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Biennial Budget Budgeting by Priorities 2013-2014

&

THEN

& NOW


The City of Redmond ncorporated in 1912, Redmond is the sixteenth largest city in the State of Washington with a population of approximately 55,360 residents in 2012. Redmond encompasses an area of 17.14 square miles, and is located less than 20 miles east of downtown Seattle at the north end of Lake Sammamish.

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The City has a Mayor/Council, non-partisan form of government. The Mayor and each of the seven City Council members are elected directly by the people to staggered four-year terms. All members represent the community at-large rather than individual districts or areas of the City. Redmond also has eight citizen advisory boards and commissions. The City of Redmond provides a full range of municipal services, including police and fire protection, emergency medical services

and disaster preparedness, planning and zoning, street maintenance and construction, parks and recreation, as well as general administrative services. The City also provides water, wastewater, and stormwater management. Redmond is home to a number of nationally known high-tech and biomedical companies. Among these are Microsoft, Nintendo of America, Honeywell International, and Physio-Control. Redmond has an employment base of more than 78,893 employees and also enjoys a strong and diversified retail sector. As Redmond continues to evolve into a thriving city of increasing diversity, it seeks to promote its sense of community through programs designed to celebrate its heritage, enhance its neighborhoods, and preserve its historical and natural treasures.


CITY OF REDMOND, WASHINGTON

ADOPTED BUDGET

FOR THE FISCAL YEARS JANUARY 1, 2013 - DECEMBER 31, 2014 JOHN MARCHIONE MAYOR

PREPARED BY: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES DEPARTMENT MICHAEL E. BAILEY

FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES DIRECTOR

MALISA FILES

DEPUTY FINANCE DIRECTOR

SHANNON OLSEN

SENIOR FINANCIAL ANALYST

NANCY VIOLANTE

SENIOR FINANCIAL ANALYST

SANDY CHANG

FINANCIAL ANALYST

CALEB WAGENAAR INTERN

KAREN LUHRS

SENIOR PROGRAMMER/ANALYST


ELECTED OFFICIALS

MAYOR JOHN MARCHIONE

CITY COUNCIL

TOM FLYNN

JOHN P. (PAT) VACHÉ (PRESIDENT)

DAYLE (HANK) MARGESON (VICE PRESIDENT)

KIMBERLY ALLEN

DAVID CARSON

HANK MYERS

JOHN STILIN

EXECUTIVE STAFF & LEGAL COUNSEL DEPUTY CITY ADMINISTRATOR FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES DIRECTOR FIRE CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR PARKS & RECREATION DIRECTOR PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR POLICE CHIEF PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR CITY ATTORNEY BOND ATTORNEY PROSECUTOR

JANE CHRISTENSON MICHAEL E. BAILEY KEVIN DONNELLY KERRY SIEVERS CRAIG LARSEN ROB ODLE RON GIBSON TIM FULLER OGDEN MURPHY WALLACE PACIFICA LAW GROUP LARRY MITCHELL


ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE 2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET

CITY OF REDMOND Wednesday, January 09, 2013

THE PUBLIC

CITIZEN ADVISORY BOARDS & COMMISSIONS Arts Commission Board of Appeals Civil Service Commission Design Review Board Disability Board Library Board Park & Trails Commission Planning Commission Salary Commission

FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES

MAYOR

COUNCIL

Capital Investment Planning City Administration Cross-Departmental Initiatives Eastside Public Safety Communications Agency Legal Services Office of Communications Policy Analysis Regional Initiatives/Partnerships

City Legislation Policy Development Redmond Public Corporation

HUMAN RESOURCES

Accounting & Financial Reporting Central Purchasing City Clerk Financial Planning Hearing Examiner Information Technology Reprographics Risk Management Treasury & Investments Utility Billing

Benefits/Compensation Employment Labor Relations Safety Training Workers’ Compensation

PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

PUBLIC WORKS

Building Permits Business License Code Enforcement Demographics & Data Development Engineering Development Review Economic Development Human Services Inspections Long Range Planning Tourism Transportation Demand Management Transportation Planning & Engineering

Construction Engineering Facilities Maintenance Financial & Administrative Services Fleet Maintenance Natural Resources Real Property Solid Waste Recycling Stormwater Management Street & Sidewalk Maintenance Traffic Operations Safety & Engineering Water/Wastewater Management

FIRE

PARKS & RECREATION

POLICE

Advanced Life Support Apparatus Maintenance Emergency Medical Services Fire Prevention Fire Suppression Public Education Training

Administration/Planning/Development Arts & Cultural Programs Events/Marketing Park Operations/Maintenance Recreation Programs Senior Programs Teen Programs

Community Policing Crime Prevention/Police Partners Emergency Dispatch Investigation Patrol Records/Evidence Traffic Training Office of Emergency Management


CITY OF REDMOND READER’S GUIDE TO THE BUDGET In 2008, the City of Redmond changed its budget process to emphasize community outcomes and citizen priorities. The overall structure of the budget follows the City’s six priorities rather than the traditional department format. The following Readers Guide describes the contents of each major section in the order they appear in the document. MAYOR’S MESSAGE The Mayor’s transmittal letter and Budget Highlights both appear in this section. The Budget Highlights describe the major budget changes contained in each of the six priorities. BUDGET AT A GLANCE The Budget at a Glance section includes a Budget Overview illustrating the Price of Government model used for decision making as well as the results of the six-year financial forecast. Also reflected is a citywide summary of revenues, expenditures and full-time equivalent employees (FTEs). BUDGET BY PRIORITIES The Budget by Priorities section contains a description of the Budget by Priorities process and a calendar of budget events. PRIORITY SECTIONS The details of each priority can be found in their individual sections. These sections describe the Request for Offers developed by the Results Team as well as a Cause and Effect Map used to define the factors and sub-factors of each priority and the City’s dashboard measures. In addition, each section contains an Offer Summary outlining the Results Team rankings and the Mayor’s funding decisions. Following the Offer Summaries are the individual offers submitted by departments including information relevant to each program outcome. CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROGRAM The Capital Investment Program (CIP) section has been structured to more closely align with the City’s vision of two vibrant urban centers and connected neighborhoods. Included is an overview discussing the Capital Investment Program expenditures and revenues as well as projects for Downtown, Overlake, Redmond neighborhoods and citywide CIP programs. Each section provides a narrative of the planned project outcomes, a list of applicable projects, planned project investments through 2018 and a project location map. BUDGET BY FUND The Budget by Fund section describes major revenues and expenditures for each fund as well as a budget-to-budget comparison of changes to full-time equivalent (FTE) positions between biennia. SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION The Supplemental Information section contains the City’s fiscal policies, department organization charts, detailed staffing authorizations, pay plans, miscellaneous statistics, a debt summary and a glossary of frequently used terms.


TABLE OF CONTENTS 2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET

CITY OF REDMOND MAYOR’S MESSAGE Letter from the Mayor ......................................................................................................... i Budget Highlights ............................................................................................................... 1 BUDGET AT A GLANCE Budget Overview ................................................................................................................ 7 Citywide Budget Summary ............................................................................................... 25 All Funds Summary .......................................................................................................... 27 Citywide FTE Summary ................................................................................................... 28 BUDGET BY PRIORITIES Process Overview ............................................................................................................. 30 Budget Calendar ............................................................................................................... 42 Business Community Results Team Request For Offers ..................................................................................... 43 Results Team Map ............................................................................................................ 48 Offer Summary ................................................................................................................. 49 Offers ................................................................................................................................ 50 Clean & Green Results Team Request For Offers ..................................................................................... 74 Results Team Map ............................................................................................................ 79 Offer Summary ................................................................................................................. 80 Offers ................................................................................................................................ 81 Community Building Results Team Request For Offers ................................................................................... 105 Results Team Map .......................................................................................................... 109 Offer Summary ............................................................................................................... 110 Offers .............................................................................................................................. 111 Infrastructure & Growth Results Team Request For Offers ................................................................................... 132 Results Team Map .......................................................................................................... 137 Offer Summary ............................................................................................................... 138 Offers .............................................................................................................................. 139 Responsible Government Results Team Request For Offers ................................................................................... 188 Results Team Map .......................................................................................................... 192 Offer Summary ............................................................................................................... 193 Offers .............................................................................................................................. 194


Safety Results Team Request For Offers ................................................................................... 268 Results Team Map .......................................................................................................... 272 Offer Summary ............................................................................................................... 273 Offers .............................................................................................................................. 274 CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROGRAM (CIP) Overview ............................................................................................................................... 339 Downtown Urban Center ...................................................................................................... 348 Overlake Urban Center.......................................................................................................... 359 Redmond Neighborhoods ...................................................................................................... 371 Citywide Programs ................................................................................................................ 393 BUDGET BY FUND Fund Spreadsheets General Fund ......................................................................................................................... 409 Total General Fund - Sub Funds ........................................................................................... 410 Total Special Revenue Funds ................................................................................................ 426 Total Debt Service Funds ...................................................................................................... 437 Total Capital Investment Program Funds .............................................................................. 440 Total Enterprise Funds .......................................................................................................... 447 Total Internal Services Funds................................................................................................ 456 SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION Fiscal Policy .......................................................................................................................... 462 Department Organization Charts and Staffing Authorizations Executive ........................................................................................................................ 472 Finance & Information Services ..................................................................................... 474 Fire .................................................................................................................................. 478 Human Resources ........................................................................................................... 481 Parks & Recreation ......................................................................................................... 483 Planning & Community Development ............................................................................ 486 Police .............................................................................................................................. 490 Public Works .................................................................................................................. 493 Pay Plans ................................................................................................................................. 501 Miscellaneous Statistics .......................................................................................................... 511 Debt Summary ........................................................................................................................ 524 Glossary .................................................................................................................................. 527


MAYOR’S MESSAGE


Guiding Principles/Economic Context In developing the budget, there were several guiding principles at work. Predicated on a commitment to honor the many citizen and staff efforts that went into our BP process to date, my focus was on preserving core City services within the current constrained fiscal environment. While the broader economy is showing mixed recovery signals, City revenues continue to lag, and the FY 2013-2014 Budget is built on a conservative forecast with slight growth in some areas (property taxes, sales taxes, utility taxes, and licenses and permits) and continued modest growth in development revenues. As the budget notes, it is anticipated that development will recover gradually through the next six years, but will not reach the levels experienced in 2007 until beyond the forecast period. Based on these projections, this budget reflects a number of expenditure reductions and some limited additions in key priority service areas as noted below and as described further in the budget sections to follow. For City operations, the budget is structurally balanced through a combination of reductions that focused on gaining additional efficiencies in current operations, assessing declines in service demand, reducing capacity and levels of service, as well as eliminating new requests. The City has continued to build on the innovations/efficiencies efforts identified in my first biennial budget and will focus on innovations in FY 2013-2014 as a means to deliver services without significant revenue increases. It should also be noted that this budget contains 5.0 full-time equivalent (FTE) position reductions offset by 5.0 FTE position additions realigned in priority services areas, such as public safety communications technology implementation, wastewater maintenance, emergency preparedness, and human services. For the CIP, the budget reflects a vision-centered, prioritybased approach, as well as the Council’s policy direction to date on key capital elements for the City’s stormwater, water, and wastewater utilities. With this foundation, major themes for the FY 2013-2014 budget include: • Fund core services within available resources and pursuant to Council policy; • Advance BP offers for City services highly ranked by staff and citizen results teams; • Focus the City’s limited CIP resources on advancing our urban centers vision and on priority projects in neighborhoods; • Hold the line on utility increases when possible; and • Continue the organization’s evolution of its BP approach, as outlined in the 10-year BP plan reviewed with the Council in the last biennium. All this is presented in a context of our ongoing efforts to make our services more efficient and customer-focused over the biennium, and to embrace innovation in service delivery as a means to demonstrate value to our Redmond citizens. Administration Goals for FY 2013-2014 Within this framework, my administration’s efforts will be focused on the following challenges over the next two years:

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• • • • • •

• •

• •

Manage the City’s third Budgeting by Priorities (BP) financial plan, with increased accountability and reporting for performance measurement and results in delivering citizen-identified priority services in a challenging fiscal environment; Maintain a focus on innovation and efficiency initiatives to improve services and reduce costs, thereby demonstrating value and accountability for results to our community; Execute service improvement initiatives identified in the information services strategic plan to advance cost-effective technology solutions in a range of City service areas; Continue implementation of recent improvements in permit processing that preserve the community’s values while delivering a fair, predictable product; Work with Redmond business and community stakeholders to establish a strong and sustainable public-private partnership to advance economic development and related community building events and activities through OneRedmond; Advance the customer service program efforts that began in FY 2009-2010, so that all City services are customer-focused, including related training and organizational development efforts, to ensure employees are prepared to advance service improvement initiatives and other associated organizational cultural changes; Pursuant to the Council’s July 2009 policy direction, continue to implement the City’s Capital Investment Program within a vision/BP context versus traditional functional area allocations, to ensure future funding is directed to priority capital projects; Implement the City’s communication strategy/outreach efforts to increase citizen engagement in major policy decisions through the City’s digital and electronic media and other relevant tools to improve access to public information and other community connections; Further efforts to enhance Redmond’s stature in the region by working cooperatively with other leaders in the area to more strategically advance Redmond’s interests at the regional, state and national level; and Build on existing relationships with Council, residents and businesses to foster collaboration and trust.

We have made great strides in these areas since I took office in January 2008, but much work remains to be done. As noted, our efforts will also focus on the three areas of emphasis identified by the Council at its 2012 retreat, specifically fiscal stability, economic development, and communications with our community. In Closing Serving as Mayor has been both a privilege and a welcome challenge, as I have worked to lead the City organization to think and act collaboratively in delivering vital public services to our community. Even in these uncertain economic times, I have been encouraged by the continued comments and suggestions from many of you that doing business at City Hall has been enhanced by the customer service initiatives put in place. I remain committed to our ongoing efforts to emphasize cost-effective, citizen-focused municipal services and to work in partnership with residents and businesses to enhance our City’s quality of life. In so doing, I will continue to advance the interests of this wonderful community and its vision in a way that our citizens will be proud to call home. In this, our 101st year, I feel honored to fulfill my role as Mayor in leading our City into its next great century.

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I thank those of you who participated in the Budgeting by Priorities process to date and urge others to get more involved in this and other efforts to build community and improve the services we deliver to you. I also thank the Council, whose support for this process in FY 2007-2008 established the foundation upon which I have been able to continue this work as Mayor. That said, I look forward to continuing discussions with the Council and community, and hope these efforts serve as a catalyst for an ongoing dialogue with citizens. I encourage your questions and suggestions on the community issues important to you and the services we provide. You can contact me by telephone at (425) 556-2101 or email at mayor@redmond.gov. Sincerely,

John Marchione Mayor

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BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS


BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS 2013-2014 Adopted Budget CITY OF REDMOND This section summarizes the major changes in the 2013-2014 Adopted Budget. For details on these changes, please see each of the priority sections of the budget. Budgeting by Priorities

See the “Budget by Fund” section for Prior Year Comparisons

One-time revenue 1% property tax Utility rate increases

Capital investments

Realignment of authorized employees

As in the past two biennial budgets, the City of Redmond is using the Budgeting by Priorities (BP) process to build the budget. As a result, Redmond is presenting information in the context of the priorities as defined by the community and refined by the City Council. The only financial information presented in the context of prior years is the “Budget by Fund” financial summaries. By its nature, BP is a form of “zero based” budgeting in that some offers may be comparable over time, but staff is encouraged to be innovative and collaborate in creating offers. Therefore it is difficult to compare budget offers over multiple budgets. The preliminary budget maintains the City’s core services while continuing to make significant investments in Redmond’s future. The City is anticipating one-time resources in the General Fund to total $9.98 million due to underexpenditures and unanticipated sales tax audit recoveries in 2011-2012. Consistent with the City’s Long Range Financial Strategy, this budget includes a 1% property tax increase and water/wastewater utility rate increases in the next biennium. In addition, the budget honors the Council’s policies with regard to reserves and transfers from the General Fund to the Capital Investment Program (CIP). The total General Fund transfers to capital investments amounts to $13.8 million. This includes the council policy which is 5% of revenues transfer ($6.8 million), sales tax on construction ($2.4 million), pavement management ($600,000) and anticipated surpluses from the current budget of $4 million. The total 2013-2014 capital investment proposed by this budget including utility investments equals $112.3 million (excluding ending fund balances and transfers out). The budget uses the newly developed Capital Investment Strategy to ensure that capital expenditures are focused on developing the City’s vision as illustrated in the comprehensive plan. The budget includes a decrease of 5.0 full time equivalent (FTE) employees, however these reductions were offset by realignment of employees to priority service areas. The positions eliminated represent a “right sizing due to innovations or efficiencies gained in City operations.

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A summary of the changes is found at the end of this section. The budget highlights of each priority are summarized below: Business Community

BUSINESS COMMUNITY I want a diverse and vibrant range of businesses and services in Redmond. o Sustainable Economic Development – Provides continuation of Redmond’s economic development initiatives.

Decline in development service demand and efficiencies gained through technology

Business License Continued support of OneRedmond Clean & Green

o Predictable Development Permitting – Supports the City’s Development Services Center (DSC) made up of the Planning, Public Works and Fire Departments. In 2014, eliminated 1.0 FTE Permit Technician ($82,610) and reduced professional services and various line items ($193,824) through right sizing in anticipation of status quo development review activity. o Business License – transferred to Planning Department (from Finance) to improve customer service and orient services around technology platforms. o OneRedmond – Provides for City’s stakeholder commitment to the OneRedmond community effort.  CLEAN & GREEN ENVIRONMENT I want to live, learn, work, and play in a clean and green environment.

Maintaining and managing Redmond’s green spaces

o Green Infrastructure Management – Maintains maintenance and management of green infrastructure within park sites and natural areas, while reducing costs and limits the flower pot program to downtown. Allocates $260,000 to the parks maintenance levy.

Maintaining park facilities

o Park Facility Maintenance – Maintains maintenance schedules to continue essential maintenance of park buildings, sports fields, play structures, pathways and other park infrastructure.

Protecting Redmond’s drinking water

o Water Utility Natural Resources – Protects the City’s drinking water aquifer and conserves drinking water resources with reorganized water conservation educational programs. Transferred vacant position ($176,000) from this offer to Water System Maintenance to provide for maintenance of the utility's above ground infrastructure.

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Reduced various line items ($186,563) including professional services, supplies, supplemental help, small tools and external repairs and maintenance through right sizing. Community Building

 COMMUNITY BUILDING I want a sense of community and connections with others.

Community Events

o Community Events – Maintains highly valued community events at pre-centennial celebration levels (with Sunday events on Derby Days).

Human Services for a sustainable Redmond

o Human Services – Ensures residents have access to needed human services. Includes 1.0 FTE Senior Planner ($238,723) on a limited duration basis as well as an additional one-time $50,000 over the biennium to support human services programs. Reduced various line items ($6,000) through right sizing.

Providing recreation to the community

Connecting the community

Redmond’s neighborhoods Future development of Downtown Park

Infrastructure & Growth

Regional transportation planning

o Recreation – Maintains the popular (and growing) community recreation programs. Reduced vacant Recreation Assistant Manager position ($283,435) through reorganization. o Communications – Maintains current level of funding for communications, community engagement and print shop activities. A plan for improving these functions is being developed consistent with direction originating from the Council’s 2012 retreat planning. o Neighborhood Planning – Continues the neighborhood planning effort through this biennium. o Downtown Park – With acquisition completed in the 20112012 budget, planning for the future development of a Downtown Park will commence with this budget. The 20132014 CIP recommends $1.4 million be set aside for future development.  INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH I want a well-maintained city whose transportation and other infrastructure keeps pace with growth. o Transportation Planning – Maintains Redmond’s participation in and advocacy for regional transportation solutions. Eliminated 0.5 FTE Principal Planner ($148,590) through reorganization.

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Developing and implementing future plans

o Plans for Redmond’s Future – Updates and implements the City’s Comprehensive Plan, Zoning Code and companion documents to preserve and enhance Redmond’s quality of life.

Transportation infrastructure

o Transportation Services – Ensures Redmond’s transportation and transit infrastructure and programs are carefully planned and coordinated with land use.

Responsible Government

 RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT I want a city government that is responsible and responsive to its residents and businesses.

Information Services

City financial services

Innovation fund

Citywide reserves and contingencies

o Information Services – Ensures the City technology systems can support the delivery of services by providing highly reliable, state of the art systems. Reduced 1.0 FTE Applications Support Analyst ($139,778) in 2014 due to efficiencies gained through the implementation of new technology. Reduced various line items ($542,600) through right sizing the budget including professional services, outside repairs and maintenance, small tools and supplies. o Financial Services – Provides utility billing, accounting, auditing, purchasing and cashiering services to support the operations of the City. Through innovations and reorganization of functional areas, eliminated 1.0 FTE. o Innovation Fund – Creates a new innovation fund ($150,000) to be managed by the Mayor’s Office. This fund will be available for use by city staff to implement new approaches to provide and improve service. o Citywide Reserves – Provides sufficient cash flow to meet the City’s needs and to support an acceptable level of City services in the event of a catastrophic incident. Meets all policy targets (8.5% General Fund; 12% Utility Funds). o Economic Contingency – Made permanent, consistent with change in Financial Policy and now includes Development Review reserves.

City Hall

o City Hall Lease Obligation – Maintains the long-term lease obligation, as well as provides maintenance on the City Hall building and parking garage.

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Safety

Review of Fire Department

Jail services

 SAFETY I want to be safe where I live, work, and play. o Fire Department Strategic Planning – Enables department to create a strategic plan using the accreditation system methodology. o Jail Services – Reduced jail services costs ($400,000) through effective contract management.

New offer – public safety technology

o Public Safety Information Technology Support – Recognizes unique public safety technology support role. Increased 1.0 FTE Senior Systems Analyst ($269,043) to continue support for the City's partnership with NORCOM and other technology improvements.

EMS / Suppression

o Emergency Medical Service / Suppression – Reduced overtime ($150,000) by decreasing minimum staffing from 24 fire personnel to 23 fire personnel on shift. No anticipated impact on service.

School safety zones

o School Safety Zones – Add improvements to school zones with the net revenues from the discontinued traffic camera enforcement program.

Emergency management and disaster preparedness

o Emergency Management – Provides emergency management programs to improve city and community preparedness for disasters. Includes addition of 2.0 FTEs to provide improved continuity to the programs in response to community requests.

Police and Fire Levy

o Public Safety – Allocated 4.5 FTEs to the Police Levy; 1.0 FTE and $300,000 in overtime to the Fire Levy from the General Fund. Public safety levies have been underutilized to date and will enable the continuation of the current level of service.

Prosecution

o Prosecuting Attorney’s Office – Prosecutes criminal misdemeanors, gross misdemeanors, traffic infractions and civil code violations. Scalability of 0.5 FTE Prosecutor position ($138,751) is eliminated in this program due to decreased demand from the City's discontinued red-light camera program and reduced court caseloads.

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Summary of staffing changes

Future outlook

2013-2014 FTE Reductions 0.50 2.00 1.00 1.50

Department Executive Finance Parks Planning Police Public Works Total

5.00

2013-2014 FTE Additions 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 5.00

The City of Redmond works to manage its fiscal responsibilities in a sustainable manner using best practices, while conforming to council policies. To that end this budget balances the need to reduce expenses, continue to innovate and capture efficiencies where possible and right-size resources in the future within the “Price of Government” framework and the City’s ten-year Budgeting by Priorities plan as described in the Process Overview section of this document. The balance between providing the right level of service and maintaining the price of government at current trend levels has proven more difficult than anticipated. The City will utilize its Long Range Financial Strategy to examine the best way to provide adequate resources to meet community service needs in the future.

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BUDGET AT A GLANCE

BUDGET OVERVIEW CITYWIDE BUDGET SUMMARY ALL FUNDS SUMMARY CITYWIDE FTE SUMMARY


BUDGET OVERVIEW 2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET

CITY OF REDMOND The Budget Overview serves as a review of the recommended 2013-2014 financial plan and includes revenue and expenditure projections over the biennium based on the City’s six-year forecast. This budget continues to use the priorities defined by the Redmond community in 2008 and expands on these concepts in pursuit of Redmond’s long-range vision. The process used by the City, known as Budgeting by Priorities (BP), relies on the Price of Government concept outlined in the book Price of Government by David Osborne and Peter Hutchison. PRICE OF GOVERNMENT The Price of Government is literally defined as the sum of all taxes, fees, and charges collected by all sectors of government divided by the aggregate personal income of that government’s constituents. The calculation is used to define the band within which residents are willing to pay for government services. The Price of Government for Redmond, illustrated below, shows all revenues as a percent of personal income ranges between 5% and 6%. This is typical for local governments.

The Price of Government

City of Redmond, Washington

8.00%

36th Street Bridge Grant

7.00%

All Revenues Taxes & Fees

6.00%

Taxes Only

5.00% 4.00% 3.00% 2.00% 1.00% 0.00%

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

Notes: Compares ratio of total city revenues to total personal income

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Estimates

Keeping the Price of Government in mind, this budget continues to conservatively forecast revenues and rely on right-sizing costs, innovation and efficiencies, and matching service expenditures with demand to balance Redmond’s resources. 7


LONG RANGE FINANCIAL STRATEGY Redmond’s General Fund Six-Year Financial Forecast identifies revenue and expenditure trends that extend beyond the biennial budget. Redmond aligns forecast assumptions with policies outlined in the City Council’s long-range strategic financial plan, as well as the goals articulated in budget formulation. The 2011-2012 budget included a forecast that illustrated a structurally balanced budget for the next six years. Since that time, revenues have continued to stagnate more than anticipated and the State of Washington has made changes in revenues it shares with local governments. The chart below now illustrates an updated long-range financial forecast that shows modest gaps in future budgets. City of Redmond 2013-2014 General Fund Budget Estimated Gap Based on Budgeted Revenues and Expenditures

$100 -$900K

-$1.4M

-$2.0M

-$2.6M

2016

2017

2018

$80

Millions

$60 $40 $20 $0 -$20 2009

2010

Beginning Balance

2011

2012 Revenues

2013

2014

Expense

2015

Difference

Ending Balance

These revenue and expenditure trends take into account the volatility and diversity of each revenue source and the ongoing and/or one-time nature of municipal costs. A more detailed explanation of sources and uses can be found on the following pages. MAJOR REVENUES & EXPENDITURES The City of Redmond is a non-charter code city with authority to levy or assess all revenues generally available to all classes of cities and towns in Washington State. The government-wide financial statements in the City’s Annual Financial Report are reported using the economic resources measurement focus and the accrual basis of accounting, as are the proprietary fund and fiduciary fund financial statements. Revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded when a liability is incurred, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. The budget is developed using the modified accrual basis of accounting for all funds.

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Effect of Implementing GASB Statement 54 The Government Accounting Standards Board (GASB) provides “statements” which prescribe generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) for governments. In its Statement 54, GASB established clearer criteria for three things that affect the City’s budget. First, GASB Statement 54 requires that reporting for special revenue funds be limited to those activities where a restriction on the revenues to that fund are imposed by an outside authority, such as state law or a grant requirement. In the past, the City has reported several activities as special revenue funds which are essentially designated uses of general revenues. For budget purposes the City continues to identify these separately as “sub-funds” of the General Fund (note that the designation “sub-fund” is a city designation and is not a GAAP term). This will enable the Council to continue to monitor activity in these sub-funds distinctly from the General Fund, but will also enable the City to report on the sub-funds and general fund combined in its audited financial statement to comply with GASB’s Statement 54. Secondly, the GASB clarified only activity which results in the creation of (or capitalized addition to) a capital asset may be reported within a capital projects fund. The budget includes capital maintenance and other capital activity that does not qualify for inclusion in a capital projects fund in “capital maintenance funds”. These are also sub-funds of the General Fund as most resources used in these efforts are general revenues. These sub-funds will also be reported as part of the City’s General Fund in its audited financial statements. Since the City manages these capital maintenance activities as part of the overall capital budget the resources for these funds are transferred from the capital funds back to the major maintenance funds (thus increasing the transfer of money among funds and artificially inflating the budget). Third, GASB Statement 54 clarifies the classifications of fund balances within governmental funds. Essentially, the amounts available for appropriation are either “committed” (where the fund balance is committed by policy action of the council to a specific purpose, such as capital investments or for use in a sub-fund as described above); “assigned” (similar to committed, but an administrative action – there are no assigned fund balances in the City); or “unassigned” (available for appropriation without encumbrance). Revenue and Expenditure Summary This section includes a discussion of major revenues utilized by the City and information on major factors affecting the revenue sources. Total revenues over the biennium equal $581.6 million, including beginning fund balances and transfers; this is an approximate 3% increase over the 2011-2012 biennium. As mentioned above, the budget is artificially inflated due to a series of transfers between the capital maintenance and construction funds, between capital construction funds for various projects and between the General Fund and the capital funds to move one time surpluses to significant projects the City hopes to accomplish in the next biennium. In addition, this budget includes a 1% property tax increase, allowed by law and Water/Wastewater utility rate increases as described below. The components of the City’s 2013-2014 revenue sources are shown in the graph on the next page.

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2013-2014 Revenues by Type All Funds ($581.6 million) Licenses & Permits 3%

Interfunds 18%

Property Tax 8% Sales/Use Tax 7%

Beginning Funds 22%

Utility Tax 4% Other Revenue 3%

Taxes 22%

Other Taxes 3%

Other Governments 10%

Charges for Services 21%

Miscellaneous 1%

In the 2013-2014 Budget, the General Fund has been reduced to take into account the continued lack of service demand in development review, right-sizing of line items as in the case of public safety overtime and gains in efficiencies due to implementation of technology projects. In other funds, specifically capital, the budget has increased due to one-time money and project savings being committed to the City’s vision of the two urban centers and Redmond neighborhoods. In addition, the budget maintains all Council policy directives regarding reserves and transfers to the CIP.

2013-2014 Expenditures by Type All Funds ($581.6 million)

Intergovernmental 6%

Capital 17%

Debt Service 3%

Transfers Out 12% Ending Fund Balance 16%

Interfund Payments 7%

Services and Supplies 7% Miscellaneous 2% Salaries and Benefits 26%

Utilities & Maintenance 4%

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As in most service organizations, salary and benefits make up the majority of budgeted costs. Although staffing reductions did occur in the budget the changes were offset by realignment of employees to priority service areas. This is a change from the 50 FTE reductions the City experienced between 2009 and 2012 due to the reduction in development review activities and stagnation of the City’s revenues. The FTE changes by department are shown below. (Note: Included in the total 2013-2014 FTE count for the City is a 0.75 limited-duration employee to support a fire prevention grant)

Department Executive Finance Parks Planning Police Public Works Total

2013-2014 FTE Reductions 0.50 2.00 1.00 1.50

5.00

2013-2014 FTE Additions 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 5.00

Challenges to balancing the budget were met through a variety of reductions that focused on gaining additional efficiencies in current operations, assessing declines in service demand, reducing capacity and levels of service and eliminating new requests. Adjustments to expenditures include: •

Elimination of most new programs requested.

Reductions were gained through efficiencies in current operations, such as department reorganizations, monitoring and management of jail and overtime costs, appropriately charging staff time to the capital investment program (CIP), changes in service demand and right-sizing administrative costs, contingencies, and reserves consistent with Council policy.

Assessing the use of fund balances and other one-time funds to accelerate or complete funding for significant capital projects, as well as using underutilized levy funds will enable the continuation of the current level of service.

Each offer outlines the proposed scalability by the department and the recommended scalability that appears in the budget. (See the Budget by Fund section for a financial summary of sources and uses of City funds). General Fund Revenues General Fund revenues are forecasted to grow only slightly from $143.4 million anticipated in 20112012 Budget to an estimated $149.4 million in 2013-2014, a change of 4% excluding beginning fund balance. Current projections forecast the 2013-2014 beginning fund balance to be approximately $9.98 million which includes the Economic Contingency set by policy at 4% or $2.7 million. This is in addition to the General Fund Operating Reserves set by policy at 8.5% or $6.2 million.

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2013-2014 General Fund Revenue by Type The General Fund supports basic operations of the City (Police, Fire, Public Works, Parks & Recreation, Planning, Human Resources, Finance & Information Services, and Administration)

Property Tax 21%

Other Taxes 1% Sales/Use Tax 26%

Beginning Funds 6%

Taxes 64%

Other Governments 12% Utility Tax 16%

Other Revenue 8%

Development Fees 10%

Sales Tax Sales tax represents 26% or $41.3 million of the City’s General Fund, making it the Fund’s largest revenue source. The overall sales tax rate for Redmond totals 9.5% of which .85% is distributed to the City for general government purposes and .1% for criminal justice programs. The majority of the sales tax collected in Redmond is distributed to other jurisdictions as illustrated in the graph on the next page. Sales tax is projected to grow by 3.5% in 2013 and 3.8% in 2014 compared to forecasted estimates in the current biennium.

Sales Tax (thousands) % Change

Distribution of Sales Tax State Admin 2%

Transit 15% State 68%

2008 19,058 -17.2%

2009 17,896 -6.1%

Criminal Justice 1% RTA 4%

Veteran's Levy 1%

Actual 2007 23,025

City 9%

Estimate 2010 17,681 -1.2%

2011 23,484 32.8%

2012 19,563 -16.7%

Forecast 2013 20,297 3.5%

2014 21,058 3.8%

Note: There was unusual sales tax payments received in both 2007 and 2011 which affects the trends illustrated in the table above.

Property Tax Redmond currently receives approximately $1.78 per $1,000 of assessed valuation from property owners located within the City limits. This equates to $33 million over the 2013-2014 biennium and assumes a Council approved 1% increase. Detailed in the table on the next page are historical collections of property taxes in Redmond. The additional amounts in excess of the 1% allowed by state legislature are attributable to revenues from new construction, annexations and uncollected taxes from previous years.

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Historical Redmond Property Tax Collections Property Tax (thousands) % Change

Actual 2007 12,053

2008 12,546 4.1%

Estimate

2009 13,343 6.4%

2010 14,758 10.6%

2011 15,726 6.6%

2012 15,949 1.4%

Forecast 2013 16,309 2.3%

2014 16,772 2.8%

Note: The significant increase in 2010 is due to the addition of almost $1 billion in value from new construction. The increase on existing properties is 1% consistent with state law.

Distribution of Property Tax Redmond’s levy is only one component of the total property tax rate that a property owner will pay. The total property tax rate includes additional levies that are earmarked for the state, schools, emergency medical services (EMS), hospitals, local libraries, King County and the port.

City of Redmond 17% Hospital 5% Emergency Medical Services 3%

State of Washington 22%

Port 2%

Library 5%

King County 13%

School District 33%

Utility Tax State law enables cities to levy taxes on natural gas, telephone, and electric utilities in an amount up to 6% of the total charges. A tax is also permitted on solid waste, water, wastewater, and stormwater utilities. Illustrated below are the utility taxes Redmond levies and the amount expected to be collected in 2013 and 2014. Utility Taxes (thousands)

Franchise Fees / Utility Taxes Admissions Tax Cellular Electric Tax Gambling Tax Garbage Natural Gas Tax Telephone Other Taxes Totals

2007 531 2,196 5,833 38 510 1,708 1,794 10

2008 410 2,323 5,803 25 538 1,385 1,348 21

Actual 2009 406 2,270 5,958 18 498 1,460 1,176 15

2010 481 2,122 6,019 54 478 1,151 1,082 21

2011 353 1,664 5,592 24 357 1,166 828 939

Estimate 2012 450 1,889 6,353 28 477 1,362 975 939

12,620

11,853

11,801

11,408

10,923

12,473

Forecast 2013 2014 463 477 1,913 1,938 6,557 6,766 29 30 483 490 1,388 1,414 975 975 939 939 12,747

13,029

1. Other taxes above include a utility tax on water sales. This was imposed in 2011 with a corresponding decrease in the water rates to provide for fire protection related costs, resulting in a shift of how these costs are funded (by a utility tax rather than utility rates) with no net change to the consumer/taxpayer.

13

1


Development Revenue A development user fee study approved in 2011 enacted a revised fee structure targeting full cost recovery for all development related fees. The forecasted revenue for this biennium assumes a continuation of this policy. Development Revenues (thousands)

Development Related Fees

Actual

Estimate

Forecast

2007 1,051 426

2008 607 527

2009 419 255

2010 654 170

2011 516 402

2012 600 400

2013 624 416

2014 649 433

Plumbing/Electric

3,563

2,197

1,613

1,895

2,044

2,653

2,767

2,886

1

Plan Review

1,544

1,025

631

458

636

690

868

896

2

Plan Checks

593

466

491

263

390

358

372

387

7,177

4,822

3,409

3,440

3,988

4,701

5,047

5,251

Residential Permits Commercial Permits

Totals

1. Includes heating/plumbing, building, electrical permits. 2. Includes building inspection/plan reviews.

Development revenues in the 2013-2014 Budget are projected to grow slightly in comparison to 20112012. According to the most current forecast, development will recover gradually through the next six years, but will not reach the levels experienced in 2007 until beyond the forecast period. Other General Fund Revenues Other revenues collected by the City include intergovernmental revenue from other jurisdictions, such as the state or county, business license fees, interest earnings, and overhead charges to the City’s utilities. Redmond expects little growth in these revenue sources through the next biennium. Other General Revenues (thousands)

Licenses/Permits Intergovernmental Fines/Forfeits

2007 3,754 6,266 789

2008 4,225 7,068 809

Actual 2009 4,268 7,637 1,051

2010 3,810 6,942 1,036

2011 3,548 8,330 706

Estimate 2012 3,902 7,900 706

State Entitlements

1,772

1,627

2,100

1,886

1,918

2,025

1,988

2,001

Miscellaneous *

4,131

4,246

4,225

6,270

4,607

4,295

4,913

3,882

16,712

17,975

19,281

19,944

19,109

18,828

19,760

19,144

Other Revenues

Totals

Forecast 2013 2014 4,007 4,115 8,146 8,440 706 706 1

1. Includes indirect costs, interest earnings, grants and rentals; 2013 includes temporary retirement savings.

Broader Economic Context The broader economy continues to exhibit cautious recovery signals. The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has been growing slowly and consumer spending continues to strengthen. New in the last few months is a small recovery in the construction related economic activity. While retail activity began to recover some months ago, Redmond has only just now begun to see a small recovery (from the lows created by the Great Recession) in construction activity.

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In Redmond, it appears the rate of economic growth continues at a pace below both what had been originally predicted and that which can sustain on-going costs of current operations. Like the 2011-2012 Budget, this Budget is built on a conservative forecast with slight growth in sales tax, utility taxes, and licenses and permits (which is consistent with the Council’s financial policies on revenues). Development revenue is expected to continue its slow recovery; however, it is not projected to return to peak levels until well beyond the forecast period (2013 remains about 30% below 2007). General Fund Expenditures by Type General Fund Expenditures The $159.4 million budgeted in Salaries & the General Fund supports the Benefits 63% basic operations of the City, such Interfund as Police, Fire, Parks, Planning, Payments 7% Public Works and Administration. The proposed biennial budget Transfers Out supports 623 full-time equivalent 11% employees (FTEs). The actual Intergovernmental number of positions eliminated in Utilities & 3% Maintenance the 2013-2014 Budget is five with Services & Miscellaneous 2% 8% Supplies an addition of five positions 6% through realignment of resources. Transfers to other funds constitute another significant portion of General Fund costs. Transfers are made to support the City’s CIP, Human Services, Arts, and Special Event Activity Funds, as well as maintenance of City Hall.

The City is expected to end the biennium with approximately $9.98 million in one-time revenue (this is compared to the $2.7 million carried into the 2011-2012 Budget). This is the result of unanticipated one-time sales taxes received in 2011 and control of expenditures. This money is proposed to go towards one-time uses including permanently funding the economic contingency reserve, continued work with Northeast King County Public Safety Communications (NORCOM) dispatch, as well as continued investments in technology. The budget includes a new innovations fund of $150,000 intended to provide resources to be leveraged for improved customer service or cost containment initiatives. Additional one-time revenues will also be transferred to the Capital Investment Program (CIP) to support the capital investment vision. These investments are in addition to support of the 5% transfer to the City’s CIP as provided for in the City’s Financial Policies. Salaries and Benefits Overall, in a budget to budget comparison, salary and benefit costs are projected to increase by 3.4% to 98.7 million over the biennium, excluding the salary and benefit contingency set aside for future labor agreements. Cost drivers for salary and benefits are market adjustments, medical costs and employer retirement contributions. Medical rate increases are budgeted at 7.1% annually; however, the actual rate changes will be assessed closer to the start of each calendar year when an actuarial analysis can be done using the latest information. This, as well as an analysis of reserves in the Medical Self-Insurance Fund will help the City to determine the actual medical rates which are expected to be consistent with the budget estimates.

15


Transfers Out Transfers from the General Fund total 11% of the General Fund budget or $18.0 million. These transfers include Human Services, Arts, and Community Events Funds, City Hall maintenance and contributions to the CIP. CIP contributions have increased by approximately 7% or $4.6 million from the 2011-2012 Budget mostly due to one-time surpluses used to support significant CIP projects, such as converting the one way Downtown streets to two-way, Downtown Park design and the 116th Street roundabout. Services & Supplies The services and supply category includes expenditures, such as operating supplies, professional services, legal, travel, training and postage. Services and supplies have increased for 2013-2014 due to of one-time professional services to support the innovation fund, a dispatch contingency for NORCOM and a strategic plan in the Fire Department. Services and Supplies Services and Supplies Supplies Legal Professional Services Communication Rentals Totals

(thousands) Actual 2009 2010 1,506 1,796 305 503 1,431 1,901

2011 1,104 368 1,398

Estimate 2012 1,767 367 1,217

401

319

323

413

443

88

99

70

130

52

55

3,687

4,700

3,259

3,804

4,287

4,366

2007 1,390 756 1,259

2008 1,438 415 1,438

363

347

357

21

96

3,789

3,734

Forecast 2013 2014 1,746 1,820 360 374 1,716 1,674

Interfund Payments Interfund payments include transfers from operating departments to internal service funds (i.e. Fleet Maintenance, Insurance Claims, and Information Technology) for services provided. Internal service funds are supported by a variety of City funds; however, the majority of their support comes from the General Fund. In a budget to budget comparison, interfund payments have increased by approximately 4% to $11.6 million. The majority of the increase is due to fleet fuel transfers, insurance support, and both one-time and ongoing transfers to Information Services for support of a Senior Systems Technician for public safety technology and continuation of the technology strategic plan. It is important to note that additional interfund payments go towards medical and workers’ compensation claims which are a part of the benefits cost category.

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Interfund Payments

$7,000,000 $6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $0 Info Services/GIS

Insurance

Fleet

Intergovernmental Intergovernmental expenses represent payments to other governments for services, such as fire dispatch, jail, and court services. Redmond currently contracts with NORCOM for fire dispatch services and with King County for jail and court services. For 2013-2014, fire dispatch costs in the General Fund have declined slightly due to a decline in calls based on a rolling eighteen month average used by NORCOM to determine dispatch charges. Court costs are also showing a decline due to the elimination of the red light camera program. Intergovernmental Expenditures Intergovernmental Jail Fire Dispatch Court/Other Totals

2007 817 196 982 1,995

2008 948 307 1,066 2,321

(thousands) Actual 2009 2010 978 893 485 329 1,253 1,200 2,716 2,422

2011 708 480 1,126 2,314

Estimate 2012 867 415 1,241 2,523

Forecast 2013 2014 740 790 410 451 998 998 2,148 2,239

1

1. Other includes elections and auditor services.

Utilities/Repairs & Maintenance (R&M) Utility costs for the City include telephone, electricity, natural gas, garbage, water, wastewater, and stormwater costs. The repairs and maintenance category includes maintenance for all City buildings including fire stations. The forecasted increases for utilities are shown in the table on the next page, as well as the historical and projected costs for utilities, repairs, and maintenance line items. In 2013-2014, included in the utility forecast is the General Fund utility tax for its fire services which equals approximately $1.9 million over the biennium. Also included is an additional stormwater charge ($239,109) toward the City’s impervious surface obligation.

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Projected Utility Rate Increases Projected 2013 2014 3.00% 3.00% 3.00% 2.90% 3.16% 3.16% 3.80% 3.80% 0.00% 0.00% 2.00% 2.00% 4.00% 4.00%

Utilities Telephone Electricity Natural Gas Garbage Stormwater Water Wastewater

Utilities/Repairs and Maintenance Utilities/R&M Utilities Repairs & Maintenance Totals

2007 2,244 935

2008 2,306 1,227

3,179

3,533

(thousands) Actual 2009 2010 2,482 2,519 1,288 1,412 3,770

3,931

2011 2,484 1,322

Estimate 2012 3,631 1,104

3,806

4,735

Forecast 2013 2014 4,033 4,164 1,026 1,060 5,059

5,224

Miscellaneous The last category of expenditures, miscellaneous, includes the economic contingency, capital purchases, tuition, advertising, and other expenditures. GENERAL FUND – SUB FUNDS AND SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Special revenue funds account for revenues and expenditures that are restricted for a particular use. With the change required for GASB 54 (see explanation at the beginning of this section), funds that were previously categorized as special revenue funds, became sub-funds of the General Fund. Examples of some larger special revenue funds are Advanced Life Support (ALS) which is supported by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Levy and the Real Estate Excise Tax Fund which collects real estate excise tax to be used in capital construction. Special revenue funds in the 2013-2014 Budget total $34.5 million (including transfers and ending fund balances) and are illustrated below. General Fund – Sub Funds General Gov't Capital Maintenance 18% Transportation Capital Maintenance 10%

Arts 1%

Special Revenue Funds

Parks Maintenance 6%

Parks Capital Maintenance 3%

Public Safety Levies 22%

Recreation Activity 17% Tourism 3%

Cable Access 4%

Equipment Replacement 13%

Real Estate Excise 20%

Operating Reserves 11%

Solid Waste 5%

Human Services 2%

Public Safety Donations 2%

TDM Services 10%

Business Tax 13% Community Events 1%

ALS 39%

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In comparison, the sub-funds of the General Fund total $71.9 million and include the capital maintenance funds for each of the CIP areas, the public safety levies passed by voters in 2007, as well as funds used to replace fire and general city equipment. Following is a discussion of the 2013-2014 projected revenues for some of the larger funds in these two categories. Advanced Life Support (ALS) In 2004, Redmond became a lead agency for the Northeast Advanced Life Support consortium made up of Redmond, Kirkland, Woodinville, Duvall, Fall City, and unincorporated areas surrounding those communities. An emergency medical services property tax is paid by all property owners in King County and the taxes collected support paramedic services throughout the County. Forecasted revenues for this service are based on the emergency medical services levy strategic plan approved by King County voters in 2007 and equal $13.5 million for the 2013-2014 biennium. In 2013, King County voters will be asked to approve the continuation of the emergency medical services levy. At that time revenues will be reassessed to determine future contract amounts. Fire, Police, & Parks Levy Funds In 2007, Redmond voters passed special property tax levies to support Fire, Police and Parks services. These levies supported the addition of firefighters and police personnel, as well as park maintenance and recreation programs. These revenues are subject to the 1% growth limitation imposed by the state legislature on property taxes. Special Levy Funds Special Levies Fire Levy Police Levy Parks Levy Totals

2007 0 0 0

2008 2,268 2,186 318

0

4,772

(thousands) Actual 2009 2010 2,284 1,982 2,195 1,422 320 251 4,799

3,655

2011 2,047 1,601 297

Estimate 2012 2,119 1,789 299

3,945

4,207

Forecast 2013 2014 2,650 2,735 2,192 2,281 341 350 5,183

5,366

Note: Excludes fund balances.

Reserve Funds The City maintains accounts dedicated to supporting the City’s reserves. According to fiscal policies, the City will maintain General Fund reserves to mitigate a significant crisis, a Law Enforcement Officers and Firefighters (LEOFF I) reserve to pay medical costs for retirees under the LEOFF I retirement system, as well as equipment replacement reserves for citywide equipment and fire vehicles. Reserves are also set aside in the Fleet Maintenance Fund (an internal service fund) for the replacement of citywide vehicles.

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Operating Reserve Fund Balances Reserves General Fund Reserve Building Permit Reserve LEOFF I Reserve Capital Equipment Reserve Fire Equipment Reserve Totals

4,894 412 420 2,690 2,417

33 0 0 0 0

(thousands) Actual 2009 2010 5,378 194 1,110 0 388 0 3,708 0 2,743 0

10,833

33

13,327

2007

2008

194

2011 5,852 309 350 3,096 3,045

Estimate 2012 0 0 0 0 0

12,652

0

Forecast 2013 2014 6,210 0 0 0 454 0 2,401 0 3,793 0 12,858

1

0

1. In 2013-2014, the Building Permit reserve has been combined with the General Fund Reserve. Note: Reserves are budgeted in the first fiscal year of the biennium. The second year represents any contributions to reserves based on the City’s forecast.

DEBT SERVICE FUNDS The City has created two debt service funds to pay for voted and non-voted debt. These funds are used to account for the principal and interest payments for the 1994 Refunded General Obligation, Bear Creek Parkway and Downtown Park projects. These debt obligations total $7.4 million over the biennium, including principal and interest. CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROGRAM In 2013-2014, Redmond has worked hard to strengthen the alignment between the CIP functional areas and the City’s long-range vision as articulated in the Vision Blueprint and the Comprehensive Plan. This alignment is especially important in the City’s two urban centers of Downtown and Overlake, as the City seeks to direct its public infrastructure investment in ways that will facilitate continued private redevelopment of these priority areas. While there are infrastructure/capital needs beyond the urban centers, capital projects still should be prioritized in much the same way as operational offers. By focusing public projects in its urban centers, the City is taking tangible steps towards realizing its vision for these areas, signaling its commitment to private developers and thereby encouraging them to continue to invest in Redmond. In 2011, the Council adopted an eighteen year capital investment strategy or Vision Blueprint that outlined the investment needed in the long-term to realize the City’s vision. The goals of the Vision Blueprint are to: •

Implement the Comprehensive Plan vision for Downtown, Overlake and established neighborhoods;

Identify key strategic actions needed to carry out the vision;

Summarize planned capital facility improvements sequencing and costs for the next 18 year period;

Guide future decisions about priority infrastructure projects and programs in each of the CIP areas;

Address deficiencies such as level of service requirements;

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Address maintenance, repair and upgrades as needed;

Address funding strategies; and

Address monitoring and reporting on progress.

Capital Investment Program projects range from street extensions and conversions to Downtown Park design, as well as utility infrastructure improvements. These projects are funded through a variety of revenue sources, both public and private. Excluding beginning fund balances, Real Estate Excise Tax (REET), impact fees and business tax, and transfers made from the General Fund are the four major revenues that make up a significant portion of the $89.1 million of 2013-2014 general CIP revenues. Other CIP revenues include federal and state grants, interest earnings and sales tax on construction.

Total 2013-2014 General CIP Revenues General Fund Transfer 16%

Business Tax 15%

Impact Fees 9%

REET 12%

Miscellaneous 6% Other Governments 8% Sales Tax on Construction 4%

Beginning Funds 22% Interfunds 6%

Interest 2%

Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) REET is a 0.5% tax on the sale of real estate inside Redmond city limits and is restricted to expenditures on capital projects. Due to the economic recession causing a lack of real estate activity in the City, REET declined by approximately 50% from its historical base of $4 million during the 2009-2010 biennium. This revenue grew slightly (3%) in 2011-2012 and is expected to have the same growth pattern in the 2013-2014 biennium. Business Tax (BTTI) Currently, a $57.00 fee is assessed per employee to businesses operating in Redmond to support transportation and transportation demand management projects. These revenues have stayed relatively stable and are projected to grow by approximately 1.2%, commensurate with projected employment growth in the City.

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General Fund Transfer Per City policy, 5% of General Fund operating revenues (minus development revenues and significant one-time collections) is transferred into the City’s Capital Investment Program. In addition, $1.1 million (adjusted for inflation) of sales tax on construction goes to support the lease on the City Hall building, as well as $300,000 per year for pavement management projects. In 2013-2014, an additional $4 million of one-time General Fund surplus will be transferred into the CIP to support the conversion of the Downtown one-way streets to two-way, complete the roundabout on 116th Street, and contribute to the Downtown Park design. Impact Fees The City collects impact fees from developers for transportation, fire, and parks. These impact fees are restricted to capacity projects that mitigate the impacts of growth in the community. Impact fees have also declined due to the economic recession consistent with development review revenue. Impact fees are expected to grow by approximately 5% from 2011-2012 levels. Major Capital Project Revenues CIP Revenues REET Business Tax General Fund Transfer Impact Fees Totals

2007 10,013 4,168 4,166 4,019

2008 2,824 4,540 4,289 6,274

(thousands) Actual 2009 2,170 4,462 7,250 971

22,366

17,927

14,853

2010 2,656 4,018 4,704 1,966

2011 2,815 4,066 4,559 2,330

Estimate 2012 3,099 4,100 4,693 2,345

13,344

13,770

14,237

Forecast 2013 2014 2,986 3,076 4,149 4,199 8,837 4,941 2,415 2,487 18,387

14,703

Note: General Fund Transfer includes 5% of General Fund revenues, sales tax on construction, pavement management and additional one-time General Fund surplus.

A significant portion of the biennial CIP has been dedicated to projects in the two urban centers, such as design and development of Downtown Park, the Redmond Way/Cleveland Street conversion from oneway streets to two-way, development of the Redmond Central Connector and the Overlake Village Pedestrian Bridge. Expenditures by functional allocation are shown below. CIP Expenditures by Functional Area (excludes ending fund balances) Parks 13%

General Government 20%

Transportation 67%

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ENTERPRISE FUNDS Water, Wastewater, and Stormwater Revenue Water, Wastewater, and Stormwater rates fund most of the costs associated with providing these services in our community. (Other sources include hookup fees and interest earnings.) Total Water/Wastewater and Stormwater revenues (including the Novelty Hill Service Area) are expected to increase from a budgeted $97.5 million to $101.1 million, a 3.7% increase. Proposed in the budget are water and wastewater rate increases for both in-City and Novelty Hill customers. These rate increases are due to a rise in purchased water costs and Metro sewer charges. City policy calls for a rate update to be performed in conjunction with the adoption of each biennial budget which occurred in July 2012. The table on the next page reflects the rates approved in the 20132014 Budget.

Water/Wastewater Rate Increases 2013 Proposed

Description City of Redmond Water Wastewater Novelty Hill Water Wastewater

2014 Proposed

2.0% 4.0%

2.0% 4.0%

2.0% 12.0%

2.0% 0.0%

Enterprise Fund Revenues Utility Revenue Water/Wastewater Stormwater Novelty Hill Totals

2007 30,612 10,893 6,261

2008 42,760 11,005 5,228

(thousands) Actual 2009 2010 31,566 23,237 10,865 11,367 6,089 5,500

47,766

58,993

48,520

40,104

1. In 2008, Water/Wastewater includes $12.1 million in bond proceeds. Note: Excludes fund balances.

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2011 30,639 12,264 7,318

Estimate 2012 30,426 11,343 6,326

50,221

48,095

Forecast 2013 2014 32,968 33,843 11,484 11,623 5,554 5,657 50,006

51,123

1


Water, Wastewater, and Stormwater Expenditures Money spent to support utility operations and construction is separated into eight utility funds [Water/Wastewater Operations, Water Construction, Wastewater Construction, Stormwater Operations, Stormwater Construction, and Novelty Hill Service Area (UPD) Operations, UPD Water Construction and UPD Wastewater Construction].

Utility Expenditures Novelty Hill Wastewater CIP Novelty Hill Water CIP Stormwater CIP Stormwater Ops Wastewater CIP Water CIP Novelty Hill Ops Water/Wastewater Ops $0.0

$20.0

$40.0

$60.0

$80.0

Millions

The total budget for all eight funds equals $188.3 million (including ending fund balance and transfers) with $115.6 million dedicated to operations and $72.7 million earmarked for construction. Included in the utility construction funds are expenditures to support the Downtown and Overlake Urban Center vision, as well as stream rehabilitation and pump station improvements (see CIP section for more detail). Prospects for the Future In the City’s long-range forecast, salary and benefits will continue to make up the majority of General Fund costs and will rise approximately 3.4% - 4.0% in future years. Contributions to the state retirement and medical costs are the two main drivers of these expenditures. The City will remain vigilant about cost containment as the economic recession continues to put pressure on citywide revenues. Past cost containment measures, new budgeting practices, and efficiency improvements will help Redmond manage expenditure increases into the future, as the City continues to refine and improve its execution of the BP model consistent with its ten-year implementation plan, continues to realize efficiencies through new technology and gains valuable knowledge through the performance measurement system. (See the Budget by Fund section for a financial summary of sources and uses of City funds).

24


CITYWIDE BUDGET SUMMARY 2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET

CITY OF REDMOND Fund Number

Budget to Budget Difference

2009-2010 Budget

2011-2012 Budget

2013-2014 Budget

$162,102,421

$146,889,655

$159,397,119

$689,741 3,496,280 855,875 3,998,296 1,385,069 3,472,006 7,549,857 5,160,813 13,843,675 5,962,110 5,578,979 668,102 0 0 0 $52,660,803

$702,549 3,250,340 975,930 0 1,392,729 4,043,057 7,586,283 5,245,842 9,067,266 6,758,079 7,348,043 940,264 982,208 7,330,497 4,674,499 $60,297,586

$581,981 3,260,317 875,855 0 1,572,373 4,980,455 8,062,368 4,450,947 9,348,677 7,417,919 8,634,689 1,111,528 1,969,906 7,041,984 12,596,634 $71,905,633

$214,763,224

$207,187,241

$231,302,752

$4,633,389 1,814,202 5,146,260 11,803,215 145,482 18,277,479 158,669 9,693 1,065,896 1,724,886 $44,779,171

$4,613,406 1,828,978 3,925,576 12,133,394 412,907 4,656,000 90,970 0 762,998 1,406,827 $29,831,056

$5,784,333 1,519,262 3,640,010 13,495,004 467,109 6,792,525 96,071 0 965,818 1,727,633 $34,487,765

$1,528,607 5,300,025 $6,828,632

$808,153 15,683,347 $16,491,500

$285,815 7,093,785 $7,379,600

($522,338) -64.6% (8,589,562) -54.8% ($9,111,900) -55.3%

CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROGRAM (CIP) FUNDS 3142 Council CIP $6,896,309 315 Parks CIP 38,044,334 316 Transportation CIP 78,292,925 3172 Fire CIP 14,532,815 3182 Police CIP 3,601,270 2 319 General Government CIP 15,146,833 Subtotal - CIP Funds $156,514,486

$1,818,408 23,281,838 36,660,784 8,249,686 873,355 13,497,811 $84,381,882

$280,247 9,568,616 50,709,493 2,300,000 150,958 6,092,902 $69,102,216

($1,538,161) -84.6% (13,713,222) -58.9% 14,048,709 38.3% (5,949,686) -72.1% (722,397) -82.7% (7,404,909) -54.9% ($15,279,666) -18.1%

100

Fund GENERAL FUND

GENERAL FUND - SUB FUNDS 011 Arts Activity 012 Parks Maintenance & Operations (M&O) 013 Community Events 015 Microsoft Development 019 Human Services 020 Fire Equipment Reserve 021 Operating Reserve 027 Capital Equipment Reserve 030 Business Tax 035 Fire Levy 036 Police Levy 037 Parks Levy 1 095 Parks Maintenance Projects 0961 Transportation Maintenance Projects 0991 General Government Maintenance Projects Subtotal - General Fund - Sub Funds GRAND TOTAL GENERAL FUND SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 110 Recreation Activity 117 Cable Access 118 Operating Grants 122 Advanced Life Support (ALS) 124 Aid Car Donation 125 Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) 126 Drug Enforcement 128 Emergency Dispatch 131 Tourism (Hotel/Motel) Tax 140 Solid Waste Recycling Subtotal - Special Revenue Funds DEBT SERVICE FUNDS 230 Excess Levy - GO Bonds 233 Bear Creek Parkway/Downtwon Park Subtotal - Debt Service Funds

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$12,507,464

Percent Change 8.5%

($120,568) -17.2% 9,977 0.3% (100,075) -10.3% 0 N/A 179,644 12.9% 937,398 23.2% 476,085 6.3% (794,895) -15.2% 281,411 3.1% 659,840 9.8% 1,286,646 17.5% 171,264 18.2% 987,698 100.6% (288,513) -3.9% 7,922,135 169.5% $11,608,047 19.3% $24,115,511 $1,170,927 (309,716) (285,566) 1,361,610 54,202 2,136,525 5,101 0 202,820 320,806 $4,656,709

11.6% 25.4% -16.9% -7.3% 11.2% 13.1% 45.9% 5.6% N/A 26.6% 22.8% 15.6%


Fund Number

Fund

ENTERPRISE FUNDS (UTILITIES) 401 Water/Wastewater M&O 402 UPD Water/Wastewater M&O 403 Water CIP 404 Wastewater CIP 405 Stormwater M&O 406 Stormwater CIP 407 UPD Water CIP 408 UPD Wastewater CIP Subtotal - Enterprise Funds INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 501 Fleet Maintenance 510 Insurance Claims & Reserves 511 Medical Self Insurance 512 Workers' Compensation 520 Information Technology Subtotal - Internal Service Funds FINAL BUDGET - ALL FUNDS

Budget to Budget Difference

2009-2010 Budget

2011-2012 Budget

2013-2014 Budget

Percent Change

$72,733,803 15,137,631 14,380,486 4,834,215 65,053,559 52,711,921 3,882,773 4,101,275 $232,835,663

$68,855,981 13,711,666 10,474,814 4,448,677 28,016,473 43,627,852 5,008,045 4,997,487 $179,140,995

$73,693,275 13,362,350 9,595,892 9,136,068 28,545,447 41,191,763 6,345,079 6,457,963 $188,327,837

$10,526,331 3,327,735 22,214,083 1,956,093 10,681,037 $48,705,279

$8,859,975 2,707,692 22,397,785 2,454,422 10,922,236 $47,342,110

$7,674,821 2,604,817 28,935,281 2,522,533 9,290,830 $51,028,282

($1,185,154) (102,875) 6,537,496 68,111 (1,631,406) $3,686,172

-13.4% -3.8% 29.2% 2.8% -14.9% 7.8%

$704,426,455

$564,374,784

$581,628,452

$17,253,668

3.1%

$4,837,294 7.0% (349,316) -2.5% (878,922) -8.4% 4,687,391 105.4% 528,974 1.9% (2,436,089) -5.6% 1,337,034 26.7% 1,460,476 29.2% $9,186,842 5.1%

Footnotes: 1. Funds 095, 096, and 099 are Capital Maintenance Funds created in the 2011-2012 Budget in response to GASB 54. 2. Funds 314, 317, and 318 will be eliminated in 2013-2014 after accounting for the transfer of funds and become a part of the 319 Fund.

26


ALL FUNDS SUMMARY 2009-2010 Actual

2011-2012 Budget

2011-2012 Estimated

2013-2014 Budget

Change

Percent Change

REVENUE Property Tax Sales Tax Utility Taxes Other Taxes Total Taxes Licenses & Permits Intergovernmental Charges for Services Fines & Forfeits Interest Other Revenue Non-Revenue TOTAL REVENUE

$40,376,133 $43,209,695 $44,236,202 $45,272,705 37,776,929 41,454,568 45,313,384 43,679,548 23,110,006 26,015,629 22,510,566 25,677,098 13,796,340 13,492,538 14,446,498 15,090,358 115,059,409 124,172,430 126,506,650 129,719,709 13,579,772 12,306,515 9,350,162 15,895,423 46,901,922 57,622,508 38,061,382 59,474,450 108,090,881 112,803,530 115,929,243 121,148,673 2,091,008 4,714,402 3,986,134 1,658,746 5,134,079 4,352,086 3,784,211 4,187,156 53,443,539 41,083,842 44,479,166 51,104,003 95,122,045 81,616,364 84,189,706 71,390,891 $439,422,653 $438,671,677 $426,286,654 $454,579,051

$1,036,503 (1,633,836) 3,166,532 643,860 3,213,059 6,545,261 21,413,068 5,219,430 (2,327,388) 402,945 6,624,837 (12,798,815) $28,292,397

2.3% -3.6% 14.1% 4.5% 2.5% 70.0% 56.3% 4.5% -58.4% 10.6% 14.9% -15.2% 6.6%

EXPENDITURES Salaries & Wages Overtime Supplemental Help Other Compensation Personnel Benefits Supplies Professional Services Communication Training Advertising Rentals Insurance Utilities Repairs & Maintenance Other Services & Charges Intergovernmental Capital Interfund Payments Debt Service Transfers Out TOTAL EXPENDITURES NET CHANGES FUND BALANCE JANUARY 1 FUND BALANCE DECEMBER 31

$101,465,371 $99,690,267 $101,502,102 $105,901,997 3,325,723 3,016,630 3,121,104 2,956,397 2,699,491 3,715,593 2,721,892 2,955,903 505,825 555,460 578,945 401,864 49,291,246 53,223,588 54,152,174 63,386,077 21,299,309 26,524,138 22,334,706 25,621,886 27,112,474 14,686,176 19,462,116 13,816,060 1,083,614 1,355,880 1,035,794 1,265,339 309,280 496,751 565,888 442,617 0 275,262 148,899 287,585 447,837 477,532 464,073 447,499 0 1,713,500 2,152,200 1,604,980 5,866,716 6,666,614 7,008,312 6,863,193 11,922,522 15,474,316 11,258,954 16,622,196 6,089,831 9,795,908 5,869,439 8,623,760 28,297,608 32,457,059 30,989,766 34,388,795 65,191 110,024,014 68,467,957 96,892,065 22,898,611 19,168,941 20,588,131 21,520,561 83,008,123 15,480,558 26,450,828 15,998,760 90,243,354 74,453,746 59,811,755 71,498,777 $455,932,128 $489,251,933 $438,685,035 $491,496,311 (16,509,475) (50,580,256) (12,398,381) (36,917,260) 162,866,329 125,703,107 159,442,625 127,049,401 $146,356,854 $75,122,851 $147,044,244 $90,132,141

$4,399,895 (164,707) 234,011 (177,081) 9,233,903 3,287,180 (5,646,056) 229,545 (123,271) 138,686 (16,574) (547,220) (145,119) 5,363,242 2,754,321 3,399,029 28,424,108 932,430 (10,452,068) 11,687,022 $52,811,276 (24,518,879) (32,393,224) ($56,912,103)

4.3% -5.3% 8.6% -30.6% 17.1% 14.7% -29.0% 22.2% -21.8% 93.1% -3.6% -25.4% -2.1% 47.6% 46.9% 11.0% 41.5% 4.5% -39.5% 19.5% 12.0% 197.8% -20.3% -38.7%

FULL TIME EQUIVALENTS

675.35

625.24

Note: 2013-2014 Budget FTE count of 622.81 is for 2014.

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622.06

622.81

0.75

0.1%


STAFFING AUTHORIZATIONS FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)

CITY OF REDMOND 2009-2010 Budget

2011-2012 Budget

Budget to Budget Difference

2013-2014 Budget

GENERAL FUND Executive/Legal3 1,3

Finance & Information Services Fire Human Resources Parks & Recreation3

Planning & Community Development

1,3

18.25

16.25

15.75

(0.50)

36.37 134.50 11.42

31.50 127.50 10.50

29.50 128.25 10.50

(2.00) 0.75 0.00

39.92

37.06

35.55

(1.51)

51.83

57.41

58.91

1.50

2014 Reduction 3

Police

-1.00

3 1

Public Works Arts Activity Special Events Parks Maintenance & Operations Microsoft Development Fund Parks CIP Maintenance Transportation CIP Maintenance GENERAL FUND TOTALS 2013 GENERAL FUND TOTALS 2014

*

-1.00

127.30

127.10

129.10

2.00

57.78 1.00 0.00 11.83 14.00 1.30 11.55 517.05

45.47 1.00 1.00 10.01 0.00 2.00 10.55 477.35

45.47 1.00 1.00 10.01 0.00 2.51 10.55 478.10

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.51 0.00 0.75 (0.25)

477.10

*

OTHER FUNDS Recreation Activity Operating Grants Fund

9.92 3.75

10.49 3.00

10.49 3.00

0.00 0.00

Advanced Life Support2

33.00

32.00

32.00

0.00

1

Solid Waste/Recycling Water/Wastewater1 UPD Operations & Maintenance

3.26 40.60 5.94

3.63 36.53 0.00

3.63 34.16 0.00

0.00 (2.37) 0.00

Stormwater Management1 Fleet Maintenance Worker's Compensation Insurance

28.77 6.16 1.00

27.48 6.58 1.00

30.85 6.58 1.00

3.37 0.00 0.00

Information Technology3

25.90

24.00

25.00

1.00

158.30

144.71

146.71

2014 Reduction 3

OTHER FUND TOTALS 2013 OTHER FUND TOTALS 2014 TOTAL ALL FUNDS 2013 TOTAL ALL FUNDS 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL FTEs

-1.00 145.71

*

-1.00

2.00 *

1.00

624.81 675.35

622.06

622.81 *

2.75 0.75

55.23

53.62

47.63

(5.99)

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Notes: 1. A reorganization of positions within Public Works, Finance and Planning occurred during 2012. 2. A reduction of one position in 2012 due to overstaffing in Advance Life Support. 3. Reductions made in 2013 include one half time position in Executive/Legal, one position in Finance/Accounting, one position in Parks and Recreations and one half time position in Planning. Reductions made in 2014 include one position in Planning and one position in Information Technology. Additions made in the 2013/2014 budget include one position in Planning, one position in Information Technology, one position in Wastewater Maintenance and Operations, .75 limited duration grant funded position in Fire Prevention and two positions in Police. * Reductions made in 2014 only.

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BUDGET BY PRIORITIES

PROCESS OVERVIEW BUDGET CALENDAR


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES PROCESS OVERVIEW 2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET

CITY OF REDMOND Why Budgeting by Priorities?

A process that is: Transparent Open Citizen Priority Based Approved by Council Objectives of BP

Starts with citizen priorities Different from traditional budgets

Redmond is a unique city that is the home to internationally significant worldwide businesses, such as Microsoft, Nintendo, Honeywell and Medtronics (Physio Control). As a result, the City is the third largest employment center in King County with a business population of 78,893 and a residential population of approximately 55,360. Challenged to provide a variety of high quality services to a wide range of customers, the City opted to change its traditional budget methods in 2008. It implemented an innovative approach to budgeting that fulfills the promise Mayor John Marchione made upon his election to office: “a transparent and open budget that is based on priorities developed with citizen input and approved by the Redmond City Council.” Mayor Marchione continues to have the same five objectives for the Budgeting by Priorities (BP) process: • Align the budget with citizen priorities; • Measure progress towards priorities; • Get the best value for each tax dollar; • Foster continuous learning in the City; and • Build regional cooperation. To move this vision forward, the City selected the BP process, because it focuses budget decisions on citizen priorities. This is in contrast to the traditional method of budgeting which adds a certain percentage to last year’s budget without assessing if the services result in the outcomes citizens expect. The starting point of the BP process is identifying the intended result of city services toward priorities developed through citizen interaction.

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Review of the BP process Review conducted by GFOA

Long-term BP timeline adopted

Early in 2010, the City undertook a thorough review of the 2008 BP process. This review was conducted by the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) Research and Consulting Center. While the review affirmed that the 2008 BP process was a significant success, it did offer several suggestions for improvements in the future. One of the key recommendations of the GFOA’s review was the development of a long-term strategy to continue to build out additional elements of BP over time. A timeline was developed as an element of the GFOA report. The City Council concurred with this recommendation and adopted a long-term BP strategy in early 2011. This budget is consistent with that strategy and continues to make improvements on this innovative approach.

Council updated long range financial strategy

In addition to the BP timeline, the Council has also reviewed and updated the Long Range Financial Strategy document first developed in 2005. This policy strategy creates the link between the biennial budget and the long-range financial sustainability of the City while providing high quality services.

Price of Government falls below 5%

As discussed in the Mayor’s budget message, the City’s Price of Government (see Budget Overview for a more complete description of the Price of Government) is projected to fall below 5% during this biennium. In fact, the development of this budget was especially challenging as resources were very limited.

Long range financial strategy

The Council contemplated this issue when recently updating the financial strategy. As a result, staff has included some elements from Chapter III of the strategy within this budget document to start the discussion regarding maintaining resources sufficient to enable the City to address community needs. Revenue Philosophy: • Assess and maintain fair, equitable and stable sources of revenue; • Prioritize less volatile revenue sources over more sensitive to changes in the economic climate, such as sales tax and sales tax on construction; • The “total” tax bill should be considered when increasing rates; • Limits to taxation; and

31


• Redmond’s

Voters should be asked to approve tax increases when the proposed increase is above a historical rate.

Community focus groups

To start the BP process in 2008 an independent firm held four focus groups with Redmond residents to determine citizen priorities. The citizens were chosen at random based on gender, age, and location. Following the focus group discussions the City held a community workshop where citizens and business owners were invited to give further input and comment on the focus groups’ identified priorities.

Six priorities were identified

Based on all the input, the Council approved the following six priorities on March 4, 2008 1:

BP process

Advisory committees

BUSINESS COMMUNITY I want a diverse and vibrant range of businesses and services in Redmond.

CLEAN & GREEN ENVIRONMENT I want to live, learn, work, and play in a clean and green environment.

COMMUNITY BUILDING I want a sense of community and connections with others.

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH I want a well-maintained city whose transportation and other infrastructure keeps pace with growth.

SAFETY I want to be safe where I live, work, and play.

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT I want a city government that is responsible and responsive to its residents and businesses.

Once the six priorities were determined, the Mayor created several teams to guide the process:

1

The focus groups also identified education as a priority; however, since education in Redmond is the responsibility of the Lake Washington School District, the Council chose not to allocate limited resources to a priority over which it had no jurisdiction, although educational components are included in several of the six priorities approved by Council.

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BP Project Team

Results Teams

Requests for Offers (RFOs)

RFO process

Project Team – Headed by the Mayor, included executive staff and the Deputy Finance Director to assist the Results Teams and guide the overall process Results Teams – Six Results Team groups were created and each group was assigned a priority. For the 2010 process, a seventh Result Team was created. This team focused exclusively on the Capital Investment Strategy. See more about this seventh Result Team later in this section. The teams were made up of four employees from crossdepartment disciplines and one citizen. The role of the Results Teams was to fashion Requests for Offers (RFOs) based on the priority approved by Council. To ensure that citizen input was incorporated into the offers, all the data gathered from the focus groups and community workshops was made available to the Results Teams. REQUESTS FOR OFFERS Each Results Team designed “Requests for Offers” (RFOs) that related to its specific priority by identifying factors and subfactors that contributed to that priority and developed purchasing strategies that answered the following questions: • Where should the City focus its efforts and resources? • Where can the City have the most impact? • Where should Redmond influence others? • Are there generic strategies that apply to all offers? The Results Teams invited all departments to bid on the RFOs and respond to specific purchasing strategies with the understanding that department offers would be ranked by the Results Teams upon completion using the factors in the RFOs as criteria.

All city funds included

Offer process

All funds were included in budget offers: General Fund, Capital Investment Program (CIP), Utilities, and Special Revenue Funds. Therefore all city services received the same level of scrutiny no matter the funding source. OFFERS An offer is a proposal by a department in response to an RFO that indicates how the proposer will meet the priority, how much it will cost, and how the success of the offer will be measured. An offer is a program or set of programs that helps achieve a priority.

33


Budget request process

Offers can be for an existing service or program, new programs or activities or improvements/changes to existing programs. Innovation was encouraged in all offers, as well as collaboration was emphasized between departments.

All budget requests are submitted as offers

In the BP process, each department must make an offer to provide a service that relates to results (a priority that is citizen driven). Each offer must describe the following: • What are we doing? • Why are we doing it? • How are we doing it? • Who are we doing it for? • Measurements to track performance for each program; and • How can the offer be scaled, either up or down.

Offers to include consistent data

Offers submitted by priority

Contents of the offer

City staff used an “online” tool designed to capture the needed information

High level indicators developed to measure progress toward priorities

OFFER SUBMITTALS Department directors and their budget teams submitted offers based on the priorities that related to their departments. No outside competing offers were accepted in this BP process, but departments were encouraged to collaborate where possible to combine services if it was in the best interest of the City. Each offer needed to contain the following information: • Description of the Offer – Simple, accurate, succinct, and complete; • Performance Measures – Describe short and long term benefits, consequences if not funded, and measures to gauge the identified outcomes; • Scalability – Provide logic and evidence to support various funding levels; • Customer Service – Identify who the customer is and how the offer meets customer needs; and • Revenue Sources – Identify revenue support DASHBOARD INDICATORS As a part of the accountability for performance elements of the City’s budget process a performance dashboard was developed. This was accomplished by a team representing the community, the council, department directors, and senior management staff. The team worked through much of the summer of 2011 to develop a proposal. The council reviewed the proposal and adopted the Performance Dashboard used for the 2013-2014 Budget. The Dashboard indicators include:

34


2012 dashboard indicators for each priority

Business Community: • The number and average longevity of businesses by •

The initial dashboard measures from the 2008 BP process were updated by the Performance Leadership Team in 2011. The City Council confirmed the dashboard and it was subsequently used in the 20132014 budget process. Data with regard to the dashboard measures are available on the City’s website: www.redmond.gov/bp.

category, relative to community goals: retail, restaurant and tourism, services, high-tech, and manufacturing; Percent of citizens and employees of businesses within the City satisfied with the range of businesses available in Redmond; and Percent of businesses satisfied with the services Redmond provides.

Clean & Green Environment: • Percentage of neighborhoods with convenient access to •

• •

parks and trails (ability to walk less than a quarter of a mile to a park or trail from home or office); Percent of the twelve significant streams that can support native habitat as measured by an index of 35 or higher (for conditions to be healthy for salmon, the Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity (B-IBI) or “bug index” score needs to be 35 or greater); Rate of single family residential waste stream (garbage plus recycling); and Percent of citizens satisfied with the quality of green spaces and trails (inclusive of parks).

Safety: • Quantity of violent crimes (crimes against persons) and • •

quantity of selected property crimes (auto theft, auto prowl, and identity theft); Percent of times the Redmond Fire and Emergency Medical Services provide a safe response with the right people and necessary equipment within the identified target times; and Number of residents engaged in activities related to public safety.

Community Building: • Percent of Redmond residents reporting they feel informed • •

about community events, programs, volunteer opportunities and issues; Percent of residents reporting they are satisfied with their engagement in community events, programs, and volunteer opportunities in the community; and Percent of Redmond citizens responding positively to a survey question that rates the overall sense of connection to the community.

Responsible Government: • Percent of community responding positively regarding satisfaction with City services;

35


• •

Trend in Redmond’s price of government; and The City’s bond rating.

Infrastructure & Growth: • Maintenance report card: includes pavement condition, • • • • •

incidence of water main breaks and sewer overflows; Mobility report card: ratio of Redmond’s transportation supply to transportation system demands (i.e. concurrency); Overall satisfaction of Redmond residents with the City’s transportation systems; Jobs to household balance (i.e. number of jobs in the local job market per household); Rents, home sale prices and income as a measure of affordability; and The pace of infrastructure development versus the pace of growth.

Capital Investment Strategy

Capital Investment Strategy One of the observations from the first BP process in 2008 was that a different approach was necessary for the Capital Investment Program (CIP) in contrast to the operating budget. In 2008, the six Results Teams had CIP offers to review along with the operating budget offers. The operating budget is for a period of two years while the CIP covers a six-year term. Also, the source of funds for the CIP is more complex than that for the operating budget.

2010 changes

In 2010, an additional Team, the Capital Investment Strategy Results Team, was established. This team was charged with developing additional criteria in the Request for Offers of the six priorities (there was not an additional priority, but rather just an additional Results Team). If an offer was intended as part of the CIP, it was passed through the priority Results Team to which the offer was submitted to the Capital Results Team. The Capital Results Team reviewed the offer in the context of: • RFO criteria of the priority under which it was originally submitted; • Additional criteria for the CIP; • Comprehensive Plan; • Vision for support of development in the urban centers; and • Additional funding constraints applicable to capital projects.

Additional criteria for capital investment offers

36


Capital Investment Strategy

Ranking the offers

Recommendation for funding from Results Team by priority

Allocations provided by the Mayor to the Results Teams based on past experience.

This process was repeated in 2012 for the 2013-2014 Budget. In addition, a great deal of work occurred between the preparation of the two budgets to create a “Capital Investment Strategy” that looked beyond the six years in pursuit of synergy in the projects and the City’s vision. RANKING THE OFFERS When the offers were first submitted, the Results Teams met with the departments to seek clarity on issues prior to critiquing and ranking the offers. During the first round of offer ranking, the Results Teams did not have funding allocations, nor were decisions based on mandates. The first round was used to give departments feedback on the content of their offer, as well as a sense of where their programs would rank. It also gave the Results Teams some time to learn and understand their role in the process. Departments were then given the opportunity to improve their offers and make adjustments based on advice from the Results Teams. The second and final rankings were carried out with estimated funding allocations, and attention was paid to those programs that were legally or contractually mandated. Recommendation for Funding Operations Results Team by Priority

Safety 24%

Responsible Government 17%

Mayor’s efforts to develop the adopted budget

Business Community Clean & Green 3% 9% Community Building 5%

Infrastructure & Growth 42%

PRELIMINARY BUDGET TO ADOPTED BUDGET In August 2012, the Mayor received the Results Teams rankings, with suggested funding levels for the various offers. The Mayor met with all the Results Teams for their insights into the process and to understand how they arrived at their conclusions.

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Department Directors Team involved

The Mayor worked for several weeks with the Directors Team to review the recommendations of the Results Teams and make adjustments to address revenue constraints and other needed adjustments.

Final decisions developed

When the final revenue estimates for the 2013-2014 Budget became available in September, the Mayor finalized the decisions necessary to present a budget to Council that is structurally balanced, reflects the recommendations of the Results Teams, and responds to the priorities recommended by citizens.

Funding by priority in adopted budget

Funding of Operations by Priority in the Adopted Budget

Safety 24%

Business Community Clean & Green 4% 8% Community Building 5%

Responsible Government 16% Infrastructure & Growth 43%

Use of Budgeting by Priorities is affirmed by the results

BP PROCESS AFFIRMED The Mayor’s vision for the BP process has resulted in more than just a budget. The inclusion of the community in outlining the priorities and the creation of Results Teams to craft Requests for Offers has expanded the budget process to include many staff, as well as citizens who never had the opportunity to be engaged in their community or its government in this manner. Creating interdepartmental teams with a citizen on each allowed staff to better understand what other departments accomplish, while gaining citizen perspective on how the services are viewed by the public. City employees are included in the budget process to a much larger extent than in the past; those who were not directly involved meet with the Mayor regularly to ask questions and gain information.

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Over the past two biennia, staff has been investigating ways of doing business differently. The City has a long standing history of both contracting out services and being a service provider to other jurisdictions. Innovations and efficiencies

City staff has developed an inventory of innovation and efficiency efforts to date whether it is pursuing outsourcing as the most effective way to do business or exploring process improvement systems to enhance service delivery. These activities include:

Public safety innovations

Public Safety • Effective partnerships with service providers, such as Fire District #34, King County Advanced Life Support, North East King County Regional Public Safety Communication Agency (NORCOM), and neighboring jurisdictions; • Pursuing regional fire training solutions; • Cost effective jail management; • Regional information sharing of crime data; • Partnering with Eastside Public Safety Communications Agency (EPSCA) for public safety radio services; • Outsourcing police vehicle fitting; and • Connecting with the Redmond Community through the Neighborhood Resource Officer Program.

Regional activities

Regional Efforts • Providing services, such as Police Dispatch to the Cities of Carnation and Duvall, as well as fire equipment maintenance to the Cities of Bothell and Mercer Island; • Cooperative training activities via Human Resources; • Delivering and funding human services; • Providing affordable housing through A Regional Coalition for Housing (ARCH); • Relationship with Cascade Water Alliance (CWA) for water delivery; and • Providing planning services to the City of Duvall.

Process improvement initiative

Process Improvement • Use of the “Price of Government” as policy basis for revenue discussions; • Implementing new technology, such as Dynamics AX 2012 for accounting and project management, and Energov for permitting; • Implementing online Council information for better access to data internally and externally;

39


• • • • • • •

City of Redmond’s financial plan Relationship of the financial planning elements

Centralized City communication and outreach efforts; Co-location of business license services with permitting services; Information Technology Strategic Plan implementation, including governance model and service management process; Instituting a new wellness program and implementing dependent premium cost-sharing; Leveraging transportation grant administration; Centralizing facilities and fleet maintenance services; and Integrating performance measures with department administration and the Council dashboard measures.

There is an intentional logic in the design of the City’s financial planning strategy. It is represented in the illustration below and referred to often in this budget.

Budget by Priorities

Capital Facilities Plan

Capital Investment Strategy Price of Government Long Range Financial Strategy First layer: Long range financial strategy

Second layer: Price of Government Resources available for the provision of facilities and services

The foundation of the City’s financial planning efforts is the Long Range Financial Strategy (LRFS) first developed by the City Council in 2005 and refreshed in 2011. This strategy is comprehensive for all city functions and funds. It includes the other elements referred to in the above illustration. The Price of Government is how the City thinks about the right level of resource that should be available to provide city services. The “price” is a ratio of total city revenues (all funds divided by all external revenues) to total personal income (personal income x population). It has historically been between 5% and 6% and is now at or below 5% in the 20132014 Budget. This is verified by the difficulty in providing a consistent level of service in this budget with the constrained resources. Using the LRFS, the City should explore options to maintain the “price” at 5% as a minimum.

40


Third layer: Capital Investment Strategy

The “Capital Investment Strategy” (CIS) was developed in 2010-2011 for two primary purposes. First, to ensure capital investments across the City are proposed in a coordinated fashion and focused on the vision as defined by the adopted comprehensive plan. Second, once a coordinated and focused CIS is developed it will inform the capital facilities plan and the ability of the City to facilitate growth. An inherent aspect is the ability to maintain the City’s past investments into the future.

CIS as a foundation

The CIS is portrayed as foundational, as the level of service (described in the State Growth Management Act) is both a capital facilities and an operating budget concept. The Comprehensive Plan describes the type of city and/or community that Redmond strives to provide in the form of facilities and levels of service. This should be reflected in both the Capital Facilities Plan (the implementation version of the CIS) and the operating budget.

Budget by Priorities

Budget by Priorities is the implementation of the operating plan through deploying financial resources. It resets the focus every two years on accomplishing as much in the way of service provision to the community as the “price” will allow. It affirms the value of the services provided through a robust use of performance management where each programs’ intended outcomes are described. The data about past performance is also part of the analysis.

Personnel is a key focus area

Capital Investment Plan

The BP process focuses on outcomes; however, those outcomes are achieved by careful deployment of resources. The primary resource used by the City to provide community outcomes is personnel. As a result, personnel costs amount to two-thirds of all expenditures. The ability to maintain a welltrained, well-equipped workforce is crucial to the provision of reliable services. The Capital Investment Strategy results in a mix of projects and programs implemented by the City. These are described in the Capital Investment Program (CIP). The CIP is a list of projects and programs that represent the City’s vision (e.g. Downtown, Overlake and Redmond neighborhoods and citywide CIP programs). Since capital resources are included in the Price of Government, the ability of the City to afford the various capital investments is also affected by the “price”.

41


BUDGET CALENDAR 2013-2014 ADOPTED BUDGET CITY OF REDMOND 2012 DATE

TASK Citizen Academy Briefing on BP

January 23

Neighborhood Meeting #1

February 23

Study Session on Performance Dashboard

February 28

Neighborhood Meeting #2

March 1

Council Briefing on BP Process/Calendar

March 6

Neighborhood Meeting #3

March 7

Request for Offers Development by Results Teams Council Briefing on Request for Offers (PAF Committee) Departments Submit First Round Offers

Feb 21 - March 12 March 20 May 4

Council Retreat

April 21

Public Hearing #1 – Budget and CIP

June 19

Departments Submit Final Offers

July 3

Council Briefing on POG and Preliminary Revenue Projections Utility (Water/Wastewater and Stormwater) Rate Study Sessions before City Council Budget Balancing with Mayor/Department Directors Development of Preliminary Budget

July 10 July-August July-August August-September

Preliminary Budget and Six-Year Financial Forecast distributed to Council; Results Teams Briefed

October 9

Public Hearing #2 – Budget and CIP

October 16 October 25(Th), 30(T) November 1(Th); 8(Th); 13(T); 15(Th); 27(T)

City Council Study Sessions on 2013-2014 Biennial Budget Public Hearing #3 – Budget and CIP

November 20

City Council Adoption of the 2013-2014 Biennial Budget

December 4

City Council Adoption 2013 Property Tax Levy

December 4

Council Debrief of 2013-2014 BP Process

December 11

42


BUSINESS COMMUNITY

RESULTS TEAM REQUEST FOR OFFERS RESULTS TEAM MAP OFFER SUMMARY OFFERS


BUSINESS COMMUNITY I WANT A DIVERSE AND VIBRANT RANGE OF BUSINESSES AND SERVICES IN REDMOND

REQUEST FOR OFFERS TEAM MEMBERS Team Lead: Tricia Thomson, Public Works Team Member: Erik Scairpon, Police Team Member: Chester Knapp, Planning Team Member: Michael Benson, Finance Team Member: Joe Townsend, Community Member DASHBOARD INDICATORS Indicator 1: The number and average longevity of businesses by category, relative to community goals: retail, restaurants, tourism, services, high-tech and manufacturing. Measure Description: A diversity of businesses creates local choices and opportunities for residents and employees of community businesses. This measure captures the variety of businesses within certain target areas identified by past studies and the City Council. Retention of family wage jobs within the area will also be illustrated by this measure. Calculation Method: Starting with the recommendations from the Economic Development Study conducted in 2010, the City Council will determine the types of businesses to be tracked within this measure. A goal for the number of jobs by business type will be established illustrating an ideal range of businesses. The data for this measure is generated by the City’s business license systems.

Indicator 2: Percent of citizens and employees of businesses within the City satisfied with the range of businesses available in Redmond and percent of businesses satisfied with services Redmond provides. Measure Description: In identifying a vibrant and diverse business community as one of the City’s priorities, Redmond’s citizens indicated that convenient access to the types of services and business amenities is important. This measure will illustrate the perception of Redmond’s residents as to whether the mix of businesses accessible within the community meets their needs. Calculation Method: For citizens the biennial survey will be the mechanism to collect satisfaction data. Create mechanism to capture business data on a rolling basis from those who do business with the City.

43


INTRODUCTION/SUMMARY OF CAUSE & EFFECT MAP The Business Community Cause and Effect Map identifies four factors that are important in addressing the priority of creating a diverse and vibrant range of businesses: 1) Business Support, Attraction and Retention; 2) Image and Identity; 3) Accessibility for Businesses and Consumers; and 4) Mix of Businesses and Activities. Factor 1: BUSINESS SUPPORT, ATTRACTION & RETENTION A focus of the City of Redmond is to exhibit and promote a healthy environment that attracts and retains businesses and services. To obtain this result Redmond must take an active role in creating an atmosphere that provides efficient processes, proactive support, and a welcoming environment. A welcoming environment includes being business friendly, making it easy for businesses to get assistance, having positive business/governmental relationships, and acknowledgement of business successes in the community. To facilitate efficient processes there must be expeditious and predictable licensing and permitting, as well as timely administrative reviews and approvals, and a single point of contact for services (project ombudsman). Businesses are looking for certainty, predictability and simplicity in permitting, licensing, regulations, and enforcement. The co-location of staff affords an opportunity to provide “one stop shop” service. An accepting, “can do” attitude for customer service with active support delivers a powerful message to the development and business community. The attitude of a “guide” versus a “regulator” is the key to collaborative problem solving resulting in timely and predictable outcomes. This factor focuses on the promotion of incubator space and targeted business cluster development in areas, such as aerospace, software/information technology, homeland security, renewable energy, biometrics, communications services, tourism, retail, as well as research and development. Factor 2: IMAGE & IDENTITY The image and community identity that a city presents to residents, as well as local and international community contributes to its ability to attract and retain a diverse set of businesses. This in turn helps contribute to community livability, well-being, and vision. The City of Redmond can facilitate creating a positive, pro-business reputation by supporting partnerships and activities that demonstrate collaboration between the City and businesses; activities that promote a talented and skilled workforce; efforts that leverage Redmond as a city that is home to many high-tech companies; development of iconic places that reinforce community identity and draw customers to Redmond businesses; improved connections to resources at universities and colleges, and fostering programs that reinforce an entrepreneurial community character. In turn, public private partnerships and continued collaboration help integrate businesses with the community, and businesses are encouraged to be actively involved in Redmond’s events and activities, such as Derby Days and Redmond Lights. Factor 3: ACCESSIBILITY FOR BUSINESSES & CONSUMERS It is critical that the infrastructure of the City allow for ample access by residents, employees, consumers, and delivery services. Water, sewer, and broadband systems along with transportation facilities all need to be designed, built, and maintained to support businesses and consumers. 44


People arrive in Redmond via roads, sidewalks, trails, private vehicles, bikes, walking or transit. The streets and streetscapes should be attractive and inviting; the many trails and pathways should be pedestrian friendly. Addressing traffic congestion during normal operating hours and in times of capital construction is important in supporting business sustainability. Balancing parking demands between the public and private sectors requires parking for employees, customers and visitors, coupled with parking enforcement and permit systems. By having round-the-clock proactive police protection, investigation of criminal incidents and public safety outreach as opposed to reactive police services the City can help contribute to an environment where residents and businesses feel more secure. The City should continue to be supportive in assisting new or expanding businesses in settling into suitable retail and office space with a quick and predictable process. Encouraging public and private amenities proximate to businesses ensures the growth of an area customer base. Our goal is to encourage people to stop, shop, work and play in Redmond by making it a pleasant, desirable, and easily accessible destination. Factor 4: MIX OF BUSINESSES & ACTIVITIES A vibrant business community necessitates a balance of daytime and evening destinations, as well as an emphasis on cultural arts and entertainment. Redmond businesses that reflect the community character, and offer a wide range of goods and services, including anchor and unique specialty stores, will help make the City a destination for “one stop shopping,� improving the availability of goods and services, as well as enticing local residents, tourists, employees, and consumers from the region to visit and shop in Redmond. The objective is to offer a variety of businesses and activities that make Redmond a destination while fostering its unique identity. A lively arts scene encompassing Redmond’s image will help make the City a destination place and keep employees in town when their work day ends. Examples include museums, art galleries, and nighttime entertainment. In addition, the neighborhood accessible retail and gathering places, including family and group facilities, will help support the creation active daytime and evening destinations for the community. Finely, improving the quality and quantity of employment opportunities and securing a variety of small, medium and large businesses, will help create a robust and durable economic base for the City. PURCHASING STRATEGIES WE ARE LOOKING FOR OFFERS THAT: Strategy 1: Provide efficient processes that result in a clear, predictable, flexible, and timely response to business-related applications. Business owners, developers, and design professionals operate most effectively when they understand the rules by which their business or project will be reviewed; understand the review process; and can rely upon established timeframes to realize predictable outcomes. A city should serve as a guide to navigating the rules, regulations, and permits that affect new, growing, and established businesses. Conducting business permitting, licensing, and enforcement in this fashion helps to set a tone of partnership. Flexibility can be addressed through customer service initiatives and approaches to meeting the objectives of this strategy. This purchasing strategy is intended to reduce review timeframes and set clear expectations without diminishing the quality of work, ensure safety, and support the comprehensive plan. 45


Strategy 2: Promote Redmond as a positive place to do business and enhance relationships between businesses, the City and community as a whole. Businesses look to locate in communities that are commerce-friendly. Recognizing the symbiotic relationship between businesses, local government, and the community, offers are favored that: enhance relationships and encourage partnerships through proactive economic development activities; provide business supportive resources and programs, including assistance in the promotion of incubator space and targeted business cluster development; promote interactions with the business community that support a safe environment; and recognize and foster business contributions to the community. Strategy 3: Establish Redmond as a destination for consumers, local and regional residents, tourists, and employees of local businesses, resulting in opportunities that reinforce a positive community image and unique identity. Redmond’s weekday population exceeds its residential total. We favor offers that encourage these employees, citizens, and visitors to spend time in Redmond beyond the traditional work day. Redmond should promote distinct commercial, entertainment, and cultural opportunities that foster interest and customer loyalty for residents, employees, and visitors alike. Enhancements to Redmond’s image will act as a financial sustainability effort to benefit both businesses and the City with greater potential revenues from these groups. Favored offers will support Redmond’s vision and priorities as identified in the Comprehensive Plan. Strategy 4: Create accessibility to businesses and activities through inviting, attractive, and safe streetscapes and public gathering places. As Redmond transitions to a more urban environment, our community has an opportunity to redefine its own unique character. Streetscapes that are inviting, connected, and secure will help establish a sense of place, and support neighborhood retail and gathering places. This strategy is designed to draw people to socialize, walk, shop, and enjoy a “Redmond” experience by creative and innovative use of plantings, art, building façade treatments, street furniture, and more. Strategy 5: Create easy, efficient and effective access to businesses that integrate mobility, infrastructure, and parking. Careful, long range planning helps increase overall business accessibility by facilitating the movement of people and products (freight) to and from the marketplace and providing the proper infrastructure to support and accommodate the mode of transit. Projects and programs that speak to efficient use of parking and other shared mobility resources will be favored. Strategy 6: Help the City be seen as entrepreneurial; achieve fiscal responsibility by implementing and sustaining innovative projects and programs that have a high value for the dollars invested. Offers are favored that demonstrate innovation through efficiency in cost, timing and approach, as well as leverage actions and resources cooperatively through cross departmental efforts, initiatives, and budget offers. For ongoing offers we favor programs and initiatives that demonstrate results that meet or exceed performance measurements or show a reevaluated approach to meet these standards.

46


CIP PURCHASING STRATEGIES Strategy 7: Urban Centers Realize Redmond’s vision for Downtown and Overlake1 by providing needed facilities, services and improvements within these two urban center neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support implementation of the vision and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 Capital Investment Program (CIP). Strategy 8: Neighborhoods Provide infrastructure connections and systems in Redmond’s established neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support improved connections within or between neighborhoods and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 CIP. Strategy 9: Preservation of capital Provide for the preservation of the City’s infrastructure system. Offers will be favored that maintain and improve the reliability, safety and integrity of the system. Strategy 10: Value for investment Achieve high value for the dollars invested and demonstrate efficiency in cost, timing and approach. Offers should describe how projects have been coordinated to provide the most effective approach and to minimize disruption to the community. In addition, explain how the offer leverages actions and resources by others, through partnerships; for example, meet the strategic needs of the City. Strategy 11: Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint Carry out the Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint – Capital Investment Strategy, 2013-2030, as well as adopted functional plans. Offers will be favored that implement recurring policy direction and priority projects from these documents, as well as leverage other projects in a cross-functional manner. NOTES/PRACTICES/SUPPORTING EVIDENCE 1. 2. 3. 4.

2011-2012 Budget Requests for Offers City of Redmond Economic Development Strategy Interview with Erika Vandenbrande on Economic Development and Budgeting by Priorities 20112012 process City of Redmond Comprehensive Plan

Resources used by prior Business Community Results Teams 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

1

Enterprise Seattle Work plan, http://www.enterpriseseattle.org Prosperity Partnership Strategy, Foundation Initiatives; Cluster Initiatives, and Competitiveness Indicators, http://www.prosperitypartnership.org State of Washington, Department of Commerce website, http://www.commerce.wa.gov City of Kirkland, www.ci.kirkland.wa.us/Business.htm City of Seattle, http://seattle.gov/html/business/default.htm City of Bellevue, http://www.ci.bellevue.wa.us/economic_development.htm

 See Redmond’s Comprehensive Plan for the vision for Downtown and Overlake  47


I want a diverse and vibrant range of businesses and services in Redmond

Business Support, Attraction & Retention • Welcoming environment through attitude and actions • City acts as a guide, not a regulator • Accepting and active support for businesses • Certainty, predictability and simplicity in permitting, licensing, regulations, and enforcement

Image & Identity • Contributes to community livability, well-being, and vision • Integrated with community

Accessibility for Businesses & Customers • Infrastructure that supports a mix of businesses

• Making Redmond an attractive place for customers, visitors, and businesses

• Easy access to businesses and activities

• Positive business reputation

• Attractive and safe streetscapes

• Safe environment

Mix of Businesses & Activities • Balance of daytime and evening destinations • Businesses that reflect community character • Contributes to availability of products and services • Neighborhood accessible retail and gathering places • Family & group facilities


BUSINESS COMMUNITY 2013-2014 OFFER SUMMARY Page No Offer # 50 PLN2468 53 PLN2451

Offer Sustainable Economic Development Predictable Development Permitting

56 59 62

FIN2411 PLN2474 PLN2456

Business License OneRedmond Access to Businesses Through Parking Management

65 71

PLN2457 PRK2582

Business Access and Mobility

68

PLN2454

An Active and Engaging Downtown Art Scene - Unfunded Tourism Promotion

2

2013-2014 Adopted Budget1

Department Planning Fire/Planning

Ranking 1 2

Finance Planning Planning

3 4 5

212,402 200,000 248,807

Planning

6

2,858,871

Parks Planning

7 8

0 690,000

$705,141 8,294,780

$13,210,001 Notes: 1. Adopted Budget totals may not include ending fund balances and fund transfers for all offers. 2. Offers with zero budget were submitted for consideration through the budget process, but not funded or approved.

49


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2468

SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Description: What: Strengthening partnerships with businesses is a cornerstone to an economically vibrant community, which in turn provides a climate to attract the range and diversity of services desired by the community. This offer focuses on: 1) creating and nurturing relationships with the business community and enhancing customer service; 2) working with the OneRedmond organization, local businesses, and property owners to support opportunities to retain, grow, and attract businesses; 3) building Redmond's image among the business community; 4) implementing innovative and entrepreneurial programs to support growth of Redmond's business clusters; and 5) promoting Redmond as a place for visitors, employees, and residents to do business. Why: A thriving and prosperous business community provides a foundation for a strong tax base to support public infrastructure and services for our community. Proactive engagement in activities that support businesses is critical to achieving sustainable economic development by providing the building blocks to ensure that residents, visitors, and businesses experience Redmond as a business-supportive community. This offer is complementary to the OneRedmond Initiative in that it represents specific actions the City will undertake, whereas the OneRedmond Initiative focuses on engaging high-level business leaders whose endorsement and support will serve to attract businesses to Redmond through a public-private partnership. How: Our offer consists of five key elements to support sustainable economic development: 路 Creating Connections with the Business and Economic Development Community: Connecting with and being an ambassador for the business community to promote Redmond as a positive place to do business and enhancing relationships between the City and business community. The Economic Development and Transportation Demand Management Division, working in concert with other staff through the City, will foster a robust business outreach program that will collaborate with partners on the Eastside and the greater Seattle community to support Redmond's economic vitality. In addition, the City's Economic Development team will support City staff across all departments to: establish positive relationships with our business community; engage individually with business owners to understand and respond to the issues they face; and act as an ambassador for business needs as they relate to City functions. Together, these activities foster a responsive, welcoming environment and build upon our reputation as a positive place to do business. 路

Identify and Increase Opportunities for Business Success: Recent economic development studies and reports [Angelou, National Community Development Services (NCDS), and Theories in Practice Strategies (TIPS)] have underscored the need for the City to identify and increase opportunities for business success by addressing elements within the City's sphere of influence. Among these are: permitting and development streamlining; developing an inventory of available commercial office and manufacturing space; provision of public infrastructure; policies that support our economic development goals and enhanced coordination; and engagement with the region's economic development strategy. Engaging with businesses to identify and reduce barriers to business success, through a formalized consultant analysis, will facilitate doing business in Redmond, enhance Redmond's brand as a business-friendly city, and build trust with our business community. Businesses will feel more welcome when City staff plays an active role in listening and responding to issues affecting business success. Such issues could be regulatory, procedural or operational. This element builds upon the significant strides the City has made in improving internal processes, by identifying additional opportunities for and/or barriers to business success and taking affirmative steps to address them. This effort would directly support certainty, predictability and simplicity in permitting, licensing, regulations and enforcement. We propose retaining a consultant to conduct interviews to assess the City's regulatory and procedural systems that may be hindering our efforts to achieve the City's economic vision. While previous consultant studies have focused on economic development strategies and organizational 50


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2468

SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT recommendations, this effort provides an objective analysis of specific City systems that could be modified to give the City a competitive edge. 路

Enhance Redmond's Image, Identity, and Business Resources: Developing a strong image and identity for Redmond is a key recommendation from recent studies. The City can further this effort by creating a welcoming and effective web presence oriented toward business and development. A strong web presence will provide access to information and resources for the business community, including the growing population of foreign born business owners in Redmond. Additionally, providing printed marketing materials about Redmond's business climate, demographics, and procedures will further enhance the City's engagement with the business community, and is a critical element of customer service. Printed materials serve to present a polished informational packet that highlights the City's Economic Development initiatives and other key information. A twofold approach is proposed to expand our promotional materials and access to needed information. First, building upon our existing web presence will provide access to commonly needed business resources, demographic information, and City statistics that are typically requested, and would serve to promote our economic development efforts, including our partnerships and Innovative Partnership Zone status. Second, producing printed materials helps our outreach and marketing efforts, and serves as a tool to reinforce the City's image and identity with respect to our sophistication and status in the region and nation.

Continuation and Enhancement of the Think Redmond Partnership: The Think Redmond partnership with the Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce is a program that has been successful in partnering with our business community to inform local businesses, visitors and residents about the benefits of supporting Redmond businesses. This program enhances Redmond's image and identity as a positive place to patronize and do business through innovative partnerships and programs. The economic development elements of this program promote Redmond businesses and encourage residents and employees to consider Redmond businesses first through the free online business directory. The promotions encourage residents, employees and visitors to patronize Redmond businesses, including after work hours. Think Redmond supports customer access by encouraging walking, bicycling, carpooling or taking the bus, which reduces traffic and frees up parking. Promotions via Think Redmond support outreach/construction mitigation efforts that help increase access to local businesses. This helps to address traffic congestion affected by construction projects. The program which includes marketing enhances Redmond's image and identity, inspires customer loyalty and reinforces biking, walking, and transit use as viable choices for non-commute trips.

Foster Development of Key Business Clusters: The Angelou and the subsequent TIPS reports identified the need to support attraction and retention of five key business clusters: Software and Information Technology, Retail and Tourism, Avionics and Homeland Defense, Renewable Energy/Clean Technology, and Emerging Industries/Entrepreneurs. Redmond is designated the State's interactive media and digital arts Innovation Partnership Zone (IPZ), which formalized an entrepreneurial collaboration to nurture and grow the interactive media and digital arts (video/online games, mobile phone/tablet applications, interactive television/advertising, social media, etc.). Continuing implementation of the IPZ business plan entails focusing on development of incubator space, facilitating relationships between educational institutions, leaders in the interactive media and digital arts industry, start-ups, and those with business development expertise and working with the Parks Department to promote the industry through activities included in An Active and Engaging Downtown Art Scene offer. Using this model, we will begin to develop similar action plans with the remaining business clusters proposed within the TIPS report.

51


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2468

SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Who: The offer focuses not only on Redmond's business and development community, but serves our residents and visitors as well. By creating the foundation and environment for business success, we are effectively creating a business climate that encourages and supports the diversity and range of businesses to serve our citizen, visitor, and daytime population.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

Establishing a minimum of 10 business contacts per week would provide a significant rate of business outreach. The purpose of these contacts is to understand each business, listen to their concerns and provide them with a resource to help resolve issues. Increase in number of total businesses and employees within business clusters identified in the TIPs report. This measure shows how successful the City is in attracting and retaining employers in the key business clusters.

Measure Businesses Contacted Businesses in Selected Categories Employees in Businesses

Target 10.00 860.00 45,918.00

2010 Act 0.00 0.00 0.00

2011 Act 0.00 0.00 0.00

2012 Goal 10.00 860.00 45,918.00

Measurement Per Week Number Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% reduction ($40,818) would eliminate Think Redmond and economic development printed marketing materials and would significantly hinder business retention and attraction efforts. A 6% increase ($50,000) would pay for a consultant to evaluate City processes and procedures from a business vantage point. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for professional services ($50,000). Reduced various line items ($50,000) including professional services, communications, repairs and maintenance, legal, and travel and training through right sizing.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$264,162

$273,249

$537,411

$83,855 $0 $0 $348,017 2.250

$83,875 $0 $0 $357,124 2.250

$167,730 $0 $0 $705,141

52


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2451

PREDICTABLE DEVELOPMENT PERMITTING Description: What: The Development Services Center (DSC) assists residents and businesses in obtaining permits to build or remodel homes and commercial buildings. There are 93 different types of permits, each unique and necessary to a specific purpose. In 2011, DSC reviewed a total of 521 entitlement permits, 304 major building permits, and 5,797 other building permits. This represents a 15.7% increase in land use permits, a 33.3% increase in major building permits, and a 55% increase in other permits compared to 2009 permit activity (2009 is a more typical year than subsequent years). It should be noted that overall DSC staffing levels were reduced by 14.5 full time equivalent (FTE) employees (a 31% staff reduction) since 2009 as a result of the cancellation of the Microsoft contract and the reduction in permitting activity. Staff members regularly review the processes to improve transparency, customer service and user-friendliness, as well as continue environmental policy and regulatory development and implementation in response to state legislation and scientific advancement. Further, DSC staff encourage applicants to incorporate sustainability measures, such as green building elements, into development proposals. This offer will also continue to advance the City's sustainability initiative and climate action planning by all City departments and the community by including several components: implementation of the City's Climate Action Plan, continued public outreach and education through Impact Redmond and Derby Day's EcoFair, continued carbon footprint benchmarking for City operations and the community, enabling of energy audits for City facilities through the coordination of this offer with other offers, and an update of City procurement policies to incorporate environmentally friendly purchasing strategies. Why: Effective permit processing leads to a built community that meets the vision of the City and its citizens, as well as promotes the City as a positive place to live and do business, with safely sited, designed, and constructed buildings. Long-term benefits of process improvement underway result in the City of Redmond's development processes becoming among the most efficient, user-friendly systems in the region. Examples include five-day turnaround associated to the Pre-Review Entitlement Process (PREP) and the 200-day reduction in the review cycle for the Civil Construction Review process (CCR). Permit review is important to ensure compliance with adopted City policies and to confirm that all codes and regulations are being met. How: To enhance user-friendliness, Fire, Planning Development Review, Building and Engineering functions are located together in the Development Services Center. Planning, Building, and Engineering are now under a single management structure. This grouping enables one-stop service for all aspects of the development process, while providing the opportunity for better internal communication and more focused problem solving. Staff members meet during project reviews to resolve conflicts between code provisions, coordinate correction requirements and ensure compliance with state law, city codes, adopted plans, standards and policies. Within this staff group, there is the Process Improvement Team, as directed by the Mayor, which is tasked with identifying ways to improve customer service related to plan review and inspections. Specifically, the goal is to establish and commit to all code requirements prior to issuance of approved plans to minimize the disruptions, variations and expenses that contractors and developers have experienced. This comprehensive review of the permit process, including improvement of established processes with the goal of greater predictability and a more timely response to inquiries and applications, prevents surprises for the applicant in terms of process or applicable code provisions that might result in costly delays and the need for redesign. The Business Community's Request for Offers (RFO) is supported by providing efficient processes and proactive support; facilitating the creation of a positive business/governmental relationship to ensure expeditious and predictable permitting, timely administrative reviews and approvals, single point of contact, certainty, predictability, and simplicity in permitting; collocating staff to provide "one-stop shopping"; accepting a "can do" attitude; acting as a "guide" versus 53


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2451

PREDICTABLE DEVELOPMENT PERMITTING a "regulator"; and providing collaborative problem solving resulting in timely and predictable outcomes that "get to yes safely." This offer provides predictability and easy-to-understand development processes with time frames that can be relied upon. DSC staff has streamlined the review of entitlement applications and civil review through implementation of the PREP and CCR processes, as well as introduction of the new Basics Program for single-family building permits and the Expedited Green Building Permitting Program for residential and commercial projects. The DSC has also produced more than twenty development brochures that explain and help guide applicants through the development process. These processes establish time frames and procedures that produce clear expectations and predictable results. Successful implementation of this offer will result in a positive perception of the City. The EnerGov permit tracking system will allow enhanced customer service and more efficient use of staff time as a result of system features, such as electronic plan review and integration with the City's Geographic Information System (GIS). The new Electronic Zoning Code (EZ Code) will also create efficiencies by providing a searchable and more manageable zoning code. To provide staffing at the appropriate levels, this offer also includes the conversion of an Assistant Planner position to an Associate Planner. In addition, this position is shown as fully funded by the General Fund. In the past, 0.19 of this position was grant funded. Who: Primary DSC customers are the general community and, in particular, the development and business communities. Customers also include any citizens needing building permits and, in general, the citizens of Redmond. Excellent customer service is an important element in the City's Economic Development program. Although some citizens may not be building anything, they rely on the DSC to provide them with information about development proposals that may interest them. The DSC also provides assistance as to how citizens can comment on and otherwise become involved in the review and comment process for development proposals. City staff are also customers of the DSC. The permit tracking software is the repository of all address-based information and is referred to and used by City staff for a variety of applications. In addition to serving applicants within Redmond, the Building Division also reviews single-family building permits and performs inspections for the City of Duvall through an interlocal agreement contract. Revenues from this agreement are received into the General Fund.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

3. 4.

Achieve a five-day turnaround time for 90% of the Pre-Review Entitlement Process (PREP) entitlement permit applications. PREP projects did meet the five-day turnaround goal. Achieve completion of civil drawing reviews in two cycles for 90% of the applications. Because the economy had such a negative impact on the development sector, the effectiveness of Measure 2 was difficult to assess as there were numerous cases where applicants just stopped their projects and did not complete their plans for the civil drawing review. Building and Fire reviews completed within established time frames 90% of the time. As shown below, fluctuations in actual performance/achievements will occur; however, the long-term goal remains high. For 2013, no overall increase and in 2014 a 1% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (measured in tons of equivalent carbon dioxide eCO2) and energy consumption [measured in Million Metric British Thermal Units (MMBtu)] for City operations. (Note that this takes into account that we are a growing city.) (New Measure)

54


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2451

PREDICTABLE DEVELOPMENT PERMITTING Measure Five-Day Turnaround for Entitlement Review Complete Civil Review Within Two Cycles Building and Fire Review Within Established Time Frames City Operations Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Energy Reduction

Target 90.00

2010 Act 97.00

2011 Act 97.00

90.00 90.00

97.00 92.00

97.00 89.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 90.00 Percent 90.00 Percent 90.00 Percent 0.00 eCO2-MMBtus

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% budget reduction ($441,593) would be equivalent to approximately 2.0-2.5 FTEs from the Development Services staff. Assuming that current permit levels stay constant, a reduction of 5% would result in less staff time being available to perform project review (approximately 80-100 hours less per week), leading to a significant negative impact on service levels and turnaround times. As an example, project assignments could be delayed at least two weeks and turnaround times would go from five days to more than 15 days. This would cause DSC to meet the performance measurement less than 5% of the time. Reductions in service would mean extended response times and could result in less development getting timely approvals for permits, thus not achieving the City's vision and reducing permit revenues. This could also cause a loss of positive customer service and predictability in the community, diminishing the perception of quality service. A 5% budget increase ($441,593) could result in an additional 2.0-2.5 DSC staff. This would allow the ability to provide an additional 80-100 hours of project review time per week, which would result in meeting performance measures 100% of the time and would allow DSC to review 15-20% more projects per year. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for 0.19 FTE Planner Associate ($32,843). In 2014, eliminated 1.0 FTE Permit Technician ($82,610) and reduced professional services and various line items ($193,824) through right sizing of line items in anticipation of status quo development review activity. Transferred salary and benefit costs ($100,000) to the Capital Investment Program for development review activity directly chargable to City projects.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

$3,131,408 $971,663 $0 $0 $4,103,071 28.285

$3,219,146 $972,563 $0 $0 $4,191,709 28.285

Total $6,350,554 $1,944,226 $0 $0 $8,294,780

55


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2411

BUSINESS LICENSE Description: What: The Business License Core Team, comprised of staff from Planning (Code Enforcement & Building), Fire (Fire Prevention), Public Works (Natural Resources) and Finance (Business License), has worked to provide the business community with team based support, guidance and efficient processes. Applicants now have an application process specific to their use (commercial, home-based, or outside city) and work with a single point of contact. This Business License offer and the team's continuing goal is to provide for a consolidated and comprehensive business license application process that is efficient, clear, predictable and timely in its response to the business community. The success of the new business model is reflected in the satisfaction level of new businesses surveyed in 2012. In addition, fees collected from Licensing provides for over $4 million towards Transportation programs. In support of the business community, the team's mission of innovation, partnership and implementation of the EnerGov system later this year speaks specifically to business support, attraction and retention and City services that provide efficient processes that results in a clear, predictable, flexible and timely responses to business-related applications. Additionally, the business license core team achieves efficiencies in cost, timing and approach through the cooperative cross departmental efforts and initiatives. The EnerGov system will enhance the team's ability to provide simplicity in licensing and improved customer service by offering online business license applications and renewals. EnerGov's web-based citizen portal and its ability to provide cross-department visibility of all activities occurring on a property will facilitate an even more expeditious licensing process with emphasized accountability. The goal of this budget offer is focused on promoting, retaining, and attracting businesses to Redmond through excellent customer service. The enhanced online applications and renewals will provide businesses with a more efficient and transparent licensing process. Why: An efficient and streamlined business licensing process is essential to attracting and retaining businesses in Redmond. It is important for businesses to be able to easily: 路 Understand what type of businesses can locate where; 路 Know the environmental and safety regulations that they need to comply with for their type of business and location (e.g. grease traps for restaurants, seismic requirements); and 路 Begin operating and generating revenue with minimal delays which can potentially cost the business hundreds to thousands of dollars. Ensuring compliance with City codes at the outset of business operations means businesses will not invest capital resources in a building or location that is not right for their type of business and minimizes the risks of fire and other safety hazards to employers, City staff and the community. The Licensing office is working with Economic Development to identify and assist with efforts that leverage Redmond as a city that is home to many high-tech companies. The team is working to ensure that all businesses operating in Redmond are licensed and paying the correct fee. Such parity is important in fostering a stronger business community. Sixty-five percent (65%) of the business license fees collected (approximately $4 million annually) are earmarked for transportation improvements and transportation demand management programs, increasing overall business accessibility and mobility. The remaining 35% of the license fees collected contributes to maintaining and enhancing the City's core levels of service. How: The Licensing business model provides a clear, accountable, and timely licensing process: 路 Provides "one stop shopping" to the business community; 56


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2411

BUSINESS LICENSE · · · ·

Demonstrates the City's desire to provide a welcoming environment to the business community; Fosters local sustainable economic development by providing easily understood regulations and a predictable timeframe; Prevents a business from locating in an area for which its use is not allowed; and Informs the business owner of any compliance issues and/or permits required upfront.

The Business License Core Team will collaborate with businesses to locate good options for retail and office space: · Ensuring the space has the appropriate fire safety measures (i.e. public gathering places and daycares), such as having to add fire sprinklers to an existing building; · Increasing overall business accessibility; · Facilitating density in urban centers; and · Ensuring a good mix of business use and activities to benefit the community. The joint inter-department Business Licensing model demonstrates a positive collaboration between the City and businesses that locate here through: · A consolidated application; · Timely reviews, inspections and approvals; · Expeditious and predictable licensing and permitting processes; and · Additional guidance regarding the City's requirements and resources. Who: Customers include both internal and external customers. · External customers: Primary customers include in-city, home-based and outside businesses, Chamber of Commerce, and outside agencies. · Internal customers: Council and all city departments

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Number of in-city businesses that have held a Redmond business license for seven consecutive years or more. Percent of new business license applicants that rate customer service as "4" or higher (scale of 1-5). (New Measure)

Measure Redmond Business License for 7 Years or More New Applicants that Rate Customer Service

Target 1,384.00

2010 Act 1,443.00

2011 Act 1,445.00

80.00

0.00

0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 1,500.00 Number 80.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: During the first month of the year, Licensing employs a half time temporary employee to assist with the annual license renewals. An increase of 5% ($9,278) to Licensing's biennium budget will provide full time support for one month, enabling the licensing office to process more returns. A 5% reduction to the biennium budget ($9,278) will result in a reduction of temporary employee services and will cause delays in processing renewals and prompt collection of renewal fees. Scalability Recommended: Reduced miscellaneous line items ($5,529) through right sizing.

57


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

BUSINESS LICENSE Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$79,999 $24,536 $0

$82,082 $25,785 $0

$162,081 $50,321 $0

$0 $104,535 0.870

$0 $107,867 0.870

$0 $212,402

58

Id: FIN2411


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2474

ONEREDMOND Description: What: The OneRedmond offer provides for proactive City of Redmond stakeholder participation in the program. It complements the Sustainable Economic Development offer by ensuring that the City is an active participant in a partnership led by the business community. The OneRedmond partnership will serve as the outward-facing presence of economic development in the community and will proactively engage in recruiting and retaining businesses and employees. The newly formed not-for-profit public-private organization (uniting the former Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce, Redmond Economic Development Alliance (REDA), and Realize Redmond organizations): 1) fosters proactive economic development; 2) provides services to support the development and growth of businesses; and 3) helps create community livability in Redmond. This innovative partnership is on the cutting edge of an emerging national entrepreneurial trend that combines traditional chamber of commerce-type membership services with economic development activities to attract and retain businesses and employees. OneRedmond enhances this mission by including creation and support of community within its charter. Why: Creation and support of a vibrant economy are fundamental to Redmond's community vision. Fostering a business climate where existing businesses are supported, new businesses and employees are attracted and retained, and community engagement occurs is key. Findings from economic development studies conducted for Redmond over the past four years [Angelou, National Community Development Services (NCDS), and Transportation Improvement Program Strategies (TIPs)] have underscored the need for the City of Redmond and local business and community leaders to work closely together to create a more supportive business climate by: 1) developing and fostering leadership in the business community; 2) identifying and mutually addressing barriers to business success and effective economic development; 3) developing the community's capacity to engage in economic development activities to increase the number and diversity of businesses; 4) providing resources to assist and grow small businesses; 5) clearly articulating Redmond's identity and image and promoting the brand; and 6) enhancing "community" (including facilitating the availability of arts and cultural experiences) for a variety of reasons, including supporting employee attraction and retention. OneRedmond was formed to address these outcomes intentionally. How: As an active stakeholder in the OneRedmond partnership, the City of Redmond would sustain the City's leadership in and commitment to collaborative economic and community development activities in Redmond. The City's involvement, prior to the consolidation of these organizations, has included participation and funding of REDA activities, membership in the Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce, and financial support of Realize Redmond. These efforts have resulted in increased engagement by local business leaders, the emergence of new leaders representing a diversity of business interests, an assessment of the local business climate, an evaluation of Redmond's current and developing business clusters and opportunity areas, the emergence of a deliberate plan to engage in economic and community development, and the formation of OneRedmond to deliberately, collaboratively, and concertedly revise and implement that plan. The City's continued financial investment into OneRedmond enables the organization to develop and grow, as well as provide the opportunity to proactively engage with and participate in OneRedmond which will deliver: 1) expertise and services to help attract, retain, and support creation of a diversity of both large and small businesses that reflect our community character; 2) economic development assistance, guidance, and facilitation in identifying and creating opportunities to help companies locate and grow in Redmond; 3) effective community leadership and connections, along with greater alignment between business, government, education, residents, and visitors that collectively reinforce a positive business reputation and an accepting and actively supportive environment for businesses; 4) creation of intentional and measureable outcomes; 5) opportunities to collaborate on policy, processes, infrastructure, and program enhancements that support easy and effective access to businesses and inform more efficient, 59


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2474

ONEREDMOND predictable, flexible, and timely interactions between the City and the business community; and 6) an enhanced and shared sense of Redmond's image and identity. While the specific set of services, resources, and activities that OneRedmond offers continues to evolve, they include providing creative and efficient resources to businesses, with an emphasis on small business development [(e.g. networking opportunities and information, education and outreach opportunities, economic development more broadly (business and employee attraction and retention) and community building (support for community events and cultural activities, and support for tourism)]. This effort will carry out in part the City's economic development strategy. Collaboration with OneRedmond further enhances the relationship between the City and businesses, as well as the community by providing a shared forum to identify issues, opportunities and desired outcomes, more effectively leveraging a finite set of resources and infrastructure to achieve those outcomes and ultimately results in easy, efficient and effective access to a mix of businesses and activities that helps balance daytime and evening destinations that best reflect Redmond's community character. Active engagement in the partnership also enhances Redmond's image and identity as a positive place to patronize and do business through innovative partnerships, provides insights into more efficient and effective City processes, and promotes the community as a more efficient and entrepreneurial place to do business. By actively engaging the private sector in OneRedmond, this offer complements City actions and activities in the Sustainable Economic Development, Predictable Development Permitting, Shared Experiences Through Community Events, Tourism Promotion, and An Active and Engaging Downtown Art Scene offers. Who: Current and prospective Redmond businesses, developers, and property owners/managers are supported through: 1) partnerships with the business community that reinforce the good business reasons for locating and doing business in Redmond; 2) encouraging investment in the community by promoting the City's assets, workforce talent, and supportive and innovative nature of the community; and 3) encouraging, recognizing, and rewarding business efforts that support the community's land use, economic, and transportation vision. Representatives of arts, cultural, human services, and other community-oriented interests by offering a focal point for community leadership and the ability to identify gaps, develop opportunities, and capitalize on synergies.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

Increase in proportion of the OneRedmond organization fiscal support provided by the business community. (The benchmark for this indicator is the relative proportion of public versus private funding when OneRedmond was formed.) Increased perception by business community that Redmond is supportive of the business community, as measured by a survey of the business community. (NCDS interviews formed baseline.) (New Measure)

Measure OneRedmond Organization Fiscal Support Increased Perception by Business Community

Target 50.00 0.00

2010 Act 0.00 0.00

2011 Act 0.00 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 30.00 Percent 0.00 Interviews

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: If 6% ($12,120) fewer dollars were provided each year, elements critical to the effectiveness of OneRedmond's mission (e.g., branding and marketing materials) would not be produced at the caliber that prospective business suitors are accustomed to seeing, which would affect Redmond's competitiveness with other areas, resulting in decreased opportunities to attract private sector support.

60


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2474

ONEREDMOND If 6% ($12,120) additional dollars were provided each year, these funds could be used to leverage additional funds from private businesses to reach out to businesses/business cluster consortiums outside the Puget Sound area to increase market awareness of the Redmond brand, allowing businesses to be recruited more broadly nationally and enhancing business community perception of Redmond as supportive of business. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated inflationary increases ($2,000) in various line items.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0

$0

$0

$100,000 $0 $0 $100,000 0.000

$100,000 $0 $0 $100,000 0.000

$200,000 $0 $0 $200,000

61


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2456

ACCESS TO BUSINESSES THROUGH PARKING MANAGEMENT Description: What: The Parking Management Program administrated by the Economic Development and Transportation Demand Management Division supports businesses and community by providing a cost-effective solution to creating short-term parking availability in Downtown Redmond consistent with the City's vision for Downtown's growth, development, and economic vitality. Why: Managing the City's on-street parking supply efficiently is critical to help create a vibrant business community in Downtown Redmond. As density increases and mixed use development (retail on the bottom floor and residential housing above) becomes more prevalent, managing on-street parking to increase short-term parking turnover is important to promote economic vitality by increasing customer access to local businesses. With easy access to commerce, Downtown Redmond becomes a more positive and convenient place to do business, which supports the vitality of current downtown establishments and helps attract additional businesses in the future. Implementing and enforcing short-term parking limits in core areas of Downtown addressed the strong concerns of business owners, property managers and customers who felt that there was not enough on-street customer parking. Earlier, prime on-street parking spaces were taken up daily by employees and residents. Several businesses expressed a desire to have more options offered for employee parking. We addressed these concerns by implementing two-hour parking limits on the streets and permit parking for an extended parking option and by maximizing the use of limited parking, on-street parking and prioritized customer access through time-limit enforcement. Alternatives to driving alone through Redmond's Trip Resource and Incentive Program (R-TRIP) incentives and personalized assistance offered additional choices. The Downtown Parking Study estimated that each customer spends approximately $20 per visit and parking space turnover rate on average is four times a day. That equates to $80 per day times 250 days (Monday-Friday) or $20,000 per space in annual sales to retailers. Using the 345 two-hour parking spaces in the enforced area for customers, estimated retail sales would be $6,900,000 annually. Retail sales tax to the City would be $47,653 annually. An employee using the same parking space has a turnover rate of one time per day with an estimate of $5 retail spending. That equates to $5 per day times 250 days or $1,250 per space. The outcome accommodates more visitors and customers, resulting in positive sales revenue. How: The City launched the parking management program September 2009 based on the industry's standard "85% Rule" (i.e., if 85% on-street parking spaces are occupied, parking management is warranted). Initially, a parking enforcement area was designated with approximately 300 spaces, signs noting two-hour time limits were installed, an extended parking permit option was created, and active enforcement began in January 2010. In 2011, boundaries were expanded at the request of businesses to include 165th Street between 85th Street and 83rd Street, expanding the enforcement to approximately 345 parking spaces. Available parking supply and access to downtown businesses has increased significantly, and the response from businesses and citizens has been generally positive. With the current success of achieving parking turnover, the City will continue to implement this program using contract services (the Redmond Police Department declined this addition to their work program), thereby providing accessibility to businesses through continued on-street parking availability that supports Downtown economic vitality. In addition, maintaining an ongoing dialog with the business community to identify and address future parking needs and concerns is also a priority and a parking advisory committee is scheduled to convene in the fall of 2012. The City will work with the Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce, OneRedmond, and local businesses to identify 62


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2456

ACCESS TO BUSINESSES THROUGH PARKING MANAGEMENT sellers and buyers of parking spaces to create more efficient use of off-street parking, demonstrating collaboration between the City and local businesses. A new innovative parking grant pilot program was initiated in April 2012 to establish a way to encourage private property owners with existing parking lots to provide hourly/day paid parking within downtown for general purpose day use. This pilot program will continue through June 2014, with analysis and results available at the conclusion in 2014. The program is funded through a City R-TRIP grant and enforcement/lot expenses are the responsibility of the grantee. In 2013, the new 92-parking space Central Connector Parking Lot will be available for public use and will be managed and operated by the City with paid parking revenue going towards operation and maintenance expenses and program enforcement. Who: Customers and businesses are provided with accessible, proximate, efficient on-street parking solutions enhancing access to businesses and increasing economic vitality; citizens and businesses are provided a one-stop service for street parking information, monthly parking permit sales, and commute option choices; and partnerships with the Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce and local businesses allow local businesses to identify off-street parking available for lease and help match up willing sellers and buyers of off-street parking spaces. Parking Management also supports the Business Access and Mobility offer by promoting efforts to use the existing transportation infrastructure more efficiently.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

Level of business and customer satisfaction with accessibility to Downtown businesses. (Baseline - 63% of residents satisfied per 2009 resident survey.) In 2011, 63% continue to be satisfied with the availability of parking near businesses in downtown Redmond. Business satisfaction with parking availability is rated very good. Parking space turnover rate of on-street parking. (2008 baseline - between 85-95% of on-street parking spaces were consistently occupied during periods of peak parking demand prior to implementation of the program with turnover rate of four cars using a single occupied stall over a 10-hour period.) A Downtown Parking survey will be conducted in the summer of 2012. In order to manage availability of a limited supply of on-street parking, the program offers on-street monthly extended parking permits for $50, generating 87 sales on average per month. That equals 75% of the available two-hour parking (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.). The turnover rate is approximately four cars using a single stall in a 10-hour period. With a new recently programmed electronic handheld device, our contractor will provide us with street counts by time and locations. Results will be available in fall 2012.

Measure Customer Satisfaction Survey On-Street Parking Space Turnover Rate

Target 65.00 85.00

2010 Act 62.00 0.00

2011 Act 63.00 77.00

2012 Goal Measurement 63.00 Percent 85.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: No additional funding to expand on-street parking monitoring and enforcement to additional areas is requested because parking demand beyond the current area does not exceed supply. Expenses for that site and enforcement are estimated to be $28,800 for two years. A portion of the revenues from the new Redmond Central Connector paid parking lot would offset operational costs, such as lighting, upkeep, and maintenance (estimated $5 per day times 40 spaces* times 21 days for 12 months = $50,400). A 5% decrease in funding ($12,495) would affect the ability to enforce the RCC parking lot consistently.

63


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2456

ACCESS TO BUSINESSES THROUGH PARKING MANAGEMENT Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$27,464

$28,191

$55,655

$96,576 $0 $0 $124,040 0.250

$96,576 $0 $0 $124,767 0.250

$193,152 $0 $0 $248,807

64


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2457

BUSINESS ACCESS AND MOBILITY Description: What: The Economic Development and Transportation Demand Management Division (ED-TDM) of the Planning Department works together with Redmond companies to support and promote Redmond businesses and to create access for customers, employees, and freight. This offer will provide resources and incentives that are business supportive, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly. These programs work to support the City's vision for our two urban centers and a healthy economic and environmental climate. Why: As employment and population growth continue, maintaining and increasing access to businesses is critical. The transportation choices of Redmond employees and residents greatly affect our community's traffic congestion, air quality, and access to businesses. By providing choices, benefits of this offer will include: enhancing employee accessibility to employment sites, increasing employee productivity, improving worker and customer attraction and retention, reducing traffic, improving air quality, providing easier access for freight and customers to reach Redmond businesses, increasing productive use of land (e.g., more space devoted to revenue-generating activities rather than parking), and enhancing a vibrant, successful business community. In addition, providing transportation resources assists businesses with the successful implementation of state and local Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) law and Transportation Management Program requirements. How: The ED-TDM Division will continue to work together with business and community partners to provide transportation management resources, tools, and incentives to maintain and improve mobility and access, and will continue to leverage our contacts with employees and residents to support the image and identity, and patronage, of local businesses. This will be accomplished through: Creative Incentives and Resources for Residents, Employees, and Businesses through the City's award-winning and nationally acclaimed Redmond Trip Resource and Incentive Program (R-TRIP), an innovative public-private partnership between King County Metro Transit, Greater Redmond Transportation Management Association, and Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce. This unique program is actively used by local businesses to manage their own transportation programs, and offers nearly 24,000 employees and residents a one-stop place for resources and "starter" incentives for transit, vanpool, carpool, bicycling, and walking, and enables users to track and view the impact of their travel activities. The contact with over 24,000 residents and employees is leveraged to promote and support local businesses through coordination with the Think Redmond program and by providing prizes and incentives to be used at local businesses. Employer and Community Events where City staff engage actively with employers and employees at more than 50 employer transportation events each year (equal to 58,425 employees). In addition, tens of thousands of Redmond residents are provided with resources for improved community livability through extensive community outreach efforts at City and community public events that promote transportation options and local business. This outreach enhances the relationship between the City and businesses, as well as the residential community. Through this outreach, ED-TDM often serves as a welcoming liaison between the community and City, improves connections between businesses and the community, and provides an opportunity to promote multiple programs. Transportation Assistance for Redmond Businesses through R-TRIP grants to provide seed funding for innovative new or enhanced employer commute option programs (e.g., transit passes, vanpool subsidies, commuter incentives, bike racks, etc.). This resource reinforces Redmond as a positive place to do business, while providing collaborative support and promoting more efficient and entrepreneurial use of transportation resources. Moreover, it provides a business-supportive way of working cooperatively to ensure compliance with both state and local commute reduction laws. This resource is unique to Redmond and is helpful leverage in recruiting and retaining businesses in Redmond. 65


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2457

BUSINESS ACCESS AND MOBILITY Programs that coordinate and support mobility provided by built infrastructure by managing peak vehicle travel demand and maximizing the efficiency of existing and planned capacity. The result is a transportation system that is less expensive, more fiscally efficient, and more environmentally beneficial. R-TRIP has provided the person-carrying capacity equivalent of four freeway lanes during peak commute hour, at a much lower cost, and lower community and environmental impact. Resources provided help existing businesses to grow and new businesses to locate in Redmond, with fewer costs than might be necessitated by creating additional on-site parking, and incurring significantly greater transportation mitigation fees, thereby increasing Redmond's economic competitiveness. Leveraging opportunities to support business vitality and the development of Redmond's urban centers by utilizing regional, state, and federal grant matching opportunities designed to support more efficient and focused development of centers, through the coordination of economic development activities, transportation planning and implementation, and management of travel demand and parking. A keystone of this effort is the Growth and Transportation Efficiency Center Program (GTEC). This program has been highly effective in securing additional grants (approximately $250,000 annually) for the City, which provides an opportunity to leverage planning efforts and investments, and also helps increase transportation capital project competitiveness in regional and state funding processes. This improves access to our urban centers, reduces trips, and supports implementation of the Comprehensive Plan. A model employee commuter assistance program for City Employees to increase the use of alternatives to driving alone by offering City employees transportation benefits commensurate with what other Redmond businesses are asked to offer their employees. This cross-departmental employee benefit supports Redmond's compliance with the state CTR law. This offer addresses several additional priorities (Clean and Green, Community Building, Infrastructure and Growth) and offers (Access to Businesses through Parking Management, Sustainable Economic Development, Green Lifestyles/Green Buildings, Regional Transportation Planning and Partnerships, and Transportation Planning and Engineering). Who: Redmond businesses, developers, and property managers are supported through: 1) forming partnerships with the business community that reinforce the good business reasons for encouraging commute options; 2) encouraging reinvestment back into the local economy by using Think Redmond-branded commuter incentives and programs that encourage residents and workers to get out of their cars and walk or bike in Redmond's retail areas; and 3) encouraging, recognizing, and rewarding business efforts that support the community's land use, economic, and transportation vision. In addition, all Redmond commuters, residents, and businesses are provided a one-stop service for learning about and obtaining resources that support using alternatives to driving alone, as well as easy tools and discounts to use local businesses.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Decrease percentage of drive-alone versus other trips among CTR program-affected employer population. Increase percentage of employers involved in commute options programs.

Measure Decrease Drive-Alone Trips Increase Employers Involved in Programs

Target 61.90 90.00

66

2010 Act 0.00 76.20

2011 Act 63.10 84.00

2012 Goal Measurement 61.90 Percent 90.00 Percent


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2457

BUSINESS ACCESS AND MOBILITY Scalability: Scalability Proposed: If $16,000 more dollars were provided, we could offer the City's supplemental employees transit passes/incentives commensurate with regular employees. If 10% fewer dollars ($288,914) were provided, we would eliminate the Downtown GTEC, as well as scale back outreach and support to small businesses, making it difficult to achieve program performance targets. It would also significantly deleverage the City's ability to further economic, mobility, land use, and sustainability objectives and outcomes. (Businesses invest an average of $25 for each public dollar invested to support commute options.) Scalability Recommended: Reduced miscellaneous line item ($18,000) for GTEC publications.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$529,406 $885,918

$546,772 $896,775

$1,076,178 $1,782,693

$0 $0 $1,415,324 2.650

$0 $0 $1,443,547 2.650

$0 $0 $2,858,871

67


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2454

TOURISM PROMOTION Description: What: Redmond's Tourism Promotion Program Experience Redmond improves and sustains the economic segment of Redmond including hotels, restaurants, and retail stores, as well as special events and arts programs, through the distribution of City-collected Lodging Tax. The Tourism Promotion Program inspires vendors to choose Redmond for their regional events, as well as encourages employees who work in Redmond (but live outside of the City) to stay after work and enjoy special events, restaurants, and shopping. Additionally, it promotes cultural, recreational and business-related visitors to spend weekends in Redmond, stay overnight in Redmond hotels, and enjoy the eclectic mix of restaurants and shops while they stay. Why: Travelers to Washington State spent $16.4 billion in 2011, $15.2 billion in 2010, and $14.2 billion in 2009, and our Tourism program's intent is to capture an ever-increasing share of this revenue. Tourism is the fourth largest industry in Washington State and 80% of small businesses are linked to tourism. Promoting tourism contributes to Redmond's sustainable economic development by growing tourism activities that in turn contribute to an expanded customer base, increased consumer sales and job opportunities, and the promotion of Redmond as an active and vibrant community to visit. This program supports privately produced events through its grant award process. The program also supports marketing efforts and some operational costs for City-sponsored special events, such as Derby Days, Redmond Lights, and arts programs including the Digital Arts Festival, art displays, and the Redmond Arts Season. By promoting major events like the biennial Cirque du Soleil and the recent Cavalia (with 70,000 attendees at 46 performances), visitors are brought to our community, with many staying overnight in our hotels and spending money on food, shopping, and frequently on other entertainment while in the area. Cirque, Cavalia (provided 200 temporary jobs and spent $3 million with local suppliers), and other sporting and cultural events have a positive economic impact on Redmond given the location of the nearest hotels, restaurants, and regional shopping center. Some, but not all, of these events apply for and receive Tourism Fund grants, while all benefit from our events and community promotions. One tourism grant recipient, Ananda Mela, is an ethnic cultural event that attracts thousands to the City Hall Campus one weekend each summer. The success of this event should attract other similar cultural events as our community continues to grow in diversity. How: The City levies a special excise tax of one percent on lodging charges that is collected at the five Redmond hotels: Overlake Silver Cloud Inn (1985), Redmond Inn (1986), Residence Inn by Marriott (2000), Redmond Marriott Town Center (2004), and Hyatt House (2009), which in total contain 867 rooms. The Tourism Promotion Program supports the growth and economic sustainability of Redmond by increasing hotel occupancy and supporting existing and new tourism-related businesses by advertising promotions offered during special events or times of the year. The Tourism Fund is allocated by the following Council-approved percentages: 50% to the Overnight Marketing Program, 39% to City-sponsored Special Events and Arts Programs, 9% to the Grants Program, and 2% to Tourism Program Administration. This fund is managed by the Tourism Fund Administrator in the Planning Department who monitors the budget and financial commitments, coordinates the Lodging Tax Advisory Committee (LTAC) monthly meetings, implements the LTAC's decisions and marketing strategies, serves as liaison between the LTAC and City officials, negotiates contracts and manages the marketing team, administers the grants program and communicates with stakeholders. LTAC (required by Lodging Tax statute) is chaired by a Council member and includes three hoteliers and three representatives from the business and cultural/arts communities-currently a board member of the Redmond Historical Society and a member of the Centennial Committee, the senior marketing manager of Redmond Town Center, and a 68


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2454

TOURISM PROMOTION member of our business community. This committee oversees the use of the funds and collaborates in marketing strategies. The LTAC also reviews grant applications and consultant proposals to make funding and program recommendations to City Council. The final decisions regarding the use of Tourism funds are made by the City Council. The program's marketing team for the past five years, Bullseye Creative, continues to be successful in spite of challenging economic times, by implementing the following communication strategies: launching an improved and enhanced website - ExperienceRedmond.com - in May 2012 that uses the Think Redmond program's business database; completing redesign of our Visitor Guide and Map in June 2012; collaborating with LTAC, local businesses, the Redmond Parks Department, Redmond Economic Development and Transportation Demand Management Division of the Planning Department, King County, the Redmond Historical Society, and the Centennial Committee; and producing online, social network and print media marketing (for example, a display ad in the 2012 Washington State Visitors' Guide). The program's website ExperienceRedmond.com facilitates information gathering about Redmond and provides many choices for visitors. This website promotes local and regional events; local retail businesses; the local arts programs; Redmond's family-friendly environment; nearby amenities, such as a recent partnership with Butler-Redmond Tours offering van service to Woodinville's wineries; outdoor activities in the area; and implements online reservations, tracking each conversion since implementing hotel conversion tracking in September 2009. Hotel conversion tracking monitors how many visitors coming to ExperienceRedmond.com are clicking buttons directing them to Redmond hotel websites to make reservations at a specific hotel. Innovations planned for the remainder of 2012 include: email tourism promotion transmissions and print marketing in Vancouver magazine to the Canadian market, a Quick Response Code and Microsoft Tag Campaign (locations of historical significance) for Redmond's Centennial, and distributions of the new Visitor Guide and Map to local businesses that draw corporate visitors (Microsoft, Nintendo, etc.) and potential students (Digipen) for the businesses' use in providing information in advance of the visits that would encourage the visitors' overnight stays in Redmond. Most of these programs will carry over through 2013-2014, with new strategic campaigns launched along the way to promote Redmond hotels to a diversity of potential visitors who might otherwise choose to stay in hotels in nearby cities or do business or vacation in another area. Who: Redmond's Tourism Program customers include: residents and visitors; the business community (hotels, restaurants, retail stores and entertainment venues); local organizations, such as the Redmond Historical Society; visiting cultural and sporting events participants; the City's Parks Department; and King County's Marymoor Park.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

A 5% increase in Lodging Tax for 2013-2014 over the previous two years' total hotel tax revenue. A 5% annual increase in hotel conversion tracking through the Tourism Program's website: ExperienceRedmond.com.

Measure Lodging Tax Revenue - Increase Over Previous Year Hotel Conversion Tracking on Tourism Website

Target 5.00

2010 Act 16.00

2011 Act 14.00

1,344.00

0.00

1,159.00

69

2012 Goal Measurement 5.00 Percent 1,280.00 Number


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2454

TOURISM PROMOTION Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Note that this allocation is driven by tax levels collected and the grants program balances awards with revenues. Assuming tax rates do not affect overall taxable revenues, scalability would be achieved by increasing or decreasing the tax rate. A 5% decrease ($34,500) could be deducted from the biennium allocation to the Overnight Marketing Program and might prevent a potential partnership or sponsorship of a regional event. A 5% increase in revenue in 2013-2014 ($30,234) could be realized by increasing the Lodging Tax to 1.05%, well under the Council maximum of 2%. This increase could be used to expand our grants allocation. Grants applications increased in 2012 and are expected to continue to increase in 2013 and 2014. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0 $345,000

$0 $345,000

$0 $690,000

$0 $0 $345,000 0.000

$0 $0 $345,000 0.000

$0 $0 $690,000

70


UNFUNDED OFFER


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2582

AN ACTIVE & ENGAGING DOWNTOWN ART SCENE - UNFUNDED Description: What: The Art Program provides entertainment and cultural activities that will encourage more visitors and foster business in our Downtown Urban Center. This is one of two offers for the total Arts Program package. This offer supports the programs that promote business connections while the Community Building offer focuses on programs targeted to citywide residents. The baseline services described in this offer supports the Business Community Purchasing Strategies 2, 3, 4 and 6 while the additional activities described in the scalability section supports Purchasing Strategies 1 and 5. Our arts and cultural services are designed to meet the needs of changing consumers interested in a mix of contemporary art and cultural experiences. In 2011, 24,000 people enjoyed our various free public programs across the visual, literary and performing arts, such as the five art projects targeted to a younger, professional audience funded by our Community Grant Program, the Arts Season. At the same time, the Art Program also serves businesses who seek to share in the benefits of growing cultural vitality in the Downtown Urban Center. For instance, since 2008, the Art Program has been an incubator for the interactive media and digital arts sector by founding, funding and organizing the Digital Arts Festival. The outcomes for the first five years have been sustained opportunities for our partners, such as DigiPen Institute of Technology, to tell a unique story about the emerging strengths of our community. In fact, the Digital Arts Festival has been so successful that our seed funding and staff support has enabled our partners to organize the event without our direction, furthering the City's reputation as being entrepreneurial. This gives the City an opportunity to think differently about how we can support the digital arts sector specifically and the business community as a whole through the arts. The highlights of this new thinking and approach include: 路 Promote Redmond as a positive place for interactive media and digital artists to do business by shifting our energies and resources from the Digital Arts Festival, which is now a community-driven event, to supporting new kinds of artists and artworks created in ongoing Artist-in-residencies. The outcome will be arts-driven incubator space for "commercial artists" within the gaming industry to pursue new ways of creating and contributing to the community as "public digital artists" thus better reflecting the City's role in our new Innovative Partnership Zone in Interactive Media and Digital Arts; 路 Establish Redmond as a destination for new professional audiences by continuing to recruit new partners for the Arts Season, support their innovative projects and leverage the Experience Redmond and Think Redmond websites as outreach infrastructure. In the first half of 2012, these projects and other Public Art projects have garnered 10 positive media stories in local and regional media outlets including the Seattle Times, KIRO TV, Evening Magazine and the Redmond Reporter. The outcome is a more positive community identity and authentic image of Redmond as a culturally vibrant place to tens of thousands of people throughout the region; and 路 Create accessibility to Downtown businesses with compelling new art projects within a "cultural corridor" by adding one new permanent artwork in the Redmond Central Connector designed to enhance a new plaza with artwork that can accommodate ongoing digital arts programming, as well as implement temporary urban art projects along Cleveland Street for the Cleveland Streetscape Project. The outcome will be a beautiful and vibrant Downtown streetscape for businesses to embrace and consumers to visit. Why: The region and Redmond in particular, is home to a unique combination sole proprietors and companies who employ musicians, game designers, engineers, architects and researchers who are both associated with the arts, but are changing what the arts mean. Institutions like Redmond-based DigiPen are combining traditional arts foundation skills with digital modeling to train the next generation of game designers, or artists. How do cities stay attractive and competitive in this rapidly changing context? Contemporary art and cultural events not only provide a unique and safe place for creative economy business people to meet and interact, but are authentic expressions of the kind of place 71


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2582

AN ACTIVE & ENGAGING DOWNTOWN ART SCENE - UNFUNDED members of the creative economy want to live and work in: creative, entrepreneurial and with a high profile community image based on a strong arts and cultural scene. How: The approach of the Arts Program is based on a model of civic partnership that balances professional expertise, public comment and public-private partnerships that leverage knowledge, resources and networks for common gain. For instance, the Arts Administrator (1 FTE), jointly funded by the Community Building Arts Program offer and Parks Planning offer, supported by a Supplemental Program Assistant (0.5 FTE), design outcomes-based programs that are vetted by the Arts Commission and executed in collaboration with contract artists or local or regional arts and cultural agencies. For example, in the first half of 2012, our partnerships enabled 13 Redmond based organizations to contribute to the City and serve the wider community, of which seven are private businesses: The Big Picture, BoneBat Film Fest, Digital Double, DigiPen Institute of Technology, Redmond Town Center, Soul Food Books and Veloce Apartments. Arts Program staff also participate in regional arts and economic development efforts, such as the new collaborative project called the Eastside Creative Vitality Index Project with the Arts Administrators from the Cities of Bellevue and Kirkland who will assess the state of the Eastside creative economy with an analysis leading to collaboration in planning and messaging among us all. Who: The focus is on businesses, employees, visitors, and residents. Specifically, this program targets: · Businesses and Property Owners: Increase exposure to existing businesses and properties, and create new opportunities and synergies among businesses in the Downtown; · Employees: More people work in Redmond than live in Redmond. Sixteen (16) game developers call Redmond home and nearly 100 are based on the eastside; · Visitors: Regional families and business travelers looking for unique weekend getaways that are both fun and enriching; and · Residents: Sixty percent (60%) of adults are college graduates; 39% of residents are ages 25-45.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Number and average longevity of arts, cultural and entertainment organizations. Percent of businesses participating as sponsors or partners in art programs.

Measure Number & Average Longevity Businesses Participating

Target 7.00 5.00

2010 Act 7.00 0.00

2011 Act 7.00 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 7.00 Number 5.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 25% increase of $176,277 on the total Art Program base budget across both Business Community and Community Building offers ($717,213) funds a new 0.75 Arts Program Coordinator position ($168,302) and their work station ($7,975) to address the next big service challenge in Redmond's Business Community: creating the framework for accommodating increased cultural vitality in the Downtown Urban Center among developers and property owners and ensuring retail and other businesses share in the benefits of this activity. With additional staff support, we can conduct the necessary outreach and create the programs that link our baseline activities to the surrounding businesses. For example: · Provide efficient processes for private developers to contribute to the vision of a vibrant Downtown cultural corridor by organizing the Downtown Cultural Corridor (DCC) Master Plan, a cross-departmental effort to explore and pursue new policies that can help integrate private development with city public art initiatives, such as incentive programs; · Further establish Redmond as a destination for the performing arts by assigning staff support to 72


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

BUSINESS COMMUNITY Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2582

AN ACTIVE & ENGAGING DOWNTOWN ART SCENE - UNFUNDED community-driven ideas, such as a Leary Street Block Party, and further link artists with property owners in Downtown with our pilot program, Redmond Inside Out, that has seen wide success at the Veloce apartments, with businesses that currently express interest in collaboration: the Vision5 Artist Studio Project, Redmond Town Center and the Marriot Hotel; 路 Stimulate efficient access to businesses through programs like Redmond Acts Out, a pilot outdoor theatre festival that shifts weekday programming from City Hall Lawn to weekend and evening programing at Anderson Park. In 2012, we have reached out to over 50 restaurants that surround Anderson Park and are proposing to advertise and promote their businesses at our event and in our paid advertising. A 5% decrease of $40,000 on the total base budget of both Art Program Offers PRK2579 and PRK2582 ($717,213) removes 16 outdoor public artworks in critical condition from public view. The collection requires $40,000 in one-time repairs to pieces currently in critical condition. Scalability Recommended: Denied request for new program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$81,433

$84,162

$165,595

$81,500 $0 $7,975 $170,908 0.750

$81,500 $0 $0 $165,662 0.750

$163,000 $0 $7,975 $336,570

73


CLEAN & GREEN

RESULTS TEAM REQUEST FOR OFFERS RESULTS TEAM MAP OFFER SUMMARY OFFERS


CLEAN & GREEN ENVIRONMENT I WANT TO LIVE, LEARN, WORK, AND PLAY IN A CLEAN AND GREEN ENVIRONMENT

REQUEST FOR OFFERS TEAM MEMBERS Team Lead: Rebecca Borker, Public Works Team Member: Deborah Farris, Planning Team Member: Mike Navarro, Fire Team Member: Meg Angevine, Parks Team Member: Kent Tsang, Community Member DASHBOARD INDICATORS Indicator 1: Percentage of neighborhoods with convenient access to parks and trails (ability to walk less than ¼ mile to a park or trail from home or office). Measure Description: A functional area plan for levels of service in parks or green space was adopted in 2010. A key metric developed in that effort was the accessibility of these amenities to Redmond’s residents. The study determined that the percentage of Redmond’s neighborhoods within ¼ mile from these amenities was a good standard. The plan identifies the neighborhoods and the basis for evaluation. Calculation Method: The City’s parks staff will revise the metric for this measure as needed using the City’s Geographic Information System (GIS) capabilities.

Indicator 2: Percent of the twelve significant streams that can support native habitat as measured by an index of 35 or higher. Measure Description: A measure used to determine the health of a stream ecosystem by analyzing the bug population. Also known as the “bug index,” which is an appropriate primary indicator to measure the ecological health of Redmond streams and whether or not they can support native habitat. Calculation Method: An index score of 35 or higher is necessary to support native habitat. Scores range from 10-50, (50 being the best health). For conditions to be healthy for salmon, the bug index score needs to be 35 or greater. Scores for Redmond streams are calculated annually.

Indicator 3: Single Family Residential Waste Stream (garbage plus recycling) and recycling rate. Measure Description: The City’s focus for the solid waste and recycling program in priority order is to reduce, reuse, recycle (3R’s) and then have disposal as the last and the least preferred option for dealing with wastes. The recycling rate alone is not a good measure since if the rate goes up it can be good or bad depending if the waste stream has gone up, down or stayed the same accordingly. While it is still very difficult to measure the true success of reduction and reuse, we can get a sense through looking at 74


the overall waste stream generated per household and then partnering that with the overall recycling rate. This gives us a better indication of our goal for this program to minimize the waste stream and then recycling as much as possible. This measure focuses on single family residential waste stream and recycling rate since the data is more readily available, the effects of program changes can be more readily measured and changes (improvements) have a greater impact of the overall waste stream. Calculation Method: The waste stream is made up of the garbage tonnage and the recycling tonnage combined. These rates will be a combination of curbside pickup and data from our recycling events. Residential customers that self-haul their garbage and/or recycling to the transfer station and/or waste mobile will not be counted. The City will acquire the curbside data from Waste Management’s monthly reports to the City as part of our solid waste contract. The recycling event totals will come from the various vendors that provide service at the event. The garbage and recycling tonnage information is reported by Waste Management each month along with the number of active accounts for each. The number of accounts is considered as the number of households. The number of accounts varies each month as new customers are added and some are removed. The number of accounts for the year will be an average of the reported monthly accounts done for both the garbage and recycling.

Indicator 4: Percent of citizens satisfied with the quality of green spaces and trails (inclusive of parks). Measure Description: A measure used to determine the level of satisfaction of users with the variety of open space and trails in the City. Calculation Method: Data for this measure will be generated by the City’s biennial survey.

INTRODUCTION/SUMMARY OF CAUSE & EFFECT MAP The Clean and Green Results Team identified four main factors critical to the goal of ensuring a clean and green environment. We developed these factors through research, team brainstorming, and review of the maps and Request for Offers (RFO) created from the previous two Clean and Green Results Teams. Factor 1: Create, Conserve, Reduce, Restore, Recycle This is our central theme and can be applied to each of the other factors as the core principles of a clean and green environment. Factor 2: Environment In order to create and maintain a clean and green environment (natural and urban) for ourselves and for future generations we must protect the resources that nourish and sustain us physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Clean air, water, and soil create a solid foundation to build upon. Maintaining and restoring healthy habitats and ecosystems is a natural way to help accomplish our goal of clean air, water and soil, while also nurturing our desire for beautiful places. Providing safe and aesthetically pleasing places to recreate encourages physical activity, and provides opportunities for connection with others in our community. A walkable, connected community encourages physical activity and also helps us maintain clean air, water, and soil by reducing pollutants emitted by vehicles.

75


Factor 3: Ethic A clean and green environment will thrive only when we embrace the ethic that sustains it. To firmly establish this ethic, continued education and outreach to the community and businesses are essential. Commitment to exploring innovative and efficient technology, despite challenging economic times, will pay off in the long term. Strong connections and partnerships between city departments, businesses, and the community help us all achieve a higher standard with less individual effort and expenditure. Factor 4: Management Our responsibility to provide key services to protect the health of our community and the environment can be fulfilled by maintaining a strong, up-to-date infrastructure and using innovative technology to control stormwater, wastewater, and solid waste, as well as protect watersheds and water sources. Education and outlets must be provided to reduce hazardous waste and pollution. Clean streets, sidewalks, and pathways provide safe places to recreate, encourage physical activity, and contribute to an enhanced aesthetic, all important elements of living in a clean and green environment. PURCHASING STRATEGIES WE ARE LOOKING FOR OFFERS THAT: Strategy 1: Demonstrate how you will effectively improve current practices to further enhance the subfactors contained within the "Environment", "Ethic", and "Management" headings. A clean and green city requires effective management of its basic services. It is a progressive and forward thinking city that can provide these services while concurrently improving the environment. We will favor offers that demonstrate how our current management practices for a clean and green city can be improved and enhanced by using and implementing innovative and cost-effective new technologies and programs. Strategy 2: Encourage Education and Outreach, Business and Community partnerships, and Cross-departmental teams. Cross-departmental coordination, partnerships with non-governmental organizations, other cities, and regional governments can increase the value obtained for resources used. In addition, partnerships help to strengthen relationships and create region-wide momentum toward building a clean and green environment. Offers that promote partnerships, education, outreach, and leadership are strongly encouraged. Strategy 3: Demonstrate how you will reduce negative impacts to the environment and control pollution through conservation, restoration, and recycling. Reducing our negative impact on the environment is critical to improving and maintaining a clean and green city. Offers should encourage sustainable consumption through waste reduction, energy efficiency, water conservation, alternative transportation, a green fleet, use of efficient green infrastructure and low impact development. Strategy 4: Continue to create and develop the City's safe and beautiful parks, open spaces, and places to recreate with emphasis on walkability and connectivity. As we become more urbanized it is imperative that we retain our identity as a physically beautiful place to live, learn, and play. We will favor offers that create and maintain healthy and sustainable habitats and ecosystems (land and water); parks, recreation areas and open spaces; and increase walkability and connectivity between parks, open spaces, neighborhoods, and urban centers.

76


CIP PURCHASING STRATEGIES Strategy 5: Urban Centers Realize Redmond’s vision for Downtown and Overlake1 by providing needed facilities, services and improvements within these two urban center neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support implementation of the vision and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 Capital Investment Program (CIP). Strategy 6: Neighborhoods Provide infrastructure connections and systems in Redmond’s established neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support improved connections within or between neighborhoods and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 CIP. Strategy 7: Preservation of capital Provide for the preservation of the City’s infrastructure system. Offers will be favored that maintain and improve the reliability, safety and integrity of the system. Strategy 8: Value for investment Achieve high value for the dollars invested and demonstrate efficiency in cost, timing and approach. Offers should describe how projects have been coordinated to provide the most effective approach and to minimize disruption to the community. In addition, explain how the offer leverages actions and resources by others, through partnerships; for example, meet the strategic needs of the City. Strategy 9: Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint Carry out the Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint – Capital Investment Strategy, 2013-2030, as well as adopted functional plans. Offers will be favored that implement recurring policy direction and priority projects from these documents, as well as leverage other projects in a cross-functional manner. NOTES/PRACTICES/SUPPORTING EVIDENCE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

1

City of Redmond 2010 - 2016 Parks, Arts, Recreation, Culture & Conservation Plan, http://www.redmond.gov/insidecityhall/parksrec/parksplanning/PARCCPlan/ProPlanDoc.asp City of Redmond 2011 - 2012 Budget (includes Budget by Priorities), http://www.redmond.gov/Government/FinancesandBudget/Budget/20112012AdoptedBudget/ City of Redmond 2009 Benthic report - Hard copy provided by Keith MacDonald & Jerallyn Roetemeyer, Natural Resources Department MacDonald, K. (2010). Biological Assessment of Stream Sites in the City of Redmond, WA. Wease Bollman Rhithron Associates, Inc., Missoula: Wease Bollman Rhithron Associates Cascade Land Conservancy/Green Redmond Partnership, http://www.cascadeland.org/stewardship/green-cities/green-redmond-partnership Puget Sound Stream Benthos Map - (Stream Sampling Site Map), http://www.pugetsoundstreambenthos.org/Biotic-Integrity-Map.aspx Stream Insect Health Indicator/Aquatic Biota Index - King County Department of Natural Resources, http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/measures/indicators/ae-aquatic-biota.aspx Solid Waste Disposal & Recycling Rates as Indicators of Resource Consumption, http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/measures/indicators/rc-solid-waste.aspx

See Redmond’s Comprehensive Plan for the vision for Downtown and Overlake 77


9. State of Washington Department of Ecology General Information, http://www.ecy.wa.gov 10. Smarter Cities - Natural Resources Defense Council; Information for creating sustainable cities., http://www.smartercities.nrdc.org 11. City of Portland, Oregon - Environmental and Sustainability Programs, http:/www.portlandonline.com/ 12. City of Eugene, Oregon - Environmental and Sustainability Programs, http:/www.eugene-or.gov 13. City of Chicago, Illinois - Environmental and Sustainability Programs, http:/www.cityofchicago.org/ 14. City of Pasadena, California, 2009 Green City Indicators and Measurements Report; Pasadena, City of. (2009). Green City Indicators Report 2009. Pasadena: City of Pasadena, www.cityofpasadena.net/greencity 15. State of Washington, Department of Ecology, River and Stream Monitoring Water Quality Index 16. 2009 - 2010 Budgeting by Priorities Request for Offers 17. 2011 - 2012 Budgeting by Priorities Request for Offers 18. Redmond Community Indicators 2009 document 19. City of Redmond 2009 Survey 20. B-Sustainable Information Commons: Central Puget Sound Information Source for Making Sustainable Choices, http://www.b-sustainable.org/natural-environment/stream-health-based-onbenthic-index-of-biotic-integrity 21. King County: Environmental Data and Trends, http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/data-andtrends/monitoring-data/stream-bugs/stream-data.aspx 22. Olympia Washington Sustainable Community Roundtable “An Indicator Research Paper� December 6, 2006; Vol 6. No. 1., http://olympiawa.gov/en/community/sustainability.aspx

78


I want to live, learn, work, and play in a

Clean & Green Environment ENVIRONMENT: Clean Air, Water, Soil Healthy Habitats and Ecosystems Safe, Beautiful Places to Recreate Walkability/Connectivity

ETHIC: Education and Outreach Innovative, Efficient Technology Business/Community Partnerships and Cross-departmental Teams Leadership

Create Conserve Reduce Restore Recycle

MANAGEMENT: Stormwater, Wastewater, Solid Waste, Water Source, Watershed Hazardous Waste and Pollution Reduction Clean Streets, Sidewalks, Pathways


CLEAN & GREEN 2013-2014 OFFER SUMMARY Page No Offer # 99 PLN2489

Planning

Ranking 1

Planning

2

0

Public Works

3

3,069,948

Public Works

4

4,505,939

Public Works

5

1,539,832

Parks

6

4,332,239

Park Facility Maintenance

Parks

7

5,490,334

Parks and Project Management Planning

Parks

8

1,587,568

Offer Green Lifestyles/Green Buildings2

Department

PW2422

District Energy Plan2 Storm and Ground Water Environmental Protection

84

PW2417

Stormwater System Maintenance

87

PW2414

Solid Waste Management and Recycling

90

PRK2573

Green Infrastructure Management

93

PRK2572

96

PRK2488

102

PLN2519

81

2013-2014 Adopted Budget1 $0

$20,525,860 Notes: 1. Adopted Budget totals may not include ending fund balances and fund transfers for all offers. 2. These offers were combined with the City's development review offer.

80


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2422

STORM AND GROUND WATER ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION Description: What: The storm and ground water environmental offer provides programmatic approaches and solutions to improve and protect surface and ground water from pollution and low flow (quality and quantity) in the City's streams and drinking water aquifer. It also protects habitat and ecosystems, especially for salmon recovery. Why: Eleven billion gallons of rain falls on Redmond annually. In an undeveloped watershed, a portion of the rain is intercepted by the forest canopy. The rain that reaches the ground either soaks into the forest duff or is trapped in small surface depressions. Water that enters the ground either becomes part of the drinking water aquifer or becomes surface water in a stream or wetland and keeps streams from drying out during the summer. Redmond residents receive 40% of their drinking water from the aquifer. In developed watersheds, such as Redmond, more rainwater reaches the ground than in forested conditions and it runs off faster and carries pollutants picked up from the streets and landscaping. The runoff must be managed to reduce pollution of our streams and wetlands. High flows and pollutants affect fish and aquatic habitat. In addition, our streams and aquifer are highly susceptible to land use conditions in the recharge area and chemicals used by residents and businesses every day. Protecting these resources is important to the quality of life, public health, recreation, sustainability, and economy of Redmond. Clean groundwater provides significant cost savings to our water customers and provides cool clean water to streams which supports fish and wildlife, as well as recreation. The public expects pure drinking water and clean, pleasing lakes and streams as they walk the Sammamish Trail or swim at Idylwood Park. In addition, regulations such as the federal Clean Water Act mandate that the City provide groundwater and stormwater pollution prevention programs. How: The first line of defense in protecting those resources is to prevent pollution from entering our streams and groundwater. Pollution prevention programs are frequently done in partnership with other agencies and include: 路

Educational, Outreach, and Stewardship for residents and businesses about how their daily activities impact groundwater, water quality, and habitat. Examples include storm drain stenciling, carwash outreach, planting events, Salmon Watchers, Watershed Festival, classroom education, and Natural Yard Care. ($387,031)

Inspection of commercial, multi-family and residential drainage facilities to assure they are properly maintained and operating to minimize impacts to the downstream ecosystem or the City's infrastructure. The Wellhead Protection Program partners with the Fire Department to collect hazardous materials information. This information is analyzed to prioritize wellhead protection inspections to businesses that focus on best management practices for chemical use and storage. A joint supplemental position ($32K) is proposed for 2013 to assist with data entry and optimization of the database used by Wellhead Protection and Fire. ($612,696)

Pollution Prevention activities such as identifying and eliminating sources of pollution (illegal dumping of paint or oil in catch basins, and sanitary sewers erroneously connected to the storm system). This program coordinates closely with Fire and Operations personnel to respond to environmental spills and cleanup efforts. ($407,997)

Planning efforts to implement Comprehensive Plan policies, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit compliance, grant administration, code updates, and low impact development. In 2012, the 81


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2422

STORM AND GROUND WATER ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION City's first Watershed Management Plan will be published, providing guidance for managing stormwater using a holistic watershed approach. Additional professional services ($90K) are requested for monitoring to document whether the watershed approach meets its goals of improved water quality. ($835,446) 路

Monitoring groundwater quantity and quality protects the aquifer and provides cool clean water to our salmon streams. Semi-annual groundwater quality monitoring is conducted to identify contaminants prior to the drinking water wells being impacted, and to manage potential contamination sources. Additional professional services funding ($112,000) will allow continued monitoring at 30 wells (existing funding allows for 23) and sampling of the full suite of potential contaminants in a portion of the wells, which has not been done since 2007. Monitoring of our streams for chemistry and bug populations provides us with information about the effectiveness of our programs, projects, and resources. ($781,923)

Maintenance of our restoration projects is needed to assure our investments in capital stream restoration and buffer improvements are effective and sustained until the natural system can be established. ($505,263)

Regional Coordination includes work on regional committees related to water quality monitoring, salmon recovery, regulatory compliance, and stormwater management, clean-up plans, low impact development, and the Puget Sound Starts Here campaign to share resources and leverage funds. ($180,026)

Who: The offer serves every City resident, business, rate payer, and visitor. Protecting the wellhead zone helps Redmond continue to provide our drinking water supply from City wells which saves water and customers the cost of buying water. This offer serves the fish, wildlife and ecosystems within Redmond, as well as many internal and outside agencies that benefit from technical expertise and support related to groundwater and stormwater pollution issues and coordination on regulatory requirement such as the Clean Water Act, Puget Sound Action Agenda, and the Endangered Species Act. Lastly, this offer directly supports the budget by performing the bug monitoring which is the performance measure for the Clean & Green budget priority.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Percentage of water quality tests that meet compliance regulations. Average B-IBI score (bug index) across the 12 core class 2 streams. (Revised)

Measure Water Quality Tests that Meet Compliance Regulations Average B-IBI Score Across 12 Core Class 2 Streams

Target 100.00

2010 Act 100.00

2011 Act 100.00

36.00

27.60

24.50

2012 Goal Measurement 100.00 Percent 24.30 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% ($185,519) reduction in funding would reduce contracted services to clean up

82


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2422

STORM AND GROUND WATER ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION environmental spills, the number of monitoring wells sampled, the suite of groundwater monitoring to fewer parameters, and water quality monitoring to measure effectiveness of watershed planning. Environmental spills are unpredictable and may have a lasting adverse impact to our groundwater, surface waters, public health, fish and wildlife. Reducing locations and parameters for groundwater monitoring and watershed effectiveness monitoring would provide less information used in evaluating the risk to our aquifer and the effectiveness of our stormwater management. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for professional services ($202,000) and supplemental help ($32,200). Transferred vacant position ($176,000) from this offer to Water System Maintenance to provide the needed support for proactive maintenance of the utility's above ground infrastructure. Reduced various line items ($186,563) including professional services, supplies, supplemental help, small tools and external repairs and maintenance through right sizing.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$1,048,345

$1,037,083

$2,085,428

$492,578 $0 $0 $1,540,923 10.145

$491,942 $0 $0 $1,529,025 9.145

$984,520 $0 $0 $3,069,948

83


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2417

STORMWATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE Description: What: The Stormwater Maintenance Division is responsible for the inspection, repair, maintenance and improvements of the public portion of the City's stormwater system which consists of approximately 200 miles of pipe, 10,000 catch basins/manholes, 100 ponds/bioswales and 215 underground detention vaults/pipes. Operation and maintenance of the Public Works Maintenance Operations Center (MOC) decant facility (vactor spoils and street sweepings) is also included. The concept of high quality green spaces is not limited to park and recreational open spaces. Stormwater maintenance actively provides upkeep for approximately 100 natural ponds, bioswales and other open spaces, many of which are considered a "green" community asset. The trend in pond design today is more community embracive than the pond of 20 years ago. Examples of this can now be found within the City ponds at the Sammamish River Trail or along neighborhood walking trails which provide bench seating that has been integrated into the design. Looking to tomorrow, Low Impact Development (LID) stormwater functions, such as rain gardens are coming, as are linear parks and urban trails, both of which incorporate pedestrian uses, open recreational spaces and will require maintenance by the Stormwater Division. Why: Water pollution degrades the beneficial uses of surface waters (i.e. habitat, recreational). As authorized by the Clean Water Act, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program regulates water quality pollution of the waters of the United States. A well-functioning stormwater conveyance system benefits both citizenry and property by preserving the integrity of public rights-of-way and safeguarding the local habitat environment. A properly functioning infrastructure protects and enhances habitat and natural ecosystems through the protection of migratory birds, aquatic and other valuable wildlife assuring for the ecological well-being of present and future generations. How: Maintenance is performed according to the requirements of the City's NPDES permit which mandates a properly operated and well maintained public stormwater system using best management practices (BMP's) developed for each type of maintenance activity. A multi-tasking crew of ten full-time Maintenance Technicians, augmented with one seasonal employee, supported by various tools, equipment and vehicles of the trade perform tasks such as inspect/clean catch basins and manholes, vaults/detention systems, flow control chambers associated with water quality structures (i.e. ponds), vegetation control, pond/bioswales cleaning, and system repairs (catch basin refurbishing, control structure maintenance, pipe repair, under drain additions/extensions). These activities also contribute to the Infrastructure and Growth Priority through the thoughtful and planned maintenance of the City's stormwater infrastructure system. Interacting with the public, Stormwater Maintenance provides excellent customer service as they respond to specific citizen inquiries. Over the course of the year, staff responds to approximately 100 inquiries. Also, Stormwater works in conjunction with Natural Resources to provide public education outreach to develop on-line and handout information, such as the brochure titled "Solving Drainage Problems Around Your Home." Who: Stormwater Maintenance serves both internal and external customers. The internal customer includes the Public Works divisions of Street Maintenance, Transportation, Natural Resources, Engineering and Water Quality. The external customer includes the general public, and most importantly, the aquatic ecosystem. In addition to the general public, external customers include Waste Management, who takes our solid waste from the decant and uses it at the Arlington, Oregon landfill as a top cover/organic layering for solid waste disposal (garbage) and 84


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2417

STORMWATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE King County Industrial Waste Treatment Division, who permits for the effluent (water) which leaves our decant facility. Because of our internal controls and level of monitoring, a very high quality of waste extremely low in heavy metals, suspended solids and FOG (fats, oils and grease) leaves the City facility and enters the sanitary waste stream.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Number of locations reported with flooding. (New Measure) Average B-IBI score (bug index) across the 12 core class 2 streams. (Revised)

Measure Locations Reported With Flooding Average B-IBI Score Across 12 Core Class 2 Streams

Target 12.00 36.00

2010 Act 0.00 27.60

2011 Act 0.00 24.50

2012 Goal Measurement 12.00 Number 24.30 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% reduction in this offer ($241,524) would cut across all aspects of maintenance of the stormwater system. Necessary operating supplies would be scaled back by 20% along with a 20% reduction on the garbage collection costs charged by Waste Management. Elimination of a FTE is not an option as this would cause us to run the risk of not meeting the NPDES permit requirements. This reduction would also prevent compliance with new LID maintenance requirements, and maintenance of new infrastructure to be added to the stormwater system. The City recently adopted LID criteria for all new construction which requires the installation of such stormwater quality controls as rain gardens, highly landscaped bioswales, and porous concrete and asphalt surfaces. It is anticipated that the maintenance costs of LID improvements will be higher than traditional stormwater infrastructure. In addition, there are several large capital projects under construction or near construction. The maintenance requirements and costs of these projects will likely be significant because of the new technologies added to the system. An increase in this offer of $33,475 (less than 1%) is for a mid-sized truck for the vegetation control crew. Currently a rental vehicle is required for six months per year. While this initially would be an increase in costs when comparing the costs of a rental versus a permanent vehicle maintained by Fleet Services, over time an annual savings of $2,100 would be recognized. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for new vegetation control vehicle (39,475). Reduced garbage and external repair and maintenance line items ($241,000) through right sizing.

85


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

STORMWATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$1,169,910 $1,052,486 $0

$1,208,074 $1,075,469 $0

$2,377,984 $2,127,955 $0

$0 $2,222,396 13.000

$0 $2,283,543 13.000

$0 $4,505,939

86

Id: PW-2417


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2414

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT & RECYCLING Description: What: Solid Waste Management and Recycling provides solid waste management services to Redmond residents, businesses, and City facilities. The primary services provided under this offer include 1) curbside pick-up of garbage, recycling and organics (yard waste and food waste) for residential, multi-family and commercial customers, 2) community recycling events for specialized items, 3) education and technical assistance to individuals and businesses, 4) regional coordination for the King County Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan and interlocal agreement (transfer stations, landfill, hazardous waste, etc.) and 5) litter pick up. Why: The goals of this program are to minimize the solid waste stream and maximize recycling, assure remaining wastes are as benign as practical and provide safe, cost effective and efficient customer service to rate payers. Currently Redmond has one of the lowest garbage fees in the region. In order to maintain low garbage fees it is important to extend the life of the Cedar Hills Landfill for as long as possible. Once the landfill is closed, costs will rise as garbage will need to be transported to other landfills in eastern Washington or out of state. The regional strategy for extending the use of Cedar Hills is to Reduce, Re-use, and Recycle. Litter pickup, whether by city staff or volunteers, results in clean streets and beautiful places to walk, shop, live, drive, and recreate. Also, state law requires municipalities to provide garbage collection service. How: The City's focus for the solid waste and recycling program in priority order is to 1) reduce, 2) reuse, and 3) recycle. The City contracts with Waste Management to collect weekly curbside garbage and recycling (paper, some plastics, glass, motor oil, electronics, food waste and yard waste) pick up. The existing contract has been in place since 2004 and will expire in 2015. During this budget cycle, solicitation of a new contractor will be undertaken to assure that service is uninterrupted. This renewal process will include the use of the Citizen Advisory Committee to provide input into services, contract provisions and contractor selection. Residential recyclable materials that cannot be recycled curbside, such as tires, batteries, metal, appliances, toilets and construction debris can be disposed of at any of three recycling events. Last year Redmond collected a total of more than 400 tons of material, collectively, at the recycling events. The events are held in coordination with the King County Waste Mobile to prevent household hazardous materials, such as pesticides and fluorescent light bulbs from entering the waste stream. Education and outreach, such as the Watershed Festival, natural yard care, and classroom programs encourages resource conservation and develops the community's environmental ethic. Technical assistance to businesses for recycling and the food waste program helps businesses save on their garbage bills and strengthens their environmental ethic. From April 2008 to April 2009, over 1,000 cubic yards of additional material was recycled as a direct result of our on-site technical assistance efforts. City staff dedicated to litter control walk our streets and sidewalks picking up trash and litter by hand. On average, 150 cubic yards of litter, the equivalent of ten dump trucks, is collected in a year. This program is a visible presence in the community and has proven to provide opportunities for customer service and ambassadorship that extends beyond solid waste performance measures. Recently, a program coordinated with the City's Streets Division, Transportation Operations Division, and Solid Waste has been added that uses volunteers to "adopt-a-street" to help with litter pickup. Other programs included in this offer are administration of the solid waste contract, residential organics outreach and promotion, in-house (City facilities) waste reduction, administering grants, and participation in regional committee and 87


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2414

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT & RECYCLING County planning. Who: The primary customers this offer serves are residential households and businesses that subscribe to garbage and recycling. Redmond solid waste rate payers benefit from extending the life of the landfill. Other customers include internal City employees and property managers. Garbage collection is also needed for municipal operations, such as offices on the City campus and on-street garbage cans. This offer also supports King County in comprehensive planning for solid waste management. Everyone who lives, works, shops in or visits Redmond enjoys clean city streets and sidewalks that are clear of litter and debris.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Single Family residential waste stream (garbage, recycling and yard/food waste) and recycling rate. (Revised) Percent of citizens satisfied with the City's recycling program. (New Measure)

Measure Single Family Residential Waste Stream (Garbage, Recycling and Yard/Food Waste) Single Family Residential Recycling Rate Citizens Satisfied with City's Recycling Program

Target 50.00

2010 Act 58.00

2011 Act 57.00

70.00 90.00

64.00 0.00

65.00 83.00

2012 Goal Measurement 50.00 Pounds 63.00 Percent 90.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% ($77,304) reduction in expenses could be achieved by reducing the number of recycling events from three to two, eliminating bulky garbage from all events, and reducing professional services by $10,000. Eliminating one of the recycling events would reduce the opportunities for Redmond residents to recycle materials that are not collected curbside by 30% (tires, metal, construction materials, bulky garbage, etc.). Citizens would potentially need to store these materials longer or might choose to dispose of the items rather than recycle them. Reducing consultant services would result in less technical assistance in the field or relying on staff to provide that service. Many of the costs for the recycling events and outreach are funded through non-competitive grants. By eliminating or reducing these costs, other programs may not qualify for the grant funds at the level that is currently granted. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

88


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2414

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT & RECYCLING Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$394,465 $391,906 $0

$406,587 $346,874 $0

$801,052 $738,780 $0

$0 $786,371 3.630

$0 $753,461 3.630

$0 $1,539,832

89


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2573

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT Description: What: The Green Infrastructure Management offer provides high-quality maintenance and management of the green infrastructure within park sites and natural areas. The management and maintenance of the green infrastructure within park sites and natural areas has a history of continual exploration and implementation of new products, technologies, and processes that can reap efficiencies in reduced resource needs, while recognizing emerging trends in recreation and the use of public park spaces. Green Infrastructure Management supports all four factors of the Clean and Green Environment priority: 1) Create, Conserve, Reduce, Restore, Recycle; 2) Environment; 3) Ethic; and 4) Management. In addition this offer supports budget priorities of Community Building (places to connect, share, and imagine), Responsible Government (quality service), Business Community (accessibility for businesses and consumers and image and identity), Infrastructure and Growth (maintain and operate), and Safety (environment). Green Infrastructure Management also provides the resources to manage and maintain the green infrastructure for the new properties developed during the 2011-2012 period including: Northeast Redmond Park, Downtown Park, 85th Street Bridge Ramp landscaping, Redmond Central Connector, park improvements at Spiritbrook Park, 185th Avenue Northeast landscaping, and 164th Avenue Northeast landscape improvements. Why: Healthy trees, well-maintained landscaped areas, and accessible natural areas provide the optimum environment for relaxation, play, and education of children and adults alike. This offer allows families or individuals to gather and participate in organized games on high-quality fields or walk a trail through local natural areas viewing native plants, songbirds, and other wildlife. This offer enhances Redmond's natural beauty through an annual flower program and maintained rights-of-way landscapes that benefit citizens and businesses. This offer stimulates environmental awareness and habits through organized community activities. How: Several specialized work programs contribute to completing the services necessary to fulfill this offer. These include: · Community Forestry - manages nearly 8,000 street trees and over 1,200 acres of native areas; · Trail Maintenance - assures the safety and accessibility of approximately 25 miles of trails; · Horticulture Maintenance - cares for the plants, flowers, and trees within parks, municipal properties, and improved rights-of-way properties; · Water Management - operates the computerized irrigation systems for park properties, rights-of-way areas, and municipal properties; and · Turf Management - performs maintenance to lawn areas including mowing, turf renovation, and turf fertilization. This offer promotes the following Clean and Green Purchasing Strategies: · Improve current practices - The work groups covered within this offer continually evaluate and assess current and emerging technology in search of practices that enhance the public experience while conserving resources. Whether through the implementation of a pesticide reduction program or the use of current weather data to guide irrigation usage, we are constantly exploring avenues for innovation and creativity. · Encourage education and outreach - The work programs represented in this offer support many citizen-fueled activities including Arbor Day activities, the community gardens at Juel Park, and the Green Redmond Partnership which is working to bring over 1,000 acres of forested parkland into active management with the use of volunteer resources, including trained Forest Stewards, and engaged neighbors. This offer 90


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2573

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT

supports frequent volunteer requests from corporations, individuals, and schools contributing to ongoing partnerships and collaboration. Reduce negative environmental impacts - Routine practices within these programs rely on advanced technology to manage water use, and support cultural practices (plant selection, mulching) over chemical solutions. Rain gardens and green roofs also provide a public example of the use of green technology. Create safe, beautiful parks and open spaces - Maintenance of public spaces is the management of a resource. The resource may be natural or highly programmed, but every day through maintenance activities, these work groups recreate safe, accessible places to play, walk, and enjoy.

Who: The customers affected by this offer cover a wide spectrum of the citizen and business community. People of every age group, from all walks of life, benefit from parks, trails, and street side beautification.

Performance Measures: 1. 2. 3.

Percent of citizens responding "satisfied" or "very satisfied" on a survey about overall satisfaction with the maintenance of Redmond parks, trails, and open spaces. Percent of street trees evaluated and pruned on a yearly basis. The City of Redmond has 7,600 street trees. The International Society of Arboriculture recommends a three-year evaluation/pruning cycle for street trees. Number of parks and open space acres restored to viable native ecosystems.

Measure City Survey Street Trees Evaluated and Pruned Parks and Open Space Acres Restored

Target 85.00 33.00 2.00

2010 Act 0.00 28.00 4.50

2011 Act 86.00 41.00 20.00

2012 Goal 87.00 33.00 5.00

Measurement Percent Percent Acres

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Increase offer through the addition of a Maintenance Supervisor. Park Operations currently has two supervisory staff. Each Supervisor oversees 12 full time employees (FTE) and 14 supplemental staff. An additional Maintenance Supervisor would improve staff and field supervision (5% - $246,759). Proposed reductions include: eliminate remaining annual flower program (200 flower pots and 7 color spots) (1.6% $78,963). If the remaining annual flower program was eliminated, street side beautification in the way of annual flowers will be removed potentially resulting in decreased customer satisfaction (one of the performance measures for this offer). Eliminate maintenance of new capital projects; sites include: 85th Street Bridge ramp landscaping, 185th Avenue Northeast landscaping, and 164th Avenue Northeast Street improvements (1.1% - $54,287). If funding were eliminated, the projects listed will not be maintained resulting in dead plant material, weed infested landscapes, overgrown plants, and decreased customer satisfaction (one of the performance measures of this offer). Eliminate the landscape maintenance of civic beautification areas and landscaped rights-of-way; liability maintenance and irrigation will continue on these sites, sites include: Northeast 90th Street Bridge landscaping; 140th Avenue Northeast; West Lake Sammamish Parkway; Northeast 70th Street/Old Redmond Road; Redmond Way (140th to 132nd, Redmond Fall City Highway to State Route 202); Willows Road; and Leary Way (4.3% - $212,213). If this funding was eliminated, aesthetic appeal of these areas would diminish (excessive weeds, litter, and overgrown plants) potentially resulting in decreased customer satisfaction (one of the performance measures for this offer).

91


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2573

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT Note: Additional scalability reductions (2%) were made in this offer to offset a smaller percent reduction in offer PRK2572, Park Facility Maintenance. Scalability Recommended: Reduced flower program ($78,963) to concentrate program in and around the new Downtown Park. Reduced the Green Redmond Partnership contract and assess level of park maintenance to capture efficiencies ($471,500).

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$1,350,728

$1,390,342

$2,741,070

$792,992 $0 $0 $2,143,720 15.125

$798,177 $0 $0 $2,188,519 15.125

$1,591,169 $0 $0 $4,332,239

92


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2572

PARK FACILITY MAINTENANCE Description: What: Park Facility Maintenance provides proactive maintenance of high-quality park buildings, sports fields, play structures, pathways, and other park infrastructure in forty-five parks properties encompassing nearly 1,400 acres. This offer supports all four factors of the Clean and Green Environment priority: 1) Create, Conserve, Reduce, Restore, Recycle; 2) Environment; 3) Ethic; and 4) Management. In addition this offer supports budget priorities of Community Building (places to connect, share, and imagine), Responsible Government (quality service), Business Community (accessibility for businesses and consumers and image and identity), Infrastructure and Growth (maintain and operate), and Safety (environment). Park Facility Maintenance also provides the resources to manage and maintain the hard infrastructure for the new properties developed during the 2011-2012 biennium, including: Northeast Redmond Park, Downtown Park, 85th Street Bridge Ramp landscaping, Redmond Central Connector, park improvements at Spiritbrook Park, and 164th Avenue Northeast landscape improvements. Why: Park Facility Maintenance provides the services that enable youth and adult league teams to play sports on high-quality fields; assures play structures are inspected and maintained to National Playground Safety Standards; provides clean picnic shelters and restroom facilities for public use; upgrades existing facilities with conservation technologies and equipment resulting in lower energy and water consumption; and ensures timely repairs are made to protect the long-term investment of public funds. How: Several specialized work programs contribute to completing the services necessary to fulfill this offer. They include: · Community Park Management - Manages all the activities within three active community parks: Grass Lawn, Hartman, and Perrigo Parks. These parks include multiple sports fields, tennis courts, basketball courts, play structures, picnic shelters, restrooms, and other infrastructure which require proactive, consistent maintenance to achieve maximum life and provide safe, useable conditions. · Preventative Maintenance - Assures proactive maintenance of building structures, pathways, wastewater systems, stormwater systems, and safety inspections and repairs of play structures. · Facility Repairs - completes repairs to structures, fencing, fixtures, and hard surfaces. · Facility Support - performs daily maintenance of restrooms, picnic shelters, and garbage removal. This work group also maintains play structures, court surfaces, and park furnishings. Park Facility Maintenance promotes the following Clean and Green Purchasing Strategies: · Improve current practices - The work groups covered within this offer continually evaluate and assess current and emerging technology in search of practices that enhance the public experience while conserving resources. Whether through the implementation of energy efficient utilities, use of recycled or long-lasting products, or the introduction of electric utility vehicles to our fleet, we are constantly exploring avenues for innovation and creativity. The future integration with the Enterprise Asset Management System will enhance our ability to effectively use available resources. · Encourage education and outreach - The work programs represented in this offer support the information within parks. These may be kiosk structures with interpretive signage, or stand-alone signs that inform the public of habitat enhancements or safe use practices. Our ongoing, long-term relationships with youth baseball and softball organizations have been successful in leveraging volunteer labor to assist in the maintenance of sports facilities. · Reduce negative environmental impacts - Routine practices within these programs support recycling within 93


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2572

PARK FACILITY MAINTENANCE

parks, use green-certified products, and often provide a public example of the practical use of recent technologies. Create safe, beautiful parks and open spaces - Maintenance of public spaces is the management of a resource. The resource may be visible or a supporting structure or utility, but every day through maintenance activities, these work groups recreate safe, aesthetic, and accessible places to play, walk, and enjoy.

Who: The customers affected by this offer cover a wide spectrum of the citizen and business community. People of every age group, from all walks of life, benefit from parks, trails, and street side beautification. Park and trail users, whether for active, organized recreation or for a simple walk to school or work, through a park or on a maintained trail, are impacted by the services provided in this offer.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Percent of citizens responding "satisfied" or "very satisfied" on a survey about overall satisfaction with the maintenance of Redmond parks, trails, and open spaces. Percent completion of monthly safety inspections and repairs of playground facilities. Monthly inspection is the minimum recommendation of the National Playground Safety Institute.

Measure City Survey Playground Safety Inspections and Repairs

Target 85.00 100.00

2010 Act 0.00 100.00

2011 Act 86.00 100.00

2012 Goal Measurement 87.00 Percent 100.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A recommended increase would include adding funding for supplemental staff. Supplemental staff performs essential tasks to ensure the parks system is safe, clean, and well-maintained. This staffing increase will assist our Division to provide a high level of customer service to our park patrons. Tasks performed by these employees will include litter pickup, restroom cleaning, sports field preparation, playground maintenance, picnic shelter cleaning, and customer interaction (1.7% - $101,448). Increase funding for park infrastructure renovation and maintenance. There currently exists a backlog of facility repairs and maintenance that are not funded. Examples of these projects include the Anderson Park plaza renovation and brick replacement; Anderson Park Adair House and restroom building roofs replacement; Grass Lawn Park asphalt pathways replacement/overlay; Anderson Park buildings log preservation treatment; and Meadow Park sport court renovation. New funding will ensure that the parks system has safe and functional facilities (3.3% - $196,928). A proposed decrease would eliminate evening staff coverage in community parks (1.7% - $101,448). This elimination would create the inability to support evening rentals at Grass Lawn Pavilion; no park patron contact during hours of busiest park usage; increased potential for vandalism/crime; and increased potential for restroom and garbage messes potentially resulting in decreased customer satisfaction (one of the performance measures for this offer). Eliminate irrigation in neighborhood parks (1.3% - $77,578). If this elimination were to occur, irrigated turf areas would go dormant during the summer months resulting in brown, unaesthetic play areas. Long term impacts would include unhealthy turf areas with excessive weed growth and bare spots. Customer satisfaction would potentially be decreased (one of the performance measures for this offer). Close the restroom at the Watershed Preserve and replace with portable toilets (.2% - $11,935). Park users would need to use a portable toilet potentially resulting in decreased customer satisfaction (one of the performance measures for this

94


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2572

PARK FACILITY MAINTENANCE offer). Note: Additional scalability reductions of 2% were made in offer PRK2573, Green Infrastructure Management, to total an aggregate of 10% between the two offers (PRK2572 and PRK2573). Scalability Recommended: Denied request for new program ($133,910) including a partial FTE and increased water and stormwater charges. Eliminated evening staff coverage in parks ($100,000) and right size level of service for parks infrastructure ($190,961).

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$1,310,198

$1,347,899

$2,658,097

$1,413,897 $0 $0 $2,724,095 14.460

$1,418,340 $0 $0 $2,766,239 14.460

$2,832,237 $0 $0 $5,490,334

95


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2488

PARKS AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANNING Description: What: Parks and Project Management Planning supports the development of the vision, policies, plans, and the actual development of green space, such as parks, trails, recreation facilities and associated cultural services programs. It is also part of a citywide strategy to ensure that Redmond remains one of the nation's best places to live, work and play now and in the future. Specifically, the offer funds staff and administrative costs for the Park Planning and Cultural Arts Division within the Parks and Recreation Department, which ensures the City has environmentally sustainable recreational and natural areas that encourage healthy lifestyles and creates community in Redmond's increasingly diverse City. Parks staff leads the Department in: · Encouraging innovative sustainable design and management of Redmond parks, trails and facilities; · Partnering to deliver projects that are economical and sustainable; · Incorporating educational opportunities into design through interpretive signage and development or enhancement of educational facilities; · Providing citizens of all ages with wholesome and diverse recreational and cultural opportunities in clean, safe and accessible facilities; · Creating a walkable community by equitable distribution of parks and trails throughout the City; · Protecting and enhancing sensitive environmental areas, wildlife habitat, water and air; and · Developing parks that protect environmental and historical elements. Why: Residents strongly support and need public parks, trails, open space, recreation facilities and cultural opportunities. It is essential to keep pace with growth in Redmond and provide the growing and changing population with the same high quality park system currently enjoyed. Per the Parks, Arts, Recreation, Culture and Conservation (PARCC) Plan, the City is committed to creating a more connected and walkable community, providing a diversified variety of park uses and activities, developing facilities for the arts, operating sustainably, and providing more aquatics, fitness, and drop-in programs. How: Envisioning a greener Redmond: Staff collaborates with cross departmental teams, Commissions and Council, with key regional partners, and with the public to update the PARCC Plan. This plan sets the Level of Service (LOS) for parks, trails, and recreation, which establishes priorities for the Capital Investment Program (CIP). Staff work closely with the Planning to update the Comprehensive Plan. The Division staffs the Parks and Trails Commission and the Arts Commission, who make recommendations on visioning, policy development, and plans for new projects. Developing a Greener Redmond: Redmond is known for its green spaces, trees, and great parks system. The Parks Department ensures that the City meets the Puget Sound Regional Council and the Washington State Recreation Conservation Office goals for growth and levels of service for parks. As the City grows, so must the parks, trails, recreation facilities, and cultural programs. As growth targets are updated, we are actively engaged in acquisition, planning, creating funding strategies, and development of properties for new park facilities or in the planning and implementation of new cultural programs. Steps Toward an Greener City in 2013-2014: In this biennium, we will continue working with partners and identifying new partners, such as the Lake Washington School District, City of Kirkland, and King County, to deliver high quality capital projects. This staff will implement the following work plan in the 2013-2014 budget cycle, which is has an estimated value of $12 million: · Build the first and second phases of the Redmond Central Connector with Public Works and Planning; 96


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2488

PARKS AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANNING · · · · · · · ·

Develop Perrigo Park Phase II to address parking and traffic safety concerns; Make improvements at Downtown Park and conduct a master plan for its ultimate development; Improvements to existing parks for safety and maintenance; Design a mitigation site at Sammamish Valley Park; Construct the Redmond Bike Park with volunteers; Collaborate with outside partners on joint recreational facility development; Develop a master plan for Farrel-McWhirter Park and replace the restroom; and Prepare a Trail Development Plan and a master plan for Southeast Redmond Park.

Parks is striving toward creating a high quality, green city for Redmond residents and for current and future residents and employees. We will develop parks and public works projects with integrated landscape design and public art, as well as provide arts programs that encourage economic activity and meet the needs of Redmond's changing population. All of this work will be accomplished by the Director, a Deputy Director, Park Planning & Cultural Services Manager, Senior Planner, Senior Management Analyst, Administrative Assistant, and Arts Administrator. Thirty-seven percent of these salaries are funded through the capital program. Who: The customers of the Parks and Recreation Department are Redmond residents, people who work in Redmond, and visitors from throughout the region and the world. Many people who use City services wouldn't otherwise be able to access recreational opportunities, art, or arts programs. The Division is continually evaluating the customer base and who in the community we need to reach out and serve better. The current goal is to reach out to Asian and Hispanic citizens and the growing diverse population of younger residents.

Performance Measures: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

Provide 7.6 hours of recreational programming to the equivalent of every citizen in Redmond. Maintain 3 acres of Community Park land per 1,000 people citywide or better. The City exceeds this goal today. Maintain 2.5 acres of Resource Park land per 1,000 people citywide or better. The City exceeds this goal today. Grow Neighborhood Park land to 1 acre per 1,000 people by neighborhood population or better. Currently the following neighborhoods are deficient (Bear Creek 0 acres, Grass Lawn 0.3 acre/1,000, Southeast Redmond 0.1 acre/1,000 due to private park, Sammamish Valley 0 acres). Improve the trail level of service by 5% in this biennium. The current trail level of service goal is 0.35 miles of trail per 1,000 people by neighborhood population. The City currently meets this level of service standard; however, by 2017, the City will need 10.8 miles of new trail to meet growth projections. To incrementally work towards this goal, staff proposed a 5% increase in the trail level of service in the next biennium, which would equate to building 2.5 miles of new trail.

Measure Recreation Programming Maintain Community Park Land Maintain Resource Park Land Grow Neighborhood Park Land Improve the Trail Level of Service

Target 7.60 3.00 2.50 1.00 105.00

2010 Act 0.00 3.00 2.50 0.50 100.00

2011 Act 0.00 3.00 2.50 0.50 100.00

2012 Goal 7.60 3.00 2.50 1.00 105.00

Measurement Hours Acres Acres Acres Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Based on levels of service provided in the 2010 PARCC Plan: Scale up by 1% ($16,000): Additional funding is needed in professional services to fund a Park Bond effort in 97


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2488

PARKS AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANNING partnership with other departments or agencies in 2013. The additional $16,000 would fund research and surveys for preparation of a bond/levy measure. Scale down 5% ($80,780): Decrease professional services account; decreasing this account would make it difficult to perform the necessary research and surveys required for bond preparation. Portions of some FTE's could be charged to the Capital Investment Program (CIP); however, this may impact programs and projects being offered in the Parks CIP budget. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$696,928

$721,682

$1,418,610

$92,634 $0 $0 $789,562 5.500

$76,324 $0 $0 $798,006 5.500

$168,958 $0 $0 $1,587,568

98


UNFUNDED OFFERS


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2489

GREEN LIFESTYLES/GREEN BUILDINGS - UNFUNDED Description: What: Continue to advance the City's sustainability initiative and climate action planning by all City departments throughout the organization and community. This offer includes several components: implementation of the City's Climate Action Plan; continued public outreach and education through Impact Redmond and the Derby Days EcoFair; continued carbon footprint benchmarking for City operations and the community; energy audits of City facilities and implementation of those audits (consultants required); and an update of City procurement policies to incorporate environmentally friendly purchasing strategies. The Climate Action Plan establishes measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption for government operations and the community. Such measures include, but are not limited to "green" building elements, energy audits, updating procurement policies, renewable energy, alternative transportation, environmental education, water conservation, and waste-stream diversion from landfills. The Impact Redmond website provides a key customer service, education, and outreach tool. This offer includes continued maintenance and updating of this site, including the use of promotional incentives to encourage people to pledge to make a positive environmental impact. Why: Sustainability and climate action planning throughout the City is a Mayoral and City Council priority. It is also a community interest as was evidenced by the Citywide 2010 sustainability event held in anticipation of the Comprehensive Plan update. Council recognizes sustainability actions help facilitate the community's desire for a green, walkable, livable city that is economically efficient, showing long-term savings, creating a competitive advantage, and enhancing Redmond's quality of life. This is consistent with the City's vision as identified in the Comprehensive Plan. The Council and Mayor have given staff direction to continue carbon footprint and greenhouse gas emissions monitoring and to focus on innovative strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce energy consumption, and realize financial savings and environmental benefits. In particular, direction was given to plan and oversee audits for City facilities, as well as review and update City procurement policies. These aforementioned elements dovetail with implementation of the City's Climate Action Plan. This proposal also reinforces the City's environmental ethic of innovative forward-thinking proactive policies; reinforces the City's position as a regional sustainability leader; and achieves compliance with regional, state, and federal mandates. It implements the King County-Cities Climate Change Pledge and subsequent Interlocal Agreement signed between the City and King County. How: There are four factors within the Clean and Green priority that this offer addresses. 路 Factor 1: Create, Conserve, Reduce, Restore, Recycle - The definition of sustainability is meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Creating alternative solutions, conserving resources, reducing consumption, restoring the environment, and recycling materials are all inherent in sustainability and climate action planning. 路 Factor 2: Environment - Clean air, water and soil, healthy habitats and ecosystems are benefits of climate action planning. Carbon footprint benchmarking tracks greenhouse gas emissions and criteria air pollutants which allow the City to make informed decisions on reduction strategies that benefit the environment and Redmond citizens. 路 Factor 3: Ethic - The City is leading by example by making tough operational decisions to lessen environmental impacts and promoting innovative solutions. The Impact Redmond website provides an educational and outreach tool to citizens and businesses to raise awareness of how their decisions impact the environment. 路 Factor 4: Management - The Climate Action Plan helps advance a path to managing water resources, energy, solid waste, and air pollution. This offer responds to all four Clean & Green Purchasing Strategies. 99


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2489

GREEN LIFESTYLES/GREEN BUILDINGS - UNFUNDED 路

Strategy 1: Improve Practices - The Council has stated the City should demonstrate leadership with respect to sustainability and climate planning. The continual monitoring of the City's operational carbon footprint will allow for an effective and strategic management engagement on how we can minimize greenhouse gas emissions and energy consumption. It promotes a progressive and forward-thinking approach versus a reactionary approach. Energy consumption awareness will help enable creative and cost-effective solutions, realizing significant dollar savings for the City. Strategy 2: Encourage Education and Outreach - This offer provides public education and outreach through the Impact Redmond website, offering information, outreach, and support to residents and businesses seeking to implement/undertake actions that enhance the "greenness" of their lifestyle. The website's interface with the Think Redmond website further engages the business community. This is a collaborative offer from the City's Climate Action Implementation Committee, representing all seven City departments. Strategy 3: Reduction in Negative Impacts - Updating the City's purchasing policies and infusing them with environmentally friendly purchasing strategies promotes wise consumption of resources, leading to waste reduction, energy efficiency, and eventual fleet conversion. Promoting green building codes addresses conservation, restoration, and recycling of building materials and buildings themselves through deconstruction and adaptive reuse. Additionally, implementing City energy audits will ensure energy conservation measures for City operations, thereby reducing energy consumption. Strategy 4: Develop the City's Places to Recreate - Green building techniques and sustainable developments, which are climate action strategies, promote connected, livable and walkable communities. Transit-oriented development supportive of urban centers, multimodal transportation options, trails and open space, water conservation, and energy efficiency are all hallmark criteria for green developments.

This offer also supports several additional priorities: Responsible Government by promoting leadership by example and fiscal responsibility; Business Community by promoting a healthy environment that helps attract and retain businesses; and Community Building through public education and outreach via the Impact Redmond website and Derby Days EcoFair. Who: Customers of this offer are the citizens and businesses of Redmond. This is supported by the City's public education outreach efforts of the Impact Redmond website and Derby Days EcoFair, as well as the City's responsibility to ensure it operates in a manner to conserve resources, be environmentally aware, and maximize dollar savings through energy efficiency measures. Citizens and businesses benefit by having accessibility to tools that they can use to improve their environmental health.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

For 2013, no overall increase in greenhouse gas emissions (measured in tons of equivalent carbon dioxide eCO2) and energy consumption [measured in Million Metric British Thermal Units (MMBtu)] for City operations. (Note that this takes into account that we are a growing city.) (New Measure) For 2014, a one percent (1%) reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (measured in tons of equivalent carbon dioxide eCO2) and energy consumption [measured in Million Metric British Thermal Units (MMBtu)] for City operations. (Note that this takes into account that we are a growing city.) (New Measure)

Measure No Overall Increase in Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Energy (2013) Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Energy (2014)

Target 0.00

2010 Act 10,271.10

2011 Act 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 0.00 eCO2-MMBtus

0.00 107,232.00

0.00

0.00 eCO2-MMBtus

100


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2489

GREEN LIFESTYLES/GREEN BUILDINGS - UNFUNDED Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% decrease ($20,520) in this budget would likely prevent the City from implementing comprehensive energy audits. A 5% increase ($20,520) in this budget will enable the City to provide seed money for a Revolving Energy Fund to perpetuate continued energy audits. A Revolving Energy Fund is a sum of money dedicated to energy efficiency, clean energy, or other energy reduction measures. This fund is sustained by energy cost savings. More importantly, a 30% increase ($123,120) would allow the hiring of a limited duration part time (0.5) Assistant Planner to assist in the management of the City's Climate Action Strategy that is currently underway. Scalability Recommended: This offer was combined with the City's development review offer.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0 $200,000

$0 $200,000

$0 $400,000

$0 $0 $200,000 0.000

$0 $0 $200,000 0.000

$0 $0 $400,000

101


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2519

DISTRICT ENERGY PLAN - NEW - UNFUNDED Description: What: Develop a District Energy Plan. This new one-time offer seeks funds to hire a consultant to confirm feasibility of implementing district energy in Redmond's urban centers ($250,000 contract based upon research with firms and cities implementing similar work). The City's role is to enable and incent ground source district energy in both urban centers to ensure the opportunities with the Downtown couplet conversion and Group Health/Overlake redevelopment in 2015 do not become a lost opportunity. Coordinating with these projects provides value to the City as an economic development driver. The City does not intend to become a district energy provider, but rather an enabler. District energy systems represent a potentially valuable asset for the community by providing a flexible platform to use more local resources and adopt new technologies. District energy refers to an innovative energy service model whereby municipalities, energy providers, and private property owners collectively leverage local energy sources to reduce the cost of, as well as demand on, traditional energy systems. In Downtown and Overlake, ground source heating/cooling has been identified as a potential mechanism for efficient energy delivery to buildings due in part to favorable subsurface conditions and timing of related capital projects. Because implementing district energy relies on use of and enhancements to City-owned property and facilities, there are advantages to integrating construction timing and scope with planned urban center projects, such as the Downtown couplet conversion and the Overlake/Group Health redevelopment. For example, when the roads are being torn up for these projects, district energy distribution piping is installed under the streets prior to their reconstruction. Heating and cooling services generally occur via a network of underground pipes distributing steam, hot water, and/or chilled water to serve multiple buildings from a central plant. As this will reduce floor area needed for individual or site-specific mechanical equipment, developers can then utilize additional space for more desirable land uses, which can facilitate economic development. Generally, the district energy plan will address feasibility and an implementation strategy. The consultant study will include the following components: an engineering plan showing a proposed layout, including collocation of utilities; financial and funding models and options; discussion on district energy system ownership and ownership of the infrastructure; analysis of City codes to determine if revisions and incentives are necessary, as well as the potential for new development and redevelopment requirements to encourage participation in the district energy system; an analysis of right-of-way needs; and discussion and recommendation on District governance. Why: Initial staff research finds district energy systems supportive of the City's vision for two urban centers and consistent with a variety of policies regarding economic development, energy use, and the natural environment. Benefits include: improved energy efficiency, enhanced environmental protection, fuel flexibility, ease of operation and maintenance, reliability, comfort and convenience for customers, decreased life cycle costs, decreased building capital costs, and improved architectural design flexibility. Economic drivers for district energy systems include decreased life cycle costs, decreased building capital costs, improved energy efficiency and reliability. Buildings connected to district energy systems have lower capital costs for their energy equipment because they do not need conventional boilers and chillers. Building performance is improved as building owners and managers can significantly reduce operating, maintenance, and labor costs. They also save valuable up-front costs that can be invested elsewhere and allow greater flexibility in building space without compromising performance. That translates to less financial risk and improved return on investment, plus elimination of principal and interest payments; property taxes associated with operating boiler and chiller installations, insurance and annual maintenance contracts; and costs associated with operating boilers and chillers.

102


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2519

DISTRICT ENERGY PLAN - NEW - UNFUNDED District energy provides a shift toward more sustainable infrastructure - energy efficiency, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, alternative energy, and energy independence. It is a proactive approach to infrastructure management. Energy professionals maintain and operate these systems, with a reliability of 99.99%. There are more than 700 district energy systems in the United States and there have been no rolling blackouts related to them. This promotes emergency preparedness for the community. District energy systems are 100% efficient "at the door" compared with 80% efficiency or less when burning natural gas or fuel oil at a building. Overall, these systems are roughly 40% more efficient energy systems, which translates into 40% energy savings over traditional heating and cooling. How: A District Energy Plan that is innovative, efficient, and collaborative provides for public engagement and provides customer service to landowners and developers. This offer meets all four factors of the Clean and Green priority. Factor 1: Create, Conserve, Reduce, Restore, Recycle - District energy provides a shift to a more sustainable infrastructure, providing choices with respect to energy. It is a creative energy service model which conserves traditional energy sources, thereby reducing energy demand. Ground source district energy is highly efficient. Factor 2: Environment - Ground source district energy systems allow for clean air, water, and soil. They promote reduced greenhouse gas emissions and enhanced environmental protection. The elimination of building chillers means elimination of criteria air pollutants typically associated with these features. Factor 3: Ethic - This offer establishes the City's commitment to explore innovative and efficient technology. An established District Energy cross-departmental team will collaborate with private property owners, citizens, and the business community to foster partnerships in implementing district energy. The City is leading by example as a change agent for energy efficiency. Additionally, existing opportunities will be leveraged, such as the Downtown couplet conversion and Overlake/Group Health redevelopment, promoting cost efficiencies in achieving the vision established in the City's Comprehensive Plan. Factor 4: Management - Ground source district energy systems promote living in a clean and green environment. The innovative clean energy service model contributes to air pollution reduction (decreased greenhouse gas emissions and decreased criteria air pollutants). This offer responds to all four purchasing strategies by enhancing the City's climate action planning efforts through innovative, cost-effective technologies. Ground source district energy represents a progressive, forward-thinking green energy service delivery model. It helps enable creative and cost-effective solutions while raising energy consumption awareness. This offer will foster a competitive and environmentally clean economic development incentive through the collaboration between the City's Climate Action Implementation Committee (represents all seven City departments), Puget Sound Energy and engagement with Downtown/Overlake developers, businesses, and property owners. It promotes leadership by the City enabling district energy to be available to future development. Ground source district energy helps reduce energy demand, increases energy efficiency, and subsequently reduces greenhouse gas emissions; district energy systems provide a shift towards more sustainable infrastructure. District energy systems provide enhanced environmental protection and energy efficiency, which are often linked to "green" developments, and these types of developments typically promote healthy and sustainable habitats contributing to livability and walkable communities. This offer also supports several additional priorities: Infrastructure and Growth by enabling innovative, efficient technology and providing an opportunity for business/community partnerships, public engagement, and customer service to landowners and developers; Business Community by providing a competitive economic edge to attract and retain businesses; and Responsible Government by promoting a vision for the City through effective leadership. Who: This is a collaborative offer from seven departments that will engage Puget Sound Energy and Downtown/Overlake property owners and developers. There will be coordination with other city infrastructure projects to ensure value stacking and maximize efficiencies. This offer fosters the ability to bring high-quality clean and green

103


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

CLEAN & GREEN Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2519

DISTRICT ENERGY PLAN - NEW - UNFUNDED service and options to the community.

Performance Measures: 1.

Completion of consultant study regarding district energy feasibility and implementation by the end of 2014. (New Measure)

Measure Complete Study by End of 2014

Target 100.00

2010 Act 0.00

2011 Act 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 0.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% decrease ($12,500) would impact the thoroughness of the district energy plan, potentially leaving the City with a product that is not complete enough to make an informed decision regarding district energy feasibility/implementation. A 5% increase ($12,500) would allow the City to begin working on steps to select a district energy provider. Scalability Recommended: This offer was combined with the City's development review offer.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

Total $0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0

$250,000 $250,000 0.000

$250,000 $250,000

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COMMUNITY BUILDING

RESULTS TEAM REQUEST FOR OFFERS RESULTS TEAM MAP OFFER SUMMARY OFFERS


COMMUNITY BUILDING I WANT A SENSE OF COMMUNITY AND CONNECTIONS WITH OTHERS

REQUEST FOR OFFERS TEAM MEMBERS Team Lead: Teresa Kluver, Parks & Recreation Team Member: Kim Bacchus, Human Resources Team Member: Anne Carlson, Fire Team Member: Dan Werr, Finance & Information Services Team Member: Byron Shutz, Community Member DASHBOARD INDICATORS Indicator 1: Percent of Redmond residents reporting they feel informed about community events, programs, volunteer opportunities and issues. Measure Description: A measure used to indicate the success of information tools the City uses to inform the public and keep them engaged in civic and community events. Calculation Method: Data for this measure will be generated by the City’s biennial survey.

Indicator 2: Percent of residents reporting they are satisfied with their engagement in community events, programs and volunteer opportunities in the community. Measure Description: A measure used to determine the degree to which community members can be actively involved in their community. The measure recognizes not everyone seeks to be involved in community events, but will capture those who want such involvement. The indicator is not exclusive to participation in City programs and events, but rather speaks to participation in other types of community programs (e.g. church, non-profit, organized sports, etc.). Calculation Method: Data for this measure will be generated by the City’s biennial survey.

Indicator 3: Percent of Redmond citizens responding positively to a survey question that rates the overall sense of connection to the community. Measure Description: A measure used to reflect a “sense of community” felt by residents. Calculation Method: Data for this measure will be generated by the City’s biennial survey.

105


INTRODUCTION/SUMMARY OF CAUSE & EFFECT MAP The Community Building Cause and Effect Map identifies four factors that create a sense of community and connections with others: 1) Communication and Connections 2) Shared Public Experiences 3) Positive Community Image 4) Places to Connect, Share, and Imagine These factors were developed from community input and verified through many research sources. Factor 1: Communication and Connections Community involvement is dependent on successful communication that enhances every citizen's ability to connect to others and access services. This involvement begins the formation of a sense of community. Strong partnerships, volunteerism, and an accessible government with the opportunity for civic participation are very important to move forward as a community. We are looking to develop diverse, effective venues for two-way communication to better connect citizens, businesses, and the City, fostering trust and encouraging active engagement. Factor 2: Shared Public Experiences The arts, recreation, and cultural experiences offered in Redmond should inspire participation. Redmond's special events, programs, and activities can serve to encourage involvement while providing an opportunity to meet others and share common interests. Events and activities that are timeless yet evolving can help emphasize and solidify a sense of community. Factor 3: Positive Community Image The diversity of Redmond residents and businesses indicates a conscious choice of making Redmond home. Redmond is unique and different from any other city. While the City continues to grow, it should retain its welcoming, safe, and green environment, offering a sense of place to each citizen. Having this unique identity and community pride is an important aspect of building community and connections with others. Factor 4: Places to Connect, Share, and Imagine Successful community building has been found to be dependent on the social surroundings that provide places to gather, find respite, or share experiences. If successful, these special places can provide the "anchor" of community life, encouraging broader, more creative interactions between friends, neighbors, and the larger community. PURCHASING STRATEGIES WE ARE LOOKING FOR OFFERS THAT: Strategy 1: Promote civic partnerships and opportunities to collaborate. Offers that leverage dollars, time, knowledge, and success by working together via partnerships are desired. Partnerships may be cross-departmental, local, or regional. Partnerships can also include the opportunity for Redmond citizens to volunteer their time and knowledge to City or community programs.

106


We favor offers that support partnerships and encourage participation by citizens, businesses, and community organizations. Strategy 2: Utilize broad and inclusive communication strategies. Redmond citizens receive information and stay connected in a variety of ways including social and online media, as well as traditional broadcast and print media. Redmond programs should make creative use of existing communication venues while continuing to explore emerging communication platforms. We favor offers that demonstrate effective and credible communication plans for the City or the individual program's target audience. Strategy 3: Provide opportunities for shared experiences. Shared public experiences are important in fostering a sense of community and building connections. The City strives to provide diverse programs for all ages, cultures, and abilities at a variety of times and locations. We favor offers that encourage citizens to engage in activities with their friends and neighbors, as well as meet other Redmond citizens. Strategy 4: Encourage pride and a sense of community in the City and its neighborhoods. A diverse population of citizens and businesses has chosen to call Redmond home. A Redmond, or neighborhood, identity is developed when people are encouraged to interact with others during daily routines or unique events in ordinary or special places. Positive participation can enhance a person's identity with a particular program, organization, or place. We favor offers that highlight diversities while strengthening and uniting the community. Strategy 5: Promote public and private gathering spaces. Public and private spaces, whether indoors or outside, offer opportunities for people to meet, interact, and share. Successful social surroundings that are varied, convenient, and inviting can draw Redmond citizens out of their homes and stimulate participation within the larger community. We favor offers that include places for citizens to sit, talk, travel, or play together. CIP PURCHASING STRATEGIES Strategy 6: Urban Centers Realize Redmond’s vision for Downtown and Overlake1 by providing needed facilities, services and improvements within these two urban center neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support implementation of the vision and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 Capital Investment Program (CIP). Strategy 7: Neighborhoods Provide infrastructure connections and systems in Redmond’s established neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support improved connections within or between neighborhoods and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 CIP.

1

 See Redmond’s Comprehensive Plan for the vision for Downtown and Overlake  107


Strategy 8: Preservation of capital Provide for the preservation of the City’s infrastructure system. Offers will be favored that maintain and improve the reliability, safety and integrity of the system. Strategy 9: Value for investment Achieve high value for the dollars invested and demonstrate efficiency in cost, timing and approach. Offers should describe how projects have been coordinated to provide the most effective approach and to minimize disruption to the community. In addition, explain how the offer leverages actions and resources by others, through partnerships; for example, meet the strategic needs of the City. Strategy 10: Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint Carry out the Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint – Capital Investment Strategy, 2013-2030, as well as adopted functional plans. Offers will be favored that implement recurring policy direction and priority projects from these documents, as well as leverage other projects in a cross-functional manner. NOTES/PRACTICES/SUPPORTING EVIDENCE 1. 2. 3.

Oldenburg, Ray (1989, 1991). The Great Good Place 2009-10 Community Building Request for Offer 2011-12 Community Building Request for Offer

2011-12 Community Building Request for Offer included the following references: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

2009-2010 Business Community Request for Offer http://www.codepublishing.com/WA/Redmond/CompPlan/PDF/index.html http://www.hks.harvard.edu/saguaro/ http://www.communityindicators.net.au/ http://www.hks.harvard.edu/saguaro/ http://www.bettertogether.org, http://www.bettertogether.org/pdfs/Arts.pdf http://www.civicpartnerships.org/docs/tools_resources/community_indicators.htm Putnam, Robert D. Bowling Alone. The Collapse and Revival of American Community (Simon and Schuster, 2000) 9. Putnam, Robert D. (1996). The Civic Enigma. June 2005 reflection back on 1995 article Bowling Alone and what's been learned since then. 10. Putnam, Robert D. (7/28/04). Health By Association: some comments. International Journal of Epidemiology.

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I want a sense of community and connections with others

COMMUNITY BUILDING


COMMUNITY BUILDING 2013-2014 OFFER SUMMARY 2013-2014 Adopted Budget1

Page No Offer # 111 PRK2432 114 PRK2438

Offer Recreation Creates Healthy and Vibrant Communities Shared Experiences through Community Events

Department Parks Parks

117 120 123

PLN2455 EXE2563 PRK2579

Strategic Investments in Human Services Connecting Community and Government A Place for the Arts and Cultural Connections

Planning Executive Parks

3 4 5

2,163,219 2,588,741 543,384

126 129

PLN2458 PLN2462

Neighborhood Planning and Community Connections Preserving and Sharing Redmond's History

Planning Planning

6 7

506,769 78,443 $15,332,062

Notes: 1. Adopted Budget totals may not include ending fund balances and fund transfers for all offers.

110

Ranking 1 2

$8,671,998 779,508


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2432

RECREATION CREATES HEALTHY AND VIBRANT COMMUNITIES Description: What: The Recreation Division provides the community with a wide variety of programs, services, and cultural opportunities to promote emotional, intellectual, and physical well-being for people of all ages, abilities and cultures. We have nine year-round activity sites, each with a unique identity, that house over 2,200 programs. In 2011, approximately 55,000 people were served by exercise and recreation classes, which equates to more than 580,000 hours of programming time through such classes. In total, over 140,000 people were touched by recreation programs and drop in activities. The Recreation Division boasts 2,900 volunteers annually that provide an average of 28,100 hours of service. Citizens use recreation facilities as places where they can meet their friends, neighbors, and form new relationships, fostering trust and encouraging active engagement and community pride. Why: The Recreation Division provides unique and innovative programs and services that are customer-driven. Many programs are supported in part or solely by fees, providing a clear indicator of what people are willing to pay, and creating an economically sustainable model. Many full programs with waitlists attest to the popularity and value that our community places on our services. Funding provided by the City's General Fund is the backbone to meeting operational needs and sustaining customer service and community partnerships. It is also the main funding mechanism supporting programs for vulnerable populations such as youth, seniors and people with disabilities. Over half of the Recreation Division budget is funded through the Recreation Activity Fund (RAF), as well as an additional 7% which is allocated through the Parks Levy. This leveraging of funds provides an abundance of opportunities for our community without being solely dependent on the General Fund. How: Many programs and services are contracted with partnering agencies which gives us the ability to leverage dollars, time, knowledge, and success while investing in local small businesses. We partner, contract, and collaborate with many outside agencies, both public and private, such as Lake Washington School District, Hopelink, and Congregation for the Homeless, to name a few. We act as a broker between service providers and the community, supporting local businesses, as well as providing services ourselves. We work cross-departmentally within the City of Redmond, providing gathering rooms, staff support, and large venues for awards banquets and public meetings. We also create opportunities to partner with our citizens by encouraging participation to assist other citizens uniting the community through volunteerism. At the Senior Center our 1,019 volunteers share their time and knowledge to produce a wide array of community programs, such as Meals on Wheels and the affordable nutrition program. Their 11,980 combined hours would equal six full time employees (FTE's). Recreation programs and services inspire participation encouraging diversity in both staff and programs. Community-based services help underserved members of the community live healthy, independent lives. Programs and services are offered year round, day and night, seven days a week, and our scholarship program assures that everyone has the opportunity to participate. The Recreation Division informs our residents and businesses of all the great services we offer and opportunities to get involved in their community. We are the City's leader in creative communication. We have a monthly e-newsletter with a circulation of over 20,000, a print Recreation Guide that gets mailed to every address in Redmond, and six websites. Our main webpage gets more "hits" than any other page on Redmond.gov. For targeted messaging, we have a dozen Facebook pages with thousands of "friends." We also use Twitter, Quick Response (QR) codes, and utilize online registration and facility booking. Who: By providing safe, accessible spaces for drop in socializing and programmed leisure, our facilities act as spectacular public and private gathering places. The Senior Center and Old Firehouse Teen Center are perfect examples where we have taken a building and created a comfortable, welcoming environment where people from different backgrounds are encouraged to interact with others during daily routines or unique events in ordinary or special places. 111


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2432

RECREATION CREATES HEALTHY AND VIBRANT COMMUNITIES Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Offer a variety of diverse programs and services to Redmond residents of all ages that will maintain or increase the number of people served from 2010 levels as indicated by the Community Indicators Report. An ongoing customer service survey of participants will indicate an 85% satisfaction rating with recreation programs and services.

Measure People Served Through Recreation Customer Satisfaction Survey

Target 2010 Act 142,428.00 142,428.00 90.00 95.00

2011 Act 148,911.00 91.00

2012 Goal Measurement 148,911.00 Count 90.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: General Fund scalability at 5% is $168,000. The scalability items are ranked in order of preference. If these cuts were made, they would negatively impact the quality of our programs leading to less favorable satisfaction survey results which may decrease the number of people participating in our programs. Potential cuts would include: · Eliminate Recreation Internship Program and offer training that is not associated with out of area travel ($50,000); · The Redmond Pool offer $35,000 was a standalone offer in the 2011/2012 Budget. We are absorbing it in the Recreation Creates Healthy vibrant communities offer, and offering it as scalability; · Redmond Youth Partnership Advisory Committee, supplemental staff and program supplies ($10,000); · Old Redmond Schoolhouse Community Center, small tools ($15,000); · Senior Center, programing ($15,000); · Teen Programs, supplies and supplemental staff ($30,000); · Adaptive Recreation, inclusion programing ($10,000); and · Farrel McWhirter, supplemental staff ($3,000) If we obtain approval of our new program (scale up), we believe the consistency added by FTE's will offset the negative impact of the cuts. To provide consistency and overall improvement in the services we provide to our community, we would like to convert 9 supplemental employees to full time positions. · Two of the FTE positions are already filled with limited duration employees and funded using supplemental offsets and RAF (no additional cost to offer); · It will cost an additional $910,676 to create seven FTE's; · $396,320 in supplemental employee line item offsets; · $168,000 will come from cuts staff identified in General Fund (Note: These are the same cuts identified in our scalability); · $200,000 will be funded through existing RAF funds; and · $146,356 will come from new RAF funds pending a proposed fee increase of up to 5%. The new program will increase RAF by 6%, and due to savings and offsets, will not affect the General Fund. Scalability Recommended: Denied new request ($1,163,912) to convert supplemental staff to permanent. Reduced Recreation Assistant Manager position ($283,435) through reorganization.

112


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2432

RECREATION CREATES HEALTHY AND VIBRANT COMMUNITIES Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$2,264,720 $1,999,555 $0

$2,340,225 $2,067,498 $0

$4,604,945 $4,067,053 $0

$0 $4,264,275 24.000

$0 $4,407,723 24.000

$0 $8,671,998

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2438

SHARED EXPERIENCES THROUGH COMMUNITY EVENTS Description: What: The City of Redmond Community Events Division provides all citizens a free and/or low cost way to gather family, friends, and neighbors together, to create memories and traditions that are connected to their community. The City of Redmond's community events include Derby Days, Redmond Lights, Eggstravaganza, recreation events, park and city openings, historical celebrations, and logistical and staff support for cultural events, such as Ananda Mela. Citizen participation at these events continues to increase (with over 64% of residents participating), while they maintain positive attendee satisfaction ratings (90% average). Why: The City of Redmond's long standing annual events, Derby Days, Redmond Lights, and Eggstravaganza, offer the community (residents, businesses and visitors) an opportunity to participate in a unique Redmond experience while promoting a positive community image for all ages. Statistics listed below highlight some of the event growth: · Over 350 people helped and 1,190 volunteer hours were donated to make these events in 2011 a success, resulting in a 32% increase in volunteer hours for the biennium; · The Redmond Lights celebration focuses on holiday traditions and the diversity that makes Redmond unique. The cultural offerings at this event showcase Redmond's diverse and growing population. Ten different community churches and various faith-based and cultural organizations work together each year to give Redmond Lights attendees an opportunity to learn and celebrate the City's diversity; · Children's programming continues to be an important motivation for community event attendees. The annual Eggstravaganza egg hunt has more than doubled its participation in the last two years and now serves over 3,000 children; and · The Derby Days Kids Parade, a multi-generational tradition, also has doubled its participation from 800 to over 1,700 kids participating on an annual basis. Many of today's parents and grandparents once marched in the Derby Days Kids Parade and now proudly watch their own children experience it for themselves. Derby Days is a proud look back at Redmond's history and diversity, as well as a glance forward to what Redmond will become. How: The Special Events staff partners with the following departments, organizations and businesses to produce these events on a yearly basis: · We collaborate with Communications, Park Operations, Public Works, Police, Fire, Finance and Information Services, Natural Resources, Economic Development, Trip Reduction, and Planning Departments to plan, staff, and logistically execute each event. Hundreds of hours are focused on these events by many employees in all departments who don't usually work together, helping to develop a sense of community among employees; · We partner with civic organizations, such as the Lions, Kiwanis, Rotary clubs, and the Chamber of Commerce to aid them in developing fund raising activities and volunteer opportunities at the community events; · We recruit and organize over 350 community volunteers, such as church groups, little league teams, Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA) classes, the Overlake Composite Squadron, and individuals to support and execute the events annually; · We solicit event (cash and in-kind) corporate sponsorships from local, regional and national businesses to support the economic sustainability of the events. Even in a slow economic climate, we have seen an increase in businesses wanting to support the cities community events either through in-kind donations and volunteerism or with cash donations. Currently, Redmond has over one hundred and fifty businesses participating as sponsors or vendors; and · Community events are communicated through the City website, as well as each events unique website, FOCUS magazine, the Recreation Guide, local and regional print publications, movie theater advertising, over 30 free online event calendar websites, press releases, cable television, radio, internet postings/ads and partnering 114


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2438

SHARED EXPERIENCES THROUGH COMMUNITY EVENTS organizations websites, signage, posters, and flyers, and through multiple social media channels. Who: The community events demographic estimates are compiled by utilizing annual event surveys collected from less than 1% of the event attendees, as well as through staff reports with year to year comparisons. Event attendees are most often a 50/50 split of male and female with more than 70% of attendees participating as a family with one or more children. Over 90% of event goers are Redmond residents with less than 10% of participants coming from other Western Washington zip codes. Over 85% of sponsors and participating businesses also are based in Redmond, with the additional remaining percentage reflecting national companies. Additional Information: 路 The Event Administrator full time employee (FTE) is included in the Recreation Offer (PRK2432) since responsibilities and duties are divided between Events and Marketing for the entire Division. 路 The largest community event sponsor (Microsoft) will be transferring their $60,000 biennial support of the Community Events to "One Redmond", in the next budget cycle. "One Redmond" is the amalgamation of the Redmond Chamber of Commerce, Redmond Economic Development, and the Redmond Foundation. To off-set this substantial loss of revenue, $60,000 in additional General Fund dollars are reflected in this budget offer request. 路 Event staff overtime costs from other departments continue to rise an estimated 15% per year due to hourly increases stipulated by union contracts and preferential assignments based on seniority.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Derby Days, Redmond Lights, and other community events are successful with a high level of attendee participation and satisfaction, as measured in the City of Redmond Citizen Survey. Increase number of community event participants by 10% on an annual basis. This includes volunteers, participating organizations, and event attendees.

Measure Increase Number of Volunteers Increase Participating Organizations Rating of Satisfied or Better

Target 300.00 120.00 90.00

2010 Act 300.00 120.00 85.00

2011 Act 350.00 150.00 91.00

2012 Goal 366.00 138.00 85.00

Measurement Count Count Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% increase would provide funding for an extended or changed Derby Days parade route ($30,000) and extending the Criterium to include Friday night racing ($12,900). This increase would allow for increased attendance and race revenues. A 15% increase would provide funding for the extended or changed Derby Days parade route ($30,000), extension of the Criterium to include Friday night racing ($12,900), and increase funding for national up and coming entertainers/performers for Derby Days and Redmond Lights main stages ($23,000) resulting in increased attendance and revenues. This increase would also allow us to add a new Fall Harvest Community Event ($13,000), as well as execute one-time events to activate the development of awareness for the Downtown Park and the Central Connector ($50,000). A 5% decrease would result in a decrease in quality of entertainers and performers at Derby Days and Redmond Lights ($20,000) and remove any ability to expand the event programming by limiting the operational rentals ($22,724). This decrease would necessitate scaled back programming offers to maintain the same level of attendance and programming

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2438

SHARED EXPERIENCES THROUGH COMMUNITY EVENTS offered. Scalability Recommended: Reduced request for new items ($60,000) including advertising, supplies and supplemental staff for existing events and projects.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$97,335

$99,797

$197,132

$287,821 $0 $0 $385,156 1.000

$294,555 $0 $0 $394,352 1.000

$582,376 $0 $0 $779,508

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2455

STRATEGIC INVESTMENTS IN HUMAN SERVICES Description: What: The Human Services Division of the Planning Department works to ensure that residents have access to needed human services and to develop and implement regional, subregional, and local solutions to specific challenges, leveraging key partnerships to achieve both goals. Through the City's funding support to local nonprofit organizations, residents are able to access assistance for a range of services, examples of this are food, shelter, utility bills, medical or dental care, legal issues, counseling, employment, learning to speak and read English, and affordable child care. Why: Adequate access to human services for residents in need is critical to creating a community in which all residents have opportunities to participate, be connected, and be engaged. To that end, the Human Services Strategic Plan calls for helping individuals and families to move from surviving to thriving which can require a broad array of possible services. How: The City contracts with local nonprofit agencies that provide a spectrum of human services so that residents are able to meet their basic needs and become thriving members of the community. In addition, Human Services staff participates in and provide leadership to policy committees and working groups that are most relevant to the challenges Redmond needs to address. Finally, staff and the Human Services Commission are working to implement strategies that will make more effective and long-term strategic use of all available resources. An 11% increase ($243,119) is requested for a needed limited duration full-time Senior Planner to compensate for the Human Services Manager position expanding its role to become Assistant Director of the Planning Department. ELEMENT 1 - DISTRIBUTE FUNDS FOR SERVICES: Beginning in 2010, Human Services staff have been working with a formal commission to review and rate applications for funding in support of local Human Service programs, many of which rely heavily on the contributions of volunteers. High-ranking proposals are those that effectively demonstrate need, sufficient skill and capacity, accessibility across cultures, and significant leveraging of other resources. Once allocations are approved by City Council, individual contracts are negotiated (current number is 51) and include specific performance measures, which are monitored by staff and tied to contract payments. In 2011, every Redmond dollar invested leveraged an additional $5.39 from other north and east cities. OUTCOME: Cost-effective, quality services available to citizens in need. ELEMENT 2 - REGIONAL PLANNING AND ADVOCACY: The City of Redmond has both a Regional Agenda and a Human Services Strategic Plan which encourage collaboration and partnership with other jurisdictions and organizations. The Council specifically directs regional involvement related to: A Regional Coalition for Housing (ARCH), King County Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness, Eastside Human Service Forum, and Community Development Block Grant. Other regional/subregional partnerships supported by the Strategic Plan include the division's work with United Way, the Eastside Homelessness Advisory Committee, the Alliance of Eastside Agencies, the Eastside Refugee and Immigrant Coalition, Communities Count, the Funders Collaborative, Regional Equity Network of the Greater Transit Communities Project, and the Eastside Social Sustainability Partnership. OUTCOMES: These activities have brought new and critical resources to Redmond residents. Regional partnerships also create much greater opportunity for innovative and effective long-term solutions to shared challenges. ELEMENT 3 - INNOVATION AND PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT: Staff and the Human Services Commission are working together to think more strategically about the ongoing investment of all of the resources at our disposal, including fund dollars, staff time, time and talents of the commissioners, internal partners in other City departments, and city residents. The Commission work plans for 2013 and 2014 will focus on developing and implementing specific strategies designed to make effective, long-term strategic use of all available resources. 117


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2455

STRATEGIC INVESTMENTS IN HUMAN SERVICES Who: The primary customers of this offer are Redmond residents in need of assistance. Secondary customers include the many partner organizations that provide the direct services, as well as our regional partners in other local jurisdictions with whom we collaborate extensively. As Redmond continues to become a more connected and fully sustainable community, we must recognize that the human infrastructure of our city is equally important to the physical infrastructure. Residents in crisis or struggling daily to get by are much less likely to be engaged, productive citizens able to share their potential with the larger community. This offer responds directly to the Community Building Factor 1, Communication and Connections, while also addressing several purchasing strategies: promotes civic partnerships and opportunities to collaborate through the work of the agencies supported by City funds; broad and inclusive communication strategies to ensure successful outreach to both agencies and residents in need, many of whom speak languages other than English; and Human Services dollars support a variety of programs which provide significant opportunities for shared experiences. The Comprehensive Plan calls for delivery of effective human services as one aspect of addressing the social sustainability of this community. Finally, Value for Investment is a key factor as the Human Services Commission reviews each request for funds. In addition, this offer addresses key elements of the Responsible Government priority by addressing the Community Connections and Communication factor and the Safety priority which specifically calls out the need for resources in support of seniors, youth, and at-risk populations. This offer proposes support for three significant partnerships: Eastside Human Services Forum ($9,500 per year ongoing); Eastside Homelessness Advisory Committee ($2,500 per year, leveraging $27,500 from other cities - new); Alliance of Eastside Agencies ($1,500 per year, leveraging $5,000 from other cities - new). TOTAL PARTNERSHIPS: $13,500/year.

Performance Measures: 1.

Goal is for all human service programs to achieve performance results of 90% or better based on contracted outcome goals. The 2011 rate is 93%, up from 91% in 2009. Background: All funded programs are required to provide reports to the City in order to ensure that they are meeting expectations set by the contract. Outputs: The number of Redmond residents served and the number of service units to be provided (e.g., counseling hours, bednights, meals delivered, training hours). Hopelink Transitional Housing program is required to provide nearly 1800 "bednights" to 45 Redmond residents/year. Outcomes: Measurable impact as a result of the service. For example, 75% of Hopelink transitional housing clients who exit will move directly into permanent housing. Collectively, programs should achieve 90% success in meeting their outcome goals.

Measure Percent of Contractors Meeting Outcome Goals

Target 100.00

2010 Act 91.00

2011 Act 93.00

2012 Goal Measurement 100.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: For this offer, the impact of scalability is about quantity and scope of services available to our residents and the number of residents who will be able to access those services. Every $1,000 buys a certain amount of food or a set number of nights in shelter. Many of our agency partners have long wait lists and high turn-away rates due to limited funding. Decreasing this offer by 5% means $106,528 fewer dollars available to provide services, resulting in more people on wait lists or being turned away completely. Conversely, increasing this offer by 5% would mean that same amount in additional dollars would be available to provide services, resulting in more people being able to receive

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2455

STRATEGIC INVESTMENTS IN HUMAN SERVICES services with fewer having to navigate the uncertainty of waiting lists or being turned away completely. For 2013-2014, Redmond has received 76 applications with requests totaling $1,192,974 per year. This represents 39% more than we expect to have available to allocate. Funding support to nonprofit organizations has been cut at virtually every level (e.g., state and county) over the past few years, and demand for services remains high as individuals and families continue to struggle to meet their needs. Scalability Recommended: Approved new request for 1.0 FTE Senior Planner ($238,723) on a limited duration basis for the biennium to support human services programs and an additional $50,000 (one-time) for human service agency support. Reduced various line items ($6,000) through right sizing.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$280,172

$288,645

$568,817

$785,274 $0 $0 $1,065,446 2.400

$809,128 $0 $0 $1,097,773 2.400

$1,594,402 $0 $0 $2,163,219

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2563

CONNECTING COMMUNITY & GOVERNMENT Description: What: The Office of Communications and Marketing plays a critical role in advancing communication strategies, and shaping opinion and perception about the quality of services and programs offered by the City, highlighting its position as a leading place to live, work, play and partner. The Communications and Marketing framework proactively manages messaging on behalf of the City. This includes message framing on a range of topics, including the City's capital investment plans, strategic plans, major economic development initiatives, and specific targeted campaigns and rollouts. Realigning the Print Program within Communications and Marketing will support comprehensive and well-planned strategies for all departments and programs within the City (including activities, such as Derby Days, Redmond Lights, and National Night Out). Promoting Redmond will be achieved through integration of print products, news features, video, social media messaging and web content to further inform and engage citizens and businesses. Since technology continues to drive public expectations, these tools must become fully integrated into the City's Communications and Marketing plans. Initiatives will be executed by developing sound business practices, measureable outcomes, clearly articulated and implementable guidelines and standards. Why: Engaging citizens, businesses, and partners around common themes and priorities is an essential component for success. The Office of Communications and Marketing plays an integral role in gathering input and feedback to promote the City's mission, vision and values in a results driven manner. Our customers are both internal and external. Internally, we provide direction for communications leadership and support for all City departments, projects, initiatives and issues management. Our work equally affects the City's constituents. The majority of the print and electronic communications that the residents, employees and businesses receive are shaped and framed with guidance, input, strategies and products developed by the Communications and Marketing staff. How: The Communications and Marketing staff work in tandem with subject matter experts across departments to ensure proper message delivery to correct audiences. Working as "smart teams" with subject matter experts across City departments will ensure better alignment of strategies and tools to support initiatives. Realigning the Print Program within Communications and Marketing will support these efforts and tighten oversight of print products. Efficient and transparent messaging will be achieved by framing and weaving together specific Citywide goals, objectives and targets. Communications and Marketing will highlight specific events, programs, plans, improvements, and projects to further engage citizens and businesses, while championing the community's priorities. The team will also provide crisis and emergency preparedness messaging. Who: Our customers are both internal and external. Internally, we provide direction for communications leadership and support for all City departments, projects, initiatives and issues management. Our work equally affects the City's constituents. The majority of the print and electronic communications that the residents, employees and businesses receive are shaped and framed with guidance, input, strategies and products developed by the Communications and Marketing staff. Council Direction: The Communications and Marketing offer was prepared and submitted prior to the initial analysis conducted by the new Communications and Marketing Administrator. Based on the assessment presentation made to the Public Affairs and Finance Committee and to the full Council in October of 2012 by the new Communications and Marketing Administrator, a more robust and realigned work plan proposal will be presented to the Council during the first quarter of 2013. This plan will contain recommendations to restructure, realign, and redevelop a highly integrated communications and marketing approach. This plan will make a specific request for support and will be proactive and initiative based. It will draw upon and encompass broad themes, strategies and tactics to better utilize technology (tools 120


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2563

CONNECTING COMMUNITY & GOVERNMENT and platforms such as print, web/social media/digital and video). Additionally, cross departmental interdisciplinary "smart teams" will be deployed to streamline and intentionally influence and shape the City's key priorities, topics, and content aimed at reaching specific constituencies (residents, businesses, community and corporate partners, industry and trade affiliations, the public, media, elected officials, citizens working in Redmond, etc.). Performance measures will also be redefined to better measure the effectiveness of such tools and initiatives in shaping, influencing and informing citizens and therefore raising awareness about Redmond and its achievements. This will be part of an overall Citywide effort to streamline business practices related to communications and marketing while establishing best practices to rebrand messaging with one voice and one overall approach.

Performance Measures: 1. 2. 3.

4.

Percent of citizens, who find value, attend events, know about key issues and say the City is either "Excellent" or "Good" at sharing news and information. Develop systems to track and measure value and impact of news, web and social media metrics to determine current and future opportunities/growth trends. (New Measure) Percentage of internal customers who utilize the print and/or consultative strategic expertise/services the Office of Communications and Marketing to help position, brand and market initiatives and projects who are "Satisfied" or "Very Satisfied" with level of support, outcome, and results. Regional and national promotion of Redmond as a leading City where businesses, residents and citizens engage.

Measure Informed Citizens Customers are Satisfied or Very Satisfied Feel a Sense of Community

Target 75.00 75.00 80.00

2010 Act 70.00 64.00 80.00

2011 Act 68.00 68.00 80.00

2012 Goal 75.00 80.00 85.00

Measurement Percent Percent Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Decrease by approximately 5% ($117,334 based on estimated $2,346,682 existing budget) While the Office of Communications and Marketing supports initiatives, products, programs and campaigns across City Departments, the vast majority (approximately 89%) of costs associated with the Office of Communications consists of direct salary and benefits in support of a strong Citywide Communications and Marketing program. Other significant operational costs are associated with the development and production of the quarterly FOCUS. Currently, approximately 30% of the cost is supported by the Public Works, Natural Resources Division as part of its regular community outreach, including the recycling insert mailer. The remaining costs ($120,000) exceed the 5% scalability threshold. Without clear data on the cost/benefit investment for all City departments print products and mailing costs, it is difficult to determine the viability of this versus other products. With regard to FOCUS, it is unclear at this time whether integrating content into a non-print format might impact certain key audiences (i.e. seniors or others who rely on print products). Also unknown is the value of the internal print newsletter versus an external newsletter or an all web based product. A realignment of collateral print products could potentially yield a greater cost savings over time and reduce duplication of efforts, better align messaging and encourage greater efficiencies. Scalability Recommended: No change to program.

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2563

CONNECTING COMMUNITY & GOVERNMENT Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$492,639 $507,429 $0

$506,594 $371,850 $0

$999,233 $879,279 $0

$0 $1,000,068 5.000

$710,229 $1,588,673 5.000

$710,229 $2,588,741

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2579

A PLACE FOR THE ARTS AND CULTURAL CONNECTIONS Description: What: The Art Program provides our community with information, resources and programs that foster creativity in all citizens; promotes cultural vitality everywhere; and ensures access to high quality arts and cultural experiences that both celebrate and challenge our ideas about who we are and what it means to live in Redmond. Redmond's Community Building arts and cultural services are designed to meet the needs of a whole residential community, from longtime cultural leaders who seek deep engagement in the pressing issues of our time, to families who have recently moved to Redmond and are looking for low-cost, enriching ways to enjoy their new hometown together. For instance, we provide consistent and open civic dialogue about cultural affairs by organizing the nine member volunteer advisory Arts Commission, which includes monthly and special public meetings where the outcome has been hundreds of citizens involved in open discussion, planning and decision making. At the same time, in 2011, 24,000 people enjoyed a variety of free public programs across the visual, literary and performing arts, such as the five arts projects targeted at a new, younger audience and funded by our Community Grant Program, the Arts Season. Other highlights of our Community Building work-program include: · Providing opportunities for shared experiences around outdoor art installations and performances in public parks through our popular Arts in the Parks series at City Hall lawn and future Downtown Park. Outcome: Friends and family gather, picnic and expand their repertoire of music and theatre genres to include cultural forms and traditions that reflect Redmond's growing international diversity; · Encouraging pride and a sense of community around a creative technology center through our new technology inspired Poet Laureate Program "Geeks For Poetry/Poetry For Geeks," by partnering with the Redmond Library to target culturally underserved populations such as 'techies,' 'teens' and the non-English speaking community. Outcome: Neighbors gather, explore different literary traditions and technologies in an innovative setting; and · Promoting public gathering spaces throughout Redmond by restoring 16 outdoor artworks that are in critical condition and conduct routine maintenance on the over 100 other pieces of artwork in our Public Art Collection including the regionally admired and often used Redmond Graffiti Wall, in addition to installing the second of two new permanent public art pieces in the Redmond Central Connector. Outcome: Everyone has public art to enjoy and a new gateway and public performance space to use. · Host the Seattle Latin American Film in Redmond by utilizing Redmond Channel Television (RCTV) as a digital arts venue and City Hall for a Latin American cultural event; · Renew loan from the Microsoft Art Collection to display artwork from their collection by women at City Hall to coincide with a Seattle Art Museum exhibition of women artists from the Louvre in Paris; and · Collaborate with the Redmond Library and Historical Society on hosting a Native American panel discussion as part of a new exhibition at the library that will showcase archeological finds from a local Redmond archeological dig. Why: Art and cultural experiences are amenities that uniquely connect people from diverse backgrounds, foster creative and intellectual engagement, and create the high profile community image residents expect. For instance, the most recent Community Survey suggests that the arts have wide appeal, with 58% of residents requesting to see more performances and public art in the community followed by 55% who would like to see more art festivals. The Community Survey also indicates that the arts are particularly effective in connecting citizens who feel most disconnected (younger residents up to age 35, renters, those living in apartments, condos, or duplexes, and residents who have lived in Redmond for less than ten years). These groups have expressed more interest in having more performances or public art in Redmond than home owners (68% versus 53%). As well, these unconnected groups express high satisfaction rates with arts programs, such as Arts in the Parks to other City sponsored events, such as 123


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2579

A PLACE FOR THE ARTS AND CULTURAL CONNECTIONS Redmond Lights (80% versus 39%). How: The Art Program's approach is based on a model of civic partnership that balances professional expertise, public comment and public-private partnerships that leverage knowledge, resources and networks for common gain. For instance, the Arts Administrator (1.0 FTE), jointly funded by this offer and Parks Planning, supported by a Supplemental Program Assistant (0.5 FTE), design outcomes-based programs that are vetted by the Arts Commission and executed in collaboration with contract artists or local or regional arts and cultural agencies. For example, in the first half of 2012, our partnerships enabled 13 Redmond based public, private, and nonprofit organizations to contribute to the City and serve the wider community including: DigiPen Institute of Technology, Microsoft Art Collection, and Redmond Library. We also utilize broad and inclusive communication strategies by leveraging the communications assets of our partners in addition to conducing staff outreach. We produce and distribute print posters and brochures, coordinate online media, take out paid advertisement, distribute City press releases, collaborate with RCTV to do art broadcasts, make presentations at local organizations and canvass door-to-door to reach both residents and business. In fact, as a testimony to the quality of the programs and effectiveness of the communications strategy, the Arts Program has earned ten positive media stories in recent months in local and regional media outlets across print, television, and social media sites including the Seattle Times, KIRO TV, Evening Magazine, and the Redmond Reporter, connecting tens of thousands more Redmond residents to the City and increasing civic pride. Who: While this is a community-wide program, the plan is to focus additional energy in the following underserved groups: Young Professionals (60% of resident adults are college graduates and the average age is 39); Globe Trotters (half of Redmond has moved here since 2005; 30% of households speak a language other than English at home; 25% are foreign born); Modern Families (51% of all households are families; 45% of all households are renter-occupied; and Artistic Startups (five new arts and cultural organizations have established themselves in Redmond over the past three years and two are reviving themselves).

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Maintain satisfaction rates of 85% for public programs as indicated in the Annual Community Survey. Maintain Public Art Collection of 114 artworks (78 indoor and 36 outdoor) including at least one additional piece in the Redmond Central Connector.

Measure Satisfaction Rates for Public Programs Maintain Public Art Collection

Target 85.00 114.00

2010 Act 0.00 113.00

2011 Act 85.00 114.00

2012 Goal Measurement 85.00 Percent 115.00 Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 14% increase ($99,237) on the total Art Program base budget across both Business Community and Community Building offers ($717,213) upgrades a currently funded 0.5 supplemental Arts Program Assistant ($40,000) into a new 0.75 permanent position (additional $99,237) to assist in solving the next big service challenge in Redmond: developing arts and cultural venues. The most recent Community Survey finds that 29% of residents would like a space to show art. This is equal to number of people who attend Arts in the Parks performances. As Redmond continues to become a more complete city, we must recognize that access to artistic and cultural activities goes hand-in-hand with the physical spaces to host these activities in all weather. Without a designated arts or cultural center, diverse citizens who experience cultural barriers to wider community participation are unable to contribute to the character of our community. Therefore, in addition to providing administrative support to the Arts Commission, Public Art Collection, and the Poet Laureate Program, this upgraded 0.75 Arts Program Assistant will help artists and local cultural organizations make use of Redmond Municipal Campus to host art installations, cultural events and lectures 124


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PARKS & RECREATION OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PRK2579

A PLACE FOR THE ARTS AND CULTURAL CONNECTIONS year-round. This adaptive re-use of existing civic space will be done in close partnership with the Redmond Library and other City Divisions, such as the Senior Center and RCTV. A 6% decrease of $40,000 on the total base budget of both Art Program Offers ($717,213) removes 16 outdoor public artworks in critical condition from public view. In addition to $15,000 in annual maintenance costs, the collection requires $40,000 in onetime repairs to pieces currently in critical condition. Please note: if this offer is not funded or is scaled back, activities outlined in the Art Program Business Community Offer may have to be scaled back in order to preserve these core services. Scalability Recommended: Denied request for new programs ($121,997) including a new position.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$46,707

$47,821

$94,528

$194,423 $0 $60,000 $301,130 0.500

$194,433 $0 $0 $242,254 0.500

$388,856 $0 $60,000 $543,384

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2458

NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING AND COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS Description: What: Long Range Planning works in partnership with each of Redmond's 10 neighborhoods to identify and implement neighborhood-specific goals, foster productive and inviting community connections, and nurture civic leadership. This is one of Redmond's significant outreach efforts and provides efficiencies for City officials, all City departments, and the Budget team to collaborate with and address the community's interests. We do this through three significant program components: neighborhood plan updates and implementation, annual Redmond Neighborhood Network (RNN), and annual Redmond Citizen Academy (RCA). Why: Collaborating with people through neighborhood planning is essential to help address neighborhood-specific issues and opportunities, strengthen their connection to their respective neighborhood and sense of community, and foster the neighborhood's relationship to the City as a whole. We believe this offer meets all of the Factors and Purchasing Strategies of the Community Building priority. By engaging Redmond's community and planning for many aspects of the City's future, this offer also supports purchasing strategies in the Business Community, Infrastructure & Growth, Responsible Government, and Safety priorities. Neighborhood planning encourages people in Redmond's ten neighborhoods to be actively engaged in envisioning and implementing the future of their neighborhood and thereby the City. Staff and community members consider a wide variety of neighborhood aspects, including housing, work, recreation, purchasing goods and services, transportation, and remaining safe. Providing streamlined, effective, and inviting opportunities for Redmond's diversity of community members help people learn about and access Redmond's government and services, gain a foundation of knowledge for serving as a civic leader and volunteer, and increase their personal comfort for working with City staff and programs regarding neighborhood issues. Plan updates and implementation also help strengthen community communication and participation by encouraging feedback on City-initiated or private development projects that implement neighborhood plans; we work with property owners and developers to help ensure the neighborhood plan is realized as change occurs and that Redmond government remains accessible to everyone. Participants of Livable Redmond (2010) and the Redmond Youth Partnership Advisory Committee (2012) emphasized the importance of community awareness, education, and engagement. City staff also recognizes success made possible through community partnerships and have helped foster increased opportunities for civic participation via the annual RNN meetings and the RCA educational series. How: On annual, six- and 12-year intervals, as defined by Comprehensive Plan Policy, Planning staff work in partnership with people in each neighborhood through the RNN and the neighborhood plan update and implementation process to identify long-term issues, short-term needs, opportunities for change, and features for preservation. The RNN provides an annual venue in the neighborhoods for the City and community to connect in two-way conversation to discuss the City and neighborhood. This meeting series includes open houses where participants learn about City programs, projects, and participation opportunities, and then meet in facilitated discussions regarding the community's specific interests, such as urgent sidewalk repair. We use the specific community input obtained during the RNN, as well as the RCA, as part of mid- and long-term neighborhood plan updates. We maintain and compare feedback from each year's process and analyze in the context of six-year refinements and 12-year robust neighborhood plan updates. Ultimately, neighborhood plans inform updates to citywide portions of the Comprehensive Plan, as well as functional plans such as the Parks, Arts, Recreation, Culture, and Conservation (PARCC) Plan. Long Range Planning holds the RCA annually to provide the community an educational opportunity regarding Redmond governance, programs, and projects, and as a steppingstone for future civic leaders. This series involves all City departments and enables participants to learn about City operations and to connect with staff and other community members. The RCA is popular and participation increased from 25 people in 2011 to 30 in 2012. Some participants of 126


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2458

NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING AND COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS the RCA subsequently volunteer on Redmond's boards and commissions, and many recommend attendance to their respective neighbors. The City looks to the participants as knowledgeable resources for helping address and consider City initiatives. Staff uses a variety of communication tools and encourages neighborhood gathering and conversations at City service fairs, open houses, and through RNN and RCA. Participation involves those who volunteer as neighborhood leaders and stakeholders, as well as those who weigh in via other opportunities, and has included up to 600 participants in a neighborhood plan update and implementation process. When plan updates are undertaken, staff works with neighborhood participants to address the neighborhood's future vision, building upon its history and current conditions. After significant outreach and collaboration with the neighborhood and neighborhood leaders, stakeholders advise the City regarding updates to neighborhood plan policies, regulations, and priority projects. Following City Council's adoption, the plan's implementation guides changes, such as neighborhood-based pedestrian and bicycle connections. Staff follows up with the neighborhood annually via the RNN, checking in regarding neighborhood plan implementation. In 2011-2012, we connected with several hundred community members to seek neighborhood perspectives concerning near- and mid-term topics. Staff also worked with the Bear Creek neighborhood to complete a plan update and begin its implementation. In 2013-2014, staff plan to complete the Southeast Redmond neighborhood plan update and to initiate and complete the Sammamish Valley neighborhood plan update; both were last addressed in the mid to late 1990s. Southeast Redmond, a city gateway located at the edge of the King County Urban Growth Area, contains a major portion of the City's manufacturing and industrial business, and will include significant components of East Link Light Rail as the system extends to Downtown Redmond. Therefore, we place high value on the 2012-2014 neighborhood plan update. Staff also plan to reconnect with the Willows/Rose Hill neighborhood to evaluate the need for updating their 2002 plan. In addition, staff will continue meeting and strengthening communication with all neighborhoods through the annual RNN and RCA. To provide appropriate staffing for the Community Planning section and enhance customer service, this offer requests that an administrative position be increased by .062 FTE. Who: Customers for the neighborhood program include all who live, work, own property, and have an interest in Redmond. This offer provides one of the City's major opportunities for staff and City officials to hear from the community and to develop reliable solutions together. Staff uses various and innovative tools to help enhance communication with the neighborhoods (2011-12 participants): neighborhood webpages (4,613); Facebook (310); e-newsletters (1,082); Neighborhood Corner of FOCUS magazine; Senior Center's First Friday Coffee Chat; Block Watch Captain meetings (55); meeting with people during the RNN and RCA (536); in parks, places of business, schools, shopping areas, places of worship/gathering, civic organizations, senior facilities, and during homeowners association meetings (1,600); interactive questionnaires (357); and direct mail and phone calls. The neighborhood program works with stakeholders including business owners, faith-based leaders, apartment managers, civic organizations, Redmond's Boards and Commissions, and OneRedmond to enhance neighborhood awareness and opportunities for participation. The Capital Investment Program (CIP) portion of this program provides funding for small-scale neighborhood improvement (installing benches) and larger projects (neighborhood trail connections) and thereby fosters City and community partnerships.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Maintain or increase the number of people who participate in neighborhood planning processes (over 2,000 in 20112012), including the Redmond Neighborhood Network. Maintain or increase the community's sense of connectedness (61% in 2011-2012) as measured by citywide survey and annual neighborhood questionnaire.

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2458

NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING AND COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS Measure Participation in Neighborhood Planning Processes Community's Sense of Connectedness

Target 800.00

2010 Act 594.00

2011 Act 993.00

61.00

0.00

61.00

2012 Goal Measurement 1,000.00 Number 61.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Decrease: A 5% decrease ($26,266) in overall funding for this offer equates to about a 16% reduction in staff time if applied to one FTE. An example of how this would translate to reduced services is that we would no longer be able to provide the Citizen Academy and Neighborhood Network series annually. Instead, these services would be offered to the community on a biennial basis; thereby lessening opportunities for people to stay informed about Redmond governance and for encouraging civic partnerships. As interest in the RCA and RNN has increased, the two-year gap in service could negatively impact the community's awareness of and participation in these popular programs, a direct and adverse impact on the performance measures. Increase: Long Range Planning requests an addition of $15,000 to fund an intern working a minimum of eight hours per week for the two-year period. This would provide the capacity for further improvements to the Redmond Neighborhood Network, including enhanced focus on each neighborhood, convenience of meeting within the neighborhoods, timely response and follow up to community interests and priorities from the Neighborhood Network and Citizen Academy events, and opportunities to pursue partnerships and grant funding. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for 0.062 FTE Administrative Assistant ($8,809).

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

$230,856 $18,927 $0 $0 $249,783 1.953

2014 $238,049 $18,937 $0 $0 $256,986 1.953

Total $468,905 $37,864 $0 $0 $506,769

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2462

PRESERVING & SHARING REDMOND'S HISTORY Description: What: Planning staff work with the community to celebrate the City's history and to preserve and enhance Redmond's historic treasures, thereby helping to maintain Redmond's unique identity and positive community image. The Historic Preservation program is the single City resource dedicated to ensuring long-term community access to Redmond's heritage and for addressing historic properties (40 years and older; total of 200 properties in 2005). We believe this offer meets all of the Factors and Purchasing Strategies of the Community Building priority through our work to: 路 Create shared public experiences for the entire community by maintaining and enhancing structures that provide unique gathering places, such as the recently updated Anderson Park picnic shelter and the Bill Brown Building (Matador restaurant), and by ensuring community access to and preservation of historic features, including Redmond's first school bell; 路 Celebrate and protect the unique and positive identity of the Downtown, the location of a majority of our historic resources, Leary Way, Redmond's historic main street, both as a community asset and as an economic development resource; 路 Promote awareness of the City's history by educating and communicating with the community through the City's website, interpretive signage, publication material, "View from History" articles in FOCUS on Redmond magazine, outreach to historic property owners, and by promoting the Downtown Historic Walking Tour; and 路 Create community connections by partnering with the Redmond Historical Society (RHS), the largest volunteer group in Redmond, which brings more than 100 plus residents together for monthly membership meetings and presentations by regional historians. By preserving, celebrating, and promoting Redmond's history, this offer also supports purchasing strategies in the Business Community, Clean & Green Environment, and Responsible Government. Why: In 2000, Redmond's City Council designated 16 properties as historic landmarks and adopted policies, zoning regulations, a capital fund, and established a Landmarks and Heritage Commission for the purpose of keeping these structures as part of the community. Their action reflects countywide planning policies that require all jurisdictions to work individually and cooperatively to identify, evaluate, and protect historic resources and public art works. Preserving our past and communicating our shared history allows Redmond to maintain a positive community image and special, unique places in the midst of growth and change. This sense of shared history is an important part of what makes Redmond different from other cities. The program directly supports the City's efforts to be more sustainable by promoting preservation and reuse of our existing built resources and public lands. At a basic level, state, county, and city policies direct Redmond to implement a historic preservation program. This is the City's only program addressing identification and preservation of historic properties. This program has earned Redmond national recognition as a Preserve America Community and regional recognition as a recipient of a 2012 John D. Spellman Award by King County. Staff assists owners of designated landmarks as they apply to the City and County for financial support. In 2013, Redmond will be classified as a federally recognized Certified Local Government (CLG), allowing staff to directly help property owners request additional funding support for preservation through Washington State grants and tax assistance. The National Historic Preservation Act requires CLGs to maintain a historic preservation commission, survey historic properties, and provide opportunities for community participation. The CLG program will also help foster national awareness of Redmond's historic landmarks. How: Planning staff works directly with property owners to preserve and maintain community treasures that contribute to Redmond's unique and positive identity. We do this by providing technical assistance for preserving historic structures, administering the City's zoning codes related to historic preservation, staffing the Landmark Commission, and administering the Redmond Heritage Restoration and Preservation Grant program in the City's Capital Investment Program (CIP) to reduce the cost of preservation. Staff collaborates with local businesses to highlight historic properties 129


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2462

PRESERVING & SHARING REDMOND'S HISTORY and provide information regarding technical aspects of owning historic properties. In 2012, we coordinated a special event for property and business owners regarding adaptive reuse of historic landmarks and candidate properties. We also connect with Redmond's youth to foster awareness and interest in Redmond's history by providing engaging activities, such as special Downtown Historic Walking Tours adapted to youth interests, and collaborating with Lake Washington School District to develop a curriculum specific to Redmond's history. Partnerships also include those with the Parks Department, owner of several historic resources, on a number of yearly projects, park master plans, and the Redmond Central Connector, and with King County Historic Preservation via an interlocal agreement to assist with technical support and financial incentives to property owners. Preserving Redmond's history provides many opportunities for partnership with the City's Arts and Culture program, such as the collaborative 4Culture Site Specific, art programming for countywide historic sites, including Anderson Park, Haida House, the Bill Brown Building, and Odd Fellows Hall. We also work closely with the RHS to fulfill data requests, develop community outreach materials, and hold events, such as the annual National Preservation Month and the 2012 reception for the Exhibit: Washington's First Women in Government. This offer includes a $12,000 grant (described below) to RHS to greatly improve City and community access to the RHS's collection. In 2012, staff undertook additional training to meet requirements associated with new 4Culture grant funding (up to $6,000) and plan to pursue funds to update Redmond's inventory of historic properties. The 1912-2012 Centennial provided significant and innovative opportunities to connect with the community regarding history and will have included completion of several new projects: an audio component of the Downtown Historic Walking Tour, adaptive reuse tour and presentation events with regional experts, hosting the annual John D. Spellman Awards ceremony, and special narrated walking tours: Boy/Girl Scouts, the Old Redmond Cemetery, and the haunted history of Downtown. Who: Customers of this program include owners of historic properties, the RHS, the community, and people who visit Redmond. Considering a portion of Redmond's historic properties for a sample week, at least 8,600 people connected with Redmond's history (based on survey of RHS, walking tours, Odd Fellows Hall, Bill Brown Building, Anderson Park facilities, and historic preservation webpages). Service to the community also takes the form of education materials about the City's history and community events, including the 1912-2012 Centennial and View from History in FOCUS magazine. We provide efficient technical support and restoration/preservation grants to owners of historic properties, fulfill data or informational requests made by these customers, and process applications related to modifications of historic resources. We believe this offer provides a very high return on value due to the level of customer service and results delivered for the budget. This offer also responds to the needs of RHS by including a new $12,000 grant for 2013-2014 which would allow RHS to provide an accessible online catalog and archive of historic documents, photographs, and oral histories for City and community use. RHS proposes 600 hours of labor to provide community access to Redmond's history and artifacts through expanded use of PastPerfect Software for Museum Collections. This service is similar to that offered by some cities in Washington and builds on work previously funded by the City and completed by RHS.

Performance Measures: 1.

Maintain or increase the percentage of residents (57% in 2009 and 49% in 2012) who report being aware of Redmond's history or historical places in Redmond.

Measure Awareness of Redmond History

Target 70.00

2010 Act 55.00

2011 Act 49.00

2012 Goal Measurement 60.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Decrease: If a 5% decrease ($3,992) in the overall funding for this offer were applied to the primary staff time, it would equate to an 8% reduction in staff availability; currently the City has only one person (0.2

130


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

COMMUNITY BUILDING Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2462

PRESERVING & SHARING REDMOND'S HISTORY FTE) who staffs this program. This would result in limiting time to code requirements, such as addressing property owner proposals for modifications to historic landmarks and staffing the Landmark Commission, and eliminating other activities, such as support to and partnership with RHS, support for Downtown walking tours, and collaboration with Redmond Arts. This would have a direct and adverse impact on the performance measure. Increase: In addition, as the City's historic preservation program increases in focus and service through partnerships with Redmond Arts and economic development initiatives, the addition of $20,000 for consultant assistance or a supplemental employee at 16 hours per week on average would allow for additional enhancements to program initiatives undertaken each year. Possible enhancements include site-specific case studies in partnership with property owners and Preservation Green Lab to facilitate sustainable, economic vitality of historic properties. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

$32,818 $0 $0 $12,000 $44,818 0.262

$33,625 $0 $0 $0 $33,625 0.262

Total $66,443 $0 $0 $12,000 $78,443

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INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH

RESULTS TEAM REQUEST FOR OFFERS RESULTS TEAM MAP OFFER SUMMARY OFFERS


INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH I WANT A WELL-MAINTAINED CITY WHERE TRANSPORTATION AND OTHER INFRASTRUCTURE KEEPS PACE WITH GROWTH

REQUEST FOR OFFERS TEAM MEMBERS Team Lead: Dave Tuchek, Parks & Recreation Team Member: Paul Cho, Public Works Team Member: Helen Howard, Finance & Information Services Team Member: Shannon Norman, Fire Team Member: Shelly Eberly, Community Member DASHBOARD INDICATORS Indicator 1: Maintenance Report Card: includes pavement conditions, incidence of water main breaks, and sewer overflows. Measure Description: The measure speaks to the reliability of the City’s infrastructure and will measure the appropriate level of preventative maintenance performed to meet acceptable levels of service. Redmond’s public infrastructure has a low failure rate, indicating that maintenance practices currently in use are effective in preventing disruptions in service. Calculation Method: Current data collected on pavement condition, water main breaks and sewer overflows will be gathered on an annual basis to form the report card. The measure will illustrate all three elements, not an aggregate.

Indicator 2: Mobility Report Card: ratio of Redmond’s transportation supply to transportation system demands (i.e. concurrency). Measure Description: State law requires that transportation system improvements are in place to serve development at the time of the development, or financially committed to within six years. This measure illustrates the degree to which transportation capacity supply meets capacity demand. Calculation Method: This measure is included in the Mobility Report Card, an annual report prepared on a number of transportation related measures.

132


Indicator 3: Overall satisfaction of Redmond residents with transportation systems. Measure Description: A measure used to reflect degree to which residents believe the overall transportation system in Redmond meets their needs. Calculation Method: Data for this measure will be generated by the City’s biennial survey.

Indicator 4: Jobs to households balance (i.e. number of jobs in the local job market per household). Measure Description: Jobs to housing balance refers to the approximate (equal) distribution of employment opportunities and workforce population across a geographic area. It is usually measured in terms of the proportion of jobs per household. For example, a jobs-housing balance of 1.25 means the demand for housing from local employment is 1.25 times greater than the amount of housing available. The aim of jobs-housing balance is to provide local employment opportunities that may reduce overall commuting distance among residents, and also the reverse, to provide homes near to workplaces. Calculation Method: Annual information from Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) on jobs combined with Redmond’s estimate of new housing units as compared to the City’s planned goals for employment and housing growth. Note: information is available from A Regional Coalition for Housing (ARCH) and City records (new housing) annually.

Indicator 5: Rents, home sales prices and income as a measure of affordability. Measure Description: The measure reflects the balance of the range of wages being paid by the business community to the range of housing prices in Redmond. The measure should illustrate whether or not Redmond has a variety of housing available to serve the needs of residents. Calculation Method: Use demographic information on citywide averages of rental costs, home prices and income to identify income as compared to housing costs. Note: information is available from ARCH annually.

Indicator 6: The pace of infrastructure development versus the pace of growth. Measure Description: The measure will track the implementation of the City’s functional plans to determine if the City’s infrastructure activity is moving in tandem with the rate of growth in Redmond development. Calculation Method: Track 20-year functional plan targets to the 20-year growth targets to determine the rate of each.

133


INTRODUCTION/SUMMARY OF CAUSE & EFFECT MAP For this priority, infrastructure includes transportation mobility, roads, sidewalks, paths, transit, cycling, walking, commute trip reduction, and connectivity; utilities includes sewer, water, electricity, gas, telecommunications, and maintenance systems to support a vibrant economic development and housing. Offers should support the City’s Infrastructure and Growth priority, which contributes to three factors: • Plan • Build & Invest • Maintain & Operate These factors are broad categories that provide for a systematic process to provide well-maintained infrastructures and a financially solvent and sustainable community. Offers should clearly demonstrate community-based results consistent with these factors, and consider a connection between prior performance commitments, outcomes and new offers proposed for the 2013-2014 Budget. Offers should emphasize excellence that clearly demonstrate collaboration, innovation, efficiency, engagement (community, interdepartmental, outside government agencies, etc.), accountability and customer service. Scalability is an integral requirement of all offers. Offers must delineate the financial increase or decrease and its impact on the level of service to the community. Factor 1: Plan A well-maintained city that keeps pace with growth, requires the creation of a blue print that defines community goals. Creating this, entails thoughtful planning, educating, and engaging with the community. The Plan must understand and adhere to local, regional, and federal regulations, as well as zoning requirements and policies. The Plan should also shift to more sustainable and greener infrastructures, provide choices for moving people, goods, and services from one place to another and ensure housing options that keep ahead of changing demographics. Factor 2: Build & Invest To support the growth of a vibrant community, the City must execute long range plans, such as the Capital Investment Strategy, Comprehensive Plan, and the Transportation Master Plan. Identifying and leveraging funding sources is vital in building the key components identified in these plans. Together with the goals of building two urban centers, we can utilize opportunities from capital improvement projects and private developments to focus on building necessary infrastructures to support planned growth. Factor 3: Maintain & Operate A successfully functioning municipal infrastructure enables a community and its businesses to operate at the highest level. To ensure that this occurs in Redmond, the City utilizes a proactive approach to infrastructure management. An emphasis on preventative maintenance reduces the frequency of more costly reactive maintenance. Maintenance of the City's growing public infrastructure (water, sewer, stormwater, roads, and facilities) is thoughtfully planned and scheduled.

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Trained personnel with the appropriate equipment are utilized to perform the required maintenance in an efficient and effective manner ensuring reduction of future budget costs, continuity of essential City services, and strengthening of the emergency preparedness of the community. The City manages and prioritizes ongoing infrastructure maintenance according to the highest standards, regulations, and policies. PURCHASING STRATEGIES WE ARE LOOKING FOR OFFERS THAT: Strategy 1: Demonstrate sound planning for future growth and current infrastructure needs. Offers should support future growth, renovation of existing infrastructure, development of the two urban centers, improved mobility, housing choices, and retail/employment areas. Also, offers will be favored that promote sustainability and green infrastructure practices. Strategy 2: Implement capital improvement investments and developer agreements that are in alignment with the City's plans and visions to support a vibrant community. Offers must show implementation of the Capital Investment Strategy, Transportation Master Plan, and Comprehensive Plan with a strong focus on the vision of two urban centers. Describe how infrastructure projects assist the City to support transportation and utilities that paces future housing, economic development, public facilities, regulations, and standards. Strategy 3: Exhibit proactive short and long term strategies that will provide for reliable, safe, and high quality maintenance and operations. Offers must describe the types of resources (people, equipment, partnerships with local and regional services, technology, and/or funding) needed for continuing maintenance and long term operation. Explain how the offer improves reliability of the system, emergency preparedness, regulatory and standards requirements, safety, and quality of services. Strategy 4: Provide, support, and improve transportation connections within, to/from, and around Redmond. Offers should provide transportation options and connectivity, improve efficiency and mobility of existing systems, and strengthen local, regional, state partnerships, such as surrounding jurisdictions, Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), Sound Transit, and King County Metro. Offers also should support transportation alternatives (bike, pedestrian, transit) which align with the City's vision. Strategy 5: Support the principle of "Excellence". Offers should describe how they will improve customer service, collaborate with others, engage the community, embrace innovation, and increase efficiencies. Offers should also provide specific performance measurements that were identified in previous offers, outcomes, and how it applies to the current offer.

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CIP PURCHASING STRATEGIES Strategy 6: Urban Centers Realize Redmond’s vision for Downtown and Overlake1 by providing needed facilities, services and improvements within these two urban center neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support implementation of the vision and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 Capital Investment Program (CIP). Strategy 7: Neighborhoods Provide infrastructure connections and systems in Redmond’s established neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support improved connections within or between neighborhoods and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 CIP. Strategy 8: Preservation of capital Provide for the preservation of the City’s infrastructure system. Offers will be favored that maintain and improve the reliability, safety, and integrity of the system. Strategy 9: Value for investment Achieve high value for the dollars invested and demonstrate efficiency in cost, timing, and approach. Offers should describe how projects have been coordinated to provide the most effective approach and to minimize disruption to the community. In addition, explain how the offer leverages actions and resources by others, through partnerships; for example, meet the strategic needs of the City. Strategy 10: Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint Carry out the Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint – Capital Investment Strategy, 2013-2030, as well as adopted functional plans. Offers will be favored that implement recurring policy direction and priority projects from these documents, as well as leverage other projects in a cross-functional manner. NOTES/PRACTICES/SUPPORTING EVIDENCE 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

1

City of Redmond Citizen Survey (2011). City of Redmond Comprehensive Plan Update (2010 - 2011). City of Redmond Capital Investment Strategy (2013 - 2030). City of Redmond Transportation Master Plan (2011). City of Redmond Mobility Report Card (2011). City of Redmond Adopted Budgets (2009 - 2010, 2011 - 2012). "How cities use parks for Green Infrastructure" (2012), American Planning Association's National Planning Conference, http:/www.planning.org/cityparks/briefingpapers/greeninfrastructure.htm. "Infrastructure" (2012), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/infrastructure. Informational interviews with City staff: Joel Pfundt, Lori Peckol, and Eric McConaghy.

 See Redmond’s Comprehensive Plan for the vision for Downtown and Overlake  136


INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH

I want a well-maintained city whose transportation and other infrastructure keeps pace with growth

Excellence  Collaboration  Engagement

 Innovation  Efficiency

 Customer Service  Accountability

Build & Invest

Plan  Community Engagement  Regulations, Zoning, Policies  Sustainability and Green Infrastructure  Transportation Choices   Connectivity  Housing Options

 Execute Capital Investment Strategy, Transportation Master Plan, Comprehensive Plan  Support Economic Development  Utilities  Transportation  Public Facilities  Funding  Regulations, Standards

Maintain & Operate  Trained Personnel and Equipment  Coordination with Regional Partners  and Services  Regulations, Standards  Emergency Preparedness  Continuity of Services


INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH 2013-2014 OFFER SUMMARY Page No 139 142 145 148 151 154 156 159 162 165 168 171 174 177 179 182 184 186

Offer # PW2419 PW2433 PW2435 FIN2556 PW2421 PW2420 PW2430 PW2441 PLN2459 PW2440 PLN2436 PLN2460 PLN2452 PW2590 PW2423 PW2548 PW2416 PW2415

Offer Wastewater System Maintenance Traffic Operations Safety and Engineering Infrastructure Design, Construction, and Compliance Geographic Information System Stormwater Engineering and Administration Water System Maintenance Acquire & Manage City Real Estate Maintain & Preserve City Buildings Addressing Redmond's Housing Needs Right of Way Maintenance Transportation Planning and Engineering Developing/Implementing Plans for Redmond's Future Regional Transportation Planning and Partnerships Asset Management Data Collection Water/Wastewater Engineering and Administration Asset Management Mobile Deployment Infrastructure Purchased Water Supply Wastewater Treatment Services

Department Public Works Public Works Public Works Finance Public Works Public Works Public Works Public Works Planning Public Works Planning Planning Planning Public Works Public Works Public Works Public Works Public Works

Notes: 1. Adopted Budget totals may not include ending fund balances and fund transfers for all offers.

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Ranking 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

2013-2014 Adopted Budget1 $3,500,979 4,677,167 2,871,833 1,336,691 8,114,907 5,036,594 124,362 4,890,621 222,329 4,673,978 1,071,342 1,010,838 866,113 95,000 16,434,140 77,060 15,479,410 29,160,224 $99,643,588


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2419

WASTEWATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE Description: What: The wastewater (sewer) system is the most commonly forgotten asset, until a backup occurs in a home, on the shores of Lake Sammamish, or a public street. Each time a customer flushes the toilet, it's taken for granted. Uninterrupted wastewater conveyance relies heavily on the efficient, reliable operation of the collection system within Redmond's city limits, as well as the Novelty Hill service area. Over the years, the City's population has grown. The number of new services brought on-line has dramatically increased. The City's wastewater infrastructure includes over 200 miles of pipe, 15 miles of utility easements, 6,800 manholes, and 24 pump stations. Wastewater's management tactic is to provide a systematic proactive approach to reduce the frequency of costly reactive maintenance, enabling our community and its businesses to operate at their highest level and ensure continuity of service. Why: The City is responsible and entrusted by the people to provide the most effective and efficient services for the benefit of our customers and community. Therefore, the wastewater collection system must be managed to provide reliable, safe and consistent service to protect human health and the environment while ensuring compliance with local, state and federal mandates. Maintaining and operating the wastewater infrastructure requires staff with specialized skills and consistent attention to detail. Wastewater effluent contains a wide range of potential contaminants and is associated with many health risks. Routine and planned maintenance activities performed on the infrastructure, such as the pipe and manhole restoration and closed circuit television (CCTV) programs protect our drinking water resource from contamination. Any deviation from this level of effort can easily result in an unsafe work and/or living conditions that place City employees, citizens or the business community at risk. How: The Wastewater Division strives to utilize proactive short and long-term strategies to provide for reliable, safe, high-quality maintenance and operations, meet regulatory requirements, and aid in emergency preparedness. Future growth and current infrastructure maintenance needs can be met through sound planning. Principles of excellence are supported via collaboration, engagement, innovation, efficiency, accountability, and customer service. Purchasing Strategies 1 (Demonstrate sound planning for future growth and current infrastructure needs); 3 (Exhibit proactive short and long term strategies that will provide for reliable, safe and high quality maintenance and operations); and 5 (Support the principle of "Excellence") are supported through these combined efforts. Key activities required for this essential service include management, forecasting and planning, CCTV inspection, high-pressure hydro-cleaning, construction inspection, infrastructure repair and replacement, pump station operation and monitoring of the SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system. After hours standby service is also provided 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to address any and all wastewater-related concerns. Additionally, discharge into the system is controlled through collaboration with the King County Industrial Waste Program and overseen by the Division's own Source Control program. The education, outreach, inspections and enforcement provided through the Source Control program have visibly reduced the impacts of prohibited discharge into our infrastructure thereby reducing the amount of necessary maintenance and repairs. All of these activities are streamlined to provide the highest level of service at a lower-than-average utility rate. The City's wastewater infrastructure is managed through the strength, integrity, and contribution of each highly trained and skilled team member in the Division. Traditionally, infrastructure management had been conducted through reactive maintenance and repair. Here in Redmond's Wastewater Division, engaged team members have led to the development of successful preventative maintenance programs and annual project plans. Staff members consciously consider health and safety, and financial impacts to property owners, business owners and the City budget, at all times. Innovative ideas, such as taking advantage of software upgrades, utilizing cure in-place pipe-patch technology, 139


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2419

WASTEWATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE implementing a strategic flow monitoring program, chemical injection to control corrosion and dangerous gases, and developing an effective manhole rehabilitation program, are leading to the Division's ultimate goal of predictive maintenance. Whereby resources are allocated exactly when and where they are necessary, before problems occur, based on condition assessments and proper asset management. Who: The offer impacts everyone who works, shops, lives or plays through or within the City and Novelty Hill service areas. The Wastewater Division is accountable to nearly 80,000 residents, business owners, and employees who utilize this service. They expect their domestic and industrial wastewater to be collected and conveyed without any disruption to their household and business activities, ever. Businesses may manufacture goods and provide services to the community while harmful pollutants and process wastes are quietly collected and conveyed, completely out of sight. Sewer service is an essential need that contributes to a vibrant community and provides a clean, green and safe environment.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1.

Number of wastewater system interruptions. (New Measure)

Measure Wastewater System Interruptions

Target 0.00

2010 Act 0.00

2011 Act 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 3.00 Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The number of new wastewater service connections and additional infrastructure requiring maintenance has substantially increased over the years in the City and the Novelty Hill service areas, while the number of staff available to manage the growth has remained at the same level. In an effort to meet demand and support future growth, three maintenance technicians were removed from performing maintenance operations and repair activities and reclassified to perform much needed specialized functions, such as the two Pump Station Technicians and Source Control Technician. As a result, the Division has five maintenance technicians to carry out preventative maintenance and repair activities on the wastewater system. For safety and efficiency reasons, these tasks need to be performed by three-man teams to satisfy traffic control requirements and confined space safety regulatory requirements. However, with current staffing of five maintenance technicians, two complete teams are not available to perform the work. A new full time technician would make it possible to deploy two three-man teams simultaneously, increasing the efficiency and safety of preventative maintenance and repair activities. Other programs would benefit as well, such as manhole rehabilitation which has been difficult to perform with the current number of technicians. The addition of one more technician would also improve the timeliness of cleaning the wastewater service areas to every two years rather than every three years and inspection of the system would occur every four years rather than every five years. In addition, repairs would be performed on a more regular basis thus reducing the possibility of a sanitary sewer overflow.

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2419

WASTEWATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE A 5% reduction in the Wastewater Division budget equates to approximately $170,000. This reduction could be accomplished by the elimination of one full-time Maintenance Technician. However, reducing staffing levels when they are already at a critical point is not a realistic option and is not recommended. The resulting staff shortage would create the opportunity for unsafe work conditions and practices to occur, placing City employees and citizens at risk. Additionally, the staff shortage would decrease the amount of maintenance that could be performed on the system defeating the purpose of strategic planning and a proactive approach which would inevitably lead to an unacceptable number of sanitary sewer overflows. Scalability Recommended: Consistent with the emphasis on maintaining the City's existing infrastructure, a new 1.0 FTE Wastewater Maintenance Technician ($176,000) will be funded through the proposed Wastewater revenue increase of 4% per year. The addition of this technician will provide the level of staffing necessary to deliver proactive maintenance of wastewater infrastructure.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$1,184,009

$1,224,534

$2,408,543

$544,458 $0 $0 $1,728,467 12.250

$547,978 $0 $0 $1,772,512 12.250

$1,092,436 $0 $0 $3,500,979

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2433

TRAFFIC OPERATIONS SAFETY AND ENGINEERING Description: What: For the next biennium, the City of Redmond Traffic Operations Safety and Engineering Division proposes to continue to operate and maintain our 103 traffic signals and 1,350 city-owned street luminaires. We will coordinate the maintenance on 2,500 street luminaires operated by Puget Sound Energy. Our Division will oversee the maintenance of 18 bridges and manage the City's pavement on over 144 miles of streets. Through our Redmond Intelligent Transportation System (RITS) we will continue to build and sustain our communications over fiber optic and copper cables to our traffic signals and to over 47 closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras throughout the City. These cameras will continue to be available for viewing through the City's web page, where they are one of the most popular selections. We will evaluate and modify signs and markings on city streets to enhance safety for all users. Our Division will operate and maintain a wide variety of traffic calming and control devices, including eight school zone flashers, eleven speed radar signs, and eleven flashing pedestrian crossings. We will work with residents and community groups to address speed and safety related issues through our neighborhood traffic calming program, and we will work in coordination with our Police Department to provide traffic and pedestrian safety education for businesses and schools in the City. We will review all capital improvement and private development project plans for traffic signals, street luminaires, lane markings, and roadway signage issues, and will also review work zone traffic control plans for right-of-way use permits for any work in the streets. Why: The careful maintenance of traffic and pedestrian signals, bridges, and paved streets allows people using any transportation mode to travel through Redmond smoothly and safely. Whether they walk, bike, ride a bus, or drive a car, individuals are able to have a high degree of confidence in the amount of time it will take them to travel to their destination. Close coordination with residents, businesses, and schools to address traffic concerns helps to ensure that we are providing a safe travel environment in all of our neighborhoods and business districts. Street luminaires help prevent traffic accidents and provide added security for pedestrians by improving night time visibility. Clearly marked streets with correct signage helps minimize confusion for all users, which improves safety and efficiency. The operation of the signals and street luminaires, the maintenance of bridges and pavement, and the provision of safe travel in neighborhoods and business districts are key to supporting the City's Transportation Master Plan. This offer supports the Infrastructure and Growth Priority and is key to the Dashboard Indicators, such as the Maintenance Report Card and overall satisfaction of Redmond residents with transportation systems, as well as building, investing, maintaining, and operating the City's infrastructure. In regards to the Infrastructure and Growth Purchasing Strategies, our offer addresses implementing capital improvement investments and developer agreements that are in alignment with the City's plans and visions to support a vibrant community, exhibits proactive short and long term strategies that will provide for reliable, safe and high quality maintenance and operations, provides support and improve transportation connections within, to/from, and around Redmond, and support the principle of "excellence". Our group is specifically structured to assist in the design and construction of transportation facilities that align with the City's vision, and once completed, we have the professional staff and resources to maintain and operate these facilities at a high quality level. We coordinate with residents and businesses to address their traffic concerns and provide them with education and engineering improvements to complement police enforcement. We work closely with other public agencies such as Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), King County Metro, and Bellevue to coordinate operations on our systems to serve all modes of travel. We strive to provide proactive maintenance on all of our facilities to deliver a transportation system that is both safe and reliable. The operation of the traffic signals and street luminaires and the provision of safe streets and crosswalks are key to the success of travel in Redmond for work, shopping, and recreation. Each successful trip through our system helps build resident satisfaction with transportation in Redmond.

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2433

TRAFFIC OPERATIONS SAFETY AND ENGINEERING How: The Traffic Operations Safety and Engineering Division is unique in that we have both engineering and maintenance staff under a single manager. This allows us to be involved from the early stages of new development and capital projects to the end product, and then to operate and maintain the constructed systems. Since the traffic signals and CCTV cameras are linked to our Traffic Management Center in City Hall through RITS, our engineers are able to monitor traffic in real time and can make adjustments in signal timing to address congestion, construction impacts, and emergency services events that we observe. Our traffic calming and safety programs are managed by staff with the knowledge and experience to work with varied groups within the City to address traffic safety and speed issues. Our group is familiar in working with contractors, consultants, outside agencies, and City staff to help ensure that we can sustain all the components of the City's transportation network. Our traffic signal technicians are trained to maintain the physical assets such as signal and luminaire poles, pedestrian and vehicular signal indications, as well as signal and electrical cabinets. Additionally, we manage outside contractors for the upkeep of bridges and pavement. Our maintenance strategy includes both proactive measures such as scheduled signal cabinet checks and bridge inspections, and reactive maintenance with staff on call 365 days a year to make emergency repairs. Who: The Traffic Operations Safety and Engineering Division provides important education to businesses and schools to support safe travel for pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists. We ensure that our residential and arterial streets are safe for motorists, pedestrians, bicyclists, transit, and emergency vehicles through careful use of traffic calming devices, street lighting, signs, and pavement markings. We serve the citizens of Redmond and residents of adjoining communities through broadcast of our CCTV cameras on the web and by timing our traffic and pedestrian signals to move people around in a timely and predictable manner. We are able to respond to equipment failures in the transportation system quickly and efficiently to minimize the impact to the travelling public. The cameras and our on-call technical expertise are also key components in the City's emergency preparedness capabilities. We collaborate with Police, Construction, and Development Services staff to provide great service to all customers.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Average travel times along City streets during peak afternoon travel times in minutes per mile. (Revised) Annual accident rate in the City (total accidents per 1,000 residential population). (Revised)

Measure Average Travel Times During Peak Afternoon Annual Accident Rate in the City

Target 2.90

2010 Act 3.01

2011 Act 2.90

10.00

6.00

7.00

2012 Goal Measurement 2.90 Minutes 0.00 Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: If our budget was increased by 1.95% ($92,891), we would propose the following: 路 Hire a half-time engineering technician to maintain the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) database and mapping for our Division. Staff reductions due to recent retirements and reorganization have resulted in a reduced capability for our group to maintain our existing traffic count, collision, and street light information. This technician would allow us to keep this data current.

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2433

TRAFFIC OPERATIONS SAFETY AND ENGINEERING If our budget was decreased by 5% ($238,655), we would propose the following: 路 Eliminate the current Traffic Safety Specialist position for a reduction of $188,806, and cut our professional services budget by $49,849, to total the 5% required. By cutting the Traffic Safety Specialist position, we would no longer provide traffic and pedestrian safety education to businesses and schools in the City. Our coordination with the Police Department on safety programs would be significantly reduced, and we would no longer manage the Adopt-a-Street Program. We would reduce or eliminate our collision records tracking system, and we would not be able to maintain the transportation related web pages on the City's website. Reduction of the professional services budget would reduce or eliminate the studies and design that we currently have prepared for the City by outside consultants. Examples of these include corridor travel time studies, vehicle speed assessments, and fiber optic communication upgrades. Scalability Recommended: Reduced various line items ($37,621) including professional services and supplemental help through right sizing.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$1,254,099

$1,291,743

$2,545,842

$1,054,857 $0 $0 $2,308,956 12.590

$1,076,468 $0 $0 $2,368,211 12.590

$2,131,325 $0 $0 $4,677,167

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2435

INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION & COMPLIANCE Description: What: Turn visions and plans into reality: the Construction Division turns urban visions, master plans, and preservation programs into high quality infrastructure improvements that improve service, prolong the life of city assets and reduce ongoing maintenance costs. This Division manages the design and construction of water, sewer, stormwater, transportation, police, fire, parks, and stream habitat projects and provides construction inspection services for work in the public right-of-way. This offer is key to delivering projects included in Redmond's Capital Investment Strategy, Transportation Master Plan, and other functional plans. Ensure infrastructure meets standards: Staff ensures that new infrastructure and construction activities meet Redmond's codes, safety standards, and complies with Federal and State requirements. Protect Redmond's infrastructure investment: staff ensure that existing community assets (i.e. utilities, streets, public and private property, surface water, groundwater, and drinking water) are protected from construction damage. Why: Plans become real: high quality infrastructure support a vibrant, growing, and thriving community by providing the essential City services and public facilities needed by businesses, residents, and visitors. These services include mobility choices, safe and reliable drinking water, sewer service, police and fire facilities, flood control, and parks. Infrastructure meets standards: the best way to reduce long term maintenance and operating costs is to ensure that new infrastructure is carefully planned, designed, and properly constructed. This provides the community with high quality, safe, reliable, long lasting, low maintenance facilities. Replacing aging and damaged infrastructure improves service and reduces ongoing maintenance costs. Assets are protected: protecting existing infrastructure from damage by construction activities reduces short term disruptions to the public, improves reliability, and reduces long term maintenance and replacement costs. Disruptions are minimized: reducing impacts to traffic, utilities, and the environment improves the flow of goods and services, reduces delays, improves air and water quality, and reduces costs. How: Collaboration and coordination: staff work closely with all City departments, Federal, State, and local agencies, utility companies, businesses, and property owners to develop effective project delivery strategies, schedules, designs, and construction contracts. Collaboration with maintenance staff ensure projects meet operational and maintenance needs. The success of these efforts is illustrated by the coordinated delivery of infrastructure projects in Downtown Redmond. Collectively, these projects set the stage for the private sector to invest in the community to realize the urban vision. Projects include: Bear Creek Parkway, Cleveland Street Sewer, 161st Avenue NE Extension, Downtown Stormwater Trunk, part of the Downtown Park, Redmond Central Connector, and 164th Avenue NE Extension. Communication: staff is customer focused and reaches out to businesses and residents with public meetings, press releases, 1610 AM radio, Redmond City Television (RCTV) clips, newsletters, project signs, message boards, email, Twitter, web postings, traffic alerts and maps, and resolution of construction issues and complaints through the Construction Issue Tracking and Response (CITAR) system. These proactive outreach efforts have resulted in a significant reduction in the number of construction related calls and complaints. Compliance: inspectors review construction drawings and work on project sites directly with contractors, developers, utility companies, and property owners to coordinate construction activities, control project quality and costs, identify and resolve issues, reduce construction related disruptions to the public, reduce environmental impacts, and ensure that infrastructure projects are built according to approved plans, specifications, and standards, as well as comply with state and federal requirements. Leverage: a portion of labor and benefit costs for staff are charged to the Capital Investment Program (CIP) (49%), Utilities (12%), effectively leveraging the General Fund budget (39%). Who: Redmond property owners, developers, contractors, residents, tax payers, businesses, utility companies, other City departments, environmental resources, and Federal, State, and local agencies depend on the services funded by this offer to ensure that needed infrastructure improvements are delivered; existing infrastructure and community resources 145


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2435

INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION & COMPLIANCE are protected from construction damage; construction activities are coordinated to minimize impacts to the community; and work is coordinated between jurisdictions.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Percentage of capital projects delivered on time. Percentage of capital projects delivered within budget.

Measure Capital Projects Delivered on Time Capital Projects Delivered within Budget

Target 80.00 80.00

2010 Act 100.00 100.00

2011 Act 92.00 92.00

2012 Goal Measurement 80.00 Percent 80.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Capital Investment Strategy for 2013-2018 calls for completing 117 capital projects worth $238 million. At current staff levels, the Construction Division can deliver approximately 11-12 projects per year which completes approximately 60% of the plan. An increase of 0.8% (approximately $26,000) would position the Construction Division to deliver 13-14 projects per year (18% increase), which completes approximately 70% of the six-year (near term) plan. The additional funding would convert a recently hired limited duration project coordinator position to a regular full-time position. The project coordinator supports the engineering project managers and inspectors who deliver the Capital Investment Program. This position handles recurring contract administration, coordination, and document management tasks. This support position is standard in private sector engineering, architectural, and construction companies. Having this consistent level of support on an ongoing basis significantly improves the City's project delivery business model. Salary and benefit costs for this full time employee (FTE) are $65,000 per year. The position will be charged 80% to CIP projects, with the remaining 20% ($13,000 per year) paid for by the General Fund. Adding this resource will result in increased capacity, provide for more efficient, consistent and predictable project delivery, support grant compliance, and improve customer service. It will allow project managers to spend more time on high value activities, such as starting new projects and managing issues, costs, impacts, risks, and changes. A 5% decrease would eliminate a 0.5 FTE, reduce professional services and training, as well as eliminate supplemental employees for a total of $88,845 per year. Of this amount, $82,500 is a 5% reduction for this offer and $6,345 is a 5% reduction in scalability from Public Works offer PW-2430 (Acquire & Manage City Real Estate). This will result in the following: 1.

Reduced customer service and increased cost to developers, contractors, and property owners. (Reduced ability to respond quickly to issues and complaints, resulting in increased disruptions to traffic, utilities, and businesses, as well as decreased safety, greater potential for environmental impacts, and higher costs to customers. Longer lead times for developers and contractors for inspections, reviews, and preconstruction meetings resulting in delays and increased costs for customers.)

146


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2435

INFRASTRUCTURE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION & COMPLIANCE 2.

Reduced capacity to deliver the Capital Investment Strategy. Reduced ability to deliver CIP projects on schedule and within budget resulting in higher CIP consultant costs, less efficient project delivery, greater risk of increased project costs, potential loss of grant funding.

Scalability Recommended: Reduced various line items ($88,000) including professional services, overtime, supplemental help, small tools, advertising, travel and tuition through right sizing. Transferred salary and benefit costs ($204,119) to the Capital Investment Program for engineering and project manager activity related to City projects.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$1,290,399

$1,314,955

$2,605,354

$132,627 $0 $0 $1,423,026 23.155

$133,852 $0 $0 $1,448,807 23.155

$266,479 $0 $0 $2,871,833

147


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2556

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM Description: What: The Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Services Group is responsible for developing and maintaining the City's GIS data and application that directly supports over 300 end users within the City and over 3,000 users on the internet. The data maintained by the GIS Services Group is critical to the City. In particular, EnerGOV (permitting), Asset Management System and New World (Fire Dispatch System) will not function without this data and underlying infrastructure that this group maintains and supports. In addition, the group maintains a number of outward facing web applications, Property Viewer, Vertical Control Viewer and Crime Map that provides residents, developers and other interested parties direct access to our geographic data. Why: Geographic data plays a key role in decision making at the City and is used numerous times throughout the day in routine operations and emergencies. This offer supports all of the Budget Priorities, but has the closest ties to support of the Infrastructure and Growth Priority and the following Strategies. ·

Demonstrate sound planning for future growth and current infrastructure needs. The GIS is used by Utilities and Transportation to develop models to help us understand where we need to improve our infrastructure to meet demands.

·

Implement capital improvement investments and developer agreements that are in alignment with the City's plans and visions to support a vibrant community. The GIS is used to track Capital Investment Program (CIP) projects and to coordinate CIP work across departments and to identify possible conflicts and/or possible cost savings.

·

Exhibit proactive short and long term strategies that will provide for reliable, safe and high quality maintenance and operations. The GIS offer provides both a tool and data that are used to develop proactive maintenance plans and to track maintenance activities. During this budget cycle GIS will be a critical component to the new Asset Management and Maintenance system being implemented in Public Works. Currently, the Stormwater Maintenance and Operations Center (MOC) Division use GIS to manage their yearly drainage basin cleaning and repair.

·

Provide, support and improve transportation connections within, to/from, and around Redmond. GIS is used to do connectivity analysis between projects and to help plan the six-year Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP), as well as map traffic counts.

·

Support the principle of excellence. The GIS offer speaks to the principle of excellence in a number of ways. Through GIS we are providing better customer service by creating interactive online tools that allow our customers to self-serve information, such as crime data and zoning information. In addition, the GIS is being used to foster collaboration and communication and will be working with customers to create interactive maps in the City's collaboration SharePoint sites. In addition, the GIS in general allow us to be more efficient and its deployment shows innovation.

How: The GIS Services Group has developed a one-stop shop for enterprise GIS data sets where staff can be assured they are using the most up-to-date and accurate data available. The GIS Services Group has eliminated redundancies, achieved cost savings, and provided a GIS framework for the entire City. The group also works with departments to develop applications that maximize the use of the GIS and integrates it into their daily workflows through off-the-shelf applications, custom applications and reports. 148


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2556

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM GIS is a key technology powering many of the City's business applications. In 2012 and 2013, the City is replacing its Asset Management System and will be calling on the GIS group to ensure that all necessary assets are mapped. Public Works is submitting a complimentary offer to provide field GIS data collection to fill in additional data gaps. Who: The GIS Services Group has four primary customers: internal staff, private developers, citizens and outside agencies. The GIS Group maintains the geographic data and the applications necessary to use the data; however, the real use of the GIS occurs in the individual departments where numerous planners, engineers, fire personnel and maintenance workers use the data and applications to make decisions, run models, find assets and respond to citizens and business requests. Currently there are ninety software systems installed and an estimated 300 direct users. With the deployment of online crime map and property viewer applications, citizens now have a direct way to interact with many GIS datasets enabling them to use the system to make decisions. GIS Services provides private developers/consultants and outside agencies with up-to-date map information to assist them in completing development projects. GIS has data sharing agreements with the following agencies: North East King County Regional Public Safety Communication Agency (NORCOM) (fire dispatch), King County, Kirkland, Bellevue and Woodinville.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

Percent of new Geographic Information System (GIS) data that complies with the established Service Level Agreement (SLA) with the Departments (goal is 100%). Meet SLA established with City Departments and maintain a high level of satisfaction from City Staff that use GIS Services. Survey respondents' satisfaction with quality and timeliness of GIS Services results in a rating of "satisfied" or "very satisfied". These measures were determined by the GIS Steering Committee.

Measure Meet SLA with Departments 100% of time Customer Service - Very Satisfied or Satisfied Quality of Product - Very Satisifed or Satisfied Timeliness of Product/Service - Very Satisfied or Satisfied

Target 80.00 80.00

2010 Act 87.00 79.00

2011 Act 86.00 78.00

2012 Goal Measurement 90.00 Percent 80.00 Percent

80.00

76.00

78.00

80.00 Percent

80.00

68.00

72.00

80.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% decrease ($86,000) could be achieved by eliminating one full time employee (FTE) (Engineering Technicians). This reductions would result in longer lead times to enter in new data into the enterprise system including: 1) data not being entered in quick enough to support issuing of permits; 2) fire personnel using outdated map data that could result in longer response times; 3) decisions being made based on incorrect or incomplete data; 4) delays in water/sewer plans which might impact where development could occur in the City; 5) longer publication times for standard maps (instead of yearly it may be bi-yearly) which could result in additional staff time to locate infrastructure in the field during maintenance.

149


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2556

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM This would delay the implementation of the Asset Management System in Public Works, because we would not have adequate staff to fill data gaps. We believe performance, as reflected in our measures, would suffer as a result. A 5% increase ($86,000) would allow us to capture additional data necessary for the asset management project (which is currently being proposed under a separate offer). Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$602,286

$618,405

$1,220,691

$58,000 $0 $0 $660,286 5.750

$58,000 $0 $0 $676,405 5.750

$116,000 $0 $0 $1,336,691

150


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2421

STORMWATER ENGINEERING & ADMINISTRATION Description: What: Stormwater Engineering and Administration provides engineering and administrative services for storm and surface water management to convey and control stormwater quantity and quality in order to provide cool, clean surface waters that are safe and healthy, prevent flooding and property damage, reduce pollution, and restore stream habitats to recover salmon populations within 50 years. Why: The 11 billion gallons of rain that falls in Redmond each year is collected by more than 10,000 structures, conveyed through nearly 250 miles of pipes to and through the 50 miles of streams, creeks, the Sammamish River and Lake Sammamish. The pipes, structures, and streams must be maintained in order to convey or control runoff safely. Uncontrolled runoff quantity can cause erosion of streams and flooding or property damage. Runoff also picks up pollutants and conveys them to surface waters. High quantity and low quality runoff is identified as a major contributor to pollution in Puget Sound and to the listing of Chinook Salmon under the Endangered Species Act, and is governed by increasingly complex regulations. Proper stormwater management protects property and public safety, and minimizes erosion and pollution. The health of Redmond's rivers, streams and lakes is important to protecting the area's high quality of life, valuable aquatic resources, and natural beauty. Today, public and private projects integrate flow control and water quality features. Most streams, however, are impacted by past development which did not fully mitigate its impacts, and so are continually eroding which reduces ecosystem services and increases hazards to property owners. Restoration efforts focus on improving habitat and stormwater management (flow control and/or water quality) through conventional and green strategies. Only addressing new growth is not sufficient to protect or maintain these important natural resources. Proactive system planning, prioritized capital investments, innovative and effective designs, and prudent financial decisions are essential to achieve the long term outcome of clean water, healthy stream corridors, and a sustainable built environment. Developing prudent fiscal policies and establishing fair and appropriate rates help ensure a reliable income stream to fund operation and maintenance, rehabilitation, and expansion of the stormwater system. How: The offer provides for engineering, planning, design, policy development, and other administrative efforts, that focus on managing flood hazards, maintaining the stormwater and surface water systems, and restoring healthy ecosystems. The following major program elements are provided: 路

Long-Range and Capital Improvement Planning. Long-range planning efforts include developing plans to replace/repair aging facilities, restore storm and surface water quality, reduce flood hazards, and accommodate growth in urban centers. The Division has taken a new approach to planning and prioritizing projects based on performance measures, supporting growth, and meeting regulations in the most sustainable and cost-effective way possible. Current planning efforts include completing regional facility plans for Overlake, Downtown, and Southeast Redmond, initiating engineering plans for priority stream basins, and continuing capital investment strategy coordination with Transportation, Planning and Parks. The Regional Facility Plans are an example of an innovative approach to accommodate growth and retrofit existing drainage areas by leveraging developer contributions to build large-scale flow control and water quality projects. These projects have received over $10 million in State grant and loan funding.

Capital Project Development and Execution. Storm and surface water projects to improve stormwater management, support growth, and maintain infrastructure are initiated, designed, and implemented through the six-year Capital Improvement Program. Projects are coordinated with other divisions to provide efficient 151


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2421

STORMWATER ENGINEERING & ADMINISTRATION service to residents. In particular, Transportation projects provide good partnering opportunities for both replacement of failing infrastructure and retrofitting for stormwater management through low impact development techniques, such as minimizing impervious surfaces, rain gardens and pervious pavements. Maintaining the system in good condition, improving flow control and water quality, and restoring habitat will support higher stream scores. Evaluating culverts provides a gauge of the condition and capacity of the pipe network that represents flooding risk in the overall stormwater system. 路

Utility Finance and Budget. Financial activities include financial policy development, budgeting, rate setting, revenue projecting, expense monitoring, and financial analysis. Stormwater billing data is managed and maintained for each parcel. Recent and ongoing efforts include digitizing impervious surface, updating rate policies, and reviewing rate credits on each parcel to ensure that ratepayers are billed in an accurate, fair, and equitable manner.

Intergovernmental and Regional Affairs. Staff participate in various committees to coordinate development of regional goals, plans, and infrastructure. Many of Redmond's projects are listed in regional plans for flood protection and restoring Puget Sound and salmon populations. This improves the ability to receive grants, and supports Redmond's reputation for excellence in managing stormwater through innovative and effective methods.

Staff provide leadership and policy direction for the Stormwater Utility, as well as engineering and technical support to other divisions within the City, residents, and businesses. Outreach is done through the Storm and Groundwater Environmental Programs Offer (Clean & Green) and individual capital projects. Who: The customers of this offer are the citizens who live, work, and play in the City and who have asked for a clean and green environment. Other customers include the natural ecosystem residents, the regulatory agencies, and tribes.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Number of locations reported with flooding. (New Measure) Average B-IBI score (bug index) across the 12 core class 2 streams. (Revised)

Measure Number of Locations Reported with Flooding Average B-IBI Score Across 12 Core Class 2 Streams

Target 12.00

2010 Act 0.00

2011 Act 0.00

36.00

27.60

24.50

2012 Goal Measurement 12.00 Number 24.30 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% ($250,000) reduction in funding could be achieved by reducing the budgets for professional services (engineering consulting) and interns. Reduced funding would delay planning efforts and impact

152


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2421

STORMWATER ENGINEERING & ADMINISTRATION the timeline to achieve our stream restoration goals. A 5% ($250,000) increase in funding could be used to leverage state and federal grants for water quality retrofit efforts (potentially partnering with Transportation) and provide for additional consultant services to speed up development of priority basin plans. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for professional services ($150,000). Further reduced professional services and supplemental help line items ($208,407) through right sizing.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$917,209

$944,396

$1,861,605

$3,128,711 $0 $0 $4,045,920 9.041

$3,124,591 $0 $0 $4,068,987 9.041

$6,253,302 $0 $0 $8,114,907

153


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2420

WATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE Description: What: Water Operations Management provides dependable water supply, treatment, and distribution for the City of Redmond and the Novelty Hill service areas. The water system supplies water for a residential population of approximately 57,800 with daytime population near 100,000 which includes business community employees. The system infrastructure operated, maintained, and repaired consists of 318 miles of water mains, 3,943 fire hydrants, 11,460 valves, five wells, seven reservoirs, five booster stations, 82 pressure reducing stations and approximately 16,907 water meters. Water is supplied to meet domestic, commercial, irrigation and fire protection needs for the water system service areas while meeting Federal, State, and local requirements. This would include water system security, water quality sampling and reporting, utility locating service and a cross connection control program with 5,923 backflow devices. Also contained within this offer is the staffing, equipment and material for 24/7 emergency response for customers of the water utility and other Public Works emergency needs. Why: Operating and maintaining the water infrastructure ensures that there is an adequate and reliable source of potable water throughout the City of Redmond and Novelty Hill service areas. The purpose of the Water Operations emergency response program is to limit the scope and duration of water system outages and the impact on utility customers, as well as limiting property damage on the infrastructure, both private and commercial, while protecting drinking water quality. How: Quality maintenance is achieved with a proactive preventative maintenance program that continuously operates, maintains, and provides the required upkeep to the water system infrastructure. A staff of 14 highly skilled and well-trained employees undertake the numerous activities that contribute to the overall management of the water utility operations including: water production/treatment/supply; repair and maintenance of the storage facilities and distribution system (services, valves, main line, hydrants, pressure reducing stations and booster stations); meter reading, installation, and repair; customer compliance of required backflow testing and water quality monitoring and sampling most of which are required by Department of Health and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and 2,846 annual underground utility locating requests. Water Operations Management also provides community outreach and public education through the required Department of Health Water Quality Report (28,000 issues), as well as partnerships with various outside organizations, such as Cascade Water Alliance, Spring Garden Event, and Nature Vision well tours with Alcott Elementary students. Who: The customers of the City of Redmond water system is anyone who lives, works or plays in Redmond's neighborhood areas or urban centers. This offer speaks to the basic necessity of water availability for residential, commercial, and industrial customers in order to sustain a vibrant and healthy community. The City of Redmond is also capable of providing emergency water supply to several adjacent water purveyors.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Number of water service interruptions. (New Measure) Percentage of water quality tests that meet compliance regulations. 154


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2420

WATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE Measure Number of Water Service Interruptions Water Quality Tests that Meet Compliance Regulations

Target 15.00 100.00

2010 Act 0.00 100.00

2011 Act 0.00 100.00

2012 Goal Measurement 15.00 Number 100.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% reduction in the offer equals approximately $245,000, which can be achieved by the elimination of one FTE. This would result in a significant reduction in maintenance programs such as flushing and pressure reducing station preventative maintenance producing less reliable delivery of water to customers for domestic and fire protection. Water quality could become compromised. Mainline valves and fire hydrant functionality becomes questionable. Pressure reducing station failure could result in pressure zone issues which could cause infrastructure failure and private property damage. A 5% increase in the offer equals approximately $245,000 for the addition of one technician needed as new infrastructure (Reservoir Park Booster station) has been added to the water system. This technician would be dedicated solely to the operation, routine/preventative maintenance and repair of our above ground infrastructure (wells, booster stations and reservoirs) resulting from an aggressive Capital Investment Program (CIP) of more than $31 million. The addition of this position also serves to comply with recommendations within the Redmond Comprehensive Plan 2030 found in the Utility section/part B Water/Sources of Supply UT-16 "Continue to utilize, protect and sustain the Redmond well system to maximize the efficiency of the system. Ensure water is treated to meet state and federal drinking water regulations" and UT-22 "Maintain adequate storage facilities to meet equalizing and fire demand volume and emergency supply." Scalability Recommended: Consistent with the emphasis on maintaining the City's existing infrastructure, a vacant 1.0 water utility FTE from the Wellhead Protection Division will be repurposed as a Water Maintenance Technician to provide the needed support for proactive maintenance of the utility's above ground infrastructure. The vacancy is already included in this offer and does not require an adjustment to the proposed utility rate changes.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

$1,337,701 $1,158,445 $0 $0 $2,496,146

$1,376,943 $1,163,505 $0 $0 $2,540,448

15.240

15.240

Total $2,714,644 $2,321,950 $0 $0 $5,036,594

155


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2430

ACQUIRE & MANAGE CITY REAL ESTATE Description: What: Acquiring and Managing City Real Estate provides for a reliable and efficient resource, a Real Property Manager, to contribute to the planning and continuation of securing property rights required to construct and implement public infrastructure projects, as well as assures projects will continue to be protected by long-term property use rights. The Real Property Manager is a professional staff person trained in local, state and national real estate fundamentals, policies, procedures and funding regulations, which are necessary to satisfy legal requirements and compliance associated with public property acquisitions and displacements. The Real Property Manager is familiar with public infrastructure design, management and maintenance operations, and will be engaged to collaborate on planning and efficient implementation of sustainable infrastructure projects. The Real Property Manager's participation and timely securing of necessary property rights provides the foundation for constructing and protecting infrastructure, and growth, in the two urban centers of Downtown and Overlake, as well as Redmond neighborhoods and is a resource to contribute to the research to plan future community and regional infrastructure projects. Between 2009 and mid-2012 there were 66 full or partial land acquisitions totaling almost $20 million. Why: The Real Property Manager understands engineering, land use, construction, planning and real estate disciplines, to effectively collaborate with internal and external customers throughout the planning, design, construction and preservation of future public infrastructure. The Real Property Manager's training and recognition of local, state and national real estate fundamentals, policies, procedures and public funding regulations is necessary to satisfy legal requirements and compliance associated with public property acquisitions, displacements and third party leasehold interests which minimize the City's liability. The Real Property Manager's ability to efficiently secure and manage real property rights is critical to protecting the investment in the implementation and execution of long term plans, (i.e. Capital Investment Strategies, Transportation Master Plan, Comprehensive Plan and the vision of two urban centers). The Real Property Manager is familiar with internal and external customers, neighboring jurisdictions and regional agencies and will complete property acquisition, leasing and management with efficiency. How: The Real Property Manager funded by this offer assures a professional staff person experienced in resources and requirements of real estate law; public policies and procedures; funding requirements; and negotiations and property transfers to efficiently plan for and secure real property rights necessary to support public infrastructure projects recognized to be a catalyst of vibrant and sustainable communities. The Real Property Manager will proactively be a part of the collaborative cross-departmental efforts to plan future and envisioned services to meet growth expectations, secure and manage property rights until such time as infrastructure construction occurs and assures the community investment is protected. The Real Property Manager's experience assures efficiency in cost, timing and approach to securing and protecting public assets. The Real Property Manager has a strong customer service record supporting planning, development and operations of public infrastructure projects and can continue to be recognized as achieving a value greater than the time and funds invested. Who: The Real Property Manager provides excellent customer service proven by internal and external customers' reliance for the Real Property Manager to participate in advising, planning, researching, reviewing and expediting the securing of property rights necessary to accommodate sustainable Capital Improvement Program and Partnership projects, monitoring and protecting the secured real property assets. The Real Property Manager will continue to serve and collaborate with existing internal customers which include: Transportation Planning; Natural Resources; Water/Wastewater Engineering; Construction Engineering; Public Works and Parks Maintenance and Operations; Development Services; Information Services; Long Term Planning; Code Enforcement; Finance Administration and Operations; Legal Counsel; and Parks Administration.

156


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2430

ACQUIRE & MANAGE CITY REAL ESTATE The Real Project Manager will represent the City and orchestrate land rights acquisition negotiations, settlements and leasehold processes to accommodate capital infrastructure projects, displacement activities, and activities to protect the City's existing property rights. The diverse external customers include: Private Citizens; Business Owners; Landowners; Representing Legal Counsel; Other Public Agencies and Municipalities; Tenants; Real Estate Agents and Brokers; Consultants; Supporting Professional Services; and Telecommunication Providers. The Real Property Manager's excellent customer service will be heightened by continuing to orchestrate creating and maintaining reliable resource information and skills needed to support timely acquisitions, efficiently and economically address customer issues, collaborate with others, and being innovative within the framework of regulations, policies and procedures.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1.

The percentage of customers who rate the services provided by the Real Property Division as excellent or outstanding as measured by a target of 80% through the City's internal survey.

Measure Customers with Excellent or Outstanding Rating for Real Property Division

Target 80.00

2010 Act 83.00

2011 Act 78.00

2012 Goal Measurement 80.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 61% increase of $39,000 per year would result in the addition of a full-time employee (FTE) in 2013-2014 to assist the Property Manager; address having sufficient resources to efficiently secure property rights to meet the time schedule of infrastructure and growth projects; add the ability to support addressing inquires and research regarding public or city property rights that protect infrastructure systems; and maintain existing property rights resource materials. In the past, these services have been provided by the Real Property Manager, various administrative staff and temporary staff, which results in inefficiencies. A FTE would provide for more timely research, improved customer response and allow the Real Property Manager to focus on the increasing complications of property rights acquisition activities required for installing and protecting infrastructure projects. The full cost of the FTE with salary and benefits is $78,000/year; however, 50% of this position will be charged to capital projects thereby reducing the burden to the General Fund. The General Fund portion is $39,000 per year. A 5% reduction of $6,345 for scalability will come from Public Works offer PW-2435 (Infrastructure Design, Construction and Compliance). Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

157


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2430

ACQUIRE & MANAGE CITY REAL ESTATE Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$56,991 $4,401 $0

$58,486 $4,484 $0

$115,477 $8,885 $0

$0 $61,392 1.000

$0 $62,970 1.000

$0 $124,362

158


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2441

MAINTAIN & PRESERVE CITY BUILDINGS Description: What: The expectation for the Public Works Facilities Maintenance Division is to maintain the City of Redmond's existing buildings, offices, and work spaces making certain they are clean, safe, comfortable and well functional thus ensuring the City's level of service does not decline nor unsafe conditions develop. Redmond's business operations have grown to serve the community through the use of twenty-two City-owned buildings representing 324,249 square feet of space. Without these structures, there would not be any senior social activities, teen events, parks and recreation activities, fire response, police protection, park and infrastructure maintenance or City business conducted. This offer provides the ability for citizens and the business community to create a diverse and vibrant community and employees to continue to plan, build, invest, maintain and operate the City's infrastructure. Along with providing twenty-four hour response to building emergencies, Facilities responsibilities include the maintenance of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) and electrical systems; painting of exterior and interior walls and doors; maintenance of the roofs, gutters and furniture; maintaining, replacing and refinishing floors and carpets; plumbing; security and safety of locks, fire alarms and elevators; lighting replacements and repair; event setup and cleanup; building supply inventory; and janitorial service contracts. Why: All buildings deteriorate over time. Regular preventive maintenance is the first and best way to preserve our buildings and protect our investments thereby extending the life of these valuable assets at the lowest cost. The City as a whole is a proactive culture and prides itself in planning for a safe and thriving community. The outcome of deferring maintenance could force the City to become reactive rather than proactive resulting in increased liability and repair costs. In addition, the number of unplanned work expenses and after hours emergency call outs would increase; employee and citizen safety would be compromised; deterioration of the buildings would ensue; and these structures would soon become unfit for use or service creating a domino effect in declining city services. Therefore performing routine maintenance of the buildings supports Redmond's proactive approach and sustains the ability of being fiscally responsible in saving dollars by eliminating more costly repairs in the future. Redmond is fortunate to have a new City Hall; however, the historical Community Center was built in 1924 and the Teen Center in the 1940's. These valuable assets, as well as the other structures in place since the 1970's, require the expertise of a trained, professional staff familiar with their special building maintenance needs. Preserving city buildings in this manner allows City staff the ability to continue delivering a high level of service and ensures that staff, citizens and visitors alike can occupy a comfortable, safe and attractive environment for working, visiting and playing. How: In support of the Principle of Excellence, the Facilities Maintenance Division routinely inspects the buildings and works collaboratively with work groups to determine what maintenance and repairs are required to ensure their safety, comfort and general building integrity. By utilizing a proactive maintenance program, the City's buildings are maintained in an effective and efficient manner. Facilities Maintenance also manages the buildings' utility bills, providing these spaces with the uninterrupted delivery of utilities that meet both health and well-being standards. Facilities oversee outside contractors and have a well-trained and specialized in-house staff who utilize the appropriate equipment ensuring the work they perform meets regulatory and standard requirements. This offer includes the anticipated increases for all the utilities consumed in the City's buildings which make up 35% of the offer. It also reflects the increased cost associated with repairing and maintaining our aging buildings, in particular the Public Safety building, the Old Redmond Schoolhouse Community Center, Fire Station 11, and the Redmond pool. An increase of $24,616 is also included in this offer which would extend the janitorial service for the Community Center from five to seven days. This building is used by the public seven days a week, yet is currently only cleaned five days, 159


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2441

MAINTAIN & PRESERVE CITY BUILDINGS leaving an unpleasant image to the citizens who enjoy Park and Recreation activities during the weekend. Extending the janitorial service would serve to improve their experiences when using the Community Center and support the City's goal of excellent customer service. Who: These valuable assets are used by every employee of Redmond's government along with the business community and citizens alike who visit them. Facilities provide the installation, repair and maintenance services to all internal City departments and divisions. By preserving the life and maintaining the City buildings, the general public and City staff have the ability to conduct normal day to day business, as well as a wide variety of other activities.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1.

Percentage of customers satisfied with the overall service they receive from Facilities Maintenance. (Revised)

Measure Customers Satisfied with Overall Service

Target 85.00

2010 Act 77.00

2011 Act 73.00

2012 Goal Measurement 80.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A decrease of 5% in this budget offer ($242,446) would translate into a reduction in janitorial service including trash removal, floor sweeping and mopping, vacuuming of carpets, restroom cleaning and disinfecting, glass cleaning, dusting and restocking of supplies from the current five days per week program down to a two day per week frequency. This would result in a lower level of customer service. Additionally, this decrease in service would significantly reduce the goal of maintaining and providing a safe, clean, comfortable and functional building environment for the general public and City staff. An increase of 3.5% in this budget offer ($150,000) would provide the addition of one FTE who would be dedicated to maintaining and overseeing the care and operation of seven fire stations. The outcome would be an improved response to building issues from the firefighters and emergency responders who utilize these building 24/7 resulting in a seamless and more economical operation of these vital City facilities. Scalability Recommended: Reduced various maintenance line items ($32,905) through right sizing.

160


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2441

MAINTAIN & PRESERVE CITY BUILDINGS Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$814,287 $1,599,555 $0

$838,704 $1,638,075 $0

$1,652,991 $3,237,630 $0

$0 $2,413,842 8.645

$0 $2,476,779 8.645

$0 $4,890,621

161


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2459

ADDRESSING REDMOND'S HOUSING NEEDS Description: What: Planning staff work to achieve improved housing choices for a diverse population, including homeowners and renters, those with special housing needs (developmentally disabled persons, women at risk, youth, seniors, etc.), and those who cannot afford market rate homes. This offer supports each of the Infrastructure and Growth Factors and nearly all of the Purchasing Strategies of this priority by: 1) planning for and implementing strategies to improve the supply and diversity of housing in Redmond, consistent with our vision of two vibrant urban centers, connected neighborhoods, and high-quality services; 2) facilitating the development of homes near transit, jobs, and other destinations, enabling Redmond to grow in a manner that supports increased mobility, is sustainable and reduces energy demand; and 3) providing quality services to citizens by assisting in the development of safe, affordable housing, particularly for those who are challenged with finding suitable options. The City has received recognition at the state and regional level for its housing policies, programs, and projects. Our housing plans and services exemplify the principle of "excellence." Why: The high price of housing makes it difficult for many to live in Redmond. A household with an income of $82,000, such as an office manager or bank teller with two children, earns about $50,000 too little to qualify to buy the average Redmond single-family home. Despite higher median incomes in East King County compared to King County as a whole, as well as some decline in home prices in the past several years, over 45% of households in Redmond are considered to be cost burdened or severely cost burdened with regard to housing costs; more than 30% or 50%, respectively, of household income is used for housing. Alternatively, many who work here simply cannot afford to live in Redmond which contributes to traffic congestion (2010 American Community Survey data). For Redmond, the housing need is not only greater affordability, but also increased supply. The amount of housing falls far short of the demand generated by the City's strong employment base; a shortage which is expected to become more severe. This offer supports actions that will enable more people who work in Redmond to also live here, which will reduce the cost and impact of employees commuting from other jurisdictions. Locating housing near jobs also improves mobility and efficiency by increasing opportunities for people to use modes other than driving alone to get to work and other destinations. Lower vehicle emissions have direct positive impacts for the environment and sustainability. In addition, the variety of housing types encouraged through Redmond's housing program are innovative and inherently sustainable. Duplexes, small detached homes, accessory dwelling units, and single room occupancies (Tudor Manor in Downtown) are less land intensive and often more energy efficient. How: Redmond is one of four founding members of A Regional Coalition for Housing (ARCH) begun in 1993 to assist East King County cities in fostering housing affordability and increased housing supply. It now consists of 15 cities and King County and is recognized by Housing and Urban Development (HUD) as a model for public/private partnerships. This offer includes our continued purchase of staff services from ARCH which allows us to complement City staff's local housing knowledge and experience with ARCH's regional perspective, experience in housing development and finance, and contract administration for affordable dwellings. This is a very efficient approach for delivering housing services and promotes collaboration with other members of ARCH for the creation of affordable housing. Affordable Housing Regulations. We will continue our work with applicants to ensure that a minimum of 10% of dwellings in new developments of ten units or more are affordable. So far, administration of this code has resulted in over 200 new affordable homes since the program was first enacted in downtown Redmond in 1993. Since 2002, an additional six of Redmond's ten neighborhoods have supported using this program. ARCH Housing Trust Fund. Our management of these funds includes allocations to nonprofit developers through a regional application and review process to create affordable and special needs housing for eligible projects in Redmond 162


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2459

ADDRESSING REDMOND'S HOUSING NEEDS and other East King County jurisdictions. Continued funding of Redmond's share of the fund is requested through a Capital Investment Program (CIP) offer (PLN2467). Together with ARCH funding, 2,575 affordable homes have been built in East King County, 762 within Redmond. New Actions Driven by the Recently Adopted Housing Strategy Plan. Staff will undertake new priority strategies as identified in Redmond's first Housing Strategy Plan which Council adopted in May 2012, including: 1) evaluating a tax exemption program to encourage housing development in mixed use areas and locations planned for light rail transit, such as Overlake; 2) providing information and other assistance to reduce the time and cost associated with adding more innovative and less costly types of housing, such as accessory dwelling units; and 3) carrying out additional outreach with the business and development communities to achieve our housing goals. Looking forward, Redmond has significant opportunities to advance its housing goals in a very meaningful way due to increased development activity, which began in 2012, and an anticipated light rail station area project funded by the Growing Transit Communities Program, a regional HUD grant of $5 million, in which Redmond is a participant. To take advantage of these opportunities, staff together with ARCH initiated work in 2012 that is expected to have the following results over the next biennium: 1) completion of planning and other start-up actions needed to develop one or more projects that include affordable housing in the City and will help to spur other private-sector investment; and 2) identification of additional partners and funding sources to support affordable and other housing development. The City has one planner focused on ensuring that Redmond is a community where sufficient housing supply and choices are available to meet the needs of a diverse population. This person is currently funded at 0.81 full time employee (FTE) with 80% of the position allocated to housing issues. This staff person is working at full capacity. Based on increased demand for service and long-term needs, we propose to increase the staffing level for the housing planner by 0.19 FTE. This proposed increase would add 7.5 more hours per week to this position, making the work items described above much more manageable. Who: Our customers are existing and potential residents of Redmond, as well as members of the business community. We respond to the needs of these customers by working to improve housing supply and affordability in Redmond, assisting current residents who may have questions or concerns about housing, and by performing outreach with the business and development communities to encourage affordable housing opportunities near employment and transit. In addition, Planning works to streamline regulations, as well as process and create incentives through land use that encourage additional housing.

Performance Measures: 1.

Increase the number of affordable and innovative homes built above the baseline of 50 dwelling units per year. Types of units include accessory dwelling units (ADUs), cottages, attached homes and innovative homes, and affordable units. This measure provides information regarding the effectiveness of housing programs, consistent with the Comprehensive Plan goal of increasing the supply and variety of housing choices. Although this measure is highly dependent on market conditions, it will indicate a trend during anticipated stabilization of the residential development market.

Measure Increase Affordable/Innovative Homes Permitted

Target 40.00

2010 Act 61.00

2011 Act 33.00

2012 Goal Measurement 50.00 Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The offer could be scaled down by 9% ($30,781) by not purchasing contract services in 2013

163


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2459

ADDRESSING REDMOND'S HOUSING NEEDS from ARCH for administration of the City's affordable housing regulations, management of the Housing Trust Fund, and assistance with housing strategies. This amount is the City's annual payment for ARCH services from the operational offer; nonpayment would terminate the City's participation. Redmond's credibility in the region would be adversely impacted since the City is a founding member of ARCH and a leader on housing issues. As other ARCH member jurisdictions are continuing to be challenged with revenue reductions, this could also trigger other jurisdictions to discontinue participation. Without ARCH's services, City staff time would be required to perform these functions with little time remaining to implement new housing strategies, with the potential of fewer affordable housing units as a result. This is a much less efficient way to administer the City's affordable housing regulations since ARCH provides the necessary technical expertise for these functions. If available, this offer also requests additional dollars be added to the Housing Trust Fund for an increase in available funding for housing development. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for 0.19 FTE Senior Planner ($46,142) and transferred salary and benefit costs ($75,369) to the Capital Investment Program for planner acitivity directly related to City projects.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$69,659

$72,176

$141,835

$40,244 $0 $0 $109,903 0.874

$40,250 $0 $0 $112,426 0.874

$80,494 $0 $0 $222,329

164


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2440

RIGHT OF WAY MAINTENANCE Description: What: Redmond rights-of-way serve as the most visible element of the City to anyone who lives, works, or commutes in the City. The Street Division has the responsibility to preserve and improve the condition of the City's rights-of-way, including roadways, sidewalks, bicycle lanes, signs and street pavement markings. We maintain neighborhood pathways; roadside structures including guard rails, hand rails, retaining walls and rockeries; street benches; and litter cans. The Division is also responsible for providing clear, safe and passable roads during snow and ice, and other related weather events. We support other City departments by clearing debris left by traffic accidents, providing traffic control as needed, and contributing to many of the City's special events. We also provide a standby system to respond to any nature of right-of-way emergency 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Why: Services provided by this offer are essential to the City's goal of providing a safe and effective transportation infrastructure and are directly related to the budgeting priority of Safety. A compromise in service in any of our responsibilities, from repairing potholes to maintenance and elimination of hazardous trees, could have serious consequences to public safety. Our street sweeping program not only provides for a cleaner City, but supports transportation alternatives like bicycling by keeping bicycle paths clear. Street sweeping also serves as a proactive approach to reducing pollutants in runoff from reaching Redmond's waterways (integral to the sound planning) as well as in support of the Clean and Green Priority. Furthermore, maintenance of clear directional signage and markings is both required by State and Federal regulations, and necessary to ensure efficient response from emergency vehicles, as well as the delivery of goods and services throughout the City. Since 2002, the City has seen a 37% increase in lane miles, yet has one less Maintenance Technician. This has increased responsibilities for the Street Division related to every task we perform. Simply put, our scope of responsibilities has increased without proportional growth in funding and staffing. The replacement of roadway markings has not been able to keep up with demands, leading to our current state of non-compliance with regulations. The development of two urban centers in Downtown and Overlake has seen renewed emphasis of many maintenance and repair operations. This relative decline in operating resources, combined with the progressive increase in costs and responsibilities has created a reactive approach to sidewalk and roadway repair. How: The Division has implemented numerous maintenance tracking and performance measurement tools. We keep records on many characteristics and measureable traits for each of our tasks, including location, types and quantities of materials used or debris removed from the roadway, scope of work, personnel hours, and the cause of issues. The purpose of these new tools is to assist in short and long term planning and responsible budgeting, as well as to aid in the development of innovative and efficient maintenance strategies. Due to the demands of the City's aging infrastructure and to keep pace with the City's growth, this offer includes increased funding for operating supplies including concrete for sidewalk and curb repair, and paint and raised pavement markers for roadway markings. Additional funding to purchase sand, salt and de-icer will allow us to sustain the high quality, well-received service we provided in response to the winter storm in January 2012. Increased funding for external contracts will build toward getting the City's contracted pavement markings (lane use arrows, bicycle symbols, and speed limit legends) in compliance with state and federal regulations. The addition of seasonal employees will allow the Division to meet the seasonal work demands in maintaining roadway markings, vegetation control, and sidewalk cleaning. A key element to maintaining the City's high service standards is employing skillful, appropriately trained staff. All crew members have taken on specialized continued training programs, including cross-training with other City Divisions 165


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2440

RIGHT OF WAY MAINTENANCE and neighboring agencies, to ensure a progressive, well-rounded workforce. In addition, one of our staff became a certified arborist this last year and has helped to develop a more proactive approach to our vegetation program. Our communications to the public regarding severe weather conditions can impact safety on our roadways. The Street Division supports the Community Building priority by keeping our customers well informed about road conditions and closures through various media outlets, including the Redmond Reporter, Redmond Focus newsletter, updates to the City website, and through social media, including Twitter updates. Who: Redmond's citizens and business owners, as well as anyone who commutes within Redmond, are impacted by the conditions of the right-of-way. The Street Division appreciates that we have a responsibility to provide efficient, effective service and we take great pride in our contributions to Redmond as a vibrant community.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Percentage of citizens satisfied with the cleanliness of the City's streets and bicycle lanes. (Revised) Percentage of citizens satisfied with the City's response to sidewalk trip hazards. (Revised)

Measure Satisfaction with Cleanliness of City's Streets and Bicycle Lanes Satisfaction with City's Response to Sidewalk Trip Hazards

Target 90.00

2010 Act 0.00

2011 Act 75.00

90.00

0.00

60.00

2012 Goal Measurement 80.00 Percent 65.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Decreasing this offer by 4.5% equals $254,545. This could be achieved by eliminating one of the City's street sweepers and related costs. A full-time sweeper operator costs $150,000 and the maintenance, fuel, the replacement rate and vehicle insurance for one sweeper costs $109,436 totaling $259,436. Currently, two sweepers are used throughout the City to pick up fall leaves, traction sand laid down during snow events, and general roadway dirt. If one of these sweepers and a full-time operator were eliminated, our customers could expect that neighborhood streets would be swept only twice a year, as opposed to an average of six times currently. Sweeping of Redmond's two urban centers and City bike lanes would also see significant delays. The increase of debris on the roadway would pose a potential hazard to bicyclists and pedestrians. We would be unable to keep pace with the accumulation of fallen leaves, and street flooding caused by blocked storm drains could be expected to increase. Finally, the ecology of our waterways could be negatively impacted, since regular sweeping serves as an effective preventative measure to keep pollutants out of stormwater runoff. This is not a recommended or viable option because it places the City at risk. Increasing this offer by 6% equals $340,000. The addition of two Maintenance Technicians ($75,000 per technician per year) would allow us to be proactive in making repairs to sidewalks and roadway asphalt ($20,000 per year for

166


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2440

RIGHT OF WAY MAINTENANCE materials) the areas we most commonly receive complaints about. Currently, sidewalk-related Capital Improvement Program (CIP) projects are aligned with pavement overlays and completing missing sections of sidewalks, rather than making repairs to existing sections. This allows some needed repairs and replacements to fall in the gap between the Street Division and CIP responsibility. With two new Maintenance Technicians, these projects could be completed effectively and efficiently by the Street Division without making compromises to already provided services. These improvements work toward the City's goal of providing a safe and well-maintained infrastructure. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for additional supplies ($58,000), outside repairs ($165,500), and supplemental help ($108,000). Reduced snow and ice contingency ($262,000) and will rely on citywide contingencies if a snow event should occur. Reduced stormwater fee for city streets ($357,000) to be consistent with a ten-year phase in schedule for the impervious surface charges.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$802,489

$825,719

$1,628,208

$1,517,644 $0 $0 $2,320,133 9.620

$1,528,126 $0 $0 $2,353,845 9.620

$3,045,770 $0 $0 $4,673,978

167


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2436

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND ENGINEERING Description: What: The Transportation Planning & Engineering Division (TP&E) is responsible for developing, planning, funding, and implementing the Long-Range Transportation Plan, Short-Range (Six-Year Plan), and managing the Transportation Capital Investment Program (CIP) to provide both a wide range of safe and reliable travel choices and completion of improvements to the transportation system that are strategically tied to the community vision and Comprehensive Plan. Why: Strategic transportation planning is essential for a rapidly growing and urbanizing city like Redmond. As the overall community and two urban centers evolve into a more livable and sustainable city, so must the City's approach to transportation planning. Given the cost of transportation improvements and constrained financial resources, the City must be intentional both in how it makes transportation investments and the timing of those investments to encourage and facilitate the City's vision. Before the final design starts or a shovel of dirt can be turned for a project, the long-range and short-range transportation plans for the surrounding area need to be determined, a more specific conceptual plan for that project must be complete, and funding needs to be fully secured. TP&E does the following to assure that the Transportation needs for the community are met both now and into the future: 1) Transportation Plans: develop, update regularly, and implement the Six-Year Plan, the Transportation CIP, and the Transportation Master Plan (TMP) which includes a Long-Range Buildout Plan, 20-Year financially constrained Transportation Facilities Plan, and task-oriented 3-Year Action Plan; 2) Public Outreach: continuously and proactively engages the community during transportation planning efforts and project development, update Six-Year Plan annually and the TMP in conjunction with the major updates to the Comprehensive Plan; 3) Studies and Designs: collects and analyzes data, manages travel forecast model, manages transportation studies, prepares conceptual and preliminary designs; 4) Leverage Funding: pursue and secure grants to leverage other City funds to fully fund projects and achieve high value for investments; coordinates with regional partners including Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), Bellevue, and Sound Transit to fund and deliver the TMP; collaborates with developers to build transportation improvements in the TMP; and leads implementation of the highest priority programs and projects contained in the TMP; 5) Coordination with Other Offers: the Division staff provide coordination and leadership in working collaboratively with other offers, including: Regional Transportation Planning and Partnerships, Traffic Operations Safety and Engineering, Predictable Development Review, Construction Services, Public Works Administration, Long Range Planning, Business Access and Mobility, Parks Administration & Planning, and the Maintenance & Operations Center. How: The offer meets or exceeds all the Infrastructure and Growth Purchasing Strategies because it is integrally linked to planning the City's land use vision. Clear direction for Redmond's transportation future is necessary to achieve the City's Vision, which this offer supports through the following specific strategies to be carried out in the biennium: Plan for the Future: TP&E is responsible for managing the Transportation Master Plan which is the blueprint for developing Redmond's Long-Range transportation system. The four key guiding principles for the plan are: 1) Support Two Urban Centers; 2) Prepare for Light Rail; 3) Provide Multimodal Travel Choices; and 4) Support Neighborhood Connections. An important focus of the TMP is a "Clean and Green" sustainable transportation system where people can get around with less reliance on cars. Finally, the TMP delineates specific tasks and strategies for achieving these plans, including a three-year action plan, a regional transportation strategy, and a performance monitoring and reporting system. Implement Capital Improvements in Alignment with Vision: Development and implementation of the TMP is in direct alignment with the City vision. Much of Redmond's Capital Investment Strategy (CIS) plan for 2013-2020 is linked to the improvements and schedule for completing the Transportation Plan. An example is completion of the Downtown Couplet Conversion which provides a core framework that has shaped the timing, need, and design of many 168


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2436

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND ENGINEERING of the other related transportation, parks, natural resources, water, and sewer capital projects in Downtown. Decision making for the City's transportation plans takes place in partnership with land use planning and in direct collaboration with larger development proposals (e.g., Group Health). Transportation improvements are strategically leveraged for collaboration with development, other projects, other agencies, and grant opportunities to maximize the highest possible value for each and every transportation improvement. Strategic Approach to Provide Safe and High-Quality Maintenance and Operations: The TMP is attentive to meeting the basic "Safety" and maintenance (preservation) needs through projects and programs that directly provide for those needs into the future. Transportation Connections: A main priority of the TMP is multimodal connections for all users, including freight and goods movement. This includes both street connections and pedestrian/bicycle connections. Creating a more connected walkable Redmond (particularly in Downtown and Overlake) is key to the land use vision and making transit and light rail a real and reliable travel choice. Connections can be regional, such as East Link Light Rail or neighborhood trail connections such as Northeast 31st Street Trail Connection in the Idylwood neighborhood. Support Excellence: Few cities have a comprehensive Transportation Master Plan and many just rely on a list of capital improvements. Innovation is integral to how we provide quality improvements that create "Great Streets", such as Cleveland Street as the Downtown Main Street. Efficiencies through the programs allow for flexible and responsive citywide improvements, such as the Bicycle Improvement Program making a new connection to Downtown on Avondale Way by reconfiguring an existing street. Who: The offer serves all the people of Redmond who walk, bike, drive, ride in a car, take transit, or transport goods and services (freight mobility) or rely on someone who does.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

3.

Transportation Keeps Pace with Growth (Concurrency) - Target is the rate of transportation improvement investment towards plan completion exceeds the rate of land use consumption by 5% or more. Measured by comparing rate of completion of Transportation Facilities Plan (TFP) to rate of completion of the land use plan (both currently use a 2022 target date). Implementation in advance of development. Transportation Customer Survey - Target is an 80% overall rating of satisfied or very satisfied. Measured by percent of customers whose travel choices as a cyclist, pedestrian, motorist, or transit user range from very dissatisfied to very satisfied. Less Car Travel (Travel Choices) - Target is less than 84% of total daily trips use an automobile. Measured by the percentage of customers who travel by single occupancy vehicle, high-occupancy vehicle (HOV), transit, bike, or walking (calculated through a travel diary done every five years).

Measure Completion of TFP Relative to Land Use Plan Customer Survey Travel Choices

Target 5.00

2010 Act 25.00

2011 Act 30.00

80.00 84.00

65.00 85.00

70.00 85.00

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: No increase to this offer is needed at this time.

169

2012 Goal Measurement 30.00 Percent 80.00 Percent 84.00 Percent


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2436

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND ENGINEERING A 5% decrease of $56,000 for the biennium in this offer results in reducing the consultant line item from $29,000 to $0. Consulting services are used primarily for reviewing work by outside agencies, such as Bellevue and Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT), and for conceptual designs to position the City for pursuing grants. In addition, the supplemental line item would be reduced from $18,000 to $0 and would eliminate supplemental positions used in research and data collection needed for grants, transportation programs, and project support. Additionally, $9,000 would be reduced from other line items, such as travel, tuition, and communications. Scalability Recommended: Reduced various line items ($14,115) including travel, tuition and office supplies through right sizing.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$503,012

$494,644

$997,656

$36,343 $0 $0 $539,355 5.000

$37,343 $0 $0 $531,987 5.000

$73,686 $0 $0 $1,071,342

170


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2460

DEVELOPING/IMPLEMENTING PLANS FOR REDMOND'S FUTURE Description: What: Long Range Planning works with community, regional and state partners, and others in the City to deliver the land use and infrastructure planning and implementation critical to achieving the community's vision of two vibrant urban centers, connected neighborhoods, and high-quality services. This responds to the community's call for "a well-maintained city where transportation and other infrastructure keep pace with growth" and supports many Factors and Purchasing Strategies of the Infrastructure and Growth priority. Infrastructure includes all facilities and services needed to support residential, commercial, industrial and all other land use activities, including water, sewer lines, and other utilities, streets and roads, communications, and public facilities, such as fire stations, parks, and schools. Why: Under state law, Redmond must plan for land use and infrastructure in accordance with the Growth Management Act and must ensure that these plans reflect changes over time at the local, regional and state level. Furthermore, the community has called for planning in advance of investment. Updating and implementing the Comprehensive Plan, Zoning Code and companion documents enables Redmond to ensure that the type of growth that the community desires occurs where and how it should. Up-to-date planning also enables the City and other public agencies to make smart and timely investments in infrastructure and services, as well as supports effective private sector investments in the community. How: Deliverables include the following primary actions and outcomes for the two-year period, listed by purchasing strategy. Demonstrate sound planning for future growth and infrastructure needs · Two (mandated) annual updates to the Comprehensive Plan based on public and privately-initiated proposals; · Amendments to the Zoning Code related to annual Comprehensive Plan amendments and independent proposals; · Consistency of purpose and coordination of policies across all of Redmond's functional plans, such as the Transportation Master Plan; · Continued facilitation of master planning in Overlake to achieve the vision, improve service delivery and infrastructure function, as well as maintain focus on mobility options; · Support for the Planning Commission, City Council and Mayor in considering choices related to planning and development; · Evaluate through either grant funding or other alternative funding mechanisms, the feasibility of implementing district energy in Redmond's urban centers. If proven feasible, the City's role will be to enable and incent, but not provide ground source district energy in both urban centers and to ensure that future development opportunities with the Downtown and Overlake do not become lost opportunities for district energy; · Collaboration with property owners and residents in Redmond's potential annexation areas to join the City; and · Representation in regional activities related to planning and involving partners, such as the Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC), Puget Sound Energy, and King County. Implement capital improvement investments and developer agreements · 2013 update to the Capital Investment Strategy; Vision Blueprint for the allocation of limited funds to necessary infrastructure to support planned growth according to the community's vision for maintenance and new capital projects; · Multi-department teamwork to ensure a cohesive system of public and private infrastructure that carries out the vision and meets community priorities like cost effectiveness, environmental protection, and choices in housing, jobs, services and transportation; and · Coordination with property owners, developers, and the rest of the community to develop and implement the master plans for the Group Health and other properties. Exhibit proactive strategies that provide for reliable, safe and high-quality maintenance and operations 171


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2460

DEVELOPING/IMPLEMENTING PLANS FOR REDMOND'S FUTURE ·

Expert analysis based on demographic, employment, permitting, land use and other planning data to inform public and private sector decisions, ranging from infrastructure maintenance and investment, to park and recreation planning, to location selection by businesses; and · Measurements of progress toward achieving community goals reported back to the community, especially through the annual Redmond Community Indicators reports, and used to calibrate new infrastructure and maintenance priorities. Provide, support and improve transportation connections · Improved competitiveness for critical state and federal funding necessary for transportation and other infrastructure through sound planning, data analysis, as well as mapping and other graphics; and · Completion of planning and implementation actions to support development of vibrant urban neighborhoods near the planned light rail stations in Overlake through the federally funded Growing Transit Communities (GTC) project led by Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) with City participation. Be excellent · Improved communication strategy, crafted with Redmond's Communications Manager, to effectively convey Redmond's future vision and implementation to a diverse audience; · Upgrades to Redmond's revolutionary electronic Zoning Code and Property Viewer applications created by a staff-consultant team in 2012 with additional search functions, map additions, and integration with the new permitting system, EnerGov; · Proposals for public/private partnerships in the urban centers, especially for Overlake Village, that address issues, such as: land acquisition and redevelopment, infrastructure finance, upkeep of places open to the public and parking; and · Compelling simulations and illustrations of future development scenarios via digital, 3D visualization techniques. To meet the City's long-term needs for planning and implementation activities and to deliver on the outcomes described in this offer, we need additional staff capacity at the Senior Planner level and therefore propose to convert an existing Associate Planner full time employee (FTE) to a Senior Planner FTE. This offer also requests the increase of 0.063 FTE for an Administrative Assistant to provide appropriate staffing for the Community Planning section formed in Planning's reorganization and to enhance customer service. We also propose one-time funds of $50,000 to retain planning and design professionals to provide supplemental expertise for: 1) the development of 3D visualization techniques to illustrate future development scenarios and 2) the implementation of public/private partnerships in Overlake. This work will help achieve the community's preferred future vision and increase community member satisfaction with the City's actions related to growth planning. Who: Long Range Planning collaborate with and deliver the services described above to three groups of customers: Community, Partners, and the Redmond Team. Long Range Planning (LRP) staff's most important group of customers is the broader Redmond Community (residents, property owners, organizations, businesses and employees, and visitors). Our local, regional and state partners include businesses, neighboring cities, King County, PSRC, Washington State Department of Commerce, Department of Ecology, and other entities. The Redmond Team includes the Planning Commission, City Council, Mayor, and City staff. LRP will engage with the Community, Partners, and the Redmond Team, recognize changing conditions, identify and analyze alternatives, as well as update mandated and essential plans. Long Range Planning will follow through by collaborating, communicating, and strategizing to implement plans.

Performance Measures: 1.

Maintain or increase the percentage of sampled citizens indicating satisfaction with the City's actions related to growth planning. (December 2011: 83% citizens feel that the City is headed in the right direction; 67% are satisfied with the plan; 12% are dissatisfied with the plan.)

172


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2460

DEVELOPING/IMPLEMENTING PLANS FOR REDMOND'S FUTURE Measure Residents Who Agree City Going Right Direction Resident Survey Respondents Satisfied With Plan

Target 76.00

2010 Act 76.00

2011 Act 83.00

47.00

47.00

67.00

2012 Goal Measurement 85.00 Percent 70.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% decrease ($54,710) in the overall funding for this offer equates to about a 28% reduction in staff time if applied to one of the FTEs. An example of how this would reduce services is that we would no longer be able to respond to data, analysis, and mapping needs except those specifically part of required reporting, such as reporting to state agencies. This would eliminate staff's ability to provide data, analysis, and mapping support to a variety of other initiatives and programs in the City that are for the purpose of advancing implementation of Redmond's vision. This would adversely impact progress on the performance measure. The addition of $15,000 for an intern working one day a week would allow staff time to be allocated across some or all of the following activities: 1) establishing a more innovative system to handle planning data and information. Results may include developing an online, public clearinghouse of commonly requested land use, permitting and demographic information, and reviewing with partner agencies the current practice of data sharing with the goal of improving efficiency; and 2) providing interactive and compelling visualizations of Redmond's future development online. This would extend staff's innovative communication with the Redmond team to the community at large. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated new request for 0.06 FTE Administrative Assistant ($8,951) and professional services ($50,000). Reduced various line items ($5,576) through right sizing.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$452,216

$465,260

$917,476

$46,676 $0 $0 $498,892 3.760

$46,686 $0 $0 $511,946 3.760

$93,362 $0 $0 $1,010,838

173


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2452

REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNING & PARTNERSHIPS Description: What: Planning staff provide active and effective advocacy to improve Redmond's regional transportation connections and services, including partnering with King County Metro Transit, Sound Transit, and the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) to promote travel choices that are accessible, convenient, multimodal, and sustainable. Why: Regional transportation facilities and services are critical to support vibrant economic development and provide access to housing, jobs, services, and amenities. These facilities and services include over $1 billion in highway and transit capital improvements (over the next 10 years) and over $35 million in annual transit services. This offer seeks to advocate for and build partnerships to ensure that complete regional transportation connections are provided by regional partners to support Redmond's Comprehensive Plan goals, vision, and policies. The Comprehensive Plan calls for a transportation system that is safe, efficient, and sustainable, providing multimodal connections and travel choices that are in alignment with the City's preferred land use character and support the development of dense mixed uses in the Downtown and Overlake urban centers. The City's Transportation Master Plan contains strategies to improve travel corridors, including highways and public transit. Without adequate regional highway and transit improvements, Redmond residents, businesses, and visitors will find access to jobs, schools, other destinations, and movement of freight and goods increasingly difficult. Further, the level of employment and residential growth planned by the City, consistent with regional growth targets, would need to be substantially reduced or congestion levels will significantly increase. This will create significant negative impacts on the environment and transportation system due to sprawl. Further improvements to the regional transportation system are necessary in order to reduce the growth of greenhouse gases of which nearly 50% are caused by transportation activities and to reflect demographic trends indicating that a significant part of the region's population will include more transit-dependent older residents and youth and those who prefer to travel by bus or rail for the sake of convenience, ease, and safety. The budget offer provides support, including advocacy, for the Mayor, Council, and regional partners to ensure that Redmond has the transportation infrastructure necessary to provide for the mobility, circulation, and access needs of existing development and future growth in its two urban centers and neighborhoods; advances planning, funding, and construction of regional arterial, highway, bus, rail, and bicycle-pedestrian trails identified in Redmond's Comprehensive and Transportation Master plans that support sustainability and efficiency consistent with the transportation vision for Redmond's urban centers and neighborhoods; advances City interests in regional strategies, such as tolling to both fund safer regional transportation facilities and efficiently manage their operation to reduce travel times and increase reliability; promotes a variety of regional travel options and service partnerships in support of the City's growth plans for better connections within Redmond and to the region provided by King County Metro, Sound Transit, and the Washington State Department of Transportation; and provides the necessary staff resources for technical analysis, communication, and engagement of Redmond's elected officials as they serve on regional transportation boards and commissions. The offer supports plans for transportation choices and connectivity for people, goods, and services, actively seeking city, local, state, and federal transportation funding for transportation projects and services, and partnering with private and public agencies to design and construct transportation system improvements that support the City's planned land uses. The offer seeks to improve the current regional transportation system by engaging regional transportation agencies and collaborating with transportation partners to meet mobility, circulation, and access needs of residential and business customers in a manner that reduces dependence on fossil fuels and provides environmental and social equity benefits. How: Through planning, partnerships, and advocacy, this offer ensures that regional transportation improvements and services align with the City's Comprehensive Plan and Transportation Master Plan. Staff works in partnership with 174


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2452

REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNING & PARTNERSHIPS regional, state agencies, and other partners to: 1) complete planned transportation improvements in the State Route 520 corridor (including a new bridge across Lake Washington capable of supporting future light rail service), trails, transit and high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes capable of supporting future light rail service, two bicycle-pedestrian bridges, and an access ramp at 148th Avenue Northeast; 2) ensure that the Sound Transit East Link light rail project effectively serves Redmond through a well-designed alignment and stations in Overlake; 3) ensure that plans for a future Sound Transit (ST3) ballot measure include further planning and construction to extend East Link light rail from the Overlake Transit Center to the Downtown Redmond urban center; 4) obtain funding to complete further improvements in the I-405 corridor; and 5) ensure that transit service meets City needs through transportation improvements and agreements, such as Transit Now partnerships with Metro and Redmond employers that increase transit access to residents and businesses. Effective partnerships improve communication, foster commitment, reduce risk, ensure coordination with other governments and the private sector, and provide funding for transit routes that serve Redmond. Without partners, Redmond would not be able to secure needed bus, rail, street, and highway improvements necessary for the future mobility of residents and businesses, and the movement of freight and goods. Who: Customers targeted by this offer include local, regional, and state transportation agencies, the Mayor, City Council, community members, Redmond businesses, adjacent cities, and state legislators. Working with these customers, Planning staff: 1) advise, present, testify, and provide technical analysis in support of the City's regional transportation objectives; 2) represent the City before advisory, legislative, and public agencies, such as the Eastside Transportation Partnership, King County Metro, Sound Transit, and WSDOT; 3) develop and implement partnerships to increase transportation funding and services; and 4) support public involvement and assist the Mayor and City Council in forming alliances with neighboring Eastside communities to promote common regional transportation interests that support Redmond's existing needs and planned growth.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

3.

4.

Maintain or increase the number of hours of service provided by Metro Transit via advocacy and work with elected officials and transit service partnership contributions. Service hours provided systemwide and to Redmond are identified. Base line target: 3,967,000 (system), 345,000 (Redmond). October 2011 - Metro Transit service hours are 3,538,000 systemwide hours and 241,000 hours of service to Redmond. Maintain or increase the number of hours of service provided by Sound Transit via advocacy and work with elected officials. Service hours provided systemwide, to the Eastside, and to Redmond are identified. Base line target: 745,000 (system), 114,000 (Redmond). 2011 estimated - Sound Transit service hours are 690,000 systemwide hours; 325,000 Eastside hours; and 117,000 hours of service to Redmond (2011 estimated hours). Maintain Sound Transit's commitment to extend East Link light rail service to at least Northeast 40th Street consistent with Sound Transit's Long-Range Plan. Support achievement of key East Link Project tasks and schedule: Final Design: 50% complete-2013; 75% complete-2014. Service starts in 2023. (New Measure) Achieve funding for highway programs and projects as identified in the City's 2013 and 2014 state legislative agenda. (New Measure)

Note: Due to lower revenue, both Metro and Sound Transit have not implemented the amount of transit service hours listed under the "Baseline Target" originally planned under Transit Now and Sound Transit 2.

175


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PLN2452

REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION PLANNING & PARTNERSHIPS Measure Target 2010 Act Metro Annual Service Hours - Redmond 345,000.00 279,000.00 Sound Transit Annual Service Hours 114,000.00 102,000.00 Redmond East Link to NE 40th Street Final 75.00 0.00 Design/2014 Funding Support for City Legislative Agenda 0.00 0.00

2011 Act 241,000.00 117,000.00

2012 Goal Measurement 241,000.00 Hours 117,000.00 Hours

0.00

0.00 Percent

0.00

0.00 13-14 Support

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% decrease ($51,362) in the overall funding for this offer equates to nearly a 19% reduction in staff time if applied to one of the full-time employees. An example of how this would translate to reduced services is that we would likely need to limit our staff support for City involvement in regional programs to one agency, such as planning for Sound Transit Phase 3 or work with King County Metro. The City would lose out to other public and private sector agencies that are able to be more active in regional transportation issues. A 5% increase ($51,362) in this budget would provide more staff time to achieve and implement both regional transportation capital and service improvements. This additional time would allow more timely and comprehensive technical assessments of regional transportation projects and allow for increased communication with the community about current and future regional transportation system improvements and issues. Scalability Recommended: Eliminated 0.50 FTE Principal Planner ($148,590) through reorganization.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$235,345 $193,927 $0

$242,904 $193,937 $0

$478,249 $387,864 $0

$0 $429,272 2.263

$0 $436,841 2.263

$0 $866,113

176


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2590

ASSET MANAGEMENT DATA COLLECTION Description: What: The City is currently in the process of selecting a new asset maintenance and management system. The system will be used to manage City owned assets such as buildings, water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure, transportation, traffic, parks, and others while keeping track of maintenance and repair activities. The system relies on a foundation of data about our assets much of which needs to be geographically located. The City already has many of the main City assets in our Geographic Information System (GIS) which is maintained by the GIS Services group. However, significant data gaps still remain that can only be addressed by field data collection (the GIS Services group is not staffed or funded to provide field collection). The Asset Management Data Collection offer is for consulting services to gather key missing data about our assets in support of the asset maintenance and management system. This is a joint offer covering multiple divisions of public works and parks operations in consultation with GIS Services. The following is a list of the types of data that we would look to collect. Some of these features have never been mapped and are not in our current GIS and others have key data elements that are incomplete or missing that could most effectively been captured in the field: 路 Transportation - Traffic signs and signal equipment; 路 Parks - Irrigation and lighting systems; 路 Stormwater - System pipe material, grates types, structure types, stormwater treatment facilities, pervious pavement; and 路 Wastewater and Water - Water meters, monitoring wells. Why: Maintaining and operating the City's infrastructure is one of the key factors in providing service to the community. The asset management system is the operational system used for managing and tracking all the major maintenance activities in the City. The system is used for such activities as managing maintenance personnel and equipment, creating/managing work orders, defining work tasks, establishing preventative maintenance activities/schedules, as well as tracking warranties and staff training/certifications. The GIS data is the foundation for the system. Assets and asset information that is missing or incomplete will need to be investigated and entered into the system in order for the system to be fully effective. This work could be conducted by individual field crews; however, that would greatly reduce their availability for actually doing the maintenance. It would be more cost effective and efficient for a consultant to collect all the various data elements rather than individual work groups tracking down the information for their individual work groups. How: The offer supports Infrastructure and Growth Purchasing Strategies by demonstrating sound planning for future growth and current infrastructure needs; exhibiting proactive short and long term strategies that will provide for reliable, safe and high quality maintenance and operations; supporting the principle of "excellence"; realizing Redmond's Vision for Downtown and Overlake by providing needed facilities, services, and improvements within these two urban center neighborhoods; providing infrastructure connections and systems in Redmond's established neighborhoods; providing for the preservation of the City's infrastructure system; achieving high value for the dollars invested; and demonstrating efficiency in cost, timing and approach. Asset management is striving for excellence in maintenance and operations through providing better more complete base information so that crews can efficiently and effectively perform their work. Better maintenance means our systems will be safer, more reliable, and function better and it will be done in a more effective and innovative manner.

177


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2590

ASSET MANAGEMENT DATA COLLECTION Who: All City customers that use the City's infrastructure will benefit as a result of this offer being accepted.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Percent of the identified data gaps collected. (New Measure) Quality of data: users are satisfied with the spatial location and attribution. (New Measure)

Measure Identified Data Gaps Collected Quality of Data

Target 70.00 70.00

2010 Act 0.00 0.00

2011 Act 0.00 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 0.00 Percent 0.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% ($5,000) increase would mean that more data elements could be collected rather than work crews collecting this information over time as they identify items in the field. A 5% ($5,000) decrease would mean that focus would be limited to major key elements that are missing, such as Parks information, signals and signs. The cost would be $90,000 one-time. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

Total $0 $0

$0 $0

$0 $95,000 $95,000 0.000

$0 $95,000 $95,000

178


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2423

WATER/WASTEWATER ENGINEERING & ADMINISTRATION Description: What: Water/Wastewater Engineering and Administration provides engineering and administration services that support the overall goal of the Water and Wastewater Utility to deliver a dependable supply of safe drinking water and a reliable system for the disposal of wastewater. Why: In order to achieve this goal there are many challenges, including rising costs, aging infrastructure, increasing regulations, and population changes that must be responded to. Proactive system planning, prioritized capital investments, and prudent financial decisions all contribute to achieving the desired level of service, overcoming challenges, and the sustainability of the utility. Planning new facilities to accommodate growth and developing replacement plans for aging facilities are programs that ensure the future reliability of the water and wastewater systems. Developing prudent fiscal policies as well as establishing fair and appropriate rates and charges help ensure that operation and maintenance, expansion of the system, and rehabilitation of the system can be paid for when needed. Managing regional contracts for supply of water and disposal of wastewater are essential for ensuring continued service for our customers. How: The offer provides for engineering, planning, designing, policy development, and other administrative efforts that focus on the long-range health of the Water and Wastewater Utility. The following are the major program elements in this offer: 路

Long-Range Planning. Long-range utility plans are developed for major system additions; upgrades or changes; and to comply with federal, state and local directives. The Water System Plan and General Sewer Plan are developed every six years and provide the guidance to ensure that each system continues to function at an optimal level. Water is provided in the required quality and quantity by having appropriate sources of water, treatment facilities, storage, booster stations, a distribution network, and fire protection. Collection and treatment of wastewater complies with local and state health regulations and federal environmental protection requirements. Some elements of long-range planning such as water supply and wastewater treatment are coordinated at a regional level through Cascade Water Alliance and King County Wastewater Treatment.

Capital Improvement Planning, Development and Execution. Planning and budgeting for capital improvements address the systematic development of a long-range plan for utility infrastructure. Water and Wastewater system capital improvements are identified through long-range planning efforts and through operation and maintenance activities. Capital projects to support growth and system rehabilitation are initiated, developed, designed, and implemented through the Six-year Capital Improvement Program. Projects are coordinated with other divisions and capital improvement programs to provide efficient service to residents.

Utility Finance and Budget. Finance and budgeting are crucial to the utility decision making process, and include the following activities: financial policy development, budgeting, rate setting, revenue projecting, expense monitoring, and financial analysis.

Intergovernmental and Regional Affairs. Staff is responsible for the administration of the water supply contract with Cascade Water Alliance and the wastewater disposal contract with King County. They participate in the various committees of these organizations to coordinate development of regional infrastructure and to establish budgets, price treatment and supply of drinking water, as well as treatment and disposal of wastewater. Agreements with neighboring cities and districts are developed and administered regarding the distribution of water and the collection of wastewater. 179


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2423

WATER/WASTEWATER ENGINEERING & ADMINISTRATION Who: There is a broad range of customers impacted by this offer. They include external customers, such as rate payers, property owners, developers, and other agencies; as well as internal customers, such as Development Services, Operations and Maintenance, other Public Works Divisions, Finance Department, Planning Department, Mayor's Office, and City Council.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1.

2. 3.

Number of water service interruptions. The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. (New Measure) Percentage of water quality tests that meet compliance regulations. Number of wastewater service interruptions. (New Measure)

Measure Number of water service interruptions Percentage of water quality tests that meet compliance regulations Number of wastewater service interruptions

Target 15.00 100.00

2010 Act 0.00 100.00

2011 Act 0.00 100.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 15.00 Number 100.00 Percent 3.00 Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A large portion of this budget is not able to be scaled within this offer as it is overhead charges from the General Fund. To the extent that General Fund services may be reduced the utility would share in a portion of that scalability. If a 5% ($317,000) reduction were made on that part that is scalable, it would significantly reduce the Long-Range Planning, Capital Improvement Planning, Capital Project Development, and Intergovernmental and Regional Affairs programs of the utility. Capital projects would be delayed. Recent investments in development of the water and sewer hydraulic models would be lost as they would not be able to be maintained. Agreements with neighboring jurisdictions would not be developed or maintained. Water consumption histories would not be maintained. Standard details would not be maintained. Participation with Cascade Water Alliance and King County Wastewater Treatment would be reduced. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

180


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2423

WATER/WASTEWATER ENGINEERING & ADMINISTRATION Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$741,963 $7,233,455 $0

$764,058 $7,694,664 $0

$1,506,021 $14,928,119 $0

$0 $7,975,418 6.342

$0 $8,458,722 6.342

$0 $16,434,140

181


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2548

ASSET MANAGEMENT MOBILE DEPLOYMENT INFRASTRUCTURE Description: What: Servers, mobile laptop/tablets hardware, hardware accessories, software licenses, and ongoing software support the initial phase of mobile deployment for the asset maintenance and management system. This is a joint offer covering multiple divisions of Finance and Information Services, Public Works, and Parks Operations. The City is currently in the process to select a new asset maintenance and management system. The system will be used to manage City's owned assets such as buildings, water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure, transportation, traffic, parks, and others while keeping track of maintenance and repair activities. After the initial implementation of the asset management system, aiming at usage of the application while in the office, the focus will be to expand the availability of the system to the Maintenance staff while in the field. The Maintenance staff will be able to track their maintenance activities, equipment and parts usage as well as access new work orders and service requests, including Geographic Information System (GIS), right from their mobile devices. The ability to access the asset information while in the field will also lead to better decision makings during emergency situations. To support the mobile capabilities of the asset maintenance and management system, the backend infrastructure such as servers, licensing, etc. must be established first. In addition to the backend infrastructure, a pilot group of six mobile laptops/tablets will be deployed to key personnel for use. Why: Maintaining and operating the City's infrastructure is one of the key factors in providing service to the community. The asset management system is the operational system used for managing and tracking all the major maintenance activities in the City. The system is used for such activities as managing maintenance personnel and equipment, creating/managing work orders, defining work tasks, establishing preventative maintenance activities/schedules, as well as tracking warranties and staff training/certifications. For the staff working in the field this system is used to guide the vast majority of their work. Having access to the system from the field will greatly improve staff efficiency, allow for quicker response time, provide better information for field decision making, and improve data tracking. How: The Asset Management Mobile Deployment Infrastructure offer supports Infrastructure and Growth Purchasing Strategies by demonstrating sound planning for future growth and current infrastructure needs, exhibiting proactive short and long term strategies that will provide for reliable, safe and high quality maintenance and operations, supporting the principle of "excellence", realizing Redmond's Vision for Downtown and Overlake by providing needed facilities, services, and improvements within these two urban center neighborhoods, providing infrastructure connections and systems in Redmond's established neighborhoods, providing for the preservation of the City's infrastructure system and achieving high value for the dollars invested and demonstrate efficiency in cost, timing and approach. Asset Management is striving for excellence in maintenance and operations through providing better timely data directly to field personnel so they have the information they need to efficiently and effectively perform their work. Better maintenance means our systems will be safer, more reliable, and function better and it will be done in a more effective and innovative manner. Examples of how mobile deployment of the asset management system will improve customer service include: · Field access to maintenance manuals for any asset in need of repair or inspection; · Crews can identify and locate assets on a map that are not currently shown in the system; · Information is available on previous maintenance activities conducted on the asset; · Changing crew deployment on the fly as new priorities are identified; · Information on assets from other functional areas; · Entering data on work completed as it happens making it available for managers and others for timely decision 182


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2548

ASSET MANAGEMENT MOBILE DEPLOYMENT INFRASTRUCTURE 路

making; and Creating/managing work orders for activities identified in the field, such as responding to an accident.

Who: All City customers that use the City's infrastructure will benefit as a result of this offer being accepted.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Percentage of time that the servers are available for mobile device usage. (New Measure) The average number of hours per day the devices are used by the field crews. (New Measure)

Measure Time Servers are Available for Mobile Device Usage Hours Per Day Devices are Used By Field Crews

Target 100.00

2010 Act 0.00

2011 Act 0.00

2.00

0.00

0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 0.00 Percent 0.00 Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: If additional funds were available, the mobile deployment could be accelerated so that more field crews have mobile access at a cost of $8,860 per unit plus $650 ongoing. At the current staffing levels and structure of the work crews, we would envision that 18 total mobile units could be deployed. The acceleration of the program would require an increase of 12% per mobile access. If less funding was made available, the servers and four units (one for the General Fund and three for the Utilities Funds) could be deployed in 2015 with additional General Fund deployment for parks and transportation in later years. The cost of the offer would be reduced by 25% to $55,440 one-time and $2,600 on-going. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2014

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

$0 $0 $0 $77,060 $77,060 0.000

Total $0 $0 $0 $77,060 $77,060

183


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2416

PURCHASED WATER SUPPLY Description: What: The Purchased Water Supply offer provides a regional approach to meeting the current and future water demands of the City of Redmond through membership in Cascade Water Alliance. Cascade is a non-profit corporation comprised of eight member cities and districts, including Redmond, that have joined together with the goal of bringing a regional approach to providing a safe, clean and reliable water supply. This is achieved through long-range planning, capital improvement, and water conservation programs that Cascade administers on a regional level. Why: The City's water system infrastructure is not designed to meet the full demand for water supply. This is due to the limited amount of water that can be produced through our wells. In order to operate the system in the way it was designed, the City requires that additional water supply be purchased from another entity. The City of Redmond is not unique in this approach to meeting water demands and therefore joined the effort to establish the Cascade Water Alliance in 1999, after the City of Seattle announced that it would no longer be able to provide water to other agencies in the future. The mission of Cascade is to provide water supply of the highest water quality standards to meet current and future needs of members in a cost effective, environmentally responsible manner. How: In order to accomplish its mission Cascade concentrates on the following activities: constructing, managing and operating water supply infrastructure; fostering flexible long-range supply and demand planning for the region; supporting the water needs of people and fish; building partnerships and regional collaboration; maintaining "One Cascade" comprised of diverse members that share a common mission and values. To ensure that the demand needs of the Cascade members can be met now and in the future requires long-range planning and Capital Improvement and Water Conservation Programs. Cascade administers these programs at a regional level and requires participation from all members. City staff, the Mayor, and Council members represent the City of Redmond at Cascade by participating on various committees and boards to influence prudent planning and investments in capital improvements. Who: All City of Redmond water utility customers receive purchased water from Cascade Water Alliance and benefit from the regional programs they administer. These customers include single family, multi-family, commercial, industrial, and irrigation users.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. 2.

Number of water service interruptions. (New Measure) Percentage of water quality tests that meet compliance regulations.

Measure Water Service Interruptions Water Quality Tests that Meet Compliance Regulations

Target 15.00 100.00

184

2010 Act 0.00 100.00

2011 Act 0.00 100.00

2012 Goal Measurement 15.00 Number 100.00 Percent


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2416

PURCHASED WATER SUPPLY Scalability: Scalability Proposed: No scalable adjustments are proposed for this offer. The costs to the City are fixed by Cascade in accordance with the terms of our supply contract. Charges are fixed for each calendar year except for Regional Connection Charges that are collected from new customers. Effects of increases in the cost of purchased water will need to be evaluated together with the total cost of all of the utility offers in balancing needs for increased rate revenues. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$0 $7,587,448

$0 $7,891,962

$0 $15,479,410

$0 $0 $7,587,448 0.000

$0 $0 $7,891,962 0.000

$0 $0 $15,479,410

185


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2415

WASTEWATER TREATMENT SERVICES Description: What: The Wastewater Treatment Services offer pays for regional wholesale wastewater treatment services provided by the King County Wastewater Treatment Division. The County works to protect water quality and prevent water pollution by providing wastewater treatment to 34 local agencies that have 30-year agreements for this service. King County owns and operates the regional treatment plants, pipelines, pump stations and other related facilities and infrastructure. Why: Most wastewater systems in the Puget Sound region, including Redmond's, were not designed to provide wastewater treatment when they were built in the early 1900's. Instead the wastewater largely flowed into lakes, rivers, and streams causing contamination to water and beaches. In 1958, voters who were concerned about this pollution created a Metropolitan Municipal Corporation (Metro) which developed a regional wastewater treatment system based on watersheds as opposed to political boundaries. The City voluntarily connected to the metropolitan sewer system and has been receiving wastewater treatment services from it ever since. In 1992, Metro merged with King County and became part of its Natural Resources Department. Today, King County continues to protect water quality by treating on average over 170 million gallons of wastewater produced by residents and businesses each day. How: For more than 40 years, King County has protected water quality in the region by providing the infrastructure necessary to provide wastewater treatment. They work closely with their utility customers on issues to ensure that they are able to continue doing so. Under the State's Growth Management Act, local jurisdictions are required to plan essential public facilities, such as wastewater treatment to meet their population growth needs. King County is in turn required to build wastewater treatment capacity for the local agencies it serves. To ensure planning decisions reflect the interest of the regional ratepayers, who ultimately pay for these investments, King County carefully reviews local comprehensive plans, compares growth projections produced by several entities, and monitors its own modeling data to determine where future system capacity might be needed. The thirty-four local agencies that pay King County for safe, environmentally responsible wastewater treatment are represented by the Metropolitan Water Pollution Abatement Advisory Committee (MWPAAC). MWPAAC members help ensure the County is making cost-effective decisions based on legitimate, emerging needs by working with the County to develop criteria to prioritize and plan projects. Once project needs are identified, the County develops plans that it shares with MWPAAC's engineering subcommittee and other stakeholders, which might include local elected officials and jurisdiction staff, business leaders, permitting agencies and community members. The King County Council and County Executive review the comprehensive plans, and only after the Council votes its approval, do plans for new projects move forward. City of Redmond staff represents the City on the MWPAAC committee. Who: All of the City's wastewater utility customers receive treatment at King County wastewater treatment facilities. The customers include all single family and multi-family, commercial, and industrial users that are connected to the wastewater system.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, 186


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

INFRASTRUCTURE & GROWTH Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2415

WASTEWATER TREATMENT SERVICES implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1.

Number of wastewater service interruptions. (New Measure)

Measure Wastewater Servicer Interruptions

Target 0.00

2010 Act 0.00

2011 Act 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 3.00 Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: No scalable adjustments are proposed for this offer. The costs to Redmond are fixed by King County in accordance with the terms of our contract. Charges vary slightly from year to year depending on the amount of wastewater disposed of by Redmond's customers. Charges continue to escalate greater than the cost of inflation due to the high costs of constructing Brightwater and other capital programs being implemented by King County. The increases in King County Wastewater fees are passed on to Redmond ratepayers automatically through the design of Redmond rates. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$0 $14,491,723 $0

$0 $14,668,501 $0

$0 $29,160,224 $0

$0 $14,491,723 0.000

$0 $14,668,501 0.000

$0 $29,160,224

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RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT

RESULTS TEAM REQUEST FOR OFFERS RESULTS TEAM MAP OFFER SUMMARY OFFERS


RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT I WANT A CITY GOVERNMENT THAT IS RESPONSIBLE AND RESPONSIVE TO ITS RESIDENTS AND BUSINESSES

REQUEST FOR OFFERS TEAM MEMBERS Team Lead: Erika Vandenbrande, Planning Team Member: Lynn Arakaki, Public Works Team Member: Julie Howe, Human Resources Team Member: Ryan Spencer, Parks & Recreation Team Member: Charu Naik, Community Member DASHBOARD INDICATORS Indicator 1: Percent of community responding positively regarding satisfaction with City services. Measure Description: A measure used to provide information on the level of community satisfaction to specific government-provided services. Calculation Method: Data for this measure will be generated by the City’s biennial survey.

Indicator 2: Trend in Redmond’s Price of Government. Measure Description: The Price of Government is literally defined as the sum of all taxes, fees and charges collected by all sectors of city government divided by the aggregate personal income of that government’s constituents. The calculation is used to define a band within which residents are willing to pay for government services. In Redmond, the band is 5%-6% of personal income which is typical for local governments. Calculation Method: The sum of all taxes, fees and charges collected by Redmond divided by the aggregate personal income of the City’s residents.

Indicator 3: The City’s bond rating. Measure Description: A measure used to reflect the City’s ability to meet and/or exceed fiscal policy benchmarks which contribute to an excellent credit rating. Some of these benchmarks include: • The Price of Government remains within the 5%-6% range (see above); • The City’s general operating reserves and economic contingencies are budgeted at a level adequate to maintain future financial stability; • User fee reviews are performed as scheduled;

188


• • •

Long-range forecasts are prepared and used to plot an appropriate financial course and to make course corrections as necessary; The City maintains an annual contact with rating agencies to report on the City’s current financial conditions; and Quarterly expenditures and revenue reports are presented to Council in a timely manner 100% of the time.

Calculation Method: Determined by bond rating agencies. Redmond’s current rating is AAA with Standard and Poor’s and Aa2 by Moody’s Investor Service.

INTRODUCTION/SUMMARY OF CAUSE & EFFECT MAP The process for refining the Cause and Effect Map for this budget priority included citizen input and team brainstorming. The team relied upon the considered, well thought out work of the previous teams as a resource and guide. The list of factors were maintained in four general, but inclusive categories that best represent the elements of a responsible and responsive government. The team believes the factors not only stand alone, but reinforce each other. Moreover, the factors and strategies to achieve the outcome of a responsible and responsive government are distinguished from similar factors and strategies contained in other priorities by the fundamental, versus more programmatic, emphasis. Overall, we believe this budget priority of “Responsible Government” helps form the foundation for and reinforces successful outcomes in the other budget priorities. The factors listed below are prioritized based on the belief that one factor provides the foundation for success of the following factors. The team believes all factors combined are important to achieve the priority of a responsible and responsive government. Factor 1: Effective Leadership and Empowerment Effective leadership can be demonstrated at all levels of the municipal organization by: 1) supporting the City's vision; 2) enabling and empowering City employees to demonstrate innovation and flexibility in realizing and communicating the vision; 3) engaging in cross-departmental alliances; and 4) providing opportunities for the professional development of staff. Effective leadership is proactive in generating regional partnerships that foster cooperation and yield benefits across city boundaries or jurisdictional borders. Effective leadership and empowerment provides the foundation for a responsible and responsive government. Factor 2: Fiscal Responsibility The City has a responsibility to manage its resources in a conservative and transparent manner so that our citizens and business community can be assured we are properly administering their contributions. Planning for the future necessitates providing for a comprehensive strategic financial and economic plan that includes policies and relevant compliance mandates, that: 1) demonstrates an understanding of the City's demographics; 2) forecasts future revenues and expenditures; 3) includes a budget that allows for economic fluctuations; 4) provides for managing the condition of our assets; and 5) includes investment strategies and appropriate fee structures. These all play an important role towards being a responsive and responsible government.

189


Factor 3: Quality Service The community can expect high quality, reliable, and responsive customer service by talented City staff through the use of effective and efficient systems and operations. Proactive and innovative approaches to City services are important to meet or exceed the community's expectations. Factor 4: Community Connections and Communication Residents, businesses, partners, and visitors are each part of the community. Connecting and communicating with the community is critical in realizing a responsible government. Readily available access to and sharing of current information, being approachable, engaging the public through sharing of ideas and opinions, as well as outreach and education each contribute to a sense of connection. PURCHASING STRATEGIES WE ARE LOOKING FOR OFFERS THAT: Strategy 1: Establish, cultivate, maintain and enhance the quality of the Redmond work force. This can be accomplished through: 1) developing an organizational culture that fosters leadership and empowerment; 2) successful attraction/recruitment and retention of experienced and well-trained personnel; and 3) providing and supporting innovative approaches to employee training and professional development. Offers will be favored that are goal based and consider all areas of organizational and employee development. Strategy 2: Encourage intra-city and regional collaboration and partnerships. We cannot do everything alone. Being a responsible government requires City staff to work together in cross departmental alliances, as well as in partnership with other governments in the region and the private sector. Offers will be favored that consider opportunities that build cooperation and yield benefits within and across city boundaries. Strategy 3: Improve or enhance customer service. The community can expect high quality, reliable and responsive customer service by talented City staff. Effective and efficient systems and operations are core to supporting superior customer service. Offers will be favored that provide proactive and innovative approaches to City services that are important to meet or exceed the community's expectations. Strategy 4: Focus on financial strategies and systems that reinforce credibility with the community. Offers will be favored that demonstrate good stewardship, conservative and transparent budgeting practices, an understanding of the community's demographics, consistency with the City's comprehensive strategic financial and economic plan, addresses sustaining the City's assets, and compliance with city policies and/or mandates. Any mandates or responses to changes in government laws must be clearly defined within the offer. Strategy 5: Effective and efficient systems, technology and operations enable us to provide community connections and excellent customer service. Ensuring online access to services allows for information exchange, provides opportunities for community engagement, and increases employee productivity.

190


Offers will be favored that enhance services provided to customers, both internal and external, as well as eliminate or reduce redundancies. Strategy 6: Through outreach, education, citizen and business involvement, creatively and effectively engage the community. Offers will be favored that proactively connect with the community to identify issues, solutions, and strategies that create the environment that supports a responsible government. CIP PURCHASING STRATEGIES Strategy 7: Urban Centers Realize Redmond’s vision for Downtown and Overlake 1 by providing needed facilities, services and improvements within these two urban center neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support implementation of the vision and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 Capital Investment Program (CIP). Strategy 8: Neighborhoods Provide infrastructure connections and systems in Redmond’s established neighborhoods. Offers will be favored that directly support improved connections within or between neighborhoods and that clearly demonstrate the benefit of funding during the 2013-2018 CIP. Strategy 9: Preservation of capital Provide for the preservation of the City’s infrastructure system. Offers will be favored that maintain and improve the reliability, safety and integrity of the system. Strategy 10: Value for investment Achieve high value for the dollars invested and demonstrate efficiency in cost, timing, and approach. Offers should describe how projects have been coordinated to provide the most effective approach and to minimize disruption to the community. In addition, explain how the offer leverages actions and resources by others, through partnerships; for example, meet the strategic needs of the City. Strategy 11: Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint Carry out the Comprehensive Plan and Vision Blueprint – Capital Investment Strategy, 2013-2030, as well as adopted functional plans. Offers will be favored that implement recurring policy direction and priority projects from these documents, as well as leverage other projects in a cross-functional manner. NOTES/PRACTICES/SUPPORTING EVIDENCE The team believes that Responsible Government provides the underlying foundation for the success of the other identified priorities. Paying the City's debt service is a critical element of being a responsible government, because it is an important part of the equation for the City's bond rating. This, in turn, affects the cost of borrowing. Our recognition of the importance of effective leadership and empowerment, good stewardship, professional staff, quality customer service, and community engagement formed the basis in the development of this Request for Offers.

1

See Redmond’s Comprehensive Plan for the vision for Downtown and Overlake 191


Responsible Government I want a city government that is responsible and responsive to its  residents and businesses INDICATOR Percent of community  responding positively  regarding satisfaction  with City services

INDICATOR Trend in Redmond’s  Price of Government

1 Effective  Leadership and  Empowerment Promote… ‐ A vision for Redmond ‐ Regional and Local     Collaboration ‐ Cross Departmental and  Community Partnership ‐ Professional and Leadership  Development of City Staff

2 Fiscal  Responsibility

Ensure…. ‐ Good Stewardship ‐ Comprehensive Strategic  Financial & Economic Plans ‐ Transparent Budget Process  ‐ Appropriate and Sustainable  Resources  & Assets ‐ Appropriate Fee Structures

3 Quality Service

4 Community  Connections  &  Communication

Provide…. ‐ High Quality, Reliable &  Responsive Customer Service ‐ Effective & Efficient Systems  and Operations and Talented  City Staff ‐ Innovative and Proactive  Approaches

2 INDICATOR  The City’s Bond Rating 

Encourage…. ‐ Accessibility and  Sharing of Information ‐ Approachable and  Responsive Engagement ‐ Outreach and Education ‐ Citizen and Business  Involvement


RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT 2013-2014 OFFER SUMMARY 2013-2014 Adopted

Page Offer # No 194 EXE2480

Offer City Administration and Management

196

FIN2413

Utility Billing

199

FIN2514

Budgeting and Forecasting Services

201

EXE2487

City Council

203

Department Executive

Ranking 1

Budget1 $819,756

Finance

2

1,617,513

Finance

3

1,171,523

Executive

4

360,852

HUM2522 Employee Recruitment and Selection Program

Human Resources

5

716,643

206

FIN2532

Finance

6

6,826,732

263

Finance

7

0

209

Open Data Repository - Unfunded2 HUM2524 Training and Organizational Development Program

Human Resources

8

508,355

212

FIN2540

Finance

9

1,119,148 1,048,093

Information Services

FIN2555

Accounting and Auditing

214

HUM2520 Labor Relations, Compensation, and Policy Administration

Human Resources

10

217

FIN2503

Hearing Examiner Services

Finance

11

51,575

219

FIN2502

Clerk's Office Division - Records and Election

Finance

12

1,018,205

222

HUM2521 Benefits Program Development and Administration

Human Resources

13

514,500

225

FIN2525

Citywide Contingencies

Finance

14

5,764,016

227

FIN2486

Payroll Administration

Finance

15

790,447

229

HUM2523 Safety and Workers Compensation Programs

Human Resources

16

1,953,137

232

FIN2526

Citywide Reserves

Finance

17

8,564,937

234

EXE2510

Innovation Fund

Executive

18

175,000

236

FIN2589

Information Technology Strategic Initiatives

Finance

19

693,000

239

FIN2515

Citywide Mail Services

Finance

20

201,790

242

FIN2512

Capital Equipment Replacement Reserve

Finance

21

4,450,947

244

FIN2516

Accounts Payable Services

Finance

22

624,283

247

LEG2494

Civil Legal Services

Legal

23

322,880

249

FIN2536

Treasury Management

Finance

24

838,287

266

FIN2578

Finance

25

0

252

FIN2592

Network and Data Security - Unfunded2 Risk Management

Finance

26

2,604,817

254

FIN2533

Outstanding Debt Obligations

Finance

27

9,868,589

256

EXE2495

Regional Policy and Services

Executive

28

1,267,033

258

FIN2517

Purchasing Services

Finance

29

613,622

261

PW2439

Provide Dependable Vehicles and Equipment

Public Works

30

5,146,759 $59,652,439

Notes: 1. Adopted Budget totals may not include ending fund balances and fund transfers for all offers. 2. Offers with zero budget were submitted for consideration through the budget process, but not funded or approved.

193


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2480

CITY ADMINISTRATION & MANAGEMENT Description: What: The Mayor's Office serves as the Executive Branch of Redmond's government whose mission is to assess community needs, propose policies, develop strategies responsive to those needs, as well as coordinate and support implementation by the departments. The Office provides leadership and is involved on a day-to-day basis in strategic planning for the future, vision implementation, policy development, intra-city and regional collaboration, and partnerships. Why: City Administration and Management provides for the Executive Branch's continued administration, management, and coordination of City activities to advance citizens' priorities and address community needs. Leadership through articulation and implementation of the City's vision ensures City staff is in alignment with each other and regional partners as Redmond strives to enhance its urban centers, Downtown and Overlake, and provide services to a well-connected and technology savvy community. The Mayor's Office has led the customer service and innovation and efficiency initiatives to better enable staff to meet the community's needs efficiently and effectively. Well thought out and timely internal and external communication is also a large part of the Mayor's Office responsibility to engage and reinforce credibility with the community and work force, as well as promote transparency in City government (see Connecting Community and Government offer in the Community Building priority for details). Lastly, a well-managed City with clear goals and objectives is essential to demonstrating fiscal stewardship, promoting community connections and providing excellent customer service. How: With overall responsibility of the City organization, this offer speaks to the Responsible Government priority through effective leadership and empowerment by articulating the vision of Redmond, leading major initiatives, such as the innovation and efficiency initiative and fostering cooperation between City staff, the City Council and area stakeholders. The emphasis on fiscal stewardship and transparency by the Executive Office is demonstrated through the calculation of the price of government to set future fiscal policy and community involvement in the Budgeting by Priorities process. Through management of the Office of Communications, City Administration focuses on connecting with the Redmond Community by providing updated tools, such as the City's website or print material such as Focus on Redmond. Funding this offer will maintain the current level of Mayor's Office responsibilities in advancing the mission stated above. Measures for this offer include the "dashboard" indicators for each Budgeting by Priority's priority since the Mayor's Office plays a prime leadership role in ensuring that citywide functions and services are coordinated to advance these key indicators, as well as the related performance measures and outcomes from departmental offers. Who: As the Mayor's Office is responsible for aligning the City's service efforts with citizen priorities, its oversight/coordination role is critical to meet customer/community service needs. The City Administration and Management offer reflects support of all areas of customer service by clearly articulating the City's vision and providing up to date information on major initiatives through a variety of print, e-mail and online forums.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Percentage of Community responding positively regarding satisfaction with City services as measured in the biennial citizen survey. Percentage of Community responding positively regarding the future direction of the City as measured in the biennial citizen survey.

194


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2480

CITY ADMINISTRATION & MANAGEMENT Measure Citizen Satisfaction with City Services Citizen Response Regarding Future Direction

Target 90.00 90.00

2010 Act 82.00 76.00

2011 Act 84.00 83.00

2012 Goal Measurement 84.00 Percent 83.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Executive Department has managerial oversight over Citywide Administration and Management, Regional Policy and Services, portions of Civil Legal Services, and the Prosecutor's Office. Taken together, a 5% scalability for these offers is approximately $170,000. It is proposed that the scalability for these offers could be met through: 1) a $70,000 reduction in the litigation line item of the Civil Legal Services budget to right-size the budget for recent litigation/claims activity; and 2) a $100,000 reduction in the Prosecutor's Office through elimination of the 0.5 full time employee (FTE) prosecutor position. The impacts of each of these reductions are described below: In recent years, the City's litigation line item has not been fully expended, due to fewer litigation/claims cases filed against the City and more rigorous budget scrutiny to ensure expenditures are properly charged to departmental budgets. While the City's current litigation outlook suggests this is a prudent reduction, it should be noted that it is difficult to predict when/if future litigation/claims may be filed in Fiscal Year 2013-2014. The reduction of the 0.5 FTE Prosecutor position was proposed in Fiscal Year 2011-2012, but was restored by the City Council due to the City's then-proposed traffic safety camera program. Because the traffic safety program was discontinued in early 2012, this reduction is again proposed for Fiscal Year 2013-2014. Impacts to the Office's workload from this reduction are described in the Prosecutor's Office offer. Scalability Recommended: No change in this program. However, as noted above scalability for the entire department appears in the Prosecutor's offer (EXE2507) and the Civil Legal offer (LEG2494).

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$330,877

$347,527

$678,404

$85,497 $0 $0 $416,374 2.250

$55,855 $0 $0 $403,382 2.250

$141,352 $0 $0 $819,756

195


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2413

UTILITY BILLING Description: What: Utility Billing provides billing, customer service, and collection of the City's water, wastewater, stormwater, and King County's wastewater treatment charges. In 2012, Utility Billing billed over $43 million and mailed approximately 140,000 statements and late notices to approximately 17,000 utility customers. Why: The Utility Billing offer addresses effective leadership, fiscal responsibility, quality service and community connections and communications. Additionally, this offer speaks to customer service, good stewardship, enhanced services through effective technology, and improved communication. Fees collected support the administration, maintenance, and capital improvements of the City's utility services. Utility Billing supports the community by fostering public trust through the correct and accurate accounting of all monies billed and received, efficient collection of revenues, and providing accurate and timely information to elected officials, rate consultants and City staff to ensure reasonable rates and desired services. Providing excellent customer service is an integral mission of the Revenue Division, and as such, the focus is on providing accurate billings, prompt and fair resolutions and responses to billing questions, service requests, and general customer inquiries, as well as ensuring strong internal controls over all financial activities. The Utility Billing operation is lean and highly efficient, yet customer service over the phone is readily available nine hours per day, Monday through Friday. How: The collection of utility and other receivables are accomplished through weekly billings and servicing of accounts, prompt recording (billing, receipts), balancing of month-end accounts receivable, reporting, auditing and analyzing revenues and statistical reports, and providing customer service. Utility Billing is focused on providing quality, effective and efficient service to both external and internal customers. Our goal for the next biennium is to continue to develop digital government services that provide transparency and access to information that will enhance our service delivery, our relationships with our utility customers and the larger community. Who: External customers include residential and commercial utility customers, and other government agencies and schools. Internal customers include Council, all city departments through efficient processes and accurate and timely information about utility accounts and revenues.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Bad debt ratio is less than .01% of total utility revenues billed during a calendar year. Via a survey mechanism, percent of utility customers that rate their overall customer service experience with Utility Billing as 4 (out of 5) or better.

Performance measure one, addresses fiscal responsibility and good stewardship of resources. Maintaining a low bad debt ratio requires that collections are managed in an effective and efficient manner. A large majority of internal customers were satisfied or very satisfied with their overall customer service (89%), quality (94%) and timeliness of their responses (91%). In early 2011, cashiering services was moved to Treasury and therefore Utility Billing was surveyed separately. In early 2012, Utility Billing received an overall customer service rating of 5 (the highest rating) from all survey respondents.

196


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2413

UTILITY BILLING 2011 was the first year an external customer service survey was conducted and approximately 80% of utility customers rated services provided by Utility Billing as 4 or higher (5 being the highest). Seventy-nine percent (79%) of the survey responders contacted Utility Billing by phone and approximately 37% of the calls were for services other than Utility Billing. Measure Bad Debt Ratio Internal Customer Satisfaction Rating (4+) External Utility Billing Customers

Target 0.01 89.00 80.00

2010 Act 0.14 0.00 0.00

2011 Act 0.06 89.00 80.00

2012 Goal 0.03 90.00 80.00

Measurement Percent Percent Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% budget reduction to the next biennium budget ($54,239) will result in a loss of one half time employee (0.5 FTE) which may impact service delivery, such as timely collections of accounts receivable balances, longer call wait times, and cause delays to system upgrades, and responses to customer requests. New Offer Included in this offer is a new Utility Billing System that addresses the incorporation of technology with a focus toward providing online access to services and creatively engaging the community through a variety of avenues to provide information. The current Utility Billing System has been in place since 1998 and does not provide the customer driven requirement for online services and GIS interface. In order to fulfill this requirement and meet the community desires for online services, a major upgrade or a conversion to a new system is required. The majority of customer requests have been for an online service where they can pay their utility bills and receive their billing statements. The online service will provide enhanced 24/7 service with real time access to utility accounts, more efficient payment options, reduce mailing expenses (postage, printing/mailing services), increase employee productivity and improve customer service. Additionally, the GIS interface will eliminate duplicate data entry, saving staff time and provide more accurate reporting capabilities. The projected timeline for the new software replacement is early 2013. Currently, the estimated software replacement cost is $600,000, to be funded by Utilities (Water/Sewer/Stormwater Funds), which does not include any anticipated hardware replacement costs. Scalability Recommended: No change to program.

197


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

UTILITY BILLING Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$375,289 $127,000 $0

$384,724 $130,500 $0

$760,013 $257,500 $0

$600,000 $1,102,289 4.000

$0 $515,224 4.000

$600,000 $1,617,513

198

Id: FIN2413


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2514

BUDGETING & FORECASTING SERVICES Description: What: Encouraging fiscal stewardship, promoting financial accountability, and ensuring fiscal compliance with state and federal laws is a part of the role of the Financial Planning vision. On behalf of the community and City departments, Financial Planning leads the biennial Budgeting by Priorities (BP) process and development of the six-year Capital Investment Program (CIP). The Division also provides fiscal review and monitoring of the City's economic climate by preparing the City's six-year financial forecast, reviewing revenue conditions, tracking revenue impacts from governmental legislation, promoting and protecting Redmond's interest on a regional level, as well as regularly updating and identifying appropriate fees and charges for service. Financial Planning acts as fiscal consultants to the various City departments. Analysts are called on to lead studies, participate on regional committees, and troubleshoot Citywide issues and challenges. Why: Financial Planning services speak to leadership and fiscal responsibility in the Responsible Government priority by providing elected officials, the Mayor, Department Directors and City staff with tools and information to make timely and informed decisions. Through assessments and analysis, Financial Planning focuses on emerging trends, performance indicators and financial policy issues to recommend course corrections, if warranted, and monitor the overall fiscal health of the City. Financial Planning also serves on regional committees to promote and facilitate regional interests while protecting Redmond's interests. How: Through budgeting, long-range forecasting, policy analysis, model development and systematic assessment of operating plans, Financial Planning analyzes how to meet the needs of a vibrant community. Examples of Financial Planning's work include playing a lead role in the City's Budgeting By Priorities process, collaborating with the Executive Office and the Fire Department to develop a Fire Cost Management Plan, and assessing the City's fleet to determine the adequacy of vehicle replacement reserves. Who: Financial Planning serves a wide array of customers, including: · The Redmond Community by answering tax and fee questions, research assistance and providing timely information; · The Mayor and Council through providing analysis and information for decision-making purposes, as well as Citywide economic updates and recommendations on potential actions; · The Department Directors by advising on the financial impact of operating plans, participating in cross-departmental projects, such as the Development User Fee and Fleet studies and helping with budget issues and challenges; · Redmond's regional and local partners by imparting information, representing Redmond's perspective and providing policy analysis and expertise on financial matters; and · City staff by troubleshooting budget issues, monitoring and tracking revenues and expenditures, as well as providing financial expertise on policy and programmatic challenges.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Rating of survey respondents' satisfaction with timeliness and quality of Financial Planning services as measured by an internal survey. Internal customer satisfaction with overall budget information resources as measured by an internal survey.

199


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2514

BUDGETING & FORECASTING SERVICES Measure Satisfaction with Timeliness and Quality Customer Satisfaction with Overall Budget Information

Target 80.00 80.00

2010 Act 72.00 75.00

2011 Act 77.00 81.00

2012 Goal Measurement 80.00 Percent 85.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The offer for Budgeting and Forecasting Services can be scaled down by reducing one staff position to part-time status (an approximate 10% or $105,000 biennial reduction). With a reduction of this magnitude Financial Planning would scale back on projects to not jeopardize the accuracy of information requested from the Office. Instead of providing support to regional committees and financial policy analysis, Financial Planning would turn its attention to just tracking and monitoring budget information, evaluating performance measures, and preparing the budget. With less staff during budget years, the Division would also have to start the budget process approximately two months earlier in order to deliver the document to the Council the first of October, as it will take the remaining staff more time to coordinate and analyze budget information and check the numbers for accuracy. The timelines and quality of budget information is estimated to decline from 77% to approximately 65% and the satisfaction with overall budget information could suffer by as much as 20% (currently satisfaction is at 81%). Redmond would also lose its place on some regional committees, such as Medic One Advanced Life Support where Redmond has a strong voice in how the region's Emergency Medical Services Levy is structured, the North East King County Regional Public Safety Communication Agency (NORCOM) Finance Committee for Fire Dispatch as well as a lessening of support for City customers, such as Fire District 34. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$534,149

$550,358

$1,084,507

$43,437 $0 $0 $577,586 4.300

$43,579 $0 $0 $593,937 4.300

$87,016 $0 $0 $1,171,523

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2487

CITY COUNCIL Description: What: The purpose of this offer is to fund the salaries and expenses associated with Redmond's City Council. Redmond has a strong Mayor/Council form of government. The seven Councilmembers, representing the community at large, are each elected directly by the people for staggered four-year terms. In response to the effective leadership and empowerment factor, the City Council provides leadership that is responsive to the needs of the community in a fiscally sound manner. Through their work, the City Council supports the City's vision by adopting comprehensive policies that ensure fiscal responsibility, such as establishment of an economic contingency as a hedge against inflationary pressures, as well as reserves to meet the City's needs in case of a wide ranging disaster. In addition, their leadership is reflected in their community communications by engaging the community in various forums to identify issues, craft solutions and create a transparent and problem-solving environment for City staff and stakeholders. Why: The City Council plays an overarching role in City government by representing the legislative branch of the City of Redmond. As in any government, they provide the checks and balances necessary to foster responsible and responsive government services. In their role as the "board of directors" they are called on to engage the community on a variety of issues to support the welfare of the City and in some cases surrounding jurisdictions and the region. They do these things to provide quality services, encourage collaboration and partnerships, reinforce transparency with their constituents, and encourage citizen involvement in their government. How: Through formal meetings, the Council hears requests from staff, individual citizens and citizen groups on a myriad of issues. They then must make decisions that best respond to the community's needs and support the City's vision. The Council demonstrates effective leadership by engaging in city and region-wide alliances to establish community connections. They demonstrate fiscal responsibility by making prudent financial decisions, creating a comprehensive financial strategy that guides city services into the future and continually examining the City's condition through their Dashboard metrics, investment strategies and policy decisions. Councilmembers are informed on citywide and regional issues through staff reports, committee meetings, trainings, and discussions with the community and other regional leaders. Finally, creating a legislative agenda every year speaks to the factor of establishing intra-city and regional partnerships and collaboration by reaching out to state legislators on issues and challenges significant to Redmond and the region. Who: The City Council offer provides the Council with the means to perform their duties to the benefit of all citizens and businesses located in the city limits of Redmond and the greater Redmond area. Some examples of the customers the City Council serves include: 路 Citizens through education, outreach and community engagement initiatives; 路 Regional partners through issue identification, problem-solving and decision-making; and 路 City staff through supporting new initiatives, fiscal transparency and maintaining the quality of Redmond's workforce.

Performance Measures: 1.

Committees working effectively: a. Agendas are published three days in advance of committee meetings; b. A goal of 70% of committee meetings attended by all committee members; and c. Committee reports given at follow-up meeting 100% of the time.

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2487

CITY COUNCIL 2.

3.

Regional affairs: a. Redmond's official position shared/emphasized 90% of the time; and b. Council members achieve leadership roles in regional committees. Ombudsman: a. Email ombudsman issues acknowledged within two business days, 100% of the time; b. Council members copied on email exchange 100% of the time; c. During regular business meetings, report on ombudsman issues 100% of the time; and d. Each ombudsman issue is formally closed, with Council acknowledgement, within a time frame established relative to the issue.

Measure Agenda Publication Committee Reports Given Report on Ombudsman Issues

Target 91.00 100.00 100.00

2010 Act 100.00 100.00 100.00

2011 Act 100.00 100.00 100.00

2012 Goal 100.00 100.00 100.00

Measurement Percent Percent Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% reduction of the total budget request ($385,852) would equal $19,293. To achieve this reduction, the travel and tuition budgets would be reduced resulting in only one Council member being able to attend one National League of Cities (NLC) conference each year. Professional services (facilitators for retreats) would be cut back, and further reductions would be made in the miscellaneous account line item, which could affect annual Boards and Commissions dinner and/or the annual meeting with State legislators. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$125,004 $53,690 $0

$127,368 $54,790 $0

$252,372 $108,480 $0

$0 $178,694 7.000

$0 $182,158 7.000

$0 $360,852

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2522

EMPLOYEE RECRUITMENT & SELECTION PROGRAM Description: What: The Recruitment and Selection offer provides the City's managers with in-house support and expertise from Human Resources staff to recruit and select highly skilled employees that will serve the citizens and customers of Redmond. Human Resources provides services in the recruitment and selection of all levels and types of positions within Redmond City Government, including seasonal, supplemental, regular, Civil Service (which covers Police and Fire employees) and executive level. In addition, Human Resources develop promotional processes for regular and Civil Service positions.* Human Resources staff provides the expertise needed to guide supervisors and managers through the hiring process by developing and implementing advertising and marketing strategies; overseeing the implementation of screening tools; providing guidance regarding best practices, policies and employment laws; and maintaining the City's employment webpage and online application system. Why: The full scope of the services included in this offer enables the City to recruit and select well-qualified applicants; ensure diversity within the workforce; maintain compliance with multi-faceted legal and policy requirements; save money by eliminating the use of outside recruitment and test development firms; and place emphasis on selecting candidates with the traits, characteristics and leadership skills that will model and reinforce the culture that Redmond is striving to cultivate. How: Human Resources provides customer service by identifying and understanding the needs of hiring managers and providing guidance in the identification and application of outreach and selection strategies to produce high-quality employment candidates. Human Resources staff works collaboratively with the hiring managers to develop recruitment and selection processes, and create application screening criteria, interview questions, and testing and assessment tools. Human Resources staff also provide oversight and guidance in the implementation of all work products to ensure appropriate screenings have been completed and applicable City rules, policies and employment laws regarding recruitment and selection are consistently applied. All work products are created specific to the position, resulting in a high-quality process tailored to Redmond's particular needs. This customized and collaborative in-house recruiting program enables the development of highly effective recruitment processes and selection tools, which results in a high-quality candidate. A quality, highly skilled employee is more likely to be successful in his/her new position, which achieves cost savings to the City by reducing the need to repeat the recruiting process when a candidate is unsuccessful. Also, the centralization of recruitment and selection activities ensures the most efficient use of the City's human and fiscal resources by effectively utilizing the "experts" in the field, while streamlining the hiring process. Over the current biennium, the Human Resources Department has been growing the in-house recruitment program to include recruitment and selection of the City's executive level positions, in addition to developing and administering the elements of promotional processes related to Civil Service positions for the City's Police and Fire Departments. Previously, these processes were handled either all or in part by consultants that would charge the City from $10,000 $20,000 or more for each process. Now, recruitment and selection and promotional processes for these types of positions are done exclusively in-house which has, and will continue to, save the City a significant amount of money. Also over the current biennium, the Human Resources Department sponsored an "Onboarding" process improvement team. "Onboarding" is defined as the orientation of a new employee. The process begins before a position is advertised and includes activities through the new employee's first year of employment. This cross-departmental team was tasked 203


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2522

EMPLOYEE RECRUITMENT & SELECTION PROGRAM with evaluating the City's current onboarding practices, in addition to making suggestions for improvement. As a result of the "Onboarding" process improvement team, Human Resources is currently working to develop a better way to incorporate the pillars of Redmond's culture into our recruitment program by clearly communicating Redmond's culture and vision to potential candidates and modifying selection practices to ensure that they not only focus on technical qualifications, but also place emphasis on selecting candidates with the traits, characteristics and leadership skills that will model and reinforce the culture that Redmond is striving to cultivate. To further enhance the level of customer service provided to our hiring managers, the process improvement team recommended developing an online portal that will be an information resource to managers and assist them through the recruitment, selection and onboarding processes. Human Resources staff is currently working on the development of this portal. Another project completed during the current biennium is the implementation of a new online application and applicant tracking system. The system was designed with emphasis on the needs of the applicant in mind. It allows the applicant to create a personalized account to manage their job search by tracking their application status, and simplifying the application process. From this system they can also search for jobs in Redmond city government and neighboring jurisdictions. The City uses the system as an outreach tool for posting all of active recruitments, and to more efficiently manage the applicant pools. For the upcoming biennium, Human Resources staff is participating on a joint committee consisting of representatives from Redmond's neighboring cities, to further enhance this applicant tracking system and make it even more user-friendly to applicants, hiring managers, and human resources staff (the daily users). Who: This Recruitment and Selection offer provides the City's managers with in-house support and expertise from Human Resources staff to recruit and select highly skilled employees that will serve the citizens and customers of Redmond. *City employees in the Police and Fire Departments are required by law to be covered by a Civil Service system. Civil Service activities are mandated by State law (Revised Code of Washington 41.08 and 41.12), Redmond Municipal Code, and Civil Service Rules, and are governed by a Civil Service Commission which is supported by Human Resources staff. Selection processes for other positions must comply with bargaining unit agreements for filling vacancies, Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) requirements (per Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964), City policy and public expectation of an "open and competitive" hiring process.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

High percentage (90% or greater) of managers and supervisors indicating satisfaction with the hiring process. (Recruiting for many open positions in 2010 was on hold due to pending budget/layoff issues.) High percentage (85% or greater) of new employees that successfully complete their probationary period.

Measure Hiring Process Satisfaction Successful Probationary Period Completion

Target 90.00 85.00

2010 Act 66.60 95.00

2011 Act 81.00 95.00

2012 Goal Measurement 90.00 Percent 85.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Human Resources Department has four offers funded through the General Fund. The scalability goal of a 5% reduction is being achieved through the aggregate of all four of these offers. These offers are the Labor Relations, Compensation, and Policy Administration offer (HUM2520), the Benefits Program Development

204


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2522

EMPLOYEE RECRUITMENT & SELECTION PROGRAM and Administration offer (HUM0521), the Employee Recruitment and Selection Program offer (HUM2522), and the Training and Organizational Development offer (HUM2524). The majority of the savings are being achieved through reductions in the Executive Office's Civil Legal Services budget. In coordination with the Executive Office, Human Resources propose reducing the Labor Negotiations budget by $164,320. A total of $114,320 of this amount is a proposed scalability reduction and the remaining $50,000 has been added to the Personnel Matters/Grievance line item. Human Resources staff has acted as lead staff in many negotiations with the City's uniformed and non-uniformed bargaining units and has the expertise to continue this role in all upcoming negotiations. The remaining $28,634 is saved through reductions in Professional Services. If this reduction is taken, the impact to service levels would be the potential risk of insufficient funds to support the City going forward with issues to an interest arbitration hearing. Both the Police and Fire union contracts expire at the end of 2012 and are open for negotiations. Both have access to interest arbitration where issues are presented to an arbiter and the arbiter's decision is binding on all parties. This additional right has been granted to these groups by the State Legislature. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$346,312

$357,002

$703,314

$6,664 $0 $0 $352,976 3.390

$6,665 $0 $0 $363,667 3.390

$13,329 $0 $0 $716,643

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2532

INFORMATION SERVICES Description: What: Just as the budget priority "Responsible Government" is the foundation for successful outcomes in other budget priorities, the City's leading edge technology is the foundation for the successful delivery of high quality and responsive customer service to the City's customers. Information Services (IS) provides a variety of services that ensure the reliability and availability of the City's technology, for example, servers, desktops, laptops, telephones, enterprise software (such as the Class recreation system, Human Resources/Payroll), Microsoft Office suite (Word, Outlook, PowerPoint), the City's website, traffic cameras, etc. Those services include, but are not limited to the following: maintain, upgrade, enhance and replace existing computing and communication systems; partners with City staff to define requirements for new systems and identifies technology options to address those needs; plans and manages projects to implement technology and/or business process changes; provides day-to-day support for computer hardware, software and telecommunications technologies; develops standard and ad hoc reports and assists with data analysis; represents City departments and Information Services in regional partnerships; implements and enforces security consistent with external mandates to protect systems and intellectual property; in partnership with the IS Governance team, sets the strategic direction of the City's technology. Why: Ensuring the City's technology is well maintained and improved as technology advances supports and maintains a strong foundation for the successful delivery of customer service throughout the City. The City's customers expect to be able to do business with the City just like they do with private companies (i.e. in person, over the phone and/or via the web). The City's technology tools enable City staff to deliver a high quality, positive customer service experience by ensuring convenient service delivery whether they are conducting business in person, over the phone or in the field. As more and more services are provided via the web, City staff has more time to spend with those customers who truly need or prefer personal interaction. City customers also have the option of self-service via the City's website allowing them to conduct business with the City at their convenience. The City's website and social media presence provides access to current information and fosters connections throughout the community. How: IS partners with City staff at all levels of the organization within and across departments to gain an understanding of the business needs in order to provide the best technology and/or services that will help facilitate the delivery of high quality, reliable and responsive customer service. IS also participates in regional partnerships when those collaborations provide benefit to the City of Redmond. As a result, the City enjoys a wide range of leading edge, effective and efficient technology. IS ensures they remain at the leading edge by migrating them forward as technology evolves and new features are added that improve functionality. IS requires that vendors of any new systems under consideration are committed to keeping their products on the leading edge. In addition, Information Services demonstrates fiscal responsibility by selecting and implementing systems that offer a high return on investment and bring business value to the City. IS leverages volume purchasing agreements and standardizes hardware and software to keep support costs low. IS participation in regional projects has resulted in favorable pricing agreements with vendors and has identified regional and/or hosted applications that have been cost-effective solutions for City staff and have provided improvements in delivering customer service. IS ensures that all technology systems are covered by maintenance contracts ensuring minimal service disruptions and that technology resources can be kept current. 206


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2532

INFORMATION SERVICES Who: The primary and direct customers of Information Services are City staff through technology support, planning and implementation of City business related technology solutions. Information Services also provides the communications infrastructure to North East King County Public Safety Communication Agency (NORCOM) for their system backups and to Kirkland to allow them a redundant communication path to Bellevue's data center.

Performance Measures: 1. 2. 3.

Information Services receives a high rating of customer satisfaction for the overall services provided by the Division. Target: 80% "satisfied" or "very satisfied" Information Services strives to limit unplanned downtime of all City technology resources to no more than one (1) hour in any given month. Target: One (1) hour or less Information meets or exceeds its service level agreements 83% of the time. (New measure - Service levels will be developed by the end of 2013)

Measure Customer Satisfaction for Overall Services Unplanned Downtime of All City Technology Meets or Exceeds Service Level Agreements

Target 80.00 1.00

2010 Act 63.00 10.25

2011 Act 68.00 22.00

83.00

0.00

0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 80.00 Percent 1.00 Hours 83.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% or $361,809 reduction would reduce funds available for small tools, fixed assets, professional services, training and associated travel. This would limit the ability of Information Services to keep the City's technology tools and infrastructure at the leading edge. Information Services uses the small tools budget to buy and test tools City staff are interested in using or in anticipation of a business need. Information Services relies heavily on consulting services to assist with implementing new technology when it doesn't make sense to develop those skills internally and to backfill resources needed for project work. Reduction of professional services dollars would require internal staff to spend more time going through steep learning curves which will significantly extend the time it takes for implementation. A reduction in training funds would make it difficult to obtain the skills needed to implement and support new technology and bridge the skills gap created from the reduction of professional services funding. Information Services staff would not be able to keep pace with the rapid changes in technology, and as a result, the City technology systems would begin to fall behind. Initially, the only performance measure to be impacted would be customer satisfaction ratings (which would decline). Within a year to 18 months, system downtime would trend up (a negative direction) and Information Services would not meet service level agreement targets. A 4% increase or $297,000 would fund the research for a Contract Management System ($50,000 one-time), outsourcing the support for all services related to the City's telephone system ($35,000 per year), supplemental support during project implementations ($25,000 per year), outsourcing of System Center support ($10,000 per year) and backup tape purchases and storage for litigation holds ($56,000 in 2013; $61,000 in 2014). Each of the identified items can be funded individually. Contract Management System research would need to be funded 100% or it would not move forward. Outsourcing support of the City's telephone system will provide City employees with more efficient, thorough, and

207


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2532

INFORMATION SERVICES timely responses to request for changes to telephone services. Supplemental support during project implementation would allow Service Desk staff to quickly and efficiently implement new projects rather than attend to usual day-to-day operations. IS now uses System Center to automate some of its services. IS has relied on external support to assist with aspects of System Center that are infrequent yet key to keeping it current. It is expertise that is difficult to develop in-house due to infrequency of the work. The costs for the purchase of backup tapes and storage for litigation holds has come from a number of sources in the past, but was never included in any particular budget. The City's attorneys have asked that backup tapes be put on litigation hold so they cannot be reused. The number is growing rapidly as is the storage cost. Scalability Recommended: Reduced 1.0 FTE Applications Support Analyst ($139,778) in 2014 due to efficiencies gained through the implementation of new technology. Reduced various line items ($542,600) through right sizing the budget including professional services, outside repairs and maintenance, small tools and supplies.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$2,116,888

$2,036,533

$4,153,421

$1,300,379 $0 $0 $3,417,267 16.430

$1,372,932 $0 $0 $3,409,465 15.430

$2,673,311 $0 $0 $6,826,732

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2524

TRAINING & ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Description: What: The training and organizational development offer ensures resources are available for Human Resources (HR) staff to develop, implement, and maintain strategic, citywide employee development programs that support the vision and culture of the City and serve the citizens and customers of Redmond. The program addresses a variety of training and development needs, such as customer service, leadership, process improvement, communication, diversity, supervision, harassment prevention, and others. In addition, staff develops and coordinates Citywide strategies to enhance the City's Customer Service Initiative. The program also provides access to the Eastside Cities Training Consortium (ECTC) for courses offered through Bellevue College, as well as the City's Tuition Reimbursement Program. Why: The Training and Organizational Development Program enables the City to provide employees with the knowledge, skills and abilities to create a progressive and dynamic culture and to achieve the City's vision and goals. This program is a key component of the City's efforts to recruit and retain talented employees. In addition, the program enables employees to provide a high level of customer service while efficiently and competently performing their jobs. Providing excellent customer service is the foundation of the City's culture and vision and sets an expectation for how employees interact and communicate with the community. The Training and Organizational Development program also provides education to employees on topics (i.e. Harassment Prevention, Diversity, and Supervisory Skills) which help reduce the City's liability and thus, supports the City's overall fiscal health. How: HR staff conducts needs assessments, evaluate and select training providers, develop and deliver specialized training using skilled in-house staff, and act as resources to managers and employees in recommending and implementing individual employee development plans. Additionally, staff members oversee the scheduling and delivery of training, and maintain tracking and notification systems. Recently, the City implemented a new HR Information System. In the upcoming biennium, HR staff plans to utilize the training module of this system to increase efficiency of these tasks, and work with Departments to develop and maintain a centralized tracking system, enabling the maintenance and monitoring of individual development plans for all employees. The HR Department recently sponsored an "Onboarding" Process Improvement team. "Onboarding" is defined as the orientation of a new employee, and begins before a position is advertised and includes activities through the new employee's first year of employment. This cross-departmental team was tasked with evaluating the City's current onboarding practices, and making suggestions for improvement. One major recommendation from this team was to have the City further define its organizational culture, and communicate this culture to new and existing employees. With leadership from the Mayor and the Directors' Team, and input from the City's Senior Management group, HR maintains and helps communicate a diagram defining Redmond's organizational culture. To assist in communicating this culture throughout the organization, each senior manager was asked to take the diagram back to his/her respective work groups to discuss how daily tasks help to support this culture. More work with regards to integrating this culture throughout the organization will need to be done in order to continue the cultural shift. In support of this endeavor, the HR Department is planning to enhance the new employee orientation program to explain the vision, values and culture of Redmond. HR also recently developed draft training standards for employees and managers and reviewed them with the Mayor and Directors' Team. These standards clearly define training expectations for new and current employees as well as include core training elements that are designed to reinforce the cultural shift to support employees in accomplishing the City's vision. These standards also reinforce the importance of continued development. One-time money will be needed to ensure that a comprehensive, sustainable program can be put into place that ensures all existing employees are provided the opportunity to achieve these 209


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2524

TRAINING & ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM standards. A key organizational development program results from the City's Customer Service Initiative. In 2008, the Mayor identified six major initiatives for the City: Developing Two Urban Centers, Permit Processing and Zoning Code Revisions, Performance Management, Information Technology, Innovation and Efficiency, and Customer Service. The HR Department was selected to lead the Customer Service Initiative. One of the first objectives was to identify the model of customer service that would be right for the City. With direction from the Mayor, a "Process Improvement" model was selected, where the primary focus is on continual process improvement to ensure City programs and systems are productive, efficient and most importantly, customer service oriented. This customer service model also supports the City's Innovation and Efficiency Initiative. Since September of 2009, the City has provided intensive Process Improvement Facilitator training to over 50 employees across all City departments. Trained personnel are now working as facilitators on eight formally sponsored, cross-departmental Process Improvement Projects focused on a variety of City functions. Employees from all departments have dedicated many hours to these projects. For the upcoming biennium, HR is planning to offer additional training sessions, with a focus on developing a train the trainer program in order to reduce costs. HR staff will work with the Directors' Team to establish a new round of formal projects, in addition to developing a program to recognize and encourage more informal projects throughout the City. This is a critical part of the City-wide effort to continually enhance the delivery of City services, and will help ensure continual process improvement becomes part of the Redmond culture. In the upcoming biennium, HR and Information Services will partner to provide technology training opportunities to City staff. This training will provide employees with the skills to better leverage the technological tools available to them. Training will be offered in a variety of formats including formal classrooms onsite and offsite, computer-based training, virtual classrooms and expert training for those wanting to take their skills to a higher level. Keeping City employees' technology skills at the leading edge will allow for more innovative use of technology in order to continue to improve delivery of services to City customers. Who: This program serves the Citizens, Council, Mayor and employees of Redmond by providing employees with the knowledge, and skills to create a progressive and dynamic culture, achieve the City's vision and goals, provide excellent service to Citizens, and ensure City programs and systems are productive, efficient and customer service oriented.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Ninety percent (90%) or more of employees that rate the training and development programs they participate in as relevant to their current or future performance goals. Seventy-five percent (75%) or more employees have had access during the year to one or more in-house trainings that are relevant to their current or future performance goals. (No data for 2010.)

Measure Training Relevance Training Access Relevant to Performance Goals

Target 90.00 75.00

2010 Act 99.64 0.00

2011 Act 98.90 100.00

2012 Goal Measurement 95.00 Percent 100.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Human Resources Department has four offers funded through the General Fund. The

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2524

TRAINING & ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM scalability goal of a 5% reduction is being achieved through the aggregate of all four of these offers. These offers are Labor Relations, Compensation and Police Administration (HUM2520), Benefits Program Development and Administration (HUM2521), Employee Selection and Recruitment (HUM2522), and Training and Organizational Development (HUM2524). The majority of the savings are being achieved through reductions in the Executive Office's Civil Legal Services budget. In coordination with the Executive Office, Human Resources propose reducing the Labor Negotiations budget by $164,320. A total of $114,320 of this amount is a proposed scalability reduction and the remaining $50,000 has been added to the Personnel Matters/Grievance line item. Human Resources staff has acted as lead staff in many negotiations with the City's uniformed and non-uniformed bargaining units and has the expertise to continue this role in all upcoming negotiations. The remaining $28,634 is saved through reductions in Professional Services. The impact to service levels, if this reduction is taken, would be the potential risk of insufficient funds to support the City going forward with issues to an interest arbitration hearing. Both the Police and Fire union contracts expire at the end of 2012 and are open for negotiations. Both have access to interest arbitration where issues are presented to an arbiter and the arbiter's decision is binding on all parties. This additional right has been granted to these groups by the State Legislature. If scalability is implemented to increase the existing budget by 5%, the HR Department will expand the current training program to ensure that training elements of the City training standards are available to all employees, thereby enabling employees to meet the standard. This expansion would be ongoing as opposed to the one-time only money that is included in the Training and Organizational Development proposal. This will ensure the immediate availability of resources as opposed to the current one-time funding proposal which will require long-term identification of internal resources and the development of those resources to sustain a training program. Training elements included in this expansion would be those that are designed to reinforce the desired cultural shift and those that support employees in accomplishing City vision. Scalability Recommended: Reduced professional services ($28,600) through right sizing of line item.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$83,807

$89,456

$173,263

$127,546 $0 $40,000 $251,353 0.600

$127,546 $0 $40,000 $257,002 0.600

$255,092 $0 $80,000 $508,355

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BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2540

ACCOUNTING & AUDITING Description: What: Accounting and Auditing manages the City's financial systems including integration of the auxiliary systems (i.e. Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable, Tyler Cash Receipting, Payroll, Business License Database). This includes managing the chart of accounts to ensure proper coding to meet Washington State requirements and ensure accurate financial data is available in a timely manner for City leaders to use in managing the City operations. These tasks culminate in the preparation of the annual financial report which is required to be submitted to the state each year along with many schedules detailing non-financial data. The City chooses to prepare a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) which incorporates the annual financial report along with statistical data. The CAFR is a "best practice" that has led to the strong City's bond rating and serves as continuing disclosure required by the City's various bond covenants. Why: The process performed by Accounting and Auditing from collection of financial information through the CAFR preparation speaks to effective leadership and empowerment and fiscal responsibility in the Responsible Government priority by providing accurate dependable financial data for regular presentation to City leaders, elected officials and the community. Through these timely presentations everyone can have confidence in using this data for both short-term needs, as well as allowing for long range projections so adjustments can be made to minimize downturns and capitalize on upswings. Accounting and Auditing also speaks to the community connection and communication in the Responsible Government priority through the transparency these presentations provide, as well as providing a measurement of the current financial health of the City. The City's bond rating, as detailed in the Responsible Government priority, is impacted directly by the work of Accounting and Auditing. Passing the annual audit of the CAFR performed by the State Auditor's Office is critical as this audited document is submitted to the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB) as part of the continuing disclosure requirements for the City's outstanding general obligation and revenue bonds, as well as other special assessment debt. If the continuing disclosure requirements are not met with an audited strong financial document it could have a negative impact on the City's bond rating. How: By constantly staying current in accounting regulations and reporting requirements, Accounting and Auditing leads efforts to keep the City running efficiently as it develops and supports key business management systems, both technology and process related. This work is made tangible in the creation of the CAFR which meets several requirements for the City as a whole, as well as regional organizations. The CAFR meets the State requirement of submission of financial data each year for statistical purposes and comparisons with other entities statewide. The audited CAFR is also submitted to Cascade Water Alliance, a non-profit corporation comprised of three water and sewer and five cities of which Redmond is one, which speaks to regional collaboration in the Responsible Government priority. Who: The Accounting and Auditing Division serves a wide variety of customers. We serve internal City staff through the management of the financial system which allows for accurate expenditure tracking. We serve the citizens of Redmond through providing timely financial information to management to identify potential issues early enough to take action. Lastly, we serve the bondholders by providing details of the City's financial position which assures them that the debt will be satisfied.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

Timeliness and accuracy in the monthly close process, so information can be available to customers by the tenth working day of each month. In 2011, this goal was not met due to the implementation of Dynamics AX 2012 (new Financial System). Accuracy of the Financial Statements which are free from material misstatements as interpreted by the State 212


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2540

ACCOUNTING & AUDITING 3.

Auditor's Office each year. High quality presentation of the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report as measured by receipt of the Award of Excellence in Financial Reporting from a peer review process through the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada.

Measure Timeliness in Monthly Close Process Audit Findings by State Auditor's Office Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Award

Target 10.00 0.00 1.00

2010 Act 10.00 0.00 1.00

2011 Act 6.00 0.00 1.00

2012 Goal 10.00 0.00 0.00

Measurement Number Number Number

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: With previous reductions in payroll staff and the increased workload due to restructuring of the employee claim for expenses it would be detrimental to the City to include scalability to that offer as it is primarily salaries and unscalable costs. Therefore scalability for both the Payroll (FIN2486) and Accounting Services (FIN2540) offers will be included in this offer. Staff costs represent 80% of the proposed budget and nonscalable costs represent 16% ($200,000 for Citywide unemployment costs and $140,000 for the state mandated audit). With 96% of the proposed budget for the Division consisting of salaries and unscalable costs, any scalability must be in staff reduction. A reduction of an Accountant position would reduce the budget by $127,181 over the biennium exceeding the requested 5% reduction or $106,418. This reduction will be especially hard felt during the annual financial statement preparation so if scalability is recommended the difference between the requested reduction and the actual ($20,763) would need to be added back to the offer to pay for a supplemental position during the first part of the year. Scalability Recommended: Reduced 1.0 Senior Accountant ($223,558) through efficiencies gained from new technology.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

$464,285 $87,586 $0 $0 $551,871

$479,685 $87,592 $0 $0 $567,277

5.300

5.300

Total $943,970 $175,178 $0 $0 $1,119,148

213


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2520

LABOR RELATIONS, COMPENSATION & POLICY ADMIN Description: What: Central to the priority of Responsible Government is retaining quality and engaged employees, practicing fiscal responsibility, and improving customer service and communication throughout the City. Just as the priority of Responsible Government helps to form and reinforce the foundation and successful outcomes of other budget priorities, the Human Resources (HR) Department provides the foundation on which other Departments within the City can continue to grow and reinforce a positive and responsive relationship with the community. Labor Relations, Compensation and Policy Administration are three areas within the HR Department that provide essential support and structure to the City, and it is through the close coordination of these three areas that the City of Redmond is able to promote a culture of innovation, reliable and responsive customer service, and community collaboration. The labor relations program (including employee relations) develops, implements, and oversees the City's relations with its non-represented employees and six represented employee groups. Program staff (labor and compensation) researches and develops economic and non-economic bargaining proposals; manages and negotiates the City's labor agreements; oversees contract administration; facilitates resolution of employee conflicts; and ensures Citywide compliance with state and federal labor and employment laws. Paramount to the development, facilitation and administration of these responsibilities is the staff's ability to foster positive communications between employees and management throughout the City. Staff acts as resources to both managers and employees in identifying workplace issues and problems, investigating concerns, and promoting adherence to the organization's cultural values. The compensation and classification program ensures the effective management of General Fund dollars that are allocated to employee compensation, with aims to enhance, cultivate and maintain the quality of Redmond's workforce. Ongoing job analysis and research, and updating the City's compensation and classification plans and policies are a vital part of this process. Further innovations of the compensation program include employee recognition programs, work life balance through paid time off programs, as well as oversight and development of performance management programs. Human Resources policy administration ensures that the creation and implementation of personnel programs, policies and procedures support the vision, goals, and initiatives of the City through the promotion of effective leadership, innovative attitudes and cross departmental collaboration. In accordance with these principles, staff provides consultative services to managers in all areas of personnel administration. Why: The aforementioned programs provide the foundation to establish, cultivate, maintain, and enhance the quality and accountability of the Redmond workforce. These programs are essential in creating a connected workforce and providing a common ground for management and employees to set expectations that are in line with the organization's priorities and responsibilities. Providing an environment where policies promote the equitable treatment of employees throughout the organization creates a cohesive environment where employees can grow and thrive. This type of environment allows for creative thinking and innovative problem solving; thereby creating a stronger connection inside the organization and within the community. Additionally, the efficient use of City resources enables departments to adapt to the changing job market, as well as attract and retain talented and dedicated employees. In coordination with the labor relations program and policy administration, the compensation and classification program enables the Human Resources Department to support engaged and productive employees, high quality, reliable and responsive customer service and fiscally responsible, cost effective and competitive wages, benefits and working conditions that are in compliance with the City policies and federal, state and local laws. How: Goals are accomplished by a variety of measures that are intended to promote the vision for Redmond, while 214


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2520

LABOR RELATIONS, COMPENSATION & POLICY ADMIN maintaining fiscal responsibility and responsiveness throughout the community. The labor relations program uses communications and data from intra-city and regional collaborations, discussions with employee groups regarding labor issues, and research regarding labor and employment laws to obtain the information necessary to ensure that all economic and non-economic proposals are thoroughly researched, properly implemented and that they conform to all applicable laws and regulations. Additionally, the program provides leadership and guidance in reference to performance issues and complaints by conducting formal investigations and cross-departmental discussions and/or mediations when necessary. The compensation and classification program accomplishes its goals by performing ongoing job analysis, as well as comprehensive research and analytical review of market surveys and data obtained by intra-city collaboration and partnerships throughout the region. This proactive approach ensures that employee compensation is competitive and that costs are supported by sound labor market data. Connected with the methods used in labor relations and compensation, goals set by human resources policy administration are accomplished through a variety of programs and initiatives, such as development and oversight of the City's Customer Service Initiative, as well as the proactive creation and updating of more effective and efficient policies and procedures. It is important to note that over 80% of Redmond's employees are represented by labor unions. The City is legally obligated to bargain with its unions over changes to wages, hours, and working conditions (Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 41.56). If the City fails to reach agreement in contract negotiations, the City is required to submit unresolved issues to interest arbitration. Arbitration is a costly and time-consuming procedure. The City is further legally obligated to abide by any contracts reached with its unions (RCW 41.56). Beyond state labor laws, the City is obligated to comply with state and federal employment laws covering both employees represented by unions and those that are not represented. These laws are constantly changing, and as such, the City must monitor developments and revise its policies accordingly. Among the applicable laws are the Fair Labor Standards Act, Family Medical Leave Act, Americans with Disabilities Act, Age Discrimination in Employment Act, Washington Minimum Wage Act, Title 7 of the Civil Rights Act, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act - Privacy Regulations, Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PACA), Washington Family Care Act, U.S. Constitution, Washington Law Against Discrimination, Washington State Human Rights Commission Regulations, and various state and federal equivalents. Who: The customers for these programs are all City employees, managers, elected officials, and the citizens of Redmond. A primary component of this offer is ensuring responsible government through fiscal oversight of General Fund dollars allocated to compensation programs, while retaining quality employees who will deliver excellent customer service to the public.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

One-hundred percent (100%) of contracts settled consistent with applicable policies and relevant market data. Voluntary turnover rate of City employees that is lower than benchmarks as defined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and other publications. 2012 Target: TBD by 2012 Bureau of Labor Statistics and other publications.

Measure Labor Contracts Voluntary Turnover Rate

Target 100.00 16.20

2010 Act 100.00 1.57

2011 Act 100.00 2.40

2012 Goal Measurement 100.00 Percent 0.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Human Resources Department has four offers funded through the General Fund. The scalability goal of a 5% reduction is being achieved through the aggregate of all four of these offers. These offers are Labor Relations, Compensation and Police Administration (HUM2520), Benefits Program Development and

215


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2520

LABOR RELATIONS, COMPENSATION & POLICY ADMIN Administration (HUM2521), Employee Selection and Recruitment (HUM2522), and Training and Organizational Development (HUM2524). The majority of the savings are being achieved through reductions in the Executive Office's Civil Legal Services budget. In coordination with the Executive Office, Human Resources propose reducing the Labor Negotiations budget by $164,320. A total of $114,320 of this amount is a proposed scalability reduction and the remaining $50,000 has been added to the Personnel Matters/Grievance line item. Human Resources staff has acted as lead staff in many negotiations with the City's uniformed and non-uniformed bargaining units and has the expertise to continue this role in all upcoming negotiations. The remaining $28,634 is saved through reductions in Professional Services. The impact to service levels, if this reduction is taken, would be the potential risk of insufficient funds to support the City going forward with issues to an interest arbitration hearing. Both the Police and Fire union contracts expire at the end of 2012 and are open for negotiations. Both have access to interest arbitration where issues are presented to an arbiter and the arbiter's decision is binding on all parties. This additional right has been granted to these groups by the State Legislature. Scalability Recommended: No changes in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$414,241

$431,424

$845,665

$101,209 $0 $0 $515,450 3.860

$101,219 $0 $0 $532,643 3.860

$202,428 $0 $0 $1,048,093

216


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2503

HEARING EXAMINER SERVICES Description: What: The Hearing Examiner provides objective review of certain types of disputes and determinations by the City as provided for by the City Code and consistent with state law. The City Clerk's Office coordinates and is responsible for the Hearing Examiner services. The Hearing Examiner budget offer supports the contracted function of a Hearing Examiner and directly relates to quality service and community connections of the Results Team Request for Offers (RFO). Staff support for the Hearing Examiner is provided by staff from the City Clerk's Office. Why: An independent Hearing Examiner provides recourse and access to land use processes of the City as a third-party, neutral expert who makes rulings over quasi-judicial appellate recommendations and decisions of land use, code violations, business license violations, and false alarm matters in accordance with City code. The offer ensures that the City meets the legal mandates as established by Revised Code of Washington (RCW) Section 35A.63.170, Hearing Examiner System, and Redmond Zoning Code (RZC) Section 21.76, and RCW 4.28 which sets forth the authority and duties of the Hearing Examiner. How: The offer is related to quality service and community connections of the Results Team Request for Offers as it provides expeditious and formal due process administered through a third-party facilitator, who possesses the legal expertise to address matters that come before them. The City Clerk's Office clearly communicates to all participants the administrative procedures involved with the Hearing Examiner process and maintains the needed neutrality to make fair and equitable decisions over applications and appeals. Through management of the Hearing Examiner docket and direct interaction with all participants in the process, the City Clerk's Office schedules matters before the Hearing Examiner, provides all public notice legally required, assists the Hearing Examiner in the administration of the processes (pre-hearing, during the hearing, and post-hearing), and coordinates all information between the departments, Hearing Examiner, and parties to the appeal. The City Clerk's Office also manages all administrative aspects of the Office of the Hearing Examiner (professional services contract, mailings, recording, and supplies). Who: The budget offer serves residents of the community, persons with business interests, City staff, and Redmond's elected officials by: 路 Addressing quality service by improving and enhancing customer service. This is done by making sure the process is fair, equitable, neutral, and is understood by all participants. It is also accomplished by ensuring legal compliance with the process, timelines, and notices required; 路 Focuses on systems that reinforce credibility with the community. This is done by providing for consistent, clearly communicated, and equitable rulings and decisions based on city ordinances and regulations; and 路 Outreach, education, citizen and business involvement, and effectively engage the community. This is accomplished through the public hearing process which reaches out to all interested parties for their opinions and assistance in making permits/projects the best they can be in accordance with City standards.

Performance Measures: Performance measure data for the Hearing Examiner Offer has been combined with the Clerk's Office overall main budget offer. This data is captured through the City's internal survey. Attempts to collect data from an external survey yielded extremely poor response. Measuring data for external users of the process ranks very low in terms of our control.

217


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2503

HEARING EXAMINER SERVICES Measure Hearing Examiner Performance Measure Satisfaction with City Clerk Services

Target 80.00 80.00

2010 Act 88.00 88.00

2011 Act 89.00 89.00

2012 Goal Measurement 90.00 Percent 90.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The budget for the Hearing Examiner services is solely based on the annual contract amount ($25,000 per calendar year) for the actual Hearing Examiner and includes small office supplies. The contract amount of the Hearing Examiner is a set hourly rate. The hourly rate assigned to each matter before the Hearing Examiner is strictly dependent upon the complexity of the matter and is determined by the Hearing Examiner. Staff support (FTE) for this offer is found in the Clerk's Office budget offer, as staffing levels to support this function vary based on workload. A decrease to this budget could significantly impact the Hearing Examiner's ability to provide the necessary support to the City of Redmond when appeals and public hearings arise. The workload of the Hearing Examiner is a variable projection (the Hearing Examiner does not work without appellate work/applications of land use being forwarded to the Hearing Examiner). There are incidences within any given year where the workload is high and others where it is minimal. The budget can be scaled in part, or in full, leaving the quasi-judicial review of land use, administrative decisions, etc. to that of the City Council. The City Council has previously chosen the hearing examiner format for this administrative review due to the subject matter knowledge and expertise that is provided by contracting with a hearing examiner. The City Code currently provides for the hearing examiner format, and any revision to the budget that would decrease the use of a hearing examiner and increase the Council's function in this regard would require a code amendment. A 5% reduction or increase in this budget offer equals $2,578. There is no real way to estimate the level of expenses that will occur in this budget based on demand for services. A decrease could affect the level of hearing examiner services that the City, under contract, is able to provide. Performance measures in providing timely services/information could be affected if the City is unable to provide the level of service required to meet the demand. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

$0 $25,700 $0 $0 $25,700

$0 $25,875 $0 $0 $25,875

0.000

0.000

Total $0 $51,575 $0 $0 $51,575

218


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2502

CLERK'S OFFICE DIVISION - RECORDS & ELECTION Description: What: The City Clerk's Office leads the City in all aspects of legislative support (council/committee agenda and meeting management, legislative drafting and codification, legislative tracking, legislative history, website updates), records management and services, public disclosure requests, Volunteer Reception Desk Program, special projects, and elections. The City Clerk also prepares, administers, and supports the budgets for the Office of the Hearing Examiner and Public Defender/Screener. The City Clerk's Office is an active participant in the City's Customer Service Initiative and actively participates in the City's Innovation and Efficiency Initiative. This offer provides all of these services and speaks directly to those areas associated with the City's Vision, as well as focuses specifically on collaboration among all customers of the Clerk's Office. The services provided by this offer specifically address the Responsible Government Request for Offers through: · Community responding positively regarding satisfaction with City services · Effective Leadership and Empowerment · Fiscal Responsibility · Quality Service · Community Connections and Communication Why: A "City Clerk" is a required city function as identified numerous times in state statute as well as City code. The City Clerk is a key point of contact between the citizens and their City government. This offer enables the City to ensure that the public processes identified above in the "What" section of this budget offer are easily understood and are available to all customers at all times, and ensuring legal mandates are met and complete customer service solutions are provided. The ultimate goal of service delivery is establishing and maintaining credibility, public trust, and "top notch" customer service within Redmond's internal community (all staff and internal participants) and external community (every person or organization outside of internal city staff and customers). How: The City Clerk's Office supports the City: · Through improving and enhancing customer service by maintaining a customer service focus. This is accomplished by providing the best possible solutions and service to all customers at all times; maintaining strong, proactive relationships with our customers; providing timely response; and providing sound procedural recommendations; · Through communication; providing a direct communication link between the City's elected officials and the public they serve; and between the public and staff; · By providing direct support to members of the community and other customers regarding their inherent and legal right to access public records and information per the laws and regulations of the State of Washington; · By providing direct support to any City employee requiring the services of the Clerk's Office - the goal is to make their jobs easier; · By providing fiscally-managed elections support; · By providing a legally responsive records management program which meets federal, state, and local laws and regulations; · By providing strong team support, career enhancement, and career advancement as it relates to the staff of the Clerk's Office; and · By participating in process improvements that gain efficiencies in processes and cross-departmental team efforts with this same goal. Through communication, collaboration, and work flow processes, the City Clerk's Office facilitates the duties outlined 219


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2502

CLERK'S OFFICE DIVISION - RECORDS & ELECTION above by being a Citywide resource and providing one-on-one interaction with members of the public, members of Council, and all departmental staff. This is done with a neutral, Citywide perspective in order to meet the needs of all customers. The City Clerk's budget offer fosters effective leadership and empowerment, good stewardship of public resources, a professional staff, quality customer service, and community engagement. These goals are reached through the deployment of available human resource and available/emergent technology. Who: Customers served by this offer include: 路 All City staff by providing direct internal services; 路 The Mayor and City Council by facilitating the legislative process, meetings and records of the City; 路 Other elected officials and agencies by coordinating activities, schedules and issues between other governments on behalf of the City of Redmond; and 路 All visitors (both physical and virtual) and the general public seeking City services.

Performance Measures: Public participants, internal City employees, and elected officials respond with a four (4) out of five (5) or better rating in the delivery of services from the City Clerk's Office regarding: 1. The accessibility of information or the response of the status of the information (either immediately or within the timeline prescribed by law, but no more than five business days from receipt of request). 2. The open accessibility to meeting locations and current meeting information of the public body within the mandated statutory time prescribed by law (public notice). 3. Assistance received from the Clerk's Office in the daily operations of other departments. Results of the internal survey show a large majority of users (89%) of the City Clerk's services are satisfied or very satisfied with the overall services they receive. This is virtually the same as in the last reporting period when 88% were satisfied or very satisfied. Similar high satisfaction is reported in timeliness (89%) and support (89%). The 11% satisfaction unaccounted for in the benchmark results is generated specifically from non-responses to the survey questions. Measure Overall Satisfaction with City Clerk Services Satisfaction with Timeliness of Service Satisfaction with Quality of Support

Target 80.00 90.00 90.00

2010 Act 88.00 88.00 88.00

2011 Act 89.00 89.00 89.00

2012 Goal 90.00 90.00 90.00

Measurement Percent Percent Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Clerk's Office is solely service-oriented and is driven by human resource; the majority of the budget provides for salaries and benefits. The human resource provided through this budget offer serves to execute all functions outlined in the description section of this offer and in the separately submitted Hearing Examiner and Public Defender budget offers. Overall salaries and benefits for this offer for 2013-2014 combined equal $709,488. This includes a portion of the Finance Director position (0.18 %). Salaries and benefits encompass 69% of the overall biennial budget. The remainder of this budget offer (31%) goes to operational expenses such as office supplies, legal advertising, providing for election services and records services, and training/dues for professional certifications/organizations. This offer now also includes a prorated share of administrative overhead expenses for the Finance Department in the operational one-time others category. The offer has $44,000 dedicated to Non-Departmental Records Storage at Iron Mountain and is a service account to all departments. Additionally, $190,000 of this budget offer is dedicated to paying for elections of

220


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2502

CLERK'S OFFICE DIVISION - RECORDS & ELECTION City elected officials (approximately $68,000 per year in voter registration costs charged by King County and another approximate $26,700 for the annual cost of conducting an election itself through King County). A 5% reduction in budget would produce an approximate $51,600 decrease to this proposed biennial budget offer. Five percent (5%) scalability can be found in a reduction of non-departmental records storage, which would require the City to retrieve 3,500 records boxes from storage, to maintain these records onsite at a city facility, to manage all records for retention periods/purposes, and to manage the addition of any new records. The additional $7,600 could be scaled from operational accounts or from the elections budget. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$345,728

$357,300

$703,028

$155,486 $0 $0 $501,214 3.180

$159,691 $0 $0 $516,991 3.180

$315,177 $0 $0 $1,018,205

221


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2521

BENEFITS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT & ADMINISTRATION Description: What: The City manages and maintains an employee benefits program that provides progressive benefits and related services to the workforce as part of a comprehensive compensation strategy. The Benefits Program is inclusive of all health and wellness plans, as well as, all other benefit components. These components include, but are not limited to, the Municipal Employees' Benefit Trust (MEBT), the 457 Deferred Compensation Plan, life insurance, disability insurance, pension plans through the Department of Retirement Systems (DRS), flexible-spending accounts (FSA), Employee Assistance Program (EAP), and the Worker's Compensation Program (expanded upon under separate offer). The Human Resources Department ensures these programs are cost-effective, legally compliant, in line with market trends and effective employee recruitment and retention tools. The Benefits Program Development and Adminstration offer funds the management and administration of all of the benefit components, including the self-insured health plan, along with delivery of customer service to employees participating in City benefit programs. While self-insurance requires significantly more oversight and staff resource allocation than purchasing from an outside insurance provider, it affords the organization the opportunity to customize the plan while managing the associated costs. Furthermore, it allows for periodic program review and design changes which results in a greater level of customer service and response to demographic shifts within the organization. In addition, Human Resources, in collaboration with the Financial Planning Division, monitor the plan to make sure a self-insured health plan continues to be the most fiscally responsible option. Why: The aforementioned programs have a direct influence on the organization's overall effectiveness. The ability to recruit and retain high performing and knowledgeable employees is directly related to the value of the benefits program and standard of customer service. Administering an innovative, well-rounded program can increase job related performance, productivity and satisfaction and result in higher quality service. At the same time, ongoing analysis and updates for the overall benefits program can provide cost containment and additional cost savings to the organization. How: Ongoing management, development, evaluation, communication, customer service, and implementation of innovative program components are achieved through the following: · Design, review and administration of health, wellness and retirement programs; thereby optimizing the City's return on investment with fiscally prudent programs; · Manage program costs and implementation of cost containment strategies - understanding Citywide employee needs (changing demographics) and what may be the most appropriate measures to control cost based on the employee demographics; · Research and evaluate healthcare trends and legislation, and ensure program consistency with best practices and recruitment and retention strategies. Having a high caliber benefits program that stays true to healthcare trends and needs, the City is able to recruit and retain high quality, outstanding employees who in turn provide excellent customer service to their customers inside and outside City limits; · Ensure ongoing engagement of customers in committees and other venues; these are cross-departmental venues that result in an engaged workforce on multiple levels; on a personal (individual) level to change behavior and on a global level to impact the behavior of those around them to help create and support a healthy workforce, this in turn reduces absenteeism and increases productivity by providing the citizens of Redmond with the highest level of service possible; · Perform ongoing benefits orientations and program component education; this provides new employees, as well as existing employees, with an understanding of the benefit programs available to them and their families by creating a stable and secure workforce; · Provide employees with multiple avenues for customer service and communication (email, voicemail, walk-in, 222


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2521

BENEFITS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT & ADMINISTRATION

· ·

·

·

· · · · ·

intranet, etc.); providing the support necessary to each and every employee (and their families) by helping them through the process, educating them about their options and providing any additional support needed. This type of service contributes to lower stress levels, lower absenteeism rates and higher levels of productivity and work satisfaction. (Recently added an internet page for families to access from home.); Provide support to employees through the resolution of benefit related issues; Ensure legal compliance of healthcare plans with Federal, State and Local laws, such as the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) and the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), in addition to claims audits and state audit rules for self-funded medical plans (Revised Code of Washington); legal compliance (with no lawsuits for inappropriate denial or application of the laws) is critical in the development and maintenance of leadership expectations with citizens and employees of the City. It builds the trust and respect necessary for the employees of the City of Redmond to go about their business with citizens and business owners within the City; Manage the interplay of all the federal and state regulation with collective bargaining agreements and City policies; work with employees in every department in the City at all levels to ensure the smooth implementation of new laws, as well as effective communication and consistent application of policies and procedures; Manage and oversee healthcare broker services, actuarial services and a third party administrator (including sub-vendors, such as stop loss insurance provider, life insurance provider, Labor and Industries, etc.) and make sure the City is getting the appropriate service at the best price; Collaborate across departments to ensure compliance of the program; management of the benefit programs requires constant communication and interaction with each and every department on a daily basis; Oversee organizational boards and committees, such as the Law Enforcement Officers and Fire Fighters (LEOFF) I Disability Board and the Employee Benefits Advisory Committee (EBAC); Administer and oversee all disability and leave issues. This helps to build a relationship based on trust and respect with employees and citizens that is necessary for the City to conduct business; Maintain confidentiality of applicable records (medical files, etc.); and Manage records retention and disclosure procedure. The appropriate maintenance and responsible disclosure of files is critical to the regional view of the State of the City.

A progressive benefits plan provides for a shared sense of purpose and alignment throughout the City, promotes organizational accountability and is reflective of the City's intention to be responsible stewards of public resources. A shared sense of purpose is achieved by providing employees with options that they feel are directly related to their own personal priorities and values. It reinforces that employees are a valuable resource. It creates a sense of advocacy and loyalty to the organization. This results in a greater level of dedication and productivity that helps to retain a multigenerational workforce, which is reflective of the current community population. A workforce that reflects the population of its community is better able to provide effective and efficient customer service and is able to keep the City's best interests at the forefront during decision making processes. Who: The customers for these programs are all City employees, managers, elected officials, and the citizens of Redmond. A primary component of this offer is ensuring responsible government through fiscal oversight of General Fund dollars allocated to benefits programs, while retaining quality employees who will deliver excellent customer service to the public.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

The five-year cost trend of the RedMed Plan is lower than trends in costs as identified by the ArlenGroup's trend surveys and other publications. 2010 Target: 11.4% or less; 2010 Actual: 9.46%; 2011 Target: 10.9% or less; 2011 Actual: 7.28%; 2012 Target: TBD by the 2012 ArlenGroup's trend survey and other publications Less than 10% of employees leaving who specify benefits as a contributing factor.

223


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2521

BENEFITS PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT & ADMINISTRATION Measure RedMed Plan Trend Employees Leaving the City Due to Benefits

Target 10.90 10.00

2010 Act 9.46 0.00

2011 Act 7.28 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 0.00 Percent 10.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Human Resources Department has four offers funded through the General Fund. The scalability goal of a 5% reduction is being achieved through the aggregate of all four of these offers. These offers are Labor Relations, Compensation and Police Administration (HUM2520), Benefits Program Development and Administration (HUM2521), Employee Selection and Recruitment (HUM2522), and Training and Organizational Development (HUM2524). The majority of the savings are being achieved through reductions in the Executive Office's Civil Legal Services budget. In coordination with the Executive Office, Human Resources propose reducing the Labor Negotiations budget by $164,320. A total of $114,320 of this amount is a proposed scalability reduction and the remaining $50,000 has been added to the Personnel Matters/Grievance line item. Human Resources staff has acted as lead staff in many negotiations with the City's uniformed and non-uniformed bargaining units and has the expertise to continue this role in all upcoming negotiations. The remaining $28,634 is saved through reductions in Professional Services. The impact to service levels, if this reduction is taken, would be the potential risk of insufficient funds to support the City going forward with issues to an interest arbitration hearing. Both the Police and Fire union contracts expire at the end of 2012 and are open for negotiations. Both have access to interest arbitration where issues are presented to an arbiter and the arbiter's decision is binding on all parties. This additional right has been granted to these groups by the State Legislature. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$230,007 $23,457 $0

$237,578 $23,458 $0

$467,585 $46,915 $0

$0 $253,464 2.050

$0 $261,036 2.050

$0 $514,500

224


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2525

CITYWIDE CONTINGENCIES Description: What: Each biennium, the Finance & Information Services Department proposes putting in place contingencies to respond to needs and opportunities that typically emerge during the two-year budget cycle. This offer supports the fiscal responsibility factor by planning for future necessities, allowing for a budget that allows for future financial fluctuations and investing in strategies to mitigate impacts of future circumstances. Adequate contingency funding benefits the community by reserving flexible funds to respond to situations that are imminent, but the details of which are currently unknown. The contingencies proposed in the 2013-2014 biennium include: 1. Salary and Benefit Contingency: Used to respond to labor contract increases or extraordinary circumstances not anticipated in the budget. Included in the contingency is the Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) money the City had set aside for changes in retirement rates beyond budgeted expenses. 2. Economic Contingency: Used to respond to unforeseen economic changes that place a hardship on the budget. This contingency was first established in the 2005-2006 budget, with one-time funds, to create a hedge against an economic downturn in the Puget Sound Region. The economic contingency is now set by Council policy at 4% of General Fund revenues ($2,687,544) in addition to the 8.5% operating reserves held to respond to a major and/or catastrophic incident; and 3. The City contracts for District Court costs from King County. Under the arrangement, King County collects the City's fines and forfeiture revenue and uses the money to fund the district court. At the end of each year, a reconciliation is prepared comparing the district court expenses and the district court revenues. The offer reflects the City's accounting of district court costs estimated at $706,373 per year. Why: Maintaining adequate contingencies continues the City's commitment to proactive management of the City's resources and systems by being able to quickly respond to increases in contractual obligations or regional situations while maintaining core operations. Reserving contingencies also demonstrate a fiscal plan that is comprehensive in nature, as well as address both short- and long-term budgetary goals. This offer focuses on financial strategies and systems that reinforce fiscal credibility with the community, staff and City stakeholders. Bond rating agencies look at the strategies cities have in place to mitigate future impacts whether it is adhering to laws governing Citywide reserves or practices the City has put in place to enhance prudent fiscal management. Putting in place contingencies to be able to respond quickly to changing fiscal conditions has proven to be one of Redmond's strengths in the bond market. How: Through assessment of regional and economic issues and contractual obligations, the Finance & Information Services Department reserves funds to respond to fiscal liabilities that may emerge during the biennium. Setting aside money in contingencies allows the City some flexibility to be able to respond to a changing fiscal environment. Who: The customers served by this offer are both internal and external. The economic contingency was established to cushion the City against further economic downturn; serving the community through the prudent reservation of funds to continue current levels of service as a hedge against further economic stress. In the case of the court, Redmond is serving both the community and our regional partners by participating in and funding the City's share of regional public safety activities.

Performance Measures: Contingencies speak to the Council Dashboard measure of maintaining the City's Bond Rating. Sound financial policies and adequate contingencies to mitigate future fiscal challenges are used to measure the strength or the City's overall financial health. The City's current bond rating is AAA.

225


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2525

CITYWIDE CONTINGENCIES Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Salary and Benefit contingency is established to mitigate the impacts of contractual increases negotiated with unions. The contingency could be scaled by $349,000 with the effect of requiring departments impacted by union increases to absorb any additional expenses associated with newly approved union contracts. Scalability Recommended: Reduced proposed increase in salary and benefit contingency ($1,201,932) through right sizing.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0 $932,520

$0 $1,166,736

$0 $2,099,256

$0 $977,216 $1,909,736 0.000

$0 $2,687,544 $3,854,280 0.000

$0 $3,664,760 $5,764,016

226


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2486

PAYROLL ADMINISTRATION Description: What: The Payroll Office processes semi-monthly payrolls that include benefit processing for all City employees. The City has six labor unions, as well as non-represented employees, and more than 100 supplemental/seasonal employees. The payroll process requires knowledge of every labor contract to ensure that all special pays for overtime, longevity, education premium, hazmat premium, and other special pays are accurate. In addition to ensuring that wages are accurate, Payroll is responsible for ensuring that medical benefits, retirement, deferred compensation, and various employee reimbursement programs are filed and paid in a timely manner. Why: Timely, accurate, and predictable compensation is a fundamental part of maintaining a motivated workforce. In addition, we must comply with several legal, contractual and regulatory requirements as a large employer. This offer cultivates, maintains and enhances the quality of the Redmond work force and enhances customer service. How: Through a strong partnership with the Human Resource Department, Payroll ensures updates to employee records are made timely and accurately. With attention to detail, Payroll reviews timesheets for completeness to identify problems prior to processing to ensure City employees receive the correct payment for services rendered. Upon completion of each payroll, the staff reconciles all benefits and taxes prior to filing returns and initiating payments. Who: Payroll is focused on providing prompt, effective and efficient service to all City department managers, supervisors and employees. We assist the City's Human Resources Department through consultation and mutual support on employee compensation issues; City employees through timely and accurate compensation; City managers and supervisors through reports, support and assistance; and related outside agencies [Department of Retirement Systems (DRS), Healthcare Management Administrators (HMA), Municipal Employee Benefit Trust (MEBT) administrator] through timely and accurate reporting of deductions and benefits.

Performance Measures: 1.

2. 3.

Complete processing of all 36 regular payrolls (24 semi-monthly, 12 monthly council, and special payrolls as needed) two days before pay day with an error rate of less than 1.5%. With reduced error rate there is less need for additional special payrolls for corrections. Post employee contributions to the Municipal Employees' Benefit Trust (MEBT) by payday and Department of Retirement Services (DRS) within five days of payday. Percentage of employees satisfied with Payroll Services as measured by the Department annual survey.

Measure Payroll Error Rate Payroll Completion Reporting Deductions and Benefits Custmer Satisfaction with Payroll

Target 1.50 36.00 36.00 80.00

2010 Act 1.00 36.00 36.00 82.00

2011 Act 1.00 36.00 36.00 84.00

2012 Goal 1.00 36.00 36.00 85.00

Measurement Percent Pay Periods Pay Periods Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Staffing costs are 72% of this offer, with the City's non-departmental unemployment cost the balance of the offer. A 5% ($29,814) budget decrease would likely require a reduction in staff. Given the previous staff cuts and the increased workload, the scalability for this offer, if necessary, will be taken with the Accounting & Auditing offer FIN2540. This offer includes current staffing levels of three full time employees (FTE): a Payroll Supervisor and two Payroll Analysts. Since going live with the Eden Payroll System, all employee 227


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2486

PAYROLL ADMINISTRATION claims for expense reimbursements are now processed through Payroll. Also, the expansion of benefit reporting through federal mandates has increased the reporting requirements which have also increased the workload. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$384,293

$392,454

$776,747

$6,850 $0 $0 $391,143 3.000

$6,850 $0 $0 $399,304 3.000

$13,700 $0 $0 $790,447

228


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2523

SAFETY & WORKERS COMPENSATION PROGRAMS Description: What: Workplace safety is one of the most important aspects of responsible government. Employees who work safely contribute to an environment that enhances and allows focus on customer service. Workplace safety programs are cross-departmental and innovatively leverage the expertise present within City departments to more efficiently provide the best possible service to City employees. Funds are allocated by department, and Human Resources safety staff work collaboratively and intra-departmentally with operating departments to design safety programs and allocate resources appropriately. The Human Resources Department has responsibility for development, management, oversight and coordination of the programs. Staff members administer training; maintain safety related records; participate in and facilitate multiple safety committees and respond to customer inquiries and requests for assistance. Why: As an employer, the City has a responsibility to ensure employee safety and to comply with State and Federal safety requirements. The City of Redmond is self-insured for Workers' Compensation benefits and is mandated to provide benefits through Title 51 and, more specifically, the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 296-15 governing self-insurance. Self-Insurance allows the City to better manage its Workers' Compensation program including how risk is shared and minimized. This hands-on approach results in a safer workplace with increased employee morale and reduced costs. The Safety and Workers' Compensation Programs offer provides the resources to fulfill this responsibility. Human Resources administration, oversight and coordination of the Safety and Workers' Compensation programs, not only ensures that the State and Federal law requirements are met, but also that the City is able to reduce costs, and provide a safe work environment. Results include increased employee morale, enhanced community safety, and the ability to control risk exposure. These programs contribute to fiscal stewardship by promoting safe work habits that lead to accident and injury prevention. Appropriate management and prevention of accidents and injuries contributes to employee well-being and morale; promotes employee retention; reduces the likelihood of injury/damage claims against the City; and offers return to work options that minimize absenteeism. The programs support customer service values by ensuring that employees are available, work safely and are able to provide the best service to the community. How: Programs are customer-focused with Human Resources staff members acting as the first point of contact for employees involved in accidents; resolving individual issues related to workers' compensation; and proactively assessing employee needs when developing and implementing safety training. Staff members develop and administer a comprehensive safety training program as determined by needs assessments, as well as State and Federal mandates. Staff members are also responsible for comprehensive accident/injury reporting and review. Work station evaluations and work practice reviews are conducted for program improvement and to prevent injuries. The Human Resources Department has worked to modify these programs over the past years, reducing reliance on consultants and developing the expertise of in-house employees to provide training and services. City employees now teach many classes that were previously offered through consultants. As a result of this innovative effort, the safety program has experienced a reduction in costs and higher levels of instruction. Feedback from employees regarding in-house instructors is positive; these instructors are found to be skilled, knowledgeable, and well-trained. Oversight of Workers' Compensation is accomplished through appropriate accident investigation; benefits administration; prompt response to customer requests for assistance and guidance; management of a third party provider; and coordination of modified duty and return-to-work programs. The third party provider advises the City regarding rules and regulations, manages claims, and assists with return-to-work and modified duty issues. During this budget cycle, the City will be conducting a request for proposal and reviewing the market for third party administrators in this 229


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2523

SAFETY & WORKERS COMPENSATION PROGRAMS area. Additionally, the City plans to evaluate the self-insured status of the program to determine whether, over the long term, insuring with the State would be more cost effective. The City plans to hire an outside consultant to complete this analysis. The cost of this study is estimated to be $10,000. This amount has been included in the proposed budget for this offer. Over the past year, the City has added technology to more efficiently manage incident and accident reporting, as well as tracking of employee training. Additionally, the City is now offering on-line training in workplace safety and defensive driving. Who: The customers for these programs are all City employees, managers, elected officials, and the citizens of Redmond.

Performance Measures: The State of Washington now compiles information for self-insured employers that directly compares the City of Redmond with other municipal employers, such as the Cities of Seattle, Bellevue, Kent, Puyallup and Olympia. This data regarding injuries, time loss days and hours worked is now reported to Labor and Industries electronically by all self-insured employers and is compiled into reports. The two most meaningful categories for comparison purposes are frequency and severity. Frequency is calculated by taking the number incidences (injury claims) that require medical treatment and dividing that number by total number of hours worked. The severity of an injury is measured by the number days an injury causes lost time from work. This is calculated by taking the number of time loss days and dividing by the total number of hours worked. The lower the number of injuries and time loss days, the better your program is performing. For 2011, the frequency and severity for injuries in the City of Redmond is lower than the comparison group of public entities that self-insure. The fractions are small because injuries rarely occur and even more rarely result in days missed from work. 1.

2.

3.

Redmond's claims frequency (claims/hour) rates are lower in comparison to available and relevant benchmarks, as defined by Washington State Department of Labor and Industries and other publications. (New Measure) 2011 Target: .000071 (3,487 claims/49,143,931 hours) 2011 Actual: .000055 (71 claims/1,280,202 hours) Redmond's claims severity (time loss days/hours worked) rates are lower in comparison to available and relevant benchmarks, as defined by Washington State Department of Labor and Industries and other publications. (New Measure) 2011 Target: .000856 (42,074 time loss days/49,143,931 hours) 2011 Actual: .00046 (586 time loss days/1,280,202 hours) Redmond's cost per incident is lower in relation to the statewide average as defined by Washington State Department of Labor & Industries and other publications.

Please note that there is a lag time of three to four months based on when quarterly reports and claims costs are due. All 2012 Target data are to be determined by Washington State Department of Labor and Industries and other publications. Data for the first quarter of 2012 will be available in June or July.

230


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: HUMAN RESOURCES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: HUM2523

SAFETY & WORKERS COMPENSATION PROGRAMS Measure Safety & Workers' Comp Claims Frequency Safety & Workers' Comp Claims Severity Safety & Workers' Comp Cost Per Incident

Target 0.00 0.00 8,457.00

2010 Act 0.00 0.00 4,631.00

2011 Act 0.00 0.00 2,945.00

2012 Goal 0.00 0.00 0.00

Measurement See Above #1 See Above #2 Dollars

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% percent decrease in this area is $98,030. There are very few areas in this program where scalability could be implemented. The Workers' Compensation Program maintains a reserve fund to cover large claims. Our current policy is to maintain 1.7 times the amount of reserves required by the State of Washington in this account. The minimum requirement for reserves in 2013 will be about $563,125. The reserve account is currently $695,568, the City could potentially reduce the reserve account cutting $98,030 for scalability; however, this is risky because the costs of this program are volatile and fluctuate from year-to-year. Scaling reserves may result in a budget deficit in the program. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

$178,568 $790,000 $0 $5,000 $973,568

$184,490 $790,079 $0 $5,000 $979,569

1.600

1.600

Total $363,058 $1,580,079 $0 $10,000 $1,953,137

231


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2526

CITYWIDE RESERVES Description: What: Reserve funds are set aside to provide sufficient cash flow to meet the City's daily needs and support an acceptable level of City services in the event of a catastrophic incident. Citywide reserves include General Fund, Law Enforcement Officers and Firefighters (LEOFF 1) and jail reserves. All other reserves, such as fleet, insurance and utility depreciation reserves appear as part of other offers. Having adequate reserves in place supports the fiscal responsibility factor by providing for a comprehensive strategic financial and economic plan that complies with current City policies. Reserves also focus on financial strategies and systems that reinforce credibility with the community, staff and Redmond stakeholders and at the same time comply with Federal, State and City legislation. This offer also supports the Safety strategy of encouraging proactive approaches to safety by ensuring the City has adequate funds in place should a widespread disaster occur within the City. Why: Adequate levels of reserves allow the City to mitigate current and future financial risk and at the same time promote responsible government through upholding sound fiscal policies while addressing short and long-term budgetary goals. Appropriate reserves also contribute to sound financial strategies that are comprehensive in nature and reinforce credibility with the community by complying with fiscal mandates. How: Major reserves are policy driven mandates. For example, General Fund reserves are maintained at a level of 8.5% of total General Fund budgeted revenues, excluding beginning fund balance, development review, and significant one-time revenue. Depending upon size, General Fund reserves in other jurisdictions range from 5% to 12% of General Fund revenues. In 2013, the City's Building Permit Reserve was combined with the General Fund Reserve. Other reserves are held to mitigate future liabilities. The LEOFF 1 reserve will be used to fund future medical costs associated with LEOFF 1 participants. Under the State of Washington's LEOFF 1 plan, the City is obligated to fund medical costs for the lifetime of public safety officers who participate in the plan. Insurance reserves mitigate the City's higher than anticipated insurance expenses. The amount of the reserves contained in this offer includes: 1. General Fund Reserve - $6,209,568; 2. Jail Reserve - $454,814; 3. Workers' Compensation Reserve - $569,396; and 4. LEOFF 1 Reserve $453,770. Who: Citywide reserves serve the community, as well as City employees. The community expects the City to manage its money in a way that mitigates the impacts of natural disasters or catastrophic events, as well as manage the risk associated with the City's various lines of business. Keeping reserves in place is a prudent financial strategy that will serve the community well into the future.

Performance Measures: Reserves are policy driven mandates and the City is obligated to maintain reserves at prescribed levels, therefore no specific measures are set up for these programs. However, sound reserve policies and adequate reserves are reviewed by bond rating agencies to measure the strength or the City's overall financial health. The City's adherence to prudent reserve policies speaks to the Council Dashboard measure of the City's Bond Rating which currently stands at AAA.

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Options for possible reserve scaling scenarios are listed below: 1. Fiscal policy states the City will maintain in reserve 8.5% of General Fund revenues in case of a catastrophic

232


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2526

CITYWIDE RESERVES

2.

event. Jurisdictions keep between 5%-12% of reserves within their General Fund. With a Council policy change the City could scale back the General Fund reserves to 7% which would be a one time savings to the General Fund of approximately $1.4 million. Decreasing the General Fund reserves may leave the City without the necessary resources needed if a significant catastrophic event should occur within Redmond and could affect the City's AAA bond rating. The Building Permit Reserve currently equals $309,735 in 2012. This offer would replace the approximately $800,000 used in 2011 to maintain baseline levels of development review services. As a scalability measure, the City could choose not to restore the additional funds needed ($792,919) to increase the Building Permit Reserve to policy levels.

Scalability Recommended: To be consistent with the recommendation to change the City's fiscal policies to consolidate reserves and contingencies, the existing Building Permit Reserve ($309,735) has been combined with the General Fund Reserve. The remaining amount ($792,919) has been moved to the General Fund balance for reallocation.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0

$0

$0

$0 $0 $7,995,541 $7,995,541 0.000

$0 $0 $569,396 $569,396 0.000

$0 $0 $8,564,937 $8,564,937

233


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2510

INNOVATION FUND Description: What: Consistent with the City's vision to provide high quality, responsive services in partnership with an engaged community, this offer establishes an Innovation Contingency to provide one-time seed money to support individuals or teams who create productivity enhancing ideas. In 2009, the Administration implemented an innovation/efficiency challenge to all departments to identify savings. This challenge resulted in savings of approximately $2.6 million. Missing from that program was seed money to implement new ideas that needed support upfront to realize a return on investment in the future. Why: The City has been using business process improvement methodologies to foster a pioneering spirit and continuous learning through process improvement ideas and team efforts. It is imperative that the City continue to be innovative and creative to meet the challenges of circumstances such as economic downturns, redevelopment, population growth and emerging technology. This offer speaks to encouraging intra-city and regional partnerships by fostering relationships across departments to meet the needs of Redmond's partners and citizens. The Innovation Contingency will also be focused on strategies and systems that reinforce credibility with the Community. How: The Innovation Contingency will be spent on pilot programs that can articulate a clear business case for supporting a new idea. The potential programs/projects will be reviewed by a team of individuals who will evaluate the costs and benefits of the pilot programs. These programs will be monitored for return on investment and success at meeting citywide goals. Once a pilot project ends, the results will be measured for the savings and outcomes achieved as well as whether it is feasible for the program to continue. The Mayor in collaboration with the Director's Team will make the final decision on moving forward with any program/project funded through the Innovation Contingency. Who: Effective and efficient systems and operations are core to supporting superior customer service. Every one of the programs/projects selected will be serving the Redmond Community by fostering proactive and innovative approaches to City services. The first tier customer served through this offer is the Redmond Community; the second would be Redmond's partners in the region. At this point it is hard to know what ideas will come out of this offer; however, the projects and programs funded through the Innovation Contingency will be required to demonstrate a clear customer service connection consistent with the Mayor's vision.

Performance Measures: 1.

Programs/project will demonstrate a measurable return on investment before being considered for funding. (Note: all programs/projects eligible for seed money will have clear and demonstrable outcomes in order to determine success or failure.)

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Innovation Contingency is a one-time program and can be scaled by 5% or $15,000. It is difficult to know the exact impact scaling of the Contingency will have on the overall program as a contingency of this kind has not been used before; however, at a minimum, fewer projects/programs will receive seed money than if the Contingency is fully funded. Scalability Recommended: Denied $100,000 of new proposal and reduced by $25,000 to support Human Services programs.

234


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

INNOVATION FUND Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0

$0 $0 $0

$87,500 $87,500 0.000

$87,500 $87,500 0.000

$175,000 $175,000

235

Id: EXE2510


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2589

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIC INITIATIVES Description: What: The Information Technology (IT) Strategic Initiative offer allows Information Services (IS) to implement a long-term strategy for adopting information and communication technologies that support the future business objectives of the City. Specifically, IS will complete the implementation of the projects defined in the plan that was adopted in 2009, survey the changing business and technology environment for new opportunities and implement projects to take advantage of those opportunities. While a great deal of the work defined in the 2009 IT Strategic Plan and subsequent iterations is complete, there are several projects currently in progress or scheduled to begin in the next biennium: expansion of the City's wireless infrastructure beyond City buildings; development of a more robust and comprehensive records program including the technology to support that program; implementation of an Enterprise Asset Management system; implementation of the recommendations made in the IT Security and Disaster Recovery Plan; and planning for a more collaborative work environment. In addition, there are new business and technology drivers creating a need for broader and/or new technology strategies. Those include: a mobile workforce that needs anytime, anywhere, any device access to business resources; the Mayor's customer service initiative which is fostering a greater need for transparent interaction with City customers, thereby improving the customer service experience; real-time remote sensing and data collection (i.e. water quality information); and a community that is using social media tools to interact and engage with government. Why: The Strategic Plan, adopted in 2009, confirmed that information and communication technologies are critical to the delivery of services throughout the City. However, the technology infrastructure required for new service delivery must be in place before those services can be offered, just as physical infrastructure like roads, water and sewer systems must be in place before major redevelopment. Funding this offer will allow IS to implement the technology that is needed 1 - 2 years into the future to support business services. The offer addresses innovative professional development by empowering users with the tools they need to deliver services, such as SharePoint and the Website Content Management system. It is proactive in identifying and implementing technical solutions that allow City staff to provide high quality, reliable and responsive customer service. It also addresses delivering effective and efficient technology systems which are the basis for excellent service delivery. These systems support better decision-making, improve staff productivity and provide better access to information by the City's customers. Finally, this offer enhances customer service by soliciting citizen feedback to inform development of the long-term technology strategy. How: Information Services develops and updates the IT Strategic Plan in concert with City staff who provide insight into what's driving business changes, their goals and objectives annually. IS then creates a set of recommended projects designed to help City staff achieve their goals and objectives. These projects are then submitted to the IT Governance Team (which includes the Director of each department) to ensure these projects remain rooted in the long-term direction of the City. Final approval of projects and related expenditures rests with the IT Governance Team. While a great deal of the work defined in the 2009 IT Strategic Plan and subsequent iterations is complete, there are several projects currently in progress or scheduled to begin in the next biennium: expansion of the City's wireless infrastructure beyond City buildings; development of a more robust and comprehensive records program including the technology to support that program; implementation of the recommendations made in the IT Security and Disaster Recovery Plan; planning for a more collaborative work environment; and real-time remote sensing. In addition, there 236


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2589

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIC INITIATIVES are new business and technology drivers creating a need for broader and/or new technology strategies. Those include: a mobile workforce that needs anytime, anywhere, any device access to business resources; the Mayor's customer service initiative which is fostering a need for greater collaboration between City staff and with City customers along with a desire to improve the customer service experience; and a community that is using social media tools to interact and engage with government. The offer is differentiated from the Information Services offer in that this offer is focused on identifying and implementing technology for future needs, whereas the Information Services offers funds ongoing operations. Who: The direct customers for this offer are City staff who are in need of technology support to implement and improve business practices. Through an active dialog with these customers IS can provide the tools necessary to improve service to their customers, the Redmond community.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Seventy-five percent (75%) of the projects selected for implementation are completed over the time horizon of the plan (the plan is three to five years and the measure has not be tracked on an annual basis). High rating of customer satisfaction with the state of the City's technology as measured through a department survey.

Measure Projects Selected for Implementation are Completed Over the Plan Timeline High Rating of Customer Satisfaction with State of the City's Technology

Target 75.00

2010 Act 0.00

2011 Act 0.00

80.00

0.00

0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 75.00 Percent 80.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The amount requested for the 2013-2014 budget represents some carry-forward of the last few projects from the earlier plan as well as an estimate of the resources needed to pursue several other known initiatives. The nature of the plan is a bit fluid as the Information Technology Governance Team can realign technology priorities in keeping the evolving business needs. A 5% or $25,000 reduction would result in reducing the scope of one or more projects identified for implementation. The IT Governance Committee would need to determine which project was the least important for supporting the City's business objectives. Scalability Recommended: Reduced one-time funding for continuing strategic intiatives ($307,000) to allow for evaluation of scope of future projects.

237


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2589

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIC INITIATIVES Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0 $250,000 $0

$0 $250,000 $0

$0 $500,000 $0

$193,000 $443,000 0.000

$0 $250,000 0.000

$193,000 $693,000

238


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2515

CITYWIDE MAIL SERVICES Description: What: In this electronic age, you would think just about everything is available electronically instead of on paper, but that is not completely true. Did you know that the City anticipates receiving and sending U.S. mail, as well as transferring (department to department) inter-office mail at a volume of close to 500,000 pieces of correspondence during this next biennium? This offer represents staff's recommendation for a fast, efficient and timely method to receive, sort, redistribute and send incoming and outgoing City mail in the most fiscally responsible manner to ensure efficient and effective pick-up/delivery. This offer provides a comprehensive, centralized Citywide mail delivery system to 42 City mail stop locations at 15 different buildings involving 18 separate budget account codes. Why: When you open your home mailbox, you expect all of your mail to be there and you expect to receive only your own mail. It is irritating to get other people's mail and you have little tolerance for mistakes. It is no different at the City. Using this proposed integrated, centralized approach increases mail delivery consistency, reduces delivery errors and relieves staff the burden of having to travel daily to the Redmond Post Office to retrieve and send U.S. mail. Further it provides for an integrated approach to City internal (interoffice) mail delivery. Citywide Mail Services addresses providing the most efficient and cost effective way to meet the need of moving mail (both internally and externally) around the City. In 1994, the City determined it was most cost effective and beneficial to contract out its mail service needs with an outside agency. Prior to this time, services were provided in-house using City staff and equipment. A significant benefit of having City mail metered and co-mingled with mail from other cities under contract with this supplier has resulted in a 5% savings on first class postage which is approximately $5,000 for the biennium. This U.S. postage savings is reflected in the offers of the individual departments as a reduced "postage" cost and is thus not reflected in this particular offer. How: The offer proposes an alternative to having individual city staff assumes responsibility for the pick-up, delivery and mailing (including postage metering) of all mail generated within their work groups. Additionally, there are several core service fees contained in this offer and minimum costs would need to be provided for an alternate manner if this offer is not funded or if scalability is exercised. These core fees include: funding for Citywide annual postal related fees, such as Post Office Box (97010) use, bulk permit use, and business reply use. This offer eliminates the need for the City to purchase and maintain individual postage scales in which to individually meter City mail or the purchase of rolls of U.S. postage stamps. Without the cost saving benefits of this offer, the 5% savings on first class postage would not be realized and other individual offers would need to be increased to cover these additional postage fees. This offer eliminates duplication of staff effort and increases the reliability with which City mail is sent/received by internal (staff) and external (the community) customers of these services. This offer relieves City staff of the requirement of performing these services in-house, to retrieve and pick-up the City's mail daily from the Redmond Post Office, sort the mail, distributing U.S. mail and inter-office mail to the various mail stops and either meter the mail or affix U.S. postage on each piece of outgoing mail and allows them to focus on their primary duties and priorities. Finally, this offer provides for the pick-up and internal delivery of Reprographics Division produced work. The City's U.S. mail is centrally picked up from and delivered to the Redmond Post Office, it is sorted and distributed daily (Monday - Friday) to all City locations by an external supplier. Annually this equates to approximately 132,000 individual pieces of outgoing U.S mail or 264,000 for the biennium, incoming mail quantities are not tracked. Additionally, this supplier provides a basic communications service for internal City staff and customers external to the City through the delivery of interdepartmental mail along with the U.S. mail. While the volume of city interoffice mail is not currently tracked, it would be a conservative estimation that this volume would represent at least half as much as outgoing mail volumes. City mail is a critical communications tool to the success of daily City operations. U.S. mail 239


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2515

CITYWIDE MAIL SERVICES and interoffice mail pick-up and delivery to the seven largest City locations occurs daily (Monday - Friday), two to three times per day; additionally pick-up and delivery to eight outlying locations occurs daily (Monday - Friday), once per day. All mail is sorted and delivered daily to the various City mail stop locations. Who: The primary recipients of City mail are the many internal City employees and City Council. However, mail originates from and its receipt benefits a variety of external customers including local area businesses, citizens and other local, state and federal governmental entities.

Performance Measures: 1.

City mail services occur with minimal City staff interruption and mail/packages arrive timely and accurately to the intended "addressee" with a 90% frequency when surveyed. Any misaddressed mail goes to the City Clerk to be opened and re-directed.

Measure Mail is Received Timely and Accurately

Target 90.00

2010 Act 93.00

2011 Act 86.00

2012 Goal Measurement 90.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Since this offer is comprised of 100% externally outsourced services, the level of funding will determine the level of service provided by the external contractor. During 2011, staff has inquired regarding the possibility of increasing the number of mail pick-up and deliveries to the Public Works Maintenance Center and selected Fire Stations which, in the City's current daily mail schedule, receive a single mail pick-up and delivery each day. In order to offer a meaningful scalability option, funding would need to be increased at least 18% (or $36,000 over the biennium). This increase would allow the City to purchase additional delivery hours that would enable all City mail locations to receive a minimum of two stops (pick-up and delivery) daily (Monday-Friday). Currently, several City mail locations receive only a single delivery/pick-up each day. This would add flexibility to an already tight daily delivery schedule. Additional staff hours could also be used not only to pick-up and deliver mail, but would allow for additional sorting of mail to individual City sites and would serve to minimize mail delivery delays and delivery mistakes typically experienced during those periods of time when mail pick-up and deliveries are being made. Alternately, if funding were decreased by 18% (or $36,000 over the biennium), the frequency of City mail delivery would be reduced to one to two stops per day in high volume buildings and one to two times per week in outlying City buildings. The City's outlying buildings, such as the City Fire Stations would be most affected by this reduction; this reduction would increase duplication of staff effort as critical mail deliveries would need to be individually transported by City staff, removing staff from their primary duties. Citywide communication would be affected in that it would require additional planning efforts on the part of City staff to "time" their interoffice or U.S. mail submissions to coincide with reduced mail pick-up and delivery services and would undoubtedly cause a slow down or delay in the delivery and receipt of basic communications to Redmond citizens, the business community, and other municipal jurisdictions which depend upon timely delivery of correspondence. The performance measure target relating to timeliness would be negatively impacted. This has been a concern of our customers in the past. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

240


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

CITYWIDE MAIL SERVICES Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0 $100,475 $0

$0 $101,315 $0

$0 $201,790 $0

$0 $100,475 0.000

$0 $101,315 0.000

$0 $201,790

241

Id: FIN2515


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2512

CAPITAL EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT RESERVE Description: What: The Capital Equipment Replacement Reserve provides funding for equipment in need of replacement within General Fund supported departments. In this program, funding is specifically set aside to provide for the replacement of equipment, not the purchase of additional equipment or the purchase of vehicles. The Capital Equipment Replacement Reserve supports fiscal responsibility by providing for the future assets departments need to provide quality service to the community, via effective and efficient systems and equipment. Redmond's fiscal policies state "the City will maintain equipment reserve funds at a level sufficient to meet scheduled equipment replacement, so as to sustain an acceptable level of municipal services and prevent physical deterioration of assets." Why: Equipment replacement is a financial strategy used by many governments to demonstrate good stewardship of resources consistent with the City's long-term financial and economic plans. The City has a responsibility to make sure employees have the resources to carry out their work in the most efficient and effective manner possible, which contributes to the overall level of service and customer service goals of the organization. This offer represents a strategic program that manages the condition of our assets, tracks the investment needed to replace them, and ensures assets are replaced when they reach the end of their useful life. The equipment requested in this offer includes items that support the Safety Priority by ensuring public safety personnel are appropriately equipped with items that are safe and functional. How: Through careful monitoring of equipment life cycle schedules, equipment that has reached the end of its useful life is budgeted for replacement. Equipment being requested in this offer has met the threshold of the City's fixed asset policies. The goal of the Capital Equipment Replacement Fund is to minimize risk and liability exposure to the City and employees from faulty or deteriorating equipment. The Capital Equipment Replacement Fund is restricted to replacement equipment that has a value of $5,000 or more. Smaller equipment is replaced through department budgets. Who: Equipment replacement assists Departments by ensuring adequate funding to replace outdated equipment and by extension allows them to provide efficient and effective customer service to the citizens of Redmond and the region at large. Bond rating agencies also scrutinize the City's policies regarding asset replacement as a way of evaluating whether or not the City is meeting its fiduciary responsibility toward the community.

Performance Measures: 1.

Percent of replacement reserve funding to meet the needs of scheduled equipment replacement and future replacement of larger systems. 2012 Actual: Based on a seven year cash flow analysis the City has sufficient reserves to replace all applicable assets due for replacement through 2019.

Measure Fund Adequate to Replace Items as Needed at End of Useful Life 100% of Time

Target 100.00

2010 Act 100.00

2011 Act 100.00

2012 Goal Measurement 100.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% reduction in funding would decrease the annual transfer by $50,000 each year. The consequences of eliminating a portion of the reserve funding include: 1. 2.

Equipment would be kept in service beyond its useful life, requiring an increase in maintenance costs and/or a delay in those services that are dependent on the outdated equipment. Policies could be reviewed to increase the replacement threshold to, for example, $20,000 or more, instead of 242


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONE TIME ONLY Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2512

CAPITAL EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT RESERVE equipment valued at $5,000 or more. This would reduce the amount of equipment that could be replaced out of the fund, resulting in less replacement costs per year. However, raising the threshold would not be a cost savings, but rather a shift in the burden from the replacement fund to departments within the General Fund as departments would need to absorb the cost of equipment replacement under $20,000. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$0

$0

$0

$0 $0 $2,054,050 $2,054,050 0.000

$0 $0 $2,396,897 $2,396,897 0.000

$0 $0 $4,450,947 $4,450,947

243


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2516

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE SERVICES Description: What: Accounts Payable will facilitate accurate and timely payment of City invoices while incorporating generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and practices. These payments are the final result of a series of processes designed to balance efficient and accurate payment with internal controls which serve to preserve City resources and protect the City's credit rating. Consolidated Accounts Payable provides for central payment of bills and ensures the placement and practice of internal controls surrounding the payment of funds in a fiscally responsible manner. Accounts Payable staff work collaboratively with City departmental (internal) staff and external customers (local business and citizens) to minimize duplication of staff effort through the use of an integrated, central payment process involving multiple purchasing tools, automated invoice review and approvals to achieve timely payment of City bills. Why: When you flip the switch, the lights come on. When you push the power button, your computer turns on. This is because someone paid the electricity bill. For the City of Redmond (who receives 50 separate electricity bills each month covering 316 individual City locations, using 78 different City budget account numbers, requiring multiple levels of City staff budget approval) this task is much more complex than it would appear. This responsibility must be handled timely (within 30 days) or in addition to no power, an additional 1% late charge must be paid on each invoice (per state law) and the City's good credit rating will be negatively affected. It is anticipated that during the 2013-14 biennium, approximately 52,000 individual invoices will require timely payment, that 16,000 claims checks will be issued to handle these payments of nearly $168 million. All activities are subject to review at audit with the goal to keep the City free of payment related audit findings. Accounts Payable Services provides a centralized and integrated approach to efficient, effective and timely payment of the City's bills to avoid paying costly late fees and harm to the City's credit rating. Also important within the City's ability to pay its bills on time is to ensure an uninterrupted flow of goods and services. If the City's suppliers are not paid in a routine and consistent manner, they are not inclined to sell goods and services to the City. Quality and reliable customer service purchasing strategies are met when citizens and local businesses are provided accurate and timely refunds (for utility overpayments, class cancellations, permit deposit refunds, etc.) and payments due to them. How: The effective and efficient payment system enables the City to meet external customer service expectations and to provide productive and responsive community connections. This Division receives information from the City's Microsoft Dynamics AX financial system, from external City suppliers/service providers and internal City staff to perform invoice verification and audit. Payment is made on externally received invoices using payment terms standard within the industry. Additionally, staff perform individual procurement card verification and audit thousands of transactions resulting from the 225 City issued procurement cards each month. By having centralized leadership, oversight and dedicated staff to perform this core financial function at the City, other department staff are relieved of the responsibility of having to perform these duties themselves and are able to focus on their primary tasks and activities in pursuit of other City goals and objectives. In 2010, the City conducted a business process review through the use of an external consulting firm. The Consultant's recommendation supported this centralized approach in meeting the City's objective of "getting the best value for each tax dollar." Further, the Consultant stated that the City's approach to centralized Accounts Payable provides for rapid visibility (transparency) of Accounts Payable data and was found to be a common denominator and efficient payment methodology among organizations who are cited as "Best in Class." This offer leads to lower processing costs, faster processing time, fewer exceptions and fewer late payments. Funding this offer supports elements necessary to have an 244


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2516

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE SERVICES effective, efficient and fiscally responsible payment system for the City that ensures community credibility. Who: The primary recipients of Accounts Payable services are the various suppliers, utility service providers, other governmental agencies, citizens and internal staff that present an invoice to the City for the payment of purchased goods, services, and activities. City staff are also customers when Accounts Payable pays bills on their behalf and assists them with their role in the payment process.

Performance Measures: 1.

Payments are to be accurate and complete with no audit findings. Department budgets should reflect actual dollar expenditures in the proper month incurred. Invoices are paid accurately within 30 days from date of invoice or performance of service, whichever is later, 90% of the time.

2.

When surveyed, City staff ranks the effectiveness and efficiency of Accounts Payable staff with a rating of three (3) out of five (5) or better.

Measure Timely Payment of City Invoices Customer Services - Effectiveness & Efficiency

Target 90.00 80.00

2010 Act 91.00 79.00

2011 Act 83.00 71.00

2012 Goal Measurement 90.00 Percent 80.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Accounts Payable Division uses supplemental help to augment existing staff. This externally contracted staff assist with reconciliation of City procurement cards. This is an inefficient use of funding. Externally contracted temporary help costs more than in-house staff and the constant turnover of this type of short-term staffing requires current Accounts Payable staff to provide introductory training and learning curve completion each time temporary staffing turnover occurs. An increase of 3.5% (or $20,900 over the biennium) in funding would allow the division to add one part time (0.50 FTE) Financial Technician in Accounts Payable. This increase, when combined with the temporary staffing budget, would reduce the City's dependency on temporary staff to support ongoing City operations, provides for more staffing stability and work product consistency. In addition to securing a more long-term solution to the City's growing procurement card program, this staff person could provide much needed backup staffing coverage and represents a more cost efficient use of currently expended funds. Alternately, a reduction of approximately 5% (or 29,850 over the biennium) in funding would require a reduction in externally contracted staffing by 50%. Currently, the division is using temporary staffing to handle the monthly verification and reconciliation of City procurement cards. With a reduction of this size, the Division would not be adequately staffed to support the reconciliation portion of this program and the program would need to be eliminated. Additionally, if a reduction was exercised, it would reduce the timeliness of City payments, afford a reduced level of scrutiny of City bills weakening internal controls and pose an increased risk to potential audit findings. This reduction would force remaining staff to shift their focus to simply "getting the bills paid," leaving little to no time to answer questions or inquires which would negatively affect the City's credibility with both internal (city staff) and external (the community) customers. Further, both performance measures would be negatively impacted. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

245


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE SERVICES Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$268,888 $38,830 $0

$276,775 $39,790 $0

$545,663 $78,620 $0

$0 $307,718 3.000

$0 $316,565 3.000

$0 $624,283

246

Id: FIN2516


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: LEG OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: LEG2494

CIVIL LEGAL SERVICES Description: What: Civil legal services provide legal counsel to the Mayor, City Council, Boards and Commissions, and City staff. These services are a critical element in supporting effective leadership, a key factor of the Responsible Government Priority. Currently, civil legal services are provided on contract by the law firm of Ogden Murphy Wallace (OMW). OMW also represents the City in civil and criminal proceedings and negotiates labor contracts, which demonstrates fiscal responsibility. Why: Civil legal services ensure City business is conducted legally and that litigation risks are minimized. Civil legal services promotes quality service through careful adherence to Federal and State law as well as City ordinances by reviewing potential new City policies and land-use decisions and articulating the City's legal obligations to the City Council, staff and the community. Fiscal responsibility is also enhanced through review of bond documents, representation on lawsuits focused on the City's tax structure and answering auditor questions regarding Redmond's fiscal management. This offer also supports the Safety Priority by encouraging citizens and businesses to comply with building, environmental, health and safety laws, through supporting the City's compliance officers in interpreting codes and standards and communicating with the community on City regulations. How: Prudent use of civil legal services safeguards public resources and City interests in matters of litigation, labor relations, and risk management. Through interpretation and articulation of City regulations and State and Federal laws, civil legal services provides internal staff advice on current and future issues, such as land use interpretation and potential new City policies. The City Attorney's Office also represents the City on criminal cases as well as provides advice on personnel matters in order to maintain the quality of Redmond's workforce. Redmond's fiscal responsibility is enhanced through this offer by providing oversight on compliance of mandates and minimizing the risk associated with running an organization with various lines of business. Who: Civil legal services provides internal customer service to the Mayor, City Council, Boards and Commissions and City staff through analysis and advice on legal issues impacting the City. The Redmond Community also benefits from the work of the City's Attorney through a well-run City that conforms to legislation under which the City is governed.

Performance Measures: 1.

Client satisfaction rating (determined via an internal customer service survey). Per the Internal Customer Service Survey results, over two-thirds of respondents who use the City Attorney are "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with the service they receive.

Measure Overall Customer Satisfaction

Target 80.00

2010 Act 86.00

2011 Act 82.00

2012 Goal Measurement 86.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Executive Department has managerial oversight over Citywide Administration and Management, Regional Policy and Services, portions of Civil Legal Services, and the Prosecutor's Office. Taken together, a 5% scalability for these offers is approximately $170,000. It is proposed that the scalability for these offers could be met through: 1) a $70,000 reduction in the litigation line item of the Civil Legal Services budget to right-size the budget for recent litigation/claims activity; and 2) a $100,000 reduction in the Prosecutor's Office through elimination of the 0.5 full time employee (FTE) prosecutor position. In recent years, the City's litigation line item has not been fully expended, due to fewer litigation cases/claims cases filed 247


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: LEG OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: LEG2494

CIVIL LEGAL SERVICES against the City and more rigorous budget scrutiny to ensure expenditures are properly charged to departmental budgets. While the City's current litigation outlook suggests this is a prudent reduction, it should be noted that it is difficult to predict when/if future litigation/claims may be filed in Fiscal Years 2013-2014. The reduction of the 0.5 FTE prosecutor position was proposed in Fiscal Years 2011-2012, but was restored by the City Council due to the City's then-proposed traffic safety camera program. Because the traffic safety program was discontinued in early 2012, this reduction is again proposed for Fiscal Years 2013-2014. Impacts to the Office's workload from this reduction are described in the Prosecutor's Office offer. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

$0 $160,000 $0 $0 $160,000

$0 $162,880 $0 $0 $162,880

0.000

0.000

Total $0 $322,880 $0 $0 $322,880

248


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2536

TREASURY MANAGEMENT Description: What: Treasury Management includes leadership of the Finance & Information Services Department, management of the City's investment portfolio, oversight of all City bank accounts and related contracted services, debt issuance and management, cashiering services, miscellaneous cash management functions, and front counter services for the Finance Department located in City Hall. Why: It is important to maintain the fiscal health of the organization by participation in strategic planning at the Director level as well as providing oversight of functions that maintain the economic and financial health of the City. Treasury Management services ensure compliance with applicable laws and best practices regarding cash and investment management; debt issuance and reporting; maintaining strong relationships with the credit rating agencies; and accurate revenue receipting. The front counter and cashiering services provide a place for customers to pay bills or obtain information and assistance. Additionally, Treasury Management partners with other departments regarding funding/debt issuance needs, receipting procedures, invoicing/accounts receivable and new bank related services such as electronic payments or receipts. How: Treasury Management assists in maintaining the fiscal health of the City by providing fiscal oversight, strategic planning, and responsive customer service. The roles within the Treasury Division are widely varied, but all relate to responsible management of City funds/assets and range from proper receipting of a utility bill, to managing the City's $150 million investment portfolio, to providing information to the credit rating agencies to maintain our strong AAA rating. Specific functions performed within this offer include: · Strategic financial planning, forecasting, transparent budgeting, and reporting to provide information to the City's stakeholders for decision-making. · Daily receipting of Citywide payments received by mail, electronically and over the counter. Accurate and timely receipting allows for the electronic transfer of information to the City's General Ledger used by many departments for interim reporting and to prepare the comprehensive annual financial report. · Front counter customer assistance for the Finance Department and the City. Staff is cross trained to ensure our customers receive high quality service with the first person they encounter. Staff is trained in and has access to many internal systems to provide information to the customers such as utility billing, business licenses, and accounts receivable current balances. · Daily cash/bank funding, investment of City funds, and providing petty cash and change funds. Processes are in place to ensure cash is available when needed and/or invested and earning interest when not needed. · Contracting for and managing the wide variety of banking services used by the City including armored car services and bank related fraud protection. Services and contracts are regularly reviewed to ensure efficiencies in operations, current practices are in place and pricing is competitive. Staff often serves as a consultant to other departments implementing new services or systems related to bank services. · Debt issuance, maintaining compliance with debt covenants, ensuring payments are made on time, consulting with departments for new or refunding debt, and reporting. Proper management of existing debt assists with keeping future borrowing at a lower cost and maintaining the City's existing high credit rating. · Retirement plan oversight, including investment advisory services for that plan, helps maintain compliance with applicable laws and protects an important employee benefit. · Credit rating agency updates to provide information on the City's financial outlook, policies and operations and help maintain current ratings. · Policy development to ensure compliance with laws and protect the City's fiscal health. 249


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2536

TREASURY MANAGEMENT Fiscal responsibility within this offer is maintained by ensuring that there is a separation of duties where needed and adequate staffing to best serve our customers. Technology and software systems are used where possible to ensure efficiencies and gathering/sharing of information electronically. Who: The customers served by the Treasury Division are: · Residents, businesses, employees, other government agencies (either in person or by phone) who seek assistance with utility billing questions, business licensing, utility tax payments, pet licensing, invoicing, etc. · Bondholders who rely on the City to maintain fiscal strength in order to receive expected principal/interest payments, as well as maintaining strong ratings from the credit rating agencies to ensure their investment holds value. · Other departments who need assistance with debt financing, as well as tracking and budgeting/planning for that debt. · Other departments who need assistance with invoicing and tracking of payments. · Mayor/Council/Departments by: - Managing the investment portfolio in a conservative manner to preserve principal and to fit cash flow needs; - Oversight of banking relationships and fees to provide an optimum service to our customers; and · Maintaining our credit ratings so that any future debt will be issued at the lowest possible cost.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

3.

Obtaining an average rating of "satisfied" or "very satisfied" on annual Finance & Information Services Department surveys. This is a new measure for the Treasury group. Prior department surveys have not reflected the newly formed division. Maintaining a rate of return on the City's investment portfolio that meets or exceeds its benchmark. Annual Average: the benchmark is directly affected by the volatility in the market. In extreme volatility, yields may take time to balance out. Providing transparency to the City's fiscal management and credit health by ensuring timely and accurate documents and reports which meet customer needs, are accessible. Development of data to track this information is in process.

Measure Customer Service Survey Rate of Return on City's Investment Portfolio Proving Transparency to City's Fiscal Management

Target 80.00 100.00 100.00

2010 Act 0.00 100.00 0.00

2011 Act 0.00 100.00 0.00

2012 Goal 80.00 100.00 100.00

Measurement Percent Percent Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A reduction of 5% ($42,360) could be partially accomplished by eliminating armored car services ($21,430). Accepting this reduction will mean that bank deposits will need to be hand carried to the bank by staff from both the Finance Department and Parks Department at the Schoolhouse. As an alternative, the City could choose to explore electronic/remote check deposit services as part of the banking services fees. Changing how our deposits are made is likely to provide a small savings, but would add additional duties to the Cashiers and create challenges with depositing cash payments. The additional $20,930 reduction needed to meet the full 5% could be accomplished through a slight reduction in staffing levels and/or other expenses within the Division. The "customer satisfaction" performance measure will be

250


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2536

TREASURY MANAGEMENT impacted by these reductions resulting in a revised target of 70%. Please note: Eighty-nine percent (89%) of this offer represents staff. At this time it is difficult to provide adequate front counter coverage and the needed separation of duties for some functions with current staffing levels. Cutting of staff in this offer will not allow for full time coverage of the front counter and may require reduced customer service hours. Seven percent (7%) of the offer represents contracts for banking services, armored car services, and investment custody services. The primary focus of these services is protection of City assets and fraud protection. The fees for these outside services have been kept at a minimum for many years; however, the banking and armored car contracts both expire during 2013 and will require Request for Proposals (RFP) to allow for other vendors to compete for business. It is unclear at this time whether fees will increase/decrease as a result of those RFP's. A small percentage of this offer covers 0.20% of department wide expenses shared among five divisions in the department. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$368,491

$381,739

$750,230

$42,860 $0 $0 $411,351 3.300

$45,197 $0 $0 $426,936 3.300

$88,057 $0 $0 $838,287

251


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2592

RISK MANAGEMENT Description: What: Risk Management includes City insurance for property and liability risks as well as the management of claims. Claims can be claims against the City by an outside party, claims by the City against an outside party (for property damage to a park, for example) or claims within the City (for repair of vandalism within a park, for example). Seventy-four percent (74%) of this offer is to pay for insurance and (17%) pays for damage and claims against the City that are not covered by insurance. The remaining (9%) covers administration of claims, consulting and a small services budget. Risk Management programs demonstrate fiscal responsibility by preserving City resources, protecting City assets and supporting City staff, and by reviewing and advising on programs, facilities and policies for their potential financial risk to the City. Risk management implements policies and strategies to mitigate and finance risks mitigation. This is done through loss prevention, education and transferring risks. Risks are transferred by contractual agreement and the purchase of insurance. Risk management staff assesses the level of risk and retain appropriate risk activities and levels through daily claims management, contract reviews and staff consultation. Staff work with consultants to calculate and recommend appropriate risk strategies including the insurance programs to pursue and cost structures that minimize the effect of incidents on City finances and operations. Why: Funding the offer will continue to protect the City's property and assets from unnecessary loss. Protecting City assets is consistent with good stewardship and being fiscally responsible to the community that paid for these assets. The Risk Management program preserves City investments (including buildings, vehicles, employees, property and monetary funds). These programs protect the City from catastrophic loss, prevent avoidable injuries and claims, ensure compliance with related state and federal laws, as well as enhance employee and citizen confidence in the City's ability to responsibly manage resources. This helps to contain the cost of City programs by reducing losses thereby reducing the cost of City government. How: Protection of assets is accomplished by risk assessment, loss prevention, loss control, education and risk financing. Loss prevention and control measures include policy and program review for enterprise risk, contract review for adequate insurance, as well as state and federal mandates. Proactive programs of a cross departmental nature are also used to help mitigate losses. Risks are transferred to other parties either by seeking insurance coverage from others or by purchasing insurance on behalf of the City. The offer includes the staff time to work with those who believe they have been damaged by the City and file a claim against the City. Risk Management works to handle these claims in a high quality and responsive manner, providing excellent customer service which often helps mitigate the cost of the claim. Who: Risk Management's direct customers include claimants and City staff involved with resolving incidents. The indirect customers are the Redmond community who benefit when the City's safety and loss prevention programs result in smaller losses of public assets from accidents and incidents.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

Amount of preventable damages and claims costs (initially decrease to sustainable, acceptable level). This represents the amount of money expended to resolve damage to city property. Goal is to have the amount of preventable damage as low as possible. (New Measure) The stability of the total cost of the risk management program as a percent of payroll. Goal is to have the cost of risk management programs as low as possible. (New Measure) 252


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2592

RISK MANAGEMENT Measure Preventable Damages and Claims Costs Total Cost Stability of Risk Management Program

Target 10,000.00 0.50

2010 Act 41,187.00 0.63

2011 Act 37,635.00 0.60

2012 Goal Measurement 10,000.00 Dollars 0.45 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Risk Management program is designed to find the best balance between minimizing risk exposure and the cost of the program. Therefore reductions in expense are a tradeoff between costs and increased potential liability. Higher potential liability could result in greater costs to the City (if losses exceed deductible levels) than the savings they achieve initially. Reductions would be gained through higher deductible and self-insurance levels and a more aggressive risk posture. These savings could be any amount (10% or $188,521 for example). Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

$55,591 $825,450 $0 $0 $881,041

$58,553 $825,450 $0 $839,773 $1,723,776

0.500

0.500

Total $114,144 $1,650,900 $0 $839,773 $2,604,817

253


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2533

OUTSTANDING DEBT OBLIGATIONS Description: What: The City has outstanding debt issued in different years to fund various projects. When the debt was issued, the City contractually agreed to pay bondholders on a structured repayment schedule and maintain compliance with bond covenants and regulations related to the debt issues. Included in this offer are the following debt issues: · Unlimited tax (voted) General Obligation (GO). The original debt for this refunding was issued in 1994 for the purpose of constructing Fire Station 16, repaying an interfund loan, and to advance refund two other GO bonds which were outstanding at the time. This debt issue matures in 2013. The total of outstanding principal and interest included in this offer is $284,900. · Limited tax (non-voted) General Obligation (GO) Bonds: a) Issued in 2008 for the Bear Creek Parkway project. The 2013-2014 principal and interest payments included in this offer total $5,297,100. b) Issued in 2011 to acquire property for a downtown central park, other City parks, and open space projects. The 2013-2014 principal and interest payments included in this offer total $1,796,075. · Water/Wastewater Revenue Bonds issued in 2008 to upgrade and improve the City's water and wastewater utilities' facilities, these bonds support three system projects: replacing two wells, extending the southeast Redmond transmission main, and upgrading the Reservoir Park pump station and reservoir. Annual debt payments are paid from utility user fees. The 2013-2014 principal and interest payments included in this offer total $2,210,676. · Anticipated State of Washington Department of Ecology loan payments for the stormwater Redmond Way water quality facility (a regional facility). The total principal and interest payments for 2014 are expected to be $134,370. · Anticipated wastewater inter-fund loan payments for pump station upgrades. The total principal and interest payments for 2014 are expected to be $143,333. The fiscal agent fees included in this offer cover the cost of service fees for paying bondholders their expected principal and interest payments during the year. Use of the fiscal agent is mandated by State law. Why: Budgeting for and paying our debt obligations on time, and as agreed to, demonstrates fiscal responsibility and the City's ability to manage our resources. Upholding the City's pledge to repay the debt reinforces credibility with the bondholders and community at large. Maintaining compliance with the bond covenants is a significant part of maintaining the City's AAA rating, credit standing and overall financial strength. How: Debt repayment schedules are determined and agreed to at the time of issuance. The City's fiscal agent, Bank of New York maintains the list of current bondholders and handles all principal and interest payments. Use of a fiscal agent for these services is required by State law. Who: The bondholders are the customers primarily served by this offer. The City as a whole however, benefits from maintaining our bond covenants so that the cost of future borrowing remains low and the credit strength of the City remains strong.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Payments are made on time. Maintain compliance with secondary market disclosure. 254


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2533

OUTSTANDING DEBT OBLIGATIONS 3.

Maintain communication with bond rating agencies.

Measure Payments Made On Time Compliance With Secondary Market Disclosure Communication With Bond Rating Agencies

Target 100.00 100.00

2010 Act 100.00 100.00

2011 Act 100.00 100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

2012 Goal Measurement 100.00 Percent 100.00 Percent 100.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: No scalability is recommended for debt obligations as it would generate lawsuits and negatively affect the City's credit rating for any future debt. Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

$0 $4,653,521 $0 $284,900 $4,938,421

$0 $4,652,465 $0 $277,703 $4,930,168

0.000

0.000

Total $0 $9,305,986 $0 $562,603 $9,868,589

255


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2495

REGIONAL POLICY & SERVICES Description: What: The Mayor's Office provides leadership and is involved on a day-to-day basis in policy development, strategic planning for the future, and intra-city and regional collaboration and partnerships. Many City interests extend beyond City boundaries and may be advanced strategically in the regional and state legislative arena, impacting all departments and the work of the City. Council, Mayor, and staff advocacy at the regional and state level are all necessary to address City interests and influence the future of the City and region. Why: Regional cooperation, with the City as a leader and active partner, provides opportunities to develop solutions that meet City interests. The City Council adopted a Regional Agenda for the City of Redmond in the spring of 2008, expressing the City's expectation for active participation and leadership in regional issues, and management of City involvement in regional issues by the Mayor's Office. The Mayor's Office support for regional and state policy and services fulfills the Responsible Government priorities of promoting effective leadership, proactively participating in regional solutions, and encouraging regional and intra-city collaboration and partnerships, all the while ensuring fiscal responsibility. How: The Mayor's Office provides staff and elected official support, and coordinates City involvement on regional and state policy and services. This work includes developing programs, policies, and solutions that address City interests; advising City Council and staff, as well as elected officials and senior-level staff from other cities and our state legislators, on a broad array of policy and service issues; and managing the work of the City's lobbyist to advance City interests at the State Legislature. The Mayor's Office budget includes funding for the City's state lobbyist, as well as regional membership dues which enable City elected officials to "have a seat at the table" and participate in regional forums involved in policy setting and advocacy, such as the Puget Sound Regional Council, Association of Washington Cities, Suburban Cities Association, and the Greater Redmond Chamber of Commerce. The Mayor's Office also manages the negotiation of agreements between the City and other jurisdictions for the provision of services for the City, especially when numerous cities are negotiating together for services. Who: Regional Policy and Services work supports the Mayor, City Council, City staff, and elected officials and staff from other jurisdictions and entities throughout King County, including but not limited to: suburban cities and Seattle, King County (Executive and Council), Sound Transit, Puget Sound Regional Council, and Suburban Cities Association, as well as our State Legislators, the Governor's Office, and State Agencies. The premise of the Regional Policy and Services proposal is that the exercise of leadership and management of City participation in the regional arena will result in partnerships and collaboration with other jurisdictions and entities for the development and implementation of services that serve City interests.

Performance Measures: 1.

Percent of Redmond citizens who believe the City is providing leadership in the region and participating in regional discussions and solutions to issues impacting the City. At least two out of three respondents agree that the City provides leadership in seeking solutions to regional issues, such as transportation or transit, water resources, social service, and court and jail service (41%). Over half of respondents are unsure of the City's leadership responsibilities and neither agreed or disagreed with the statement (33%) or didn't know how to respond (19%).

2.

City Council satisfaction with implementation of the City's Regional Agenda.

256


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: EXECUTIVE OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: EXE2495

REGIONAL POLICY & SERVICES Measure Citizen Perception of Regional Leadership Council Satisfaction

Target 0.00 100.00

2010 Act 0.00 100.00

2011 Act 41.00 100.00

2012 Goal Measurement 0.00 Percent 100.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: The Executive Department has managerial oversight over Citywide Administration and Management, Regional Policy and Services, portions of Civil Legal Services, and the Prosecutor's Office. Taken together, a 5% scalability for these offers is approximately $170,000. It is proposed that the scalability for these offers could be met through: 1) a $70,000 reduction in the litigation line item of the Civil Legal Services budget to right-size the budget for recent litigation/claims activity; and 2) a $100,000 reduction in the Prosecutor's Office through elimination of the 0.5 full time employee (FTE) prosecutor position. In recent years, the City's litigation line item has not been fully expended, due to fewer litigation cases/claims cases filed against the City and more rigorous budget scrutiny to ensure expenditures are properly charged to departmental budgets. While the City's current litigation outlook suggests this is a prudent reduction, it should be noted that it is difficult to predict when/if future litigation/claims may be filed in Fiscal Years 2013-2014. The reduction of the 0.5 FTE prosecutor position was proposed in Fiscal Years 2011-2012, but was restored by the City Council due to the City's then-proposed traffic safety camera program. Because the traffic safety program was discontinued in early 2012, this reduction is again proposed for Fiscal Years 2013-2014. Impacts to the Office's workload from this reduction are described in the Prosecutor's Office offer. Scalability Recommended: No change in this program. However, as noted above scalability for the entire department appears in the Prosecutor's Offer (EXE2507).

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

$381,281 $243,775 $0 $0 $625,056

$391,897 $250,080 $0 $0 $641,977

2.750

2.750

Total $773,178 $493,855 $0 $0 $1,267,033

257


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2517

PURCHASING SERVICES Description: What: Purchases Services provides staffing and resources to support the City's basic procurement activities, including compliance with laws and regulations and the payment of mandatory fees. In these tough economic times, those of us who have shopped for personal or commercial goods and services know it is important to compare pricing in order to get a good deal. When we are paying for those goods and services using valuable tax dollars, it is critical that the City consistently pays competitive prices. This offer is staff's recommendation for ensuring the objective of "getting the best value for each tax dollar" is achieved. Through the centralization of purchasing authority, leadership and management oversight, best value is consistently realized. Professionally trained, knowledgeable and experienced buyers in the Purchasing Division work collaboratively with City staff to secure an uninterrupted flow of goods and services necessary to run operations. Purchasing staff verify receipt and delivery to ensure the City only pays for goods received and services rendered. Under this offer, purchasing activities are conducted in a predictable, consistent, open and transparent manner. City buyers are well-versed in the complex and ever changing federal, state and city purchasing laws, rules and regulations surrounding public sector acquisitions. They can ensure purchases offered for competitive bidding to various suppliers provide fair and equal access to encourage full supplier participation and that all legal requirements are met. The contracting documents and tools developed and managed by the Purchasing Division provide adequate protection and minimize risk to the City in the event a particular purchase does not go as intended and remedial action would become necessary. Why: Fiscal responsibility in managing the expenditure of tax dollars is achieved when goods and services are competitively acquired in a consistent manner by competent, trained buyers. Duplication of staff effort is minimized under this offer by allowing other department staff to focus on working to meet other City priorities, ensuring the most efficient use of staffing resources and relieving them of the responsibility of staying current on the multiple, complex and ever changing bid laws surrounding the acquisition of public sector goods and services. Coordination of surplus activities by this division ensures the best outcomes governing the sale of surplus City owned assets. All of these strategies come together to provide a comprehensive and integrated approach in addressing the City's strategy of effective and efficient procurement operations. Achieving competitive prices reduces the cost of government. Having a centralized purchasing division focused on reducing acquisition costs allows the procurement dollars to go farther. Effective leadership efforts within the Purchasing Division leads to fair and equal treatment of the many suppliers who conduct business with the City by increasing the transparency with which purchases are made and by eliminating inconsistent practices and procedures that confuse and frustrate suppliers and discourage them from participating in bid offerings. Purchasing process consistency reinforces credibility with the local business community. How: Under this offer, the City pays reduced prices for the various goods and services needed to run daily operations. Buyers actively negotiate direct price concessions with suppliers and source access to other governmental public purchasing cooperatives and consortiums. They can then "piggyback" arrangements to capitalize on their competitive bidding efforts so Redmond can receive the best value for each tax dollar. In addition to reducing costs, the City pays for basic goods and services; this offer provides the foundation for a host of purchasing tools used by staff to facilitate order placement. Purchasing Services provides funding to access the management oversight of the eCityGov Shared Works Roster portal (small works roster deemed mandatory by City Council), funds mandatory fees for the benefit of all City departments, such as the Office of Minority & Women Business Owned Enterprises and cooperative fees such as access to the Office of State Procurement contracts. Purchasing Services also provides the oversight and management of the City's growing 258


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2517

PURCHASING SERVICES procurement card program (there are 225 individual cards in use), as well as the City's Contracts On-Line (contract formation) Internet application. From receiving staff requisitions and creating thousands of purchase orders (for goods and services) using the financial software system, providing for the creation of hundreds of City standard contracts (for professional services) or overseeing thousands of procurement card transactions (for smaller dollar value items and travel related purchases) an uninterrupted flow of goods and services is ensured and efficiencies realized. This Division also works collaboratively with Accounts Payable to ensure timely payment is achieved, late payment fees are avoided, fiscal integrity is ensured and the City's bond rating is not adversely affected. In 2010, City staff conducted a process improvement initiative to explore opportunities and to identify specific staff concerns. The Committee recommended expanding the procurement card program to include its use to procure staff travel and expand its purchasing capacity. To date, both of these recommendations have been implemented. Another committee recommendation sought increased access to historical purchases. In response to this request, commodity codes were adopted and implemented in the City's new financial software system to enable staff the ability to track their purchases by type (commodity). Purchasing staff continue to explore ways to maximize the value of their procurement activity efforts. Who: The primary recipients of Purchasing Services are internal staff and external suppliers. These services facilitate daily operations, allowing internal City staff to secure needed goods and services from the business community in a timely, efficient, transparent and equitable manner. External suppliers are provided a fair opportunity to compete in City bidding opportunities and strengthens the City's credibility.

Performance Measures: 1.

2.

City purchasing is handled in a consistent and transparent manner, purchases are fiscally responsible ensuring the best value for the tax dollar is achieved, purchases exceeding $5,000 are offered for competitive bid to the supplier community on a routine basis and bid awards are documented 90% of the time. When surveyed, City staff ranks the effectiveness and efficiency of Purchasing staff with a three (3) out of five (5) rating or better.

Measure Customer Service - Effectiveness & Efficiency Consistency in Competitive Bidding Practices

Target 80.00

2010 Act 64.00

2011 Act 61.00

90.00

93.00

98.00

2012 Goal Measurement 80.00 Percent 90.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: Some of the Purchasing Process Improvement Committee's recommendations have not been implemented due to funding limitations. These include: department staff training in selected procurement areas, expansion of the Intranet purchasing site and expansion of the Contracts On-Line Intranet application to provide for data warehousing. Additionally, under the Clean & Green priority, staff is recommending increased support of sustainable purchasing practices and habits. An increase of 13% ($88,020 over the biennium) in funding would allow the Division to hire an additional 0.5 employee (FTE), Buyer, to champion these process improvement recommendations. This increase in staff could further the City's current "green" procurement activities, allowing Redmond to lead by example the sustainability priority of driving affordable, market based environmental and social improvements in the goods and services it procures in support of various City services and the Council/Mayoral climate action planning priority.

259


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2517

PURCHASING SERVICES Alternately, this offer could be scaled downward approximately 7% (or $35,980 over the biennium) by reducing one of the two Buyers positions to part time status (from 1.0 to 0.8 FTE). This reduction would have a significant impact on divisional service levels due to lack of purchasing staffing support, oversight and management. This would reduce divisional focus to transactional based purchasing activities, eliminating many of the value added and cost avoidance activities while increasing the City's risk exposure and weaken internal controls. City departments would pay more for goods and services, not enjoy the ease of order placement or timely product delivery and would not gain access to the various purchasing cooperatives/consortiums made known to them as a direct result of purchasing staff effort. Additionally, this reduction would severely limit the consistency and transparency in purchasing practices and create a duplication of effort within City departments. This would weaken internal controls currently in place to ensure suppliers are provided adequate opportunity to participate in the City bid processes and receive fair, equal and consistent evaluation and award of purchases. The identified target rating measures would be negatively impacted as well. Purchasing has been working hard to improve these ratings. A reduction in this base offer would seriously undermine the effectiveness of the program and we would recommend the elimination of customer service measures and just focus on procurement metrics (e.g. number of purchases by type). Scalability Recommended: No change in program.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary 2013

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2014

Total

$267,824

$275,183

$543,007

$34,605 $0 $0 $302,429 2.620

$36,010 $0 $0 $311,193 2.620

$70,615 $0 $0 $613,622

260


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2439

PROVIDE DEPENDABLE VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT Description: What: Fleet Services is responsible for procuring and maintaining the City's fleet in a safe, dependable, cost-effective manner. The fleet consists of 281 vehicles and pieces of heavy equipment, and roughly 200 pieces of smaller equipment, all valued at approximately $10 million. The goal of Fleet Services is to achieve a balanced cost savings while working collaboratively with its customers to provide them with appropriate vehicles and equipment. Other Fleet responsibilities include maintaining all aspects of the City's fuel-dispensing system, maintaining and repairing portable emergency generators, maintaining a vehicle wash facility, and decommissioning surplus vehicles and equipment. Why: The ability to respond to public safety emergencies and conduct business throughout the City depends heavily on the reliability and availability of needed vehicles. Without an efficient and proactive fleet maintenance program, services delivered to the citizens of Redmond by City staff would be compromised, projects would be delayed, and the safety and emergency needs of our citizens and business community would be jeopardized. How: In 2011, Fleet Counselor Services Inc. (FCS), was selected to conduct a comprehensive fleet study. After comparing the City's existing fleet operations with industry best practices, they provided strategies and recommendations for the effective and efficient management of the City's fleet. FCS also provided Sentinel Certification software which established measurements and standards for improving Redmond's fleet management. Moving forward, this will be the framework to help the City achieve "100 Best Fleets" status which recognizes excellence in government fleet management. Using fleet study recommendations, Fleet will follow a preventive maintenance program that meets and commonly exceeds manufacturers' guidelines along with maintaining an inventory of frequently needed parts. This will streamline maintenance and repairs resulting in a reduced risk of premature parts failures and minimize breakdowns. Most of the inventory items are purchased from local businesses in support of the City's Business Community Priority. In addition to the repair and maintenance of the City's motor pool cars, Fleet Services is also responsible for the specifications and procurement of new vehicles utilizing the combined purchasing power available through the Washington State general contracts. Fleet Services team members are knowledgeable in all types of diesel, gas, hybrid, and electric vehicles used by the City ranging from heavy duty construction equipment to commuter sedans. Fleet has also invested in state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment designed to accurately troubleshoot component and engine failures as well as remain up to date with new and upcoming technologies. In support of the Clean & Green budgeting priority and the City's environmental initiative of "greening the fleet", Fleet strives to reduce emissions by investing in numerous hybrid vehicles and continues to investigate alternative fuel sources, such as compressed natural gas (CNG), and other eco-friendly innovations. Who: Fleet Services' primary customers are the City employees. With the exception of Fire, Fleet provides all City departments with accessible transportation and the equipment employees need to perform their jobs safely, effectively, and efficiently.

Performance Measures: The Public Works performance measures are focused on determining how well customer expectations are met for each of the core services provided by the Department. These cores services are water, wastewater, stormwater, environmental protection, transportation, facilities maintenance, and fleet. Performance measures were developed for each core service to evaluate the effectiveness of the functions necessary to provide each service which consist of planning, 261


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: PUBLIC WORKS OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: PW-2439

PROVIDE DEPENDABLE VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT implementation, maintenance, and administration. All Public Works offers contribute to one or more core service and function, and therefore directly impact many of the same measures. 1. Percentage of customers satisfied with the overall service they receive from Fleet Services. (Revised) Measure Customers Satisfied with Overall Service

Target 85.00

2010 Act 0.00

2011 Act 73.00

2012 Goal Measurement 85.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: A 5% scalability ($258,617) would be achieved by scaling back on vehicle and equipment replacement purchases, as a result of extending the life of these assets. These savings would be passed onto each department paying for vehicle replacements which ultimately would reduce the amount available for this offer. Based on the comprehensive Fleet Study performed in 2011, the life expectancy of most of the City's vehicles and equipment have already been extended. Careful research would have to be performed to determine new life cycles which would very likely have an outcome of increased repair costs and inevitably a higher vehicle failure rate. Many City employees view their vehicles as their office. Increased downtime due to equipment and vehicle failures would reduce their availability and customer service satisfaction. Scalability Recommended: No change in program pending implementation of recommendations from the City's fleet study.

Budget Offer Summary: Expenditure Summary

Ongoing-Sal/Ben Ongoing-Others OneTime-Sal/Ben OneTime-Others TOTAL

2013

2014

Total

$661,477 $2,283,957 $0

$688,332 $1,512,993 $0

$1,349,809 $3,796,950 $0

$0 $2,945,434 6.580

$0 $2,201,325 6.580

$0 $5,146,759

262


UNFUNDED OFFERS


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2555

OPEN DATA REPOSITORY - NEW - UNFUNDED Description: What: The new Open Data Repository offer is a service that provides constituents with online access to a broad range of City-supplied data sets along with the tools to view the information. The Open Data Repository works in conjunction with our Public Records Request process to provide greater transparency to the workings of government. While the Public Records Request is the formal, legal process to provide official records of the City, the Open Data Repository is a more open and accessible means for constituents to get information. The Open Data Repository also provides a service to computer programmers, either the City's or third party developers, which allows them to access those same data sets from a computer or smartphone application. Programmers can extend the use of City's data sets by combining them with other data and/or services that provide more value to constituents than a simple data set. One popular example is the OneBusAway application which uses real-time bus information from King County Metro to keep riders informed about their bus' arrival times and possible service disruption. Why: The service provided by the Open Data Repository will: · Improve customer service by providing online, self-service access to information at any time and in doing so reduce workload on City staff to meet records requests. The service also provides customers with the tools to view and analyze the information, as well the ability for them to share and discuss their analysis with others (Strategy 5: online access to services, community engagement, and employee productivity); · Increase transparency to the business of government, building confidence in the process and the institution. Further, it helps the City meet its obligation to provide information as requested by constituents (Strategy 4: focus on systems that reinforce credibility with the community); · Allow Information Services to partner with other departments to identify and post data sets of interest to the public. The service also supports the efforts of third party developers to create applications and services that benefit our constituents (Strategy 2: cross department alliances, encourage partnerships with the private sector); · Create a process for identifying new data set needs in coordination with the public and staff. It also provides a mechanism to automate the upload of data sets to the repository (Strategy 3: proactive and innovative approach, effective and efficient systems supporting customer service); and · Provide improved service to internal customers who have Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or want to (Purchasing, Accounting) publish their data sets as a means to achieve their transparency or operational effectiveness objectives (Strategy 5: enhance services provided to internal customers). How: A practical example of how this works (one of many from thoughout the City) comes from the Planning Department, which receives approximately 325 official requests for records a year and another 200 unofficial requests requiring around 20 hours per week from the records coordinator. Funding this offer allows Planning to define the commonly requested data, which Information Services can then automatically extract and load to the repository each night. Constituents who choose to use the repository will be able to download the data for use in their own systems or they may search, sort and filter the data with the repository's easy to use tools. Self-service not only improves the customer experience, but also reduces the workload on the records coordinator who can dedicate that time to other important work, including responding to official records requests that cannot be met through the repository. The implementation and maintenance of the Open Data Repository is organized into three functions: · Planning & Implementation: The Open Data Repository will contract with a service provider who will provide the City with data storage; maintain the site infrastructure; build and extend the end user tools; and maintain the application programming interface used by software developers (City staff or interested third party developers); · Content Collaboration: Information Services will work with departments to identify an initial group of data 263


BUDGETING BY PRIORITIES BUDGET OFFER

RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT Department Name: FINANCE & INFORMATION SERVICES OFFER - ONGOING Type of Offer:

Id: FIN2555

OPEN DATA REPOSITORY - NEW - UNFUNDED

sets to deploy to the site. Likely candidates could include data related to finances, purchasing, budgets, business licenses, permits and other data that is already generally available online; and Ongoing Maintenance: Information Services will continue to open up new data sets in consultation with staff, records coordinators, the Information Technology Governance Committee, other jurisdictions and constituents (see the open data sites for Seattle and Chicago for examples, <http://data.seattle.gov>, <https://data.cityofchicago.org/>). Information Services will be responsible for automating the posting of large data sets, but non-technical staff can be responsible for smaller, less volatile data sets.

Who: The Open Data Repository serves four customers. The first is the constituents that want access to electronic data at any time without having to make a records request. The second is the records coordinators who will see a reduction in requests from individuals seeking data (not official records). The third customer is those business process owners who have expressed interest in moving popular data set to the web for access (such as GIS and Finance). The fourth customer is software developers, either internal or external, who will write applications that extended the reach of the data by making it available to a broader range of users along with other data or services.

Performance Measures: 1. 2.

Increase the number of data sets available for use in the repository. Reduce the amount of time non-public safety records coordinators spend on records requests by moving information queries to the repository (recognizing that many public safety records have sensitive data that could never be moved to the repository).

Measure Data Sets Uploaded to the Respository Decrease Effort Spent on Records Request

Target 20.00 10.00

2010 Act 0.00 0.00

2011 Act 0.00 0.00

2012 Goal Measurement 0.00 Count 0.00 Percent

Scalability: Scalability Proposed: 1. A 5% reduction ($2,900) in the offer would force a serious re-evaluation of the hosting model. It would most likely mean the elimination of the user tools to view the data and of the application programming interface that allows programmers to access the information. It would also require more staff effort to maintain and upload the data sets. 2.

A 5% increase ($2,900) could be used to add some additional services or to develop a campaign to encourage citizens and third party developers to use the data sets.

Scalability Recommended: New program eliminated.

264


Redmond Biennial Budget P1  

Budgeting by Priorities

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