 2009-2010

Transfers In - Drainage Water Sales Wastewater Service Water Tap Fees Wastewater Tap Fees Wastewater Surcharges Water Impact Fees Wastewater Impact Fees Penalties Interest on Investments Other Income Use of Fund Balance

$

44,815 3,874,668 2,418,523 34,225 13,075 383,134 76,436 10,173 126,550 15,897 565,883

Total Revenues

$ 7,563,380

ACTUAL 2010-2011 $

46,025 4,490,222 2,267,549 19,766 9,039 666,465 42,642 5,485 126,415 8,544 91,825

$ 7,773,977

135

ACTUAL 2011-2012 $

46,695 4,633,761 2,247,218 27,920 11,950 1,374,527 69,275 13,679 119,404 5,892 354,351

$ 8,904,672

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013 $

48,500 4,250,000 2,702,500 20,000 7,000 1,200,000 30,000 3,000 120,000 7,000 75,000 1,463,390

$ 9,926,390

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014 $

49,205 4,300,000 2,702,500 20,000 7,000 1,100,000 120,000 7,000 75,000 1,389,220

$ 9,769,925


CITY OF SAGINAW ENTERPRISE FUND OVERVIEW OF REVENUES 2013-2014 The City of Saginaw's Enterprise Fund accounts for water and wastewater operations with the intent that the costs of providing goods and/or services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges and fees. Below is an overview of the Enterprise Fund Revenues. The City's revenues are reviewed individually and are based on trend analysis. WATER SALES: The City of Saginaw purchases water from the City of Fort Worth. Fort Worth will increase their wholesale water rates 16.2%. This budget includes a 15% increase in the City's water rates.

WATER SALES REVENUES

In Thousands

$5,000 $4,000

$3,000

$3,132

$3,876

$3,179

$3,563

$3,725

$3,875

07-08

08-09

09-10

$4,490

$4,634

$4,250

$4,300

121-13

13-14

$2,000

$1,000 $0

04-05

05-06

06-07

10-11

11-12

WASTEWATER SERVICE AND SURCHARGE: The City of Fort Worth bills Saginaw for wastewater treatment based on the strengths and volume that are passed through the system. As the City continues to grow and adds more customers, the strength and volume increases along with the charges. Fort Worth will decrease their wastewater rates 3.80% This budget includes no change in the City's wastewater rates. All commercial or industrial customers who discharge to the system that are categorical, significant or high strength are in the monitored category. Their waste stream is then tested for strength and regulated pollutants quarterly. The results of these tests are then used to calculate the wastewater surcharges. These charges are based on the prevailing City of Fort Worth rate for BOD and TSS plus a 10% premium. WASTEWATER SERVICE REVENUES

In Thousands

$3,903

$4,000

$3,500

$2,802

$3,000 $2,500

$2,000

$3,803

$3,622

$2,270 $2,011

$2,134

04-05

05-06

$2,441

$2,338

07-08

08-09

$2,934

$1,500 $1,000

$500 $0

06-07

09-10

136

10-11

11-12

121-13

13-14


CITY OF SAGINAW ORGANIZATIONAL CHART AND SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL 2013-2014 WATER & WASTEWATER Citizens of Saginaw

Mayor and City Council

City Manager (1)

Asst. City Manager/ Finance Director (1) Director of Public Works/Economic Development (1) Clerical Support Administrative Assistant - W/WW (1) Administrative Clerk (3)

Economic Development

Administrative Technician-W/WW (1)

Fleet Maintenance Chief Mechanic (1) Senior Mechanic (1)

Superintendent of Field Operations (1)

Public Services Streets and Parks Manager (1)

Drainage Operator - Drainage (1) Maintenance Worker (1)

Streets Inspector - Public Services (1) Sr. Maintenance Worker - Public Services (2) Maintenance Worker Public Services (5)

Parks Sr. Maintenance Worker (1) Maintenance Worker (2)

Water & Wastewater Crew Supervisor W/WW (2) Senior Maintenance Worker - W/WW (2) Maintenance Worker W/WW (3) Meter Reader/Maintenance (1) Environmental Specialist (1)

09-10 1 1 2 1 4 1 1 1 1 3 16

TITLE Director of Public Works/Economic Development Water & Wastewater Supt./Field Operations Crew Supervisor - W/WW Senior Maintenance Worker - W/WW Maintenance Worker - W/WW Meter Reader/Maintenance Environmental Specialist* Administrative Assistant - W/WW Administrative Technician - W/WW Administrative Clerk TOTAL:

Inspections/ Code Enforcement Chief Building Official (1) Senior Inspector (1) Code Enforcement Officer (2) Animal Control Officer (2) Administrative Clerk (1) Animal Shelter Attendant - Part Time (2)

FISCAL YEAR 10-11 11-12 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 16 16

12-13 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 3 16

The Public Works Department houses the offices listed above. Those positions highlighted in gray are paid out of the Water & Wastewater budget. The Administrative Technician - W/WW and the two (2) Administrative Clerks are located in the General Administrative Office. *The Drainage Utility Fund reimburses this fund for half the salary and benefits of the Environmental Specialist.

137

13-14 1 1 2 2 3 1 1 1 1 3 16


CITY OF SAGINAW DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 WATER & WASTEWATER The Director of Public Works/Economic Development is the manager of all Public Works employees. The Water & Wastewater maintenance employees share office space with the Public Services and Inspections/Code Enforcement departments at the Public Works building. The water billing personnel are located at the General Administrative Office at City Hall. They are responsible for the billing and collection of approximately 7,200 accounts. The City has a two-cycle billing system for utility customers. The City contracts out the printing and mailing of utility bills. One full-time employee reads meters two (2) days each month. This employee works on other projects the rest of the month. Saginaw is 100% dependent upon the City of Fort Worth for its water supply and wastewater treatment. The water/wastewater division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the City's water distribution system and wastewater collection system. This division maintains the water system following the guidelines for human consumption and fire safety set forth by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). They maintain adequate pressure throughout the water system, repair and maintain all distribution lines, keep accurate records of distribution and pumpage and report to the State as required. They ensure that all pump stations are operational and maintains an annual maintenance program. They maintain updated maps for location of lines, repairs breaks in a timely manner and take water samples as required by law. They also turn water on and off for residents, complete all water-related work orders, and resolves customer complaints and inquiries. In addition they are responsible for the maintenance of the wastewater collection system. The City of Saginaw sends 100% of its wastewater to the City of Fort Worth for treatment. They repair broken sewer lines, clear line blockages, conduct video inspections of wastewater lines and provide regular cleaning of all lines in the City as preventative maintenance. The City monitors significant industrial users and categorical industries by sampling their sewage effluent to ensure compliance with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards.

138


CITY OF SAGINAW EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014 WATER & WASTEWATER EXPENDITURES BY CATEGORY

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Debt Payments Water Purchases Wastewater Purchases Transfer to Capital Project Fund Capital Outlay

$

1,055,670 1,217,014 514,450 2,165,499 1,933,755 653,999

$

1,091,723 983,328 497,809 2,283,723 2,175,859 833,363

$

1,128,000 1,082,920 1,047,149 2,200,000 2,460,000 1,416,000 592,320

$

1,117,020 1,064,740 884,165 2,500,000 2,600,000 1,165,000 439,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

7,540,386

$

7,865,804

$

9,926,389

$

9,769,925

In Thousands

$3,000

$2,000

Capital Outla

$1,000

$0

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

Salary and Benefits

Operating

Debt Payments

Water Purchase from Fort Worth

Wastewater Service from Fort Worth

Transfer to Capital Project Fund

Capital Outlay

139


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 WATER & WASTEWATER City Strategy

FY 2012-2013 Department Goal

FY 2012-2013 Department Achievement

FY 2013-2014 Department Goal

Seek alternate sources of Completed replacement of 660 residential funding and use water meters, completed painting of water Replace 128 commercial water meters, Complete Water and Wastewater projects interlocal storage tank, completed sewer line sewer replacement at Burlington Road 10" using Enterprise Fund reserves agreements to replacements at Ruidoso, Thompson, and and water line replacement at Lawson 8". increase levels Ridgecrest. of service or cost savings

Maintain adequate reserve funds to operate the city in case of a financial emergency

Add $100,000 to General Fund Emergency Reserves and $100,000 to Enterprise Fund Emergency Reserves

Added $100,000 to Reserve for Emergencies for a total of $1,700,000.

Add $100,000 to General Fund Emergency Reserves and $100,000 to Enterprise Fund Emergency Reserves

Maintain Moody's rating of Aa3 and Standard and Poor's raging of AA-/Stable

Maintained Moody's rating of Aa3 and upgraded Standard and Poor's rating to AA.

Maintain Moody's rating of Aa3 and Standard and Poor's rating of AA.

Replace 660 water meters

Replacement of 660 residential water meters completed.

Replace 128 commercial water meters.

I&I Study Phase 1 Phase 1 has been completed. I&I study of Little Fossil Creek Basin. Maintain and Complete Saginaw Blvd 12" water line This project was completed in FY12/13. upgrade the South East 18" Trunk Main Replacement phase 1. City's South East 24" Trunk Main Replacement Complete 8" water line replacement at infrastructure to This project was completed in FY12/13. Phase 2 Lawson Road. assure quality services South East 24" Trunk Main Replacement This project will be completed in FY13/14. South East 24" Trunk Main Replacement Phase 3 Phase 3 Opal Street Culvert Sanitary Sewer Replacement

This project will be completed in FY13/14.

Opal Street Culvert Sanitary Sewer Replacement

LONG TERM OBJECTIVES Replace water lines as designated on the Capital Improvements Plan. Change out old residential water meters and replace with new electronic meters. Replace wastewater lines as designated on the Capital Improvements Plan. Inspect, reseal and/or replace, as necessary, all wastewater manholes. Maintain current certifications through continuing education credits and seek new certifications. Promote the “Clean It Like You Mean It� program to rid the City of hazardous waste, tires, etc.

140


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014 WATER & WASTEWATER ANNUAL OBJECTIVES

2012-2013 PERFORMANCE

Take water samples monthly, to make sure it is safe for the residents to use, with 100% of the samples tested being acceptable.

Water samples were tested monthly and all 240 samples were acceptable.

To maintain adequate water storage for the Fire Department flow requirements for sanitation and business and residential consumption.

Fire Department flow requirements were met.

Change out old water meters according to the meter replacement program (100 meters per year).

During FY12/13, 51 new meters were installed and 653 meters were replaced.

To read 100% of water meters correctly.

100% of water meters were read correctly.

Take wastewater samples quarterly.

Wastewater samples were taken 100% of the time.

Respond to requests for non-emergency service within 24 hours.

100% of requests for non-emergency service were responded to within 24 hours.

To seek alternate sources to get projects funded and built. The City shared the cost of sewer replacements at (CDBG funds, constructed by developers, shared costs Bluebonnet St and Franklin Ave by using CDBG allocations with the county or another city.) administered by Tarrant County. Reduce workers compensation claims by promoting safety on the job.

We continue to promote workplace safety.

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET 246,071 366,800 464,902 250,880 450,000 86 52 54 55 51 4,700 263 427 653 150 6,810 6,935 6,978 7,050 7,100 89,297 85,610 86,600 87,531 88,000 1,120 1,240 863 1,010 850 86% 97% 100% 100% 100% 0 0 1 1 0

PERFORMANCE MEASURES Wastewater Mains Cleaned (Feet) New Water Meters Installed Water Meters Changed Out Water Customers Water Meters Read Water Meters Reread Percent Rereads Correct Workers Compensation Claims

WATER SYSTEM STORAGE AND PUMPING INVENTORY Gallons

3000000 2000000

2000000

In Millions

2250000

10.00

5.20

5.00

1000000 0

7.00

Ground Storage

0.00

Elevated Storage

Firm Capacity Peak Day Demand

Million Gallons Per Day

These graphs show the water storage and pumping capabilities of the City. Firm capacity is the total pumping capacity that a system can deliver with the largest pump out of service. The average 2012/2013 water demand was 2.8 million gallons per day.

141


CITY OF SAGINAW GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2013-2014

These graphs show the water storage and pumping capabilities of the City. Firm capacity is the total WATER pumping &capacity WASTEWATER that a system can deliver with the largest pump out of service. The average 2012/2013 water demand was 2.8 million gallons per day. AVERAGE DAILY WATER VOLUME

AVERAGE DAILY WASTEWATER VOLUME 3.50

4.00

3.00 3.00

2.50 2.00

2.00

1.50 1.00

1.00

0.50

0.00

0.00 08-09

09-10 10-11 11-12 Normal Actual

12-13

WATER & WASTEWATER STATISTICS Water Customers Average Residential Bill for all utilities based on average use of 8,000 gallons per month WATER FEES Minimum - 2,000 gallons Residential - next 8,000 gallons Residential - 10,000+ gallons Comml/Industrial next 8,000 gallons Comml/Industrial 10,000+ gallons WASTEWATER FEES Minimum - 2,000 gallons Residential - 2,000+ gallons Comml/Industrial Minimum - 2,000 gallons Comml/Industrial - 2,000+ gallons

08-09

09-10

09-10 10-11 11-12 Average Actual

10-11

6,812

11-12

6,935

12-13

12-13

6,978

13-14

7,000

7,100

$

77.23

$

80.00

$

80.29

$

82.53

$

87.72

$ $

11.93 3.69 3.93 3.93 4.75

$ $

12.77 3.95 4.21 4.21 5.09

$ $

12.77 3.95 4.21 4.21 5.09

$ $

12.13 3.75 4.00 4.00 4.84

$ $

13.95 4.32 4.60 4.60 5.56

13.97 2.20 13.97 3.82

$

16.07 2.53 16.07 4.39

$

$ $ $

13.97 2.20 13.97 3.82

$ $ $

$

$

13.97 2.20 13.97 3.82

$ $ $

$

$

16.07 2.53 16.07 4.39

According to Texas Municipal League’s 2013 Water Survey, the average cost of water usage of 5,000 gallons in all Texas cities that responded is $31.65, a 4.15% increase over the 2012 average of $30.39. Saginaw’s cost for 5,000 gallons of water usage is $23.38. The average cost for cities with similar population (15,001-20,000) is $28.60. The average cost of wastewater service for residential usage of 5,000 gallons in all Texas cities that responded is $24.42, a 2.48% increase over last year’s average of $23.83. Saginaw’s cost for 5,000 gallons of wastewater service is $23.66. The average cost for cities with similar population is $26.66.

142


CITY OF SAGINAW SUMMARY OF WATER & WASTEWATER DEBT SERVICE EXPENDITURES 2013-2014 BUDGET 2012-2013

ACCOUNT DESCRIPTION Bond Principal Payment

$

Bond Interest Payment Paying Agent Fees TOTALS

$

560,000

$

455,000

159,355

144,055

2,250

2,250

721,605

(1) Bond principal due. The outstanding bond balance at 9-30-14 will be

143

BUDGET 2013-2014

$

601,305

$

3,440,000

(1)


CITY OF SAGINAW WATER & WASTEWATER DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS 2013-2014 2001 Waterworks & Sewer System Revenue Bonds Principal $ Interest Total $

50,000 28,075 78,075

2006 Waterworks & Sewer System Revenue Bonds Principal $ Interest Total $

105,000 82,680 187,680

2010 Waterworks & Sewer System Refunding Bonds Principal $ Interest Total $

300,000 33,300 333,300

TOTAL REQUIREMENTS Principal Interest Fees TOTAL

455,000 144,055 2,250 601,305

$ $

144


CITY OF SAGINAW WATER & WASTEWATER DEBT OUTSTANDING 2013-2014 Description Interest Rate Range Redemption Dates

Original Issue

Bonds Outstanding 10/1/2013

FY2013-2014 Payments Principal Interest

Bonds Outstanding 9/30/2014

2001 Waterworks and Sewer System Revenue Bonds 4.200% to 5.700% September 1, 2003 to September 1, 2022

$ 1,000,000

$

575,000

$

50,000

$

28,075

$

2006 Waterworks and Sewer System Revenue Bonds 3.950% to 4.850% September 1, 2004 to September 1, 2027

$ 2,535,000

$ 2,005,000

$

105,000

$

82,680

$ 1,900,000

2010 Waterworks & Sewer System Refunding Bonds 2.000% to 3.000% September 1, 2011 to September 1, 2020

$2,505,000

$ 1,315,000

$

300,000

$

33,300

$ 1,015,000

$ 6,040,000

$ 3,895,000

$

455,000

$

144,055

$ 3,440,000

TOTALS

145

525,000


CITY OF SAGINAW WATER & WASTEWATER DEBT REQUIREMENTS FUTURE YEARS 2013-2014 SEPTEMBER 30, 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 TOTALS

PRINCIPAL

$

INTEREST

480,000 490,000 410,000 240,000 245,000 255,000 220,000 230,000 160,000 165,000 175,000 180,000 190,000 3,440,000

$

Average Annual Requirement Waterworks and Sewer System Refunding Bonds Series 2010 due September 1, 2010 to September 1, 2020 Waterworks and Sewer Revenue Bonds Series 2001 due March 1, 2002 to September 1, 2022 Series 2006 due March 1, 2007 to September 1, 2027

146

130,710 116,460 98,670 84,180 74,495 64,610 54,280 44,800 34,800 28,400 21,800 14,800 7,600 775,605

TOTAL

$

610,710 606,460 508,670 324,180 319,495 319,610 274,280 274,800 194,800 193,400 196,800 194,800 197,600 4,215,605

$

324,277


CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND

City of Saginaw

The Capital Projects Fund is used to account for the financing and construction of Governmental Funds type projects and Enterprise Fund projects funded through general obligation bonds and certificate of obligation bonds, other than those recorded in the proprietary fund. 147


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND SUMMARY OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES YEAR-END ACTUAL 2011-2012 REVENUES Bond Proceeds Bond Premium Reimbursements from Tarrant County - Longhorn Reimbursements from Tarrant County - Bailey Boswell Bailey Boswell Rd - Developer Contribution Grant Assistance - CDBG Interest on Investments Transfer from General Fund for Western Center Transfer from General Fund for City Hall Transfer from General Fund (Court Security) for City Hall Transfer from Enterprise Fund for City Hall Transfer from Enterprise Fund for W/WW Projects Transfer from Drainage Fund Transfer from Donations - Beautification for City Hall Use of Previously Issued Bond Funds TOTAL REVENUES

$ $

$

EXPENDITURES Bond Sale Expenses Bailey Boswell Road Western Center/156 Paving and Signal Design Old Decatur Rd/Cromwell Marine Creek Signal Misc Street Projects City Hall Renovation Fleet Facility Water Projects Wastewater Projects Drainage Projects TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

148

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

529,913 10,000 84,999 2,157 -

$ 7,895,000 $ 263,000 155,350 750,000 50,000

$ $

-

700 300,000 1,725,000 125,000 100,000 1,316,000 345,000 50,000 -

7,500 1,165,000 1,040,000 800,000

627,069

$ 13,075,050

$ 3,012,500

67,545 518,405 34,700

158,000 2,560,000 300,000 10,000

800,000 -

2,000,000 77,100 306,000 970,000 345,000

465,000 700,000 1,040,000

620,651

$ 6,726,100

$ 3,005,000


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND OVERVIEW 2013-2014 The City of Saginaw's Capital Projects Fund accounts for the acquisition and/or construction of capital facilities and serves as a component of the City's long range plan. Maintaining and upgrading infrastructure in a fiscally conservative manner that seeks to minimize debt funding by seeking alternative sources of financing perfectly aligns with the City's long term strategic goals. In 2011 our City Engineers, Kimley-Horn and Associates, completed a Comprehensive Master Plan Update (Master Plan) and Capital Improvements Plan (CIP). The Master Plan and CIP for the years 2011-2016 was approved the City Council on May 3, 2011. These plans provide a statement about our community's growth patterns, the general distribution and location of land use, a detailed thoroughfare plan and other general guidelines for various plan elements. The Plan provides a written consensus to guide future growth and development while allowing flexibility to respond to new ideas and direction as the City progresses, changes, and grows. The 2011 Master Plan and CIP theme is Back to Basics . The City prepared for the growth projected in the 1990's by constructing infrastructure to meet the demand. As the City approaches build-out, the new plan focuses on strengthening the infrastructure system and maintaining existing infrastructure. This return to the basics of operation and maintenance of infrastructure is the theme for this plan. The basis for long range planning is population growth. Prior to the economic downturn, Saginaw was one of the fastest growing cities in all of Tarrant County. The growth rate has slowed considerably with a population increase of 1% since the 2010 census. Based on available land and current densities, Saginaw is expected to reach its build out population of 29,040 in 2033. The plan presents findings and recommendations for implementation to meet the infrrastructure needs over the next five years and beyond. The plan addresses the following key components: Streets and Thoroughfare Plan Community Facilities Water Distribution System Wastewater Collection System Drainage The following tables summarize the proposed capital improvements by category on an annual basis with anticipated project costs.

149


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND OVERVIEW 2013-2014 POPULATIONS PROJECTIONS

150


City of Saginaw Capital Improvement Plan 2011-2016

Project Description Western Center/156 Paving Improvements and Signal Design Bailey Boswell Ph. 1 Reconstruction Old Decatur Rd to Saginaw Blvd Bailey Boswell Overpass Bailey Boswell from Saginaw Blvd to the S-curve Bailey Boswell Ph. 2 Reconstruction S-curve to Jarvis Road Bailey Boswell Ph. 3 Reconstruction Jarvis Road to Approx. 500' west of Ash Meadow Dr. Bailey Boswell Ph. 4 Reconstruction Approx. 500' west of Ash Meadow Dr. to FM 156 E. McLeroy Boulevard (Western Center Extension) S-curve to Blue Mound Rd E. McLeroy Boulevard Ph. 2 Reconstruction S-curve to Saginaw Blvd W. McLeroy Boulevard Ph. 3 Reconstruction Saginaw Blvd to Knowles Dr. W. McLeroy Boulevard Ph. 4 Reconstruction Knowles Dr. to Old Decatur Rd Knowles Drive Ph. 1 Reconstruction Longhorn Rd. to McLeroy Blvd Knowles Drive Ph. 2 Reconstruction McLeroy Blvd to W.J. Boaz Rd Knowles Drive Ph. 3 Reconstruction W.J. Boaz Rd to Normandy Ln Industrial Blvd Reconstruction 10,000' East of Saginaw Blvd to FM 156 Railroad Quiet Zone Study

Total Street Construction

City Hall Remodel Park Master Plan Trail and Sidewalk Connectivity System Softball/Baseball Complex Recreation Center Expansion Library Expansion/Satellite Annex

Total Community Facilities

Prior Year

Current Yr

185,000

300,000 2,965,000

USE OF FUNDS

Adopted

Note 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015

1 1,2

185,000

3,265,000

600,000

2,000,000

2015-2016

Future CIP

2,000,000

Tarrant

County

Cap Proj

Fund

General

Fund

SOURCE OF FUNDS Court Sec

Fund

Beautification

Fund

Enterprise

Fund

Drainage

Fund

300,000

To Be

Determined

300,000 3,150,000

1,500,000

1,650,000

4,000,000

5,000,000

0

0

200,000

50,000

750,000

8,000,000

9,000,000

200,000

600,000

7,200,000

0

8,000,000

8,000,000

0

200,000

400,000

1,400,000

5,000,000

7,000,000

7,000,000

0

200,000

2,200,000

1,600,000

0

4,000,000

4,000,000

0

4,100,000

4,100,000

4,100,000

5,900,000

5,900,000

5,900,000

6,900,000

6,900,000

6,900,000

4,800,000

4,800,000

4,800,000

2,900,000

2,900,000

2,900,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

720,000

720,000

720,000

3,800,000

3,800,000

3,800,000

800,000

3,250,000

10,950,000

1,800,000

46,920,000

35,000 6,000,000 2,000,000

600,000

Total

0

0

0

8,035,000

Notes 1 Project funded through cash reserves 2 Includes two (2) grant applications to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 3 Project funded through Utility Impact Fees 4 Projects constructed by City of Fort Worth 5 Projects possible constructed by Developers 6 Utility Relocation Project for TXDOT Highway Expansion 7 Paid with Drainage Utility Reserves 8 Paid with Cap Proj Reserves and Drainage Utility Fund 9 Paid with Drainage Utility Fees 10 On hold due to TXDOT Review Fee Issue

151

1,800,000

65,370,000

2,600,000 35,000 0 6,000,000 2,000,000 0

10,635,000

5,500,000

25,650,000

300,000

0

0

0

2,325,000

125,000

50,000

100,000

0

1,800,000

33,920,000

35,000 6,000,000 2,000,000

0

0

2,325,000

125,000

50,000

100,000

0

8,035,000


City of Saginaw Capital Improvement Plan 2011-2016 Prior Year

Project Description

South Hampshire 16" Water Line South Hampshire across Hialeah Park to Saginaw Blvd Saginaw Blvd 12" Water Line Ph. 1 McLeroy to Franklin Fort Worth Meter Station Upgrade Upgrade to 8,800 gpm facility West McLeroy 12" Water Line Ph. 2 Elementary #14 to Old Decatur Rd. East McLeroy 12" Water Line S-Curve to Blue Mound Road Basswood Blvd. 12" Water Line Bailey Boswell Rd. to TXU Easement Old Decatur 8" Water Line West McLeroy Blvd. To Springhill Dr. Old Decatur 12" Water Line Ph. 1 West McLeroy Blvd. to First Baptist Church Old Decatur 12" Water Line Ph. 2 - COMPLETED Bridle Trail to Meadowdale Dr. Saginaw Blvd 16" Water Line Ph.2 Palomino across Saginaw Blvd to Samson 12" water line FM. 156 12" Water Line Basswood to Grand Central Parkway

Current Yr

USE OF FUNDS

Adopted

Note 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 3

306,000

3

407,000

2015-2016

Future CIP

465,000

Tarrant

Total

713,000

County

Cap Proj

Fund

General

Fund

SOURCE OF FUNDS Court Sec

Fund

Beautification

Fund

Fund

306,000

465,000

4

Enterprise

Drainage

Fund

To Be

Determined 407,000

465,000

0

5

210,000

0

210,000

210,000

5

380,000

380,000

380,000

5

405,000

405,000

405,000

5

165,000

165,000

165,000

5

0

160,000

160,000

5

0

0

0

3

845,000

845,000

845,000

6

845,000

845,000

845,000

2,640,000

4,188,000

Total Water System

160,000

0

306,000

465,000

407,000

370,000

Notes 1 Project funded through cash reserves 2 Includes two (2) grant applications to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 3 Project funded through Utility Impact Fees 4 Projects constructed by City of Fort Worth 5 Projects possible constructed by Developers 6 Utility Relocation Project for TXDOT Highway Expansion 7 Paid with Drainage Utility Reserves 8 Paid with Cap Proj Reserves and Drainage Utility Fund 9 Paid with Drainage Utility Fees 10 On hold due to TXDOT Review Fee Issue

152

0

0

0

0

0

771,000

0

3,417,000


City of Saginaw Capital Improvement Plan 2011-2016

Project Description I&I Study Phase 1 Little Fossil Creek Basin South East 24" Trunk Main Replacement Ph. 1 & Ph. 3 East Meter Station to west of Blue Mound Rd by bore Kennedy to E. McLeroy across National Guard South East 24" Trunk Main Replacement Ph. 2 612 Blue Bound Road to Kennedy South East 18" Trunk Main Replacement Little Fossil Creek to the 15" National Guard Sewer Opal St. Culvert Sanitary Sewer Replacement (1) 400 ft. of 6-inch SS parallel to channel I&I Study Phase 2 West Cement Creek Blue Ridge Trail 8" Sanitary Sewer South West 21" Truck Main Replacement Longhorn Rd. to Sky Wood Ct. Jarvis Road Sanitary Sewer Upgrade Bailey Boswell Rd. to Brenda Ln. FM. 156 Sanitary Sewer Relocate Saginaw High School to Bailey Boswell I&I Study Phase 3 East Cement Creek Basin I&I Study Phase 4 Big Fossil Creek Basin

Total Wastewater System

USE OF FUNDS

Prior Year

Current Yr

Adopted

100,000

0

40,000

0

660,000

Note 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 1 1,3 1

65,000

1

2015-2016

Future CIP

Tarrant

County

Cap Proj

Fund

General

Fund

SOURCE OF FUNDS Court Sec

Fund

Beautification

Fund

Enterprise

Fund

140,000

140,000

660,000

660,000

520,000

585,000

585,000

150,000

150,000

150,000

45,000

45,000

0

45,000

700,000

580,000

0

Fund

To Be

Determined

90,000

90,000

185,000 405,000

185,000 405,000

185,000 405,000

0

580,000

580,000

700,000

700,000

700,000

90,000

90,000

90,000

90,000

90,000

90,000

1,560,000

3,720,000

6

715,000

Drainage

90,000

580,000

165,000

Total

Notes 1 Project funded through cash reserves 2 Includes two (2) grant applications to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 3 Project funded through Utility Impact Fees 4 Projects constructed by City of Fort Worth 5 Projects possible constructed by Developers 6 Utility Relocation Project for TXDOT Highway Expansion 7 Paid with Drainage Utility Reserves 8 Paid with Cap Proj Reserves and Drainage Utility Fund 9 Paid with Drainage Utility Fees 10 On hold due to TXDOT Review Fee Issue

153

0

0

0

0

0

1,580,000

0

2,140,000


City of Saginaw Capital Improvement Plan 2011-2016

Project Description Saginaw Blvd. System #2 Utility Relocation Saginaw Blvd. System #2 Ph. 4 Lemon to Northern East Cement Creek Improvements Culvert at Opal Street Saginaw Blvd. System # 2 Ph. 5 Northern to Cambridge Saginaw Blvd. System # 2 Ph. 6 Cambridge to Across from Minton East Cement Creek Improvements Channel to McLeroy (Blue Ridge St. Internal Drainage) East Cement Creek Improvements Culvert at W. McLeroy Saginaw Blvd. System #3 Right of Way Easements, RR Permits, RR Inspection Saginaw Blvd. System #3 Ph. 1 Saginaw Blvd. System #3 Ph. 2 Saginaw Blvd. System #3 Ph. 3 Saginaw Blvd. System #3 Ph. 4 Saginaw Blvd. System #3 TXDOT Review

Total Drainage System Total Capital Projects

Prior Year

Current Yr

USE OF FUNDS

Adopted

Note 2011-2012 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 7 7 8

20,000 55,000

65,000

2015-2016

Future CIP

Total

Tarrant

County

Cap Proj

Fund

General

Fund

SOURCE OF FUNDS Court Sec

Fund

Beautification

Fund

Enterprise

Fund

20,000 825,000

825,000 215,000

Drainage

Fund

To Be

Determined

20,000 825,000

335,000

65,000

270,000

900,000

900,000

900,000

600,000

600,000

600,000

490,000

490,000

490,000

300,000

300,000

300,000

9

322,000

322,000

322,000

10

2,000,000 1,250,000 250,000 880,000 600,000

2,000,000 1,250,000 250,000 880,000 600,000

2,000,000 1,250,000 250,000 880,000 600,000

55,000

85,000

1,040,000

0

0

7,592,000

8,772,000

0

65,000

0

0

0

0

1,115,000

7,592,000

1,005,000

6,371,000

3,005,000

4,237,000

11,320,000

66,747,000

92,685,000

5,500,000

25,715,000

2,625,000

125,000

50,000

2,451,000

1,115,000

55,104,000

Notes 1 Project funded through cash reserves 2 Includes two (2) grant applications to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 3 Project funded through Utility Impact Fees 4 Projects constructed by City of Fort Worth 5 Projects possible constructed by Developers 6 Utility Relocation Project for TXDOT Highway Expansion 7 Paid with Drainage Utility Reserves 8 Paid with Cap Proj Reserves and Drainage Utility Fund 9 Paid with Drainage Utility Fees 10 On hold due to TXDOT Review Fee Issue

154


155


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - STREETS 2013-2016 Bailey Boswell Phase 1 Reconstruction Scope Old Decatur Road to Saginaw Blvd Method Reconstruction Project Cost $3,150,000 Fiscal Year project to be completed in 2013-2014 This project consists of the reconstruction of Bailey Boswell to the ultimate section Description requirements identified on the City's Master Thoroughfare Plan, 6-lane divided. This project will be constructed through a partnership with the County. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Budget Bailey Boswell Overpass Intersection of Bailey Boswell and Saginaw Blvd including reconstruction from Saginaw Blvd to Scope the S-Curve Method New Construction Project Cost $9,000,000 Fiscal Year engineering beginning in 2013-2014 This project consists of the construction of an overpass to elevate Bailey Boswell over the Description railroad tracks and Saginaw Blvd to the commercial developments on the west side Impact on Debt was issued for all phases of the Bailey Boswell project. Debt service in 2013-2014 for Operating bond issue is $858,653. Budget Bailey Boswell Phase 2 Reconstruction Scope S-Curve to Jarvis Rd Method Reconstruction Project Cost $8,000,000 Fiscal Year engineering beginning in 2013-2014 This project consists of the reconstruction of Bailey Boswell to the ultimate section requirements identified on the City's Master Thoroughfare Plan, 6-land divided. This project Description includes intersection improvements at Jarvis Road and Bailey Boswell. This project could possibly be constructed through a partnership with the County. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Debt was issued for all phases of the Bailey Boswell project. Debt service in Budget 2013-2014 for bond issue is $858,653. Bailey Boswell Phase 3 Reconstruction Scope Jarvis Rd to 500" West of Ash Meadow Dr Method Reconstruction Project Cost $7,000,000 Fiscal Year engineering beginning in 2013-2014 This project consists of the reconstruction of Bailey Boswell to the ultimate section Description requirements identified on the City's Master Thoroughfare Plan, 6-land divided. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Debt was issued for all phases of the Bailey Boswell project. Debt service in Budget 2013-2014 for bond issue is $858,653. 156


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - STREETS 2013-2016 Bailey Boswell Phase 4 Reconstruction Scope 500" West of Ash Meadow Dr to FM 156 Method Reconstruction Project Cost $4,000,000 Fiscal Year engineering beginning in 2013-2014 This project consists of the reconstruction of Bailey Boswell to the ultimate section requirements identified on the City's Master Thoroughfare Plan, 6-land divided. This project Description includes intersection improvements at the following locations: Bailey Boswell and High Country Trail and Bailey Boswell and FM 156. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Debt was issued for all phases of the Bailey Boswell project. Debt services in Budget 2013-2014 for bond issue is $858,653. East McLeroy Blvd (Western Center Extension) Scope S-Curve to FM 156 (Blue Mound Rd) Method New Construction Project Cost $4,100,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project will complete an important principal arterial connection to Western Center Blvd. Description This project should be closely coordinated with TxDOT and the City of Fort Worth. Impact on There will be an increase in maintenance costs for this project. However, because this is a Operating future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the operating budget at this time. Budget East McLeroy Blvd Phase 2 Reconstruction Scope Saginaw Boulevard to S-Curve Method Reconstruction Project Cost $5,900,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project will complete an important principal arterial connection to Western Center Blvd. Description This project should be closely coordinated with TxDOT. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Budget West McLeroy Blvd Phase 3 Reconstruction Scope Knowles to Saginaw Boulevard Method Reconstruction Project Cost $6,900,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project will complete an important principal arterial connection to Western Center Blvd. Description This project should be closely coordinated with TxDOT. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Budget

157


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - STREETS 2013-2016

West McLeroy Blvd Phase 4 Reconstruction Scope Old Decatur to Knowles Method Reconstruction Project Cost $4,800,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project will complete an important principal arterial connection to Western Center Blvd. Description This project should be closely coordinated with the City of Fort Worth. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Budget Knowles Drive Phase 1 Reconstruction Scope Longhorn Road to West McLeroy Blvd Method Reconstruction Project Cost $2,900,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Description Construction of a 4-lane undivided roadway and associated drainage improvements. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Budget Knowles Drive Phase 2 Reconstruction Scope West McLeroy Blvd to W.J. Boaz Rd Method Reconstruction Project Cost $3,000,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Description Construction of a 4-lane undivided roadway and associated drainage improvements. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Budget Knowles Drive Phase 3 Reconstruction Scope W.J. Boaz Rd to Normandy Lane Method Reconstruction Project Cost $720,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Description Construction of a collector roadway as identified in the Master Thoroughfare Plan. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Budget

158


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - STREETS 2013-2016 Industrial Blvd Reconstruction Scope Saginaw Blvd to FM 156 Method Reconstruction Project Cost $3,800,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Construction of a 4-lane undivided roadway and associated drainage and railroad crossing Description improvements. Impact on This project will have no impact on the operating budget because it is a reconstruction of an Operating existing street. Budget Railroad Quiet Zone Study Scope Multiple Railroad Crossings within City Limits Method Study and Implementation Project Cost $1,800,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Description Study and implementation of railroad quiet zones. Impact on There will be an increase in maintenance costs for this project. However, because this is a Operating future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the operating budget for Budget implementation of the study results at this time.

159


160


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - COMMUNITY FACILITIES 2013-2016 City Hall Remodel Project Cost $2,000,000 project to be completed in 2013-2014 Fiscal Year The existing City Hall facilities are in need of updating for space and technological improvements. Description Impact on Operating Budget

The impact on the operating budget will be minimal. There are no plans to add staff so there will be no impact on Personal Services. Although the building plans call for a larger building, the new construction will be more energy efficient so there is no expected impact to utility costs. It is expected that repair costs will be reduced by new construction but these will be offset by an increase of $5,000 for janitorial expense.

Park Master Plan Project Cost $35,000 Fiscal Year Plan and recommendations to be completed in 2013-2014 The current Saginaw Parks Master Plan and Beautification Plan was completed in 1996. National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA) recommends that an updated parks and recreation master plan should be Description prepared every five years to document community-wide parks and recreation needs. Additionally, the Texas Recreation and Parks Department (TPWD) requires that in order to be eligible for grant funding that a new plan should be filed every ten years and updated at five years. Impact on Operating This is a study so there will be no impact on the operating budget. Budget Trail and Sidewalk Connectivity System Project Cost Unknown Fiscal Year Future Project An anticipated result of the Parks Master Plan will be projects to improve the trail system and sidewalk Description connectivity through the City. The connectivity project will link schools and parks to residential areas. Impact on Increased maintenance costs are expected for this project. However, because this is a future project, we are not Operating able to quantify the impact on the operating budget at this time. Budget Softball/Baseball Complex Project Cost $6,000,000 Fiscal Year Future Project

Description

The proposal to build ball fields was narrowly defeated in the 2000 bond election. We continue to receive requests for a new facility. Our current field at Willow Creek Park is well used and hosts up to 40 teams per season. A four-plex facility with central concession stand/restrooms, walks, parking, lighting, and land acquisition would cost approximately $3.5 million and require approximately 25 acres of land. If we were to acquire 50 acres, we could construct the four-plex for adult play, 6 fields for youth baseball and softball and possibly have room for some soccer fields or practice fields. The cost of this option is estimated at $6 million.

Impact on Operating Budget

We are expecting increases in Personal Services, Operating, and Contract Services expenditures when this project is completed. However, because this is a future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the operating budget at this time.

161


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - COMMUNITY FACILITIES 2013-2016 Recreation Center Expansion Project Cost $2,000,000 Fiscal Year Future Project The existing recreation center facilities are in need of updating for space and use improvements. Description Impact on We are expecting increases in Personal Services, Operating, and Contract Services expenditures when this Operating project is completed. However, because this is a future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the Budget operating budget at this time. Library Expansion/Satellite Annex Project Cost Unknown Fiscal Year Future CIP The existing Library facilities are in need of updating for space and technological improvements. The satellite Description annex would provide library services to residents in another area of the City. Impact on We are expecting increases in Personal Services, Operating, and Contract Services expenditures when this Operating project is completed. However, because this is a future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the Budget operating budget at this time.

162


163


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - WATER 2013-2016 South Hampshire 16" Water Line Scope South Hampshire across Hialeah Park to Saginaw Blvd Method Open-cut with pavement patch Project Cost $306,000 Fiscal Year first phase of project to be completed in 2013-2014 Description

This project will continue the transmission loop from the Longhorn Pump Station to Industrial Boulevard across Saginaw Boulevard that was started with the Longhorn Water Line.

Impact on Operating Budget

Slightly reduced Operating costs are expected upon completion of this project. However, the reduction will have an unquantifiable, minimal impact on the operating budget.

Saginaw Blvd 12" Water Line, Ph. 1 Scope McLeroy to Franklin Method Open-cut with pavement patch Project Cost $465,000 Fiscal Year 2013-2014 This project increases the size of the existing 8-inch diameter line to provide additional Description transmission capacity from the Longhorn Pump Station North along Saginaw Blvd. Impact on Slightly reduced Operating costs are expected upon completion of this project. However, the Operating reduction will have an unquantifiable, minimal impact on the operating budget. Budget

Fort Worth Meter Station Upgrade Method Replace existing meter station and piping with 8,800 gpm facilities Project Cost $0 Fiscal Year Future CIP Description This project would be constructed by the City of Fort Worth It is expected that maintenance costs will be reduced upon completion of this project. Impact on However, because this is a future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the Operating operating budget at this time. Any savings in maintenance costs wll be allocated to other Budget locations in the water system. West McLeroy 12" Water Line Phase 2 Scope Elementary #14 to Old Decatur Rd Method Open-cut with pavement patch Project Cost $210,000 Fiscal Year 2015-2016 This project would provide additional transmission capacity along W. McLeroy Blvd. from Description Longhorn Pump Station to the Wayside Elevated Tank. It is expected that maintenance costs will be reduced upon completion of this project. Impact on However, because this is a future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the Operating operating budget at this time. Any savings in maintenance costs will be allocated to other Budget locations in the water system.

164


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - WATER 2013-2016 East McLeroy 12" Water Line Scope S-Curve to FM 156 (Blue Mound Road) Method Open-cut within future ROW Project Cost $380,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project is the third phase of a three phase project to provide improved transmission Description along East McLeroy Blvd between Saginaw Blvd and FM 156. This project could be constructed by developers. It is expected that maintenance costs will be reduced upon completion of this project. Impact on However, because this is a future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the Operating operating budget at this time. Any savings in maintenance costs will be allocated to other Budget locations in the water system. Basswood Blvd 12" Water Line Scope Bailey-Boswell Road to TXU Easement Method Open-cut within future ROW Project Cost $405,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Description This project could be constructed by developers. It is expected that maintenance costs will be reduced upon completion of this project. Impact on However, because this is a future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the Operating operating budget at this time. Any savings in maintenance costs will be allocated to other Budget locations in the water system. Old Decatur Rd 8" Water Line Scope West McLeroy Blvd to Springhill Dr Method Open-cut Project Cost $165,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project provides a link between West McLeroy Blvd and Park West Subdivision. This Description project could be constructed by developers. It is expected that maintenance costs will be reduced upon completion of this project. Impact on However, because this is a future project, we are not able to quantify the impact on the Operating operating budget at this time. Any savings in maintenance costs will be allocated to other Budget locations in the water system. Old Decatur Rd 12" Water Line Phase 1 Scope West McLeroy Blvd to First Baptist Church Method Open-cut Project Cost $160,000 Fiscal Year 2015-2016 This project would provide additional transmission capacity along Old Decatur Rd from Description Longhorn Pump Station to the Wayside Elevated Tank. This project could be constructed by developers. Impact on It is expected that maintenance costs will be reduced upon completion of this project. Any Operating savings in maintenance costs will be allocated to other locations in the water system. Budget 165


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - WATER 2013-2016 Saginaw Blvd 16" Water Line Phase 2 Scope Palomino across Saginaw Blvd to Samson 12" water line Method Project Cost $845,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Description

This project provides a link to the east side of 287 and improved flow to the industrial area of the city.

Impact on Operating Budget

It is expected that maintenance costs will be reduced upon completion of this project. Any savings in maintenance costs will be allocated to other locations in the water system.

FM 156 12" Water Line Relocation Scope Western Center Blvd to Grand Central Parkway Method Open-cut Project Cost $845,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Due to TxDOT widening along FM 156, this portion of the existing 23" water line would be Description relocated and extended to Grand Central Parkway. Impact on It is expected that maintenance costs will be reduced upon completion of this project. Any Operating savings in maintenance costs will be allocated to other locations in the water system. Budget

166


167


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - WASTEWATER 2013-2016

Infiltration/Inflow (I/I) Study Phase 1 Scope Little Fossil Creek Basin Method Study Project Cost $140,000 Fiscal Year 2013-2014 This study will include flow monitoring and identification of problem sections. It will also include Description smoke testing and television inspection of selected sections. The study will recommend projects to address the most critical I/I areas. Impact on This is a study so there will be no impact on the operating budget. As projects are completed Operating as a result of the study, there will be a savings due to less water entering the wastewater Budget system. Southeast 24" Trunk Main Replacement Phase 1 and Phase 3 Scope East Meter Station to 612 Blue Mound Rd & Kennedy to E McLeroy across National Guard Method Bore and Open Cut Project Cost $660,000 Fiscal Year 2013-2014 This project will provide needed capacity to the major trunk main serving the Little Fossil Creek Description Basin. This project will also decrease I/I problems in the existing line. Impact on It is expected that maintenance costs will be increased upon completion of this new line. Operating However, due to reduction of inflow/infiltration as a result of this project we expect no change in Budget overall operating costs. Southeast 24" Trunk Main Replacement Phase 2 Scope 612 Blue Mound Rd to Kennedy Method Open Cut Project Cost $585,000 Fiscal Year 2013-2014 project completion This project will provide needed capacity to the major trunk main serving the Little Fossil Creek Description Basin. This project will also decrease I/I problems in the existing line. Impact on It is expected that maintenance costs will be increased upon completion of this new line. Operating However, due to reduction of inflow/infiltration as a result of this project we expect no change in Budget overall operating costs. Southeast 18" Trunk Main Replacement Scope Little Fossil Creek to the 15" National Guard Sewer Line Method Open Cut Project Cost $150,000 Fiscal Year 2013-2014 project completion This project will provide needed capacity to the major trunk main serving the Little Fossil Creek Description Basin. This project will also decrease I/I problems in the existing line. Impact on It is expected that maintenance costs will be increased upon completion of this new line. Operating However, due to reduction of inflow/infiltration as a result of this project we expect no change in Budget overall operating costs.

168


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - WASTEWATER 2013-2016 Infiltration/Inflow (I/I) Study Phase 2 Scope West Cement Creek Basin Method Study Project Cost $90,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This study will include flow monitoring and identification of problem sections. It will also include Description smoke testing and television inspection of selected sections. The study will recommend projects to address the most critical I/I areas. Impact on Operating This is a study so there will be no impact on the operating budget. Budget Blue Ridge Trail 8" Replacement Scope Mesa Court to Longhorn Road Method Trenchless Project Cost $185,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This line was identified for replacement due to pipeline deterioration and infiltration/inflow Description problems. Replacing the line using a pipe bursting method will increase the pipes capacity with minimum disruption to the neighborhood. Impact on It is expected that maintenance costs will be increased upon completion of this new line. Operating However, due to reduction of inflow/infiltration as a result of this project we expect no change in Budget overall operating costs. Southwest 21" Trunk Main Replacement Scope Within Willow Creek Park, adjacent to Knowles Drive from Longhorn Road to Sky Wood Court Method Open-cut Project Cost $405,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This will provide additional capacity to the major trunk main serving all of the West Cement Creek Basin. Based on the development type and density that fills the rest of the basin, this Description line may be reduced to an 18" as shown in previous master plans. In the mean time, the City will need to continue to monitor the existing 15" line capacity. Impact on It is expected that maintenance costs will be increased upon completion of this new line. Operating However, due to reduction of inflow/infiltration as a result of this project we expect no change in Budget overall operating costs. Jarvis Road 8" Sanitary Sewer Line Scope Bailey Boswell Rd to existing 8" near Brenda Lane Method Open-cut or trenchless Project Cost $580,000 Fiscal Year 2014-2015 Description

This project will provide additional wastewater capacity and the ability to serve the area north of Bailey Boswell Rd once development occurs. This project could be constructed by developers.

Impact on Operating Budget

It is expected that maintenance costs will be increased upon completion of this new line. However, due to reduction of inflow/infiltration as a result of this project we expect no change in overall operating costs.

169


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - WASTEWATER 2013-2016 FM 156 Sewer Line Relocate Scope Saginaw High School to Bailey Boswell Method Open-cut Project Cost $700,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP Due to TxDOT widening along FM 156, portions of the existing 15", 10", and 8" sewer line Description would be relocated. Impact on It is expected that maintenance costs will be increased upon completion of this new line. Operating However, due to reduction of inflow/infiltration as a result of this project we expect no change in Budget overall operating costs. Infiltration/Inflow (I/I) Study Phase 3 Scope East Cement Creek Basin Method Study Project Cost $90,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This study will include flow monitoring and identification of problem sections. It will also include Description smoke testing and television inspection of selected sections. The study will recommend projects to address the most critical I/I areas. Impact on This is a study so there will be no impact on the operating budget. Operating Budget Infiltration/Inflow (I/I) Study Phase 4 Scope Big Fossil Creek Basin Method Study Project Cost $90,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This study will include flow monitoring and identification of problem sections. It will also include Description smoke testing and television inspection of selected sections. The study will recommend projects to address the most critical I/I areas. Impact on Operating This is a study so there will be no impact on the operating budget. Budget

170


171


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - DRAINAGE 2013-2016

Saginaw Blvd Drainage System #2 - Phase 4 Scope Lemon Street to Northern Ave Project Cost $825,000 Fiscal Year 2013-2014 This project includes the extension of Drainage System #2 from Lemon Street to Northern Ave. Design has been completed. Easements must be acquired outside the TxDOT rights-of-way. Description Franchise utilities that conflict with the proposed drainage system must be relocated. Easement acquisitions and utility relocation are scheduled for FY 2011-2012. Impact on The opearating impact of a closed pipe project is minimal. Operating Budget East Cement Creek Improvements Scope Culvert at Opal Street Project Cost $335,000 Fiscal Year 2013-2014 This project will address flooding issues with the existing culvert under Opal Street near Description Southern Ave. Impact on Operating The opearating impact of a closed pipe project is minimal. Budget Saginaw Blvd System #2 Phase 5 Scope Northern to Cambridge Project Cost $900,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project includes the extension of Drainage System #2 from Lemon Street to Northern Ave. Design has been completed. Easements must be acquired outside the TxDOT rights-of-way. Description Franchise utilities that conflict with the proposed drainage system must be relocated. Easement acquisitions and utility relocation are scheduled for FY 2011-2012. Impact on The opearating impact of a closed pipe project is minimal and will have an unquantifiable Operating impact on the future budgets. Budget Saginaw Blvd System #2 Phase 6 Scope Cambridge to Minton Project Cost $600,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project includes the extension of Drainage System #2 from Lemon Street to Northern Ave. Design has been completed. Easements must be acquired outside the TxDOT rights-of-way. Description Franchise utilities that conflict with the proposed drainage system must be relocated. Easement acquisitions and utility relocation are scheduled for FY 2011-2012. Impact on The opearating impact of a closed pipe project is minimal and will have an unquantifiable Operating impact on the future budgets. Budget 172


CITY OF SAGINAW CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS - DRAINAGE 2013-2016 East Cement Creek Improvements Scope Opal Street to West McLeroy Blvd Project Cost $790,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project may need to be accelerated based on flooding issues in East Cement Creek Description Drainage Basin. Impact on The opearating impact of a closed pipe project is minimal and will have an unquantifiable Operating impact on the future budgets. Budget Saginaw Blvd System #3 Pre Construction Scope Acquisition of easements, railroad permits and railroad inspection Project Cost $322,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project improves the drainage along Saginaw Blvd between McLeroy Blvd and Longhorn Blvd. The project consists of earthen channel from FM 156 to the BNSF railroad, crossing under and proceeding along the west side of the railroad. The improvements then turn Description westward, crossing under the Union Pacific and BNSF Railroads, and proceeding across Saginaw Blvd. A main line will extend to the north from Saginaw Blvd along the west side of Saginaw Blvd to Green Ave. Another main line will be extended to the south to Hialeah Park. Impact on Operating There is no operating impact related to the pre-construction phase of this project. Budget Saginaw Blvd System #3 Phases 1 through 4 and TxDOT Review Scope McLeroy Blvd to Longhorn Blvd Project Cost $4,980,000 Fiscal Year Future CIP This project improves the drainage along Saginaw Blvd between McLeroy Blvd and Longhorn Blvd. The project consists of earthen channel from FM 156 to the BNSF railroad, crossing under and proceeding along the west side of the railroad. The improvements then turn Description westward, crossing under the Union Pacific and BNSF Railroads, and proceeding across Saginaw Blvd. A main line will extend to the north from Saginaw Blvd along the west side of Saginaw Blvd. to Green Ave. Another main line will be extended to the south to Hialeah Park. Impact on The opearating impact of a closed pipe project is minimal and will have an unquantifiable Operating impact on the future budgets. Budget

173


174


175


CCPD FUND

City of Saginaw

The CCPD (Crime Control and Prevention District) Fund is used to account for the revenues from sales tax designated for this fund and expenditures related to the CCPD. 176


CITY OF SAGINAW CCPD FUND SUMMARY OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES YEAR-END ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

REVENUES Sales Tax Grant Assistance Interest on Investments Use of Fund Balance

$ $ $ $

936,569 83,441 777 110,247

$ $ $ $

900,000 1,000 104,400

$ $ $ $

950,000 500 86,510

TOTAL REVENUES

$

1,131,033

$

1,005,400

$

1,037,010

$

812,175 52,226 266,632

$

827,500 60,300 117,600

$

821,710 104,800 110,500

$

1,131,033

$

1,005,400

$

1,037,010

EXPENDITURES Tsf. to General Fund-Salaries/Exp Operating Capital Outlay TOTAL EXPENDITURES

177


CITY OF SAGINAW FUND DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 CCPD FUND The Crime Control and Prevention District (CCPD) was originally approved in November 1997 as a one-half cent sales tax and went into effect on April 1, 1998. In May of 2002, the citizens voted to continue the CCPD for another five years. In May of 2007 voters renewed the CCPD for another ten years. The Board of Directors governs the District. Councilmembers.

The Board of Directors consists of the Mayor and

The district is automatically dissolved on the fifth anniversary of the date the district began to levy taxes if the district has not held a continuation or dissolution referendum. A majority of the governing body of the political subdivision that created the district by resolution may request a referendum on continuation or dissolution. Due notice must be given to the public and a public hearing must be held first. The board may not hold a referendum earlier than the fourth anniversary of the date the district was created or earlier than the third anniversary of the date of the last continuation or dissolution referendum. The governing body that created the district may specify the number of years for which a district should be continued. A district may be continued for 5, 10, 15 or 20 years. The continuation of this tax was brought before the voters in 2002 and again in 2007. The most recent election resulted in the continuation of the District for ten (10) years, at .375 cents. There were 528 votes for continuation and 90 against. The goal of the CCPD is to increase patrol officer visibility, enhance crime fighting ability by acquiring new equipment, providing additional training and updating technology and by reducing the number of juvenile offenders involved in repeated criminal and/or gang-related activity. The department continues to receive requests for Crime Prevention services on a daily basis. Many of these requests involve insurance home inspections, while others concern Crime Watch Programs, police department tours and school visits. The addition of a Community Services Officer allows the department to participate in programs such as Crime Watch and National Night Out, and host the Citizens Police Academy. This position reports to the Administrative Sergeant and assists in other areas of the department as needed. Since April 1998, the City has hired ten additional patrol officers, a public services officer, a dispatcher and a school resource officer with CCPD funds. Over the last 10 years, CCPD funds have been used to fund/purchase: · · · · · · ·

Pay increases for Police personnel; Handguns, patrol rifles, ballistic vests, equipment and supplies; Officer training; A police reporting system; Police vehicles and equipment, Radar and in-car video systems; A DVD recorder system in dispatch.

178


CITY OF SAGINAW CCPD FUND REVENUE SUMMARY 2013-2014 CCPD FUND TOTAL REVENUES

$1,200,000 $1,020,786 $901,000

$1,000,000

$950,500

$856,155

$827,941 $800,000

$600,000

$400,000

$200,000

$YEAR END

YEAR-END

YEAR-END

REVISED

PROPOSED

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

BUDGET

BUDGET

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

CCPD FUND SALES TAX BY MONTH ACTUAL 2009-2010

MONTH OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

PROPOSED BUDGET 2013-2014

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

61,305 65,655 64,710 60,057 83,652 57,521 55,231 77,329 68,552 75,709 84,942 70,713

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

65,618 70,280 67,141 66,695 92,974 61,860 57,652 82,002 66,908 66,091 80,014 70,815

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

70,452 81,221 70,785 75,671 98,377 62,795 70,922 82,543 69,257 96,180 82,253 76,112

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

70,327 83,731 70,435 69,662 108,896 63,532 62,210 84,992 64,613 71,571 80,455 69,575

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

74,234 88,383 74,348 73,533 114,946 67,062 65,666 89,714 68,202 75,547 84,925 73,440

TOTALS

$

825,375

$

848,050

$

936,568

$

900,000

$

950,000

BUDGET

$

748,000

$

805,000

$

920,000

$

900,000

$

950,000

179


CITY OF SAGINAW CCPD FUND EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014

CCPD FUND TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$1,131,033

$1,200,000

$1,005,400 $910,242

$894,919

$1,000,000

$1,037,010

$800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 $ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

APPROVED BUDGET 2013-2014

EXPENDITURES BY CLASSIFICATION ACTUAL 2009-2010

DESCRIPTION

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

APPROVED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Capital Outlay

$

807,500 39,699 47,720

$

782,365 43,149 84,728

$

812,175 52,226 266,632

$

827,500 60,300 117,600

$

821,710 104,800 110,500

TOTALS

$

894,919

$

910,242

$

1,131,033

$

1,005,400

$

1,037,010

180


DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND

City of Saginaw

The Drainage Utility Fund is used to account for operations of the City’s drainage system. Services of the Fund are intended to be self-supporting through fees assessed on residential and commercial properties based on the storm water runoff they produce. 181


CITY OF SAGINAW DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND SUMMARY OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES YEAR-END ACTUAL 2011-2012 REVENUES Drainage Utility Fees Other Income Interest on Investments Use of Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES

EXPENDITURES Tsf. to Enterprise Fund-Salary/Exp Tsf. to Enterprise Fund--GLTD Tsf. to General Fund-Salary/Exp Tsf. to Capital Projects Fund Operating Contract Services - Engineering Capital Outlay TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

431,564 77 967 4,009

$

$

436,617

$

$

36,695 10,000 108,220

$

550,000 800 773,355

551,000

$

1,324,155

$

38,500 10,000 112,000 104,000 25,000 148,000

$

39,205 10,000 112,955 1,040,000 77,000 25,000 19,995

$

437,500

$

1,324,155

1,000 -

37,341 5,909 238,452 $

436,617

182

550,000

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014


CITY OF SAGINAW DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND OVERVIEW OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 2013-2014 The City established a drainage utility district on January 4, 2005. Fees are assessed on properties based on the amount of storm water runoff they produce. Single family residences are assessed a uniform base fee of $4.00 per month. As part of the FY 12/13 budget process, residential rates were increased from $3.00 to $4.00 per month. Other properties, including multi-family, commercial, and industrial, produce more storm water runoff at a higher rate and are charged a fee based on the number of equivalent base (residential) units adjusted for the use and size of the property. A drainage utility is used by cities throughout the State to fund drainage projects. It is similar to water and wastewater utilities in that users of the drainage system pay a monthly fee to pay for the system’s operation. Every piece of property in the city contributes storm water runoff that must be collected, routed and monitored to protect the public’s health and safety from loss of life or property damage caused by flooding, stagnation and non-point source pollution. The City needed a drainage utility to offset the growing cost of operating the storm drainage system. These costs include maintenance of the existing system, federal mandates to control storm water runoff, floodplain management and planning and construction of new drainage facilities. The City hired maintenance personnel and purchased equipment (dump truck, brush chipper and Gradall) to focus on maintaining the existing drainage infrastructure. A Vactor truck was purchased in FY09-10 for use in water and wastewater projects as well as drainage projects. An environmental specialist was also hired to oversee floodplain management, permit administration and other federally mandated programs as well as sampling, industrial pretreatment program, site inspections and the cross-connection control program. One-half of the salary for this position is paid from the drainage utility and the other half from the water and wastewater department. Remaining funds will be used for easement acquisition and design of major drainage systems. Future funds will be used to partially pay for debt issued to finance major construction projects. Storm water monitoring is now required by law.

183


CITY OF SAGINAW DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND REVENUE SUMMARY 2013-2014

DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND TOTAL REVENUES

$550,000

$600,000

$500,000

$431,564

$428,427

$421,802

$550,000

$400,000

$300,000

$200,000

$100,000

$YEAR END

YEAR-END

YEAR-END

REVISED

ADOPTED

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

BUDGET

BUDGET

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

The $1.00 per month rate increase began in FY12/13. DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND SALES TAX BY MONTH REVISED ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

MONTH OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

$

35,059 35,064 35,105 35,033 35,071 34,493 35,259 35,211 35,274 35,304 35,350 35,579

$

35,537 35,559 35,901 35,893 35,771 35,841 35,883 35,961 36,063 36,059 36,097 33,862

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

36,071 36,038 36,090 36,125 36,081 36,118 36,156 36,256 36,198 36,157 36,235 34,040

$

45,192 51,891 45,359 45,367 45,306 45,218 45,432 45,423 45,444 45,434 45,498 44,437

$

45,192 51,891 45,359 45,367 45,306 45,218 45,432 45,423 45,444 45,434 45,498 44,437

TOTALS

$

421,802

$

428,427

$

431,564

$

550,000

$

550,000

BUDGET

$

362,000

$

415,000

$

415,000

$

550,000

$

550,000

184


CITY OF SAGINAW DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014

DRAINAGE UTILITY FUND TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$1,324,155

$1,400,000

$1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000

$437,500

$436,617 $342,302

$220,751

$400,000 $200,000 $ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

EXPENDITURES BY CLASSIFICATION ACTUAL 2009-2010

DESCRIPTION

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

Operating Contract Services Capital Outlay Transfers

$

43,938 50,490 67,606 180,268

$

42,018 12,599 17,310 148,825

$

37,341 5,909 238,452 154,915

$

104,000 25,000 148,000 160,500

$

57,000 45,000 19,995 1,202,160

TOTALS

$

342,302

$

220,751

$

436,617

$

437,500

$

1,324,155

185


STREET MAINTENANCE FUND

City of Saginaw

The Street Maintenance Fund is used to account for the revenues from sales tax designated for this fund and expenditures related to street maintenance and repairs. 186


CITY OF SAGINAW STREET MAINTENANCE FUND SUMMARY OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES YEAR-END ACTUAL 2011-2012 REVENUES Sales Tax Interest on Investments Use of Fund Balance TOTAL REVENUES

EXPENDITURES Industrial Streets South Streets North Streets Supplies TOTAL EXPENDITURES

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

$

340,684 473

$

320,000 700 369,000

$

320,000 500

$

341,157

$

689,700

$

320,500

$

45,407 80,574 31,170

$

235,225 423,775 30,700

$

136,645 133,355 30,000

$

157,151

$

689,700

$

300,000

187


CITY OF SAGINAW STREET MAINTENANCE FUND FUND DESCRIPTION 2013-2014 The State of Texas Tax Code allows Texas cities to raise their local sales tax rate by one-eighth of one cent or one-fourth of one cent if the funds are dedicated to street maintenance and repair. Cities may impose the tax with voter approval if the combined local sales tax will not exceed two percent. Voters must approve the additional sales tax and the city's governing body must call the election. The city administers the tax directly and accounts for the funds separately as required by state law. The sales tax is restricted to use only to maintain and repair municipal streets that existed on the date of the election and may not be used to build new streets. The street maintenance sales tax expires four years after it takes effect unless voters approve continuation in an election held for that purpose. The citizens of Saginaw voted to approve a one-eighth of one cent (0.125) sales tax for the purpose of street maintenance and repairs on May 12, 2007. In November 2011, voters renewed the Street Maintenance Tax for four years. The City’s Master Plan contains projects that the City has traditionally utilized County interlocal agreements to accomplish. Additionally, the fund will be used on other street programs and street maintenance materials such as asphalt and concrete. Staff has generated an electronic Street Condition Survey along with a rating system which can be used for planning and budgeting purposes.

188


CITY OF SAGINAW STREET MAINTENANCE FUND REVENUE SUMMARY 2013-2014 STREET MAINTENANCE FUND TOTAL REVENUES

400,000 350,000

$321,330

$318,326

$340,683

$320,000

$320,000

300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000

50,000 0 ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

STREET MAINTENANCE FUND SALES TAX BY MONTH 2012-2013 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 REVISED ACTUAL ACTUAL ACTUAL BUDGET

MONTH OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER

2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET

$

21,999 28,550 22,261 22,215 32,385 22,450 20,665 33,426 25,979 28,000 34,260 29,140

$

25,667 29,823 24,508 24,077 34,502 22,670 21,228 32,330 24,327 24,122 30,943 24,129

$

25,744 32,428 25,255 26,775 36,659 22,466 25,148 31,707 24,773 33,698 31,104 24,927

$

25,277 31,541 23,984 23,873 34,536 22,903 20,871 30,916 24,316 24,976 30,709 26,096

$

25,277 31,541 23,984 23,873 34,536 22,903 20,871 30,916 24,316 24,976 30,709 26,096

TOTALS

$

321,330

$

318,326

$

340,683

$

320,000

$

320,000

BUDGET

$

290,000

$

320,000

$

320,000

$

320,000

$

320,000

189


CITY OF SAGINAW STREET MAINTENANCE FUND EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014

STREET MAINTENANCE FUND TOTAL EXPENDITURES $689,700 $700,000 $600,000

$500,000 $369,593

$400,000

$300,000 $240,150

$300,000

$157,151 $200,000 $100,000 $ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

EXPENDITURES BY CLASSIFICATION ACTUAL 2009-2010

DESCRIPTION

ACTUAL 2010-2011

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

ACTUAL 2011-2012

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

Personal Services Operating Capital Outlay

$

369,593 -

$

240,150 -

$

157,151 -

$

689,700 -

$

300,000 -

TOTALS

$

369,593

$

240,150

$

157,151

$

689,700

$

300,000

190


City of Saginaw Street Condition Survey 2012-2013 BLOCK

All All 400-500 800 300-400 100-300 All 300-500 1000 All All All 300-800 All 1000-1300 All All 200-500 All 1000 All All All 200-300 All All All All All All All 300-400 All 100-500 All 300-800 All All All All All All 200-300 All All All All All All All All All All

STREET NAME

Bailey Boswell Road McLeroy Boulevard Normandy Lane Mustang Drive Blue Ridge Trail Green Avenue Reed Avenue Roberts Drive Westcliff Avenue Burlington Road Kennedy Lane Arcadia Street Palomino Drive Edwards Drive Knowles Drive North Fairmount Street Green Ridge Trail Hampshire Street South Norton Drive Parkhill Avenue Taos Court Thompson Drive West Hills Terrace Worthy Street White Rock Street Bristol Avenue Brenda Lane Delmar Court Canyon Drive Colt Court Garvey Road Guadalupe Drive Indian Crest Drive Industrial Boulevard Lawson Road Lottie Lane Opal Street Palomino Court Prairie Court Ruidoso Court Ruidoso Street Short Street Southern Avenue Southern Court Anderson Street Arthur Drive Belmont Street Bluebonnet Street Cole Avenue Dennis Drive Franklin Avenue Georgian Road East Hampshire Street North

WIDTH

50 42 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 49 25 27 27 27 37 25 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 20 27 27 27 24 27 27 29 27 29 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 31 27 27 27 27 27

LENGTH

15,185 14,663 2,314 666 1,563 1,100 507 1,151 553 4,131 917 872 1,405 2,812 2,824 1,887 1,144 1,500 762 1,345 237 3,610 2,357 892 870 870 904 279 575 231 374 1,385 642 2,394 1,704 2,329 350 311 213 229 3,157 295 1,222 266 1,137 708 1,762 1,855 1,601 1,435 1,148 1,710 1,430

191

SQUARE FEET

759,250 615,846 62,478 17,982 42,201 29,700 13,689 31,077 14,931 202,419 22,925 23,544 37,935 75,924 104,488 47,175 30,888 40,500 20,574 36,315 6,399 97,470 63,639 24,084 23,490 23,490 18,080 7,533 15,525 6,237 8,976 37,395 17,334 69,426 46,008 67,541 9,450 8,397 5,751 6,183 85,239 7,965 32,994 7,182 30,699 19,116 47,574 57,505 43,227 38,745 30,996 46,170 38,610

TYPE OF SURFACE

RATING

RECOMMENDED MEASURE

Asphalt Asphalt Asphalt asphalt Asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt Asphalt Asphalt asphalt Asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt con/asph asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt

1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

Reconstruct Reconstruct Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Overlay Overlay Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance


City of Saginaw Street Condition Survey 2012-2013 BLOCK

100-200 All 1000-1300 All 400-500 600 1300 All All All All All All All All All All 100-400 All All 300-400 All All All All 300-700 All All All All All All All 100-200 All 100-200 200-400 700-800 500 600-800 1200 All 1100 600-700 All 1000 1000-1100 200-700 100-800 100-1000 All 100-200 All

STREET NAME

Hampshire Street South Kay Lane Knowles Drive North Lemon Street Meadow Street Normandy Lane North Creek Drive Opal Street Palo Duro Circle Pimlico Way Rancho Drive Ridgecrest Circle Ridgecrest Drive Saddle Drive Wagley Robertson Washington Avenue Watson Road Cambridge Drive Clover Drive Fair Meadows Drive Green Avenue Greenway Drive Meadowdale Drive Meadowview Drive Mesa Court Mustang Drive Old Decatur Road Park Center Boulevard Park Center Court Pinto Lane Rockledge Drive Saddle Ridge Lane Sierra Blanca Drive Southern Avenue Stallion Lane Worth Street Asbury Drive Blue Ridge Trail Guadalupe Drive Hampshire Steet South North Creek Drive North Park Drive Parkhill Avenue Parkwest Boulevard Thompson Court Westcliff Avenue Westcliff Avenue Minton Road Knowles Drive South Knowles Drive North Elkins Palomino Fox Drive

WIDTH

LENGTH

SQUARE FEET

TYPE OF SURFACE

RATING

RECOMMENDED MEASURE

8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor

27 27 37 27 27 27 27 34 27 27 27 23 27 27 24 27 27 29 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 35

1,003 1,136 2,810 610 1,730 597 1,051 3,816 1,060 1,380 1,119 2,028 3,523 827 1,706 560 959 1,310 962 431 904 1,440 462 431 324 2,344 14,047

27,081 30,672 103,970 16,470 46,710 16,119 28,377 129,744 28,620 37,260 30,213 46,644 95,121 22,329 40,944 15,120 25,893 37,990 25,974 11,637 24,408 38,880 12,474 11,637 8,748 63,288 491,645

asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asph/con

45 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 27 28 27 27 27 27 27 27 33 27 27 27 40 37 37 27 27 27

3,870 544 686 1,698 833 1,518 1,475 1,136 648 1,069 1,031 723 1,940 786 983 874 980 279 815 895 2,103 4,134 5,646 364 1,897 1,776

174,150 14,688 18,522 45,846 22,491 40,986 39,825 30,672 17,496 29,932 27,837 19,521 52,380 21,222 26,541 23,598 32,340 7,533 22,005 24,165 84,120 152,958 208,902 9,828 51,219 47,952

asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt Asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt Asphalt Asphalt Asphalt Asphalt Asphalt Asphalt Asphalt

192

Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor

Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor

Monitor


City of Saginaw Street Condition Survey 2012-2013 BLOCK

STREET NAME

WIDTH

LENGTH

SQUARE FEET

TYPE OF SURFACE

RATING

RECOMMENDED MEASURE

All All All All 100-400 100-200 800 All All

Straw Road Appaloosa Street Hialeah Court Hialeah Park Northern Avenue Western Avenue Parkwest Boulevard Landsdale Lane Wofford Way Total Asphalt

27 27 27 27 29 28 33 27 27

1,003 622 297 1,545 906 1346 873 881 1,826 167,136

27,081 16,794 8,019 41,715 26,274 37,688 28,809 23,787 49,302 32

Asphalt asphalt asphalt asphalt Asphalt Asphalt Asphalt asphalt asphalt Miles

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor

500-1300 100-200 All All All All All All All All All All All All 200-300 All All All All All 400-500 All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All

Industrial Boulevard Minton Road Jarvis Road Mockingbird Drive Alex Street Amber Drive Apple Tree Court Atchison Drive Babbling Brook Drive Bailey Street Basswood Boulevard Basswood Court Big Sky Lane Blue Jay Drive Blue Ridge Trial Blue Wood Drive Brandy Court Bridle Trail Brookhollow Lane Buckstone Drive Cambridge Drive Candlestick Trail Canterbury Drive Cardinal Drive Carriage Lane Cherry Tree Court Chestnut Lane Cheyenne Court Churchhill Drive Cindy Lane Comiskey Court Commonwealth Court Commonwealth Drive Condor Trial Cottonbelt Drive Crystal Brook Drive Denise Drive Dominion Court Dustin Street

29 40 29 29 27 45 29 27 27 27 71 78 29 29 27 29 29 27 28 29 29 27 29 27 29 29 29 29 27 27 27 29 29 29 27 27 27 29 27

2,714 591 5,119 2,852 767 4,661 516 826 925 765 3,913 88 615 529 780 939 682 1,593 813 495 1,771 966 1,519 1,051 3,147 244 2,760 686 575 810 688 268 1,367 1,247 781 922 771 119 765

78,706 23,640 148,451 82,708 20,709 209,745 14,964 22,302 24,975 20,655 277,823 6,864 17,835 15,341 21,060 27,231 19,778 43,011 22,764 14,355 51,359 26,082 44,051 28,377 91,263 7,076 80,040 19,894 15,525 21,870 18,576 7,772 39,643 36,163 21,087 24,894 20,817 3,451 20,655

concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete

7 7 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor

193


City of Saginaw Street Condition Survey 2012-2013 BLOCK

All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All 200-300 All All All All All All All All All All

STREET NAME

WIDTH

LENGTH

SQUARE FEET

TYPE OF SURFACE

RATING

RECOMMENDED MEASURE

Eagle Drive Fenway Lane Flamingo Drive Fossil Wood Drive Fox Run Trail Friar Drive Frisco Drive Gallahad Drive Gold Dust Lane Grand Central Court Grand Central Parkway Greenbriar Court Harriman Drive Heather Ridge Parkway Helmsford Trail Hemlock Trail Hiawatha Court Hiawatha Lane High Country Trail Highland Station Drive Hillwood Drive Hummingbird Trail Iron Horse Drive Jan Court Katy Drive Kempson Court Kings Cross Drive Lariat Drive Little John Court Locksley Court Locksley Drive Lotte Lane Marine Lane Marsha Street Meadowlark Drive Missouri Lane Mitch Street Mooney Drive Nathan Street Norfolk Drive Nottingham Court Nottingham Trail

29 27 29 29 27 29 29 29 29 27 37 29 27 47 29 29 27 27 43 27 27 27 27 27 27 29 27 29 29 29 29 29 29 27 29 27 27 29 27 27 29 29

1,493 1,172 1,577 829 1,391 707 513 310 361 246 4,359 378 1,154 2,525 497 2,367 398 958 2,019 1,375 1,859 1,216 1,140 720 436 533 527 345 115 483 201 1,553 589 1,577 1,303 287 758 376 783 864 650 105

43,297 31,644 45,733 24,041 37,557 20,503 14,877 8,990 10,469 6,642 161,283 10,962 31,158 118,675 14,413 68,643 10,746 25,866 86,817 37,125 50,193 32,832 30,780 19,440 11,772 15,457 14,229 10,005 3,335 14,007 5,829 45,037 17,081 42,579 37,787 7,749 20,466 10,904 21,141 23,328 18,850 3,045

concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor

All

Oak Court

27

412

11,124

concrete

9

Monitor

All

Oak Hollow Trail

27

613

16,551

concrete

9

Monitor

Oriole Drive Paddington Drive East Paint Horse Trail Parkview Drive Peach Tree Court Peacock Drive Pennsylvania Drive Pullman Drive

29

1,265

36,685

concrete

Monitor

27 29 29 29 29 27 27

784 646 1,347 373 983 1,406 1,713

21,168 18,734 39,063 10,817 28,507 37,962 46,251

concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

All All All All All All All All

194

Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor


City of Saginaw Street Condition Survey 2012-2013 BLOCK

All All All All All 100-200 All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All 400-500 All All All

STREET NAME

Quail Drive Raven Drive Redding Court Redding Drive Remington Drive Roberts Drive Robin Drive Rocky Top Circle Round Rock Drive Roundhouse Drive Roundrock Loop East Roundrock Loop North Ryan Street Rye Glen Court Sagewood Lane Sansom Buelavard Santa Fe Drive Sartoga Court Sawyer Drive Saybrook Court Shea Lane Silver Streak Drive Silverbrook Drive Sky Creek Court Sky Wood Court Stafford Station Drive Stetson Trail Swan Circle Taylor Street Tiger Street Topeka Drive Towne Court Triad Buelavard Trinity Trail Union Drive Victoria Drive W J Boaz Road Westgrove Drive Westwood Whistle Stop Drive Whitney Street Willow Court Windsor Drive Woodcrest Drive Wrenthan Drive Wrigley Way Zephyr Drive Acorn Court Aeronca Drive Asbury Drive Ash Meadow Drive Bar Wood Drive Big Willow Court

WIDTH

27 27 29 29 27 27 29 79 27 29 27 27 27 29 27 43 27 29 29 29 27 27 27 27 27 27 29 29 27 46 27 23 39 27 27 27 48 27 27 27 29 27 29 39 29 27 35 29 29 28 39 29 29

LENGTH

912 2,607 218 765 706 1,543 279 76 2,510 938 610 398 1,238 240 924 1,778 1,644 250 1,024 250 807 2,262 1,877 722 573 1,606 366 265 1,954 134 1,213 699 553 1,247 1,408 777 3,735 2,346 844 1,879 303 533 739 4,144 428 956 425 525 381 1,814 773 510 547

195

SQUARE FEET

24,624 70,389 6,322 22,185 19,062 41,661 8,091 6,004 67,770 27,202 16,470 10,746 33,426 6,960 24,948 76,454 44,388 7,250 29,696 7,250 21,789 61,074 50,679 19,494 15,471 43,362 10,614 7,685 52,758 6,164 32,751 16,077 21,567 33,669 38,016 20,979 179,280 63,342 22,788 50,733 8,787 14,391 21,431 161,616 12,412 25,812 14,875 15,225 11,049 50,792 30,147 14,790 15,863

TYPE OF SURFACE

RATING

RECOMMENDED MEASURE

concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 10 10

Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor


City of Saginaw Street Condition Survey 2012-2013 BLOCK

All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All 300-400 500 600 All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All All

STREET NAME

Big Willow Drive Black Ash Bob White Canary Drive Castlebrook Court Catalpa Road Cessna Court Comanche Springs Drive Crane Circle Creek Ben Drive Creek Point Drive Creek Terrace Drive Creekside Drive Crestview Court Defiel Road Dove Circle Falcon Road Finch Circle Grace Lane Greenvale Court Griffith Drive Gull Circle Hazelnut Court Ibis Court John Kennedy Drive Kingsbrook Lane Kingsley Drive Leatherman Drive Mallard Drive McNeill Lane Meadow Street Northern Avenue Parkwest Boulevard Partridge Drive Pelican Way Pheasant Road Piper Drive Quest Court Redwing Drive Robbins Way Rock Dove Circle Rock Elm Road Rough Rider Drive Sequoia Way Sherry Lane Sherwood Trail Sparrow Drive Spring Drive Spring Hollow Drive Springhill Drive Springs Way Springwood Drive Steerman Court

WIDTH

29 29 29 29 29 29 29 35 29 28 29 28 28 27 34 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 35 29 29 29 29 27 29 33 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 29 24 29 29 29 29 28 28 27 28 27 29

LENGTH

1,845 251 906 763 402 1,079 348 813 255 320 433 703 645 454 2,397 186 487 311 638 410 1,756 205 515 255 884 668 730 537 1,672 385 704 118 434 1,504 348 1,314 231 210 1,295 1,049 452 593 1,445 1,750 1,063 690 1,399 134 2,157 1,821 244 2,353 384

196

SQUARE FEET

53,505 7,279 26,274 22,127 11,658 31,291 10,092 28,455 7,395 8,960 12,557 19,684 18,060 12,258 81,498 5,394 14,123 9,019 18,502 11,890 50,924 5,945 14,935 7,395 25,636 23,380 21,170 15,573 48,488 11,165 19,008 3,422 14,322 43,616 10,092 38,106 6,699 6,090 37,555 30,421 13,108 17,197 34,680 50,750 30,827 20,010 40,571 3,752 60,396 49,167 6,832 63,531 11,136

TYPE OF SURFACE

RATING

RECOMMENDED MEASURE

concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor


City of Saginaw Street Condition Survey 2012-2013 BLOCK

All All All All All All All 1100-1200 300 All All All All All All All

STREET NAME

Surry Court Sycamore Lane Virginia Lane Vista Mill Court Vista Mill Drive Wabash Court Water Wood Drive Westcliff Avenue Western Avenue White Ash Street Willow Vista Drive Willow Wood Willowstone Trail Willowview Drive Wood Drive Longhorn Road

WIDTH

29 29 29 29 29 29 29 27 29 29 29 27 29 29 29 100

LENGTH

450 529 1,019 240 1,538 392 513 654 834 553 1,653 1,299 924 1,452 236 8,055

197

SQUARE FEET

13,050 15,341 29,551 6,960 44,602 11,368 14,877 17,658 24,186 16,037 47,937 35,073 26,796 42,108 6,844 805,500

TYPE OF SURFACE

RATING

RECOMMENDED MEASURE

concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete concrete

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor Monitor

Monitor


DONATIONS FUND

City of Saginaw

The Donations Fund was created in May 2009 to better track funds received through water bill donations as well as direct donations to the City for specific purposes. Currently, Animal Control, Parks, Library, Beautification, Senior Center, Police, and Fire have donation funds available for expenditure. 198


CITY OF SAGINAW DONATIONS FUND SUMMARY OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES YEAR-END ACTUAL 2011-2012 REVENUES Donations Revenue Interest on Investments Other Income Use of Animal Control FB Use of Library FB Use of Beautification FB Use of Senior Center FB Use of Police FB Use of Fire FB TOTAL REVENUES

EXPENDITURES Animal Control Parks Library Beautification Senior Center Police Fire TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$

REVISED BUDGET 2012-2013

139,527 314 24

$

155,000 300

ADOPTED BUDGET 2013-2014

$

4,000 70,000 950 2,000 5,200

28,640 59,360

-

145,000 300

$

139,864

$

243,300

$

227,450

$

3,577 19,004 40,748 29,851 367 7,874

$

3,000 11,000 80,600 137,250 950 10,500

$

4,000 41,000 134,750 950 2,000 5,200

$

101,421

$

243,300

$

187,900

199


CITY OF SAGINAW DONATIONS FUND OVERVIEW OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 2013-2014 The Donations Fund was created in May 2009 to better track funds received through water bill donations as well as direct donations to the City for specific purposes. Currently, Animal Control, Parks, Library, Beautification, the Senior Center, Police, and Fire Department have donation funds available for expenditure. Each of these departments has an advising board which helps create the budgets for and approves expenditures of donations. REVENUE Donations Revenue This includes the $2.00 donations on most water bills for Parks, Library and Beautification as well as direct donations from the citizens and businesses within the City for other purposes. Beautification receives $1.00 and Parks and the Library each receive 50 cents. Interest on Investments This is based on current rates. EXPENDITURES: Animal Control Budgeted expenditures for a surveillance system and the animal shelter. Parks There are no budgeted expenditures for Parks. Library Budgeted expenditures include data processing expenses, books, cd’s, dvd’s, supplies, and contract services for the summer reading program. Beautification Budgeted expenditures include various beautification projects including Adopt-a-Spot and Yard-of-theMonth programs, various maintenance and repair projects throughout the City as needed, holiday decorations and mowing contracts for Saginaw Blvd. and Blue Mound Rd. Phase 2 of the Old Decatur Road landscaping and one third funding for the community sign is also budgeted. Senior Center Budgeted expenditures include supplies for various programs at the Senior Center. Police Budgeted expenditures include supplies for the Fire and Police Banquet. Fire Budgeted expenditures Fire Camp, the annual Easter Egg Hunt, and the annual Fire and Police Banquet. 200


CITY OF SAGINAW DONATIONS FUND REVENUE SUMMARY 2013-2014 DONATIONS REVENUE

160,000

$155,000

$153,125

$145,000

$139,527 $132,844

140,000 120,000 100,000 80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000 0 ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

REVISED

ADOPTED

2009-2010

2010-2011

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

DONATIONS REVENUE BY MONTH 2009-2010 ACTUAL

2010-2011 ACTUAL

2011-2012 ACTUAL

2012-2013 REVISED BUDGET

$

11,477 10,703 10,420 9,675 9,787 23,736 9,048 8,662 13,025 9,565 9,624 27,405

$

9,638 11,299 9,937 10,290 9,597 16,835 9,626 11,555 11,456 10,046 12,395 10,170

$

11,464 10,440 11,201 10,445 10,526 16,128 10,291 11,557 11,109 12,706 13,628 10,032

$

10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 15,833 15,833 15,833 15,833 15,833 15,835

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

11,102 11,056 10,754 10,363 10,193 19,322 9,870 10,828 12,128 11,013 12,148 16,223

TOTALS

$

153,125

$

132,844

$

139,527

$

155,000

$

145,000

BUDGET

$

120,000

$

120,000

$

120,000

$

155,000

$

145,000

MONTH OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUGUST SEPTEMBER

201

2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET


CITY OF SAGINAW DONATIONS FUND EXPENDITURE SUMMARY 2013-2014

DONATIONS FUND TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$243,300 $250,000 $187,900 $200,000 $150,000

$108,465

$101,421

$92,766 $100,000 $50,000 $ACTUAL 2009-2010

ACTUAL 2010-2011

ACTUAL 2011-2012

REVISED 2012-2013

ADOPTED 2013-2014

EXPENDITURES BY CLASSIFICATION 2009-2010 ACTUAL

DESCRIPTION

2010-2011 ACTUAL

2012-2013 REVISED BUDGET

2011-2012 ACTUAL

2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET

Animal Control Parks Library Beautification Senior Center Police Fire

$

3,725 29,875 10,098 37,389 11,679

$

5,707 22,084 35,518 41,803 406 2,947

$

3,577 19,004 40,748 29,851 367 7,874

$

3,000 11,000 80,600 137,250 950 10,500

$

4,000 41,000 134,750 950 2,000 5,200

TOTALS

$

92,766

$

108,465

$

101,421

$

243,300

$

187,900

202


POLICIES, RESOLUTIONS AND ORDINANCES

City of Saginaw

203


CITY OF SAGINAW

RESOLUTION NO. 2013- 08 BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS

ADOPTING A BUDGET FOR THE CITY OF SAGINAW FOR THE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING OCTOBER 1, 2013 AND ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2014

WHEREAS, the City Council has heretofore held a public hearing on the adoption of a budget for the City of Saginaw, Texas, for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2013 and ending September 30, 2014 after due notice as provided by law; and

WHEREAS, said City Council is of the opinion and finds that the proposed budget should be adopted and approved, with such modifications and amendments as shown in

the budget hereto attached and incorporated by reference as part of this Resolution; NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS: 1.

That the proposed budget prepared by the Mayor and City Council and filed with

the City Secretary, with such modifications and amendments as have been made by the City Council, a copy of which proposed budget with any and all such modifications and amendments is attached hereto and incorporated by reference as part of this Resolution, be and the same is hereby approved and adopted as the budget for the operation of the

City of Saginaw, Texas, for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2013 and ending September 30, 2014.

2. That a copy of said budget as hereby adopted is hereby authorized to be filed with the City Secretary at all offices required by law. ADOPTED AND APPROVED this the

17th

day of September, 2013.

APPR4

D:

i

Gar ATTEST:

Jani

England,

City

Sec

APPROVED AS TO FO

Br/

eredith,

ary AND LEGALITY:

City Attorney

204

Brinkley,

ayor

dip


CITY OF SAGINAW ORDINANCE NO. 2013- 16

AN ORDINANCE LEVYING TAXES FOR THE USE AND SUPPORT OF THE

CITY

OF

SAGINAW, TEXAS

MUNICIPAL

GOVERNMENT, AND

PROVIDING FOR THE BOND AND INTEREST RETIREMENT FUNDS OF ALL OUTSTANDING GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS OF THE CITY, FOR THE TAX YEAR 2013;

SPECIFIC

PURPOSE

AS

APPORTIONING EACH LEVY FOR THE

STATED;

AND PROVIDING

AN

EFFECTIVE

DATE.

City of Saginaw, Texas, has done and performed all statutory requirements precedent to the setting of the City' s tax rate for 2013; including the holding of all WHEREAS,

the

required public hearings, if required, after due notice, now, therefore:

BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS: Section 1.

That there is hereby levied and there shall be collected for the use and support of the municipal government of the City of Saginaw, Texas, and to provide an interest and sinking fund for the retirement of each series of outstanding general obligation bonds of the City of Saginaw, Texas, upon all property, real, personal and mixed, within the corporate limits of the City of Saginaw, Texas, subject to taxation, a tax of FIFTY-ONE CENTS ( 51. 0000) on each ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($ 100. 00)

TAX

RATE

WILL

RAISE

valuation

MORE

of

2013.

THIS

MAINTENANCE

AND

property for the tax

TAXES

FOR

OPERATIONS THAN LAST YEAR' S TAX RATE.

year

THE TAX RATE WILL

EFFECTIVELY BE RAISED BY .57 PERCENT AND WILL RAISE TAXES FOR

MAINTENANCE

AND

APPROXIMATELY -$ 11. 05

OPERATIONS

FOR THE

ON

YEAR.

A

$100, 000

HOME

BY

Said tax being so levied and

apportioned for the purposes hereinafter set forth, to- wit:

For Interest and Sinking Funds of the City of Saginaw, Texas, for payment of the principal as it matures and interest as it accrues upon all outstanding General Obligation Bonds of the City of Saginaw, Texas, a tax of TWENTY- TWO AND 976/ 10, 000THS CENTS 22. 0976) on each ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($ 100. 00) valuation of property. a)

b)

For the maintenance and operation of the General Government of the City of

Saginaw, Texas, ( General Fund), a tax of TWENTY-EIGHT AND 9024/ 10, 000THS CENTS 28. 9024)

on each

ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS ($ 100. 00)

1

205

valuation of property.


Section 2.

All monies collected under this Ordinance are hereby appropriated and set apart for the purposes recited, and the City Manager shall cause books of account to be kept so as to readily and distinctly show amounts collected and expended and on hand at any time, in each of said funds, and it is hereby made the duty of every person collecting or receiving money for the City of Saginaw, pursuant to the supervision and direction of the City Manager, to deliver to the City and its designated officer or employee all such money so collected or received, together with a statement showing to what fund such should be deposited and from what source received. All receipts of the City of Saginaw, Texas, not specifically apportioned by this Ordinance are hereby made payable to the General Fund, unless the City Council shall by resolution or ordinance otherwise direct. Section 3.

This ordinance shall be in full force and effect immediately upon its adoption.

ADOPTED AND APPROVED this

17th

day of September, 2013. APP I

G. ry :

OVIC rink

,

Mayer

City of Sagin. w, Texas ATTEST:

J

is

England,

City S

retary

APPROVED AS TO FORM AND LEGALITY:

4i

v4

a City

I 1!-

Atto711,

eredith,

y

2

206


CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS ORDINANCE NO. 2013- 17 AN

ORDINANCE

OF

THE

CITY

OF

SAGINAW,

TEXAS

AMENDING CHAPTER 98 OF THE SAGINAW CITY CODE BY REVISING

WATER

SEVERABILITY

SERVICE

CLAUSE;

RATES,

PROVIDING

PROVIDING A

A

CUMULATIVE

CLAUSE; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

WHEREAS, the City of Saginaw is a home rule city acting under its charter adopted by the electorate pursuant to Article XI, Section 5, of the Texas Constitution and Chapter 9 of the Local Government Code; and

WHEREAS, the City has established reasonable rates for the provision of water and sewer service; and

WHEREAS, due to changes in the cost of providing such services, the City Council has determined that the rates for water service must be increased; and

WHEREAS, the City Council has determined that the rates set forth herein are reasonable.

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS: SECTION 1.

That Section 98- 261 of the Saginaw City Code is hereby amended to read as follows: Section 98- 261. Water Service Rates

There are hereby fixed and established the following water rates for service from the municipal systems for each category of customer as follows: WATER SERVICE RATES Residential

Category

13. 95 Basic Monthly Charge 4. 32 per 1, 000 gallons for each 1, 000 gallons in excess

of 2, 000 gallons up to 10, 000 gallons total volume 4. 60 per 1, 000 gallons for each 1, 000 gallons in excess of 10, 000 gallons total volume

City of Saginaw Ordinance

No. 2013- 17,

Page 1

207


Multi- Family

Category

13. 95 Basic Monthly Charge per Dwelling 4. 60 per 1, 000 gallons for each 1, 000 gallons in excess

of 2, 000 gallons per dwelling unit up to 8, 000 gallons additional volume

5. 56 per 1, 000 gallons for each 1, 000 gallons in excess of 8, 000 gallons additional volume Commercial/ Industrial

Category

13. 95 Basic Monthly Charge 4. 60 per 1, 000 gallons for each 1, 000 gallons in excess

of 2, 000 gallons up to 10, 000 gallons total volume 5. 56 per 1, 000 gallons for each 1, 000 gallons in excess of 10, 000 gallons total volume

SECTION 2.

It is hereby declared to be the intention of the City Council that the phrases, clauses, sentences, paragraphs and sections of this ordinance are severable, and if any phrase, clause, sentence, paragraph or section of this ordinance shall be found or declared to be

invalid, or unconstitutional by the valid judgment or decree of any court or competent jurisdiction, such finding or declaration shall not affect any of the remaining void,

phrases,

clauses,

sentences,

paragraphs

or

sections

of

this

ordinance,

since the same

would have been enacted by the City Council without the incorporation of this ordinance of any such unconstitutional phrase, clause, sentence, paragraph or section.

SECTION 3.

This ordinance shall be cumulative of all ordinances of the City of Saginaw, Texas, except where the provisions of this ordinance are in direct conflict with the provisions of

such ordinances in which event the conflicting provisions of such ordinance are hereby repealed.

SECTION 5.

This ordinance shall become effective on October 1, 2013.

City

of

Saginaw Ordinance No. 2013- 17,

Page 2

208


PASSED AND APPROVED this

17th

day of September, 2013.

1 . 9 Gar Brinkley ayor ATTEST:

Japice

ngland, City Secr tary

APPROVED AS TO FORM AND LEGALITY:

Fry

ere'

ith, City Atto

City of Saginaw Ordinance No.

2013- 17,

Page 3

209


CITY OF SAGINAW RESOLUTION NO. 2013-02 A RESOLUTION BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS, APPROVING THE CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS, INVESTMENT POLICY

WHEREAS, the Investment Committee has reviewed the City of Saginaw, Texas Investment Policy as adopted on January 26, 1988, and as heretofore revised on September 6, 1988, February 6, 1990, March 5, 1996, September 18,2001, and December 7, 2010; and WHEREAS, the Investment Committee has found that no revisions to the Investment Policy are necessary at this time; and WHEREAS, the City Council has heretofore reviewed the City of Saginaw, Texas Investment Policy and finds that no revisions are necessary at this time; NOW, THEREFORE; BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS: 1. That the City Council of the City of Saginaw, Texas, does hereby formally approve the CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS INVESTMENT POLICY. 2. That henceforth the Investment Policy, last revised and amended on the 7h day of December, 2010, and hereby approved shall remain in full force and effect and shall supersede and amend any prior such policy and provisions thereof. APPROVED this 5th day ofFebruary, 2013.

England, City

210


CITY OF SAGINAW FINANCIAL POLICIES 2013-2014 The financial management policies of the City are designed to ensure the financial integrity of the City’s government and assist the City in achieving the following:      

Quality basic City services that meet the needs and desires of the citizens. A financial base sufficient to maintain or enhance City assets required to support community service demands. Responsiveness to the constantly changing needs, desires, and service requirements of the City. Prudent and professional financial management practices to assure residents of Saginaw and the financial community that the City of Saginaw is well managed and in sound financial condition. Cost effective services to citizens through cooperation with other government entities. An adequate capital improvement program that maintains and enhances the public’s assets.

General Goals  The City will hire an outside (independent) auditor.  The auditors must demonstrate breadth and depth of staff necessary to handle the City’s audit in a timely manner.  The audited financial statements shall be prepared within 90 days of the close of the fiscal year.  Annual reporting will be done within the guidelines set forth by Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP).  Interim activity reports will be made available to Council and Management.  Financial systems will be maintained to monitor expenditures/expenses and revenues on a monthly basis with a thorough analysis and adjustment (if required) at the end of each quarter.  Budgets for all funds are adopted on a basis consistent with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP).  Annual appropriated budgets are adopted for all funds.  The City will strive to maintain accounting policies and practices in the preparation of its annual financial report.  The report will be presented to the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for review of qualifications that meet those necessary to obtain the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting.  The City will also submit its annual budget to Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) for review to receive the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award. Staffing levels shall be adequate for the departments of the City to function effectively. Overtime shall be used only to address temporary or seasonal demands that require excessive hours. Possible ways to increase efficiency shall be explored before adding staff. However, the staffing levels shall not be inadequate or marginal such that the City’s internal controls are jeopardized. 211


CITY OF SAGINAW FINANCIAL POLICIES 2013-2014 (Continued) Cash and Investment Management Concepts  The City shall manage and invest its cash with three objectives, listed in order of priority:  Safety  Liquidity  Yield  The safety of the principal invested shall always remain the primary objective.  All investments shall be designed and managed in a manner responsive to the public trust and consistent with state and local law.  The City shall maintain a comprehensive cash management program which includes:  Collection of accounts receivable.  Vendor payment in accordance with invoice terms.  Prudent investment of available cash. Cash management is defined as the process of managing monies in order to ensure maximum cash availability and maximum yield on short-term investment of idle cash. Periodic review of cash flow position shall be performed to determine performance of cash management and investment policies. Detailed policy structures (City Investment Policy and Depository Agreement) shall be followed with respect to Cash/Treasury management. Interest earned from investment of available funds, whether pooled or not, shall be distributed to the funds from which monies were provided to be invested. Fund Balance/Operating Position Concepts  The City will maintain a fund balance (cash and investments), to be used for unanticipated emergencies, between 15 and 20 percent of the operating budgets of the General and Enterprise Funds (excluding capital outlay).  These monies will be used to avoid cash-flow interruptions, generate interest income, reduce need for short-term borrowing and assist in maintaining an investment-grade bond rating. Revenue Objectives The City shall strive to operate a revenue system, which is simple and reliable, so that assurances can be provided that the revenue base will materialize according to budget planning.  

Consistent monitoring and collection policies will be maintained to ensure the integrity of the revenue system. Revenue collections will be consolidated under the Finance Department. Monthly reports shall be prepared to compare actual revenues to budgeted revenues and to determine the variances and associated corrective action necessary.

212


CITY OF SAGINAW FINANCIAL POLICIES 2013-2014 (Continued) The City will periodically review its fee structure to ensure that revenue collections are adequate to meet corresponding expenditures (cost of service concept).  The Enterprise Fund will pay a franchise fee based on the same rationale as used with the electric, gas, and telephone companies. A franchise fee is paid to compensate the City for street and alley usage. Expenditure/Expense Issues  Monthly reports shall be prepared showing actual expenditures/expenses compared to budgeted expenditures/expenses.  Where appropriate, performance measures and productivity indicators shall be used as expenditure/expense guidelines and reviewed for efficiency and effectiveness.  This information shall be included in the annual budgeting process.  Procedures shall be taken so as to maximize any discounts offered by creditors.  Current liabilities shall be paid within 30 days of receiving the invoice.  Accounts Receivable procedures shall target collection within 60 days from date of service. 

Debt/Capital Planning Criteria  The City will strive to limit general obligation annual debt requirements to 35 percent of general government expenditures.  Revenue bond coverage (Enterprise Fund) shall be maintained at a minimum of 1.25 times.  Long Term Debt shall not be used for operating purposes. The life of the bonds shall not exceed the useful life of the projects.  Full disclosure of operations and open lines of communication shall be made to rating agencies. The City staff, with the assistance of bond advisors, shall prepare the necessary materials and presentation to the rating agencies.  The City shall explore funding alternatives in addition to long term debt including leasing, grants and other aid, developer contributions, capital recovery fees, and current funds.  Major capital improvement expenditures are found in three areas of the budget.  General Fund operating budget – For replacement of worn out equipment or additional equipment to increase the effectiveness of the department. The life of most capital outlay purchases ranges from two (2) years to ten (10) years. The effect on future operational budgets is minimal because purchases are one time only.  Capital Projects Fund – Capital improvements from this fund will require the use of tax and revenue bonds. Since the improvements are to improve the infrastructure, this will reduce the overall commitment of operational funds on pay-as-you-go projects. Capital improvements include street improvements, drainage improvements, and improvements to community facilities.

213


CITY OF SAGINAW FINANCIAL POLICIES 2013-2014 (Continued) 

Enterprise Fund – Capital improvements from this fund are from Waterworks and Sewer System Revenue Bonds. Capital improvements include installation of new water and wastewater lines and repair and replacement of older existing lines.

Budget Concepts  The City shall prepare a proposed itemized budget for each budgeted fund.  Current operating revenue will be sufficient to support current operating expenditures/expenses.  Debt or bond financing will not be used to finance current expenditures/expenses.  Fund balance may be used to balance the budget so that budgeted revenues equal budgeted expenditures.  The Operating Budget should be balanced with current revenues, and, if necessary, a portion of the undesignated surplus, greater than or equal to current expenditures/expenses. When balancing the budget the following options should be considered before using the undesignated surplus.  Increase existing fees or adding new fees.  Seek outside funding such as grants, cost sharing with other entities, additional sales tax, etc.  Make programs self-supporting, reduce, or eliminate programs.  Increase the property tax rate.  Annual estimates of revenue in all funds shall be based on historical trends and reasonable expectations and assumptions regarding growth, the state of the economy, and other relevant factors. A conservative approach shall be observed in estimating revenues.  If at any time during a fiscal year it is estimated by the City Manager that the current year’s expenditures in any fund will exceed available revenues, the City Manager shall notify City Council and propose a plan, if necessary, to deal with potential problems.  Even though ad valorem taxes are collected by Tarrant County, the City shall follow a policy of aggressively pursuing the County’s collection of current and delinquent ad valorem taxes, and shall strive to maintain a current ad valorem tax collection rate of 97 percent.  Expenditures in all funds shall be managed so as to ensure the obligations of each fund are met when due. Expenditures in the General Fund shall remain within each department’s original appropriation level unless an ordinance providing for an additional appropriation has been approved by the City Council.  The budget process will be coordinated so as to identify major policy issues for City Council consideration several months prior to the budget approval date so proper decision analysis can be made. The budget review process shall include City Council participation, and a Public Hearing to allow for citizen participation in the budget preparation. The budget shall span sufficient time to address policy and fiscal issues by the City Council.

214


CITY OF SAGINAW FINANCIAL POLICIES 2013-2014 (Continued) 

 

  

A copy of the proposed budget shall be filed with the City Secretary when it is submitted to the City Council in accordance with the provisions of the City Charter. Copies may also be viewed on the City’s web site, in the office of the Asst. City Manager/Finance Director and the Library. Revenues actually received will be regularly compared to budget revenues and variances will be investigated. This process will be summarized in the monthly financial reports prepared by the Asst. City Manager/Finance Director and submitted for City Council review. The level of budgetary control is the department level in all funds. When budget adjustments among departments and/or funds are necessary, they must be approved by the City Council. All City purchases and contracts over $25,000 shall conform to the competitive bidding process as set forth by the City Charter. Recommendation on purchases and contracts over $25,000 shall be submitted to the City Council for approval. (In June 2002, the City Council adopted the bid and proposal threshold of Section 252.021 of the Texas Local Government Code relating to bid and proposal thresholds, which supersedes Section 9.04 of the City Charter. This increases the threshold from $5,000 to $25,000.) Monthly financial reports will be prepared by the Asst. City Manager/Finance Director showing actual expenditures compared to original budget. These reports will be given to the City Council for review. Monthly accounting reports will be distributed to all Department Heads to enable more precise management of their respective departmental budgets. Each Department Head is responsible to ensure proper budgetary procedures are followed throughout his or her department.

215


CITY OF SAGINAW DEBT MANAGEMENT POLICY 2013-2014 LEGAL DEBT MARGIN Article XI, Section 5 of the State of Texas Constitution states in part: “… no tax for any purpose shall ever be lawful for any one year, which shall exceed two and one-half percent of the taxable property of such city, and no debt shall ever be created by any city, unless at the same time provision be made to assess or collect annually a sufficient sum to pay the interest thereon and creating a sinking fund of at least two percent thereon.” As stated in the Texas Constitution, the amount of bonds a home rule city may issue is limited by its charter. As a home rule city, the City of Saginaw, Texas is not limited on the amount of debt it may issue because the charter does not specify a limitation. However, there are restrictions on the City’s power to tax as stated below. Section 13.05, City of Saginaw Charter - Limitation of Tax Rate The maximum tax rate shall not exceed one dollar and fifty cents ($1.50) on the One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) valuation of taxable property within the City of Saginaw. Even though the Texas Constitution allows a higher tax rate the City of Saginaw is bound by its charter. The City’s Charter provides that general property taxes are limited to $1.50 per $100 of assessed valuation for general governmental services including the payment of principal and interest on general obligation bonds. The 2013 adopted tax rate is $.51 per $100 of assessed valuation based on 100% of appraised value. This is well under the $1.50 limit. Rules promulgated by the Office of the Attorney General of Texas stipulate that such Office will not approve tax bonds of any city unless the city can demonstrate its ability to pay debt service requirements on all outstanding tax debt, including the issue to be approved, from a tax levy of $1.00 per $100 of valuation, based on 99% collection of the tax. Assuming the maximum tax rate for debt service of $1.00 on the 2013 taxable assessed valuation of $1,222,259,646 at 99% collection, tax revenue of $12,100,370 would be produced. After paying the current year’s debt service payment of $3,173,828, the city would have an available debt service capacity of $8,926,542.

216


CITY OF SAGINAW DEBT MANAGEMENT POLICY 2013-2014 DEBT FINANCING POLICIES 

Total general obligation principal debt will not exceed 5% of the Taxable Value. 2013 Taxable Value

10-1-13 Outstanding GO. Debt

$1,222,259,646 x 5% $ 61,112,982 $

25,770,000

Where possible, the City uses certificates of obligation, special assessment, revenue bonds, or other self-supporting bonds instead of general obligation bonds.

The City will strive to limit general obligation annual debt requirements to 35% of the general government expenditures. 2013-2014 General Fund Operating Expenditures

$ 12,448,515 x 35% $ 4,356,980

The 2013-2014 annual debt requirement is $3,173,828. This is within the 35% goal outlined above. The 2013-2014 budget includes debt service payments for debt currently outstanding as shown in the Debt Service Fund section of the budget. The City of Saginaw will use debt financing when it is appropriate. It will be judged appropriate only when the following conditions exist:  When major long-term capital improvements are desired.  When it can be determined that future citizens will receive a benefit from the improvement. When the City of Saginaw utilizes long-term debt financing it will ensure that the debt is soundly financed by:  Conservatively projecting the revenue sources that will be utilized to pay the debt.  Financing the improvement over a period not greater than the useful life of the improvement.  Determining that the cost benefit of the improvement, including interest cost, is positive.

217


Excerpt from the City Council Meeting of the City of Saginaw held at the City Hall on September 2, 2003

ITEM 15 CONSIDERATION OF APPROVAL OF CAPITALIZATION POLICY (CC-0903-12) Asst. City Manager Johnson stated that the Governmental Accounting Standards Board has implemented new accounting standards that now apply to the City. The main effect of their Statement No. 34 is the way the city capitalizes and reports assets. The City's Capitalization Policy was adopted last and the auditors have had a chance to study the new requirements and have recommended some changes to the policy. They recommended that the $1,000 minimum for reporting an expenditure as a capital asset be changed to $5,000. They also recommended showing depreciation on infrastructure based on the suggested useful life for each category shown on the attached chart. ACM Johnson stated that these changes have been incorporated into the attached documents and recommended approval as presented. Motion was made by Mayor Pro Tem Brinkley and seconded by Councilmember Bevill to approve the Capitalization Policy as presented. Motion carried. For:

Mayor Robbins, Mayor Pro Tem Brinkley, Councilmembers Bevill, Sedberry, Davis, Crowell

Against:

None

Absent:

Councilmember Flory

218


CITY OF SAGINAW, TEXAS CAPITALIZATION POLICY I. Purpose To provide a uniform criteria for identifying City expenditures for capitalization, and for the proper asset classification of capital expenditures, including guidelines for the determination of the economic useful lives of assets. II. Policy A. It is the general policy of the City of Saginaw to identify an expenditure as a capital asset if it meets all of the following requirements: 1. 2. 3. 4.

is City owned costs $5,000 or more has an economic useful life of one or more years is intended to provide productive benefit to the City during its useful life.

B. Additional expenditures on existing assets may be capitalized if the asset’s productive capacity is significantly improved or the economic useful life of the asset is extended by three or more years. Replacement assets may be capitalized if they meet the four criteria listed above. C. Capital items in most cases are new or replacement items with long lives. Expense items are generally those which are used up in a short time (less than one year) or are expenditures which maintain an existing asset in good condition, but do not improve it from its original condition. D. Low value capital items (cost below $5,000) are arbitrarily expensed to reduce the bookkeeping costs of tracking and depreciating them. E. For various reasons, some City assets may have a reduction in productive benefit not accounted for by normal depreciation. Such assets (if not fully depreciated) shall be removed from City asset accounts or reduced in value, and written off to expense, to the extent that future benefit to the City has been reduced. F. Expenditures that do not qualify as capital expenditures, where they can reasonably be forecast, should be funded by the annual operating budget.

219


Capital Assets Asset Categories and Suggested Useful Life Group

Description

SubGroup

Description

Examples

Useful Life

Non-Infrastructure NFOE

Furniture, office equipment

Desks, tables, chairs

5

NCHS NTEL NMVH

Computer Hardware & Software Telephone Equipment Motor Vehicles

Monitors, CPU, printer

5 7 5

NMVH NMVH NMVH NMVH NMVH NBLT NBLP NBLP NBLP NBLP NBLP NKIT

NHCE

NCLT NBUS NFTK NPOL NPW

General cars and light trucks Busses Fire trucks Police Public Works

Buildings - Temporary Buildings

Kitchen Equipment

NENGS NFFE NPSE NMEDE NTCE NRCE

Heavy Construction Equipment Engineering, Scientific Equipment Firefighting Equipment Police Special Equipment Medical Equipment Traffic Control Equipment Radio, communications equipment

NRAE NLIBB NLIBA

Recreational/Athletic Equipment Library Books Artwork

NOUTE

Outdoor Equipment

NCUSE

Custodial Equipment

NHVAC NROOF NCPTR NELP

HVAC Systems Roofing Carpet Replacement Electrical/Plumbing

T-buildings, other portable Air-conditioners, heating, ventilation systems

20 40

Appliances

20 7 10 12 7

Backhoes, Trucks, Dozers, front-end loaders, Large Tractors

10

Lab Equipment Ladder, hoses Stoplights Mobile, portable radios Weight machines, mats, golf carts, treadmill tackling sled, pitching machines Collections Collections Playground equipment, scoreboards, bleachers, radio towers Floor scrubbers, vacuums, other

220

8 15 25 5 6

10 10 5 10 10 10

7 15 20

12 10


Capital Assets Asset Categories and Suggested Useful Life Group

Description

SubGroup

Description

Examples

Useful Life

Non-Infrastructure Non-Infrastructure (Continued) NGNDE

Grounds Equipment

NLIS

Land Improvements - structure

NLIG NLDS

Land Improvements - ground work Landfill Disposal Systems

NLAND

Land

Mowers, tractors and attachments Parking lots, sidewalks, bus ramp, fencing, running track, Golf Course, Ball field, park landscaping, flagpoles

Infrastructure IEAS IDNS ISSYS IWSYS

Easements Drainage Systems Sewer Systems Water ystems

IWATW

Sewer Systems

IWATW

ILCAN

Levees and canals (unlined)

IWATW

ICANL

Canal lining

IWATW

IDAM

Dams

IWATW

Concrete

IWATW

Earthen embankment

IROAD IROAD IROAD IROAD

Roads

IRPAV IRASPR IRASPU

Paved Asphalt - rural Asphalt - urban

221

10 20

25 25 no depreciation no depreciation 50 50 50 no depreciation no depreciation no depreciation no depreciation no depreciation no depreciation no depreciation 20 10 10


CITY OF SAGINAW GENERAL FUND EMERGENCY RESERVE POLICY 2013-2014 Policy number 87-4, creating the Emergency Reserve Fund Policy, was approved October 20, 1987. This policy increased the current Emergency Reserve for General Fund from $150,000 to $450,000 from unappropriated surplus. This would rename the surplus funds. The Emergency Reserve would remain at $450,000. The interest income will be added to the General Fund Operating Funds. The increase of $450,000 in the Emergency Reserve will enable the City to operate the General Fund for three months. These funds will not be used unless there is some type of emergency and with Council approval. The Council amended 88-1, City of Saginaw Investment Policies on September 6, 1988. It states that the City shall maintain an Emergency Reserve Fund Balance in General Fund between 20% and 30% of the operating budget. The Emergency Reserve was increased from $450,000 to $550,000 at that time. REVISIONS On June 7, 1994, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $550,000 to $600,000.

On September 17, 1996, the City amended the policy. The new policy states that the City shall maintain an Emergency Reserve Fund Balance in the General Fund between 15% and 20% of the operating budget. The Emergency Reserve balance was increased to $600,000. On September 15, 1998, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $600,000 to $700,000. On October 5, 1999, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $700,000 to $800,000. On October 3, 2000, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $800,000 to $900,000. On August 21, 2001, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $900,000 to $1,000,000. On August 22, 2002, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,000,000 to $1,100,000. On August 12, 2003, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,100,000 to $1,200,000. On September 7, 2004, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,200,000 to $1,300.000. On August 29, 2005, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,300,000 to $1,400,000. On September 5, 2006, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,400,000 to $1,500,000. On September 4, 2007, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,500,000 to $1,650,000. On September 3, 2008, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,650,000 to $1,750,000. On September 28, 2009, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,750,000 to $1,850,000. On September 22, 2010, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,850,000 to $1,950,000. On September 7, 2011, the General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $1,950,000 to $2,050,000. On September 4, 2012, General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $2,050,000 to $2,150,000. On September 3, 2013, General Fund Emergency Reserve increased from $2,150,000 to $2,250,000. 222


CITY OF SAGINAW POLICY ON SALARIES AND COMPENSATION 2013-2014 Salaries for all positions for the City of Saginaw will be administered as follows:  There will be a starting salary and maximum salary for each grade as set by the City Council. Department Heads may allow up to one year of credit for a minimum of three years experience with City Manager approval for new employees.  When a percentage raise is approved by the City Council, the starting and maximum salary for each grade will increase by that percent.  When the City Council approves a raise in the pay scale, the Department Head has the authority to approve or deny the raises based on the employee’s job performance and attitude with final approval of the City Manager. The increase is not a blanket, automatic, across-theboard raise.  A schedule for incentive pay for the Police, Fire, Public Services, and Water & Wastewater Departments has been established. The amounts are to be paid on a monthly basis per the accomplishment and are over and above the pay scale of the pay grade.  When an employee promotes to the next highest position their salary will be set at whichever step of the new position will provide a raise over their current salary. Employees that are demoted to a less responsible position will use the classification grade number of the lower classification for determining the monthly salary as years of service would dictate. BENEFITS AND LONGEVITY The City of Saginaw is an at will employer offering the following benefits:  SALARY: Salary ranges are designed to be competitive with industries and other municipalities.  RETIREMENT: Texas Municipal Retirement System (6% of Employee’s total salary with City match of 2:1 or 12%).  LONGEVITY: $6.00 per month of service after the first year. Paid in lump sum check on the first Friday in December of each year.  SERVICE AWARDS: Service pin awarded for 5 years of service; a diamond is added for each additional 5 years.  VACATION: One week after first six months; two weeks after one year; three weeks after five years; four weeks after 15 years; and five weeks after 25 years. Vacation is earned monthly. Part-time employees working at least 30 hours per week earn vacation benefits as well.  HOLIDAYS: New Year’s Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and following Friday, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, and two Floating Holidays.  INSURANCE:  Medical and Dental (Employee portion paid by City, dependent coverage optional and City will pay maximum of $365.00).  Life 50,000/100,000 (Paid by City).  OTHER: Sick leave, disability plan, and military leave.

223


CITY OF SAGINAW JOB CLASSIFICATION LIST 2013-2014

GRADE

CITY GOAL MINIMUM MID-POINT MAXIMUM

6

25,329

31,661

37,995

7

27,082

33,852

40,622

8

28,835

36,043

43,252

9

30,588

38,235

45,881

10 11

32,342 34,094

40,428 42,617

48,513 51,141

12

35,847

44,809

53,770

14

39,353

49,192

59,029

15

43,260

52,582

61,903

16

43,736

54,669

65,604

17

46,659

58,762

70,864

18

50,748

63,435

76,122

19

54,178

67,774

81,370

20

57,760

72,200

86,641

21 22 23

61,266 64,773 68,279

76,583 80,964 85,348

91,900 97,159 102,418

25 27 28

75,291 82,303 85,809

94,113 102,878 107,261

112,936 123,455 128,714

33 35

103,340 110,352

129,174 137,940

155,010 165,528

FLSA N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N E E E E E E E N N E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E

JOB TITLE

224

Maintenance Worker - Parks, Public Services Maintenance Worker - Drainage Utility Maintenance Worker - W/WW Administrative Clerk Court Clerk Library Assistant Senior Maintenance Worker - Parks, Public Services Senior Maintenance Worker - Drainage Utility Senior Maintenance Worker - W/WW Administrative Technician - Court Dispatcher Jailer Administrative Technician - W/WW Crew Leader - Parks, Public Services Animal Control Officer Code Enforcement Officer Administrative Assistant - Office Coordinator Communications Supervisor Public Services Specialist Senior Code Enforcement Officer Recreation & Aquatic Coordinator Administrative Assistant - W/WW Crew Leader - W/WW Inspector - Public Services Inspector Mechanic Firefighter Police Officer Recreation Supervisor Asst. Library Director/Children's Services Senior Inspector Senior Mechanic Fire Apparatus Operator Police Corporal Environmental Specialist Streets and Parks Manager Water Utilities Manager Fire Lieutenant Police Sergeant City Secretary Administrative Assistant/Human Resources Manager Assistant Finance Director/Budget Analyst Information Technology Manager Library Director Chief Mechanic Chief Building Official Water & Wastewater Supt./Field Operations Division Chief - Fire Police Captain Director of Recreation & Community Services Fire Chief Police Chief Director of Public Works/Economic Development Asst. City Manager/Finance Director City Manager


CITY OF SAGINAW INCENTIVE PAY SUMMARY 2013-2014 MUNICIPAL COURT Bilingual Translator

$

FIRE Intermediate Certificate Advanced Certificate Masters Certificate Arson Investigator EMT (in addition) Paramedic Instructor Certificate (in addition to other certificate) Fire Inspector

$

POLICE Intermediate Certificate Advanced Certificate Master Certificate Bilingual Translator Intermediate Communicator Advanced Communicator

$

PUBLIC SERVICES Pesticide Applicator License Herbicide Applicator Lawn & Ornamental Lawn & Weed Applicator Pest Control Weed Control Bilingual Translator

$

INSPECTIONS/CODE ENFORCEMENT Pesticide Applicator License Animal Control - Euthanasia

$

FLEET MAINTENANCE Mechanic Certification-Brakes Mechanic Certification-Engine Repair Mechanic Certification-Heating and A/C Mechanic Certification-Suspension and Steering

$

WATER AND SEWER Water Class "B"- Ground Water Treatment Operator Water Class "C" - Water Distribution Operator Water Class "C" - Ground Water Treatment Operator Water Class "C" - Surface Water Treatment Operator Wastewater Class II - Collection Operator Wastewater Class III - Collection Operator Class II Wastewater Lawn & Ornamental Weed Control Bilingual Translator

$

MONTHLY 50.00 MONTHLY 20.00 50.00 100.00 35.00 20.00 200.00 40.00 50.00 MONTHLY 20.00 50.00 100.00 50.00 20.00 50.00 MONTHLY 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 50.00 MONTHLY 25.00 25.00 MONTHLY 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 MONTHLY 40.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00 50.00

NOTE: Valid certifications from Texas Department of Health, Texas Commission for Paid Personnel or TECLOSE required.

225

$ $

$

$

$

$

$

ANNUAL 600.00 ANNUAL 240.00 600.00 1,200.00 420.00 240.00 2,400.00 480.00 600.00 ANNUAL 240.00 600.00 1,200.00 600.00 240.00 600.00 ANNUAL 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 600.00 ANNUAL 300.00 300.00 ANNUAL 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 ANNUAL 480.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 300.00 600.00


CITY OF SAGINAW SCHEDULE OF PERSONNEL BY DEPARTMENT 2013-2014 DEPARTMENT

FY09-10

FY10-11

FY11-12

FY12-13

FY13-14

7 3 27 44 11 0 8 4 7 2 2 16

7 3 27 44 11 0 8 4 7 2 2 16

7 3 27 44 14 0 3 4 7 2 0 16

7 2 27 44 11 3 3 4 7 2 0 16

7 2 27 44 11 2 3 5 7 2 0 16

131

131

127

126

126

1 6 7 2

1 6 7 2

1 6 7 2

1 6 7 2

1 6 5 2

TOTAL PART TIME POSITIONS

16

16

16

16

14

SEASONAL PART TIME POSITIONS: Police Recreation and Community Services Library

3 38 0

3 38 0

3 54 0

3 54 0

TOTAL SEASONAL POSITIONS

41

41

57

57

58

188

188

200

199

198

FULL TIME POSITIONS: General Administrative Office Municipal Court Fire Police Public Services Parks Recreation and Community Services Library Inspections/Code Enforcement Fleet Maintenance Economic Development Water & Wastewater TOTAL FULL TIME POSITIONS PART TIME POSITIONS: Police Recreation and Community Services Library Inspections/Code Enforcement

CITY WIDE TOTAL ALL POSITIONS

3 54 1

Summary of Personnel Changes Municipal Court - When the Municipal Court became a court of record in FY12-13, the City contracted out services for the Municipal Judge. Public Services Department - Three park maintenance positions were reassigned in FY 12-13 from Public Services to the new Parks Department. The position that remained vacant, was eliminated. Recreation and Community Services - Three parks maintenance positions were reassigned to Public Services in FY11-12. Library- One part time library assistant becomes full time for 6 months beginning in FY13-14. One part time assistant becomes a seasonal part time position.

226


CITY OF SAGINAW PERSONNEL INFORMATION 2013-2014

TOTAL PERSONNEL BY DEPARTMENT Municipal Court 1.01%

Recreation and Community Services 31.82%

Fire 13.64%

Public Services 5.56%

Library 5.56%

Parks 1.01%

Inspections/Code Enforcement 4.55%

Water & Wastewater 8.08% General Administrative Office 3.54%

Fleet Maintenance 1.01%

Police 24.24%

RESIDENT TO EMPLOYEE RATIO

106

105

105

104

102

103

103 102

102 100

106

100

99

98 96 94

227

100


GENERAL INFORMATION

City of Saginaw

228


CITY OF SAGINAW MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS

Date of Incorporation — 1949

Population (2010 Census) – 19,806

Form of Government – Council - Manager (Home Rule) Location – Nine miles north of Downtown Fort Worth. Saginaw is located in Tarrant County which is one of the main counties in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. The County’s population grew 25% from the 2000 Census to the 2010 Census. The county population as of the 2010 Census was 1,809,034 and the estimated population for 2012 is $1,831,230 per the North Central Texas Council of Government 2012 Population Estimates by City and County. Area – 7.75 square miles or 4,960 acres

Registered Voters – 11,144 (May 2013)

Fire Protection: Number of Stations – 2 Number of Paid Firefighters – 27

Recreational Facilities: 7 parks comprising 111.49 acres Willow Creek Park Highland Station Park Brian Schwengler Park Opal Jennings Park William Houston Park Sagewood Park Knowles-Towrey Park

Police Protection: Number of Stations – 1 Number of Officers – 38 Library: Number of Libraries – 1 Number of Materials – 57,200

4 Recreation Centers Saginaw Recreation Saginaw Community Center Senior Citizens Log Cabin Center Aquatic Center

Boards and Commissions: Planning & Zoning Board Board of Adjustment Advisory Recreation & Parks Board Industrial Revenue Authority Capital Improvements Advisory Committee Beautification Committee Library Board Senior Citizens Advisory Board Animal Shelter Advisory Committee

Services provided by City of Saginaw: Water and Wastewater Police and Fire Protection Library, Parks and Recreation Inspections/Code Enforcement/Animal Control

Other Service Providers: Garbage-Progressive Waste Services Cable television - Various providers Electric and Gas - Various providers Telephone – Various providers

Services provided by Tarrant County: Property tax billing and collecting County road maintenance Health Inspector

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School District – Eagle Mountain-Saginaw Independent School District The Eagle Mountain-Saginaw Independent School District (EM-S ISD) is located in the Northwest corner of Tarrant County and includes 73 square miles of land in the cities of Saginaw, Blue Mound, portions of Fort Worth and unincorporated Tarrant County. District enrollment is 17,619 students attending 3 high schools, 5 middle schools, 14 elementary schools, and 3 specialized schools.

Chisholm Trail High School

EM-S ISD is among one of the fastest growing school districts in the area. EM-S ISD opened the Sarah Hollenstein Career and Technology Center in August 2011 and Chisholm Trail High School, the districts third high school in 2012. Sarah Hollenstein Career and Technology Center

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TARRANT COUNTY TEXAS

Tarrant County is comprised of 41 incorporated areas: Arlington Azle Bedford Benbrook Blue Mound Burleson Colleyville Crowley Dalworthington Gardens Edgecliff Village

Euless Everman Flower Mound Forest Hill Fort Worth Grand Prairie Grapevine Haltom City Haslet Hurst

Keller Kennedale Lake Worth Lakeside Mansfield Newark North Richland Hills Pantego Pelican Bay Reno

Source: Tarrant County Web Site 231

Richland Hills River Oaks Saginaw Sansom Park Southlake Trophy Club Watauga Westlake Westover Hills Westworth Village White Settlement


City of Saginaw Demographics

Population by Age 30.00%

25.80% 25.00%

20.00%

16.90% 13.90%

15.00%

10.00%

13.90%

9.40%

8.20%

6.80% 5.10%

5.00%

0.00%

<5

5-19

American Indian 0.60% Black 4.00%

20-24

25-34

Asian 1.80%

35-44

45-54

55-64

65+

Population by Race

Other 1.80%

Hispanic 23.60%

White 68.20%

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City of Saginaw Demographics

Employment by Occupation 20.00%

18.00% 14.70%

15.00%

15.40%

15.00%

11.60% 9.40%

10.00%

6.60%

6.00% 5.00% 2.30% 1.00% 0.00%

Average Income by Household < $15K $15K-$25K 3.90% 2.70%$25K-$35K 5.70%

>$150K 8.00%

$100K-$150K 19.30%

$35K-$50k 15.20%

$75K-$100K 19.00%

$50K-$75k 26.20%

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CITY OF SAGINAW HISTORY OF ASSESSED VALUE AND TAX COLLECTIONS 2013-2014

Assessed Value $1,400 $1,200 $1,000 $800 $600 $400 $200 $2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Tax Levy $7,000 $6,000 $5,000 $4,000

$3,000 $2,000 $1,000 $2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

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www.ci.saginaw.tx.us

HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT In 1848 David Thurmond and his family from Virginia first settled the City of Saginaw. In 1882 Jarvis J. Green from Michigan named the city Saginaw after a city in his home state. The first public school was started in 1893. The post office was established in 1933. The City was incorporated in 1949 with John Kennedy as the first Mayor. On January 16, 1988, the citizens voted to adopt a Home Rule Charter. The City is currently a Home Rule city with a Council-Manager form of government. The elected officials include the Mayor and six Councilmembers. All seven Council members are elected by place number and at large and for three year staggered terms. The City Council is responsible for adopting ordinances and regulations governing the City, adopting the budget, determining policies, and appointing the City Manager, City Attorney, City Secretary, and Judge of the Municipal Court as well as members of boards and commission. The City Manager is responsible to the Council, for appointing and supervising employees of the City (except those appointed by Council) and for preparing and administering the annual budget and capital improvements program. LOCATION The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate boundaries comprise a total of approximately 7.75 square miles. Saginaw sits solidly in the heart of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, conveniently located nine miles north of downtown Fort Worth and 37 miles west of Dallas. It is just a few minutes away from both Eagle Mountain Lake and Lake Worth. Saginaw remains an agribusiness center for much of Texas with some of the largest grain storage facilities in the United States. Alliance Airport and Texas Motor Speedway are located within 15 miles of Saginaw. The Federal Bureau of Printing & Engraving facility is located six-tenths of a mile from Saginaw. The Dallas-Fort Worth Regional Airport is 20 miles east of Saginaw and Meacham Airport is only three miles away. CITY COUNCIL The Saginaw City Council consists of a Mayor and six Councilmembers. The City Council meets at 6:00 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. The meetings are open to the public To address the Council at a meeting, contact the Council Secretary at (817) 232-4640. For an item to appear on the agenda, the agenda request form must be turned in by noon on the Wednesday before the next council meeting.

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PLANNING AND ZONING The Planning and Zoning Commission meets at 6:00 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month as needed. To appear before the Planning and Zoning Commission please contact the Planning and Zoning Secretary at (817) 230-0500. The Planning and Zoning agenda deadline is two weeks prior to the Planning and Zoning Meeting. The Board of Adjustments hears appeals of Planning and Zoning decisions. They meet as needed. CITY HALL In 1966, with a population of 1,740, the citizens voted to build a new City Hall. City Hall houses the administrative offices of the Mayor and City Council, City Manager, City Secretary, Finance Department, Water Billing Department, Municipal Court and Human Resources. Contact these departments at (817) 232-4640. The City Hall has a well-versed staff who can answer questions regarding the City. City Hall is open Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The following holidays are observed: New Year's Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and the day after, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Open record requests should be directed to the City Secretary at City Hall. Municipal Court records requests should be directed to the Court Clerk at City Hall. ELECTIONS City Hall is the polling place for all City Elections, which are held the second Saturday in May. Voter registration cards are available at City Hall. You must be registered 30 days prior to the election in order to vote. PERMITS Permits are required for most types of construction and remodeling. Citizens should contact the Building Permit Department at (817) 230-0453, Ext. 2451 to see if a building permit is required. Permits are also required for garage sales. Garage sales are allowed on residential property only. A garage sale permit is $5.00 and can be purchased at City Hall. The garage sale permit is good for three consecutive days. Each family is allowed two garage sale permits per year. The City issues three signs per sale and additional signs are prohibited. Solicitors are also required to obtain a permit at City Hall before soliciting. Ordinance No. 91-9 requires citizens to obtain a permit for security alarm systems. A security alarm is any security system that makes a noise that can be heard outside the building. Security alarm permits are $10.00 and should be purchased at the Police Department.

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ANIMAL CONTROL All outdoor pets are required to be in fenced yards or on a leash. A maximum of 3 dogs is allowed per household. City ordinances require annual registration of cats and dogs. Registration tags for dogs and cats should be purchased at the Public Works Facility at 205 Brenda Lane for $3.00. To view animals in the shelter go to the City’s website at www.ci.saginaw.tx.us. Residents may contact the Animal Control Officer at (817) 230-0500, Ext. 2460. WATER & WASTEWATER DEPARTMENT Water for Saginaw residents is purchased from the City of Fort Worth. Saginaw also utilizes Fort Worth’s sanitary wastewater treatment facilities. Water service, wastewater service and garbage pickup are provided through the City of Saginaw. A payment in advance of $110.00 is required for new customers. This is retained by the City, and all but $10.00 is applied to the customer’s last water bill, and any excess will be refunded when the account is closed. New water accounts require the presentation of ALL of the following documents:  Valid picture ID  Valid Lease agreement or settlement statement  Payment in advance of $110.00 METER READING Water meters are read monthly. The City is divided into two cycles for meter reading and billing. The cycle is determined by the customer’s address. Cycle One meters are read during the middle of the month and the bills are mailed on the last working day of the month. Anyone in Cycle One that does not receive their bill by the 5 th of the month should contact the Water Billing Department at (817) 232-4640. Cycle One water bills are due by the 15th of the month. If the 15th falls on Saturday, Sunday, or a legal state or national holiday, the due date is extended to the next regular business day. Cycle One water accounts that are not paid in full by the 15th of the month are charged a $5.00 late charge. Cycle Two meters are read at the first of the month, and bills are mailed on the 15th of the month. Anyone in Cycle Two that does not receive their bill by the 20 th of the month should contact the Water Billing Department at (817) 232-4640. Cycle Two water bills are due by the 30th of the month. If the 30th falls on Saturday, Sunday, or a legal state or national holiday, the due date is extended to the next regular business day. Cycle Two water accounts that are not paid in full by the 30th of the month are charged a $5.00 late charge. Failure to receive a bill or payments delayed in the mail do not void a late charge. Accounts with past due balances over fifteen days will be scheduled for disconnection, and a fee of $25.00 will be added to the account balance. This fee applies even if the customer pays the account balance at the time the water crew arrives to disconnect the service. 237


For accounts that are disconnected, if the balance is paid between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. on a weekday, the service will be reconnected by 5:00 p.m. on that same date. After 5:00 p.m. and on weekends, disconnected accounts may pay their balances plus an additional $50.00 after hours fee at the Police Department. Once payment is made, the “on call” personnel will be contacted and service will be reconnected as soon as feasible. If a resident turns the water back on, there will be an additional fee of $100.00 plus repair costs for any damage caused to the service. There is a tampering fee of $100.00 plus repair costs charged for unlawfully connecting to or tampering with any water service within the City of Saginaw water system. To make arrangements for late payments contact the Water Billing Department at (817) 2324640. If a customer plans to be out of town during the payment period for either Cycle One or Cycle Two, arrangements may be made to pay an estimated bill or to pay the bill when the customer returns. There is a transfer fee of $10.00 on accounts transferring from one location to another within the City. Transfer requests must be made in person. There is also a charge of $25.00 on all returned checks. To terminate services, please make your request in person with your termination date and forwarding address. There is a final fee of $10.00 applied to accounts when service is terminated. This fee is included on the customer’s final bill. WASTEWATER CHARGES The City of Saginaw uses the winter average calculation to determine monthly wastewater charges. The water usage for the months of November, December, and January are added together. This sum is then divided by three, which gives you the winter average. A resident that does not move in prior to November is charged based on the average of 8,000 gallons, until they have had water service through the three months used to calculate the winter average. This calculation method and average are both set by City Ordinance as adopted the City Council. All water leaks and wastewater stoppages should be reported to the Water Department Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at (817) 230-0500. After hours or on weekends, report leaks and wastewater stoppages to the Police Department at (817) 2320311, Ext. 2360. DRAINAGE UTILITY FEE On January 4, 2005, the City Council established a drainage utility within the City. Every piece of property in the City contributes to storm water run off that must be collected, routed and monitored to protect the public’s health and safety from loss of life or property caused by flooding, stagnation, and non-point source pollution.

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The drainage utility fee is used to offset the growing costs of operating the storm drainage system. These costs include maintenance of the existing system, federal mandates to control storm water runoff, floodplain management and planning, and construction of new drainage facilities. Single family residences are assessed a base fee of $4.00 per month. Other properties, including multi-family, commercial, and industrial produce storm water at a higher rate and will be charged a fee based on the number of equivalent base units adjusted for the use of property. GARBAGE PICK-UP Progressive Waste provides “Take-All” service for residential garbage collection. “Take-All” means that Progressive will collect all items placed on the curb in a can, bag, or box except for items that are harmful to the environment. Brake fluid, cleaners, fluorescent bulbs, pesticides, pool chemicals and used oil should be taken to the Environmental Collection Center at 6400 Bridge Street in Fort Worth. Residents must take a water bill stub with them to show proof of residency. Bulky items including stoves, furniture, water heaters, etc., when placed on the curb, will be picked up on normal collection days. When Progressive picks up the regular garbage they will radio their office to send another truck to pickup bulky items. Garbage and bulky items will be picked up according to the attached schedule. Garbage should not be placed at the curb any sooner than 12 hours prior to the pick up date. Garbage and brush won’t be picked up if it weights more than 50 pounds. If your garbage is not picked up please call Progressive at (817) 222-2221. Brush will not be included in the weekly “Take-All” service unless it is in a container or tied in four foot. or smaller bundles. Progressive provides curbside pickup of brush twice a year; once in the spring and again in the fall. Trucks will go down each street one time only, reporting to the City each street as it is completed. Call City Hall for more information. Progressive also picks up recycling once a week. recyclables.

Residents are not required to sort

POLICE DEPARTMENT FOR EMERGENCIES CALL 911. The Police Department is located at 505 West McLeroy Boulevard. There are 25 patrol officers providing 24-hour protection. In addition to our patrol officers, the department also employs three crossing guards who provide traffic assistance at Bryson, High Country, and Saginaw Elementary schools. The Police Department provides house checks for residents when they are out of town. To request this service call (817) 232-0311 Ext. 2360. Bicycles may also be registered at the Police Department for $1.50. Security Alarm Permits are required and should be purchased at the Police Department. These permits are $10.00. An Alarm Permit Application is included in this packet. 239


MUNICIPAL COURT Ticket information is available by calling the automated phone attendant at (817) 230-0597. You may pay tickets between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday at City Hall. If you need further assistance call the Municipal Court at (817) 232-4640, Ext. 2322 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Court is held on Thursdays twice a month. FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR EMERGENCIES CALL 911. Saginaw has a full-time Fire Chief and 26 full-time firefighters providing 24-hour protection. The Saginaw Fire Department is equipped with the latest in fire fighting equipment and is trained in tactics to fight all types of fires. Fire Station #1 is located at 400 South Saginaw Boulevard and Fire Station #2 is located at 801 Basswood Boulevard. The non-emergency telephone number for Station #1 is 817 232-4640 extension 2100 and the number for Station #2 it is (817) 2300430. The Saginaw Fire Department also provides an “Advanced Life Support (ALS) First Responder Program” for all medical emergencies within the City. All full-time personnel are required to be paramedics, and are required to respond to medical calls, on-board an ALS equipped Engine Company. The Fire Department has two of these. This apparatus is equipped with heart monitors and defibrillators for heart attack victims, as well as all necessary supplies and medications for all types of medical emergencies. Patients are stabilized and prepared for transport prior to the arrival of the ambulance. Saginaw utilizes Medstar Ambulance Service for ambulance transport services to the hospital. The Fire Department is also in charge of monitoring weather conditions 24-hours a day. In case of severe weather the Fire Department will activate the city’s siren warning system. Please do not call when you hear these sirens, but take cover immediately. These sirens are tested the first Wednesday of each month, between 1:00 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. Do not be alarmed when you hear this test. The community sign, located across from the Fire Station, is available for use through the Fire Department. To reserve the sign call the Fire Station at (817) 232-4640 extension 2100, weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., or come by the Fire Station. Certain rules and time limits apply for use of the sign. PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT The Public Works Department is located at 205 Brenda Lane. Water, Wastewater, Street, Maintenance, Community Development, Inspections/Code Enforcement, Economic Development and Animal Control offices are located at the Public Works Facility. City vehicles and equipment are located there as well. 240


Building permits and inspections are processed at the Public Works Facility. Requests for building permits should be submitted to the Public Works Facility (817) 230-0500 Ext. 2451. Requests for inspections should be made by calling (817) 232-4263 or fax your request to (817) 232-9868. All City code violations, including high grass, should be reported to the Code Enforcement Department at the Public Works Facility. Their phone number is (817) 230-0500 ext. 2443. Animal Control is located at the Public Works Facility. To reach the animal control officer call (817) 230-0500 ext. 2460. After hours call 817 232-0311 extension 2360. LIBRARY The John Ed Keeter Saginaw Public Library is located at 355 W. McLeroy Boulevard, next to the City Hall. The Library opened on November 3, 1992. On December 3, 1994, the library was renamed after Mayor John Ed Keeter who died while in office on June 30, 1994. On September 27, 2002 an addition to the Library was completed that doubled its square footage. Books, magazines, audiotapes, videotapes, and compact disks are available for checkout. Encyclopedias, a three-year backlog of certain periodicals and Abridged Readers Guide to Periodicals is kept for research. Internet workstations are also available for use. Library membership is FREE to Saginaw residents, land owners, and business owners. Out-of-town membership is available for an annual fee of $15.00. The Library participates in the “Texas Share Program”. Other services include interlibrary loan, large print books, monthly displays, copies, films and children's programs. Story Time is held weekly from September through April. Summer Reading Club begins the second week in June and continues through July. The Library phone number is (817) 230-0300. The Library Director may be reached at Ext. 2340. LIBRARY HOURS AS FOLLOWS: Monday Closed Tuesday 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Wednesday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Thursday Friday Saturday

9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

SAGINAW AREA RECREATION AND ATTRACTIONS Saginaw has seven parks, two tennis courts, a volleyball court, and a softball field, a disc golf course, a Recreation Center, an Aquatic Center, a Community Center and a Senior Citizens Center.  Highland Station Park is located on High Country Trail (near Highland Middle School and High Country Elementary). It has two playgrounds, a swing set, horseshoe pits, a

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 

   

tennis court, a sand volleyball court, a basketball court, a hiking/jogging trail, and a pavilion that may be reserved by contacting the Recreation Center at (817) 230-0350. Brian Schwengler Park is a neighborhood park located at Thompson Dr. and Longhorn Rd. It has a playground, a swing set, several play features, and two covered picnic areas. Willow Creek Park is a 65-acre park containing a 2 ½ mile jogging/bicycle path, picnic sites, a lighted softball field, tennis courts, 9-hole disc golf course, volleyball court and four playgrounds. The two pavilions and gazebo may be reserved by contacting the Recreation Center at (817) 230-0350. William Houston Park is located at 720 Park Center Blvd. It has a large playground with numerous play features, several covered picnic areas, two soccer fields, and a pavilion that may be reserved by contacting the Recreation Center at (817) 230-0350. Opal Jo Jennings Park is a neighborhood park located at Opal St. and Mustang Dr. It has a playground, several play features, swing sets, and two covered picnic areas. Sagewood Park is a neighborhood park located at 1055 Sagewood Lane. It features a playground and a covered picnic area. Kiwanis Park is a neighborhood park located at Saginaw Blvd. and W. Southern Ave (next to Fire Station #1). It features a gazebo and the City’s Veterans Memorial.

The Advisory Recreation and Parks Board meet on the third Monday of each month. They are responsible for determining how funds received through voluntary donations on water bills are spent. The Recreation Center is located at 633 W. McLeroy Boulevard. It has four multi-purpose activity rooms, a full-size gymnasium, a performance area, an equipped fitness center, restroom/locker/shower facilities, a game room and a racquetball court. Adult programs include Jazzercise, Step Aerobics, Pilates, Massage Therapy, CPR certification, Tae Kwon Do, Tong Il Lo Martial Science and Karate. Youth activities include Cheerleading, Gymnastics, Music, HipHop Dance, Tap, Ballet, Karate and Fun Time Live. Basketball, baseball, softball and volleyball leagues are also offered by the Recreation and Community Services Department. A complete list of programs can be found on the City’s web site or in the “Play Book” available at the Recreation Center. The Saginaw Aquatic Center provides a wide range of leisure opportunities for the citizens of Saginaw and surrounding communities. Anyone wishing to enjoy the facility can either pay a daily use fee or purchase an annual membership card for the center. The City of Saginaw will also offer swim lessons, water aerobics and a competitive swim team for a variety of age groups. The Aquatic Center has the following features.         

6-lane competition lap pool a leisure pool a custom train themed play structure with water slides several spray/splash features a small train slide a large water slide a full service concession stand showers, locker rooms, restrooms two group pavilions 242


lots of shade and seating (chairs, chase lounge chairs, picnic tables, etc.)

The Community Center is located at 720 Park Center Boulevard. The Log Cabin Senior Citizens Center is located at 405 S. Belmont Street. Both buildings are available for rental. For more information call 817 230-0350. There are several youth sport organizations in the area that include: Baseball & Softball Pioneer Youth Baseball & Softball Association, www.pybsa.org, (817) 232-3638 Northwest YMCA, www.northwestymcafw.org, (817) 237-7237

 

Basketball  Northwest YMCA, www.northwestymcafw.org, (817) 237-7237  Upward Basketball, www.northwestbaptistchurch.net, (817) 237-6063 Football & Cheerleading  Saginaw Youth Association, www.syatx.org, (817) 232-5282 Soccer  Northwest YMCA, www.northwestymcafw.org, (817) 237-7237  Eagle Mountain Soccer Association, www.emsasoccer.org, (817) 298-1668 Saginaw is the "hometown" of Eagle Mountain Lake, a beautiful body of water often dotted by sailboats and cabin cruisers. Saginaw is only a short distance from the historic Fort Worth Stockyards, the magnificent Bass Performance Hall, Kimbell Art Museum and Amon Carter Museum of Western Art. Texas Motor Speedway is just north of Saginaw and provides auto racing, concerts and other types of entertainment. The world's original indoor rodeo, the Southwestern Exposition Fat Stock Show and Rodeo, is staged annually in Fort Worth. Also located in the Metroplex are "Six Flags Over Texas", the Texas Rangers and Fort Worth Cats baseball teams and the Dallas Cowboys football team. The Northwest Branch of the YMCA is a short distance from Saginaw and all YMCA programs are available to Saginaw area residents. Windy Ryon Roping Arena is located just south of the City. It is the home of the annual Windy Ryon Roping held in May. Hotel accommodations are plentiful in the area. Saginaw has two small hotels and there are over fifteen well-known hotel chains less than five minutes away. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE The Saginaw Area Chamber of Commerce is located at 301 S. Saginaw Boulevard in the restored train depot. Maps, brochures, and other information relating to businesses and activities in the Saginaw area are available. The Chamber is currently open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. The Saginaw Area Chamber of Commerce meets the third Thursday of each month. The Chamber phone number is (817) 232-0500. The Chamber of Commerce is committed to creating and preserving the best possible business environment in the Saginaw Area. They are dedicated to economic growth, job 243


creation and retention, enhancement of the quality of life in a community where a healthy business environment and responsible stewardship of public and private resources are paramount. GENERAL INFORMATION As the result of a Town Hall Meeting, the City Beautification Committee was formed in 1997. This Committee has worked hard to improve the beauty of the City by planting flowers and trees. A stone welcome marker was placed at the south entrance to the City. Funding for their projects is obtained through a voluntary donation that is added to residents’ water bills. The Beautification Committee also sponsors an “Adopt A Spot” program. All residents are invited to adopt a spot in the City. They are asked to keep it clean, plant flowers, etc. If you would like more information call City Hall at (817) 232-4640. There are churches of most denominations located in the community. Several of the churches have Mothers Day Out Programs. The churches joined together and established the Community Link Mission. The Mission provides food for those in need. Saginaw is served by the Eagle Mountain-Saginaw Independent School District, recognized throughout Texas as one of the outstanding school systems in the State. The District was established in 1958. Their Administrative office is located at 1200 Old Decatur Road. Their phone number is (817) 232-0880. The Northwest Campus of Tarrant County College also serves the educational needs of Saginaw. The beautiful college campus is located only one mile west of Saginaw on Loop 820. In addition, Fort Worth is the home of Texas Christian University and Texas Wesleyan University. Nearby Denton is the home of the University of North Texas and Texas Woman's University. Arlington, also located in Tarrant County, is the home of the University of Texas at Arlington. The Star-Telegram provides daily newspaper service to the City. -- Star Telegram - (817) 335-4837. The Saginaw Branch of the U. S. Post Office is located at 101 S. Belmont Street. There is also a drive-up mailbox located in the 500 block of South Saginaw Blvd.

244


GLOSSARY AND INDEX

City of Saginaw

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CITY OF SAGINAW LIST OF ACRONYMS

ARB – Appraisal Review Board ADE – Automotive Diagnostic Excellence ASE – Automotive Service Excellence BOD – Biochemical Oxygen Demand CCPD – Crime Control and Prevention District CDBG – Community Development Block Grant CEU – Continuing Education Units CID – Criminal Investigations Division CIOT – Click it or Ticket CO – Certificate of Obligation CSO – Community Service Officer EOC – Emergency Operation Center EPO – Emergency Protective Order FTE – Full Time Equivalent GAAP – Generally Accepted Accounting Principles GASB – Government Accounting Standards Board GFOA – Government Finance Officers Association GO – General Obligation Bonds HAVA – Help America Vote Act HEAT – Help End Auto Theft HUD – Housing and Urban Development NAPA – National Automotive Parts Association NIAT – NAPA Institute of Automotive Technology 246


NTRLS – North Texas Regional Library System PSO – Public Service Officer SRO – School Resource Officer STEP – Selective Traffic Enforcement Program TAD – Tarrant Appraisal District TCEQ – Texas Commission on Environmental Quality TLETS – Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunications System TNT – Truth-in-taxation TRE – Tax Rate Equivalent TSS – Total Suspended Solids TxDOT - Texas Department of Transportation W/WW - Water and Wastewater

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CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET GLOSSARY The Annual Budget contains specialized and technical terminology that is unique to public finance and budgeting. To assist the reader of the Annual Budget document in understanding these terms, a budget glossary has been included in the 2013-2014 Annual Budget. ACCOUNTS PAYABLE: A liability account reflecting amounts on open accounts owing to private persons or organizations for goods and services received by a government (but not including amounts due to other funds of the same government or to other governments). ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE: An asset account reflecting amounts owing to open accounts from private persons or organizations for goods and services furnished by a government. ACCRUAL ACCOUNTING: The basis of accounting under which transactions are recognized when they occur, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. AD VALOREM TAXES (Current): Latin for "value of". Refers to the tax assessed against real (land and buildings) and personal (equipment and furniture) property located within the taxing unitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jurisdiction which are subject to taxation on January 1 of the current year. Following the receipt of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certified values from the appraisal district, the City Council sets the tax rate and levies taxes for the fiscal year beginning October 1 and continuing through the following September 30. AD VALOREM TAXES (Delinquent): Ad Valorem taxes are due on October 1 and become delinquent if not paid before February 1 of the fiscal year in which it is imposed. AD VALOREM TAXES (Penalty and interest): A delinquent tax incurs a penalty of seven (7%) percent of the amount of the tax for the first calendar month it is delinquent, plus one (2%) percent for each additional month or portion of the month the tax remains unpaid prior to July 1 of the year in which it becomes delinquent. However, the delinquent tax on July 1 incurs a total penalty of twelve (18%) percent of the amount of the delinquent tax without regard to the number of months the tax has been delinquent. ADVANCE REFUNDING BONDS: Bonds issued to refund an outstanding bond issue prior to the date on which the outstanding bonds become due or callable. Proceeds of the advance funding bonds are deposited in escrow with a fiduciary, invested in US Treasury Bonds or other authorized securities, and used to redeem the underlying bonds at maturity or call date and to pay interest on the bonds being refunded or the advance refunding bonds. APPRAISAL REVIEW BOARD (ARB): This is a group of local citizens authorized to check Tarrant Appraisal District's work and resolve disputes with taxpayers. This board certifies the appraised values on the appraisal roll. APPRAISED VALUE: To make an estimate of property value for the purpose of taxation. The market value of real and personal property located in the City as of January 1 each year. (City of Saginaw property values are determined by the Tarrant Appraisal District.) APPROPRIATION: A legal authorization granted by a legislative body (City Council) to make expenditures and incur obligations for specific purposes. An appropriation is usually limited in amount and time when it may be expended. 248


ARB HEARINGS: The property owner may protest the appraisal of his property value to the Appraisal Review Board at the ARB Hearings. ASSESSED VALUATION: A valuation set upon real estate or other property by a government as a basis for levying taxes. ATTRITION: A wearing down bit by bit. If an employee leaves the City or is terminated, the position may not be filled. It will be at the City Manager's review and discretion. AUDIT: A comprehensive investigation of the manner in which the government's resources were actually utilized. The audit can be classified as a financial audit or a performance audit. A financial audit is a review of the accounting system and financial information to determine how government funds were spent and whether expenditures/expenses complied with the legislative body's appropriations. A performance audit consists of a review of how well the government met its stated goals. AUDITOR'S OPINION: A statement signed by an auditor in which he states that he has examined the financial statements, the system of internal control, the accounting records, and supporting evidence in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. He expresses his opinion, based on the examination, the financial condition of the governmental unit or any of its enterprises, the results from operations and any facts that he has investigated in his professional capacity. AUTOMATIC AID: Automatic Aid is when another fire department is automatically dispatched along with our fire units on certain pre-determined type calls such as structure fires, grass fires, rescue incidents, etc. Anytime any of the fire departments, in the automatic aid group, respond to a reported structure fire or major incident, the other fire departments in the group automatically respond. AUTOMOTIVE DIAGNOSTIC EXCELLENCE (ADE): Once you have passed certain tests you earn this designation. It is sub group of ASE. AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE EXCELLENCE (ASE): This is a national institute that provides automotive diagnostics certification for the mechanics. BALANCE SHEET: A financial statement that discloses the assets, liabilities, reserves, and balances of a specific governmental fund as of a specific date. BALANCED BUDGET: The operating budget should be balanced with the use of current revenues and, if necessary, a portion of the undesignated surplus. In a balanced budget, budgeted expenditures/expenses should not exceed budgeted revenues. A structurally balance budget requires that ongoing revenues equal or exceed ongoing expenditures/expenses. BIOCHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND (B.O.D.): The amount of oxygen needed for a biochemical oxidation in a given time at a given temperature. An indication of wastewater strength. BOND: A written promise to pay a sum of money on a specific date(s) at a specified interest rate. The repayment of both the principal and interest are detailed in a bond ordinance. BOND FUND: A fund formerly used to account for proceeds of general obligation bond issues. Such proceeds are now accounted for in a Capital Projects Fund. The Capital Projects Fund is primarily an accounting entity. The indentures of many revenue bond issues identify the "Bond Fund" as the fund into which proceeds for capital projects are deposited, managed, and disbursed. The term Bond Fund is also used to refer to a mutual investment fund consisting of bonds. 249


BOND ORDINANCE: An ordinance authorizing a bond issue. BOND RATING: Designation of the quality of bonds or notes issued by state and local governmental units. Ratings are provided by agencies or corporations that seek thereby to render a professional judgment concerning the quality of the security being rated. The City's current bond rating from Moody’s Investment Services is an Aa3 and from Standard and Poor’s is an AA-. BOND REVENUES: Revenues, including special taxes, levied or collected for the purpose of providing for payment of the debt service on outstanding bonds. BONDED DEBT: That portion of indebtedness represented by outstanding bonds. BUDGET: A financial plan, for a specified period (usually one year) of operations that matches all planned revenues and expenditures/expenses with services provided to the residents of the City. BUDGET CALENDAR: The schedule of key dates which the City follows in the preparation and adoption of the budget. BUDGET MESSAGE: The opening section of the budget which provides the City Council and the public with a general summary of the most important aspects of the budget, changes from the current and previous fiscal years, and the views and recommendations of the City Manager. BUDGET RESOLUTION: The official enactment, by City Council, to legally authorize City Staff to obligate and expend the resources of the City. BUDGET REVISIONS: A procedure used to revise a budget amount after the budget has been adopted by the City Council. BUDGETED FUNDS: Funds that are planned for certain uses but have not been formally or legally appropriated by the legislative body. The budget document that is submitted for Council approval is composed of budgeted funds. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS: Expenditures related to the acquisition, expansion or rehabilitation of an element of the government’s physical plant; sometimes referred to as infrastructure. CAPITAL OUTLAY (CAPITAL EXPENDITURES): Expenditures which result in the acquisition of or addition to fixed assets. These expenditures must meet certain criteria. CAPITAL PROJECTS: Major construction, acquisition, or renovation activities which add value to a government’s physical assets or significantly increase their useful life. Also called capital improvements. CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND: The fund used to account for bond proceeds used for the acquisition or construction of major capital facilities. CASH: Currency, coin, checks, postal and express money orders, and bankers' drafts on hand or on deposit with an official or depository designated as custodian of cash and bank deposits. Note: All cash must be accounted for as part of the fund to which it belongs. It is not necessary, however, to maintain a separate bank account for each fund unless required by law. CASH ACCOUNTING: A basis of accounting in which transactions are recorded when cash is either received or expended. 250


CASH MANAGEMENT: The management of cash necessary to pay for government services while investing temporary cash excesses in order to earn interest revenue. Cash management refers to the activities of forecasting the inflows and outflows of cash, mobilizing cash to improve its availability for investment, establishing and maintaining banking relationships, and investing funds in order to achieve the highest interest and return available for temporary cash balances. CERTIFICATES OF OBLIGATION (C.O.): A financing mechanism used to pay contractual obligations. A security issued by a municipality or county for the purpose of paying contractual obligations incurred with the constructing and equipping of various allowable projects. Certificates do not require voter approval but do require the publication of a notice of intent to issue. The certificates may be secured by a pledge of ad valorem tax revenue or monies derived from the operation of a revenue-producing system or facility. CHARTER: Written instrument setting forth principles and laws of government within boundaries of the City. CLEARING ACCOUNT: An account used to accumulate total charges or credits for the purpose of distributing them later among the accounts to which they are allocable or for the purpose of transferring the net difference to the proper accounts. CLICK IT OR TICKET (CIOT): This is a campaign to conduct enforcement as part of a statewide and national mobilization effort to increase the use of safety belts in cars and pick-up trucks. To achieve this goal, the program combines a concerted local and statewide media campaign with additional law enforcement activities to reinforce the message. Selective Traffic Enforcement Programs (STEPs) are grants provided by TxDOT to law enforcement agencies to enforce traffic safety laws such as speed and safety belt use. CODE RED: A high speed telephone emergency notification system that gives City officials the ability to deliver pre-recorded emergency telephone notification/information messages to targeted areas or the entire city at a rate of up to 60,000 calls per hour. By activating and using the â&#x20AC;&#x153;CodeREDâ&#x20AC;? system, everyone will receive a telephone call at home, their workplace, and even their cell phone, to notify them of the situation and give them instructions as to what to do. COMBINED SUMMARY STATEMENT: A summary of two or more funds presented on a single page that includes a total of the funds presented. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG): Federal HUD funds administered through Tarrant County for approved community revitalization projects in participating cities. COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER (CSO): The same as a Crime Prevention Officer. This person is responsible for presenting crime prevention programs and neighborhood crime watch programs. CONSOLIDATED CASH ACCOUNT: An account to facilitate cash management by having two or more operating funds merge their cash balances into a consolidated account for the current management of such balances, including temporary investment thereof. In some governments, the consolidated cash account membership includes not only operating funds but also capital funds. This consists of all funds of the City in one bank account. This account is used for all accounts payable. Deposits are transferred as needed from the Depository account. Each fund earns interest and is accounted for separately. (See Fund.) 251


CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS (CEU): Certification programs require a specific number of hours of additional training after certification in order to maintain that certification. CONTRACTUAL SERVICES: The costs related to services performed for the City by individuals, business or utilities. COPS GRANT: The COPS I FAST PROGRAM GRANT and COPS II FAST PROGRAM GRANT are grants funded by the Federal Government. They provide 75% the first year for salary and benefits for the Patrol Officer. The contribution will reduce to 50% the second year and 25% the third year. The fourth year, the City then pays 100% of the Patrol Officer's salary and benefits. COST: The amount of money or other consideration exchanged for property or services. Costs may be incurred even before money is paid; that is, as soon as liability is incurred. Ultimately, however, money or other consideration must be given in exchange. COURT SECURITY FEE: Fee collected by the court for convictions of misdemeanor offenses in the Municipal Court. Funds to be used to finance items used for the purpose of providing security services for the housing of the Municipal Court. COURT TECHNOLOGY FEE: Fee collected by the court for convictions of misdemeanor offenses in the Municipal Court. Funds to be used to finance the purchase of technological enhancements and service and maintenance agreements for the Municipal Court. CRIME CONTROL AND PREVENTION DISTRICT (CCPD): In 1989 the Legislature enacted the Crime Control and Prevention District Act. This Act allows cities to establish a district and impose a local sales tax to fund its programs. A majority of the voters must approve the creation of the district and adopt the sales and use tax to fund the district at an election held specifically for that purpose. CRIME TAX: The additional three-eighths cent sales tax that is collected for use by the Crime Control and Prevention District. CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION (CID): Is responsible for investigating criminal offenses that occur in the City of Saginaw. CURRENT TAXES: Property taxes that are levied and due within one year. DEBT SERVICE FUND: The fund used to record payment of long-term debt principal and interest. Formerly called the Interest and Sinking Fund. DEBT SERVICE REQUIREMENTS: The amount of revenues which must be provided for Debt Service so that all principal and interest payments can be made in full as scheduled. DEDICATED TAX: A tax levied to support a specific government program or purpose such as the sales tax used to reduce property taxes. DEFERRED COMPENSATION FUND: This fund is used to account for assets held for employees in accordance with the provisions of Internal Revenue Code Section 457 (retirement funds for the employees). DEFENSIVE DRIVING: Defensive Driving is an educational classroom driver safety course that has been approved by the State of Texas. It is sometimes used for dismissal of a citation or a discount on automobile insurance. 252


DEFICIT: (1) The excess of the liabilities of a fund over its assets. (2) The excess of expenditures over revenues during an accounting period; or, in the case of enterprise funds, the excess of expense over income during an accounting period. DELINQUENT TAXES: Taxes that remain unpaid on or after the date on which a penalty for nonpayment is attached. DEPARTMENT: A major administrative organizational unit of the City that indicates overall management responsibility for one or more activities. DEPOSITORY BANK: Banking institution that handles the day to day operational cash flow (daily deposits, payroll checks, and accounts payable checks). The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current depository bank is Frost. DEPOSITORY CASH ACCOUNT: This consists of all deposits made to the City of Saginaw. This includes daily deposits, transfers from TexPool, and direct deposits. All funds are accounted for and earn interest. DEPRECIATION: Expiration in the service life of capital assets attributable to wear and tear, deterioration, action of the physical elements, inadequacy or obsolescence. That portion of the cost of a capital asset that is charged as an expense during a particular period. DIRECT DEPOSIT: Deposits that are made directly from one bank to another. The use of direct deposit causes no mail delay. We utilize direct deposits from the State on our Sales Tax collections and Mixed Beverage Tax as well as Property Tax payments made through Tarrant County. DISBURSEMENT: Payment for goods and services in cash or by check. DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM: A system comprised of smaller water lines which distribute water from the transmission system to the customers. DONATIONS FUND: The Donations Fund was created in May 2009 to better track funds received through water bill donations as well as direct donations to the City for specific purposes. Currently, Animal Control, Parks, Library, Beautification, Senior Citizen, Police, and Fire have donation funds available for expenditure. EFFECTIVE TAX RATE: The rate that produces the same revenues in terms of the total amount of taxes as compared to the prior year. ELEVATED STORAGE: Water storage tanks that are raised above the ground and connected to the transmission system to help maintain the system pressure. Excess water pumped flows into these tanks, or if pumping does not meet customer demand, water drains from the tanks to supplement the pumping. EMERGENCY OPERATION CENTER (EOC): An area specifically designed to manage a major incident. It will serve as the command center and be equipped with disaster supplies, computers, maps, CodeRED system, weather siren network, etc. ENCUMBRANCE: The commitment of appropriated funds to purchase an item or service. encumber funds means to set aside or commit funds for a specified future expenditure. 253

To


ENTERPRISE DEBT: Debt that is to be retired primarily from earnings of publicly owned and operated enterprises. ENTERPRISE FUND: A fund established to account for operations (a) that are financed and operated in a manner similar to private business enterprises where the intent of the governing body is that the costs (expenses, including depreciation) for providing goods or services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges or (b) where the governing body has decided that this fund is used to account for operations of the water distribution and sanitary wastewater systems. EMERGENCY PROTECTIVE ORDER (EPO): Magistrate's Order for Emergency Protection commonly referred to as EPO. A Magistrate's Order for Emergency Protection is an emergency order protecting; the victim, the victim's children, and any other family members; from further domestic violence. ESTIMATED REVENUE: The amount of projected revenues to be collected during the fiscal year. EXEMPT: Personnel not eligible to receive overtime pay and who are expected to put in whatever hours are necessary to complete their job assignments. The respective department head, as partial compensation for overtime hours worked by exempt personnel, may allow compensatory time off. EXPENDITURE CLASSIFICATION: A basis for distinguishing types of expenditures. The major classifications used by the City are Personnel, Operations, Capital Outlay, and Debt Service. EXPENDITURES: A decrease in the net financial resources of the City due to the acquisition of goods and services. FIRE ACT GRANTS: These are grants issued by the Homeland Security Department. This program is a competitive grant process open to all paid, volunteer, or combination Fire Departments. There are several categories of grants available such as: Fire and EMS Operations, Firefighter Safety, Firefighting and EMS Vehicles, Personal Protective Equipment category to purchase â&#x20AC;&#x153;turnout gearâ&#x20AC;? and Training to learn basic firefighting techniques. FIRM PUMPING CAPACITY: The total pumping capacity that a pump station can deliver with the largest pump out of service. The state requires that water systems have firm capacity that meets peak day requirements. FISCAL YEAR: A 12-month period to which the annual operating budget applies. The City of Saginaw has established October 1 through September 30 as its fiscal year. FIXED ASSETS: Assets of a long-term character that are intended to continue to be held or used. Examples of fixed assets include items such as land, buildings, machinery, furniture, and other equipment. FRANCHISE TAX: This is a charge paid for the use of City streets and public right of way and is in lieu of all other municipal charges, fees, street rentals, pipe taxes or rentals, easement or other like franchise taxes, inspections fees, and/or charges of every kind except ad valorem and special assessment taxes for public improvements (electric, gas, telephone, and cable TV). FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE): The number of hours part-time employees work is added together and then divided by the number of hours a full-time employee works. The result is the number of fulltime equivalent employees. 254


FULL FAITH AND CREDIT: A pledge of the general taxing power of a government to repay debt obligations. (The term is typically used in reference to general obligation bonds.) FUND: An accounting entity with a self-balancing set of accounts that record financial transactions for specific activities or government functions. The major funds used by the City of Saginaw include the General Fund, the Debt Service Fund, the Capital Projects Fund, Crime Control and Prevention District Fund, Drainage Utility Fund, Street Maintenance Fund, and the Enterprise Fund. FUND BALANCE: The assets of a fund less liabilities, as determined at the end of each fiscal year. The excess assets after liabilities are deducted are referred to as surplus funds. GENERAL FUND: The fund used to account for all financial resources except those required to be accounted for in the City's other funds. GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS (G.O.): A security issued by a municipality for the purpose of paying contractual obligations incurred with the constructing and equipping of various public projects such as streets, buildings and improvements. G.O.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s require voter approval and are backed by the full faith and credit of the issuing government. GENERALLY ACCEPTED ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES (GAAP): Uniform minimum standards of and guidelines to financial accounting and reporting. They govern the form and content of the basic financial statements of an entity. They encompass the conventions, rules, and procedures necessary to define accepted accounting practice at a particular time. They include not only broad guidelines of general application, but also detailed practices and procedures. They provide a standard by which to measure financial presentations. GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION (GFOA): A professional association of approximately 17,500 state, provincial and local government finance officers in the United States and Canada. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD (GASB): The source of generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) used by State and Local governments in the United States of America. It is a private, non-governmental organization. GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS: Those funds through which most governmental functions typically are financed (General Fund, Debt Service Fund, Capital Projects Fund and Special Revenue Funds). GRADALL: Industrial maintenance machine (tractor/material handler) with a boom arm and 360 degree rotational movement designed for use over rough terrain. GRANTS: Contributions or gifts of cash or other assets from another government or private company to be used or expended for a specific purpose, activity, or facility. GROUND STORAGE: Tanks at ground level that store water so that it can be pumped into the system as demand warrants. HAZ-MAT: Hazardous Materials. HELP AMERICA VOTE ACT (HAVA): Effective January 1, 2006, voting systems must be accessible to individuals with disabilities in a manner that provides the same opportunity for access and participation as for other voters. 255


HELP END AUTO THEFT (H.E.A.T.): A voluntary statewide decal program designed to reduce car thefts. Vehicle owners not normally using their vehicles between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. sign an agreement allowing peace officers to verify ownership if they observe the vehicle being used during H.E.A.T. hours. IMPACT FEES: The mechanism used to recover costs of capital improvements necessary to serve future development. Impact fees cannot be assessed to correct a system deficiency. INTERFUND TRANSFERS: Amounts transferred from one fund to another fund. INTOXILYZER: The Intoxilyzer is a breath test machine used by the Police Department to test possibly intoxicated persons who have been arrested for driving while intoxicated. LEVY: To impose taxes, special assessments, or service charges for the support of City activities. LINE-ITEM BUDGET: A budget that lists each expenditure/expense category (salary, supplies, travel, repairs, etc.) separately, along with the dollar amount budgeted for each specified category. LONG-TERM DEBT: Debt with a maturity of more than one year after the date of issuance. MAINTENANCE: The upkeep of physical properties in condition for use or occupancy. Examples are the inspection of equipment to detect defects and the making of repairs. MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS (M&O): operation of a budget. MAXIMUM DAY DEMAND: consumption day in a year. MEDIAN VALUE: distribution.

The funds that are used for the maintenance and

The water consumption, in volume of water, used on the highest

The median value for an ordered array of numbers is the mid-score of the

MIXED BEVERAGE TAX: A tax at the rate of fourteen percent (14%) is imposed on the gross receipts of a licensee for the sale, preparation, or service of mixed beverages consumed on the premises of the business. MODIFIED ACCRUAL ACCOUNTING: The basis of accounting adapted to the governmental fund type spending measurement focus. Under it, revenues are recognized when they become both “measurable” and “available” to finance expenditures of the current period. Expenditures are recognized when the related fund liability is incurred except for (1) inventories of materials and supplies which may be considered expenditures either when purchased or when used; (2) prepaid insurance and similar items which need not be reported; (3) accumulated unpaid vacation, sick pay, and other employee benefit amounts which need not be recognized in the current period, but for which larger than normal accumulations must be disclosed in the notes to the financial statements; (4) interest on special assessment indebtedness which may be recorded when due rather than accrued, if offset by interest earnings on special assessment levies; and (5) principal and interest on long-term debt which are generally recognized when due. This accounting technique is a combination of cash and accrual accounting since expenditures are immediately incurred as a liability while revenues are not recorded until they are actually received. MOTOR ALL DATA SYSTEM: Computer based automotive diagnostic and repair manual. essential tool in properly diagnosing and repairing today’s sophisticated vehicles. 256

An


MUTUAL AID: Mutual Aid is when the City has an agreement with another fire department to assist them or they will assist us when we determine we need additional assistance or resources after arriving at an incident. Anytime another fire department responds to a reported structure fire or major incident and needs assistance they call the other fire departments and request assistance. That fire department then responds by sending one fire engine company. NAPA INSTITUTE OF AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY (NIAT): Continuing education and training in diagnostics skills and repair capabilities that is sponsored by NAPA Auto Parts. NON-EXEMPT: Personnel eligible to receive overtime pay when overtime work has been authorized or requested by the supervisor. NORTH TEXAS REGIONAL LIBRARY SYSTEM (NTRLS): A consortium of 73 public libraries in North Texas. It is one of ten library Systems funded through yearly grants from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. It offers Libraries consulting services, including grant writing, workshops, technical support, and networking opportunities. OPERATING BUDGET: The approved financial plan that outlines estimated revenues and expenditures/expenses for the fiscal year. It lists line item allowable expenditures/expenses for daily operation necessary to provide basic governmental services. The operating budget can only be amended with approval of the City Council. (The General Fund, Debt Service Fund and Enterprise Fund make up the City of Saginaw's operating budget.) OPERATION ID: Electric engraving pencils are available at the Police Department for citizens to engrave their Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s License Number on personal property. This helps return stolen property to the owner. OPTICOM: A system that allows emergency vehicles the right of way through intersections equipped with the Opticom device by overriding the traffic signal system and providing the approaching emergency vehicle with a green light so it can pass safely through the intersection. ORDINANCE: A formal legislative enactment by the governing board of a municipality. If it is not in conflict with any higher form of law, such as a state statute or constitutional provision, it has the full force and effect of law within the boundaries of the municipality to which it applies. The difference between an ordinance and resolution is that the latter requires less legal formality and has a lower legal status. Revenue raising measures, such as the imposition of taxes, special assessments and service charges, universally require ordinances. OVERLAPPING DEBT: The proportionate share of the debts of local governments located wholly or in part within the limits of the reporting government which must be borne by property owners within each government. PEAK HOUR DEMAND: The maximum total one-hour water demand given in units of volume per day that a given distribution system experienced or would experience during a particular year or other time period. Also known as maximum hour demand. PERSONAL SERVICES: The costs associated with compensating employees for their labor. POLICE EXPENDABLE TRUST FUND: Fund used to account for the sale of confiscated property. 257


PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS LIEUTENANT: This supervisor will be assigned to the Office of the Chief, with responsibility for the recruiting, testing, and background investigations of new personnel, internal affairs investigations, training (as the Department training coordinator), fleet manager, building management and quartermaster. This position does not recommend punishment or serve in the chain of command of other departments, but would be in place to ensure that investigations are conducted equitably, in accordance with city and legal requirements. PROPERTY TAX: Property taxes are levied on both real and personal property according to the property's valuation and the tax rate. PUBLIC SERVICE OFFICER (PSO): The PSO serves as a detention officer, relief dispatcher, Intoxilyzer operator, and is available to take walk-in and telephone reports from the public. The PSO works during business days to handle paperwork for arraignments and processing of prisoners, as well as providing assistance to the Municipal Court Judge. PURCHASE ORDER: A document that authorizes the delivery of specified merchandise or the rendering of certain services and the making of a charge for them. RECONCILIATION: A detailed summary of increases and decreases in the expenditures/expenses from one budget year to the next. REFUNDING BONDS: A procedure whereby an issuer refinances an outstanding bond issue by issuing new bonds. The proceeds of the new bonds are either deposited in escrow to pay the debt service on the outstanding obligations, when due, or they are used to immediately retire the outstanding obligations being refinanced. These are referred to as the "refunded bonds" or the "prior issue". RESERVE: An account used to indicate that a portion of a fund balance is restricted for a specific purpose. REVENUE BONDS: Bonds whose principal and interest are payable exclusively from earnings of an Enterprise Fund. In addition to a pledge of revenues, such bonds sometimes contain a mortgage on the Enterprise Fund's property. The term revenue bond is currently used in the municipal bond market to comprehend almost all bonds other than general obligation bonds. REVENUES: Funds that the government receives as income. It includes such items as tax payments, fees from specific services, receipts from other governments, fines, forfeitures, and interest income. SAFER GRANT: Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response. A grant funded by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. This grant provides funding, for a percentage of the base pay and benefits for a firefighter, over a five year period. At the end of the five year period the City would be responsible for the entire salary. SALES TAX: A general "sales tax" levied on persons and businesses selling merchandise or services in the city limits on a retail basis. The basic tax is one-cent but cities have the option of imposing additional sales taxes in varying amounts of up to one cent. These additional sales taxes are known as dedicated taxes, because their proceeds may be spent only for certain purposes. The City of Saginaw’s dedicated taxes are used for the reduction of property taxes crime control and prevention and street maintenance. The Texas Comptroller collects the sales tax and “rebates” the city’s share on a monthly basis. The comptroller retains a small portion of the tax revenue to cover the state’s administrative costs. 258


SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER (SRO): A police officer that is assigned to the middle schools. He is there mainly as a police presence and to assist with juvenile problems. SINKING FUND: The term sinking fund derives from the concept of "floating a bond issue". The sinking fund was the fund created to accumulate monies to "sink" the debt at its maturity. SOURCE OF REVENUE: Revenues are classified according to their source or point of origin. TEXAS LAW ENFORCEMENT TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM (TLETS): A statewide telecommunications network that is composed of over 700 terminals/databases/computer interfaces representing over 675 city, county, state, federal, and military law enforcement and criminal justice agencies in Texas. This network is controlled by a computerized, electronic message switching system located in the headquarters of the Texas Department of Public Safety in Austin. TARRANT APPRAISAL DISTRICT (TAD): An entity established by State Law to ensure uniform property appraisals for all taxing jurisdictions in Tarrant County. TAXES: Compulsory charges levied by a government for the purpose of financing services performed for the common benefit of all citizens. TAX RATE: A rate at which taxes are levied per $100 of assessed valuation. The amount of tax stated in terms of a unit of the tax base. For example, $.50 per $100 of assessed valuation of taxable property. TAX RATE LIMIT: The maximum rate at which a government may levy a tax. The limit may apply to taxes raised for a particular purpose, or to taxes imposed for all purposes, and may apply to a single government, to a class of governments, or to all governments operating in a particular area. Overall tax rate limits usually restrict levies for all purposes and of all governments, state and local, having jurisdiction in a given area. TAX ROLL: The official list prepared by the Tax Assessor-Collector showing the amount of taxes levied against each taxpayer or property. TEXAS COMMISSION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (TCEQ): Formerly known as Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission (TNRCC). The State agency that oversees pollution control laws. TEXAS STEP: Located at Texas State University-San Marcos, as a part of the Department of Criminal Justice in the College of Applied Arts, Texas Statewide Tobacco Education & Prevention (Texas STEP) provides public awareness information on the tobacco laws, best practices and protocols to enforce the laws, and ways to increase tobacco awareness at the local level. Aimed at reducing youth access to tobacco products by eliminating the illegal sale of tobacco to children, this law provides for comprehensive retailer education and inspections of retailers by law enforcement to ensure compliance. Texas STEP provides training and technical assistance throughout the State of Texas. Participating law enforcement agencies receive updates on the law, are provided strategies and curricula on compliance education, are informed on the health consequences of youth tobacco use, are made aware of their legal reporting responsibilities, and can receive in-service training on the enforcement protocols. TEXPOOL: An investment service for public funds provided by the State. It offers local governments the opportunity to join with the State of Texas and other public entities to get the highest earnings possible on public money under the safest conditions. 259


TOTAL SUSPENDED SOLIDS (TSS): Solids that have not been broken down by organisms. An indication of wastewater strength. TRANSMISSION SYSTEM: A system of large water lines which transport large quantities of water from one area to another. TRE-TAX RATE EQUIVALENT: The method of calculating the financial impact of alternate funding sources in terms of pennies on the tax rate. It helps you determine how much you would need to add or delete from the tax rate to fund the budget. TRUTH-IN-TAXATION (TNT): The Texas Constitution and Property Tax Code require taxing units to comply with certain steps in adopting their tax rates. These truth-in-taxation laws have two purposes. They are to make taxpayers aware of tax rate proposals and to allow taxpayers, in certain cases, to roll back or limit a tax increase. Property owners have the right to know of increases in their propertiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; appraised value and to be notified of the estimated taxes that could result from the new value. A City must publish its effective and rollback tax rates before adopting an actual tax rate. They must publish special notices and hold two public hearings before adopting a tax rate that exceeds the lower of the rollback rate or the effective tax rate. If a taxing unit adopts a rate that exceeds the rollback rate, voters may petition for an election to limit the rate to the rollback rate. TWO IN/TWO OUT: Guideline established by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection requiring that no less than a team of two firefighters can enter a burning building or structure. In addition, there must be at least two additional firefighters outside the building in full protective gear that can immediately enter the building to rescue the entry team in the event they become trapped. UNDESIGNATED SURPLUS: Excess fund balance that has not been designated to a particular expense. The Council reviews the undesignated surplus during budget preparation. This is mainly used for one time capital outlay purchases. W/WW: Water and Wastewater.

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CITY OF SAGINAW BUDGET INDEX -AAcronym List 246 Amendment Process for Budget 31 Animal Control 114 Assessed Valuation and Tax Levy Graphs 234 -BBudget Adoption Resolution 204 Budget Award 8 Budget Calendar 32 Budget Cover Page-Truth in Taxation 1 Budget Glossary 248 Budget Highlights 23 Budget Process 29 Budget Summaries - All Funds 37 Budget Summary – 5 Year 40 Budgetary Control and Amendment Process 31 -CCapital Outlay by Fund/Department 44 Capital Projects Fund 147 Capitalization Policy 219 City Council 3 City Manager’s Budget Message 15 Community Profile and Information 229 Consolidated Budget Summary by Fund 37 Crime Control and Prevention District (CCPD) 176 -DDebt Management Policy 216 Debt Service Fund 125 Debt Service – Enterprise Fund 143 Demographics 232 Description of Funds 34 Donations Fund 198 Drainage Utility Fund 181

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-EEagle Mountain-Saginaw ISD 230 Economic Development 120 Elected Officials 3 Emergency Reserve Policy 222 Employee Benefits Policy 223 Enterprise Fund 133 Expense/Expenditure Overview - General Fund 54 -FFinancial Policies 211 Fire 69 Fleet Maintenance 115 Fund Balance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Use of Beginning Balance Explanation 35 Fund Structure 36 -GGeneral Administrative Office 58 General Fund 46 General Fund Emergency Reserve Policy 222 GFOA Budget Award 8 Glossary 248 -IIncentive Pay Summary 225 Inspections/Code Enforcement 108 -JJob Classification List 224 -LLibrary 100 Long Range Planning 9 -MMap of Tarrant County Area 231 Municipal Court 64 -OOrganizational Chart 15

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-PParks 88 Personnel Changes Summary 226 Personnel Information Graphs 227 Personnel Schedule by Department 226 Police 76 Population Graph 16 Public Services 82 -RRecreation & Community Services 93 Revenues Overview Enterprise Fund 135 General Fund 48 -SSalaries and Compensation Policy 223 Sales Tax Revenue â&#x20AC;&#x201C; General Fund 53 Schedule of Sources and Uses of Funds and Changes in Fund Balance 37 Statistical Information - Miscellaneous 229 Strategic Plan 11 Street Maintenance Fund 186 Summary of Revenues and Expenditures Enterprise Fund 134 General Fund 47 -TTable of Contents 4 Tarrant County Area Map 231 Tax Levy and Assessed Value Graphs 234 Tax Rate Ordinance 205 Truth in Taxation Notice 1 -WWater & Wastewater 137 Water Rate Ordinance 207

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Fy 13 14 approved budget  

City of Saginaw Approved Budget - Fiscal Year 2013/14

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