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Bicycle-Friendly Guelph Initiative

outside

Getting Guelph to go by bike Every day, people travel across the city to work, school, shop or visit. Most of these trips are less than five kilometres, but only one per cent are taken by bicycle. The Bicycle-Friendly Guelph Initiative is working to make cycling safer and more convenient. Using the five Es, encouragement, education, engineering (bike lanes, trails etc.), enforcement and evaluation, Bicycle-Friendly Guelph is intended to triple the number of daily bike trips in Guelph by 2018. As Guelph learns to go by bike, the city reduces the greenhouse gas emissions caused by daily driving, and reduces its environmental footprint.

In this issue…

3

A Community Energy Plan update Save energy, reduce emissions, fight climate change

Introducing our new City Hall

4

6

April 7 is opening day

Take it outside! It’s a great time to enjoy Guelph’s parks and trails

Furry neighbours? Steps to help you coexist with wildlife

8

Spring 2009

Visit guelph.ca/bike to find more cycling tips, download the Guelph cycling map and more! Join our facebook group and tell us how you are going by bike in Guelph. See page 7 for more about cycling in Guelph

Get your landscape ready for spring There may still be a chill in the air but now is a good time to start thinking about your lawn and gardens. Developing beautiful, healthy landscapes does not have to include hours of maintenance and pesticide use. In fact, through landscape planning, proactive maintenance, and proper plant selection, you can significantly reduce requirements for weeding, watering and continued maintenance, while eliminating the need for pest controls. Make your lawn and garden a natural, healthy landscape and discover the benefits of going green!

Need some help getting started? Sign up for your free landscape assessment Let one of Guelph’s Landscape Advisors help you make your lawn and gardens naturally beautiful.

The Landscape Assessment program can help you:

• assess your property and plan how to naturalize your landscape • identify landscape and ground cover alternatives • develop water-efficient lawns and gardens • determine the native plant species that will thrive in your landscape • learn about natural pest control practices and pesticide alternatives • identify proactive pest control practices to naturally control common landscape pests • limit the effects of drought by showing you lawn and garden maintenance techniques • cater your landscape to suit your needs so you can spend more time enjoying it!

Book your landscape assessment To book your free 30-minute assessment call 519-822-1260 x 2107 or e-mail healthylandscapes@guelph.ca. Assessments are completed on a first-come-first-serve basis, from May through August. Landscape assessment visits will be booked Monday through Thursday between 12 and 7 p.m. For more information about the Healthy Landscapes program visit guelph.ca/healthylandscapes.


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insight Guelph

Spring 2009

Guelph lawns and gardens go ‘green’

Welcome to the spring 2009 edition of Insight Guelph – a new look for a newsletter that focuses on important matters that affect us all. The City will bring Insight Guelph to your doorstep four times this year because when asked, you told us a newsletter is among your preferred ways to receive City information. I hope you find this edition enjoyable and useful. This spring brings an exciting change for City staff and residents alike – the opening of our new City Hall. Employees will begin moving into the new City Hall in late March, and it will be open to the public by April 7. I appreciate the patience of the community, and staff in particular, as this major project was completed. I know that when the building is open, everyone will agree that it was worth the wait. We will be hosting public tours of the new City Hall on Saturday, April 25th as part of the annual Doors Open tour. Everyone is welcome to attend. Our Grand Opening celebration, with events for the whole family, will be held on June 20th. Mark your calendars! You can read more about the new City Hall’s leading-edge green features and other amenities on page 4. These include a green roof, a living wall, lots of natural light, and LEED construction that provides significant energy and water savings. In other news, by now you’ve likely received a copy of the City’s 2008 annual report, “We’re Making a Difference.” This report provides highlights of the City’s progress on the goals set out in our Strategic Plan. It also contains some stories of how residents across our city are making a difference. You can find more of these stories online at guelph.ca/makingadifference, along with the report itself. As always, if you have any feedback or questions, please send me an e-mail at mayor@guelph.ca or call 519-837-5643. This e-mail address and phone number will stay the same in the new City Hall.

Karen Farbridge Mayor P.S. Residents also told us they’d like more City information via e-mail. We’re happy to oblige! Sign up for City e-News on guelph.ca and have City news sent straight to your inbox.

In January 2009, the City of Guelph’s Pesticide Use By-law took full effect, banning the non-essential and cosmetic use of pesticides for residents and commercial applicators. In 2008, the provincial government proposed a ban on the sale and cosmetic use of pesticides. The provincial ban – expected to come into effect this spring – will ban about 250 pesticide products for use. Once the provincial ban is implemented it will

replace the numerous municipal by-laws in place across the province. Residents with pesticide products can dispose of them safely at the City’s Household Hazardous Waste Depot, free of charge. The Depot is located at 110 Dunlop Drive and is open Tuesday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Or visit dowhatyoucan.ca to find local retailers that will safely dispose of pesticides.

Riverside Park

Healthy landscapes, healthy community To help residents achieve healthy, natural lawns and gardens the City of Guelph offers a variety of resources and gardening workshops through its Healthy Landscapes program. Watch for upcoming workshops in the City News pages in the Friday edition of the Guelph Tribune or visit guelph.ca/ healthylandscapes.


insight Guelph

Spring 2009

A Community Energy Plan update The world’s fight against climate change starts with reducing energy consumption. In Canada, this is especially important in cities because urban centres are where most of the country’s energy is consumed. The City of Guelph is doing its part by working with community partners, residents and other levels of government to use less energy and emit fewer greenhouse gasses than the current global average. Our Community Energy Plan is our roadmap. Here’s just some of what Guelph has achieved to date:

Saving energy while delivering City services • The LEED construction of Guelph’s new City Hall will create annual energy savings of approximately 38% and water savings of 31% compared to a conventional building. Energy savings will mean a reduction of almost 800 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year. • The City negotiated the purchase of off-peak electricity to power Guelph’s street lights, saving between $168,000 and $185,000 annually.

Save energy, reduce emissions, fight climate change

• The City is re-commissioning energy management systems to optimize equipment operation; implementing energy-efficient lighting systems in some of its facilities; and installing variable flow pumping systems for City swimming pools – all of which are intended to save energy. • By switching incandescent traffic and crosswalk lights to LED, Guelph saves 963,300 kWh every year and reduces its energy costs by $82,000 annually. LED traffic signals reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 543 tonnes a year.

Who is Making a Difference in Guelph? The exceptional achievements of Guelph and its residents are truly inspiring. We have lots to be proud of, including your story! Share your story at guelph.ca/makingadifference and check out We’re Making a Difference – Guelph’s first annual report that highlights how our City is making a difference.

• Guelph Transit and the Guelph Fire Department operate their fleets with bio-diesel fuel blends, reducing harmful air pollutants. • A cogeneration facility at the Wastewater Treatment Plant uses methane gas collected as part of the wastewater treatment process to produce electricity – enough to supply one third of the power the Plant requires to operate, saving the City about $300,000 annually in energy costs. This green energy generation offsets about 3,500 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions. • The City purchased clean, renewable energy from Bullfrog Power for its Waterworks facility. The purchase will help reduce the City’s carbon dioxide emissions by more than 700 tonnes.

Saving energy through community partnerships • The City of Guelph is partnering with Guelph Hydro and Union Gas to measure the energy used in 23 buildings as part of a Natural Resources Canada pilot program designed to promote energy-efficiency in existing buildings and energy-efficient design in new buildings. • The community-wide replacement of 40,000 incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs has cut greenhouse gases by about 20,000 tonnes. • Ecotricity – the Eastview landfill gas facility that creates electricity using methane from the landfill – reduced carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 212,000 tonnes from 2005 to 2007. • Energy savings associated with Guelph Hydro’s Conservation & Demand Management programs resulted in a reduction of about 6,500 tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2007.

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Visit guelph.ca/cep for a full progress report on the CEP. Guelph’s CEP is a 25-year strategy. Its aim is to secure a healthy, reliable energy future while reducing environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas emissions.  For information contact communications@guelph.ca.

Voted Canada’s most caring city! Maclean’s Magazine, August 28, 2008


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insight Guelph

Spring 2009

Introducing our new City Hall Find out what’s happening as City service areas make the transition into new City Hall. This information will be communicated weekly in the City News pages of the Guelph Tribune and online at guelph.ca.

Guelph’s new City Hall will mean better customer service, feature environmentally-sensitive design, draw more people into gorgeous downtown Guelph, and shine a spotlight on our architectural heritage while embracing state-of-the-art design and construction principles.

Opening day

New City Hall officially opens April 7. Several City services, previously located throughout the downtown core, will now be available to residents in one convenient and central location – 1 Carden St.

Visit new City Hall to access these City service areas: • Budget Services • Building and Engineering Services • Bylaw Enforcement • CAO’s Office • Clerk’s Office • Community Facilities and Programs • Corporate Communications • Corporate Property • Development, Parks, Transportation and Policy Planning • Economic Development • Environmental Services • Financial Services • Human Resources • Information Technology Services • Integrated Services and Development • Legal Services • Mayor’s Office • Neighbourhood Engagement • Parking • Procurement and Risk Management Services • Taxation and Revenue • ServiceGuelph • Tourism Services • Traffic

Be one of the first to get an inside look at Guelph’s new City Hall as it opens its doors for Doors Open Guelph. Guelph’s new City Hall is designed to meet the rigorous environmental standards associated with LEED Silver. Among its environmental benefits: the building will reduce the City’s consumption of fossil fuel and water, decrease air and water pollutants, and reduce “heat island effect”. Catch a glimpse of some of the building’s environmental features and appreciate its overall beauty at Doors Open Guelph – an annual celebration of the city’s history and architectural heritage. Join us Saturday, April 25, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Doors Open Guelph opens the doors to some of Guelph’s finest buildings for free public tours. It’s organized in partnership by the Guelph Arts Council, Heritage Guelph and City of Guelph Tourism Services.

What is ServiceGuelph?

ServiceGuelph provides centralized customer service, making access to City information, services, and resources even simpler.

What ServiceGuelph can do for you: Accept payments for... • Property taxes • City of Guelph invoices • Business licence renewals • Parking tickets Process sales of... • Transit tickets and passes • Swim/skate/aquafit tickets and passes • Dog licenses • Bulky item pickups • Wood chip deliveries • Ride ‘n Splash passes • Parking tokens • Business directories • Metal detecting permits

Answer questions about... • General City information • Councillors/ward/meeting schedules • Transit schedules/rates/services Receive applications for... • FAIR – Fee Assistance in Recreation cards • PAL/LAC – Personal Assistance and Leisure Access cards • Veterans transit/parking passes • Accessibility parking passes • Subsidized transit passes • Mobility Services transit passes • Smart Wash/Royal Flush programs • Special event/street party permits • Employment applications for posted positions

We make it simple.

Process... • Registrations for recreation programs and memberships • Norfolk Street Bridge Banner bookings • Facility reservations • Marriage licence applications • Civil wedding ceremony bookings • Burial permits • Commission of documents • Downtown poster approvals • Bids and tenders submissions

For more information, visit guelph.ca/serviceguelph or e-mail serviceguelph@guelph.ca


insight Guelph

Spring 2009

This Earth Day, be part of something

Protecting Guelph’s natural heritage

HUGE

– help Guelph plant a new forest!

Tread lightly

As the city grows, it is important to protect its heritage. Guelph has many historic buildings and streets, and a number of significant green spaces, rivers, wetlands and forests. The City of Guelph is developing the Natural Heritage Strategy, has identified significant natural areas, and is developing policies to protect and enhance these areas. The resulting Natural Heritage policies will become part of the City’s Official Plan which helps to determine how Guelph grows in the years to come. A related project to manage the trees and wooded areas in the city is also underway. The City is looking at trees in parks, at schools, in yards and in conservation areas as part of the Strategic Urban Forest Management Plan. The goals of the Plan are to: • Take our tree inventory so we understand tree locations, species, age etc. • Manage potential hazards presented by an aging urban forest – e.g. falling branches in neighbourhoods and urban areas • Plant more trees more often to replace aging urban forest • Choose tree species and conditions to maximize their lifespan • Protect and manage the existing forested areas on public and private lands

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Please do your part to protect Guelph’s natural heritage. This spring, enjoy Guelph’s trails while being mindful of their delicate ecosystems. • Don’t pick or dig up plant life • Enjoy the splendour of wildlife from a distance; we put animals and ourselves at risk if we get too close • Obey posted signs – e.g. bicycles are not permitted on some trails because they pose risk to the natural area • Don’t litter • Refrain from dumping yard waste in natural areas

ROTARY forest Join the Rotary Club of Guelph as it celebrates Earth Day and the planting of a 40-hectare forest at the Guelph Lake Conservation Area. Once established, the forest will reduce air pollution, help preserve water quality, slow temperatures from climbing, and improve wildlife habitat and bio-diversity. Saturday, April 25 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Guelph Lake Nature Centre 7677 Conservation Rd, Guelph For full details, including parking and shuttle information, call 519-836-7860 or visit guelph.ca/environment

Tell us about the trees you’re planting and learn more about the City’s environmental initiatives at guelph.ca/environment

The City of Guelph proudly salutes the Rotary Club of Guelph for its magnificent vision. A new urban forest for Guelph… now that’s making a difference!


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insight Guelph

Spring 2009

Take it outside! Hit the trail Guelph boasts more than 1,000 hectares of land dedicated to parks and natural open space. This spring, step off the beaten track and onto one of Guelph’s beautiful trails. Preservation Park This 27-hectare wooded area is off of Kortright Rd between Edinburgh Rd and Scottsdale Dr. University of Guelph Arboretum A 165-hectare oasis of trails and wooded areas at the University of Guelph. Hanlon Creek Trail A 3.1 km trail from University Village Park to Preservation Park via Kortright Rd. Speed River Trail A 3.4 km trail from Victoria Rd N to Speedvale Ave W via Riverside Park. CNR Spurline Trail A 1.6 km trail from Dufferin St to London Rd via Exhibition Park. Downtown Trail A 1.6 km riverside trail; completed sections include Goldie Mill, John Galt Park adjacent the River Run Centre, and Heritage Park. Eramosa River Trail A beautiful 4.1 km trail from Guelph’s famous Covered Bridge to Stone Rd via Victoria Rd S. Silvercreek Trail A 4.9 km trial from Royal City Park to Janefield Ave via Silvercreek Park, Centennial Park and W.E. Hamilton Park Guelph Humane Society Trailhead A 13 km trail from the Speed River to the outskirts of Cambridge. The Guelph trailhead is adjacent to the parking area of the Guelph Humane Society off Wellington Rd. Parking is limited to five cars; please consider carpooling. Not all of these trails are owned and/or maintained by the City of Guelph.

For more information on hiking opportunities visit the Guelph Trail Hiking Club at www.guelphhiking.com

Whether you walk your dog along a trail, tour the neighbourhood on your bike, or play tennis in the park, it’s a great time for you and your family to get out and enjoy the city’s parks and trails.

Park it Guelph’s parks provide special spaces for a variety of activities and sports, places for people to gather, and quiet places to relax in natural surroundings. There are close to 100 parks in Guelph. Among them, you’ll find: • • • • • • • • • •

More than 70 km of trails and paths 120 sports fields 80 play structures Splash pads – now free! 8 picnic shelters 18 washroom facilities 22 tennis courts 14 basketball courts 10 beach volleyball courts  heritage features such as the Allan Mill, Riverside Floral Clock Gardens, John McCrae Gardens, and the Boathouse.

Help keep our parks pristine

Visit guelph.ca regularly for information about community clean-ups. You can help keep Guelph’s parks and green spaces beautiful by taking part in annual clean-up events. For a listing of all City parks visit guelph.ca > living > parks and trails > parks.

Dog days Take your dog with you when you explore a new park or trail this spring. Just remember that in most areas, dogs must be on a leash and under your control. When on a leash,“under control”means your dog won’t come within one metre of other animals and people. When off-leash, “under control”means that your dog remains within sight and earshot, responds to voice commands, and won’t come within one metre of other animals and people. Guelph’s well-behaved canine population can run and play leash-free in one of eight off-leash areas and on unoccupied sports fields during off-peak hours. Visit guelph.ca > living > parks and trails > leash-free zones for details.

Off-leash areas

• Eramosa Park, east of Audrey Ave • Lee Street Park, southern half • Riverside Park, west of the river and north of Woodlawn Rd • Norm Jary Park, between the ball diamonds off Applewood Cr • Margaret Greene Park, west of St Peter’s School • Crane Park • Centennial Park, off Municipal St – west of tennis bubble and north of ball diamond • John Gamble Park, south of access road leading to Shadybrook Cr

Owners are responsible for the actions of their dogs, including picking up and disposing of their waste. To keep parks and open spaces clean, please stoop and scoop – remove and dispose of your animal’s waste matter. Thinking of bringing a pet into your family? Consider giving a homeless animal a new lease on life; visit www.guelph-humane.on.ca for adoption hours and information. Animals for adoption from the Guelph Humane Society are well socialized, have been given their initial required shots, treated against fleas, and spayed or neutered.


insight Guelph

KAINE HILL DR

RD

WATSON RD S

ST

VICTORIA RD S

JANEFIELD AVE

YS PK

COLLEGE AVE E

ON TS WA

EDINBURGH RD S

COLLEGE AVE W DEAN AVE

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Legend

HARVARD RD

KORTRIGHT RD W

RICKSON AVE

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Parks

WATSON RD S

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WATSON RD N

YORK RD

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COLLEGE AVE W

WATSON RD N

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HADATI RD

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WELLINGTON RD 41

TS AM S

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ELIZABETH ST

Check your ABCs before you ride

Walking/Cycling Trails*

• air pressure should match the number listed on your tires • brakes should create a skid when you roll your bike forward and squeeze them • chain and bearings should be cleaned and oiled about once a month

Rivers Waterways

LOW ES R

RD CLAIRFIELDS DR W

FARLEY DR

LAIRD RD

CLAIR RD W

DE

CLAIRFIELDS DR E

GOODWIN DR

CLAIR RD E

• tune-up each spring so you are ready to roll • lock up your bike through the tires and the frame whenever you’re not riding • write down your bike’s serial number and keep it in a safe place LIN G

TO N

RD

34

GORDON ST

HANLON EXPY HWY 6

W EL

MALTBY RD W

Bike Lane WELLINGTON RD 37

Wide Paved Road Main Road Secondary & Side Roads Railways *Often shared between pedestrians and cyclists. Please obey all posted signs.

WE LL ING

TO N

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CLAIR RD W

COLONIAL DR

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SUMMERFI ELD

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ARKELL RD

Other bike bits

For more off-road biking trails visit Guelph Off-Road Biking Association at www.gorba.ca

EASTVIEW RD

WATSON PKY N

METCALFE ST

DELHI ST

STEVENSON ST N STEVENSON ST N

DR RIV ER VIE W

WOOLWICH ST WATER ST

ELL ST

REGENT ST

SILVERCREEK PKY S

DR STE PHA NIE

WHITELAW RD

MACDON

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AVE WATERLOO

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GRANGE ST

ES EV NE

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Cycle safe WELLINGTON RD

AVE WATERLOO

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LIN EL W SPEEDVALE AVE E

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PAISLE Y ST

MUNICIPA

Know your signals and traffic rules: • a bell and lights are required for all bicycles • helmets are required for cyclists under the age of 18 • use bike lanes or ride 1 to 1.5 metres from the curb • on busy streets, walk your bike when using crosswalks or sidewalks; pedestrians and motorists don’t expect to see cyclists on sidewalks • on trails, use your bell to notify people before you pass them

LK ST

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ALMA ST N

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SILVERCREEK PKY N

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WELLINGTON RD 31

WESTMOUNT RD

EDINBURGH RD N

WILLOW RD

EMMA ST

DH WYN

In order to safely share the road, motorists and cyclists obey a lot of the same rules: • obey all traffic signals – stop at stop signs and red lights • stop to make sure the road is clear before entering • travel in a straight line on the right side of the road in the same direction as other cars and bicycles • signal turns early to notify other drivers and cyclists; turn only after checking to see that the road is clear

E BRANT AV

MUSKOKA DR

NICKLIN RD

SPEEDVALE AVE W

Share the road

WAVERLEY DR

KATHLEEN ST

DAWSON RD

HANLON EXPY

IMPERIAL RD N

ELMIRA RD N

WOODLAWN RD E

WINDSOR ST

Bike bits

WOODLAWN RD W

STEVENSON ST S

WOODLAWN RD W

VICTORIA RD N

Walk, run, bike and play

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HWY 6

WELLINGTON RD 39

WELLINGTON RD 86

Spring 2009

MALTBY RD E

HWY 7


insight Guelph

Recreation and Parks Month

Join us throughout June to celebrate Recreation and Parks Month! A number of recreation activities for all ages, interests and abilities have been organized at your favourite recreation locations to get you in motion and participating in the fun! Participating locations: • Centennial Pool • Evergreen Seniors Centre • Guelph Community Pottery Centre (50 Municipal St) • Lyon Pool • Victoria Road Recreation Centre • West End Community Centre Visit guelph.ca/recmonth for a calendar of activities and events, available in May.

Spring 2009

Greenspace is for everyone’s enjoyment Residential neighbourhoods are designed with careful planning. In many cases, they include parks, storm water management ponds and corridors, and wetlands. These public spaces are owned by the City whose responsibility it is to ensure they’re used for their intended purposes. When people interfere with these neighbourhood features, it’s called encroachment – the gradual trespass on another’s property. Encroachment activities are prohibited because they can cause problems for you, your neighbours, and surrounding ecosystems. This spring, be a good neighbour and avoid these common encroachments:

Grass cutting Avoid cutting beyond your property line if your property abuts a storm water management corridor. These are designed to hold and drain rainwater naturally with the aid of plants.

Dumping Dumping sod, plant clippings, brush, rocks, garbage and other debris in natural areas upsets the natural balance of decay and growth and can destroy natural habitats. Dispose of waste, including yard and garden waste, at the Waste Resource Innovation Centre, 110 Dunlop Dr or use a composter.

Tanya Dowsley

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Receptacles in parks are intended for waste generated by park patrons and not homeowners.

Removal of or addition to living fences Living fences are designed and planted on City lands at the edge of residential lots in many newer developments.  Don’t alter living fences; they’re intended to define property limits, provide privacy screening, create wildlife habitat, and add visual interest.

Planting, pruning, cutting and/or removal of plants Tree, bush, shrub, flower and grass species that are planted by the City or by developer are specifically chosen for the City lands on which they’re planted. The same is true for living fences. Altering them has environmental, drainage, wellness and aesthetic impacts. You can help preserve an important balance in your neighbourhood by avoiding encroachment activities, and by informing the City if you see them taking place. The City of Guelph is committed to the maintenance of City lands, so they can be enjoyed by everyone. For more information about encroachment contact 519-822-1260 x 2279.

A fawn in a window well in Guelph’s south end.

Furry neighbours? Wildlife comes with the territory when there are 1,000 hectares of parks and open space at your doorstep. With spring’s thaw, animals emerge from their winter slumber to forage for food. To coexist with wildlife, consider these steps: • Refrain from feeding wildlife; animals quickly adapt to humans and become reliant on our hospitality. • Make garbage inaccessible to wildlife; consider placing waste at the curb on your collection morning instead of the night before, or in labelled cans with tight-fitting lids. • Be cautious while driving. Animals are most active around sunrise and sunset. Obey posted speed limits – particularly on streets that pass through green space. Wildlife is part of what makes Guelph beautiful, but if animals are causing a serious nuisance and you feel you must take action, contact a humane removal service. In Ontario, there are laws that govern the killing, trapping, and relocation of animals. Killing, trapping, or removing animals during the birthing season is inhumane, and hazardous to people and animals. To learn more about coexisting with wildlife contact the Ontario SPCA Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre at 705-534-4350 or wildlife.midland@ospca.org. For information about the safe, humane removal of wild animals, contact Humane Wildlife Control at 1-877-222-9453 or humanewildlifecontrol.com. With information from the Ontario SPCA.


insight Guelph

Spring 2009

Spring/Summer Guelph Community Guide now available!

Protecting Guelph’s rivers and groundwater supply

Over 1,000 recreation and leisure programs, activities, events, performances, groups and ideas! two easy ways to get your copy

pick it up

Managing stormwater in your neighbourhood

Find the guide at over 100 locations in guelph, including: • Centennial Pool • Doctors’ offi ces • Evergreen Seniors Centre • Guelph Community Pottery Centre at 50 Municipal St • Guelph Public Library (all branches) • Grocery stores • Neighbourhood Groups • River Run Centre • ServiceGuelph at City Hall • Sleeman Centre • Victoria Road Recreation Centre • Visitor Information Centre • West End community Centre

As you watch your lawn re-appear this spring, do you ever wonder where all that melted snow, salt and sand ends up? Melting snow and rain are called stormwater. In a natural landscape, stormwater will soak into the soil, be absorbed by trees and plants, evaporate into the air, or gently trickle into streams, lakes, rivers, and wetlands. In cities, stormwater rushes over our rooftops, driveways, lawns and roads collecting salt, dirt, oil, fertilizer, pet waste, litter and other pollutants. This nasty mixture is either channelled into storm sewers, or runs into our rivers and waterways. Heavy rains and melting snow can also cause river levels to rise and cause flooding.

For a complete list of locations visit guelph.ca/recreation

How do stormwater ponds help?

download it

The City builds and maintains stormwater management ponds to temporarily hold rainfall, melted snow or water that runs off of your roof, lawn or driveway. Water from the local storm sewer is collected in the pond, treated to remove pollutants, and then slowly released back to our waterways.

Visit guelph.ca/recreation

If you live near a stormwater pond • • • •

Obey all posted signs Avoid disturbing the surrounding area Avoid sending swimming pool discharge or chemicals into the pond or storm sewers Report beaver or other animal activity to the City

How else can you help? • Use a rain barrel to collect roof runoff and re-use rainwater in your garden • Plant a garden instead of grass – plant and rock gardens can absorb more stormwater and prevent surface runoff • Plant a garden on your roof – green roofs absorb rain and melted snow while insulating the building • Avoid over-watering your lawn or garden • Limit use of fertilizer • Dispose of trash, yard waste and pet waste properly • Do not dump chemicals into storm sewers

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Visit guelph.ca/stormwater for more information about the City’s stormwater management master plan.

registration starts Monday, March 30 519-837-5699 or regexpress.guelph.ca


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insight Guelph

Wash clean, wash green with the smart Wash Rebate Program Guelph residents who purchase and install a new front-loading ENERGY STAR® rated washing machine in 2009 will be eligible to receive a $100 rebate from the City of Guelph and Guelph Hydro Electric Systems Inc. Please note: A limited number of rebates are available for the program. Rebates are available on a first come, first serve basis to Guelph residents serviced via the municipal water supply. For more information visit guelph.ca/smartwash or call 519-822-1260 x 2633.

Save water, Save money

Stop flushing it all away! Almost 30% of all water consumed in the home is flushed down the toilet. Saving water and money is as easy as replacing your high water use toilets with new low-flush models through the City of Guelph’s Royal Flush Toilet Rebate Program. Replace up to two 13-litre (or more) toilets with new low-flush All Stars models and receive a $40 or $60 rebate on your hydro bill from the City of Guelph. $40 rebate for each low-flush, six-litre toilet $60 rebate for each dual-flush or high efficiency toilet Multi-residential and commercial rebates of $60 are also available. Call 519-822-1260 x 2633 for more details.

For more information T 519-822-1260 x 2633 E royalflush@guelph.ca guelph.ca/waterworks

Spring 2009

City committed to safe drinking water and planning for growth In December 2008, City Council passed a resolution to increase the water and wastewater rates by 15.5 per cent. The rate increase means that an average home consuming 250 cubic metres (m3) per year will pay roughly seven dollars more each month.

How much is the increase? The following water and wastewater rate increases took effect March 1, 2009: 2008

2009

Increase

Water rate (m3)

$0.82

$0.97

$0.15

Water basic charge (daily)

$0.15

$0.17

$0.02

Wastewater rate (m3)

$0.88

$1.05

$0.17

$0.23

$0.25

$0.02

$557

$643

$86

Wastewater basic charge (daily) Average annual residential bill (250 m ) 3

Why rate increases are necessary

The City of Guelph’s water and wastewater budgets are  funded solely from the sale of water. Customers fund the operation and maintenance of Guelph’s municipal water and wastewater utilities through their water and wastewater bills. The majority of the cost of providing water and wastewater treatment services  does not  decrease when customers  use less water. In other words, if customers don’t use any water and create no wastewater for one month, there are still significant costs incurred to keep both systems operating, namely: • the cost of maintaining the underground infrastructure that connects customer properties to the water supply and wastewater collection systems; • the costs of keeping facilities operational and in a state of readiness for fire fighting and varying customer use; • the administrative costs of customer service, billing, and collecting revenue; and • the significant, ongoing cost of complying with provincial regulations.

The rate increases allow the City of Guelph to comply with provincial regulations, provide safe drinking water, replace infrastructure in a timely fashion, and plan for the growing needs of our community. Even with these increases, Guelph’s water rates are close to the average of surrounding municipalities.

Water and wastewater rate comparison for surrounding municipalities (in dollars per cubic meter)

$2.37

Cambridge

$3.00

$2.85

$2.66

London

Waterloo

$1.84

Halton Region

Kitchener

$2.02

Guelph

* Rates reflect combined water and wastewater volumetric rates for 2009, does not include the daily basic charges

Save water, save money You can limit the impact of the rate change by reducing the amount of water used. Try some of these water-saving tips around your home: • Replace your water-guzzling appliances and fixtures – such as toilets, shower heads, dishwashers and washing machines – with water-efficient models. The City provides rebates for residents who replace high-water use toilets with new lowflush, dual flush, or high efficiency models. Visit guelph.ca/ royalflush for details. Purchase an ENERGY STAR® rated, frontloading washing machine in 2009 and you could be eligible for a $100 rebate through the City’s Smart Wash Rebate Program. Visit guelph.ca/smartwash for details. • Fix the drips. A leaky faucet dripping 30 drops per minute uses 204 litres of water per month. Replace worn washers and valve seats to prevent leaks. • Use a rain barrel. Rainwater can be used to water trees, shrubs and gardens.

Guelph residents are water wise Guelph residents are making a difference when it comes to water conservation. Guelph’s population has grown almost 15 per cent since 1999, but the city’s total water consumption has declined by 17 per cent. Guelph’s success at conserving water has deferred the need to build approximately $1 million in new water supply capacity and $9 million in deferred secondary wastewater treatment capacity.


insight Guelph

Spring 2009

Community events

Spring Magic for Women April 18 100 Westmount Rd T 519-824-6000 x 4405 www.sjhh.guelph.on.ca

Guelph Contemporary Dance Festival June 4 – 7 T 519-780-2220 E gcdf@bellnet.ca www.guelphcontemporarydancefestival.com

Bicycle-Friendly BBQ April 22 4 p.m. Covered bridge on Gordon St to City Hall guelph.ca/bike Clean & Green Community Clean Up May 2 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Followed by a barbecue lunch for volunteers 519-837-5628 x 0 Emergency Preparedness Day May 6 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. West End Community Centre 21 Imperial Rd S Free admission guelph.ca/emergency

Guelph-Wellington Local Food Fest June 7 Ignatics Farm Highway 6 just north of Guelph T 519-821-6638 x 335 E wellington.buylocal@sympatico.ca www.guelphchc.ca Donkey Day June 14 Donkey Sanctuary of Canada 6981 Puslinch Concession 4 T 519-836-1697 www.donkeysanctuary.ca

Guelph Eco Days May 18 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Waste Resource Innovation Centre 110 Dunlop Dr guelph.ca/wetdry

Thursday, April 30, 2009 8 pm · $45–$57

Urban Survival Skills for Cyclists May 24 T 519-846-2715 x 4610

Karen Kaeja

Earth Hour March 28 8:30 p.m. www.EarthHourCanada.org

Village People

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The PLAYlist The monthly e-newsletter keeps you tuned in to events, concerts, festivals, theatre and more going on in Guelph and Wellington County.

riverrun.ca · 519.763.3000 Box Office 35 Woolwich Street, Guelph

Come to the Bicycle-Friendly BBQ

RRC_Guelph_Ad_news.indd 1

2/28/09 12:18:02 PM

Wednesday, April 22 4 to 6 p.m. Gather your best biking buddies at the covered bridge on gordon St. be sure to wear your helmet and reflective clothing. cyclists must be seen to be safe. Share the road and cycle safe while travelling north on gordon St to city hall. enjoy burgers and veggie-friendly bbQ fare and refreshments. visit guelph.ca/bike for event details or join our facebook group for regular bicyclefriendly updates.

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insight Guelph

Spring 2009

Who to call

Ward information Ward 1

Ward 2

Ward 3

Councillors

Councillors

Councillors

Bob Bell

Vicki Beard

June Hofland

Services

Phone

T 519-822-6152 E bob.bell@guelph.ca

T 519-821-4856 E vicki.beard@guelph.ca

T 519-821-1667 E june.hofland@guelph.ca

Mayor’s Office

519-837-5643

CAO’s Office

519-837-5602

Kathleen Farrelly

Ian Findlay

Maggie Laidlaw

Building

519-837-5615

T 519-822-5946 E kathleen.farrelly@guelph.ca

T 519-830-4681 E ian.findlay@guelph.ca

T 519-837-1732 E maggie.laidlaw@guelph.ca

City Clerk’s Office

519-837-5603

Civic Museum

519-836-1221

Community Design and Development Services

519-837-5616

Neighbourhood Groups

Neighbourhood Groups

Court Services (Provincial Offences Court)

519-826-0762

Grange Hill East Neighbourhood Group

Brant Ave Neighbourhood Group

Economic Development

519-837-5600

Engineering

519-837-5604

Finance

519-837-5610

Fire and Emergency Services

519-824-6590 519-837-5601

T 519-836-9427 E grangehilleast@yahoo.ca

Two Rivers Neighbourhood Group T 519-837-4248 E info_tworivers@yahoo.ca

Neighbourhood Groups Exhibition Park Neighbourhood Group

City of Guelph Services and Facilities

T 519-821-9243 E brant.ave.ng@gmail.com

T 519-767-5750 E epng70@yahoo.ca

Waverley Neighbourhood Group

Onward Willow Better Beginnings Better Futures Project

Human Resources Legal Services

519-837-5637

T 519-824-8498

Library (Main Branch)

519-824-6220

McCrae House

519-836-1482

Operations

519-837-5628

Parking

519-837-5612

Parks Maintenance

519-837-5628 519-824-1212

River Run Centre (Box Office)

519-763-3000

T 519-821-9677 E waverleygroup@hotmail.com

Onward Willow Centre Neighbourhood Group T 519-824-6892

Ward 4

Ward 5

Ward 6

Police Services River Run Centre (Administration)

519-837-5662

Councillors

Councillors

Councillors

Sleeman Centre

519-822-4900

Gloria Kovach

Lise Burcher

Christine Billings

TTY (Teletype for Deaf )

519-826-9771

T 519-824-9695 E gloria.kovach@guelph.ca

T 519-736-0449 E lise.burcher@guelph.ca

T 519-826-0567 E christine.billings@guelph.ca

Taxation

519-837-5610

Tourism

519-837-1335

Traffic

519-837-5628

Mike Salisbury

Leanne Piper

Karl Wettstein

Transit

519-822-1811

T 519-763-4461 E mike.salisbury@guelph.ca

T 519-824-9000 E leanne.piper@guelph.ca

T 519-763-5105 E karl.wettstein@guelph.ca

Waste Resource Innovation Centre

519-767-0598

Wastewater Treatment Plant

519-837-5629

Waterworks

519-837-5627

Neighbourhood Groups

Neighbourhood Groups

Neighbourhood Groups

Parkwood Gardens Neighbourhood Group

Hanlon Creek Neighbourhood Group

Clairfields Neighbourhood Group

T 518-824-6340 E parkwood.g.n.g@bellnet.ca

T 519-822-1260 x 2677 E hanlon_creek_neighbourhood@yahoo.ca

T 822-1260 x 2676 E clairfields@gmail.com www.clairfields.org

West Willow Woods Neighbourhood Group

O.U.R. Three Bridges Neighbourhood Group

T 519-826-9930 E wwwng@bellnet.ca

T 519-822-1260 x 2678 E info@our3bridges.ca www.our3bridges.ca

Kortright Hills Neighbourhood Group T 519-837-0974 E khng@bellnet.ca

Insight Guelph is a publication of The Corporation of the City of Guelph. T 519-822-1260 x 2610 E communications@guelph.ca guelph.ca Write/Visit: City Hall, 1 Carden St Guelph, ON N1H 3A1 Insight Guelph is printed on newsprint containing recycled content.


Insight Guelph - Spring 2009