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Acknowledgements The Comprehensive Plan Committee and Planning staff would like to thank all of the individuals and organizations who provided their input on Plan Ithaca. We greatly appreciate everyone who participated in the planning process with their comments and ideas for the city’s future. We would also like to thank Professor Jennifer Minner and students in the Spring 2015 Concepts and Methods of Land Use Planning class for their work on the draft plan and their assistance with public outreach.

design: Art & Anthropology, Inc. photography provided by: Allison Usavage; Downtown Ithaca Alliance; Hangar Theater; Jolene Almendarez, The Ithaca Voice; and the following City departments: Clerk’s Office, Ithaca Fire Department, Ithaca Police Department, GIAC, Mayor’s Office, Public Works, Ithaca Youth Bureau.

Comprehensive Plan Committee

Planning and Development Board

Kirby Edmonds, Chair David Kay, Vice-Chair Jutta Dotterweich* Gary Ferguson Chad Hoover Graham Kerslick Deb Mohlenhoff Rob Morache* Alphonse Pieper C. J. Randall Larry Roberts John Schroeder Tom Shelley Stephen Smith Wendy Wallitt Hollis Erb, Town of Ithaca Liaison

Garrick Blalock, Chair Mark Darling, Board of Public Works Liaison Jack Elliott McKenzie Jones-Rounds Robert Aaron Lewis C. J. Randall John Schroeder

*Former Committee Member

Common Council Svante L. Myrick, Mayor Cynthia Brock George McGonigal J.R. Clairborne Joseph Murtaugh Donna Fleming Ellen McCollister Graham Kerslick Stephen Smith Josephine Martell Deb Mohlenhoff

Prepared by the City of Ithaca Planning Division Megan Wilson, Senior Planner, Project Manager JoAnn Cornish, Director of Planning and Development Phyllisa DeSarno, Director of Economic Development Nels Bohn, Director of Community Development (Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency) Jennifer Kusznir, Senior Planner Nick Goldsmith, Sustainability Coordinator Bryan McCracken, Historic Preservation Planner Lisa Nicholas, Senior Planner Lynn Truame, Community Development Planner (Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency) Charles Pyott, Research & Editorial Assistant Debbie Grunder, Executive Assistant


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Table of Contents 1 Introduction

3 7 17

7 Natural & Cultural Resources

2 Public Participation & Communication

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8 Sustainable Energy, 118 Water, & Food Systems

1.1 History 1.2 Vision

3 Land Use

3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

Importance of Compact Mixed-Use Development Future Land Use Map Future Land Use Categories Focus Areas

4 Economic Vitality 4.1 4.2 4.3

Fiscal Health Economic Development Workforce Development & Job Training

5 Community Livability

5.1 Housing 5.2 Historic Preservation 5.3 Public Safety 5.4 Physical Infrastructure 5.5 Health, Wellness, & Support

26 29 35 37 49

52 58 61 66

70 73 77 80 84 87

6 Mobility & Transportation

90

6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4

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Increasing Transportation Choice Both Locally & Regionally Connecting Land Use & Transportation Efficiency and Innovation in Technology, Operations & Management Communication & Education to Support Transportation Choices

99 101

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7.1 Natural Resources 7.2 Cultural Resources

106 109 114

8.1 Energy 8.2 Water Resources & Stormwater Management 8.3 Food Systems

123 126

9 Appendix A: Glossary

131

10 Appendix B: Public Outreach Summary

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11 Appendix C: Maps

138

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note: Appendix C is available at: www.cityofithaca.org/165/City-Comprehensive-Plan

11.1 General Neighborhood 11.2 City and Town Future Land Use 11.3 Historic Districts 11.4 Environmental Features 11.5 Impervious Surfaces 11.6 Transportation Corridors and Trails 11.7 Parks & Natural Areas

12 Appendix D: Resolutions

12.1 Common Council 12.2 Planning and Development Board 12.3 Comprehensive Plan Committee

146 146 149 152


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1.0

Introduction A comprehensive plan is a vision for the future and a blueprint for change, particularly as it relates both to the physical growth of a city’s buildings, streets, and infrastructure and to the retention and enhancement of quality of life elements, such as parks, neighborhoods, and social equity. Once adopted, it becomes a fundamental part of the City’s decisionmaking processes, serving as both an inspiration for a broad range of City actions, and a standard by which they can be measured. The comprehensive plan guides the Common Council and City boards and committees and informs City policies, including zoning and funding decisions.


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Completed in 1971, the City’s previous comprehensive plan, Ithaca, N.Y.: A General Plan, has since been amended 14 times by various neighborhood and strategic plans. Local conditions that affect Ithaca, as well as national and global trends, have changed dramatically since the adoption of the 1971 plan, resulting in the need to prepare a new comprehensive plan that addresses present-day issues at the local level. The plans, goals, and visions of individual residents, organizations, and institutions shape Ithaca’s development through a cooperative planning process. During this ongoing process of community planning, we seek collectively to observe and analyze existing conditions, identify issues, evaluate potential courses of action, and create a framework within which

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See Appendix B for a complete summary of public outreach.

development can occur that balances the sometimes competing objectives and priorities existing within the community. The key ideas, goals, and recommendations which together form the structure of this comprehensive plan emerged from public input received over the course of several years. The City’s Comprehensive Plan Committee has overseen the planning process and conducted extensive public outreach. In a series of public workshops, neighborhood meetings, and stakeholder meetings held at various locations throughout the city, and via multiple surveys, Ithacans were asked to reflect and comment on what they liked most and least about the community and to identify the issues that were of greatest concern to them. Based on this information, focus groups delved more deeply into the issues raised, and subcommittees of the Comprehensive Plan Committee (known as chapter groups) drafted objectives and recommendations to address them. The draft plan, Plan Ithaca, was then submitted to the public for comment, and final revisions were made based on public input.1

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Structure of Plan Ithaca The City has undertaken a two-phase process for the preparation of the new comprehensive plan. Phase I involves the preparation of Plan Ithaca, a city-wide plan that identifies a vision and goals for the entire city. Phase II will include the subsequent preparation of specific neighborhood or thematic plans, based upon Plan Ithaca. All Phase II plans will build upon Plan Ithaca and will reflect the goals of the broader document in the more detailed plans. In addition to this introductory chapter, Plan Ithaca is organized into seven chapters, as follows: • Public Participation • Mobility & Transportation & Communication • Natural & Cultural Resources • Land Use • Sustainable Energy, Water, & Food Systems • Economic Vitality • Community Livability Three thread-through themes serve as overarching concepts that guide the entire plan. Each chapter reflects the principles of sustainability, equity, and collaboration, as described below.

Three thread-through themes serve as overarching concepts that guide the entire plan. Each chapter reflects the principles of sustainability, equity, and collaboration, as described below. Sustainability

Equity

Collaboration

Living in a way that allows present generations to meet their needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. A sustainable community must safeguard the health and well-being of its economic, social, and environmental systems — including food security, clean air and water, healthy ecosystems, and effective governance.

The services, amenities, and opportunities that are available through City efforts are accessible to all residents through means that preserve dignity and that are free of discrimination. These may include participation in decision-making, as well as access to information, housing, transportation, economic opportunity, jobs and job training, recreation, and a safe and healthy environment.

The City works in partnership with other municipalities, educational institutions, and community organizations to realize the goals of Plan Ithaca.


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General Notes ▪ Any mention of “Ithaca” throughout the plan refers to the City of Ithaca. ▪ The use of the word “City” (with a capital C) refers to the City of Ithaca

as a government.

▪ The use of the word “city” (with a lower case c) refers to the city as a

geographic area.

▪ Phrases or words shown in small capitals are defined in Plan Ithaca’s

Glossary (Appendix A).

The topics included in the various chapters of Plan Ithaca are often connected to ideas in other chapters. To help make this connection, color-coded cross-references are provided in a text box next to each section. If you are interested in the ideas in a particular section, you may also be interested in reviewing the referenced chapter. The key to these cross-references is as follows:

A comprehensive plan is, ideally, a living document — a written agreement

PP Public Participation & Communication LU Land Use EV Economic Vitality CL Community Livability

the City makes with itself and its

MT Mobility & Transportation

residents at a given

S Sustainable Energy, Water, & Food Systems

point in time.

NC Natural & Cultural Resources

A comprehensive plan is, ideally, a living document — a written agreement the City makes with itself and its residents at a given point in time. A good comprehensive plan evolves organically and ages gracefully, as the City and the community members involved in implementing it “learn by doing.” As new trends emerge and community needs change, our priorities will evolve and implementation strategies will be revised. As a living document, Plan Ithaca must be regularly revisited and updated to reflect our community priorities. Plan Ithaca, is a snapshot of our community in 2015: our collective effort to learn from our past, look into our future, and commit ourselves to a course of action that will make our city a better place to live, work, and play for all Ithacans.

2 It is interesting to note that DeWitt was a member of the commission, which included Gouvernour Morris and John Rutherford, that laid out the gridiron street system on upper Manhattan between 1807 and 1811.

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1.1

History of the City’s Development The following narrative has been assembled to highlight key events and conditions that have shaped the development of the city’s physical form and character. A familiarity with this history is important to understanding the complex and diverse conditions and influences that shape current and future development in the city.

Ithaca’s development was largely influenced by the environmental conditions that characterize the region. Ithaca’s terrain is marked by a valley, the “Flats,” surrounded by steep hills on the west, south, and east, and by Cayuga Lake to the north. The city is cut by the Cayuga Inlet and three major creeks — Fall, Six Mile and Cascadilla Creeks — that cascade down these hillsides and empty into Cayuga Lake. It was these geographic conditions that attracted the native people of the Cayuga Nation to the region.

The lands of the Cayuga Nation, a member of the five-nation Iroquois Confederacy, were located roughly within the watershed of Cayuga Lake and included the present day City of Ithaca. Like the other native tribes in the Central New York region, the Cayuga Nation was driven out of the area during the Revolutionary War period.  At the conclusion of the war, New York State began negotiations with members of the Cayuga Nation remaining in the area to attain formal title to their lands.  On February 25, 1789, the tribe ceded its traditional lands in and around Cayuga Lake to the government, opening up the area to European settlers.    The original white settlement in the area that would become the City of Ithaca began on the Flats. The city’s regular street pattern was originally laid out by Simeon DeWitt, Surveyor General of the State of New York, in 1806. Owning much of the dry, flat land between Six Mile and


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Cascadilla Creeks, DeWitt laid out a series of north/south and east/west streets in a grid pattern to encourage settlement and development.2 He also reserved lots within the gridiron for schools, churches, and other civic uses, including the public square now referred to as DeWitt Park. The city’s early accessibility by seven overland turnpikes helped encourage linear development from east to west along the street grid. With a population of about 1,000, Ithaca was incorporated as a village in 1821. The new village charter established a government consisting of five trustees, who were empowered to erect public buildings, raise taxes, procure fire engines and equipment, make necessary repairs and improvements, and pay officers of the corporation. At this time, the recognized center of the village was the corner of Owego (now State) and Tioga Streets and all official notices were posted on that corner. Linear development began along Owego (State Street) as it became a main thoroughfare to the rapidly developing area at the Cayuga Inlet. The first 15 years after incorporation were particularly important because it was during this period that the core components of the street plan were put on the ground. During this time, the village population more than quadrupled from 860 to almost 4,000. Sidewalks were built, and the village boundaries were extended. In 1831, a map of the village was prepared that extended the northsouth grid pattern to the area

bounded by Brindley, Cascadilla, Factory (now Stewart Avenue), and Clinton Streets. (This map was the foundation for the present street system.) Much of the growth of the village was in the form of peripheral expansion around the established core. In 1835, the grid was extended up lower East Hill to approximately Stewart Avenue and the area west of Auburn Street was laid out at a diagonal to the village’s original plat. In addition to the seven turnpikes connecting Ithaca to surrounding communities, the village’s development was also influenced by Cayuga Lake and the railroad industry. The steamboat Enterprise, launched on Cayuga Lake in 1821, as well as the Telemachus and DeWitt Clinton, further facilitated inter-community connectivity and transportation. Unfortunately, the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825 did not have the positive economic

With a population of about 1,000, Ithaca was incorporated as a village in 1821.

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impact many local business anticipated. The construction of four railroads that linked Ithaca to other rail, stagecoach and steamboat lines was complete by 1874. However, the area’s steep terrain and the poor quality of early rail equipment made extensive rail access prohibitively expensive. The construction of the railroads did spur a speculative real estate boom during which Ezra Cornell, a mill worker, farmer and self-made businessman, purchased large tracts of land on East Hill. This land would become the site of Cornell University.

Major public improvements were constructed in the late 1840s and early 1850s. With an increase in taxes, the Village was able to fund gravel sidewalks, the extension and improvement of streets, and increased fire protection. Communication with other communities during this period was improved with the completion of a telegraph line in 1846. The Ithaca Water Works, a private company, was established in 1853 to bring clean water into the village. The Ithaca Gas Works formed in the same year, accommodated the use of gaslights in homes and stores, and the installation of street lights. The 1860s marked a period of significant growth in the city. During this decade, the Village laws were codified, and all the streets were numbered and their names marked. Probably the most significant development during this period was the opening of a private educational institution in 1868 that was designated as New York’s Morrill Land Grant university. Chartered in 1865, Cornell University was named after Ezra Cornell,


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who gifted two hundred acres of his farmland on East Hill for its establishment. On October 7, 1868, Cornell University formally opened and admitted its first class of 412 students. It grew over the next four decades and became, at one point, the nation’s second largest university. University-related development immediately began on East Hill. The 1870s and 1880s were decades of considerable change in the village. In 1870, an iron bridge was built over Six Mile Creek at Aurora Street, which improved access to South Hill. Telephone lines were first installed in the village in 1878. Also installed during the period were electric street lights, street paving, and a fire alarm system. In terms of transportation, the biggest change was the advent of the electric street railway system that was chartered in 1884. In 1888, Ithaca was incorporated as a city, the twenty-ninth in New York State. Ithaca’s “weak mayor, strong council” system of city government was established at this time; it was the first such system in the state. Work to increase the number of paved streets and to lay sewer pipes in anticipation of a future sewer plant immediately followed the City’s incorporation. Nearly a

decade later, the city sewer systems opened for public use. The village’s population was 10,107 in 1870; however, by the time the Ithaca Gun Company was founded in 1880, the city’s population had reached 11,190. In 1892, W. Grant Egbert founded the Ithaca Conservatory of Music, which later became Ithaca College. Located downtown on DeWitt Park, the population of conservancy students was an integral part of the downtown economy from the late 19th through the mid-20th centuries, with the school occupying several downtown buildings and students renting rooms and patronizing downtown restaurants and shops.

Changes occurred

Changes occurred over the next two decades that transformed the small rural village into a regional industrial center and college town. A strong local economy of new large-scale industries emerged (e.g. Ithaca Gun, Morse Chain and International Salt Co.). These maturing industries, combined with the steady growth of Cornell University in the 1890s, led to a sustained building boom in Ithaca through the turn of the century. Ownership of the city’s water supply was transferred from a

and college town.

over the next two decades that transformed the small rural village into a regional industrial center A strong local economy of new largescale industries emerged.

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private company to the City following a severe outbreak of typhoid fever in 1903. In 1908, the Board of Public Works was established to oversee its operation and all future improvements within the city. Most construction during the late-19th and early-20th century took place east of Stewart Avenue on East Hill, where the demand for student and faculty housing had become acute. Around the turn of the century, the city began to grow outside the bounds of the old village settlement on the Flats, and by 1889, most of the land on the Flats had been developed. In the 1890s, intensive development began on the hills surrounding the Flats, first on East Hill adjacent to Cornell University, then on South Hill, and later on West Hill. This growth was accelerated with a major expansion at Cornell University beginning in 1902, with the establishment of the New York State College of Agriculture. By 1900, Ithaca’s population stood at 13,136 people.

The automobile increased Ithaca’s accessibility in the 1920s and established the city as the central place for employment and retail services in the county. In 1923, a citizen’s committee was appointed to consider and formulate plans for a comprehensive program of permanent improvements for the City. Public improvements made during this period were directly related to the increased number of automobiles and included: a large bond issue for street repair, work on bridges, purchase of the first public parking area, establishment of a municipal asphalt plant, and the installation of the first traffic lights in the business district and of stop signs on busy corners. In 1926, the first City Planning Commission was appointed. During the 1920s, the City also purchased and rehabilitated Renwick Park, renaming it Stewart Park after its benefactor, Mayor Edwin C. Stewart. The park was originally constructed as a privately-owned amusement park and was later used as a silent-film studio. Residential construction boomed throughout this decade and a number of large public buildings, including the Belle Sherman and Henry St. John schools, were constructed as well. The City’s population reached 20,000 people by 1930. In contrast to the national trend, Ithaca’s economy remained relatively stable throughout the 1930s. Major construction projects — including the Tompkins County courthouse and jail, the


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Southside Center, and the New York State Electric and Gas building at 108 E. Green Street (now City Hall) — were completed during this period. Federal relief agencies funded as part of the New Deal also completed municipal projects, including the golf course and parks improvements, during this time. Other civic improvements included new street lights, upgraded electric services, a 750,000 gallon municipal water tank on West Hill, water service expansions, and a new sewage treatment plant. During the 1930s, trolley lines were significantly cut back and gradually replaced by buses; trolley service stopped in 1935 after a major flood that year washed out some of its rails. During World War II, few new public projects were completed within the city as the community focused on the war effort. In 1941, fire

engines were barred from crossing ten bridges within the city; two of the bridges were condemned and closed. The end of World War II ushered in a new era of significant changes within the city, many within the downtown core. With many veterans enrolling at Cornell University and Ithaca College under the G.I. Bill, the city experienced a significant shortage of housing in the post-war period. The influx of students, and their families, was accommodated in several ways. Temporary dormitories were built, and “Vetsburg� was built on East Hill with houses moved from Messina, New York. However, most of the increased housing demand was absorbed through the conversion of large, single-family homes into multi-unit apartment buildings. Also during the 1940s, low-

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cost housing units were planned for West Hill and bus routes were extended up South Hill. The Ithaca Shopping Plaza, featuring Ithaca’s first supermarket, opened on Elmira Road in the late 1940s. The 1950s marked another decade of significant change in the city. The continued demand for increased housing led to a building boom and heated debate on zoning and development. In the zoning ordinance passed in 1950, the City tried to address its long-term needs both for housing and for industrial development. Based on the principles of single-use or Euclidean zoning, the new ordinance was criticized at the time for being too restrictive. Founded in 1915, the Village of Cayuga Heights voted to reject City annexation in 1954. However, the City successfully annexed the Spencer Road district in 1956. In that same year, 42 existing suburban school districts merged with the Ithaca City School District. The end of the decade also saw the construction of the “Tuning Fork,” which caused the destruction of numerous commercial buildings along East State, East Seneca, and Aurora Streets and substantially decreased downtown density. Ithaca’s population, which had grown rapidly between 1940 and 1950, declined throughout the 1950s and 1960s as new housing developments opened in suburban areas outside of the city. In the 1950s, the city’s population was 29,257 people or approximately 50 percent of the population of Tompkins County. By 1960, the City’s population was 28,799 or 44 percent of the county’s population; this corresponds to a 2 percent decrease in the city’s population


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and a 12 percent increase in the county’s population. In addition to the changes in residency trends, the downtown business district also changed significantly in the 1960s. New York State Route 13 was rerouted onto Meadow and Fulton Streets, redirecting auto traffic off of Cayuga Street and away from downtown. The first of several large-scale shopping centers outside of the city was built in the early 1960s, drawing business away from downtown merchants. Entire blocks of downtown commercial buildings were leveled during this period as part of urban renewal. The original City Hall, constructed in 1844, was demolished to provide additional downtown parking, and the current City Hall on East Green Street was purchased. The loss of Old City Hall — as well as the Ithaca Hotel, the Cornell Public Library (built by Ezra Cornell), and other architecturally and historically significant buildings during this period — led to a strong local preservation movement that is still active today. Demolition in the business district was accompanied by demolition in some residential neighborhoods. One entire city neighborhood (the Rhine) was demolished during the decade to make way for excavation of the Flood Control Channel, which created Inlet Island; this wasconsistent with urban planning philosophy of the era. The relocation of Ithaca College and the Ithaca City School District to areas outside of the city also changed downtown. From 1960 through 1965, Ithaca College, formerly the Ithaca Conservancy of Music, constructed an entirely new campus on South Hill in the Town

of Ithaca. In 1968, the College’s final academic department moved to the South Hill campus, removing its faculty and students from the city’s central core and leaving several vacant buildings. During a relatively short, five-year period, the city school district expanded the Fall Creek School and constructed Northeast and Glenwood elementary schools and DeWitt and Boynton middle schools. All of the new schools were built outside of the city. The year 1974 saw the construction of the Ithaca Commons pedestrian mall. Its boundaries are Green Street to the south, Cayuga Street to the west, Seneca Street to the north, and Aurora Street to the east. The Commons was created to counter balance the effects of new large shopping malls located outside of the city, particularly in what is now the Village of Lansing. This was a time when many small towns in the United States were experimenting with creating pedestrian malls, and the Ithaca Commons is one of the few successful examples that remain. However, the Commons did not

The year 1974 saw the construction of the Ithaca Commons pedestrian mall.

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entirely prevent the movement of major retailers and entertainment venues from downtown to more suburban locations. At one time, five major department stores including J.C. Penny and Woolworths were located downtown; all relocated or closed by the 1990s. The period also saw the closure of several movie theaters downtown, the relocation of the city high school in 1960, and the closure of the DeWitt Junior High School in 1971. In the same year, the former downtown high school property (now called the DeWitt Building) was converted into a mixed-use retail, office and residential building. The Ithaca Farmers’ Market was established in 1973 as a venue for local growers and craftspeople to sell their goods. The rapidly expanding market moved five

times before settling in its current location on the waterfront where steamboats from Cayuga Lake used to dock. The market has developed into a thriving community gathering place. A dock was built to accommodate local fishermen, people arriving by boat, and those who want a picturesque picnic spot. The Farmers’ Market has continued to grow and prosper, often attracting well over 5,000 people a day. What was originally an innovative way to sell local produce, crafts, and baked goods is now an Ithaca tradition. In 1988, Cornell opened its new Center for Theatre Arts in Collegetown, and the Ithaca/ Tompkins County Convention & Visitors Bureau became operational. Collegetown development increased significantly during the 1980s, shifting more retail activity and rental student housing nearer to the Cornell campus, and creating more density in this area of East Hill. This period saw significant growth at both Cornell and Ithaca College, including new academic buildings and new campus residential halls. The next decade saw the construction of the state-of-the-art Ithaca College Science Building, the relocation of the Ithaca Post Office from downtown Ithaca to the


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Village of Lansing, and a new $11 million Tompkins County Airport terminal. City population as a percentage of the county has continued to decrease since the 1960s. In 1990 the city’s population stood at 29,541 people, approximately 31 percent of the county population. In 2000, the city’s population represented only 30 percent of the county total. With a city population of 30,014, this percentage decreased to approximately 29.5 percent in 2010. Development outside of the central core has included affordable housing and EcoVillage on West Hill, retail development and additional housing to the east, and light industrial redevelopment on South Hill. Closed in 2011 and sitting vacant for many years, the Morse Chain Works / Emerson Power Transmission property on South Hill is being redeveloped into a mixed-use development that includes space for retail, residential, and manufacturing uses. As the demand for housing in Ithaca has increased, housing development within the city has been largely compact and dense. It has also expanded into all areas surrounding the city. The increased focus on new development within the city has initiated conversations about land use, zoning, and other approaches to regulating the built environment. Among these is the replacement of the city’s Euclidean zoning with a form-based code, which would focus on the physical characteristics of the built environment rather than use. Also being

considered is a Euclidean zoning and form-based code hybrid that would address the use as well as the physical form and context of the built environment. The land area of the city is currently almost fully developed; however, a substantial amount of underutilized land remains, especially in the form of surface-level parking lots.

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A Vision for Our Future The City of Ithaca is proud to be known as a place of great natural beauty, rich heritage, diverse and vibrant community life, small city character, and steadfast pursuit of social equity, physical accessibility, livability, and environmental sustainability. By preserving and building upon these strengths, we strive to be a model community in which to live and work, and an exceptional destination for visitors. This vision outlines our community’s goals for the future and will help guide the City as it implements the Comprehensive Plan. Three key themes convey this vision: Preserve & Enhance; Create & Promote; and Engage & Embrace.

Preserve & Enhance Our Neighborhoods – Ithacans place a high value on the sense of belonging, support and connection that are inherent in our neighborhood identities. The character and livability of our existing neighborhoods must be protected. Our Strong Community Bonds – Community cohesiveness relies on meaningful bonds among residents, neighborhoods, and community institutions. A strong sense of community is one of our greatest assets, and we must continue to cultivate these connections. Our Historic & Cultural Resources – Ithaca is fortunate to have a rich heritage of historic buildings, an active arts community, and a diverse and significant cultural history. Stewardship must remain a priority in order to preserve our valuable cultural and historic resources. Our Natural Resources – The striking beauty of our natural areas and open spaces is a source of delight for residents and visitors alike. We depend upon our water and land resources and use them actively. These must be protected and preserved for the enjoyment, recreation, and use of current and future generations. Our Educational Resources – Educational resources for children and adults are of a high quality and draw many new residents to the City. Higher education is a key economic engine as well as a source of Ithaca’s vitality.


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Create & Promote A Strong Economy That Provides Opportunities and Economic Security for All Residents –To create a healthier, more prosperous community, it is essential to strengthen and further diversify our economic base while supporting local businesses and current employers. We will work to enhance our dynamic down town and commercial centers. We will seek to create job readiness and well-paying employment opportunities for all our residents to secure a rewarding future for both the individual and the community as a whole. A Range of Mobility & Transportation Options – With an emphasis on environmental sustainability, we aim to enhance connectivity and mobility by all modes of travel for people of all abilities. We commit to improving universal accessibility and livability for residents and visitors. A Sustainable Built Environment – Following best practices, we will promote forward-looking mixed-use, commercial, and residential development. We will continue to expand housing opportunities for all income levels and life stages. We are committed to investing wisely in the maintenance and improvement of our infrastructure to foster the community growth and development for which we strive.

Engage & Embrace The Diversity of Our Community & Our Cultural Heritage – The City celebrates the strengths of the community that make Ithaca a truly special place for all of those who call it home. It is the people who make Ithaca such an extraordinary city, and we celebrate the diversity of our population and our cultural heritage. We will continue to pursue equality, inclusion, and fairness in our political, economic, and social systems. Our Innovative Spirit & Creative Thinking – Ithaca has long been a place for creative thinking and groundbreaking ideas. Realizing that every member contributes to the community, we will continue to nurture this innovative spirit and draw upon the knowledge, creativity, and energy available to us. An Inclusive, Ongoing Public Dialogue – We want an ongoing, public dialogue that reflects the diversity of our community and engages our residents to be co-creators of their future. Collaborative Efforts with Institutional Partners & Surrounding Municipalities – We commit to working collaboratively as a community, with our institutional partners, and with surrounding municipalities to achieve our vision.

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P U BL I C PA RT I C I PAT I O N & CO M M U N I C ATI O N

Plan Ithaca

Public Participation & COMMUNICATION

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2.0

The City believes that successful governance depends on high-quality two-way communication between all parts of the City government and the public.

The City strives to engage all community members in governing and decision-making processes that are important to them. Effective communication, built on relationships of trust, is central to achieving this goal. As in many municipalities throughout the country, there are various groups of people within our community who, for a broad array of reasons, do not participate in local governance. Decisions that affect them are then made without their input or consideration of their needs and interests. We must pursue more opportunities for dialogue and encourage all members of the community to become involved in issues that concern them. While the City has expanded its public outreach in recent years, it continuously aims to improve upon its efforts by balancing public input with timely decision making. The City believes that successful governance depends on high-quality two-way communication between all parts of the City government and the public. By providing a variety of opportunities and platforms for the community to participate in the governing process, the City aspires to make all members of the community confident that their voices will be taken seriously and given respect in decision-making processes that are important to them.

In order to have effective and active involvement in these processes, community members must have transparent and easy access to relevant information. The City is responsible for sharing information with the community about potential policy decisions, available services, and opportunities to become involved in City governance. New technology has created more ways to connect with the public, and the City will continue to pursue a variety of traditional and electronic methods that are responsive to the needs of our diverse community. In particular, the City is committed to finding the most effective ways to communicate with hard-to-reach populations who often do not participate in local governance.

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Public Participation & Communication : GOALS 1

All members of the community will know of and have opportunities to participate in governing and decision-making processes of interest to them.

2

The City’s active outreach to the community will support high-quality public participation.

3

All members of the community will feel confident that their voices will be taken seriously and given respect in City decision-making processes that are important to them.

4

All members of the community will know how to access information about decisions being made and what information is informing those decisions, and all this information will be easily accessible to the public


P U BL I C PA RT I C I PAT I O N & CO M M U N I C ATI O N

Public Participation & Communication : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Explore alternative mechanisms for public participation that would engage more members of the community.

B

Continually assess throughout City government who is engaged in City processes and who is not. Develop strategies to understand the interests of, and involve and/or gather the input from those stakeholders who do not participate.

C

Provide information and materials in languages, formats, and media that reflect the demographic diversity of the community.

D

Seek diverse representation on City boards and advisory committees.

E

Continue to improve accommodations that allow people with disabilities to access information and fully participate in City processes.

F

Invest in communications infrastructure, such as online engagement tools or public computer access within City facilities, to provide enhanced access to information.

G

Identify alternative ways of communicating with the public, particularly with those members of the community who typically lack access to information and do not participate in City processes.

H

Work with community organizations, neighborhood associations, and educational institutions to communicate with as many residents as possible and to educate the public on how to access information provided by the City.

I

Provide voter registration forms at City Hall and post polling locations on the City website.

J

Continue to make more information available on the City website.

K

Provide links on the City website to services and other information provided by community partners, such as information about transportation options and social services.

L

Continue to utilize traditional methods of public outreach, including local newspaper, radio, fliers, and mailings.

M

Work with the public to identify the most effective ways of involving and communicating with the community and dedicate resources to these methods.

N

Standardize organizational procedures for how information is disseminated to the public.

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LAN D US E

Plan Ithaca

Land Use

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LAN D US E

3.0

EV CL MT NH S

Ithaca is frequently highlighted as an outstanding community for residents and visitors. Among the many accolades: 2013 Among America’s 10 Great Places to Live by Kiplinger’s Finance; Smartest City in America by Lumosity; Most Secure Place to Live in the United States (population under 150,000) by Farmers Insurance

2012 #27th Best Small City for Successful Aging by USA Today

2011

Top 10 Cities for Carless Retirement by U.S. News and World Report; Top 10 Affordable Cities to Retire To by AARP; Most Secure Place to Live by Small Towns

2011, 2010, 2009, 2007 Top 100 Places to Live by Relocate America

Ithaca’s Stable Economy, lively downtown, and engaged population support a rich and diverse small-city lifestyle. The city and region possess a wealth of natural resources, including an abundance of water from Cayuga Lake, the Cayuga Inlet, and the three creeks that run through city neighborhoods. Ithaca is consistently and widely recognized as an exceptionally attractive community for its overall character, livability, and economic opportunities, making it a terrific place for current and future residents to call home. Ithaca is well-positioned to become a resilient city that will thrive in the face of the perhaps unprecedented change that will come with shifting global economic and environmental conditions. A large portion of the city lies within the 100-year and 500-year flood plains. Recent hydraulic analysis shows that these flood-prone areas include most of the city’s commercial and industrial properties as well as over 600 residential units.3 Changing weather patterns, recent flood events, and new insurance requirements pose challenges for both new development and established properties.

3

To realize our bright future, we must balance the preservation of quality-of-life and community character with the need to adapt to these changing conditions and provide opportunities for future growth. Residents and policy makers must actively collaborate today to ensure we maintain and improve our existing neighborhoods, historic character, and sense of place for tomorrow. At the same time, we must strive to create greater equity by welcoming newcomers into our community and providing opportunities for new and more diverse housing. As a community

Hydraulic Analysis and Impacts of Long–term Shoaling for Flood Risk Management Project, Cayuga Inlet, Ithaca NY, May 2011

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3.1

Importance of Compact Mixed-Use Development

Proposed mixed-use projects offering ground floor retail and commercial space with upper story offices and apartments.

that already prizes its strong sense of place, we must protect the beauty and value of our humanmade and natural environments.

Much of the land within the City of Ithaca is already developed, but there are many opportunities to redevelop underutilized properties. â–Ş There are 194 developable vacant parcels within the city. This represents 3.6% of all parcels within the city. â–Ş Surface parking lots occupy 330 acres or nearly 9% of all land within the city.

Over the next twenty years, our community will respond to trends associated with an aging population, climate change, transitions in energy supply, and transformations within higher education and other sectors that form our economic base. Ithaca’s resilience will be enhanced by fostering increasingly compact and well-designed mixeduse development in suitable locations. This kind of development will help lighten tax burdens, connect jobs and services to public transit and housing, more efficiently incorporate green infrastructure, and reduce the pressure of sprawl on the greenspace and agricultural lands surrounding the city. Evidence demonstrates that people drive significantly less when they live in walkable, compact, mixeduse urban areas. This reduces overall traffic congestion and enhances

accessibility, while promoting neighborhood livability for all. Not only is this type of development both desirable and economical, it is also one of the most efficient strategies for addressing both the causes and consequences of climate change. This development strategy also responds to the increased demand for attached and smalllot housing that is well-connected to jobs and services. This trend is being driven by the increasing percentage of households made up of older Americans and people without children, as well as decreased driving and car ownership, particularly among people under age 30. Our existing development patterns, demographics, and travel habits strongly suggest that our residents already support a denser, mixeduse, and more connected cityscape. The 2010 U.S. Census shows that an unusually large proportion of people walk to work or school in Ithaca, with an estimated 42 percent of Ithacans commuting to work or


LAN D US E

school by foot or bike, and 12 percent taking public transit. Furthermore, our largest employers are located within, or directly contiguous to, the City and our many stable neighborhood areas are served by the local public transit system. Ithaca’s network of diverse, highly walkable neighborhoods is characterized by a brisk, competitive housing market and a low rental vacancy rate, indicating a strong unmet demand for more urban living opportunities. Connected, compact mixed-use developments that offer financial, environmental, and quality of life benefits can accommodate this unmet demand and prepare us for future growth. We have an immense opportunity to maximize our role as a regional hub by attracting a larger population and counteracting the decades-long trend of low population growth within City limits. Since 1950, Tompkins County’s population has nearly doubled, from 59,122 to 101,544, while Ithaca’s population has grown by less than 1,000, from 29,257 to 30,014, falling from 50 percent to 30 percent of the county’s population. The city’s stable economy, wealth of natural resources, and recent development trends suggest that our population could continue to grow significantly. If we can simultaneously retain our existing residents and attract newcomers, we have the opportunity to strengthen our role as the economic, social, and cultural center of Tompkins County and the region.

Historically, county population growth has largely been the result of jobs located within, or contiguous to, City boundaries. Only a small percentage of those workers have chosen to live within the city itself, resulting in sprawling residential development patterns outside of the city that directly affect every city resident. In addition to the transportation, health, agricultural, and environmental problems associated with sprawl, we face an impact on our quality of life due to commuting patterns and the loss of political influence. Further, a constrained tax base (due to an unusually large percentage of tax-exempt property) must support the infrastructure needed for a regional employment center. Attracting a larger population requires us to create more choices — about where to live and how to get around — for people of all economic and social backgrounds. Working to counteract sprawl will also help to preserve the beauty and environmental integrity of all of Tompkins County.

Figure 3.1 Population growth since 1950 120,000 100,000 1

Tompkins County’s population City of Ithaca’s population

80,000 60,000 40,000 20,000

0

1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010

Source: U.S. Census, 1950-2010

We have an immense opportunity to maximize our role as a regional hub by attracting a larger population and counteracting

Underutilized sites in the city should be considered for redevelopment.

the decades-long trend of low population growth within City limits.

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To achieve these goals, we must make rational decisions about where and how to grow. Because most of the land in the city is already developed, accommodating growth will largely be a matter of reimagining and redeveloping appropriate areas. At the same time, we must also preserve our quality of life, community character, and cherished small-city lifestyle.

The Future Land Use Map (page 35) shows a geographic representation of how we can advance these goals. There are opportunities for growth in all areas of the city. In some areas, any growth must enhance existing character and in others, new development will transform the area in a way that is consistent with both our future goals for the city and our community values.

To maintain the vitality of the city, we must provide opportunities for new housing and businesses to support the increased population we want to attract. Higher-density areas on the map encourage growth in the form of well-designed, compact mixed-use development. Urban Mixed-Use, Waterfront


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To maintain the vitality of the city, we must provide opportunities for new housing and businesses to Mixed-Use, and Enterprise areas are intended to serve this role, with the majority of new development located there. These areas are located on, or adjacent to, major transportation corridors within the city, making it easy for residents to get to jobs and services, and for visitors to access local businesses. In contrast, the map’s remaining land use categories are assigned to areas where the intent is to preserve and enhance the existing character. The established Lowand Medium-Density Residential areas are neighborhoods with a variety of single-family, two-family, and multi-family homes. There are fewer opportunities for new development in these areas, although some infill opportunities certainly

exist. New development would be welcomed in these locations, provided it is of high-quality design and compatible with the existing built environment and uses of the neighborhood. Designated historic districts, which are essential to the preservation of our architectural and cultural history, overlay various land use categories. Additionally, Environmentally-Sensitive areas identify environmentally-important locations, where special consideration must be given to preserve their unique natural features.

support the increased population we want to attract.

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Land Use : GOALS 1

The city’s role as the economic, social, and cultural center of Tompkins County will be strengthened by attracting and retaining a larger proportion of the County population, reversing a half-century trend of population loss to the County.

2

Additional housing will provide opportunities for people of all incomes, ages, and abilities to live in the city.

3

Neighborhood character will be preserved and enhanced.

4

As the city continues to develop, green spaces will be enhanced and located to best serve residents and visitors.

5

Green space surrounding the city will be preserved to minimize sprawl and protect open space and agricultural lands.

6

Transportation and housing options will reduce commuter traffic.

7

Housing will be located so that jobs and services are easily accessible.

8

An increased tax base will reduce the tax burden for residents.

9

Permitted land uses will promote business expansion and job growth within the city.

10

The community will be economically vibrant and offer a high quality of life.

11

New development will be consistent with the City’s land use goals and map and will be of high-quality design.

12

Land use planning decisions and investments will be coordinated with the goals of the Mobility & Transportation chapter.


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Land Use : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Make land use decisions in accordance with the Future Land Use Map and the conditions identified in the “Planned Characteristics� subsections for individual Future Land Use categories. Specific recommendations will be further refined in Phase II.

B

Explore flexible zoning options to achieve the identified land use goals and implement the Future Land Use Map.

C

Maintain a balance of allowed non-residential uses in residential areas to preserve and enhance neighborhood character.

D

Require outreach to neighborhoods early in the development process.

E

Revise the environmental review process to better address contemporary practices and information needs.

F

Implement design standards and policies that require sustainable building practices and technologies.

G

Work with neighboring municipalities to explore mechanisms to preserve green space surrounding the city and prevent sprawl, such as a transfer of development rights program.

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Future Land Use Map

RD

RD

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ST

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RD

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NB

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Future Land Use DR

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Cemetery

Focus Area

RD

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Parks

1:18,798

*

Environmentally-Sensitive

N

NK

City Border

Urban Mixed-Use

TO

BA

2,800 Feet

Waterway

Waterfront Mixed-Use

G IN

ND

1,400

City Streets

Medium Density Residential

DD

RD

0

Low Density Residential

CO

N

NYS Roads

RD

RD

Railroad

DR

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Land use boundaries will be further refined in Phase II.

JUNIPER

NORTHVIEW RD

Educational

LN

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RD

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RD

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Future Land Use Map

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SIMSBURY DR

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SA

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Redevelopment of the former Emerson site could provide significant housing and business opportunities.

The development of Harold Square will create new downtown housing and offices and revitalize ground floor commercial spaces.

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3.3

Future Land Use Categories RESIDENTIAL This is an area that consists primarily of housing. The types of housing may vary between and within residential areas and include singlefamily, two-family, and multi-family dwellings.

Low-Density

Medium-Density

PURPOSE

PURPOSE

Low-density residential areas acknowledge existing residential development within the city that averages fewer than 10 dwelling units per acre. In general, no significant changes to the character of low-density residential areas are proposed. Infill development in these areas must be sensitive to the character and setting of the existing neighborhood. LOCATION

Low-density residential development is found in portions of West Hill, Belle Sherman, University Hill, South Hill and Cornell Heights. DENSITY

Average existing density is fewer than 10 dwelling units per acre.

Medium-density residential areas acknowledge existing residential development within the city that averages between 10 and 20 dwelling units per acre. Usually made up of single-lot one- and two-family homes, these areas also contain a diverse mix of apartment buildings and complexes. Many of these areas are within walking distance to Urban Mixed-Use areas. No significant changes to the character of medium-density residential areas are proposed; however, it is desirable to continue to provide a variety of housing types in these areas and there are opportunities for infill development on vacant or underutilized sites. Such development should be sensitive to the character and setting of the existing neighborhood. LOCATION

Medium-density residential areas are found throughout the city. It comprises most of the Flats – the Northside, Southside and Fall Creek neighborhoods, as well as portions of East, West and South Hills, Bryant Park, and Cornell Heights. DENSITY

Average existing density is approximately 10-20 dwelling units per acre.


LAN D US E

Higher-Density Higher-density residential uses are accommodated within the Waterfront Mixed-Use, Urban Mixed-Use, and Enterprise areas.

Urban Agriculture Community gardens and other urban agriculture projects are appropriate in almost all future land use categories, including Residential, Waterfront Mixed-Use, Enterprise, and EnvironmentallySensitive areas.

Neighborhood Commercial Neighborhood-scale commercial uses, including small pedestrianoriented retail, restaurants, personal services, and professional offices, are appropriate in many residential areas. While predominately located in the Fall Creek and Northside neighborhoods at present, additional areas will be considered for neighborhood-scale commercial uses as part of Phase II.

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3.3 | Future Land Use Categories

WATERFRONT MIXED-USE An area for a mix of residential, commercial, and water-related uses where maintaining public access to, and views of, the waterfront is encouraged.

PLANNING ISSUES & CHALLENGES

Flood-prone Existing environmental contamination Poor soils, resulting in additional construction impacts and costs Railroad crossings Major transportation corridors and the railroad are barriers between the waterfront and adjacent neighborhoods Lack of sufficient pedestrian & bike connections to Inlet Island Auto congestion from local and through traffic Adjacency of diverse uses Need to maintain visual access to the waterfront Retention of existing water-based and waterfront uses

LOCATION

Waterfront Mixed-Use is located on non-park land between the Flood Control Channel and Route 13 and includes Inlet Island. EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS

This area has a broad range of existing uses including the City Wastewater Treatment Plant, a City Department of Public Works facility, Tompkins Consolidated Area Transit (TCAT) offices and bus garage, a petroleum fuel facility, the largest covered marina on Cayuga Lake, the Cornell University and Ithaca College boathouses, a fitness center, and the Farmers’ Market. Parts of this area offer expansive views across the Flood Control Channel to Cass Park and Treman Marina.

OPPORTUNITIES

Several sites are underutilized or vacant. Most existing buildings in the area are well-below current development thresholds. PLANNED CHARACTERISTICS

The area will consist of mixed-use development including commercial and housing, with an emphasis on uses that create an active waterfront environment. There will be a focus on the preservation and enhancement of water-related uses. New development should protect viewsheds and allow public access to the waterfront. Pedestrian and bicycle connections should be improved, particularly to adjacent mixed-use areas. Developable space in the waterfront area is at a premium, and reducing the impacts of parking in new development should be carefully considered.


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3.3 | Future Land Use Categories

URBAN MIXED-USE Residents and workers in urban mixed-use areas should be in immediate proximity to services, retail and public transportation. Urban Mixed-Use is assigned to a wide range of subareas (described below) in which increased development or redevelopment is encouraged. Some have a unique underlying character that should be preserved or enhanced, while others need major redevelopment to create an identity and sense of place.

▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪

Higher-density housing (20+ dwelling units per acre) is encouraged.

1. Downtown/Urban Core

This is an existing Urban Mixed-Use area.

EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS

The Downtown/Urban Core has a strong sense of place. It is a dense, walkable area that includes the Ithaca Commons (a large public pedestrian mall), small-scale retail, restaurants, high-density housing, offices, and government services. The area includes national and local historic districts and many historic buildings that contribute to its identity. OPPORTUNITIES

Some underutilized sites present opportunities for significant redevelopment due to higher development potential than in other areas of the city. New residential and hotel development, as well as the refurbishing of the Commons, is expected to enliven the downtown.

Urban Mixed-Use is assigned to the following locations:

PLANNED CHARACTERISTICS

The Downtown/Urban Core will remain the heart of the city, a destination for all residents and visitors, a prime location for car-free living, and an employment center. New development will provide increased density with more residential options while preserving the historic character of downtown. Ground-level commercial activity will enliven the streetscape. The area will be a transportation hub that is served by multiple transit routes and that provides ample pedestrian and bicycle facilities.

Downtown/Urban Core West State/Mlk Street Corridor West End Collegetown Southwest

This district is for dense, multi-story development that allows a combination of commercial uses, offices, and housing and is designed to create access and connections to services, employment, adjacent neighborhoods, and multi-modal transportation corridors.

PLANNING ISSUES & CHALLENGES

Construction coordination Preservation of and compatibility with existing historic resources Capacity and condition of parking garages Utility capacity Poor soils, resulting in additional construction impacts and costs Constrained development sites

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PLANNED CHARACTERISTICS

2. West State/ MLK Street Corridor

This is an existing and evolving Urban Mixed-Use area.

PLANNING ISSUES & CHALLENGES

Interface between West State/ MLK Street and the West End Lack of consistent character Adjacent one-way streets make the area less welcoming to pedestrians and bicycles Likelihood of poor soils, resulting in additional construction impacts and costs Sensitivity of new development to adjacent neighborhoods and the Henry St. John Historic District Preservation of, and compatibility with, existing historic resources

EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS

West State/MLK Street connects downtown to the Waterfront, West End and West Hill, and is adjacent to two major transportation corridors that are car-dominant. The City has made a significant investment in the streetscape, which combined with the area’s adjacency to residential neighborhoods, has created a lively, emerging commercial district. As this has occurred, some areas have achieved a distinct character that should be protected and enhanced. OPPORTUNITIES

Many vacant or underutilized sites and surface parking lots provide a high potential for redevelopment. Additional housing is particularly desirable in this location.

New development should support and enhance the distinct character that has begun to emerge along West State/MLK Street. The street will become a major pedestrian and bicycle corridor, connecting the West End and Waterfront to the Downtown/Urban Core. Increased housing will bring more residents into the area, supporting smallscale, ground-floor commercial along the street.


LAN D US E

3. West End

The area is in transition to Urban Mixed-Use.

EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS

The West End is a gateway to the city from the north and west, and connects the West State/MLK Street corridor to the Waterfront District. The area is dominated by four one-way transportation corridors that are designed almost exclusively to accommodate high volumes of motor vehicles, resulting in a negative pedestrian and bicycle experience. The area is rapidly changing as the last vestiges of single family residential use are being replaced by denser residential and commercial development. There are now a wide variety of commercial uses in primarily one-story buildings, including some high-volume local businesses. OPPORTUNITIES

There are many vacant and underutilized parcels and surface parking lots that provide a high potential for redevelopment. PLANNED CHARACTERISTICS

The area should provide a better pedestrian-scale street-level experience with slower traffic, safer pedestrian and bike crossings of major transit corridors, and improved connections to the adjacent waterfront area and existing trail network. New development should feature multi-story mixed-use buildings that define a street edge and provide pockets of green space.

PLANNING ISSUES & CHALLENGES

Lack of consistent character Need to protect neighborhood edges Insufficient pedestrian, bicycle, and transit facilities Separated from adjacent neighborhoods by State routes Auto congestion from local and through traffic Intersection of all major one-way corridors One-way streets feel less welcoming to pedestrians and bicyclists High level of development pressure due to availability of parcels and ability to assemble development sites Streetscape investment needed Limited transit options Lack of green space Poor soils, resulting in additional construction impacts and costs. Railroad crossings Intercity bus terminal

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4. Collegetown

This is an existing Urban Mixed-Use area.

PLANNING ISSUES & CHALLENGES

EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS

Collegetown is characterized by

Insufficient pedestrian, bicycle, many multi-story mixed-use and transit facilities

buildings, as well as smaller

Inadequate transition between residential buildings. The area is Collegetown and surrounding notable for its high concentration neighborhood Expansion of student housing of student residents and a lack into established residential of owner-occupied housing. Central Collegetown has the neighborhoods

Streetscape investment densest development within the city and is one of the primary needed Lack of green space On-going parking management Lack of amenities needed to support car-free living

gateways to Cornell University. The area has the highest volume of pedestrian traffic in the city; however, the sidewalks in the area are insufficient to handle this volume. Development pressure over the past 20 years has changed the character of the area. Although there is a lack of green space throughout Collegetown, it is adjacent to Cascadilla Gorge and the associated trail network.

OPPORTUNITIES

While there are limited vacant sites in Collegetown, there are many opportunities for redevelopment, including surface-level parking lots and many underutilized properties. PLANNED CHARACTERISTICS

Central Collegetown will feature dense, mixed-use development that gradually transitions in scale and form into the surrounding neighborhoods. An active streetscape will enliven the pedestrian experience, and enhanced pedestrian, bicycle, and transit facilities will accommodate the high-volume of traffic in the area. New development should feature multi-story mixed-use buildings and pockets of green space.


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5. Southwest

This is a planned Urban Mixed-Use area.

EXISTING CHARACTERISTICS

The Southwest is a gateway to the city from the south. It is characterized by large scale, single-story commercial development, national retail chains, and an increasing hotel presence. Route 13, a high volume multi-lane road, bisects the area, making it feel separate from the rest of the city. The area is particularly car dominant, with extensive surface parking lots and inadequate pedestrian and bike facilities. OPPORTUNITIES

This area has much undeveloped or underutilized property, including 60 contiguous acres of undeveloped City-owned property. The sediment spoils from Cayuga Inlet dredging operations could improve the development potential of this site by raising its elevation and creating a berm (offering visual and noise buffering) between the site and the railroad. PLANNED CHARACTERISTICS

This area could be transformed to incorporate housing, improve connectivity for bikes and pedestrians, strengthen connections to adjacent natural areas and trails, and present a more attractive urban appearance. This will be the lowest density Urban Mixed Use area because development must respond to unique environmental conditions and other constraints,

some of which may be improved by ideas in the “Opportunities� section above. This area is likely suitable for specialized housing, office, medical facilities, and perhaps relocated Department of Public Works facilities.

PLANNING ISSUES & CHALLENGES

Flood-prone Poor drainage Poor soils, resulting in additional construction impacts and costs Insufficient pedestrian, bicycle, and transit facilities; insufficient internal connections Protection of Southside and Spencer Road neighborhoods from commercial development Concerns about single use balanced with the need to accommodate large-scale retail Lack of housing Railroad

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3.3 | Future Land Use Categories

ENTERPRISE

This district Enterprise is assigned to the following locations: identifies areas that have primarily industrial, office, and research and development uses, and that are targeted for expansion of business and Commercial Avenue employment Cherry Street Located in close proximity to a opportunities as The City’s industrial park since 1990, this area has a wide variety major transportation corridor, well as particular of businesses. There is opportunity this area currently houses large residential uses. for increased development due industrial and commercial uses, to some vacant or underutilized parcels, including a six-acre City-owned property. This area will be connected to the Black Diamond Trail.

including the Tompkins County Solid Waste Facility. There may be future opportunities for expansion and diversification of uses.

Emerson

Carpenter Business Park

Previously a heavy industrial site, Emerson is now under consideration for redevelopment to include housing, commercial and industrial use. Due to the size of the site and the existing infrastructure, there is an opportunity for significant new housing and business development.

This relatively large undeveloped area is served by existing infrastructure and is located immediately adjacent to a multi-use trail and a major transportation corridor. It has great potential for business development and employment opportunities.


LAN D US E

3.3 | Future Land Use Categories

ENVIRONMENTALLYSENSITIVE This district acknowledges areas with unique natural features and characteristics that warrant special attention to preserve and protect attributes, such as steep slopes, woodlands, water courses or wetlands. There is a wide range of conditions present within the Environmentally-Sensitive areas, including some areas that are part of the existing built environment. New development may be permitted in some locations but will require a higher level of review. Other locations are inappropriate for development and new construction will be prohibited to protect the environment.

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3.3 | Future Land Use Categories

EDUCATIONAL

This district acknowledges existing educational institutions, including neighborhood schools, as well as large institutions developed in a campus-like setting. This includes areas with extensive coverage by buildings, parking lots, and other improvements; physical plant and support facilities; stadiums and athletic fields; and lawns, quads, and formally landscaped areas.


LAN D US E

3.3 | Future Land Use Categories

HISTORIC DISTRICT (OVERLAY)4 Historic Districts are distinct geographic areas that contain a high concentration of architecturally and/ or historically significant buildings, structures, or sites that were all developed during a discrete period in time (the “period of significance”) and that remain largely physically intact from that period. Modification of existing structures or construction of new structures within designated historic districts must receive a C ertificate of A ppropriateness from the Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Commission before a building permit can be issued.

CURRENT LIST OF EXISTING HISTORIC DISTRICTS

Clinton Block Cornell Arts Quad Cornell Heights DeWitt Park Downtown West East Hill Henry St. John University Hill

4

See Appendix C for a map of the City’s historic districts.

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3.4

Focus Areas These are areas with unique opportunities for development and redevelopment that require special planning and infrastructure consideration. They differ from other areas targeted for development in that they present unique challenges and opportunities.

Four Focus Areas are identified:

*1 Southwest Ithaca

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITIES

SPECIAL PLANNING OR INFRASTRUCTURE CONSIDERATIONS

123 acres of surface parking lot

Drainage/Stormwater/Flooding issues

Low density (one story buildings)

Route 13: lack of connection despite proximity

Large parcel of publicly owned vacant land

No infrastructure on City-owned parcel

Will connect to extensive trail network.

Preservation of low-income housing (Nate’s Floral Estates)

Dredged spoil site could be designed to accommodate future development.

*2 Undeveloped West Hill Land

Large area of undeveloped land suitable for housing and potential neighborhood commercial area

Utility capacity

Incomplete road network; lack of sidewalks Sensitivity of development to existing character Large tracts of privately-owned land


LAN D US E

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITIES

*3 Emerson

SPECIAL PLANNING OR INFRASTRUCTURE CONSIDERATIONS

Large site with significant redevelopment potential

Contamination from previous industrial use

Inter-municipal coordination

Inter-municipal coordination

Connects to extensive trail network

Road capacity / transportation challenges

Unique views over Ithaca

*4 Waterfront

Relatively underutilized prime real estate adjacent to water

Utility capacity

Well connected to trail network and waterfront attractions

Lack of connectivity to adjacent neighborhoods. Railroad Maintaining views and public access to the waterfront Broad range of existing uses Poor soils Flooding

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ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

Plan Ithaca

Economic Vitality

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ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

4.0

This chapter provides a framework for strengthening Ithaca’s position as a regional hub with a thriving local economy. As the economic, cultural, and social center of the region, we must foster an environment that stimulates diverse employment and housing opportunities while enhancing our quality of life. Private investment, capital improvements, and public services create a community where people want to visit, live, work, play, and invest. Ithaca is a distinctive city with many economic advantages for its size. We have a flourishing local economy that provides opportunities for many to work, own a business, and invest. Our economy has remained relatively stable despite economic downturns at the state and national levels. This is due in large part to the presence of our internationallyrenowned higher educational institutions that serve as major employers while providing numerous educational and cultural opportunities for the community. Our bustling commercial districts, including one of the country’s most successful pedestrian malls, walkable neighborhoods, and

5

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008-2012 American Community Survey.

wealth of natural, cultural, and historic resources make Ithaca a destination for visitors and enhance the quality of life for residents. The Ithaca area is home to several major employers that provide jobs to residents of the city and the region. Cornell University, Ithaca College, Tompkins-Cortland Community College, and the Ithaca City School District play a significant role in employment within the city, with nearly 49 percent of employed adults working in the education sector.5 Other sizeable sectors of the city’s economy include hospitality, health care, professional and

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Visitors are drawn to many of the same features that enrich the lives of residents.

technical services, and retail. The majority of recent job growth has been in education and health care, with smaller increases in high-tech and hospitality jobs. Overall local unemployment is relatively low at 4.1 percent, compared to 6.7 percent for New York State and 6.1 percent nationally.6 Tourism is another key component of the local economy that continues to grow steadily. Ithaca is a destination for hundreds of thousands of tourists each year, and many others pass through the area as part of their travels. In 2012, Tompkins County attracted more than 900,000 visitors, creating $174 million in associated spending and supporting more than 2,300 jobs. During this time, tourism generated over $22.7 million in local and State sales tax, providing a tax benefit of $589 per household within the county.7 Visitors are drawn to many of the same features that enrich the lives of residents: the area’s natural beauty, traditional neighborhoods, small-city character, dining and

6

shopping opportunities, cultural and heritage events, and higher educational institutions. It is essential to preserve and enhance these qualities and features that make Ithaca a destination for so many. As the sector continues to grow, tourism should benefit local residents, businesses, and institutions while allowing visitors the opportunity to enjoy the unique characteristics of our community. The city’s lively commercial districts serve as destinations for residents and visitors while providing many employment opportunities. Each of the four commercial districts (Downtown/Urban Core, the Waterfront, Collegetown, and the Southwest) has its own unique character. Each should be encouraged to complement, rather than compete with, the others. In addition, there are Enterprise areas throughout the city, most of which are current employment centers, and all of which are ideal locations for the expansion of business and employment opportunities.

Source: NYS Department of Labor (May 2014); U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (May 2014)

Source: The 2009 Tompkins County Visitor Profile Study; “The Economic Impact of Tourism in New York – 2012 Calendar Year” by Tourism Economics 7

Tourism is another key component of the local economy that continues to grow steadily. ▪ In 2012, Tompkins County

attracted more than 900,000 visitors, creating $174 million in associated spending and supporting more than 2,300 jobs.


ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

The City provides services that support all sectors of the local economy, including fire and police protection, snow removal, and street repairs. The City offers youth programs; maintains parks, trails, and natural areas; and assists local

There are many challenges we must face in order to sustain a prosperous economy that provides opportunities for

businesses. The City also partners with non-governmental organizations to provide services (such as public transportation through TCAT) to benefit the community and assist local businesses. Additionally, public investments, such as streetscape improvements and the rebuilding of the Ithaca Commons, better the community for residents and visitors alike while stimulating investment in private properties and businesses. All of these enhance our quality of life and help to create a community that is attractive to visitors, residents and businesses.

all residents.

8

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008-2012 American Community Survey.

There are many challenges we must face in order to sustain a prosperous economy that provides opportunities for all residents. Our economy is heavily dependent upon education, and any changes within that sector can have a tremendous impact on the community. We must continue to support the educational sector while also seeking ways to diversify our economy. By attracting a wide variety of businesses and employers, we will be in a better position to withstand economic fluctuations and prosper during times of economic uncertainty. Despite projected job growth, employment issues and poverty affect many within the community. While overall unemployment is comparatively low, it remains a problem, particularly for people of color and women.8 A larger problem within the community is underemployment, with many accepting part-time work when a full-time position would be preferred or low-wage positions offering little opportunity for advancement. As a result, many residents, especially young people, leave the area for employment. As we diversify our economy and seek new businesses, we must focus on creating more well-paying job opportunities for all of our residents as well as providing job training to build a skilled labor force that meets the needs of employers.

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Unemployment and underemployment contribute significantly to the city’s high poverty rate. Approximately 14 percent of all families in Ithaca live in poverty, a rate that is markedly higher than those of Tompkins County, New York State, and the U.S.9 The poverty rate is even higher for families of color and families with a female head of household. With limited employment opportunities and notably high housing costs, it is very difficult for these families to get out of poverty and afford living in the city. A severely limited tax base adds to the affordability concerns faced by many city residents. Nearly 40 percent of the land area within the city is tax-exempt, comprising nearly 60 percent of the total assessed value of properties in the city.10 The remaining property owners must carry the tax burden for the entire city, resulting in higher taxes for both residents and businesses. The combination of notably higher housing costs and higher taxes makes the city an unaffordable place to live for many. Maintaining the level of services the community desires with an increasingly limited budget is an ongoing struggle for the City. The cost of City government has increased rapidly in recent years,

Figure 4.1 Unemployment rate % 10

6.7%

8 6 4

6.1%

4.1%

2 0

Local

New York State

National

due largely to unfunded mandates and pension and health care costs. Property and sales tax revenues have not increased at the same rate, forcing the City to make difficult decisions about both property tax rates and the services it provides. To strengthen the City’s financial position and improve its overall fiscal health, the City must strategically increase its tax base and diversify its sources of revenue.

9 Ibid. The U.S. Census Bureau defines a family as two or more individuals related by birth, marriage, or adoption. This figure may include students as part of a family living within the city but excludes the majority of the student population. 10 Source: City of Ithaca GIS Program; Tompkins County Department of Assessment; New York State Office of Real Property Tax Services

A severely limited tax base adds to the affordability concerns faced by many city residents. Nearly 40 percent of the land area within the city is tax-exempt, comprising nearly 60 percent of the total assessed value of properties in the city.


ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

4.1

Fiscal Health The City of Ithaca provides highlyvalued services for more than 30,000 residents, as well as businesses, educational institutions, not-for-profit organizations, and visitors. For its size, the City offers a wide variety of unique services, including a comprehensive sidewalk program, urban forestry, flood control on area waterways, enhancement of streams and gorges, youth programming, and economic development.

LU CL MT NC

Figure 4.2 City Expenditures by Category11

15%

$9,821,248

10%

43%

The City of Ithaca is one of the area’s largest employers, with nearly 440 full-time employees. The City’s total annual budget is just under $67 million, which funds the operation of twelve departments. The majority of these revenues come from property taxes, sales taxes, and other local sources (including fees, contracts with other municipalities, and payments in lieu of taxes). The City’s largest expenditures are related to public works and public safety.

$6,808,824

$28,590,735

32%

$21,563,992

Administration Community Programs Public Safety Public Works

Figure 4.3 City Revenues by Source12

17%

$11,182,441

17%

32%

$21,402,237

$10,980,221

20%

$13,425,000

4%

$2,766,533

1%

$850,082

5%

4%

$3,344,108

$2,441,000

Property Taxes Sales Tax State and Federal Aid Parking Revenues Sidewalk Assessments Permits, Licenses, & Fees Water & Sewer Revenues Other Revenues

11

Source: City of Ithaca 2015 Budget

12

Ibid.

The City strives to sustain and improve its services and infrastructure at a cost that allows people of all socio-economic groups to live and work within the city. In a climate in which State and Federal aid are declining, the City of Ithaca continues to face an uncertain financial future. The cost of providing municipal services continues to rise, and the challenge is to find the appropriate balance between maintaining the vital services residents and employers demand and taxpayers’ ability to pay for them. The City must optimize all sources of income, promote economic growth that expands the tax base, and invest strategically in services and infrastructure that enhance our quality of life and promote economic vitality. By providing more housing and attracting a larger population, we will expand the tax base while offering more people the opportunity to live within the city. Additional compact, mixed-use development in appropriate areas will have the greatest impact. This type of development generates higher property tax revenues per acre than single-use commercial or residential developments. It allows residents to live near jobs, services, and transit while transforming underutilized areas into desirable urban neighborhoods. Appropriate compact, mixed-use development will provide significant new development opportunities while preserving the character of our established residential neighborhoods.

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Fiscal Health : GOALS 1

The City will maintain a strong financial position through sound fiscal stewardship.

2

The City will balance available resources with reasonable spending to provide services that meet the needs of the community.

3

City services will be delivered to the community in the most efficient way possible.

4

The local property tax base will be expanded, in coordination with the goals of the Land Use chapter.

5

The City will share services with surrounding municipalities where appropriate.

6

City services and infrastructure will be financed by diverse and innovative sources.

7

Costs for City services and infrastructure will be equitably shared between the City, local educational institutions, tax-exempt organizations, and surrounding municipalities.


ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

Fiscal Health : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Establish a consolidated five-year capital plan that prioritizes future spending.

B

Maintain the City’s debt load at a level that supports strong fiscal health.

C

Maintain the City’s fund balance at a level equivalent to 10 percent to 20 percent of the operating budget.

D

Develop standards for the use of the City’s fund balance.

E

Continue to move operating expenses from borrowed capital funds to the City’s general fund.

F

Invest strategically in infrastructure and services to increase the city’s economic competitiveness in order to attract private investment and employment and to facilitate development that will increase the tax base, in coordination with the goals of the Land Use chapter.

G

Invest in technology and employee training to streamline operations and improve the efficiency of service delivery.

H

Encourage the return of tax-exempt properties to the tax roll.

I

Aggressively seek grants and financial assistance to deliver City services and infrastructure.

J

Develop and maintain strong partnerships with major employers and higher educational institutions that foster economic development and strengthen the fiscal health of the City.

K

Identify opportunities to share services and equipment with surrounding municipalities and through public-private partnerships.

L

Create a cost structure for shared services with surrounding municipalities where City taxpayers do not pay twice for services and facilities, such as TCAT, the 9-1-1 communications center, and the public library.

M

Regularly evaluate and adjust fees to better reflect the costs of providing City services.

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4.2

Economic Development PP LU CL MT

To remain the economic and employment center of the region, we aim to capture new business growth within the city, including high-technology and knowledgebased businesses and manufacturing.

Continued economic development is critical to the prosperity of the city and its residents. New development, the creation of new enterprises, and business expansions grow the tax base while offering additional employment and housing opportunities for residents. The City plays a key role in economic development. Business recruitment and retention is a focus of these efforts, and the City works with new and existing businesses to support their success. This includes fostering partnerships to enable projects, connecting businesses and developers with available resources, and endorsing appropriate applications to the Tompkins County Industrial Development Agency (IDA) for partial property tax abatements and sales tax exemptions. City staff acts as a liaison between government and business and identifies additional steps the City can take to assist local businesses.

The City seeks sustainable economic growth and investments that maintain its character and enhance the quality of life of all of its residents. We will build upon our strengths as a community and as a region to create a future that is economically prosperous, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. To remain the economic and employment center of the region, we aim to capture new business growth within the city, including high-technology and knowledge-based businesses and manufacturing. We will foster an environment that attracts and retains businesses and employers that create well-paying local jobs that enable people to live within the city. The City will work with employers, private developers, and surrounding municipalities to create a strong economy that provides opportunities for all residents. It will continue to support existing businesses and will pursue a diverse range of new industries to expand its economic base.


ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

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Economic Development : GOALS 1

The City will attract and retain firms valued by the community, including lowenvironmental-impact manufacturing, green businesses, locally-owned businesses, and businesses owned by under-represented groups.

2

The economic environment will retain, nurture, and grow new and existing businesses within the city.

3

The creation and expansion of local employment, particularly well-paying jobs, will provide opportunities for all income levels and age groups.

4

A variety of businesses will diversify the economy and reduce economic dependence on a single sector.

5

Business start-ups and expansions will have adequate access to capital.

6

Tourism will remain a vital component of the city and regional economy.

7 8 9

The educational sector will continue to be recognized and supported as a driving 4.2 – force of the local economy.

Economic Development Goals Structural barriers that prevent people from overcoming poverty will be eliminated. Brownfield sites will be remediated and redeveloped.


ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

Economic Development : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Maintain a strong economic development function within City government and dedicate staff resources to this purpose.

B

Be a partner in regional economic development efforts that leverage our strengths to create sustainable growth.

C

Become a regional partner in efforts to apply technology resulting from university research to the development of products and services that compete in a global marketplace.

D

Encourage infill and redevelopment of underutilized properties, in coordination with the goals of the Land Use chapter.

E

Work with business owners, developers, and entrepreneurs to support the creation and expansion of business opportunities.

F

Support the development and redevelopment of properties in the city, in coordination with the goals of the Land Use chapter.

G

Ensure that land use regulations provide sufficient appropriate areas zoned to meet the demand for business and employment-based activities.

H

Align land use regulations with the project review and permitting process to support the goals of the Comprehensive Plan.

I

Research policy options to create disincentives for vacant commercial properties.

J

Work with community partners to promote tourism.

K

Preserve and enhance the characteristics that attract tourists to Ithaca, including its sense of place and the beauty of its urban, architectural, and natural environments.

L

Identify and pursue strategies to encourage those traveling through the city to stop for dining, lodging, and shopping.

M

Encourage mixed-use development that includes a range of housing types and employment opportunities, in coordination with the goals of the Land Use chapter.

N

Connect businesses, developers, and entrepreneurs with available resources.

O

Seek State and Federal funding to support the economic development goals of the community.

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Economic Development : RECOMMENDATIONS continued

P

Work with higher educational institutions to address possible changes in the industry in order to retain the economic benefits to the community of a thriving local higher education sector.

Q

Be a key partner with other organizations that are planning and implementing programs to reduce poverty.

R

Dedicate staff resources to assist higher educational institutions in the creation, expansion, and retention of high-tech businesses.

S

Support the remediation and redevelopment of brownfield sites by working with private property owners and developers and State and Federal funding sources.


ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

4.3

Workforce Development & Job Training

PP CL MT S

As we experience economic growth, we must ensure that the economic life of the city reflects the diversity of our community. Business expansion will bring additional employment opportunities, and local workers can meet the needs of these businesses. In order for all residents to access these opportunities, we must focus on the development of a well-trained, local workforce. Job readiness and skill development programs will prepare residents for employment in a wide variety of sectors, particularly those with an identified workforce demand, such as hospitality, construction, health care, education, and high-tech industries.13 In addition, we must address other

13

Source: Tompkins Workforce Investment Board.

barriers that impede employment for many residents. By providing readiness programs, particularly for low-income residents and young adults, and improving access to available opportunities, many community members in need of employment will be able to successfully enter the workforce and secure a more prosperous future.

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Workforce Development & Job Training : GOALS 1

A strong and diverse local workforce will have skills and training that align with the needs of local employers.

2

Job readiness and skill development programs will be available to community members, particularly to low-income residents and young adults.

3

Barriers to employment, such as lack of child care and insufficient transportation, will be eliminated.


ECO N O M I C V I TALI T Y

Workforce Development & Job Training : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Work with schools, community organizations, and existing programs to expand job training and placement, apprenticeship, and supported work opportunities.

B

Continue to work with the Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency to provide job training and placement for low- and moderate-income people within the community, in support of the 2014-2018 Consolidated Plan.14

C

Work with Ithaca City School District and community organizations to share information on job training and employment opportunities for youth and recent graduates.

D

Encourage sufficient County, State, and Federal funding support for Tompkins Cortland Community College, Workforce NY, and other providers to offer robust opportunities for unemployed and underemployed persons to increase their marketable skills and expand opportunities for local jobs to be filled by city residents.

E

Be a key partner in creating a supported pathway out of poverty into well-paying jobs.

F

Work with the community to identify barriers to employment and possible ways to remove these barriers.

G

Encourage mixed-use development that includes a range of housing types and employment opportunities, in coordination with the goals of the Land Use chapter.

H

Continue to provide youth programs through GIAC and the Ithaca Youth Bureau.

I

Work with local social service agencies and the Ithaca City School District to increase awareness of available youth programs that would allow parents an opportunity to secure employment.

J

Work with the Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency and community organizations to develop programs that reduce barriers to employment.

K

Work with higher educational institutions to provide training programs to develop advanced job skills.

14

Available for review in the Ithaca Urban Renewal Agency.

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CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

70

Plan Ithaca

Community Livability


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CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

5.0

This chapter outlines a strategy to ensure Ithaca remains a desirable place to live, work, and visit. Ithaca is a diverse and dynamic city, and its residents value the small-city character and high quality of life the community offers. As we plan for the future, we must maintain and enhance our existing neighborhoods, historic Our community character and sense of place for tomorrow.

should be accessible

to all residents, regardless of their particular physical or socio-economic circumstances.Â

Ithaca is a community of neighborhoods, each with its own strong identity. For our city to thrive as a whole, each of these neighborhoods must have adequate infrastructure, services, and physical connections to meet the needs of its residents and support their aspirations. We must foster a strong sense of community and support meaningful bonds between residents, neighborhoods, and institutions. Our community should be accessible to all residents, regardless of their particular physical or socio-economic circumstances. 

We strive to maintain and enhance the livability of our community for current and future residents. We must provide a range of housing opportunities that are affordable and accessible to all. As we accommodate more housing, we must be sensitive to the historic character of our neighborhoods and protect the qualities valued by our residents. We must also provide the infrastructure and services to support community needs and create an environment that allows all residents and visitors to be safe, healthy, and well.

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5.1

Housing LU EV

Figure 5.1 Increase in median home value vs. median rental rate %

100

Median home value Median rental rate

80

+91% +79%

60 40 20 0

2000

2012

A severely limited tax base adds to the affordability concerns faced by many city residents. Nearly 40 percent of the land area within the city is tax-exempt, comprising nearly 60 percent of the total assessed value of properties in the city.

Housing remains a concern for both current residents and those who would like to live within the city. The cost of housing in Ithaca has increased dramatically over the past several years, with the median home value having risen 91 percent since the year 2000 and with median rent up 79 percent during the same period.15 Extraordinarily low vacancy rates for both rental and homeowner units suggest that a lack of supply is a primary factor fueling these increases. The large student population within the city and the additional pressure it places on the rental housing market also have a direct impact on the availability, quality, and affordability of rental units. For households with lower incomes, this constricted market leaves very few options for decent housing that is both affordable and conveniently located. Well over half of all renters in Ithaca pay more than 30 percent of their income for housing costs, as do over 20 percent of all homeowners.16 To address this situation, the City recognizes the need to increase the supply of high-quality, safe, and accessible housing that is affordable to both renters and homebuyers across all income levels, with particular attention to those with low, moderate, or middle incomes. In addition to increasing the supply, the City must seek innovative ways

15

to reduce housing costs for renters, who make up more than 70 percent of the population.17 A major challenge will be to expand and adapt our existing housing stock to meet the needs of current and potential residents, while retaining the sense of place and investment in resources that those existing structures embody. Of the approximately 11,000 housing units in Ithaca, the vast majority, over 8,000 units, were built before 1950 and were designed to meet the physical, social, and demographic needs and expectations of a different era.18 Smaller units; denser development patterns; units that are physically accessible to all; special needs housing for the homeless, those in recovery, or those in transition; and housing that helps reduce our energy usage and carbon footprint are all priority needs recognized by the City; however, the City also recognizes the need to preserve the essential character of our existing neighborhoods. Ithaca is extremely fortunate to have many blocks of relatively dense wood-frame modest housing of a type that has

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Census vs 2008-2012 American Community Survey (ACS)

16

Source: 2010 HUD Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy data (CHAS)

17

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008-2012 American Community Survey (ACS)

18

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008-2012 American Community Survey (ACS)


CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

Neighborhood stability is also strengthened by the presence of owner-occupied units and by positive social connections between neighbors, whether renters or owners.

been largely destroyed in many American cities. Neighborhoods with historic homes and traditional urban patterns are attractive amenities that appeal to residents and visitors. Neighborhood stability is also strengthened by the presence of owner-occupied units and by positive social connections between neighbors, whether renters or owners. Moreover, homeownership is one of the primary means of wealth-building for most Americans. Nationwide, only the District of Columbia has a lower rate of homeownership than New York State, and Ithaca’s homeownership

rate, at a mere 27 percent, is approximately half the New York State average.19 The City recognizes the need to both stimulate increased rates of homeownership and support homeowners who wish to remain in their homes.

19 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, “Housing Characteristics, 2010;” 2008-2012 American Community Survey (ACS). This figure includes the city’s student population.

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Housing : GOALS 1

Ithaca will have an adequate supply of safe, accessible, and affordable housing available to all residents, regardless of their life circumstances or special needs.

2

The city will be home to a range of housing options, including different levels of affordability and housing types, in each neighborhood.

3

New residential units will be compatible with the essential character of established neighborhoods, in coordination with the goals of the Land Use chapter.

4

Homeownership and owner-occupancy of residential units will increase throughout the city.

5

The existing stock of affordable housing will be preserved and well-maintained.

Housing : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Facilitate the development of more housing within the city.

B

As part of Phase II of Plan Ithaca, prepare a housing strategy to identify specific ways to increase housing supply and decrease housing costs.

C

Develop policies to mandate the inclusion of affordable units within new market-rate housing developments.

D

Provide the required staffing levels and support services to ensure timely periodic inspections of existing housing.

E

Actively pursue compliance with all applicable residential codes and maintenance standards for existing housing units.

F

Continue to utilize Federal funding and seek out additional sources of financial support for developing subsidized housing to meet the needs of low- and moderate-income residents and populations with special needs.

G

Explore ways to incentivize landlords to reduce rental housing costs.


CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

H

Investigate ways for major employers to help reduce housing costs for employees (through subsidies or other means).

I

Return dilapidated, vacant, and/or underutilized properties to productive use.

J

Fund municipal services in a way that fairly distributes the burden of their cost across all property owners, including tax-exempt properties, as a means of increasing affordability.

K

Develop policies to proactively support appropriately located and designed affordable and/ or special needs housing that meets an identified market demand.

L

Investigate options for tax assessments of community housing land trust properties in order to maintain affordability.

M

Review the zoning code and consider revisions to increase flexibility for residential development, while preserving desirable neighborhood characteristics.

N

Develop standards and guidelines for new development to promote compatible design.

O

Continue to seek alternative ways to fund municipal services.

P

Explore policy options to increase the homeownership rate and help homeowners remain in their homes.

Q

Explore incentives to improve residential property maintenance in city neighborhoods.

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5.2

Historic Preservation LU EV NC S

Ithaca’s Historic Resources

There are eight local historic districts within the city, including the Clinton Block, Cornell Arts Quad, Cornell Heights, DeWitt Park,* Downtown West, East Hill,* Henry St. John, and University Hill districts. There are also twenty-four individually designated local landmarks within the city, and four additional properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places that are not designated at the local level. *The East Hill and DeWitt Park Historic Districts are also recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.

Ithaca’s rich community history is represented in its built environment. These historic resources help to establish a sense of place, characterize individual neighborhoods, and provide unity and an identity to the community as a whole. They offer a unique opportunity for residents and visitors to explore Ithaca’s culture and heritage. To protect these resources, the City has established an historic preservation program to ensure that designated historic resources are preserved. It establishes the criteria and processes through which local historic districts and landmarks are identified, designated, and regulated. Value is also placed on undesignated historic resources that contribute to neighborhood character and unify the community. Records of these resources are maintained by the City and are used to help inform zoning and development decisions. The preservation of historic resources also contributes to the economic vitality of the city and is an important economic development tool. These resources provide a solid foundation for heritage tourism, which annually attracts visitors to the city, promotes outside spending, increases tax revenues, and creates tourism jobs. Through local property tax abatements, as well as other tax credit programs, the City incentivizes private sector investment in

the community’s historic resources and encourages downtown redevelopment, densification, and sustainable growth. The preservation program indirectly creates local professional and skill-trade jobs, provides job training opportunities, and increases local spending on materials and labor. The City seeks to strategically preserve elements of the built environment that provide residents with a sense of place and community identity. We will continue to protect known historic resources and work to identify those that have been overlooked. Innovative development that is sustainable, environmentally sound, and sensitive to the historic character of the community and that improves the quality of life of residents and the experiences of visitors will be encouraged. The City will work with developers, educational institutions, and other community partners to ensure preservation continues to strengthen the local economy through job creation, local spending, and tourism.


CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

Historic Preservation : GOALS 1

The community will understand the importance of historic preservation and take pride in the collective history represented by the built environment.

2

All historic resources worthy of preservation will be protected, whether formally designated or not.

3

Improvements to designated structures will conform to the Historic Preservation Ordinance.

4

Existing historic buildings will be rehabilitated or adaptively reused rather than demolished.

5

New construction within or adjacent to historic districts or individually listed landmarks will be compatible with the existing built environment.

6

Historic preservation will be recognized as an economic development tool.

Historic Preservation : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Allocate additional staff resources to historic preservation.

B

Continue to provide information on the importance of historic preservation to neighborhood associations, individual property owners, local institutions, and other organizations.

C

Continue to designate resources identified as historically or architecturally significant.

D

Continue to annually notify owners of historic properties about the designated status of their property; local, state, and federal incentive programs for preservation activities; and the Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Commission (ILPC) approval process.

E

Review and update the existing Reconnaissance Level Survey of Historic Resources to ensure t hat all resources that possess cultural or historical value are identified.

F

Digitize historic resource inventory forms and publish information in a format that is easily accessible to the community.

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Historic Preservation : RECOMMENDATIONS continued

G

Erect signage within local historic districts and at individually-designated landmarks explaining their historic context and significance.

H

Collaborate with preservation and education organizations to establish a preservation-trade certification program.

I

Collaborate with local, County and State governments, and other organizations to promote and expand heritage tourism opportunities.

J

Designate an Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Commission (ILPC) liaison to the Planning Board.

K

Formalize a procedure that requires the Planning Board to request comments from the ILPC on projects that could impact historic resources outside historic districts.

L

Promote appropriate rehabilitation of existing buildings to capture embodied energy and promote energy efficiency.

M

Collaborate with Tompkins County and/or other municipalities to explore the feasibility of a local carbon tax on demolitions or tax abatement incentives for reuses or rehabilitations.

N

Seek additional grant funding to conduct intensive-level surveys of historic resources, renovate City-owned historic resources, and improve and/or expand heritage tourism infrastructure.

O

Continue to incentivize private sector investment in historic preservation through the local tax abatement program.

P

Encourage and facilitate the use of State and Federal preservation tax incentive programs in development projects.

Q

Use patterns of traditional design - including detailing, materiality, size, mass, form, rhythm and scale - which all enhance the sense of place within historic neighborhoods, to inform future development.


CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

5.3

Public Safety

PP EV

The Ithaca Police and Fire Departments annually respond to more than 25,000 calls for service within the city.

Public safety is vital to maintaining our high quality of life and sense of security. Residents should feel safe in their neighborhoods and throughout the city. Public safety also has important impacts on the local economy, as businesses are more likely to locate and expand in a secure environment and residents and visitors are more likely to shop at and spend money in these local businesses. Ithaca remains one of the safest cities in the country and has even been cited as the most secure city with a population under 150,000.20 The safety of our community is due in large part to our public safety personnel. The Ithaca Police and Fire Departments annually respond to more than 25,000 calls for service within the city. In addition to

20

Farmers Secure Places to Live Survey, 2011

emergency response, they take an active role in public education and outreach, including car seat inspections, fire prevention training, the Police Explorer Program, and public open houses. These programs increase awareness of public safety issues while building relationships with residents. We strive to make Ithaca a safe and secure environment for all members of our community. The City will continue to provide high-quality police and fire protection, code enforcement, and emergency management services. It will work cooperatively with other

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municipalities and community partners to help manage public safety needs as they arise, prevent problems before they begin, and develop strategies to address ongoing concerns. The City will collaborate with other municipalities on emergency preparedness, including responses to extreme weather events and adequate emergency shelters. Work must be done to address feelings of mistrust between the police department and some groups and neighborhoods within the community. To be successful, the City must nurture strong, trusting relationships between

its residents and its public safety personnel. Community members, police, fire, and code enforcement personnel must be comfortable communicating and working together on a daily basis in order to come together effectively during emergencies and other times of need. Public safety is the responsibility of every member of this community, and we must work together to build a safer environment for all to live, work, and visit.


CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

Public Safety : GOALS 1

The city will be a safe and secure environment for all members of the community.

2

The City will provide a timely and appropriate response to emergencies.

3

All segments of the community will have strong relationships with first responders that encourage collaboration, communication, trust, and understanding.

4

The community will be well-educated on personal safety and emergency preparedness.

5

Members of the public will have a way to communicate with neighbors or first responders in an emergency situation.

Public Safety : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Work collaboratively across City departments and with community partners, including the Cornell Police and Ithaca College Public Safety, to improve public safety and prevent crime.

B

Identify ways for residents and the police to work collaboratively on community safety, such as neighborhood watch programs.

C

Improve property maintenance of deteriorated structures to deter crime, aid in emergency response, and enhance neighborhood character.

D

Provide community members with opportunities to openly discuss their concerns.

E

Explore ways to create an independent and more effective Community Police Board.

F

Create a Community Action Team to focus on community policing and outreach.

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Public Safety : RECOMMENDATIONS G

Dedicate resources to ongoing educational and community-building programs.

H

Continue efforts to educate residents on City ordinances, such as the exterior property maintenance and noise ordinances, to build stronger neighborhoods and relationships between permanent and student residents.

I

Support and enhance alternatives to incarceration for non-violent offenders, in collaboration with neighboring municipalities.

J

Implement a Downtown Outreach Coordinator program to provide needed social services on the streets in the city’s core.

K

Offer volunteer opportunities for community members.

L

Provide public safety personnel with all tools - including personnel, equipment, and training necessary to meet city and regional public safety needs.

M

Ensure all City staff have the resources they need to aid the community in times of crisis.

N

Work cooperatively with other municipalities and non-governmental agencies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of service.

O

Work with the Ithaca City School District and other municipalities to provide emergency shelters and cooling centers.

P

Investigate additional ways for the public to communicate in emergency situations

Q

Work with private property owners to provide emergency communication devices in private developments.


CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

5.4

Physical Infrastructure PP LU EV MT NC S

Public investments in our infrastructure also stimulate investment in private properties and businesses, contributing to the economic vitality of our city.

Ithaca is a desirable community that is characterized by high-quality infrastructure and public services, such as clean drinking water, well-maintained streets, pedestrian amenities, and inviting parks. Our investments have created a variety of amenities and exceptional public services that benefit the community. Our facilities and services directly improve our quality of life, enhance our neighborhoods, and create a thriving business environment. Public investments in our infrastructure also stimulate investment in private properties and businesses, contributing to the economic vitality of our city. One of the City’s most critical functions is to provide the infrastructure and services that people depend on and that contribute to their quality of life. Much of the infrastructure that is essential to the livability of our community is not easily visible and the services are often assumed. The City provides water, sewer, and stormwater services and maintains streets, sidewalks, bridges, and parks. While the continuation of services and maintenance of our infrastructure is essential, the City has faced financial challenges in doing so. A lot of the infrastructure is aging and in need of repairs or replacement. Infrastructure maintenance costs continue to rise, and unfunded mandates, particularly for water and wastewater treatment, create additional financial burdens. Regular maintenance, once done routinely, has been deferred due to

budget cuts, and additional investment in infrastructure and staff will be needed to address the accumulated demand. At the same time, the City aims to meet the community’s expectations that infrastructure quality and level of service be maintained and enhanced. The City is committed to providing high-quality infrastructure and services to the community. It will continue to make investments that enhance the quality of life for our residents and promote economic development and tourism. In light of increasing costs and ongoing fiscal constraints, the City will seek outside resources to help make these investments and identify ways to more equitably apportion costs of upgrades among all users. The City has already implemented innovative funding strategies including the creation of a sidewalk program and a stormwater user fee - that more fairly assign the costs of these services to the largest users, and it will continue to seek ways to enhance our infrastructure and services that minimize burdens on taxpayers.

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Physical Infrastructure : GOALS 1

City infrastructure and private utilities will be regularly maintained and upgraded to ensure continued operation and service to the community.

2

Physical infrastructure will be designed to be compatible with the built environment.

3

Investment in infrastructure will be prioritized based on existing condition and level of use as well as impacts on commercial activity and quality of life.

4

Construction activity by City departments, New York State, Tompkins County, the Town of Ithaca, utility companies, and private developers will be well-coordinated.

Physical Infrastructure : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Create an interdepartmental geospatial inventory of City facilities and infrastructure.

B

Develop an asset management plan for City facilities and infrastructure to guide future investment and maintenance.

C

Re-establish an ongoing maintenance program that is funded out of the City’s operating budget.

D

Reduce maintenance backlog and avoid future deferred maintenance.

E

Provide adequate staffing and training for all levels of construction and maintenance operations.

F

Establish a consolidated five-year capital improvement plan that prioritizes future investment.

G

Incorporate ongoing maintenance costs when planning for new infrastructure.

H

Continue to develop and implement innovative and self supporting funding mechanisms to improve the city’s physical infrastructure.


CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

Physical Infrastructure : RECOMMENDATIONS continued

I

Continue to seek outside funding to support infrastructure needs.

J

Lobby New York State and Federal officials and lawmakers to increase public investment in infrastructure improvements and repair.

K

Work to establish an adequate reserve fund to cover emergency repairs, regular maintenance, and ongoing infrastructure upgrades.

L

Encourage or, if possible, require private utilities to locate wires, cables, etc. underground.

M

Consider abandoning underutilized non-critical infrastructure.

N

Revise the telecommunications ordinance to reflect changes in technology.

O

Develop collaborative working relationships with private utility companies.

P

Consider impacts of denser development on physical infrastructure and evaluate any impacts against the benefits that the development would provide.

Q

Reassess the current use and condition of City infrastructure and facilities to determine if some structures can be abandoned, deconstructed, demolished, sold, or consolidated.

R

Consider reducing the width of neighborhood streets, where appropriate, to reduce maintenance costs and provide additional green space.

S

Pursue new technology and innovative approaches to maintenance, construction, and deconstruction of physical infrastructure that improve efficiency, reduce costs, and minimize environmental impacts.

T

Continue regular meetings and communication with surrounding municipalities, New York State, and utility companies to coordinate construction projects.

U

Continue ongoing inter-departmental collaboration on public and private construction activities.

V

Explore strategies to improve coordination of construction activity, use of equipment, and other resources by City departments, New York State, Tompkins County, the Town of Ithaca, utility companies, and private developers.

W

Require that all above-ground publicly-funded infrastructure (except routine in-kind maintenance) receives design review.

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5.5

Health, Wellness, & Support Our wellness, whether physical, mental, or spiritual, affects our quality of life and community livability. Many factors contribute to wellness, including parks and recreation, transportation, and medical and social services. We must address all such aspects to allow residents and visitors the opportunity to be healthy and well. MT NC S

We strive to create an environment where a healthy lifestyle is possible and affordable for all. We will provide safe and active transportation options and recreational opportunities. Our public spaces will be accessible and welcoming to everyone. We will also help facilitate access to convenient and affordable food, medical care, and support services for all members of the community.

The City recognizes the importance of wellness to the individual and the community and is committed to supporting active, safe, and healthy lifestyles among all residents and visitors. As it invests in infrastructure, parks, trails, recreational facilities and programs, the City has the opportunity to promote social interaction, physical activity, and personal rejuvenation. In addition, new and continued collaborations with community organizations and the private sector can offer other recreational opportunities and enhance access to needed medical care and support services.


CO M M U N I T Y LI VAB I LI T Y

Health, Wellness, & Support : GOALS 1

The community’s use of active modes of transportation will improve individual health and wellness, as well as environmental sustainability.

2

All residents and visitors will have access to parks, trails, recreational facilities, and community activities that support social interaction and physical activity.

3

Recreational opportunities will be provided for youth throughout the city.

4

Preventive, ongoing, and emergency health care will be accessible and available to all.

5

Physical, economic, and social barriers to health and wellness will be eliminated.

6

Public spaces will be welcoming to all residents and visitors.

7

The built environment will be accessible for people of all ages and abilities.

8

Public and private properties will be free from contamination.

Health, Wellness, & Support: RECOMMENDATIONS A

Maintain and enhance existing bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure.

B

Continue to expand sidewalk, trail, and bike boulevard networks, including along the city’s waterways and gorges.

C

Provide seamless connections between the City’s sidewalk, trail, and bike boulevard networks and those of adjacent municipalities.

D

Complete the draft Trails Master Plan.

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E

Ensure there is a range of activities for all ages in City parks.

F

Investigate extended hours and programming at City facilities to provide additional recreational opportunities for youth.

G

Work with the Ithaca City School District and other community partners to create more programming and community spaces for youth.

H

Work with TCAT to provide safe and convenient transportation to City parks and recreational facilities.

I

Continue to support and promote 2-1-1 services to city residents.

J

Support and expand the City employee wellness program.

K

Identify barriers to health and wellness, and work with community partners to eliminate those barriers.

L

Create guidelines for community use of public spaces to promote respectful treatment for all who use those spaces.

M

Provide information on City parks, trails, recreational facilities, and programs that is easily accessible to the community.

N

Seek funding to clean up contamination where practicable. Where not immediately practicable, design creative solutions to eliminate exposure until cleanup can occur.


M O BI L I T Y & T R A N S P O RTATI O N

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Mobility & Transportation


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M O BI L I T Y & T R A N S P O RTATI O N

6.0

Reduced car use enhances the quality of life in neighborhoods while decreasing vehicle emissions, gas consumption, and congestion.

This chapter provides the framework for achieving an exceptional multi - modal transportation system that is coordinated with our land use goals. We aim to have a network with a range of safe and accessible transportation options for all users, to increase connectivity and to enhance neighborhood livability. Ithaca’s current transportation system is primarily designed for cars, and while we will continue to accommodate motor vehicles, a fundamental goal is to achieve a sustainable system offering viable alternatives to private automobile trips. Creating such a system advances sustainability and equity. Integrating transportation and land use goals will result in more housing options that are better connected to jobs and services. This will make it possible for residents to conduct more of their daily activities without the use of private automobiles. Reduced car use enhances the quality of life in neighborhoods while decreasing vehicle emissions, gas consumption, and congestion. At the same time, providing real alternatives to private car use ensures

that all residents have transportation access to basic needs such as food, medical care, education, and public services, and that they are connected to employment opportunities and social support. We must also strive for innovation in the management of our motor vehicle infrastructure. This includes exploring better ways to address parking demand, conduct winter road maintenance, and design paved areas to lessen stormwater impact on our valued waterways. In

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Figure 5.1 Travel to Work or School by Mode

46%

commute by vehicle

42%

commute by foot or bicycle

12%

commute by public transportation

Ithaca has the foundation of an outstanding pedestrian and bicycle-orientated community

a time of dwindling public funding for transportation infrastructure, we must also explore shared services, pursue mutually beneficial partnerships, and implement innovative funding solutions. Ithaca has the foundation of an outstanding pedestrian and bicycle-orientated community. It is relatively compact with a street system that is primarily built on a grid. Many streets are favorable for walking and biking; most have sidewalks on at least one side and many have low traffic volume and speed. Ithacans themselves have demonstrated a commitment to active transportation modes with up to 42 percent of residents already choosing walking and biking for their commutes to work and school.21 However, some areas of the city lack basic pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure, and

improved access is needed to major employers and destinations. For many, traffic, topography, and convenience are also obstacles to active transportation. Tompkins Consolidated Area Transit (TCAT) provides bus service to Ithaca and surrounding towns. It runs county-wide and is considered an excellent system for its size. The city is the core of its service area with two major hubs in the central business district. Most points in the city are within one-quarter mile of a bus route, and all points are within one-half mile. Approximately 12 percent of Ithacans choose public transit for their daily commute, and ridership is high throughout the system.22 Although this is higher than the national average, we strive to increase ridership from all segments of the population. The City has worked to strengthen transit service through direct funding of TCAT, partnering for grants, and requiring some new development projects to accommodate transit. Improvements needed within the city include sheltered bus stops, real time schedules, and addressing service gaps in areas such as the West End.

21

Source: U.S. Census 2000, 2010, Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) and American Community Survey (ACS)

22

Ibid


M O BI L I T Y & T R A N S P O RTATI O N

The three major roadway corridors that traverse the city are designed primarily for cars and have limited bike and pedestrian amenities. These are: NY State Route 13, a north south route through the city that divides into a one-way pair along Fulton and Meadow Streets and is the city’s busiest road; State Route 79, an east-west route through the core of the city with one way traffic along Green Street, traveling east, and Seneca Street, traveling west; and Route 96/96B, a north-south route that is the primary connection to South Hill, including Ithaca College to the south and Trumansburg to the north.

23

Source: Ithaca Tompkins County Transportation Council (ITCTC)

These roadways carry tens of thousands of vehicles each day, bringing significant local and through traffic into the city neighborhoods. In addition, these roads tend to separate adjacent areas and feel unsafe and unwelcoming for those not in motorized vehicles. The steep grades of both Route 79 and Route 96B as they enter the central business district have been the cause of a number of serious vehicular accidents resulting in tragic fatalities and considerable property damage. Solving this problem is a priority and will take cooperation from many levels of government. Ithaca is a regional employment hub, with the largest employers located within or directly contiguous to the city. Vehicular travel patterns are heavily influenced by employment. There are approximately 16,000 jobs located in the city, of which about 80 percent, or 13,400, are filled by workers commuting from outside the city.23 This figure does not account for how commuters travel through the city or for those who live in the city and commute out, but it does clearly illustrate that new housing could have a large and positive impact on commuting patterns.

Figure 5.2 13,400 (80%) jobs are filled by workers commuting from outside the city

80%

commute from outside the city

20%

commute from within the city

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The City is making improvements to the management of its on-street parking, lots and garages, and more public investment is needed to implement new technologies.

Parking for private vehicles has significant implications for land use, fiscal health, community livability, and environmental management. Data from 2014 indicates that more than 330 acres of land, nearly 9 percent of the total acreage of the city, is devoted to vehicle storage in surface parking lots. Nearly all privately-owned surface parking lots are tied to single landowners or businesses, rather than allowing shared parking. In addition to the parking required by zoning, larger retail developers often build parking to meet peak demand, resulting in hundreds of empty spaces on most days of the year. In addition to private lots, the City owns several surface lots and three public garages; two in the central business district and one in Collegetown (one additional downtown garage is owned in partnership with other interests). Parking has a real cost that must be carefully weighed with the benefits it provides. Surface parking lots tie

up significant acreage that could otherwise be used for mixed-use development, providing housing and commercial and employment opportunities, while public parking (particularly structured parking) is expensive to build and maintain. The City is making improvements to the management of its on-street parking, lots and garages, and more public investment is needed to implement new technologies. The aspirations expressed in this chapter’s goals will require upgrading the city’s overall transportation infrastructure in numerous ways to better promote walking, transit and bicycling, while still accommodating motorized vehicles. At the same time, our existing facilities should be managed for maximum longterm value and efficiency to ensure safety and minimize environmental impacts.


M O BI L I T Y & T R A N S P O RTATI O N

6.1

Increasing Transportation Choice Both Locally and Regionally LU CL

The City will strive to increase transportation choices for both residents and visitors. Providing safe and convenient alternatives to private cars reduces traffic, protects the environment, benefits personal health, supports our desired growth patterns, and helps preserve Ithaca’s attractive small-city character. Increased investment in pedestrian, bike and transit facilities will also play an important role in advancing greater equity in our community by insuring safe, accessible and affordable transportation options for all residents. Connectivity to surrounding towns and regional population centers will be improved wherever possible.

Creating more choice implies balancing public investment among transportation modes. Because the city’s transportation network is now primarily designed for motorized vehicles, the majority of transportation resources are currently dedicated to maintaining and improving this infrastructure. Increased investment in pedestrian, bike and transit infrastructure may, at times, conflict with maintaining or improving levels of service for private cars. As we transform our transportation network according to the following goals, each action step must be evaluated for potential drawbacks and benefits.

Complete Streets are designed to provide safe, convenient access and mobility for all users

regardless of age or ability. Complete streets are designed to make it easy and pleasant to cross the street, walk to shops, bicycle to work and use transit. In other words, they encourage active transportation . Complete streets are also part of an interconnected network of streets, providing access to and from multiple points. There is no single design prescription for a Complete Street; each one is unique, incorporating features responding to its traffic volume and community context. This will range from high traffic boulevards with separate lanes or corridors for different modes, to minor residential streets where multiple modes might be accommodated on a single paved lane, to the possibility of converting some low traffic roads to living streets designed primarily for pedestrian activities.

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Increasing Transportation Choice : GOALS 1

Ithaca will provide an interconnected transportation network that makes it convenient, routine, and feasible for all residents and visitors to walk, bike, and use transit.

2

Ithaca’s transportation infrastructure will be designed to increase multi-modal connectivity, creating an interwoven network that extends into adjacent municipalities.

3

To reduce auto dependency, transportation modes shall be prioritized in the following order: pedestrian, bicycle, transit, private cars, and goods movement.

4

Every City street will be a complete street that accommodates multiple modes of transportation, including active transportation modes.

5

Pedestrian travel will be supported on all city streets through well-maintained and enhanced facilities that meet, at a minimum, Americans with Disabilities Act requirements.

6

Attractive new pathways will run along natural features — such as creeks and gorges — and connect to the street system, enhancing neighborhoods and serving as active transportation corridors.

7

Convenient, well-designed, and well-maintained bike facilities will encourage increased bicycling on city streets.

8

Frequent transit service, along with improved stops and shelters, throughout a broad service area will offer increased comfort, safety, and accessibility, particularly in areas serving low-income and elderly people.

9

The public parking supply will be managed to enhance vitality in city neighborhoods and commercial areas, support programs that provide alternatives to private car use, and be cost-neutral to the City.

10

Innovative ways to improve the delivery of goods and services will be in place.

11

Pedestrian, bike, and transit improvements will be spread equitably throughout the city so people of all income levels and abilities will benefit from them.

12

Shared transportation services, such as bike and carsharing programs, ridesharing and vanpooling, will be actively supported.

13

Coordinated regional transportation improvements — ranging from better pedestrian, bicycle and street connections with adjacent municipalities to better bus, rail and airline connections with other cities and states — will help ensure convenient regional mobility.


M O BI L I T Y & T R A N S P O RTATI O N

Increasing Transportation Choice : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Adopt complete streets principles as official City policy to ensure that Ithaca’s streets are well-designed, interconnected, and provide safe and convenient accommodations for all modes of transportation.

B

Work with the Town of Ithaca and Ithaca Tompkins County Transportation Council (ITCTC) to (1) provide seamless bicycle and pedestrian linkages, such as continuous sidewalks between destinations in the two municipalities, and (2) secure transportation connections along the west City line, so that traffic heading to and from new development in the town has alternatives to Route 79.

C

Provide adequate sidewalk width in the commercial core areas of the city, with particular attention to the central core of Collegetown and the areas surrounding the Ithaca Commons.

D

Improve pedestrian lighting on public streets.

E

Increase the City’s level of funding, effort and focus on trail planning, maintenance, and construction.

F

Minimize disruptions to pedestrians and cyclists from construction projects by requiring advance notice, signage and the maintenance of alternative routes during the entire construction period.

G

Consider the needs of pedestrians and cyclists in decisions concerning on-street parking.

H

Accommodate multiple modes of transportation in all public and private developments and maintenance projects.

I

Preserve existing rail, canal, and historic trolley rights of way for future transportation use.

J

Promote participation in public and private transportation demand management (tdm) programs. The City should work in partnership with the private sector to find mutually beneficial solutions to accommodate employee commuting and other transportation needs, including bicycles.

K

Advocate for the expansion of bus service and air travel to regional destinations and work with TCAT to coordinate local bus service with intercity schedules.

L

Pursue opportunities to improve the intercity bus station.

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6.2

Connecting Land Use & Transportation CL NC S

Transportation facilities will reflect the city’s development patterns as proposed in the Land Use chapter and help realize the City’s goal of strengthening its role as a regional hub. A complete transportation network is essential for creating new housing and businesses and protecting the health of our existing neighborhoods. As we transform our transportation network, we must ensure that projects provide benefits equitably throughout the community.

Living streets (often referred to by their Dutch name, woonerfs) are low-traffic streets designed

primarily to accommodate non-motorized activities. They function as shared public space for pedestrians, cyclists, children, and slow-moving cars. Living streets do not have traffic lights, stop signs, lane dividers, or even sidewalks and often feature curves or narrow widths at certain points to provide cues to motorized vehicle drivers to slow down and remain alert. A key concept is to encourage human interaction; those who use the space are forced to be aware of others around them, making eye contact and engaging in person-to-person interactions.

Connecting Land Use & Transportation : GOALS 1

Transportation planning decisions, management strategies, and investments will be coordinated with the goals of the Land Use chapter, helping to foster compact, connected, and walkable neighborhoods and mixed-use areas.

2

The City’s transportation infrastructure will be designed with sensitivity to the surrounding land use contexts to strengthen and enhance the livability of city neighborhoods.

3

All city streets, including state highways, will meet transportation needs while knitting together, rather than separating, adjacent city neighborhoods and commercial areas.

4

Streets, trails, intersections, and sidewalks will be designed and maintained as attractive public spaces using sustainable design principles.

5

An official City map will clearly depict planned future multi-modal transportation corridors to facilitate the reservation, acquisition, and construction of these corridors.

6

The environmental review process for development projects will employ a balanced multimodal (rather than auto-centric) analysis of transportation impacts.


M O BI L I T Y & T R A N S P O RTATI O N

Connecting Land Use & Transportation : RECOMMENDATIONS

A

As part of Phase II of Plan Ithaca, complete, adopt and implement a City Transportation Plan that addresses at a minimum the following points: 1.Establishment of a street typology based on land use, transportation needs, and impacts to neighborhoods. 2. Identification of appropriate treatments (per complete streets standards) for each type of street to accommodate multiple modes, ensure long-term mobility, and protect the vitality of adjacent neighborhoods. 3. Recommendations for low-volume streets that could be narrowed and transformed into living streets.

B

Introduce traffic calming measures as needed to promote safety and increase livability in city neighborhoods.

C

Work with NYSDOT, the Ithaca Tompkins County Transportation Council (ITCTC), and other interested agencies to transform the Route 13 corridor - from the north end of its Fulton/ Meadow split to its Fall Creek bridge - into a complete street / urban boulevard (with sidewalks, street trees, bike lanes and safe pedestrian crossings) for the purpose of reconnecting areas of the city (e.g., the lakefront) that have been separated by this functionally limited-access stretch of highway; conduct a feasibility analysis for this transformation within five years. Consider the merits of adding a new intersection in the vicinity of Carpenter Business Park.

D

Improve the maintenance and design of the edges of arterial corridors to enhance the appearance of existing treelawns and sidewalks (or provide these, if missing), and to provide curb bump-outs and / or other facilities to enhance the attractiveness and safety of crossings.

E

Create and adopt an official City map (with input from both engineering and planning standpoints) showing all planned future multi-modal transportation corridors and future street connections.

F

Update environmental review procedures and documents to provide a balanced and measurable multi-modal analysis of transportation impacts.

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6.3

Efficiency & Innovation in Technology, Operations, & Management LU CL S

The City will provide a transportation system that offers long-term value for future generations while reflecting its identity as a pioneering community. Transportation systems represent large public investments and should be built, maintained, and operated to the highest quality possible to ensure value over time. We should strive for innovation, including advancements in transportation technology, design, construction, and materials while being ever mindful of long-term environmental, safety and fiscal impacts.

Efficiency & Innovation : GOALS 1

The construction quality and design of transportation infrastructure will reflect community goals as expressed throughout Plan Ithaca.

2

Design principles, policies, and operational strategies will allow the adoption of innovative transportation and communication technologies.

3

The public parking supply will be managed using innovative technologies.

4

Transportation infrastructure maintenance will be evaluated and prioritized to ensure preservation of the asset (e.g., ongoing maintenance to extend the lifespan of bridges and avoid the need for premature replacement).

5

The transportation system will be managed to promote safety, provide fiscal and operational efficiency, and minimize negative environmental impacts.


M O BI L I T Y & T R A N S P O RTATI O N

Efficiency & Innovation : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Use innovative technologies and design approaches in construction and maintenance activities.

B

Explore the feasibility of innovative transportation technologies — for example, a fixed-rail trolley system or hillside bicycle lift — in order to leverage future funding opportunities. Consider the potential tourism appeal of such technologies.

C

Support TCAT’s efforts to introduce INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS technologies into the transit system.

D

Provide City staff with ongoing professional training and encourage them to monitor and implement new technologies and innovations in all areas of the transportation field.

E

In partnership with the NYS Department of Transportation, conduct a risk analysis of all steep approaches into the city to determine the most effective and feasible methods for improving safety of heavy trucks entering the city. Develop and adopt a plan for their implementation.

F

Collaborate with other agencies and municipalities to seek operational efficiencies and funding from State, Federal or other sources.

G

Continue to develop and implement innovative and self-supporting funding mechanisms to improve the transportation network, such as the Sidewalk Improvement Districts program.

H

Incorporate electric vehicle charging infrastructure into public facilities and private developments, as feasible.

I

Ensure that future City budgets increasingly reflect the transportation goals presented in this document by growing support for multiple transportation alternatives.

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6.4

Communication & Education to Support Transportation Choices PP CL

The City will strive to provide access to accurate and engaging information about transportation options that help people make informed choices and select the best transportation option for themselves and their community. Simply providing alternatives to private vehicle use will not reach everyone who might be willing to try biking, walking, or transit as a transportation mode. Factors that influence individual transportation decisions vary widely. They include real or perceived cost, safety, and convenience, as well as personal mobility, fitness, and concern for the environment.

Communication & Education : GOALS

1

Well-supported, ongoing programs will be in place to promote awareness of: • Active transportation options; • Transportation safety; • Personal and public cost of transportation options; • Travel time between destinations for different modes of transportation; • Environmental and energy-use impacts of transportation choices; and • Transportation Demand Management concepts and programs

2

Information and communication techniques and technologies will be up-to-date, reflecting evolving means of disseminating information.


M O BI L I T Y & T R A N S P O RTATI O N

Communication & Education :

RECOMMENDATIONS A

Support programs that improve conditions for walking and bicycling to school.

B

Work with community partners to develop and support educational programs and campaigns that address distracted driving and other safety issues.

C

Support educational programs that provide information about how the combined cost of housing and transportation varies with housing location.

D

Develop multiple effective means of communication between the City, transportation partners and the public regarding transportation matters and concerns.

E

Establish a portal on the City website linking to all community transportation resources.

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N AT U R A L & C U LT U R A L R E S OURC E S

7.0

This chapter serves as a guide for the responsible stewardship of our natural, cultural, and historic resources and will help us protect, preserve, and enhance them for the use, enjoyment, and edification of current and future generations. The City of Ithaca is fortunate to have an abundance of such resources that are enjoyed by residents and visitors alike. With its rich and stimulating history, our community is home to a wide variety of museums, galleries, theaters, and special events, as well as numerous parks, trails, and natural areas. These resources offer opportunities for physical activity, social interactions, entertainment, contemplation, creativity, and learning. They are vital to the community’s character, our quality-of-life, and the health of our residents. These exceptional resources also foster a sense of place, invite future residents, and attract visitors.

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7.1

Natural Resources LU EV CL MT S

The City owns and operates nearly 370 acres of parkland and more than three miles of publicly-accessible waterfront.

The city has a large number of parks, natural areas, and trails. Many of these amenities are located near our waterways, allowing residents and visitors alike to enjoy the city’s gorges, creeks, and Cayuga Lake. They provide a highly-valued and unique opportunity to interact with the natural environment in an urban setting. These will become increasingly important as the city continues to densify, and we must continue to preserve and enhance these existing resources and improve accessibility to them for all members of our community.

The City owns and operates nearly 370 acres of parkland and more than three miles of publicly-accessible waterfront. These parks range in size from large, regionally-used parks such as Stewart Park and Cass Park, to small, neighborhood parks such as Washington Park and Thompson Park. There are a wide variety of recreational opportunities, from passive enjoyment of a park’s open space to more active offerings, including swimming, ice

skating, tennis, and boating. Additionally, there are almost 900 acres of designated natural areas within or adjacent to the city. These areas are dedicated to the preservation of natural features but allow residents unique access to open space and waterways. This access is augmented by over 25 miles of trails that pass through wooded areas and stream corridors and near waterways. In addition to publicly-owned land, there are also numerous acres of privately-owned green space, much of which is owned and managed by Cornell University, located near waterways, on steep slopes, and in other locations that inherently preserve natural features. While the impressive size and variety of the park network provides many opportunities for the region, it also presents many challenges for the City. Parks and recreational facilities must be well- designed and well-maintained in order to benefit the community. However, maintaining nearly 370 acres of parkland as well as playgrounds,


N AT U R A L & C U LT U R A L R E S OURC E S

Continuing to provide parks, natural areas, and recreational trails, playing fields, swimming pools, an ice rink, and other amenities is a tremendous expense that falls almost entirely upon the City. Historically in times of budgetary constraints, routine maintenance of these resources has been reduced and plans for further enhancement have been postponed. However, our natural resources contribute greatly to the economic vitality of the community and our quality of life. Continuing to provide parks, natural areas, and recreational facilities for the community remains a priority, and we must be creative and seek alternate ways to make these resources available. In addition, we must focus on enhancing the accessibility of our parks and recreational facilities. We must improve physical connections to the parks, and we must ensure park amenities are safe and

accessible to all. While we have a lot of open space within the city, some neighborhoods lack adequate green space. Residents must travel to these amenities, and pedestrian and bike connections are often inadequate. Additionally, not all park facilities are accessible to seniors and people with disabilities. Parks, trails, and associated facilities must be designed and upgraded to the greatest extent possible to accommodate users of all ages and abilities so they can be equally enjoyed by all members of the community and all visitors.

facilities for the community remains a priority, and we must be creative and seek alternate ways to make these resources available.

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Natural Resources : GOALS 1

The City will provide and adequately fund well-maintained and safe parks, trails, and natural areas.

2

Community partnerships will support the maintenance, enhancement, and promotion of parks, trails, and natural areas.

3

The City will maintain and enhance its existing recreational facilities.

4

Gorges throughout the city will be protected to ensure their continuation as critical natural assets for current and future use.

5

Residents and visitors will be aware of gorge safety guidelines and will know how to safely enjoy the area’s gorges.

6

Steep slopes will be preserved to protect ecologically sensitive areas and to enhance the character and aesthetics of the city.

7

Facilities within City parks will be accessible so they may be equally enjoyed by all members of the community.

8

City parks, trails, and natural areas will form a well-established network of interconnected green space.

9

All members of the community will have access to the waterfront.

10

Existing green space in the city will be preserved and opportunities for additional green space will be strategically considered.

11

Distinctive, noteworthy, and characteristic community viewsheds will be protected.

12

City trees and plantings will help preserve and enhance local vegetation diversity. Existing tree canopies in City parks and on streets and right-of-ways will be maintained, enhanced, and, where appropriate, expanded.


N AT U R A L & C U LT U R A L R E S OURC E S

Natural Resources : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Update designations of City parks and natural areas.

B

As part of Phase II of Plan Ithaca, prepare a park system plan that addresses at a minimum the following points: 1. Management and maintenance of City parks 2. Establishing clear guidelines for designating City property as a park 3. Identification of areas that lack proximity and access to parks 4. Analysis of existing park facilities for underutilization and possible substitution and relocation

C

As part of Phase II of Plan Ithaca, prepare a management plan for the City’s natural areas that addresses at a minimum the following points: 1. Management and maintenance of City natural areas 2. Establishing clear guidelines for designating City property as a natural area 3. Collaboration with private property owners on the preservation and management of privately-held lands.

D

Re-examine the City’s organizational structure for parks, natural areas, and recreational facilities, with the following considerations: 1. Funding and operations, including potential regional funding, where appropriate 2. Creation of a central Parks, Recreation, & Natural Areas Department 3. Consolidation of advisory boards. 4. Dedication of staff resources to the maintenance of natural areas and stream corridors.

E

Update the City’s Parks Inventory and Tree Inventory.

F

Complete the draft Trails Master Plan.

G

Seek grants and other outside funding to maintain and enhance City parks and natural areas.

H

Support implementation of the Stewart Park Rehabilitation Action Plan.

I

Continue to work with the Town of Ithaca to complete the City’s portion of the Black Diamond Trail.

J

Continue to work with property owners on a permanent easement for a trail connection through the properties to connect the South Hill Recreation Way and the Gateway Trail.

K

Identify trails that are appropriate for pedestrian use only due to environmentally-sensitive conditions.

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Natural Resources : RECOMMENDATIONS continued

L

Enhance connectivity between the gorges, parks, natural areas, and other areas of the city by creating a green space network that links these resources.

M

Continue to work with Cornell University, adjacent municipalities, private property owners, and community partners on: 1. Preservation and enhancement of the gorges and surrounding areas. 2. Development of gorge safety programs and protocols. 3. Education of the public on safe and responsible use of the gorges.

N

Create signage and other visually informative displays to both facilitate wayfinding and promote its parks, trails, and natural areas to an even wider audience.

O

Work with TCAT to provide safe and convenient transportation to City parks and recreational facilities.

P

Strengthen protection mechanisms for the Cayuga Inlet, Six Mile Creek, Cascadilla Creek, and lower Fall Creek stream corridors.

Q

Prepare and adopt a steep slopes ordinance that includes guidelines for any development on steep slopes.

R

Explore opportunities for enhancing public access to the waterfront including: 1. Providing more opportunities for swimming in Cayuga Lake by exploring all practical possibilities within the city and working with neighboring municipalities to explore options outside of the city. 2. Creating a public boating center with meeting space, events, restrooms, and boat rentals. 3. Considering creation of a boardwalk to the lighthouse beyond Newman Golf Course and the Cornell Biological Field Station. 4. Considering possible destination uses on the waterfront. 5. Working with Tompkins County to fund the implementation of the Blueway Trail network on Cayuga Lake.

S

Explore ways to strategically expand the amount of both publicly- and privately-held green space.

T

Provide appropriate protections for Environmentally-Sensitive areas on the Future Land Use Map that lack such protections.

U

Implement a minimum green space requirement in residential neighborhoods throughout the city.

V

Enhance ongoing tree and landscape maintenance, including watering, pruning, and pest control.


N AT U R A L & C U LT U R A L R E S OURC E S

7.2

Cultural Resources EV CL

Cultural resources help define our identity as a city and provide personal enrichment, enjoyment, and unique learning opportunities. They allow residents and visitors to explore their culture and heritage and learn about those of others. The ability to recognize, accept and embrace the diversity of our community creates an environment for people from different backgrounds to live together with mutual respect and appreciation.

Cultural resources are the collective evidence of the past activities and accomplishments of people and may include any traditional resource that is important for maintaining the cultural traditions of a group. Some examples of cultural resources include cultural landscapes, archaeological sites, historical records, social institutions, expressive cultures, old buildings, religious beliefs and practices, spiritual places, industrial heritage, folk life, and artifacts.

The number and variety of these resources are remarkable for a city of our size and are an important part of our identity as a diverse and dynamic community.

Ithaca has a lively cultural life that contributes to the well-being of our residents and the economic vitality of our community. We have an exceptional variety of theaters, libraries, galleries, public art, museums, historical resources, and public spaces that are used for public gatherings and cultural expression. The numerous concerts, film series, theater performances, art exhibits, and festivals held throughout the year enrich the lives of residents and visitors. The number and variety of these resources are remarkable for a city of our size and are an important part of our identity as a diverse and dynamic community.

The City directly supports cultural resources by offering a variety of programming through the Greater Ithaca Activities Center (GIAC) and the Ithaca Youth Bureau, maintaining a public art program of more than 100 pieces, and creating historical and thematic walks with in the city. The City owns the old airplane hangar in Cass Park, which is leased to the Hangar Theater and is a regional destination. The City also plays a role in supporting privately-funded institutions, events, and groups by providing venues and assistance for more than 30 special events each year and devoting staff resources to participation on boards of various organizations. Recognizing the importance of our cultural environment, the City is committed to continuing its efforts and working with local partners to sustain these resources for all community members and visitors.

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Cultural Resources : GOALS 1

The City will provide and adequately fund City-sponsored events, programs, and other resources, such as GIAC and Ithaca Youth Bureau programming, the Martin Luther King Jr. Walkway, neighborhood investment programs, and public art.

2

Privately-sponsored events and organizations will be encouraged and supported.

3

The community will be aware of events, exhibits, and other programs open to the public.

4

Collaboration with community partners will help preserve and promote cultural and historic resources.

5

Cultural resources will be accessible to the entire community.


N AT U R A L & C U LT U R A L R E S OURC E S

Cultural Resources : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Continue to dedicate City resources to arts, culture, and historic resources.

B

Publicize programming on cultural history and existing cultural resources in the local media.

C

Continue to seek new and creative sources of funding needed to preserve and enhance our cultural resources.

D

Work with higher educational institutions and community partners to: 1. Encourage Cornell University, Ithaca College, and Tompkins Cortland Community College to hold cultural events off campus. 2. Create a comprehensive map of art installations, theaters, museums, and other cultural and historic institutions. 3. Create a virtual events center where event planners can access documents and information. 4. Maintain data on the economic importance of our cultural resources.

E

Utilize the City’s communication tools to: 1. Promote events, exhibits, cultural organizations and sites, and other opportunities within the community. 2. Disseminate information about transportation options to and from community programs and events, particularly between the city and area campuses.

F

Work with TCAT to provide safe and convenient transportation to events, museums, theaters, and other cultural destinations.

G

Create signage and other visually-informative displays to both facilitate wayfinding and promote its cultural resources to an even wider audience.

Hangar Theatre presentation of Little Shop of Horrors, Rachel Philipson

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S U S TA I N A BL E EN ERGY, WAT ER , & FO O D SYS TE M S

Plan Ithaca

Sustainable Energy, Water, & Food Systems

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S U S TA I N A BL E EN ERGY, WAT ER , & FO O D SYS TE M S

8.0

Past Steps Towards Sustainability 2001 Ithaca joined Local Governments for Sustainability (ICLEI) — over 600 local governments and entities working towards sustainability, energy conservation, and climate protection.

2006 Ithaca signed U.S. Mayors Climate Action Agreement, with 204 mayors in 38 states, committing to meet or exceed Kyoto Protocol targets for reducing global warming.

2009 Ithaca adopted the Climate Smart Community Pledge, focused on improving operations and infrastructure, increasing energy independence and security, and boosting economic growth.

2009 Ithaca began a series of upgrades to the Ithaca Area Wastewater Treatment Facility, aiming to generate more than 70 percent of its energy through biogas production.

This chapter lays out the City’s and the community’s fundamental vision, goals, and individual strategies for making Ithaca’s energy, water, and food systems more environmentally, economically, and socially sustainable. Countless communities like Ithaca are confronting the progressively more serious environmental and economic challenges associated with the growing human impact on our natural environment, including climate change, pollution, and widespread ecological decline. Informed by a well-established body of research and best practices, communities are grappling with the vital need to promote energy and resource conservation, economic resilience, social equity, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. While many of the changes necessary for a more sustainable and resilient future can be made at the individual level, the crucial role of local government in encouraging and accelerating change has become increasingly apparent. The City has long recognized its obligation to protect and nurture the health and well-being of its

residents and natural environment for future generations, as it also strives to create a more diverse, equitable, and prosperous economy. Adopting the 2006 Local Action Plan was a pivotal step in making City government more energy-efficient and reducing its greenhouse gas emissions. An updated and more comprehensive Energy Action Plan 2012-2016 was subsequently adopted in 2013, which also added recommendations for reducing community-wide emissions. Through these efforts, the City reduced its emissions by 14 percent from 2001 to 2010, with a

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Past Steps Towards Sustainability continued

2011 Ithaca installed solar thermal hot water systems, using solar energy to produce 45-50 percent of the hot water for the Streets and Facilities building and Cass Park. The City also installed solar photovoltaic panels at the Central Fire Station and Ithaca Youth Bureau.

2013 Ithaca adopted the Energy Action Plan 2012–2016 aimed at further reducing greenhouse gas emissions of City government operations.

2014 Ithaca, in collaboration with four other municipalities, launched the Residential Energy Score Project to develop a plan for scoring the energy performance of local homes. The project aims to use market forces to improve the energy efficiency of existing housing stock by providing meaningful home performance information to future home buyers.

further goal of reducing them to 20 percent below 2001 levels by 2016. The City is committed to reducing community-wide emissions to 80 percent below 2010 levels by 2050. Despite this progress, the City has not yet adopted an overarching long-term strategy for identifying, prioritizing, and implementing its sustainability goals. To successfully build on its achievements, it needs to take a more integrated, strategic, and organized approach. Since sustainability is inextricably connected to virtually every part of the community and City government, illustrating these connections will allow it to create a far more unified and effective method of implementing its sustainability goals. For example, an effective City transportation policy should not just deal with traffic and parking, but should also enhance access to public transportation and provide bicycle- and pedestrian-friendly environments, thus helping to reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. The City needs to incorporate sustainability into all of its decision-making and operations. It will therefore be crucial to invest City staff with responsibility and accountability for these sustainability efforts,

supported by the strong leadership of the City’s elected officials and decision-makers, based on the recommendations in Plan Ithaca. This City-wide integration will also help create and foster strategic relationships, leverage funding opportunities, and maximize City resources, while eliminating the redundancies, inconsistencies, and unintended consequences of developing strategies in isolation from one another. Ithaca is better prepared to pursue sustainability, compared to many other communities in the region and across the country, because of its more compact urban form and comparative lack of urban sprawl. And yet the community relies on the surrounding region for energy, water, and food, so it needs to think regionally.


S U S TA I N A BL E EN ERGY, WAT ER , & FO O D SYS TE M S

Ithaca is better prepared to pursue sustainability, compared to many other communities in the region and across the country, because of its It is important to emphasize that pursuing the City’s sustainability goals need not impose an excessive financial burden on our community, although investments will need to be made that will not provide immediate returns. The benefits of more sustainable energy use, watershed protection, and making local food accessible to all city residents will invigorate Ithaca as a whole, allowing residents to save money, become healthier and more efficient, and harmonize the relationship between our environment, economy, and community. The collective resources saved through the long-term implementation of these strategies can then be devoted to other positive uses in the community. Employing strategies that achieve multiple objectives — coordinated between City departments, other govern-

ment agencies, non-profits, private companies, and residents — will be the most productive approach. The more successfully we integrate our combined efforts to produce a sustainable economy, environment, and social system, the more productive, healthy, and happy Ithacans will ultimately be.

more compact urban form and comparative lack of urban sprawl.

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8.1

Energy Figure 8.1 Community Greenhouse Gas Emissions by Sector, 201024

Ithaca strives to become a carbonneutral community, with the initial goal of reducing community-wide emissions to 80 percent below 2010 levels by 2050.

PC LU EV CL MT

1% Solid Waste

22%

25%

Transportation

Residential

4%

Industrial

48%

Commercial

Ithaca strives to become a carbon-neutral community, with the initial goal of reducing community-wide emissions to 80 percent below 2010 levels by 2050. The City will continue to become more energy-efficient and reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. The City will also encourage energy conservation and waste reduction throughout the community, while promoting a renewable energy infrastructure and the efficient and strategic use of resources, through

24

Source: City of Ithaca Energy Action Plan 2012-2016

leadership, education and outreach, revisions to the City Code, and energy security and reliability policies. While technological progress and other factors will inevitably affect this process, opening up entirely new and exciting avenues for change, our community needs to pursue every available strategy for change.


S U S TA I N A BL E EN ERGY, WAT ER , & FO O D SYS TE M S

Energy : GOALS 1

Ithaca will be a leading model, facilitator, and educator for small-city transitions to higher energy efficiency, energy conservation, waste reduction, and reuse.

2

The city’s energy supplies will meet the highest standards of security and reliability.

Energy : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Establish a permanent City sustainability staff position(s) to coordinate the City’s sustainability-related initiatives.

B

Develop priorities for upgrading City facilities and infrastructure in accordance with the City of Ithaca Energy Action Plan 2012-2016.

C

Promote educational programs for residents, businesses, and City staff about energyrelated issues and resources, such as economic incentives, water conservation, waste reduction, and energy efficiency.

D

Collaborate with Tompkins County and/or local municipalities to explore: 1. Required disclosures of energy use for all properties; 2. Required annual energy benchmarking for large buildings in accordance with regional sustainability goals; and 3. The feasibility of a local carbon tax.

E

Enact more stringent local energy codes based on standards for new and existing buildings and voluntary certification programs.

F

Remove barriers to building energy upgrades, including solar access, in the City Code.

G

Advocate for building energy upgrades at private facilities.

H

Seek funding opportunities to support renewable energy systems, higher energy efficiency, and energy conservation in City facilities.

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Energy : RECOMMENDATIONS continued

I

Investigate ways to diversify and strengthen our local power grid through City-owned renewable energy systems including wind and hydropower, local energy production, and district energy systems.

K

Encourage appropriate local alternative fuels use and production.

L

Identify potential energy resources in the City’s waste stream.

M

Pursue resource-sharing, recycling, re-use, and conservation to reduce the energy used collecting and processing waste.

N

Promote innovative shared community access to products and services, through renting, lending, swapping, and bartering.

O

Educate the public about the relationship between local energy and water conservation.


S U S TA I N A BL E EN ERGY, WAT ER , & FO O D SYS TE M S

8.2

Water Resources & Stormwater Management Figure 8.2

5.3% Other

Typical U.S. Household Water Use25

16.8%

13.7%

Shower

Leaks

21.7%

26.7%

Clothes Washer

Toilet

15.7% Faucet

PP LU EV CL MT NC

Distinguished by a comparative wealth of water resources,our community will provide regional leadership to protect our watershed through innovative management, protection, and conservation policies and practices, thereby safeguarding our drinking water and other water resources for future generations. We cherish Cayuga Lake, its creeks, inlet, and

Did you know?

Water treatment and delivery accounted for 19 percent of the City’s greenhouse gas emissions in 2010.

25

surrounding buffer areas as genuine assets for everything from community character, natural beauty, and tourism, to the vital ecological benefits and economic opportunities they provide. We also recognize the critical relationship between modern stormwater infrastructure and the natural stormwater-handling capacity of the city’s water resources, like floodplains, wetlands, and stream buffers. As a result, we will significantly increase the use of green infrastructure practices and technologies by adopting green infrastructure and low-impact development requirements and by educating the public and developers about them.

Source: American Water Works Association & AWWA Research Foundation

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Water Resources & Stormwater Management : GOALS 1

Cayuga Lake, its tributaries, and the local watershed will be protected from pollution, sedimentation, erosion, flooding, invasive species, and other threats to drinking water supplies, wildlife, recreation, and economic development.

2

Community water consumption will be reduced through more efficient water use.

3

Stormwater run-off will be significantly reduced.

Water Resources & Stormwater Management : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Play a leadership role in long-term, collaborative, and intermunicipal approaches to protect Cayuga Lake and the local watershed.

B

Support completion of the updated Cayuga Lake Watershed Restoration & Protection Plan and collaborate with community-based water-monitoring groups and other municipalities to implement it.

C

As part of Phase II of Plan Ithaca, develop a City floodplain management program that addresses at a minimum the following points: 1. A method for determining whether flood-prone areas should be rebuilt or repurposed after a major flood; 2. Harmonization with flood-related portions of the Tompkins County Multi-Jurisdictional All-Hazards Mitigation Plan; and 3. Changes to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).

D

Partner with state and local agencies to develop a long-term dredging strategy for appropriate City waterways, including rehabilitating the Flood Control Channel and performing regular dam maintenance.

E

Prioritize areas to be protected from development and to serve as buffers to absorb stormwater run-off, filter pollutants, and preserve wildlife habitats.

F

Work with community partners to educate the public about watershed-protection measures (e.g., illustrate how daily choices and routines affect water quality).


S U S TA I N A BL E EN ERGY, WAT ER , & FO O D SYS TE M S

G

Preserve green space and other natural systems (stream corridors, detention ponds, wetlands, etc.) that enhance water quality and quantity.

H

Adopt and implement comprehensive strategies to aggressively reduce the water consumption of City operations and to encourage private water conservation.

I

Maintain the City’s stormwater user fee to provide reliable funding and oversight for stormwater infrastructure maintenance and improvements, stormwater run-off reduction incentives, soil erosion prevention, water-quality programs, demonstration projects, dredging, floodplain management, and enforcement of related ordinances.

J

Fund a stormwater study to identify the areas in the city most vulnerable to stormwater run-off.

K

Discourage new construction of impervious surfaces and encourage conversion of existing impervious surfaces into pervious surfaces or landscaping.

L

Identify ways to minimize any negative impacts to the city resulting from upstream development located in neighboring municipalities.

M

Collaborate with Tompkins County to explore allowing appropriate graywater and rainwater use in buildings.

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8.3

Food Systems LU EV CL NH

We will transform Ithaca’s food systems into a more communitybased food network and economic engine. Ithaca is fortunate to have a diverse and flourishing local food community with a deep and enduring interest in organic foods, sustainable local agriculture, cooperative food markets, community gardens, agricultural education, and a more equitable local food system. More work remains to be done, however, to achieve a more fully sustainable and locally-based food system that makes nutritious

food available, affordable, and accessible to everyone. Food production, processing, and distribution should be locally integrated to enhance public health and food security, making Ithaca’s food systems as energy-efficient and environmentally sustainable — and as accessible to all residents — as possible.

Food Systems : GOALS 1

All city residents will enjoy food security.

2

Residents will have opportunities to grow their own food locally through private or community gardens.

3

Ithaca’s community food network will improve food accessibility by connecting food entrepreneurs with policymakers, permitting agencies, and community members.

4

Ithaca will be home to local food-production and food-processing enterprises that capitalize on our location at the heart of a thriving agricultural region.


S U S TA I N A BL E EN ERGY, WAT ER , & FO O D SYS TE M S

Food Systems : RECOMMENDATIONS A

Allow and encourage the location of farmers’ markets and small food markets providing wholesome and healthy food throughout the city.

B

Collaborate with TCAT to establish a regular shuttle to the Ithaca Farmers’ Market and provide convenient service to local grocery stores.

C

Identify and remove impediments in the City Code to community gardens, shared projects, and other urban agriculture projects.

D

Promote community gardening sites, harvesting systems, and edible landscapes in all neighborhoods.

E

Encourage multi-unit housing owners and developers to set aside land for community gardens.

F

Advocate for the use of soil contamination testing and remediation procedures for community gardens and similar projects and require testing and remediation for sites on City property.

G

Collaborate with community partners to develop a long-term strategy for regularly maintaining community gardens and similar projects with strong community participation.

H

Promote safe and appropriate use of wasted organic resources.

I

Identify and remove zoning barriers to establishing food-production and foodprocessing enterprises in the city, where appropriate.

J

Focus City economic development efforts on attracting food-production and foodprocessing enterprises, where appropriate.

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9.0

Appendix A: Glossary Active Transportation

Human- powered transportation that includes walking, cycling, wheeling, in-line skating, skateboarding, cross-country skiing, canoeing and kayaking.

Adaptive Reuse

The renovation of a building for the purpose of changing its use.

Alternative Fuels

Alternatives to traditional gasoline, diesel, and coal fuels, such as biodiesel, ethanol, electricity, hydrogen, and natural gas. Many of these fuels, depending on how they are produced, reduce overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Alternative fuels may be used in a dedicated system that burns a single fuel, or in a mixed system with other fuels including traditional gasoline or diesel, such as in hybrid-electric or flexible fuel vehicles.

Brownfield

A property where expansion, redevelopment, or reuse may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.

Capital Improvement

A structural improvement or repair made by the City that enhances public property or infrastructure or increases its useful life.

Carbon Footprint

The total amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) that are emitted into the atmosphere each year by

an entity (for example, a person, building, process, or organization). In its community GHG emissions inventory, the City includes emissions from residential, commercial, and industrial buildings, as well as emissions from transportation and solid waste disposal. This includes emissions from fuels that are burned directly, such as by heati ng homes or driving cars, as well as emissions that come from the power plants that make our electricity and the landfills where our trash gets sent.

Carbon-Neutral

To be carbon-neutral is to have a net zero carbon footprint. This is achieved by balancing the measured amount of greenhouse gas emissions with an equivalent amount sequestered or offset or by buying enough carbon credits to make up the difference.

Carbon Tax

A compulsory charge levied on carbon emissions or electricity or fuel usage, with the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Certificate of Appropriateness The official Ithaca Landmarks Preservation Commission approval of an application to make alterations to a locallydesignated historic property.

Character

The identity and sense of place associated with a neighborhood. Community bonds, built form (architecture and size and scale of buildings), streetscape, and public

amenities are all components of neighborhood character and influence how residents and visitors perceive an area.

Collaboration

The City works in partnership with other municipalities, educational institutions, and community organizations to realize the goals of Plan Ithaca.

Community Livability

The combination of ease of access to daily living needs, perceptions of public safety, availability of affordable housing and economic opportunities, and individual levels of comfort (aesthetics, noise levels, etc.) that contribute to quality of life for residents.

Cultural Resources

The collective evidence of the past activities and accomplishments of people and may include any traditional resource that is important for maintaining the cultural traditions of a group. Some examples of cultural resources include cultural landscapes, archaeological sites, historical records, social institutions, expressive cultures, old buildings, religious beliefs and practices, spiritual places, industrial heritage, folk life, and artifacts.

Deconstruction

The disassembly of a structure to salvage as many of the reusable materials as possible. Deconstruction is a more environmentally-friendly alternative to demolition, as it diverts materials from local landfills and allows their reuse.


A P P E N DI X A

Destination Use

An attraction, event, or activity that draws people to a location

marking helps to track building performance over time and allows building-to-building comparisons.

District Energy Systems

Equity

In general, a district energy system provides the thermal requirements, in the form of steam, hot water, or chilled water, to a centralized group of users such as a campus or a city. The system typically contains a central energy plant and a distribution network (e.g. a pipeline) that delivers the energy to the consumers. District energy systems are often used in tandem with combined heat and power (CHP) technology as a means of efficiently using the waste heat from a large electric generator.

Edible Landscapes

Food-producing plants that are used as part of decorative gardens or landscaping.

Embodied Energy

The amount of energy consumed to produce a product or building. This includes the energy needed to mine or harvest natural resources and raw materials and that are needed to manufacture and transport finished materials.

Energy Benchmarking

An energy benchmark is essentially a snapshot of a building’s energy use; it usually includes utility bill data for the timeframe covered (often a year) as well as operational characteristics (such as square footage and operating hours) that help frame the data. Bench-

The services, amenities, and opportunities that are available through City efforts are accessible to all residents through means that preserve dignity and that are free of discrimination. These may include participation in decision-making, as well as access to information, housing, transportation, economic opportunity, jobs and job training, recreation, and a safe and healthy environment.

Floodplain

Areas of low-lying ground adjacent to a waterway that are subject to flooding. Properties located in a designated flood plain are subject to additional development regulations and insurance requirements.

used to pay for administration and operating expenses.

Green Businesses

Organizations or companies whose operations have no or minimal negative impact on the local or global environment, the community, or the economy.

Greenhouse Gas

Greenhouse gases are natural or manmade gases that trap heat in the atmosphere and contribute to the greenhouse effect. Greenhouse gases include carbon dioxide, methane, water vapor, nitrous oxide, and fluorinated gases. Changes in the concentration of certain greenhouse gases, due to human activity such as fossil fuel burning, increase the risk of global climate change.

Green Infrastructure

All processes and infrastructure involved in food production, processing, distribution, and consumption.

Civil, structural, water and environmental improvements that are designed to reduce or eliminate negative impacts on the local or global environment, the community, or the economy.

Fund Balance

Heritage Tourism

General Fund

Historic Resource

Food System

The difference in value between revenues and assets owned by an organization and its obligations to pay expenses. A positive fund balance is essentially the City’s reserved savings. The primary operating fund for the City. The general fund includes the revenues used to sustain dayto-day general operations and is

Travel to experience the places and activities that authentically represent the stories and people of the past and present – including historic, cultural, and natural resources. A site, building, structure, or object (or a grouping of these resources) that has cultural value based on its association with historic events

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or the lives of historically significant individuals, aesthetic qualities or architectural form, or potential to yield information about the past.  Historic resources also include artifacts, records and material remains related to these properties or resources.

Hospitality

A broad range of fields within the service industry including food and beverage, lodging, and spa services. Hospitality professionals often provide services to visitors.

Infill

Development of vacant or underutilized properties within a predominantly built-up neighborhood or commercial area.

Intelligent Transportation Systems

Real-Time Passenger Information systems that provide vehicle location information to customers, and scheduling systems to develop optimized schedules for both vehicles and operators.

Job Readiness

Training that individuals receive to prepare them to seek or obtain employment and to keep their jobs once they are hired.

Local Historic District or Landmarks

Individual properties or groupings of historic resources that have been designated by a municipality as being significant to the community’s history, architecture, archeology, engineering or culture. 

These districts and landmarks are often protected, and alterations regulated by, a local preservation ordinance.  Local historic districts and landmarks can be simultaneously listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Mixed-Use Development

Development projects that provide for more than one use or purpose within a shared building or development area. Mixed-use development may allow the integration of commercial, retail, office, medium to high-density housing, and in some cases light industrial uses. These uses can be integrated either horizontally or vertically in a single building or structure.

Multi-Modal Transportation System

Transportation system that uses a variety of modes to transport people and goods. Components of the system may include vehicular roadways, transit (bus, rail), bikeways, pedestrian ways (sidewalks, trails), freight railways, and airplanes.

National Historic District or Landmark

Individual properties or groupings of  historic resources that are recognized on the National Register of Historic Places, the federal list of historically significant properties, as being significant to American history, architecture, archeology, engineering or culture.  While alterations to properties listed on the National Register are not regulated at the local lev-

el, certified rehabilitations of listed properties are eligible for funding incentives.

Period of Significance

The interval of time during which a property or district was associated with important events, activities or persons, or attained the characteristics that make it culturally, historically, or architecturally valuable.  The period of significance usually begins with a date when significant activities or events began giving the property its historic significance; this is often the date of construction for an individual property or period of first development for a district.

Property Tax Abatement

A subsidy provided by a taxing authority that lowers the cost of owning, operating, or improving a property by reducing or eliminating the taxes paid by the owner of the property for a set period of time.

Renewable Energy

Energy and electricity supplied from continually replenished energy sources, such as wind and solar power, geothermal, hydropower, and various forms of biomass. In general, energy produced from renewable resources results in lower greenhouse gas emissions than the same amount of energy produced from fossil fuels.

Sales Tax Exemption

A subsidy provided by a taxing authority that enables a purchaser to make sales tax-free purchases.


A P P E N DI X A

Sustainability

Living in a way that allows present generations to meet their needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. A sustainable community must safeguard the health and well-being of its economic, social, and environmental systems – including food security, clean air and water, healthy ecosystems, and effective governance.

Transfer of Development Rights Program

A zoning mechanism used to protect open space, farmland, and natural and cultural resources by redirecting development that would otherwise occur on these lands to areas planned to accommodate increased growth and development.

Transportation Demand Management (TDM)

Strategies that result in a more efficient use of transportation resources. TDM emphasizes the movements of people and goods rather than motor vehicles and also gives priority to more efficient modes (such as walking, biking, ridesharing, vanpooling, public transit and telework) particularly under congested conditions. TDM strategies are particularly well suited for business districts and high employment areas.

Underemployment

The condition in which people in a labor force are employed in jobs that are not commensurate with

their training and experience or that are inadequate with respect to their economic needs.

Watershed

The entire land area that drains into a creek, river, lake, or other body of water.

Wellness

Physical, mental, and spiritual health and well-being.

Zoning

A regulatory mechanism through which the City regulates the location, size, and use of properties and buildings. Zoning regulations are intended to promote the health, safety and general welfare of the community, and to lessen congestion, prevent overcrowding, and facilitate the adequate provision of transportation, water, sewer, parks, and other public services.

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10.

Appendix B: Public Outreach Summary The Comprehensive Plan Committee conducted extensive public outreach throughout the planning process. Written comments were accepted at any time, and the committee heard public comment at the start of each of its meeting. Additional public outreach was conducted at key points in the development of the plan. The first phase of outreach focused on getting general input from community members on their impressions of Ithaca. A series of meetings were held throughout the community during the fall 2011 and winter 2012. Many of the meetings were organized by committee members and staff around a particular topic or to get feedback from individual neighborhoods. Committee members and staff also attended meetings of established organizations, In addition to the meetings listed below, an online survey was created, and hard copies of the survey were made available at various locations throughout the city. Nearly 1,000 survey responses were collected. At the public meetings and in the survey, participants were asked about their favorite parts of Ithaca and their thoughts on the city’s strengths and weaknesses.

Initial Public Meetings

Kick-Off Public Workshop at GIAC

Disability Advisory Council

Active & Healthy Lifestyles

Public Forum at GIAC

Active Transportation

Southside Neighborhood Meeting

Bryant Park & Belle Sherman Neighborhood Meeting

Student Input Session at Cornell University

Chamber of Commerce

Tompkins County Climate Protection Initiative

Collegetown Neighborhood Council Downtown Ithaca Alliance Board Historic Resources Human Services Coalition Forum

Tompkins County Mental Health Subcommittee South Hill Neighborhood Meeting

Ithaca High School Senior Class

Washington Park Neighborhood Meeting

Learning Web

West Hill Neighborhood Meeting


A P P E N DI X B

Following this initial phase of public input, subcommittees of the Comprehensive Plan Committee and staff used the comments received, along with data on existing conditions and trends, to create a vision and goals for the sections of each chapter. Focus groups were then organized throughout the spring and summer of 2013 to get comments on the goals for each section of the plan. In addition to providing their reactions to the goals, the focus groups were also asked to provide recommendations to implement the goals and identify potential barriers to implementation.

Focus Groups

Communication

Faster & Farther

Fiscal Health

Parks, Trails, & Natural Areas

Economic Development

Arts

Commercial & Employment Districts

Cultural Resources

Housing Historic Preservation

Events, Festivals, & Tourism Energy

Public Safety

Water Resources & Stormwater Management

Physical Infrastructure

Food Systems

Health, Wellness, & Support

Community Leaders of Color

Tompkins County Coordinated Transportation Planning

Tompkins County Office of the Aging Advisory Committee

Transportation System Users

People with Disabilities

The new information built upon the previously collected public input, and following the focus group meetings, the subcommittees and staff drafted each of Plan Ithaca’s chapters. At the same time, the entire committee worked on the plan’s Land Use chapter. The first draft was presented at two public workshops in April 2014 and involved more than 100 community members. The complete draft of Plan Ithaca was made available for public review in early April 2015. The Comprehensive Plan Committee and staff scheduled a series of open houses throughout the city to hear the community’s comments on the draft plan. The eighth open house was scheduled and facilitated by graduate students at Cornell University and, while targeted

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to students, was open to the general public. In addition to the open houses, opportunities for public comment and questions were provided at Loaves and Fishes, the Southside Community Center Food Pantry, and the Tompkins County Economic Development Collaborative. Additional meetings were scheduled to get input from City staff and the Town of Ithaca and Tompkins County Planning Departments. Open Houses

St. Luke Lutheran Church (Collegetown) Fall Creek Elementary School Southside Community Center Greater Ithaca Activities Center (GIAC) South Hill Elementary School Tompkins County Public Library Lehman Alternative Community School Mann Library (Cornell University)


A P P E N DI X C

11.

Appendix C: Maps See separate attachment available at: www.cityofithaca.org/165/City-Comprehensive-Plan

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General Neighborhood Map GENERAL NEIGHBORHOOD MAP Legend City Boundary Waterway

TOWN OF ITHACA CITY OF ITHACA

Park/Natural Area

Renwick Slope

Cayuga Lake

Palmer Woods Stewart Park

Allan Treman Marina

Treman Marina

Newman Golf Course

CORNELL HEIGHTS

Cass Park

Cayuga Inlet

Ithaca Falls Natural Area

Fall Creek Fall Creek Gorge

WATERFRONT & INLET ISLAND

Auburn Park

Conley Park

Octopus Cliffs

WEST HILL

FALL UNIVERSITY HILL CREEK Linn Street Woods

CORNELL

NORTH SIDE

Thompson Park

Conway Park

Brindley Park

WASHINGTON PARK

Cascadilla Creek

Cascadilla Gorge

EAST HILL COLLEGETOWN Dryden Road Park

Dewitt Park

Maplewood Park

DOWNTOWN

Bryant Park

Sixmile Creek

ield

s

McDaniels Park

yF

SOUTH SIDE

berr

BRYANT PARK & BELLE SHERMAN Straw

139

Titus Triangle

SOUTH HILL

Wood Street Park

SOUTHWEST AREA

Six Mile Creek Valley

Baker Park

CITY OF ITHACA TOWN OF ITHACA

General Neighborhood Map SPENCER ROAD

Negundo Woods

Legend City Boundary Waterway

TOWN OF ITHACA CITY OF ITHACA

Park/Natural Area

Renwick Slope

Cayuga Lake

South Hill Swamp

Allan Treman Marina

Âą

N

0

Treman Marina

1,500 1,500

0

Palmer Woods

Stewart Park

Buttermilk Creek Gorge and Inlet Valley Slope

Feet 3,0003,000 Feet

1:7,000

NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Data Source: City of Ithaca Department of Public Works, 2013 Map Prepared by: City of Ithaca GIS Program, June, 2015

1:7,000

Newman Golf Course Cass Park

Cayuga Inlet

CORNELL HEIGHTS

Ithaca Falls Natural Area

Fall Creek Fall Creek Gorge


A P P E N DI X C

11.2

City and Town City and Town Future Land Use FUTURE LAND Future Land Use

CITY AND TOWN

USE

DRAFT DRAFT

Legend City Future Land Use

Waterway

Legend

STATE ROUTE 13 N STATE ROUTE 13 N

Area of Special Concern

KE GARDEN AVE GARDEN AVE

STATLER DR STATLER DR

T

H IT

A AC

RD RD

WORTH ST WORTH ST MITCHELL ST MITCHELL ST

PEAR SALL

PL

R W AT E

ST ST

GILES ST

BR ID GE

PL

TEAD

ES HOM

ST

W AT E

R

ST

CA HA IT D R ALE GED RID RDRD LEYALE VAGLED RID D YR E L VAL

CORNELL ST CORNELL ST

CH MIT

S ELL

ENERGY DR ENERGY DR

LINDEN AVE LINDEN AVE DELAWARE AVE DELAWARE AVE

BLAIR ST BLAIR ST

L

E CH MIT

T BR AV YA E N T AV E

T LS

RD HOY

RD

D AD RE ESTE AV HOM EST CR OD E O V W TA ES CR OD O W

PL

SA

RD HOY

BR ID GE

SP

TURNER PL TURNER PL

EN CE EN RS CE T RS T

SP

HO PLZ HO PLZ SAGE AVE SAGE AVE

WEST AVE WEST AVE

UNIVERS ITY AVE UNIVERS ITY AVE

GLEN PL GLEN PL

ST AT E

W

EDDY ST EDDY ST

13 S E

13 S

RO UT

E

ST AT E

RO UT

W

ALLEN ST ALLEN ST

S MEADOW ST S MEADOW ST

JAKE ST JAKE ST

SA UR OR UR AS OR T AS T

ST RD TH I

ST RD

TH I

PARK RD TAUGH PARK RD ANNO TAUGH CK BL VD ANNO CK BL VD

BRINDLEY ST BRINDLEY ST

RA IL R OA LR D OA SE D RV SEMA IC RVRY E MA RD IC ST RY E RD ST

T PL EN NT SC CE RE ES C CR

RA I

CAMPUS RD

ELMWOOD AVE ELMWOOD AVE

COLLEGE AVE COLLEGE AVE

TAYLOR PL TAYLOR PL

CAMPUS RD

DRYDEN RD MAPLE AVE OAK AVE DRYDEN RD MAPLE AVE

BR YA N

GILES ST

PEAR SALL

HUDSON PL

TOWER RD

RHODES DR OAK AVE

S ST

IEW PLBIA ST HILLV COLUM

N QUARRY ST N QUARRY ST FERRIS PL FERRIS PL STEWART AVE STEWART AVE

N ST TO SS HUD SON HUD

BIA ST COLUM PLEASANT ST

TE SM SJA

ST ST NTPECT PLEASA PROS

E JAM

E GREEN ST PROSPECT ST

TOWER RD

RHODES DR

EDGEMOOR LN WILLIAMS ST WILLIAMS ST

CES DR SCIEN S DR SCIENCE

EAST AVE EAST AVE

E

SOUT LN OOR EDGEM H AV E

N ST GREE EE ST STATE

PARK ST

CENTRAL AVE CENTRAL AVE

SOUTH AV

DEWITT PL DEWITT PL

CHE STN CHE UT S STN T UT S T FLO RA FLO LA RA VE LA VE CHER RY ST CHER RY ST

CRADIT FARM DR

E SENECA ST

HILLVIEW PL

AVE

FALL CREEK DR

WAY

N AURORA ST N AURORA ST

HALLER BLVD HALLER BLVD

ILLARYD N WD WA N WILLAR

LINN ST LINN ST

1,500

RD

THUR FALL CREEK STON DR

E SENECA ST E BUFFALO ST

S CAYUGA ST S CAYUGA ST

0

N TIOGA ST N TIOGA ST UTICA ST UTICA ST

1,500

E COURT ST E BUFFALO ST

S GENEVA ST S GENEVA ST S ALBANY ST S ALBANY ST

±±

D PL NR TOHUDSON ING DD CO RD N TO ING DD CO

QU AR QU RY AR RD RY RD

TS RDH A IS IR R MOR S ELM HT IS RR MO

ST ON E

ST ON E

RD

3,000 Feet

1,500

N GENEVA ST N GENEVA ST N ALBANY ST N ALBANY ST

S PLAIN ST S PLAIN ST

R

CE EN

SP

0

LL WI

RD

S MEADOW ST S MEADOW ST

R

CE EN

SP

0

KING ST

E STATE ST

PARK ST ST WOOD

A IR

CRADIT FARM DR

E JAY ST

W CLINTON ST CLEVELAND AVE N TI W CLINTON ST TU S N AV TI E VE TU SA S ITU AV ST E E AV S HYERS ST ITU ST WOOD ST HYERS ST

M EL

N

Y DE

AB

CLEVELAND GREEN ST W AVE

FAIR ST FAIR ST

LN

ST

W STATE ST W SENECA ST

ST

CECIL A MALONE DR

LN

TT BO

CECIL A MALONE DR

REUBEN ST REUBEN ST

TT O

B AB

A ST W SENEC LO ST W BUFFA

ST ST W GREEN W STATE

ST ON N T O UL LT F FU S

M EL

ST

LN CO L IN

W COURT ST W BUFFALO ST

S

HOOK PL ST M EL

W ST

PARK PL PARK PL

HOOK PL

IN

A FR

ST

ST T INS MLS AK DN AA FR T E YATES ST SS TAM ASD CK E YATES ST O ALLST E MARSH NC ST N HA ST ST O CIKS OE D ST O ALL R A MARSH E C CA FARM ST NM OTN S SC NM T HA AD ES ISO CASCADILLADST ILL RO A N ST MA CA FARMAVE MO SC AD CASCA ST DILLA ST ESTY ILL AA V COURT STE E W COURT ST ESTY ST

N MEADOW ST N MEADOW ST

WARREN PL WARREN PL RICHARD PL RICHARD PL

SUNRISE RD

N FULTON ST N FULTON ST

SUNRISE RD

L NK

ST

N OL

E FALLS ST

SISSO N PL

HEIGHTS CT THURSTON WAIT AVE AVE

E LINCOLN ST E FALLS ST QUEEN ST E LINCOLN ST E JAY ST N ST QUEEST KING

ST

CLIFF ST CLIFF ST

SUNRISE RD PL HOPPER

RD

H ST T H FIF

PL HOPPER SUNRISE RD

TH I

ST

T FIF

LAMBETH WAY

E AV

LAMBETH WAY

W

RD

C L IN

KLINE RD

ST

E AVLOW L OW WI

TH I

T KE E SLA

LL WI

D RR

PIE

SISSO N PL

HEIGHTS CT WAIT AVE

PL

K LA

P

N CAYUGA ST N CAYUGA ST VE AUBURN ST EKE A V AUBURN ST E ALA T AK YS VLE STDE E A T AVLOW TS L STIRS OW WI ST F FIR

ST R STTO OREC E CT H AV TEER VE LL RW H L ABE LTVEIE ELMP FAWL PBCA LVIE FAL A EM V AC ELL VE AB LL P BEAM MP C N CA DL OO LN DW AK OO KW OA

RD IER

PL V I N I N EL LV K

KLINE RD

DEWITT PL DEWITT PL

D KR AR TP AR W RD E ST RK PA RT WA E ST

Cemetery City Border City Future Land Use Waterway Environmentally-Sensitive Rural/Agricultural Cemetery City Border Educational Natural/Open Environmentally-Sensitive Rural/Agricultural Enterprise Semi-Rural Neighborhood Educational Natural/Open Parks Established Neighborhood Enterprise Semi-Rural Neighborhood Low Density Residential TND Medium Density Parks Established Neighborhood Medium Density Residential TND High Density Low Density Residential TND Medium Density Neighborhood Mixed-Use Enterprise Medium Density Residential TND High Density Waterfront Mixed-Use Campus Neighborhood Mixed-Use Enterprise Urban Mixed-Use Inlet Valley Gateway Waterfront Mixed-Use Campus Area of Special Concern Urban Mixed-Use Inlet Valley Gateway

3,000 Feet 3,000 Feet

1:6,125 1:6,125 1:6,125

NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Map Source: Tompkins County Digital Planimetric Map 1991-2012 Data Source: City of Ithaca GIS Program, 2012 Map Prepared by: Department of Planning, City of Ithaca, NY,GRS June,802015 NY State Plane, Central Datum Map Source: Tompkins County Digital Planimetric Map 1991-2012 Data Source: City of Ithaca GIS Program, 2012 Map Prepared by: Department of Planning, City of Ithaca, NY, June, 2015

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11.3

Historic Districts

HISTORIC DISTRICTS

RO

LINN ST

E R RD

K I N SON GD OC K

LO DIC AD

T

T EA S

Dryden Road Park

ONEIDA PL

PARKER ST

BLAIR ST

ELSTON PL

SEN E CA WAY

S TIOGA ST

DO N

Local Historic District

L N T INE P

L

RS CE

W

S GENEVA ST

EN SP

S PLAIN ST

W

N CO R LK WA

Park/Natural Area

EA D

FOUNTAIN ST

CRESCENT PL

National Historic District L EL

ER TR AT NT R T ME LA IV EW NT AY

TE

ILL HH

SO

UT

TURNER PL

ST CE R

SP EN

Historic Designation VA LE

T

TI P

VALLEY RD

HistoricDistricts

ER WAT

ST

Waterway

P

E

PL

ZET

D

PL

PL

Legend

ST

EPL AG TT

RE N

CK

RL ES

CO

HILLVIEW PL

AR

RIDGEDALE RD

E OR NM L P

ST

Hillview Park

A

AC

MITCH ELL ST

AN BR

D OO

COLUMBIA ST

E PL TTAG CO

R

CO

CH

Columbia Street Park

DU

W

ES ST

PLEASANT ST

ITH

MITCHELL ST

STATE ROU T E 366

JAM

S ALBANY ST

AV E

YANT AVE

Bryant Park

G

R IS PL

E CLINTON ST

CENTER ST

E

IRVING

ST

FER

Henry St. John

BR

S QUAR R Y

Six Mile Creek Natural Area

GILES ST

PROSPECT ST

S CAYUGA ST

S PLAIN ST

FAYETTE ST

S GENEVA ST

ON ST

D PL OXFOR

BOOL ST

ORCHARD PL

T

AS

HUDS

COOK ST

I RV IN

OR

Six Mile Creek

FROSH ALLEY

NT OU FAI R M E AV

E STATE ST / M.L.K. JR ST

Maplewood Park

ELMWOOD AVE

N L INDE AVE

UR

W GREEN ST

VE DELAWARE A

N W ECA AY

SA

E GREEN ST

EDDY ST

N QUARRY ST

W STATE ST/ M. L. K. JR ST

Downtown West

HARVARD PL CATHERINE ST

SE

Ithaca Downtown

OAK AVE

DRYDEN RD

SAGE PL

SCHUYLER PL

Clinton Block

O

SUMMIT AVE

CA

A

DRYDEN CT

OSMUN P

GLEN PL

FOUNTAIN PL

WILLIAMS ST

ILLA AD PL

E

SC

AK V

ND P

L

EDGEWOOD PL

SPRING LA

DEWITT PL

WILLETS PL

E PL ERRAC

N GENEVA ST

N ALBANY ST

L

H HIG LA

East Hill

E SENECA ST

DR HOY RD

T

Dewitt Park

STATLER DR

L EG E AVE

C OL

HOLLIS T E R

Cascadilla Creek

Dewitt Park

GARD AV E N E

S D WH I TE E DRIV EWAY

S

GE SA E AV

EDGEMOOR LA

E BUFFALO ST

S TITUS

GA

AL AVE

A

L

CASCADILL A PARK RD

W BUFFALO ST

N TITU S AV

OK

C ENTR

W

ST WE AVE

C

AV E

E COURT ST

W COURT ST

P TT WI DE

Y C OF I EM THA CA ET AR Y

SEARS ST

ESTY ST

C AMPUS RD

SOUTH AVE

A

IT

LA

R FO RK PA

AC ITH Y OF C ITY METAR CE

ILL

A CA AVE SC AD IL

N

AD

ES LA T

Y

ST

SC

ES VE T

M W O ARY AN OD DR

A

D

CA

LZ

ITHAC CITY OF CEMETAR

F ITHACA TARY

IR TH CASCADILLA ST

W CLINTON ST

RD AV EN E

TOWER RD

CT LLENROC

ST

CITY O CEM

ND

CO

E

FARM ST

RESERVOIR AVE

RESERVOIR AVE

A H OU

CORNELL AVE A CITY O F ITHAC CEMETARY

T ES

W SENECA ST

RESERVOIR AVE

Cornell Arts Quad

HO P

LINN ST

SE O

WES T AVE

WEST AVE

N TIOGA ST

AUBURN S T

ST

E MARSHALL ST

Thompson Park

NR

PL

University Hill

E YATES ST

W YATES ST

W MARSHALL ST

MO

FOREST HOME DR

W U P ES WEST CAM P A R T Y K CA DRIVEW A IN M G P LO U T

VE EA

ST ST

ON

R AW

S

ST ST W TOMPKINS

E TOMPKINS ST

N AURORA ST

K

CG

UNIVERSITY AVE

K LA

FIR DIS

UTICA ST

T

E AV

OC

ELTA A D WAY PH A L RIVE D PHI

N CAYUGA ST

YS

W NC

M

E LEWIS ST

DE

LO

MA

D LAR WIL AY W

E AV

MAPLE GROVE PL

RO STA UT TE E 13

B A RTON PL C DR HI P IVE SI WA Y

T E JAY ST

Auburn Park

WIL HA

DR

ST AT E

WI

TS

VE EA

ST

AL

H I G HLAND E AV

LARD W IL AY W

OR

K LA

S

W LEWIS ST

ST

BA L

Y DR

Fall Creek

L LARD O OP

KING ST

MS

LE

R

Fall Creek Gorge

LAKE ST

ST

Conley Park

AM AD

R IS R OBER TS P L

D

FALL CREEK DR

L

SH

QUEEN ST

A AD

B

CH

CRA D IT FARM DR

E LINCOLN ST

COLN ST

ST AV EWA E R

Ithaca Falls Natural Area

N AURORA ST

E FALLS ST

T

N TIOGA ST

E YORK ST

W JAY ST

LIN

BRO

L AN D AV E

GH HI

RD INE KL

3 E1

Cornell Heights

SISSON PL

M HA RIP

WAIT AVE

THURSTON AVE

W LIN

NK

HEIGHTS CT

Y WA

UT

D

GE

L IFF P

A

D LO

EDGECL

OO

S UP JES RD

ORN PL

PL

W

DEARB

THE KNOLL

W FALLS ST

A FR

URNE LA

CK OF F

VE

E RD

DLA N D PL

W YORK ST

WILLO AV W E

TB O

PL

RD

W OO

AM

E

PIER RD

S

DH

RIDG

ITHACA HIGH SCHOOL DRIVEWAY

EE

WY

N

N

KLIN

WE

Stewart Park

VI EL

KO RD FF

K

LA

WYC

LA

ROSEMA RY

M

Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

H C

141

City Boundary

TR E

VA

AV E

HYERS ST

±

N

0

0

750

750

1,500 Feet

1,500 Feet

1:3,006

1:3,006

NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Data Source: City of Ithaca Department of Public Works, 2015 Map Prepared by: City of Ithaca GIS Program, June, 2015


A P P E N DI X C

Environmental Features

11.4

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES Environmental Features

Legend Percent Slope

Waterway

Less than 5%

TE STA E STAT

RO UT 4

Legend

E 13

CITY OF ITHACA

Percent Slope

TE STA

5 to 10%

GI

ES

E 13

M

QU

NE O ST

GARDEN AVE

STATLER DR

PL IT T

W

ST

CORNELL ST

I

LINDEN AVE

SUMMIT AVE

EDDY ST GARDEN AVE

BLAIR ST

ield s yF berr

K

Straw

AL W

R

R CO

NE

L

ST

HO ME

ST

PK

IN

S

yF

BR ID

GE

TO M

CO

EA UN

Straw

L

ST

TY

STEA

W

OO

AL

D RD

WO

D

LE

Y

OD

CR

EST

A VE

AV E

CITY OF ITHACA

HO ME

R

E

ST

RD

RD

L

.J

ST

L.K

berr

K AL W

NE

ST

GE

M.

MITCHELL ST E WA T

L

R CO

AL E ED

VAL L EY

ield s

G R DI LE S ST

RD

BR ID

G RI D

MILLER E ST ST AT E ST WORTH ST /

WORTH ST

MITCHELL ST

R

I

CORNELL ST

SUMMIT AVE

DELAWARE AVE

BLAIR ST

TE

HO PLZ

WEST AVE

LINN ST EDDY ST

LINDEN AVE

ST R TURNER PL

R CE

IL L HH

HE IS

RD RY

TS HE IS

RD

TO M

PK

IN

S

CO

EA UN

ST

TY

TOWN D RDOF ITHACA STEA

W

OO

AL

WO

D

LE

Y

OD

CR

EST

A VE

AV E Six Mile Creek Natural Area

CITY OF ITHACA

PL

ST AT E

RO

UT

E

79

ON PL

I N GTON R D

RD NBY

Ithaca College

B / DA

RD

Six Mile Creek Natural Area

ST AT E

RO

UT

E

79

Lower Reservior

O

NE

ROUT

QU

AR

E 96

RY

STATLER DR

HO PLZ SCHUYLER PL

PL

IT T

W

SCHUYLER PL

EN SP E

UT

ST

R

CE

SP EN

I GH

UT

TS

HH

IL L

TE

WEST AVE

LINN ST

R TURNER PL

ST

R CE

EN

SP E

SO

ST

D

TH IR

R

CI

R

CA

JAKE ST

S IE

SS

I GH

AR

AD

RO

T

RY S

TE

RP

EN

ST

SO

RD

P ARK

E RV IC

MA

SE AD RO

RA IL S MEADOW ST RD

RD

RD

STAT E

IR A

A PL Park TH

TOWN OF ITHACA

RD

ST

M

R

CE

LA VE

RY ST

CHER

ne l han ol C ontr dC Flo o

JAKE ST

S

S MEADOW ST SP EN

CAS S ST D TH IR

R CI R TE

EN CA

RP

E

T ST TNU CHES

ALLEN ST

RA

FLO

ALLEN ST

AY L NT

CAS S

RD

P ARK

PL E

RY ST

CHER

AD RO E

T

RV IC SE

RY S

AD

MA

IE SS

RO

GU

W

PL

EL

NT

GU

RA IL

W

OAKWO O D L A E

HALLER BLVD

T ST TNU CHES

LA VE

M

RA

EL

ST

RD

D R YD E N RD.

MAPLE AVE

A Bryant C

PL

FLO

OT

W Maplewood Park AOTE ROUTE 36 ST O D 6/D AVE RD. R YD E NMILLER ST AV E

NG IRVI

ON

AL E ED

PL

WA T

YA

CK

O

A PL Park TH

E ST PEAR / M SALL .L. PL K. JR

N T

ND

Maplewood Park

VE

E

G RI D

OA K T AV E LO ING RK DR Y D E N RD

MAPLE AVE

DC OO

DA

PA

A BR

O

VAL L EY

ST AT

BOOL ST

W

O

NT

D HU G I LE S ST I N GTON R D DD

CO

AV

SCE

VE

PL D E N RD

M

WA

E

VE

EL

ne l

L ING RK

ATE ROUTE 36 ST 6/

KITE H IL L

S

han

PA

H OY R D

CAMPUS RD

RI

ol C

CAMPUS RD

TOWER RD

BR

FE R

ontr

TOWER RD

KITE H IL L

COLLEGE AVE

N QUARRY ST

dC

E

R

Flo o

SAG E A V

AY L

R

EAST AVE

NT

A VE

DD

PL

FF

L NP

O

VI

OO

E

EL

W

HALLER BLVD

K

Cornell University

D R

AN

RESE R VOIR A V E

A Bryant C

PL

O

SCE SALL

Beebe Lake

FOREST H OM E

RY

ON

DC OO

ST

KA

CR E

ND

W

ES ST

CK

GRAN D VIE

PEAR

VE

RESE R VOIR A V E

T FARM DR

Dryden Road Park

W

N T

TI P IRVING L

A BR

S

JAM

WA

D

PL

RI

PL

DR Y

YA BR ES ST

PLEASANT ST

Columbia St. Park ST ST COOK COLUMBIA BOOL ST Hillview Park REN HILLVIEW PL ZET

CR E

DD

C

CT ST S PE

ST

OA

JAM

O

DI

H OY R DCOOK ST

Sixmile Creek

FE R

S GENEVA ST

CO

M

H UDS

I PL

RR

A CR

WILLIAMS ST

E SENECA ST

LA

S AURORA ST

S ALBANY ST

ETT

E DEWITT PL SAG E A V

E BUFFALO ST

COLLEGE AVE

PR

Beebe Lake

Cascadilla Creek

Dryden RoadO Park N

N QUARRY ST

S GENEVA ST

S CAYUGA ST DEWITT PL

ST E GRE EN ST WILLIAMS

I T FARM DR

FOREST H OM E

SO UTH A V E

EAST AVE

D EDGEM OOR

AD

PL

ON

W

A STE WART AVE M

CO

PL

R DD OO W ST N TIOGA AN Y AR VE M ST STE WART A SEARS

CO N GENEVA ST

SO UTH A V E

S ON PL

DS

L NP

C

E AV REN Z

Baker Park

HILLVIEW PL

RA

Cornell OR LA RD EDGEM O RK C A S CA University DILLA P A

COLUMBIA ST

PARK ST Hillview Park

HU

S ISS G

N

L AVE

DE

E COURT ST

E SENECA ST

PLEASANT ST

GRAN D VIE

VI

LINN ST

M

Y

KE LA

R RK

CR

EL

LO

WA W I L L AR D N CAYUGA ST

N AURORA ST

UTICA ST

AUBURN ST

B / DA

NBY

Ithaca College

Lower Reservior

EL

M

STAT E

IR A

RD

ROUT

E 96

ER

WOOD ST Columbia St. Park

S PLAIN ST

NC

AV E

Ithaca CommonsCascadilla Creek

Sixmile Creek H UDS ON N TIT U S A VE S E T S AV Titus Triangle E CT ST S TPITU OS R P HYERS ST

S AURORA ST

E SP

C O MM E RCIAL A V E

S PLAIN ST

Negundo Woods

E SP

C O MM E RCIAL A V E

FAYETTE ST

S MEADOW ST

Negundo Woods

RR

ER NC

N ALBANY ST

MO

LINN ST

M

E G R E EN S T

AV E

MO

S MEADOW ST

FAIR G R

DS OUN

S

FAIR ST

S PLAIN ST

PARK ST

Baker Park

KWY RIA L P E MO

N TIOGA ST

FAIR ST

VEY AW PK LS TU Titus Triangle TIA SRI MO SOUTH ST ME NDS HYERS ST FAIR G ROU

Wood Street Park

U

Wood Street Park

N TIT U S A VE

WOOD ST

TIT

SOUTH ST

S GENEVA ST

AV E

S

LA

N

DILLA P A

E BUFFALO ST

Ithaca Commons CENTER ST S CAYUGA ST

S ALBANY ST

S PLAIN ST

B EN ST

S

S GENEVA ST

ST

FAYETTE ST

N

W CLINTON ST

CENTER ST

U

SEARS ST

ST

N ALBANY ST

TO

TIT

N PLAIN ST

N

UL

S

C A S CA

W CLINTON ST

ST

W GREEN ST

T

PARK PL

TO

SF

REU T

B EN ST REU S CORN ST

A G AT A B T L ET LL OR ST BB A

S CORN ST

UL

W STATE ST/ M. L. K. JR

W GREEN ST

Dewitt Park

CA DIL

DE

ST W STATE ST/ M. L. K. JR E COURT ST

SF

N PLAIN ST

WARREN PL

VI

N GENEVA ST

PARK PL

W COURT ST

W SENECA L A MALON E DR CECIST

W

ST

ST

Van ESTY Horn Park ST

ST

R N EL

Dewitt Park

Washington FARM ST CA Park SC AD ILL AA VE W SENECA ST

ST

W

FARM ST

L AVE

Thompson Park

ST

E YATES ST G RA

T H U RST O N AV E RO B E RTS PL FALL C REE K DR

U NIVERSITY A V E

K DR

E MARSHALL ST

CA S

TH

OE

UR

NR

FO

N FULTON ST

MO

ST ST FIR ST ST N AURORA ND CO

ST ST

BUFFALO WST CASCADILLA

Washington Park

W BUFFALO ST

SE

ST ON

DIS

B E RTS PL

FALL C REE

O LL

O N AV E

E TOMPKINS ST

ST

R N EL

COURT ST E MARSHALLWST

RO

W A IT AV E

U NIVERSITY A V E Thompson Park

DIS

E YATES ST ESTY ST

ST

Y ATES

E AV ST N MEADOW KE LA

FIR

TH

ER

AUBURN ST

E AV

UR

MA

ON ST ST ST WASHINGT N CAYUGA TH FIF

W

FO

WASHINGTON ST

RD

N FULTON ST

N MEADOW ST

CLIFF ST

WARREN PL

K

M

TAB

ST

ST

RD

TAYLOR PL

HOOK PL

ND

TH

K

Brindley Park Conway Park

McDaniels Park

LO

CO

FIF

D PL

HA

CK

W

MA

Y ATES

W

ST

ST ON ST OE NR MO ST E TOMPKINS Conway Park CASCADILLA ST

Auburn Park

WIL

SE

AR

CLIFF ST

TAYLOR PL

RI C H F PA R

O NC

CK

O NC HA ST E LEWIS

ST

T

S MS

ST

W JAY ST

Y DE

E AV Conley Park

A AD

ST

UTICA ST

KE LA ST

E LEWIS ST

T H U RST

O LL

Ithaca Falls Auburn ParkNatural Area

E AV W ST LAKE LO WIL

OW

IN

ST

IL L

TH

KL

Van Horn Park

ST

LA

AN

E AV

W

T

T

FR

LN

Y DE

R

ST

KE LA

O

W

CO

TH E K N

CK

AV RED W AY W I LFLA F O AY EW DG

OW

CT

R

RD

S RI

LIN

QUEEN ST

W JAY ST

ST E FALLS IN ST KL Conley Park AN FR E LINCOLN STT SS AM AD QUEEN ST

W FALLS ST

E

T D KLLNI NSE R CO

E LINCOLN ST M PL

WY

Area

PL

ON

K

NE

IL L

HE

O

R PL HO PPE

N SU

TH

D

CT

D PL

M

LIN

HA

LAKE ST

W E

ED

Ithaca Falls Natural

S ISS

W A IT AV E

AY EW

D

LV

AV

CK

DG

LV

VE

KB

RK PA

E FALLS ST

W FALLS ST

IR D W YORK SSTT E YORK ST

AD

TH E K N

W YORK S TE YORK ST

OC SS CE AC

RO

M PL

R RD

PI E

TE R

LA

NN

IR D

AD

CECIL A MALON E DR

TT

R RD

HA

LO

KB

IE W

EL

HA

HE RO

SS CE AC

WY

NE

OC

LV

PB

UG

TE R

AR

EL

O

STATE ROUTE 13

NN

FAL

CAM

TA

OAKWO O D L A

D

HA

AD

VE

RD

IS NR

McDaniels Park

BB

R

UG

RO

PI E

EL

HOOK PL

A

ek

AV

PL

T Brindley Park S

G

K

TA

SS

LA

RI C H

SU

F PA R

A LL

Cre

ED

D

DELAWARE AVE

AD

CE

IE W R PL

HO PPE

SUNRISE RD

City Boundary

GI M

RO

AC

LV

RK PA

City Boundary

STATE ROUTE 13

SS

KE

Fall

K LI N E R

W

CLI F

VI

ek

Cayuga Inlet

S

Gorge Protection Zone

ES

CE

LA

Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

Cass Park

SUNRISE RD

W

Cre

Newman Golf Course Cass Park

LAMBETH WAY

LAMBETH WAY

CLI F

Fall

T P AR

Cayuga Inlet S

PL

Ithaca Commons

L

AC

GA

E

R WA

Newman Golf Course

FAL

EL

OR

D

KE

YU LD R D

OR

Road

Gorge Protection Zone

Park

R

LA

CA

DR

K

F IE Marina Treman

DR

ER

OO

100-year

City Designated Natural Area

K

GA

Stewart Park

BR

Railroad

Ithaca Commons

Road

Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

Treman Marina

ST

IE L D RD

PB

ER

KF

CAM

IF CON

OO

A

JA

Allan Treman Marina

IF CON

BR

EW

DR

YU

ST

BB S

CA

Cayuga Lake

Wetland

City Designated Natural Area

Railroad

P AR RT

Greater than 50%

500-year

Greater than 50%

Stewart Park

Allan Treman Marina

500-year

Waterway

Park 100-year, base flood elevations provided

21 to 50%

L

4

ROUT

E3

BB S

UT

DR

E STAT

RO

CITY OF ITHACA

11 to 20%

JA

100-year, base flood elevations provided

21 to 50%

Less than 5%

TOWN OF ITHACA

100-year

11 to 20%

ROUT

E3

TOWN OF ITHACA

Cayuga Lake

Wetland

5 to 10%

Buttermilk Creek Gorge and Inlet Valley Slope

±

Buttermilk Creek Gorge and Inlet Valley Slope

±

0

N

0

1,550

0

1,550 1,550

3,100 Feet

3,100 Feet 3,100 Feet

1:7,500

1:7,500

1:7,500

NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Data Source: City of Ithaca Department of Public Works, 2015 Map Prepared by: City of Ithaca GIS Program, May, 2015

NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Data Source: City of Ithaca Department of Public Works, 2015 Map Prepared by: City of Ithaca GIS Program, May, 2015

142


143

:A

P L A N I THACA

VISION FOR OUR FUTURE

Impervious and Semi-porous Surfaces, City of Ithaca, NY 2015

11.5

IMPERVIOUS AND SEMI-POROUS SURFACES Impervious and Semi-porous Surfaces, City of Ithaca, NY 2015 RD

EX T PL SISS ON

BARTON PL

EX T

GARDEN AVE

PA

HO PLZ

SAGE AVE

STATLER DR

DR YD EN

ST

LO T

BLAIR ST

HOMESTEAD TER

DELAWARE AVE

PA DR YD EN

FAIRVIEW S Q

COBB ST

SUMMIT AVE

DRYDEN CT

LINDEN AVE

EDDY ST

ELSTON PL

W ALK

W ALK

E N T INE P

L

VA L

CO

RN

ELL

G IL

ES

ST

WATER

ST

TR EV A

S TE HOME AV E

ST GRANDVIEW PL

GR

A

HAWTHO

PEARSA LL

AVE

BR ID GE

ST

ELL

ER ENC

SP

GRAN DVIEW

CO

RN

EA

ST

WO OD AV

AD

RD

HOMESTEAD TER

I PL

EASTWOOD TER

ST

W

ST

NC ER SPE W

RK IN

G

LEG E AVE

FAIRVIEW S Q

COL

PEARL ST

HIG COBB ST

CORNELL ST

SCHUYLER PL

ST

EASTWOOD TER

PARKER ST

PL

LO T

RK IN

G

WEST AVE

STEWART AVE MAPLE GROVE PL

CIT Y OF IT HAC A

GLEN PL

TERRAC E PL

LINDEN AVE

DELAWARE AVE

SISS ON

AV E TH UR ST O

N

RD

EAS T

GARDEN AVE

LA W IL

CENTRAL AVE

LINN ST SAGE AVE

SUMMIT AVE

HIG

TE R

SO UT H HI LL

REN ZE TT

E T AV RES ODC WO

E

PL

RD

PEARL ST

N TH UR ST O

EAS T CENTRAL AVE

HO PLZ

LEG E AVE

DRYDEN CT

GLEN PL

SCHUYLER PL

ELSTON PL

BLAIR ST

L

BR ID GE

RD

RD

ST

FOUNTAIN

VA

LLEY

NT CE ES CR

RY

RD

CORNELL ST

AV E

ROUTE 13 STAT E

STEWART AVE

A GR GRANDVIEW PL

S MEADOW ST

JAKE ST

ST GUS SIE

COLUMBIA ST

HILLVIEW PL

E CIR HAWTHORN

QU AR

ELL

TURNER PL

TE R

ST ER ENC

SP W

MAR Y ST

W MAR Y ST

ICE RO RV SE

RAI

LR OA D

SPE

AD

NC ER

ST

ST

E

CH ER RY

COL

M N TERRAC E PL

PARKER ST N FULTON ST

ALLEN ST ST SP EN CE R E

BRINDLEY ST

SO UT H HI LL

NUT ST CHEST

S MEADOW ST

AV OR AL

A

T

ST

FL

ALE ED RIDG

PL

E

C HA R

N ST

STO NE

MAPLE GROVE PL

BARTON PL

RD LA

W IL

ST

DO W

EA CIT Y OF IT HAC A

CIR NTE R

TH

ST N MEADOW TAUGHANNOCK BLVD

RD

PARK

TAYLOR PL TAYLOR PL

JAKE ST

AC

S

CIR

STATLER DR

STAT E

A CASS PA RK

TAUGHAN NOCK BLVD

ALLEN ST

CA RP E

VIN EGA R

TAUGHANNOCK BLVD

N FULTON ST

LINN ST

RA NC E

ST DO W EA M N

CIR NTE R

TH

N MEADOW

W

CA RP E ST

A CASS PA RK

TAUGHAN NOCK BLVD RD

PARK

BRINDLEY ST

MAR Y ST AD MAR Y ST

ITH

ST

RA NC E

VIN EGA R

ST

PL

N

GUS SIE

MILLER ST

AVE

ST

DO AN

E T AV RES ODC WO

OO D

CK

WO OD AV

IRV ING

MITC HELL

W

PL

L I NG P

RD

AV E

MAPLE AVE

BR

ST

AD

O DC OO

EA

RN

S TE HOME

W

CO

T

ORD OXF

S LE

ELMC REST

BOOL ST

ORCHARD PL

TR EV A ST PECT ST AV E PROS

HUDSO

RNE PL

PL

HUDSON PL

CODDINGTON RD

S HT IG HE

City Boundary RD

Building - 429 acres

RY

RD

QU AR

D

COOK ST

IRV

ELL

EL M

PL

R

FROSH ALLEY

CATHERINE ST

RD

K AV E

DRYDEN RD

E AG TT CO

ER

OA

HARVARD PL

ES ST JAM

EN C

OSMUN PL

N YA BR

ST

HILL

DR

PL SCADILLA CA

PL

COLLEGE AVE

CH ER RY

HLAN D

WILLIAMS ST

RD

RN

TOWER RD

KITE

WEST AVE

AC

RVOIR AVE

HOY RD

S QUARRY ST

ICE RO

RE SE

RD

N QUARRY ST

RV

DR

SE

D

LR OA D

R PA

WOO

T LA

EDGEMOOR LA

A

IS PL FERR

RAI

FOREST HOME DR

CAMPUS RD

SAGE PL

E

AVE

E GARDEN AV

FORES

LA

AV

S RI

CRADIT FARM DR

LOT

TAYLOR PL

R D

EAST AVE

PARKING US

M

TAYLOR PL

AY EW DG

G

KITE

NUT ST

AVE WYCKOFF

LO

H

MC

RIVEWAY ID

RING

CHEST

N PL LVI KE

AVE

C

RD

K

PL

ITT DEW

DEWITT PL

SP

OR AL

B

D EWO OD R

R RD AMME TRIPH

WEST

HIGHLAND

RIDG

DELTA PH

ANN

Y METAR CE

W

LLEY

NDVIEW CT

S MEADOW ST

RD SOUTHWEST PARK

Paved Drive - 82 acres

STO NE

A IR

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L PKWY RIA MO

ELM

ALPHA

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SE

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ME

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SP

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FAIR

COMMERCIAL AVE

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ST

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IRV

PL

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RD

AR WILL AC

N

S

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PL

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RD SOUTHWEST PARK

A IR

ITH OF

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DO AN WATER

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CODDINGTON RD

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UNNAMED

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ST

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SEARS ST

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PL NT CE ST ESS ALBANY CR

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S

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DS UN G RO

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CECIL A MALONE DR

WEGMANS DRIVEWAY

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ME

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ST

LA

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N

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O

PL

PL

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CLEVELAND AVE

LT

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MITC HELL

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PL

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FU

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LA VIL

REN ZE TT

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PL

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ST

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W

AV E

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FOUNTAIN

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A

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THU RSTON AVE

FALL CREEK DR

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S ALBANY ST

N CORN ST

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HYERS ST

FAIR ST

ST

BOOL ST

ORCHARD PL

N GENEVA ST

N PLAIN ST

ST

AVE

COOK ST

COLLEGE AVE

N QUARRY ST

SAGE PL

PARK PL

N

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O

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CORN E L L

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LA

W

WASHINGTON ST

LT

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AV

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ST

TABE R ST

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TOWER RD

VE

OA

FARM ST

FROSH ALLEY

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HEIGHTS CT

RVOIR AVE

WAY

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CIT Y

CASCADILLA ST E SENECA ST

N RBOR DEA

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L F PFOREST HOME DR LIF

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UN IVE

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KE

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WILLIAMS ST

TH UR FO

ST

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CIR

EL

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EDGEC

LAKE ST

LA

SP

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PL SCADILLA CA

PL

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CECIL A MALONE DR

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WEST AVE

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W YATES ST

SE

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CAMPUS RD

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WAY

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THE KN OLL

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PARKING US

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LA

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VE

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RIVEWAY ID

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ST

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R

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FALL CREEK DR

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ST FIR

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HE

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AV

HIGHLAND

DELTA PH

UN IVE

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N PL SISSO

WAIT AVE

ALPHA

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N CAYUGA ST

W LEWIS ST

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WAY

S ST

PIER RD

WAY

W

IS RR MO

B

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RD

KING ST RK

BL VD

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CLIFF PARK RD

UNNAMED

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PA

T SS

PL

N RBOR DEA

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HEIGHTS CT

R PIE

QUEEN ST

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AD RO ST SS AUBURN CE AC

AM AD

PL

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OU

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AM AD

CAS S

ESTY ST

ST

LA

AR WILL

ST

ST

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CK

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LAMBETH WAY

TABE R ST

ST

TH UR FO

N

R YLO TA

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M

AV

LIN NK

ST

PB CAM

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DR

O

FRA

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UNT MO EST W

KN

ST

SUNRISE RD

PL

Paved Parking - 276 acres Paved Playground - 4.2 ares Paved Surface - 2.7 acres

COMMERCIAL AVE

Private Roadway - 5 acres

City Boundary

Private Walk - 64 acres

Building - 429 acres

Public Roadway - 284 acres

Paved Drive - 82 acres

Public Walk - 59 acres

Paved Parking - 276 acres

Unpaved Drive - 52 acres

Paved Playground - 4.2 ares

Unpaved Parking - 55 acres

Paved Surface - 2.7 acres

Unpaved Playground 11 acres

Private Roadway - 5 acres

Unpaved Walk - 3.3 acres

Private Walk - 64 acres

R

D

RD

ER

SP EN CE R

EN C

TT BO AB

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DEY

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ST

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EL

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AD

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IS NR SU

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RD

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KN

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NT

CAS S

WOO D

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SS CA

RD

ST

PA

WEST

KE LA

LD

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RD

ST

ROUTE 13

GA YU CA

BR OO KF IE

RK T PA AR EW

J AMES L GIBBS DR

RD STEWART PARK

AD RO

ST

SP EN CE R

PA

E

SS CE AC

ART EW

RD RK PA

TURNER PL

KE LA

ST

T AR EW

WEST AVE

GA YU CA

ST RD RK

EDDY ST

RK T PA AR EW

J AMES L GIBBS DR

RD STEWART PARK

ST

SP

SP EN CE R

RD

Public Roadway - 284 acres Public Walk - 59 acres

0

1,500

N

±

3,000 Feet

0

1:6,250

3,000 Feet

1,500

0

NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Map Source: Tompkins County Digital Planimetric Map 1991-2014 Data Source: City of Ithaca Department of Public Works, 2014 Map Prepared by: GIS Program, City of Ithaca, NY, May, 2015

1,500

3,000 Feet

1:6,250

1:6,250

Unpaved Drive - 52 acres Unpaved Parking - 55 acres Unpaved Playground 11 acres Unpaved Walk - 3.3 acres

NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Map Source: Tompkins County Digital Planimetric Map 1991-2014 Data Source: City of Ithaca Department of Public Works, 2014 Map Prepared by: GIS Program, City of Ithaca, NY, May, 2015


Comprehensive Plan Transportation Corridors and Trails

A P P E N DI X C

11.6

Comprehensive Plan TRANSPORTATION CORRIDORS Transportation Corridors and TrailsAND TRAILS

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Comprehensive Plan Transportation Corridors and Trails

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NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Map Source: Tompkins County Digital Planimetric Map 1991-2012 Data Source: City of Ithaca GIS Program, 2012 Map Prepared by: Department of Planning, City of Ithaca, NY, May, 2015

1:6,125

N

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Planned Trail Transit Corridors

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±

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NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Map Source: Tompkins County Digital Planimetric Map 1991-2012 Data Source: City of Ithaca GIS Program, 2012 Map Prepared by: Department of Planning, City of Ithaca, NY, May, 2015

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11.7

Ithaca Parks, Natural Areas and Trails

PARKS, NATURAL AREAS AND TRAILS

Legend Existing Trail Planned Trails

TOWN OF ITHACA CITY OF ITHACA

Park/Natural Area

Renwick Slope

Waterway

SD

R

City Boundary

M

ES

LG

IBB

Cayuga Lake

JA

Palmer Woods Stewart Park

CA

Allan Treman Marina

YU

P AR RT

K

LA

D R

GA

ST

A EW

KE AC

CE LINN ST

WEST AVE

GARDEN AVE

HO PLZ

STATLER DR

PL IT T

W

SUMMIT AVE LINDEN AVE

TS HE

IG H

HU

IS

CO

DD

VE

PEAR

SALL

AR

D

CORNELL ST

AC

ST

K

berr

yF

ield

s

D

W

E

LE R

RD

Straw

DA

EL

L

AT

GE

AL

RI D

WORTH ST

MITCHELL ST

/M

.L. K

.J

R

CO

RN

ST

HOM

TE

GE

ST

S ST BR

TO M

PK

IN

S

CO

EA UN

ESTE

ST

TY

AD RD

DC OO WO W OD AV AL E LE Y

RE S

T A VE

CITY OF ITHACA

PL

TOWN OF ITHACA

ON PL

IN G TON R D

S MEADOW ST

QU

AR

RY

RD

RR

DS

WA

MILLER ST

VE

TH

Six Mile Creek Valley

GRAN D VIE

MAPLE AVE Maplewood Park

I

BLAIR ST

A VE

DA

ID

EN

SP

O

VAL L E Y

ST

ER

LT TH

HIL

EDDY ST

SCHUYLER PL ST R CE EN SP E T

ST

WA

U

I LE

PL

W

S MEADOW ST

JAKE ST

RS

ALLEN ST

RD P ARK

AD RO E RV IC

T

SE

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SS

G

NT

GU

TURNER PL

EN

RP CA LA VE

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RA

CHER D OA

M

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L

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Bryant Park

NG PL IRVI

PL

ST

TI P

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EL YA

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RA

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D E N RD

W

DO

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COLUMBIA ST

HILLVIEW PL

DR Y

KA

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Hillview Park

BOOL ST

W

Columbia Street Park

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BR

S

PL

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Sixmile Creek H UDS ON ST P E CT ST

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D

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PA

H OY R D

Dryden Road Park

B

T ST

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HALLER BLVD

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MO

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PARK ST

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SEARS ST

S ALBANY ST

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HYERS ST

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E GR E E N S T

E

CR

W

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AA VE

N ALBANY ST

S

AV TITUS

S PLAIN ST

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MOR

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ILL

Baker Park

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W AY

AD

N GENEVA ST

S PLAIN ST

Titus Triangle

Wood Street Park

LINN ST

VE EA

ST

N TIT U S AVE

WOOD ST

RA

E SENECA ST

W GREEN ST

FAIR ST

SOUTH ST

G

N

L AVE

FARM ST

Dewitt Park

AV E

R N EL

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SC

PL

Fall Creek Gorge

Thompson Park

CASCADILLA ST

CENTER ST

US

E YATES ST

CA

ON

Fall Creek

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TH U R S T ON AV E RO B E RTS PL FAL L C RE E K DR

UN IV ERSITY A V E

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ST

FAYETTE ST

ST

TIT

N AURORA ST

AUBURN ST

OE

N PLAIN ST

S CORN ST

N S

UTICA ST

N CAYUGA ST

T

ST

PARK PL

WASHINGTON ST

TO

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ND

NR

W CLINTON ST

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LA

ST MO

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ST

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Washington Park

UL

ST

DIS

W STATE ST/ M. L. K. JR ER

W

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W SENECA ST

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Auburn Park

ESTY ST

W BUFFALO ST

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M

MA

H

WARREN PL EL

NC

RT

ST

RD HOOK PL McDaniels Park

ST

SE

H

K

N FULTON ST

D PL

N MEADOW ST

RD

IS

MS

ST

U FO

T FIF

HA

Conway Park

PL

CLIFF ST

AR

NR

Conley Park

A AD

K OC

YS

IN

E LEWIS ST

LO

KL

ST

WIL

AN

QUEEN ST

DE

VE EA

FR

LN

W JAY ST

K LA

SS

ST

CO

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Ithaca Falls Natural Area

W I L L AR D

OW

T

TAYLOR PL

RI C H

SU

A VE

IL L

R

CE

LIN

E LINCOLN ST

ST

LAKE ST

W E

TH

O

AC

RK

AD

Brindley Park

O

FF

VD

CT

PA

RO

IRD

TH E K N

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S ISS

W A I T AVE

GE

BL

HE S

F CLI F PA R

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CK

VE

TE R

LA SUNRISE RD

CK

L

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PL

HOPPER

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MP

EL

NO

IE W LV

EL

OR

LAMBETH WAY

G

HA

RD

R PI E Cayuga Inlet

Octopus Cliffs

A

D

K

AN

D RD

W

LL VI

ED

E

GH

K LI N E R

AV

W

WY

N

U TA

IE L

F AL

DR

Newman Golf Course Cass Park

DELAWARE AVE

AD

KF

PB

IFER

OO

CA M

CON

BR

R

RO

STATE ROUTE 13

SS Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

Treman Marina

ST

ON

E

Ithaca Parks, Natural Areas and Trails C O M ME R CIAL A V

Negundo Woods

SP

E

EN

CE

R

RD

RD

Southwest Substitute Parkland

EL M

IR

A

Legend Existing Trail Planned Trails

TOWN OF ITHACA CITY OF ITHACA

Park/Natural Area

Renwick Slope

Waterway

SD

R

City Boundary

ES

LG

IBB

Cayuga Lake

M

South Hill Swamp

JA

Palmer Woods

Buttermilk Creek Gorge and Inlet Valley Slope Stewart Park

Allan Treman Marina

N

0

2,800 Feet

1,400

0 Fuertes Bird Sanctuary

STATE ROUTE 13

AD

±

P AR RT

D R

RO

Treman Marina

WA

K

E ST

1,400

1:7,000

2,800 Feet

CK

D LO

VD

TH E K N

W YORK S TE YORK ST

E FALLS ST

IL L O

LAKE S

W

W FALLS ST

Ithaca Falls Natural Area

O LL

S ISS

ON

PL

W A I T AVE

Y WA

BL

GE

CK RD

A VE

NO

R PI E Cayuga Inlet

L NP

L

FF

MP

VI

HA

O

AN

D

EL

ED

E

GH

K LI N E R

K

WY

N

U TA Newman Golf Course Cass Park

NY State Plane, Central GRS 80 Datum Data Source: City of Ithaca Department of Public Works, 2015 Map Prepared by: City of Ithaca GIS Program, May, 2015

1:7,000

TH U R S T ON AV E RO B E RTS PL FAL L C RE E K DR

CR

AD

I T FARM DR


AP P E N DI X D

12.

Appendix D: Resolutions 12.1 Adoption of Plan Ithaca as Phase I of the City of Ithaca Comprehensive Plan Adopted Resolution Common Council September 2, 2015 WHEREAS, the Comprehensive Plan outlines a vision for the city’s future and serves as a guide for future decision-making, policies, and funding, and WHEREAS, the City of Ithaca’s existing Comprehensive Plan was completed in 1971 and has since been amended fourteen times by various targeted neighborhood and strategic plans, and WHEREAS, while some objectives of the 1971 plan and its amendments are still applicable, many are not, and both local conditions and broader national and world-wide trends that affect Ithaca have changed dramatically since then, resulting in a need for an updated comprehensive plan that addresses present-day issues and anticipates future ones, and WHEREAS, the City decided to pursue a two-phased approach to its new Comprehensive Plan, where Phase I entails the preparation of an “umbrella” plan that sets forth broad goals and principles to guide future policies throughout the city and where Phase II will include the preparation of specific neighborhood and thematic plans, and WHEREAS, in accordance with the City of Ithaca Municipal Code and New York State General City Law, the Planning and Development Board is responsible for preparing and recommending a new Comprehensive Plan to the Common Council for adoption, and WHEREAS, the Planning and Development Board established the Comprehensive Plan Committee (“the Committee”) by resolution in July 2008 and charged the Committee with the following responsibilities regarding the preparation of a proposed, new comprehensive plan: a) Preparing and approving a request for qualifications (“RFQ”) for a consultant team to assist with Phase I of the development of the proposed, new City of Ithaca comprehensive plan; b) Reviewing the responses to the RFQ, conducting interviews of consultant teams, and making a recommendation of a consultant team to the Planning Board, Mayor, and Common Council for their respective approvals;

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c) Overseeing the preparation of a draft of Phase I of the proposed, new comprehensive plan, by coordinating the work of staff and the selected consultant team, ensuring the level of public outreach and engagement necessary to reflect community goals, and making progress reports to the Planning Board and Common Council (periodically and as requested); and d) Approving a draft of Phase I of the proposed, new comprehensive plan for review and acceptance (with possible modification) by the Planning Board, recommendation by the Planning Board to Common Council, review and approval (with possible modification) by Common Council’s Planning and Economic Development Committee, and adoption by Common Council, and WHEREAS, public input has been a priority for the Committee throughout the planning process, and the Committee made efforts to gather community input at various stages of the plan’s development, and WHEREAS, the Committee worked with a consultant on the initial phase of public outreach and on the preparation of two background reports that would inform the preparation of the new plan, but following the completion of these tasks, the City decided to move forward without the consultant team; the remaining work on the draft plan was completed by the Committee and staff, and WHEREAS, using comments from the initial public outreach, as well as data on existing conditions and trends, subcommittees of the Committee (known as “chapter groups”) and staff created an overall vision for the City and goals for the sections of each chapter, and WHEREAS, a series of focus group meetings were held to get comments on the goals for each section of the plan, as well as ideas for implementation, and the chapter groups and staff used this feedback to draft each of the plan’s chapters, and WHEREAS, at the same time, the full Committee prepared the plan’s land use chapter and held public workshops in April 2014, and WHEREAS, the complete draft Phase I plan, Plan Ithaca, was made available for public review in April 2015, and the Committee held eight open houses to get public comments on the draft plan, and WHEREAS, the Committee revised the draft plan to incorporate new public input, and at its meeting on June 15, 2015, the Comprehensive Plan


AP P E N DI X D

Committee voted to recommend the draft Plan Ithaca for review and consideration by the Planning and Development Board as Phase I of the Comprehensive Plan, and WHEREAS, the Planning and Development Board held public comment on the draft Plan Ithaca at its meeting on June 23, 2015 and reviewed the draft at a special meeting on June 30, 2015, where it recommended it for adoption by the Common Council as Phase I of the Comprehensive Plan, and WHEREAS, following the July 2015 Planning & Economic Development Committee meeting, the draft Plan Ithaca was circulated for additional comment, and a new draft, dated August 6, 2015, was prepared that incorporates many of the submitted comments, and WHEREAS, the draft Plan Ithaca was submitted for review by the Tompkins County Planning Department pursuant to ยง239-l-m of the New York State General Municipal Law, which requires that all actions within 500 feet of a county or state facility, including county and state highways, be reviewed by the County Planning Department, and has also been distributed for review by the City of Ithaca Conservation Advisory Council, and WHEREAS, a public hearing for the adoption of the plan was held on August 12, 2015, and WHEREAS, the Common Council has considered the draft Plan Ithaca as recommended by the Comprehensive Plan Committee and the Planning and Development Board; now, therefore, be it RESOLVED, that the Common Council hereby adopts Plan Ithaca, dated August 6, 2015, as Phase I of the Comprehensive Plan, and be it further RESOLVED, that this Comprehensive Plan shall serve as a guide for future decisions made by Common Council, City boards and committees, and City staff, and be it further RESOLVED, that Common Council shall establish regular reviews and updates of the Comprehensive Plan every five years. Moved by: Seconded by: In Favor: Against: Abstain: Absent:

Murtagh McCollister Brock, Fleming, Clairborne, Kerslick, Martell, McCollister, McGonigal, Mohlenhoff, Murtagh, Smith 0 0 0

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12.2 Planning and Development Board Recommendation of the Draft Plan Ithaca to the Common Council Adopted June 30, 2015

WHEREAS, the City of Ithaca’s existing comprehensive plan was completed in 1971 and has since been amended fourteen times by various targeted neighborhood and strategic plans, and WHEREAS, while some objectives of the 1971 plan and its amendments are still applicable, many are not, and both local conditions and broader national and world-wide trends that affect Ithaca have changed dramatically since then, resulting in a need for an updated comprehensive plan that addresses present-day issues and anticipates future ones, and WHEREAS, the City decided to pursue a two-phased approach to its new Comprehensive Plan, where Phase I entails the preparation of an “umbrella” plan that sets forth broad goals and principles to guide future policies throughout the city and where Phase II will include the preparation of specific neighborhood and thematic plans, and WHEREAS, in accordance with the City of Ithaca Municipal Code and New York State General City Law, the Planning and Development Board is responsible for preparing and recommending a new Comprehensive Plan to the Common Council for adoption, and WHEREAS, the Planning and Development Board established the Comprehensive Plan Committee (“the Committee”) by resolution in July 2008 and charged the Committee with the following responsibilities regarding the preparation of a proposed, new comprehensive plan: a) Preparing and approving a request for qualifications (“RFQ”) for a consultant team to assist with Phase I of the development of the proposed, new City of Ithaca comprehensive plan; b) Reviewing the responses to the RFQ, conducting interviews of consultant teams, and making a recommendation of a consultant team to the Planning Board, Mayor, and Common Council for their respective approvals; c) Overseeing the preparation of a draft of Phase I of the proposed, new comprehensive plan, by coordinating the work of staff and the selected consultant team, ensuring the level of public outreach and engagement necessary to reflect community goals, and making progress reports to the Planning Board and Common Council (periodically and as requested); and


AP P E N DI X D

d) Approving a draft of Phase I of the proposed, new comprehensive plan for review and acceptance (with possible modification) by the Planning Board, recommendation by the Planning Board to Common Council, review and approval (with possible modification) by Common Council’s Planning and Economic Development Committee, and adoption by Common Council, and WHEREAS, public input has been a priority for the Committee throughout the planning process, and the Committee has made efforts to gather community input at various stages of the plan’s development, and WHEREAS, the Committee worked with a consultant on the initial phase of public outreach and on the preparation of two background reports that would inform the preparation of the new plan, but following the completion of these tasks, the City decided to move forward without the consultant team; the remaining work on the draft plan was completed by the Committee and staff, and WHEREAS, using comments from the initial public outreach, as well as data on existing conditions and trends, subcommittees of the Committee (known as “chapter groups”) and staff created an overall vision for the City and goals for the sections of each chapter, and WHEREAS, a series of focus group meetings were held to get comments on the goals for each section of the plan, as well as ideas for implementation, and the chapter groups and staff used this feedback to draft each of the plan’s chapters, and WHEREAS, at the same time, the full Committee prepared the plan’s land use chapter and held public workshops in April 2014, and WHEREAS, the complete draft Phase I plan, Plan Ithaca, was made available for public review in April 2015, and the Committee held eight open houses to get public comments on the draft plan, and WHEREAS, following its review of the comments, the Committee revised the draft Plan Ithaca to incorporate new public input, and WHEREAS, at its meeting on June 15, 2015, the Comprehensive Plan Committee voted to recommend the draft Plan Ithaca, dated June 15, 2015 for review and consideration by the Planning and Development Boards as Phase I of the Comprehensive Plan, WHEREAS, the Planning and Development Board held public comment on the draft Plan Ithaca at its meeting on June 23, 2015 and reviewed the draft plan at a special meeting on June 30, 2015; now, therefore, be it

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RESOLVED, that the City of Ithaca Planning and Development Board recommends the revised draft Plan Ithaca, dated June 30, 2015, as revised by the Planning and Development Board on that date, for review and adoption by the Common Council as Phase I of the Comprehensive Plan, and be it further RESOLVED, that pending a recommendation from the Comprehensive Plan Committee, the Planning and Development Board will recommend implementation priorities, including a prioritized list of neighborhood and thematic plans to be completed as part of Phase II of the Comprehensive Plan. Moved by: Seconded by: In Favor: Against: Abstain: Absent:

Randall Jones-Rounds Blalock, Elliott, Jones-Rounds, Lewis, Schroeder, Randall 0 0 Darling


AP P E N DI X D

12.3 Comprehensive Plan Committee Recommendation of the Draft Plan Ithaca to the Planning and Development Board Adopted June 15, 2015

WHEREAS, the City of Ithaca’s existing comprehensive plan was completed in 1971 and has since been amended fourteen times by various targeted neighborhood and strategic plans, and WHEREAS, while some objectives of the 1971 plan and its amendments are still applicable, many are not, and both local conditions and broader national and world-wide trends that affect Ithaca have changed dramatically since then, resulting in a need for an updated comprehensive plan that addresses present-day issues and anticipates future ones, and WHEREAS, the City decided to pursue a two-phased approach to its new Comprehensive Plan, where Phase I entails the preparation of an “umbrella” plan that sets forth broad goals and principles to guide future policies throughout the city and where Phase II will include the preparation of specific neighborhood and thematic plans, and WHEREAS, in accordance with the City of Ithaca Municipal Code and New York State General City Law, the Planning and Development Board is responsible for preparing and recommending a new Comprehensive Plan to the Common Council for adoption, and WHEREAS, the Planning and Development Board established the Comprehensive Plan Committee (“the Committee”) by resolution in July 2008 and charged the Committee with the following responsibilities regarding the preparation of a proposed, new comprehensive plan: a) Preparing and approving a request for qualifications (“RFQ”) for a consultant team to assist with Phase I of the development of the proposed, new City of Ithaca comprehensive plan; b) Reviewing the responses to the RFQ, conducting interviews of consultant teams, and making a recommendation of a consultant team to the Planning Board, Mayor, and Common Council for their respective approvals; c) Overseeing the preparation of a draft of Phase I of the proposed, new comprehensive plan, by coordinating the work of staff and the selected consultant team, ensuring the level of public outreach and engagement necessary to reflect community goals, and making progress reports to the Planning Board and Common Council (periodically and as requested); and

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d) Approving a draft of Phase I of the proposed, new comprehensive plan for review and acceptance (with possible modification) by the Planning Board, recommendation by the Planning Board to Common Council, review and approval (with possible modification) by Common Council’s Planning and Economic Development Committee, and adoption by Common Council, and WHEREAS, public input has been a priority for the Committee throughout the planning process, and the Committee has made efforts to gather community input at various stages of the plan’s development, and WHEREAS, the Committee worked with a consultant on the initial phase of public outreach and on the preparation of two background reports that would inform the preparation of the new plan, but following the completion of these tasks, the City decided to move forward without the consultant team; the remaining work on the draft plan was completed by the Committee and staff, and WHEREAS, using comments from the initial public outreach, as well as data on existing conditions and trends, subcommittees of the Committee (known as “chapter groups”) and staff created an overall vision for the City and goals for the sections of each chapter, and WHEREAS, a series of focus group meetings were held to get comments on the goals for each section of the plan, as well as ideas for implementation, and the chapter groups and staff used this feedback to draft each of the plan’s chapters, and WHEREAS, at the same time, the full Committee prepared the plan’s land use chapter and held public workshops in April 2014, and WHEREAS, the complete draft Phase I plan, Plan Ithaca, was made available for public review in April 2015, and the Committee held eight open houses to get public comments on the draft plan, and WHEREAS, following its review of the comments, the Committee revised the draft Plan Ithaca to incorporate new public input; now, therefore, be it RESOLVED, that the City of Ithaca Comprehensive Plan Committee recommends the draft Plan Ithaca, dated June 15, 2015, for review and consideration by the Planning and Development Board as Phase I of the Comprehensive Plan, and be it further RESOLVED, that the Committee will recommend implementation priorities, including a prioritized list of neighborhood and thematic plans to be completed as part of Phase II of the Comprehensive Plan.


AP P E N DI X D

Moved by: Seconded by: In Favor: Against: Abstain: Absent:

Edmonds de Arag贸n de Arag贸n, Edmonds, Ferguson, Kay, Kerslick, Mohlenhoff, Randall, Schroeder, Shelley, Wallitt 0 0 Hoover, Pieper, Roberts, Smith

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2015 Plan Ithaca - A Vision for Our Future  

Plans Ithaca is city-wide comprehensive plan that identifies a vision and goals for the future of the city of Ithaca, NY.

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