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Grube, Nikolai and Ruth J. Krochock 2007 Reading between the Lines: Hieroglyphic Texts from Chichén Itzá and Its Neighbors. In Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, pp. 205-249. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks. Kowalski, Jeff Karl 2007 What’s “Toltec” at Uxmal and Chichén Itzá? Merging Maya and Mesoamerican Worldviews and World Systems in Terminal Classic to Early Postclassic Yucatán. In Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, pp. 251-313. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks. Kubler, George 1961 Chichén Itzá y Tula. Estudios de Cultura Maya I:47-80. Mexico, D.F. 1962 From the Toltec Maya to the Spaniards. In The Art and Architecture of Ancient America, pp. 174-208. Baltimore: Penguin Books. Schmidt, Peter J. 2007 Birds, Ceramics and Cacao: New Excavations at Chichén Itzá, Yucatán. In Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, pp. 151203. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks. Smith, Michael E. 2007 Tula and Chichén Itzá: Are We Asking the Right Questions? In Twin Tollans: Chichén Itzá, Tula and the Epiclassic to Early Postclassic Mesoamerican World, pp. 579-617. Washington, D.C.: Dumbarton Oaks.

Dedication To Sylvanus Morley, who never lost his appreciation for the romance of archaeology; To Earl Morris, who brought his talents honed in the Southwest to Chichén Itzá; and To Karl Ruppert, who accomplished so much of the groundwork archaeology at Chichén Itzá.

Red Jaguar Throne, Castillo-sub, which Morley called the “most important single object ever discovered in the Maya area” (1947:Table XI)

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Architecture and Chronology at Chichén Itzá, Yucatán  

Architecture and Chronology at Chichén Itzá, Yucatán