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insight Guelph

Summer 2009

Fleur Krafczek

good ways

to grow In this issue… More places like home Kevin Palmer

Preserving green spaces

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There are no two ways about it: Guelph’s green spaces make the city a lively and enjoyable place to live. While making room for more people, homes and jobs, the City is also protecting and preserving habitats for wildlife, woodlands, wetlands, rivers and valley systems — all of which are important components of Guelph’s natural heritage. The City of Guelph has studied and

The city is 182 years old, and it’s time for Guelph to grow up

Leslie Samchuk

look 6 likeWhatwhenwill itGuelph grows up?

What’s up downtown? A stronger city starts in the core

Keith Love

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9 Better ways to go Trains, buses, cars and bikes

Deborah Wilson

Building variety in Guelph’s residential neighbourhoods

mapped the natural features within the city boundary, and identified areas where species of birds, frogs, salamanders, fish and other wildlife live. The City also recommends ‘buffers’ be established around these areas to help protect sensitive natural systems. Guelph’s Natural Heritage Strategy protects, preserves and enhances the city’s unique natural characteristics like rivers, wetlands and woodlands.

Urban trees – Guelph’s green assets Each tree in Guelph forms part of the urban forest; whether it’s in your yard, a park or a conservation area. Guelph is lucky to have approximately 30 per cent tree canopy cover across the city. In an effort to enhance this tree canopy, the City has developed a framework for a Strategic Urban Forest Management Plan — a plan to help Guelph effectively manage our city’s trees. Once developed the plan will aim to: • Plant more trees across the city • Develop an inventory to monitor and manage Guelph’s trees • Protect healthy trees on private and public land through pruning and education Preserving Guelph’s Natural Heritage System is critical to Guelph’s balanced, responsible approach to growth. Learn more about Guelph’s plans to protect natural green spaces at guelph.ca/environment

Green Acres Guelph measures about 21,745 acres or 8,800 hectares. Here’s a look at how the city’s green spaces measure up. Undeveloped natural space 2,160 hectares (24% of city) Wetlands, open water, swamps 800 hectares (9% of city) Meadows and thickets 750 hectares (8% of city) Woodlands, forests, plantations 1,100 hectares (12.5% of city) Residential, commercial, parks, agriculture, etc. 6,700 hectares (76% of city) 1 hectare = 2.47 acres


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insight Guelph

Guelph is growing

How we manage growth is up to us In 1856, the Grand Trunk Railway arrived in Guelph, triggering a period of tremendous growth, industry, and prosperity that set the foundations for the city we know today. More than 150 years later, Guelph is still growing. In fact, we are part of the fastest growing urban area in Canada and the third fastest growing area in North America — the Greater Golden Horseshoe. The provincial government has a plan to manage this growth by concentrating it in built-up areas, in order to curb sprawl and protect farmland and natural resources. Their plan is the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe and, for Guelph, it means that we will add 54,000 new residents and 32,400 jobs over the next 25 years. The million-dollar question is: how can we accommodate this growth while still maintaining our community’s character? That question has been the focus of a growth management strategy for Guelph that has been several years in the making. I am pleased that this edition of Insight Guelph takes a closer look at growth management in our community. As you’ll read, growth has wide-ranging implications, affecting everything from transportation systems and housing to economic development and parks. In fact, almost all major projects underway in the City are driven by the imperative to accommodate growth in a smart and sustainable way. Growth is inevitable. But how we manage it is up to us. Through careful planning and strategic investments, we are working to achieve the community’s vision of a compact, prosperous, and vibrant city. As always, if you have any comments or questions, please send me an e-mail at mayor@guelph.ca or call 519-837-5643.

Karen Farbridge Mayor

Summer 2009

Guelph among Canada’s top ten places to live

Guelph’s Heffernan Street Bridge

Guelphites have long sung their city’s virtues as a great place to live, work, study and play. And we’re not alone! In his latest book, Who’s Your City?, Richard Florida, director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, ranked Guelph among the top ten places to live in Canada in four out of five demographic categories: University graduates, mid-career professionals, families with children, and retirees. “Guelph’s standing on this list is remarkable. We’re rubbing elbows with the likes of OttawaGatineau, Calgary, and Victoria,” says Mayor Karen Farbridge. “Our city has tremendous strengths that will enable us to attract talent

and prosper in the new economy.” Last year, the City worked with Ipsos Reid to conduct its own Citizen Satisfaction survey. Findings revealed 96 per cent of residents ranked their quality of life in Guelph as very good or good — well above the average when compared to other cities. The revised Canadian edition of Florida’s international bestseller used a number of important factors to determine each city’s ranking; the percentage of the city’s population that fits a particular life stage, underlying economic conditions (regional economic growth and a measure of creativity, talent and tolerance), amenities and quality of life factors (arts and culture), and cost of living.

Best places to live in Canada* Overall Singles

Mid-career

Families

Empty-nesters

Retirees

1

Calgary

Ottawa-Gatineau

Ottawa-Gatineau

Toronto

Ottawa-Gatineau

2

Iqaluit

Calgary

Toronto

Ottawa-Gatineau

Toronto

3

Ottawa-Gatineau

Whitehorse

Calgary

Calgary

Calgary

4

Victoria

Yellowknife

Fredericton

Victoria

Victoria

5

Yellowknife

Iqaluit

Yellowknife

Canmore

Montreal

6

Edmonton

Edmonton

Guelph

Charlottetown

Vancouver

7

Guelph

Guelph

Quebec City

Vancouver

Kingston

8

Canmore

Victoria

Kingston

Montreal

Quebec City

9

Whitehorse

Toronto

Hamilton

Parksville

Guelph

10

Montreal

Montreal

Montreal

Kingston

Halifax

* Who’s Your City? by Richard Florida (Appendix C, p. 326)


insight Guelph

Summer 2009

You’re invited to the

Guelph water

Ours to protect. Ours to conserve. Ours to enjoy. Guelph is one of the largest cities in Canada to rely solely on groundwater. One of the major goals in the City of Guelph’s Official Plan is to recognize and sustainably manage the groundwater and surface water resources needed to support the city’s growth. City and Provincial policies are in place to ensure groundwater resources are respected, protected and conserved. After all, Guelph’s water supply is based on groundwater, which also sustains the area’s natural environment. The safety and security of our water resources are critical to ensuring a high quality of life for existing and future residents and businesses.

Our commitment • To provide a high quality water supply to meet the needs of residents and businesses, now and in the future. • To promote water conservation and efficiency measures to sustain our valuable water resources. • To protect the quality and quantity of the city’s surface and groundwater resources through municipal initiatives and community stewardship. • To practice and encourage effective management of storm water drainage in order to maintain or enhance the water resources of the Guelph area. • To use storm water management to help regulate the quantity and quality of storm water run-off to receiving natural watercourses, wetlands and recharge facilities. The City of Guelph is committed to protecting our water as the city grows and develops. Guidelines are in place to ensure our city grows sustainably, and that development activities do not impair the ability of our water resources to provide a quality water supply for our community, and to

• Diverting biosolids from landfill by applying the treated biosolids to land as a fertilizer. • Exploring opportunities to reuse treated wastewater effluent for applications, such as irrigation.

sustain the area’s natural ecosystem, now and in the future.

Protecting our water

When it comes to protecting our water supply, everyone has a role to play.

What the City is doing • Conducting an environmental study in the southwest quadrant to evaluate the potential to increase Guelph’s water supply. • Working with the Grand River Conservation Authority to improve monitoring along the Speed River, identifying areas of improvement of the overall health of the watershed. • Exploring new rebate programs for the installation of water-efficient humidifiers, outdoor water timers, rain barrels, grey water reuse systems, and rainwater harvesting systems. • Conducting a Water Loss Mitigation Strategy to deal with leaks in the system. • Updating the Sewer Use By-law to control the quality of wastewater that reaches the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP). • Identifying optimization activities to improve efficiency at the WWTP.

What you can do • Follow the Outside Water Use Program guidelines for outdoor watering activities. • Look for water-efficient fixtures and appliances. The City currently offers rebates for water-efficient toilets and front-loading washing machines. • Repair leaks. Keep an eye on faucets, toilets and other water fixtures. • Keep hazardous materials out of our sewer system and waterways. Drop off your household hazardous waste (HHW) products at the HHW Depot, 110 Dunlop Drive, free of charge. • Select native plants for your garden; they thrive in local conditions and require less water. • Use a rain barrel to collect rainwater for your gardens.

Saturday, June 20 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Join us for the official opening ceremonies and stay for the entertainment, food and tours of your new city hall. visit guelph.ca/grandopening for more information. no rSvp necessary.

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insight Guelph

Summer 2009

Good plans, good decisions

The City’s Official Plan provides for healthy, balanced growth You wouldn’t build a house without a set of plans, would you? Guelph’s Official Plan is a lot like a set of blueprints to build an entire city. It shows where the City plans to put houses, roads, schools, parks, offices, hospitals, and factories, while protecting and enhancing natural features like forests, rivers, wetlands and other green spaces. The goal of Guelph’s Official Plan is to provide a healthy mix of places to live, work and enjoy. The Official Plan is the City’s primary tool for managing growth; it specifies which kinds of development can occur in different parts of the city. Like most plans, Guelph’s Official Plan changes from time to time. Some updates are required by the Province, while other adjustments are based on the city’s changing needs and priorities.

plans for growth in the region. Ontario’s Growth Plan estimates Guelph’s population will increase to 175,000 by 2031; an increase of roughly 54,000 people and 32,400 jobs. The Province’s Policy Statement also sets rules for development in the city. Among other things, the Province encourages cities to redevelop brownfields (aging or vacant industrial sites); protect air quality, wetlands, woodlands, streams and groundwater; and use renewable energy. The City is updating Guelph’s Official Plan to conform to the Province’s Growth Plan and be consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement.

The Province’s plans

Are you curious about new developments in your neighbourhood? Subscribe to City e-News for weekly updates and announcements about projects in your community. Visit guelph.ca/news.

Much like a new house on an existing block should compliment its neighbours, Guelph’s Official Plan should compliment the Province’s

Get to know Guelph as it grows

Above and beyond Guelph’s Official Plan update does more than just meet the Province’s requirements. Over the past few years, Guelph has conducted careful research and analysis that serve as the background for the City’s Official Plan update: • Natural Heritage Strategy (2009) • Urban Design Action Plan (2009) • Local Growth Management Strategy (2008) • Community Energy Plan (2007) • Strategic Plan (2007) • City-wide Trail Master Plan (2005) • Guelph-Wellington Transportation Study (2005) • Transportation Strategy Update (2001) For information about Guelph’s Official Plan update, visit guelph.ca/opupdate.

Guelph’s City Hall Past, present, future

In 1856 when Guelph’s original City Hall was built, it was well suited to accommodate the needs of our city’s 4,500 residents. Since then, 59 Carden Street has been home to almost all City services at one point or another throughout its 153 years as Guelph City Hall. During its tenure, this beautiful building saw temendous growth that continues today. The City of Guelph outgrew its beautiful century home many years ago, and as a result several services came to be housed at five downtown locations. Because of the inconvenience of multiple office locations and increasing leasing costs, in 2005 Council decided a new City Hall was needed to meet the current and future demands of a city that continually attracts new residents, businesses and visitors. Our community now has similar long-term expectations for the new kid on the block, 1 Carden Street, commonly known as new City Hall. Having opened its doors only a few

months ago, new City Hall is ready to take on that challenge and is off to great start. New City Hall has been designed to maximize accessibility, convenience, environmental leadership, cost savings, and accommodate future growth. Accessibility features in the new building are on each floor starting at the entrance, and span the floor tiles, signage on the walls, washrooms, drinking fountains, and Council Chambers. Customer service has been enhanced now that residents can access City services in one central and convenient location. The ServiceGuelph counter on the main floor offers residents personalized customer service, helpful information and quick transactions. New City Hall was built to meet the LEED (Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design) Silver Standard set out by the Canadian

Green Building Council, which translates to outstanding conservation and efficiency. In addition, residents benefit from the hundreds of thousands of dollars of savings each year in rent, energy and water costs. For more information about new City Hall visit guelph.ca/cityhall.


insight Guelph

Summer 2009

Kevin Palmer

e Juisn Recreation and Parks Month in Guelph Guelph residents want to be among the most physically and socially active people in canada. So choose from hundreds of recreation activities, hit the trails or enjoy a day at the park and make it a reality!

More places like home

For details visit guelph.ca/recmonth

Building variety in Guelph’s residential neighbourhoods Today, living in Guelph, for the most part, means living in a neighbourhood of detached or semi-detached homes. In fact, Statistics Canada’s 2006 Census indicates that roughly 58 per cent of homes in Guelph are low-density detached/semidetached houses.

What will your neighbourhood look like in the next 25 years? The stage is being set for exciting changes in many neighbourhoods from the city’s downtown core to its outer edges. Guelph has strong urban qualities balanced with protected natural spaces and parks. The City plans to maintain this balance as Guelph’s population grows. For instance, Guelph will eventually provide more variety than it does today through more medium-density homes such as townhouses, and higher-density homes such as apartment buildings. Guelph will offer a better mix of housing options over the next 25 years so that it can accommodate an additional 26,500 new households.

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Celebrate Seniors Month

Memorable and complete communities that offer shopping and commercial districts, public parks, recreation facilities and effective public transit will be created, resulting in attractive, lively and enjoyable neighbourhoods.

at the Evergreen Seniors Centre Evergreen Seniors Centre, Guelph’s community centre dedicated to residents and visitors 55 plus, has many activities planned to celebrate seniors throughout June.

Creating communities where everyone feels at home The City’s goal is to create neighbourhoods where people from all walks of life can enjoy Guelph’s parks and green spaces, access facilities and services, build relationships with their neighbours and take pride in the place they call home. Students need affordable housing and are likely to rent an apartment or share a house close to amenities and along transit routes. Young couples may choose to buy or rent an affordable, entry-level townhouse or apartment as a starter home. They will look for a place where they can get to know their neighbours and enjoy community parks, nearby shopping and entertainment. Families are more likely to live in larger

June 19 Free Fitness Fridays Urban Poling, 10 a.m. June 25 Poker Walk and Picnic at Riverside Park, 10 a.m. June 26 Free Fitness Fridays Total Body, 10 a.m.

homes that are close to shopping, parks, schools and recreations facilities. Retirees may prefer low-maintenance town homes or condominiums that offer a sense of community and security while bringing people closer to public transit, shopping, and City amenities.

For more information about Seniors Month or the Evergreen Seniors Centre call 519-823-1291 or visit guelph.ca


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insight Guelph

Summer 2009

What will Guelph look like when

a

os

Rd

Woolwich St

am Er

Silvercreek Pkwy S

York Rd

Stone Rd W

Stone Rd E

Community Nodes Corridors New Communities

Gordon St

when The cITY waS Founded In 1827, John Galt created a unique plan which laid out the roads, and residential, religious and commercial areas, all nestled where the Speed and Eramosa Rivers meet. Since then Guelph has grown, in fits and starts, from the core to the urban area we know today. To prevent sprawl and the use of agricultural land beyond Guelph’s boundary, the city needs to grow up, and make better use of space within built-up areas. You’ll see better pedestrian and cycling routes, improved transit, quality parks and green spaces and more accessible amenities located close to home as Guelph gradually shifts from low density development toward more town homes, apartments, and mixed-use centres that combine office, commercial and residential buildings. The goal is to create a well-functioning, healthy, compact and therefore more sustainable city based on a network of unique neighbourhoods that meet the wide-ranging needs of the community. Community nodes, corridors and a network of new communities are just a few of the ideas being considered for future redevelopments in Guelph.

±

The city is 182 years old, and it’s time for Guelph to grow up

Silvercreek Pkwy N

it grows

Innovation District

EVOLVING COMMUNITY NODES Community nodes can be planned or redeveloped to offer a mix of housing, offices and shopping amenities. Each node can offer quality public spaces, access to transit, cycling and pedestrian routes, improved connections between neighbourhoods, commercial centres and other destinations. The north, west and south community nodes already have conventional shopping amenities, employment opportunities and a few nearby medium and highdensity residential buildings with access to transit. Intensification of these areas could bring a greater variety of housing, improved tran-

sit, cycling and pedestrian routes, and related amenities. In the east, where commercial development is still in the planning stages, Guelph has opportunities to encourage an even better mix of residential and commercial buildings, and more compact, pedestrian-friendly development. This neighbourhood node could feature unique design and architecture, include quality community spaces and invoke a sense of pride. In the south and west community nodes, there are upcoming opportunities for improved transit connections and hubs for the surrounding communities.


insight Guelph

Summer 2009

7

Watch what comes next on the York District Lands – Guelph’s Innovation District.

CONNECTIONS ALONG CORRIDORS Many single-storey buildings along Guelph’s main streets may be re-developed to increase the concentration of people living and shopping along Guelph’s corridors. Stone Road, for example, can offer a greater mix of uses between the Stone Road Mall, the University and research park while new buildings on Gordon Street and Woolwich Street will need to fit in with existing heritage features. Along Eramosa Road and Silvercreek Parkway more buildings could face directly onto the street, close to bus stops and sidewalks, and upper floors can be used for housing or offices. York Road could be redeveloped and integrate surrounding parks, nearby natural features and offer improved cycling and pedestrian routes.

NEW COMMUNITY OPPORTUNITIES The healthiest communities are those where people can choose to walk to schools, parks and shops; live in a house, town home or apartment; work close to home; and see beauty in their neighbourhood’s architecture and natural features. New and growing communities in Guelph’s south end can provide a variety of housing types within many price ranges, along with nearby employment opportunities. New neighbourhoods with beautiful parks and natural areas, pedestrian-friendly amenities and unique design will mean lower environmental impacts and more vibrant communities.

The large parcel of land located southeast of the downtown, sometimes called the York District Lands, is earmarked for a very exciting future. Home to what will be known as Guelph’s Innovation District, these lands will one day house a variety of businesses, including those specializing in the agricultural and environmental technologies sectors, along with residential and other uses. The land, entirely located within Guelph’s urban boundary, is more than 1,000 acres in size, and will be a key to Guelph’s future. The land is linked to all of Guelph’s key priority areas. It’s vital to our growth management strategy and to meeting the Province’s Growth Plan requirements; it offers tremendous opportunity to provide employment lands for our economy; Guelph’s Waste Resource Innovation Centre is located on the property, making it important for the future of organics processing and waste diversion; it offers our best opportunity to meet Guelph’s Community Energy Plan targets through integrated energy planning; and finally, the land is central to building partnerships, because those with interests in the land include the provincial government, University of Guelph, and private companies. For more information about the York District Lands and Guelph’s Innovation District, visit guelph.ca/innovationdistrict. Guelph’s urban design action plan and Growth management Strategy included more information about Guelph’s plans for nodes, corridors, new communities and other developments. visit guelph.ca for details.


insight Guelph

go by bike!

guelph.ca/bike

Building a deck or shed? Putting in a pool or hot tub? Getting ready to renovate? Whether you’re hiring a contractor or doing it yourself, we can help with building permits and guidelines. 519-837-5615 building@guelph.ca guelph.ca

Summer 2009

What’s up downtown?

Deborah Wilson

8

A stronger city starts in the core

As the city grows, Guelph’s downtown will change for the better. New developments and community spaces will enhance the city’s natural beauty, green spaces and historic buildings, and downtown will offer a more balanced mix of housing, culture and commerce. Ask most people for a downtown Guelph landmark, and they’ll point to the Church of Our Lady Immaculate in the heart of the city. This beautiful building can be seen for miles around, and represents an important part of Guelph’s heritage. Just north of the church, the City is renovating the historic Loretto Convent building to house the new Civic Museum — a cultural highlight for people living in or visiting Guelph.

South of the church, on Wilson Street, will see some big changes as the City adds vehicle and bicycle parking facilities and street-level commercial space. The design of the Wilson Street garage will be in keeping with the surrounding area, and the new facility will meet the needs of more people moving in and out of the core. Look east along Carden Street to see the City putting the finishing touches on new City Hall, and preparing to renovate old City Hall for the Provincial Offences Court, also referred to as the Municipal Court. The landscaping and features in front of these two buildings will create the Civic Square; a new shared community space with trees, plants, seating areas and public art. Walk a little further along Carden Street

and you’ll arrive at the proposed site for Guelph’s transit hub. Plans for local and regional buses and trains to meet in a central downtown location will improve the city’s connections to surrounding communities in Wellington County, Kitchener-WaterlooCambridge and the Greater Toronto Area. Finally, the new central library will be a focal point and meeting place for the community. Guelph plans to redevelop the parking lot on Baker Street to build the new library, more community green space and create opportunities for new residential, commercial and office buildings on the rest of the site. As these projects are completed, a trip downtown will bring you to new facilities and exciting new public spaces, and you’ll still have a fantastic view of the church!

Civic Museum

Wilson Street Parking Garage

Project list Baker Street Library The new library will create an inviting public space and offer opportunities for medium and high-density residential and commercial buildings downtown. The City plans to purchase four buildings on Wyndham Street North and completely redevelop the Baker Street parking lot to make room for a LEED-certified library building, surrounding green space and at least 400 parking spots. Civic Museum The new Civic Museum will be built to the LEED Silver Standard set by the Canadian Green Building Council, with room for classrooms, a children’s gallery, meeting facilities, offices, a gift shop, archives, research and storage. The interior demolition is complete and the conversion of the building is planned to begin in September 2009. Provincial Offences Court Guelph’s historic old City Hall at 59 Carden Street will undergo a complete

interior renovation and restoration as the City converts the building to the Provincial Offences Court, also referred to as the Municipal Court. Work is scheduled to begin in July, and reconstruction will take about one year. Transit Hub Environmental and engineering studies and plans are underway to redevelop the area near Guelph’s VIA rail station and Greyhound bus terminal. A new transit hub at this location will connect regional and local transit systems. GO Transit is completing an Environmental Assessment, and expects to offer service to Guelph in 2011. The hub will be the main transfer point for people travelling in to, out of and around the city. Wilson Street Parking Garage A six-level garage will provide 395 parking spaces, barrier-free parking, washrooms, bicycle parking and new retail space at street level. Energy and water conservation features are planned as part of the project. Construction is expected to start later this year, and completion is planned for 2010.


insight Guelph

Summer 2009

Distinctive spaces for everyone

Europeans have known for centuries that quality public spaces are the heart and soul of great cities. Just think of the piazza — every Italian city and town has one, no matter how small. Strong public spaces build community, encourage health and wellness, support social interaction and foster a distinct sense of place. When they’re well planned and beautifully built, they have tremendous positive impacts on our quality of life. Perhaps now more than ever, designing and building great public spaces is on the minds of North Americans and Guelphites in particular. That’s because Guelph is at a pivotal point in its evolution, poised to grow with an increasing trend toward urban living. In their efforts to make Guelph one of Canada’s most sustainable cities, City planners have identified the need for high-quality public spaces across the city, starting in the city’s historic core.

Guelph’s Civic Square The plan for the new Civic Square at Carden and Wilson Streets, next to new City Hall, is an example of the future direction of quality public spaces in Guelph. Developed under the Market Place Urban Design Plan, adopted by Council in 2008, the Square will offer beautiful spots to gather, reflect, admire

public art, and enjoy community events. Guelph’s new Civic Square will be a very important open space addition to the community. It will provide an appropriate setting for civic events, engage residents on a daily basis, and distinguish the city for visitors. Central to the Civic Square plan is the idea that the Square should contain distinct and clearly defined places that respond to the character of the buildings that surround it, all while linked by strong pathways, greenery and healthy trees. The Civic Square plan incorporates Carden Street and Wilson Street as part of the design, and engages and enhances the sidewalks and street design for the businesses and residents along the sunny side of the street. Subject of a major fundraising drive, the Square’s focal point is to be an active water feature and skating rink that will bring the community together for daily activities and special events. It is to be designed to demonstrate the best water and energy conservation practices while providing the community with a new year-round recreational facility. For information about Guelph’s Civic Square, visit guelph.ca/cityhall > community spaces. For information about fundraising efforts for the Civic Square, or to donate, contact the Civic Square Fundraising Group at 519-836-4772.

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Better ways to go

Trains, buses, cars and bikes Getting in and out of Guelph on a train or bus is about to get a little easier. A number of projects are already underway and will connect Guelph to surrounding communities, and improve transportation within the city. GO trains could come to downtown Guelph as early as 2011, bringing people from Kitchener-Waterloo into Guelph for work, and taking people from Guelph into the Greater Toronto Area. The City is also looking for ways to use the Guelph Junction Railway for passenger travel in the city. The 24 miles of track between Guelph and Campbellville are already used to transport industrial products, and could eventually connect to the rail

system planned for Kitchener-Waterloo. Plans are also in the works for redeveloping the downtown VIA rail station to offer better connections between trains, regional transit, and local bus routes. Future transit hubs are also being considered in Guelph’s west and south-end neighbourhoods. Guelph buses tend to travel between destinations like schools, shopping centres, community centres, offices or industrial parks — places where people are concentrated. As more people live, work and shop

in community nodes, transit can move people from place to place more efficiently. One of Guelph’s goals is to create communities where more commuters can cycle or use transit, and where we can literally run errands on our own two feet. More transit routes will offer full accessibility for people using canes, scooters or wheelchairs; particularly in mixed-use areas where people live within walking distance of shopping, recreation facilities and other amenities. A well-planned transportation network includes all modes of travel; walking, cycling, buses, trains, cars and trucks. Guelph supports the Province’s plan to upgrade intersections on the Hanlon Expressway (Highway 6). New interchanges at Laird Road and Stone Road will offer better delivery routes for Guelph’s commercial and industrial areas, while improving traffic connections between Hamilton and Kitchener-Waterloo. An efficient transportation system will save fuel and energy, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and is an important part of Guelph’s Community Energy Plan.

Look for different ways to travel. Take fewer trips in your car. The City calls it transportation demand management, and it happens when we find ways to share a ride with a friend, take the train, the bus, ride a bike or walk. You can save money, reduce stress, and lower Guelph’s environmental footprint. Learn more at guelph.ca/tdm.


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insight Guelph

Summer 2009

Supporting diversity Did you know immigration to Canada now accounts for the majority of our country’s population growth? In our city alone, 20 per cent of residents were born in another country and over the past ten years 7,000 immigrants have settled in Guelph. As our city becomes more diverse, new talents, traditions and ideas are introduced to the community, making it culturally rich and more vibrant. All new residents need support as they settle in our city. The City of Guelph is working to meet the needs of an ethnically and culturally diverse city in many ways, and works with community partners to help new Canadians access a variety of services. The City of Guelph is one of more than 30 service providers working together, collectively called the Guelph Inclusiveness Alliance (GIA), to make Guelph and Wellington County a welcoming community to new Canadians. The GIA’s efforts focus on employment needs, increasing access to translation and language services, increasing awareness of racism and discrimination, partnership development, and research.

Directory of Services for new Canadians of Guelph The GIA recently developed the Directory of Services for new Canadians of Guelph. This resource is an easy-to-use listing of employment, housing, health care, English as a second language (ESL) training information, and other ser-

vices. Download a free copy in one of seven languages from volunteerguelphwellington.on.ca/communityinfo.aspx.

Neighbourhood Engagement The City of Guelph plays another role in supporting diversity through its Neighbourhood Engagement initiatives. It provides support, often in the form of resources for recreational and social programs, to 12 neighbourhood groups. Each neighbourhood group operates independently to meet its own unique needs. Many of these groups offer support to new Canadians. The West Willow Neighbourhood Group is one example of how neighbourhood groups can connect new Canadians and their new neighbours. This group provides referrals to social supports for housing, education and the multicultural centre. It offers after-school programs, summer camps, and local events. It also sources translators and occasion-

ally publishes newsletters in languages other than English to keep everyone informed. At the Onward Willow Neighbourhood Group staff speaks 11 languages. Programs are ethno-specific to help reduce language barriers. The group also has a new Canadian Advisory Committee to ensure it’s responsive. Making sure all citizens have the opportunity to participate in community life is part of the City of Guelph’s commitment to being community-focused, responsive and accountable. For more information about the City’s involvement with the GIA or neighbourhood groups, please contact: Cindy Richardson Community Manager, Neighbourhood Engagement Community Services T 519-822-1260 x 2700

*United Way of Guelph and Wellington Community Connections, February/March 2008 Social Planning Report: The Face of Guelph and Wellington is Changing

Redefining brownfields In the true spirit of the three R’s (reduce, reuse and recycle), Guelph hopes to encourage the re-use of vacant or underused industrial and commercial lands throughout the city. Redeveloping brownfields makes better use of utilities and City services such as roads, watermains, sewers, libraries and hospitals already in place. The City has identified roughly 175 brownfield properties in Guelph. Most are empty, paved lots or abandoned buildings in older parts of the city. There may be a history of industrial activity or environmental pollution that requires special treatment or removal techniques. Once a site is cleaned up however, it can

brownfield (broun-feeld) n. 1 an industrial or commercial site that is idle or underused because of real or perceived environmental pollution. 2 a development opportunity that limits sprawl and helps clean up the environment while creating new facilities to meet community needs.

be used for new stores, office buildings, townhomes, or factories in the city’s already built up areas. In some cases, the redevelopment of brownfield sites features new de-

Walker Office Building 111 Farquar St, a former granary.

sign elements combined with existing buildings to create truly unique spaces that show pieces of Guelph’s history.

Making it easier Proper clean-up is critical to restore the soil and surrounding area to a healthy state. This takes time, and it can be expensive. The City shares the cost of environmental testing to learn about potential pollution on a site, ensure appropriate measures are taken to protect Guelph’s groundwater supply, and improve the local environment. In fact, as part of its Brownfield Redevelopment Community Improvement Plan, the City offers a number of financial incen-

tives for property-owners seeking to redevelop brownfield sites. The City can provide tax assistance during and after a clean up, and offer grants based on new tax revenues that will be created once the site is converted to a functioning new facility. In Guelph you can see an old mill turned into affordable apartments where a textile factory once stood, and offices inside a historic granary. Guelph is working to create more unique communities and neighbourhoods while reusing properties, recycling old buildings, and reducing sprawl. For additional information on brownfield redevelopment programs in Guelph, visit guelph.ca/brownfields.


insight Guelph

Summer 2009

Stephanie Dearing

Community events Guelph buildings tell the city’s story From the simplest structure to the most elaborate architectural achievement, Guelph’s buildings show how people live and offer interesting examples of various time periods or styles. As Guelph grows and more properties seek redevelopment, it is important to recognize and preserve the places that make the city unique. Guelph has a list of 4,000 properties in what is called the Inventory of Cultural Heritage Resources. The list includes structures that help tell the story of the city. The Inventory includes modest and elaborate homes, hotels, bridges, places of worship and education, office buildings and factories of all ages and types. Some are formally designated under the Ontario Heritage Act while others require further research to find out if their cultural and heritage features warrant designation under the Ontario Heritage Act.

Changes to property listings Recently, 1,900 non-designated properties from the Inventory were placed on another list called the Municipal Register of Cultural Heritage Properties. The properties added to the Municipal Register are not the same as heritage properties designated under the Ontario Heritage Act. The process for renovating a building on the Municipal Register has not changed, but if a property owner plans to remove or demolish a building on the Municipal Register, they must give the City 60 days notice. The City will use that time to learn more about the property and its role in the community. If there is no significant cultural or heritage value, the building can be removed.

Recreation and Parks Month June 1 – 30 guelph.ca/recmonth Seniors Month June 1 – 30 guelph.ca > living > recreation and culture > recreation offerings > seniors Guelph City Hall Grand Opening June 20 guelph.ca/grandopening

60 Cardigan St

Tim Hortons sponsored Safety First Aquatic Fun Event June 20 519-837-5657 Subaru Triathlon Series 1 June 20 – 21 trisportcanada.com

McCrae House

Property owners who feel that information included on the Municipal Register is incorrect or that a property does not in fact have cultural or heritage value can apply to have the listing corrected or removed. The complete Municipal Register of Cultural Heritage Properties is available at heritageguelph.ca or can be viewed at ServiceGuelph in City Hall.

July Festival Italiano Date to be announced 519-821-1110

August John Galt Day August 3 guelph.ca Eco Days August 3 guelph.ca/wetdry Guelph Ribfest August 28 – August 30 ribfestguelph.com

art on the street 2009 July 18 downtownguelph.com Hillside Music Festival 2009 July 24 – 26 hillsidefestival.ca

September Subaru Triathlon Series 2 September 5 trisportcanada.com

Are you on the list? Listed properties are located all over the city and vary in age, size and character. People who own properties on the Municipal Register should have received a letter from the City of Guelph.

June

St. George’s Anglican Church

Guelph Jazz Festival September 9 – 13 guelphjazzfestival.com

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insight Guelph

Summer 2009

The City of Guelph’s Outside Water Use Program (OWUP) has three levels that affect residential outside water use. Program levels are triggered by dry weather and local watershed conditions. Refer to the colour-coded information below to find out what watering activities are permitted during the three program levels. To determine the current OWUP level visit guelph.ca/water, call 519-837-5627 or watch for signs posted around the city.

Level 0 Blue

– careFul uSe

0

• Alternate day and time restrictions apply to lawn watering* • Decorative fountains and garden ponds must re-circulate water • No restrictions on watering trees, shrubs, flowers and gardens; vehicle washing (hose must be equipped with a shut-off nozzle); recreational sprinklers, splash pads, pools and hot tubs

Level 1 Yellow

– reduce ouTSIde uSe

1

• Alternate day and time restrictions apply to lawn watering* • Decorative fountains and garden ponds must re-circulate water • No restrictions on watering trees, shrubs, flowers and gardens; vehicle washing (hose must be equipped with a shut-off nozzle); recreational sprinklers, splash pads, pools and hot tubs

Level 2 RED

– reduce & STop non-eSSenTIal uSe

2

• Lawn watering is not permitted • Alternate day and time restrictions apply to watering trees, shrubs, flowers and gardens, and vehicle washing (hose must be equipped with a shut-off nozzle)* • Decorative fountains and garden ponds must re-circulate water • No restrictions on recreational sprinklers, splash pads, pools and hot tubs * Odd numbered addresses water on odd numbered days, even numbered addresses water on even numbered days, between 7 and 9 a.m. and 7 and 9 p.m., as needed.

Guelph wate Ours to conserve

Ours to protect

Ours to enjoy

Who to call

Ward information Ward 1

Ward 2

Councillors

Councillors

City of Guelph Services and Facilities

Bob Bell

Vicki Beard

T 519-822-6152 E bob.bell@guelph.ca

T 519-821-4856 E vicki.beard@guelph.ca

Services

Phone

Kathleen Farrelly

Ian Findlay

T 519-822-5946 E kathleen.farrelly@guelph.ca

T 519-830-4681 E ian.findlay@guelph.ca

Mayor’s Office CAO’s Office Building City Clerk’s Office Civic Museum Community Design and Development Services Court Services (Provincial Offences Court) Economic Development Engineering Evergreen Seniors Centre Facility Bookings Finance Fire and Emergency Services Human Resources Legal and Realty Services Library (Main Branch) Neighbourhood Engagement McCrae House Operations Parking Parks Maintenance Police Services River Run Centre (Box Office) River Run Centre (Administration) Sleeman Centre TTY (Teletype for Deaf ) Taxation Tourism Traffic Transit Victoria Road Recreation Centre Waste Resource Innovation Centre Wastewater Treatment Plant Waterworks West End Community Centre

519-837-5643 519-837-5602 519-837-5615 519-837-5603 519-836-1221 519-837-5616

Ward 3

Ward 4

Councillors

Councillors

June Hofland

Gloria Kovach

T 519-822-1260 x 2505 E june.hofland@guelph.ca

T 519-824-9695 E gloria.kovach@guelph.ca

Maggie Laidlaw

Mike Salisbury

T 519-837-1732 E maggie.laidlaw@guelph.ca

T 519-763-4461 E mike.salisbury@guelph.ca

Ward 5

Ward 6

Councillors

Councillors

Lise Burcher

Christine Billings

T 519-736-0449 E lise.burcher@guelph.ca

T 519-826-0567 E christine.billings@guelph.ca

Leanne Piper

Karl Wettstein

T 519-824-9000 E leanne.piper@guelph.ca

T 519-763-5105 E karl.wettstein@guelph.ca

Beat the bore – get wet or go for a ride! Playing outdoors, getting wet, or going on an exciting ride offer great ways to have fun on those long summer days. Splash pads

– Free summer 2009 (Norm Jary, Hanlon Creek, West End Community Centre) June 27 – Sept 7, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Wading pools

(Sunny Acres Park, Mico Valeriote Park and Exhibition Park) June 27 – Sept 7, 12 – 6 p.m.

Outdoor pools (Lyon Park) June 26 – Sept 6, visit guelph.ca for times

Amusement Rides

(Riverside Park) May 18 – June 21, weekends and holidays only June 27 – Sept 7, open daily 11 a.m. – 7:30 p.m.

For more information call 519-837-5628

519-826-0762 519-837-5600 519-837-5604 519-823-1291 519-837-5678 519-837-5610 519-824-6590 519-837-5601 519-837-5637 519-824-6220 519-837-5618 519-836-1482 519-837-5628 519-837-5612 519-837-5628 519-824-1212 519-763-3000 519-837-5662 519-822-4900 519-826-9771 519-837-5610 519-837-1335 519-837-5628 519-822-1811 519-837-5621 519-767-0598 519-837-5629 519-837-5627 519-837-5657

Insight Guelph is a publication of The Corporation of the City of Guelph. T 519-822-1260 x 2610 E communications@guelph.ca guelph.ca Write/Visit: City Hall, 1 Carden St Guelph, ON N1H 3A1 Insight Guelph is printed on newsprint containing recycled content.


Insight Guelph - Summer 09