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A DRAFT OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN FOR THE CITY A MESSAGE from THE CITY OF NORTH VANCOUVER After many months of community engagement, we are pleased that a draft Official Community Plan (OCP) has been released. It builds on the 2002 OCP and centres on a vision of the City in 2031 as a vibrant, diverse and highly livable community. The OCP seeks to respond to changing trends and challenges from housing to employment to climate change. In the coming weeks, the City will be inviting you to have further input into the City’s future. We encourage everyone to learn more about this Plan and join the conversation.

WHAT IS AN OCP AND Why is it Important? An Official Community Plan (OCP) is a policy document that sets out the vision, goals and objectives to guide the municipality. Council, city staff and community members use the OCP to help make decisions about a variety of issues including housing, transportation, employment, social well-being and the provision of services. Much has changed in the City since the current OCP was adopted in 2002, including the growing impacts of climate change, rising energy costs, concerns around affordable housing, and other emerging issues. This review provides an opportunity to update the Plan with these issues in mind and a view to the future.

COMMUNITY VISION “In 2031, the City of North Vancouver is a vibrant, diverse, and highly livable community, resilient in its ability to adapt and thrive in the face of change, and sustainable in its ability to prosper without sacrifice to future generations”.

CityShaping is the community engagement process to update the City’s Official Community Plan. Over 2,300 community members have participated to date. Join the conversation about the future of your community. Find details on input opportunities at www.cnv.org/CityShaping.


DRAFT PLAN AT-A-GLANCE This map supports plan objectives through land use. The annotations below highlight some of the key changes to the updated land use map.

4. Partnership with Vancouver Coastal Health: The City has partnered with VCH to incorporate a health lens into the OCP. 5. Planning for Future Transit Land Use Corridors: Changes to the City’s Land Use Plan support Translink’s Frequent Transit Network. 6. Land Use Changes: Changes include: 1) Central Lonsdale 2) E. 3rd St. Area, and 3) Two Secondary Suites in Residential Level 1. 7. Small Commercial Nodes: The plan enables small scale mixed uses in residential areas such as corner stores. 8. New Development Permit Areas (DPAs): DPAs allow the City to establish specific guidelines in its Zoning Bylaw for entire areas on issues such as form, character and hazard mitigation. 9. Introduction of Density Bonus Caps: Density bonus caps have been introduced in the OCP. A separate Density Bonus and Amenity Contribution Policy is also available for public input. 10. Sustainability Targets and Indicators: Sustainability Targets and Indicators provided in each chapter are tied to specific policy objectives.

Mixed Use Level 1 (Low Density)

1.0

ED

RIV

E

68

56

1 ST

9 TH

46

16 37 55 46 16 40

4.0 23

2.05

Parks, Recreation & Open Space

2.2

34 23

Maximum Building Height Exceptions (M)

18

19

E KEITH

55 23 3 62 16 7 32 57

Commercial

RENT

5T

H

Y

LE

ER

OV

CL

54% OWN

ON

GT

IN AV

SH

4T

H

D

36

2N

D

40

1S

T

PL

Special Study Area

H

3R

ES

School & Institutional

6T

AN

ST DAVID’S

46

28

46%

8 TH

16

HARBOURSIDE

S

3.0

10 TH

DR EW ’

Mixed Use Level 4 (High Density)

3.0

AUTOMALL

AN

2.5

2.5

TENURE

Incremental intensification including mid-rise buildings on East 3rd Street and townhouses and duplexes in the surrounding neighbourhood.

11 TH

46

ST

2.0

East 3rd Street - Frequent Transit Development Area

12 TH

SQUAMISH NATION

RUFUS

13 TH

K’S

-

WILLIAM

14 TH

74

W KEITH

SUTHERLAND

MAHON

JONES

ST.ANDREW’S

15 TH

68

46

Mixed Use Level 3 (Medium Density)

Harbourside

37

14 TH

3 RD

17 TH 16 TH

37

15 TH

PA TR IC

Mixed Use Level 2 (Medium Density)

3.5

RIN

37

HENDRY

2.5

2.6

16 TH

18 TH

SUTHERLAND

Residential Level 6 (High Density)

MA

BEWICKE

1.6

Density Bonus Cap** (FSR)

GOSTICK

Residential Level 5 (Medium Density)

1.0

17 TH

19 TH

LONSDALE

CHESTERFIELD

18 TH

LA

RS ON

25

GRAND BOULEVARD

20 TH

19 TH

FELL

Residential Level 4 (Medium Density)

TE M PE

21 ST

47

20 TH

ST. GEORGE’S

WESTVIEW

L

0.75

FEL

Residential Level 3 (Low Density)

22 ND

21 ST

NEILSON

0.5

23 RD

22 ND

**Density Bonus Caps: Have been introduced for medium and high density categories.

MAITLAND

24 TH

56 23 RD

Residential Level 2 (Low Density)

Intensification along Lonsdale and around the hospital precinct and recognition of the ongoing planning effort for Harry Jerome Residential Complex.

TRANS CANADA HWY 24 TH

MOODY

0.5

26 TH

ST

3. New Policy Components: New policies addressed in this plan include adaptation to climate change, connecting health and the built environment, public safety, and a greater focus on affordable housing options.

Established land use designations to be retained while benefiting from proposed frequent transit service.

OCP Base Density (FSR)

Central Lonsdale

SOMERSET

27 TH

*Providing for the potential for both an in-house secondary suite and a coach house through an amendment to the City’s Zoning Bylaw.

Mixed Use

2. Updated Community Vision and Sustainability Framework: An interlinked set of community values centred on a vision of the City in 2031 has been introduced.

Residential Level 1* (Low Density)

28 TH

RIDGEWAY

Land Use Designation

Although many of the current Plan’s goals and objectives have been maintained, some of the major changes in the Draft OCP include: 1. Longer Time Horizon: This plan includes a Community Vision to the year 2031 and, in keeping with the Regional Growth Strategy, has 2041 on the horizon.

Marine Drive - Frequent Transit Development Area

HAMILTON

The Draft OCP builds on the basic framework and many of the goals and objectives of the City’s current Plan. This includes the ongoing pursuit of a compact and complete urban community with a mix of housing and employment opportunities well served by transit and amenities. It also includes an integrated set of policies to maintain a distinctive sense of place and the development of a sustainable and highly livable city.

Legend

Residential

WHAT ARE THE 10 BIG CHANGES?

3 RD

Source: Statistics Canada – 2011 National Household Survey

AD

E

AGE

Application in Process (Height TBD )

Mixed Employment

0-24

This map is one part of the Draft OCP and is subject to change. For more information visit www.cnv.org/CityShaping.

Industrial

65+

25%

POLICY AREAS

14%

61%

Land Use – Housing, Population and Employment Decisions around land use are key to developing a complete, compact, urban community with easy access to a variety of housing types, transit, employment and recreation.

Community Well-being Fostering a community where people are supported and encouraged in an inclusive, healthy and safe environment.

Parks, Recreation and Open Space A linked system of public spaces, indoor and outdoor recreational facilities and services, parks, greenways and natural areas for healthy, active living and community gatherings are important to a complete community.

Economic Development When the economy is working well, the community prospers, enabling community members to support themselves and providing a strong tax base from which to fund services and infrastructure.

Transportation, Mobility and Access One of the most significant issues facing the community is meeting its transportation needs through a variety of convenient transportation choices while supporting efficient goods movement. This includes planning for those with disabilities, limited mobility and residents with low income.

Natural Environment, Energy and Climate A healthy environment for the future includes protecting and improving ecological health, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and integrating climate adaptation measures.

Arts, Culture and Heritage A creative community, building on the diversity of its people, landscape and history to inspire innovation and reinforce sense of place.

Municipal Services and Infastructure Building a financially sustainable legacy of green, durable, timeless infrastructure and responsive, thoughtful delivery of services helps to sustain the health and well-being of the community.

25-64 Source: Statistics Canada – 2011 National Household Survey

DWELLING TYPE 20% (2001) 15% (2011)

80% (2001) 85% (2011)

Single Family

Multi-Family

Sources: Statistics Canada – 2001 Census / 2011 National Household Survey


WHERE ARE WE IN THE PROCESS?

HOW YOU CAN GET INVOLVED Council has referred the Draft OCP for public input and discussion. There are many ways to participate and keep informed of upcoming activities: • Sign up for regular updates at CityShaping@cnv.org • Attend an Open House • Fill out a Feedback Form • Review the latest Summary Reports • Follow us on Facebook, Twitter • Check our webpage regularly at www.cnv.org/CityShaping Whether you have followed the whole process or are just joining in now, your input will help make the City an even better place to live.

FOR MORE INFO This handout includes an overview of some key policy changes. For more information please review the Draft OCP. This document and background materials are available at cnv.org/CityShaping.

CONTACT US City of North Vancouver 141 West 14th Street North Vancouver, BC V7M 1H9 CityShaping@cnv.org Email: CityShaping@cnv.org www.cnv.org/CityShaping Phone: 604.990.4240

REGIONAL CONTEXT The Metro Vancouver Regional Growth Strategy (Metro Vancouver 2040: Shaping our Future) focuses on land use policies to guide the future development of the region and support the efficient provision of transportation, regional infrastructure and community services. A Regional Context statement outlines how each Metro Vancouver municipality will accommodate its share of the regional growth and how local policies align to support the Regional Strategy.

Draft OCP Summary Document: Highlights and Key Changes  

After many months of community engagement, the City is pleased that a draft Official Community Plan (OCP) has been released. It builds on th...