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to position the structure closer stylistically to the Castillo than the Chac Mool Temple. The altantean altar in the Jaguar Temple, almost certainly repositioned there from another structure, is of no significance concerning the initial construction of the temple.

a bone necklace and bone in his headdress, also wears the cross hatched elongated ovals. Similar elements occur on the columns of the Lower Jaguar Temple. Although specific elements from the columns and pilasters of the Chac Mool Temple resemble those from the ball court sculptures, the similarity ends with the shared elements. If the sculptures on columns 4, 5 and 6 from the inner room of the Chac Mool Temple most resemble figures from the Lower Jaguar Temple, it is because of the elements themselves. Proportions, poses, and gestures distinguish the two sets of sculpture.

The column and pilaster sculpture of the Chac Mool Temple suggests some period of time elapsed between it and the ball court buildings. The figures on the first three columns and the pilasters of the Chac Mool Temple are distinct from the sculpture on the last three columns. In attire, objects carried, and overall style of the carvings, the figures on columns 1 to 3 and on the pilasters most closely resemble the figures from the Castillo. Occasionally there are direct resemblances, like the skeletal figure 3W from the Chac Mool Temple and figure K1O from the Castillo. The curved sticks, often held across the left or right shoulders, recall the curved sticks and postures of the figures in the South Ball Court Temple, but the headdresses share traits with the Castillo figures. Chac Mool figure 2E has a turban headdress like those at the ball court, but he is the only individual at this temple so attired.

Some period of time elapsed between the two sets of sculpture. The Chac Mool Temple shares elements of sculpture with the Castillo and the ball court buildings. The Castillo is earlier stratigraphically than the Chac Mool Temple. Most probably the ball court buildings are also earlier. The ball court buildings do not share significant elements of style with any structure that is demonstrably later than the Chac Mool Temple. The ball court sculptures represent an early sub-style at ChichĂŠn ItzĂĄ, and the Castillo sculptures are generally transitional between that sub-style and the later sculptures of the Chac Mool Temple and the Temple of the Warriors.

The inspiration for the figures on columns 4 to 6, on the other band, may have come from the Lower Temple of the Jaguars, where skirted figures also appear, as do mosaic mantles, gaiters, straight spears, head masks, and flexible shields. Figure 4N, who wears a conical hat and carries an offering, is similar to an individual on the left side of the lower row of figures on the north wall of the North Ball Court Temple. Figure 6W, who wears

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Architecture and Chronology at Chichén Itzá, Yucatán  

Architecture and Chronology at Chichén Itzá, Yucatán