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AGENDA Ordinary Meeting of Council 6.00pm Wednesday September 26, 2012

*** Broadcast live on Phoenix FM 106.7 ***

VENUE: Reception Room, Bendigo Town Hall, Hargreaves Street, Bendigo

NEXT MEETING: Wednesday October 17, 2012 Bendigo Town Hall Copies of the City of Greater Bendigo Council’s Agendas & Minutes can be obtained online at www.bendigo.vic.gov.au


Vision Values Goal Areas

GREATER BENDIGO will be the best place to live work and visit, where: • growth and living standards are managed to sustain and enhance quality of life • a regional culture of learning, creativity and innovation allows people to flourish • its rich natural and cultural heritage is conserved for today and tomorrow • resilience, local spirit and identity are proudly celebrated. Council will achieve its vision by working with the community and business, displaying leadership in its decision-making, operating in an open manner and basing decisions on sound information.

Council will realise its vision by setting strategic objectives, strategies and committing to annual actions within four Goal Areas: • Built and Natural Environment • Economic Development • Community and Culture • Our People, Our Processes


ORDINARY MEETING WEDNESDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 2012

ORDER OF BUSINESS: ITEM

PRECIS

PAGE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

3

PRAYER

3

PRESENT

3

APOLOGIES

3

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

3

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME

3

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS

4

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

5

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

6

1.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

8

1.1

Petition: Request for Relocation of Partial Road Closure Barricade in Chrysler Drive, Epsom

8

2.

BUILT AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

10

2.1

Planning Scheme Amendment C186 - Consideration of an Authorisation Request to Update the Planning Controls for the Former Crystal Ice and Gillies Pie Factory Sites

10

2.3

Planning Scheme Amendments - To Endorse Request for Interim Heritage Controls (C188) and Seek Authorisation for Permanent Heritage Controls (C189) for 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square

30

2.4

Use of Land for Place of Worship and Place of Assembly and a Waiver and Reduction in Car Parking - 24-30 View Street, Bendigo

40

2.5

Subdivision of Land into 52 Lots and the Removal of Native Vegetation - 320 Howard Street, Eaglehawk

55

2.6

Staged Subdivision of Land and the Removal of Native Vegetation (A Permit Amendment to Create an Additional Lot) - Elsworth Park Estate, Strathfieldsaye

75


2.7

Subdivision of Land into Two Lots - 24-28 Holmes Road, North Bendigo

89

2.8

Subdivision of Land into 5 Lots and Construction of 5 Two Storey Dwellings and a Waiver of Visitor Parking Requirement - 46 Nolan Street, North Bendigo

101

2.9

Subdivision of Land into Four Lots and Construction of Four Dwellings - 24 Harpin Street, Strathdale

122

2.10

Construction of a Dwelling and Associated Sheds on Lot 2 at 1000 Axedale-Goornong Road, Fosterville

136

2.11

2-Lot Subdivision, Demolition of Outbuilding and Part of Dwelling; Construction of Carport and Fences - 19 Milroy Street, Bendigo

145

2.12

Response to Petition: Request for Speed Humps in Bobs Street, White Hills

157

2.13

Mitchell Street Bus Stops and Streetscape Redevelopment

161

3.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

179

4.

COMMUNITY AND CULTURE

180

4.1

Eaglehawk Regional Play Space - Presentation of Concept Design and Release for Public Consultation - Contract No: 2494-2011/12

180

4.2

Gateway Park Master Plan - Results of Community Engagement and Finalisation of Master Plan

187

4.3

Municipal Fire Management Plan 2012/2015

193

4.4

Community Facilities Funding Program (Minor) 2013-2014

197

4.5

Community Policing Vehicle

203

4.6

Kids Character Carnival

209

5.

OUR PEOPLE, OUR PROCESSES

220

5.1

Accounts Payable and Contracts Awarded Under Delegation

220

5.2

Record of Assemblies

222

5.3

Appointment of Independent Member of the Audit Committee

228

5.4

Bendigo Regional Archive Centre Annual Report 2011/2012

230

5.5

Improving The Way We Do Things - 2011/12 Annual Report

233

7.

NOTICES OF MOTION

246


8.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

246

9.

MAYOR'S REPORT

246

10.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

246

11.

CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS

246

____________________________ CRAIG NIEMANN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY PRAYER PRESENT

APOLOGIES

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS That Standing Orders be suspended to allow a presentation to Mr Peter Mundy from the Sister Cities Committee, on his installation as a Bard of the Gorsedh of Cornwall and the conduct of Public Question Time.

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME Public Question Time Guidelines Public Question Time – Purpose Council has provided the opportunity for members of the public to ask questions of broad interest to Council and the community. Matters relating to routine Council works should be taken up with Council’s Customer Service Officers through its Customer Request System. By the time planning matters have reached the council agenda, they have been through an extensive process as required by the Planning and Environment Act. In addition, in most instances mediation has been held between the parties involved. Throughout the process there are many opportunities for the people to ask questions. Therefore, no questions relating to planning matters on the Agenda will be accepted. Public Question Time – Where, When And Who The public question time is held at every Ordinary Meeting of Greater Bendigo City Council. Meetings of Council commence at 6.00pm in the Reception Room, Bendigo Town Hall, Hargreaves Street, Bendigo. The public question time is held at the start of the meeting as close as practical to 6:00pm. A maximum of 30 minutes has been provided for registered and unregistered questions. Residents are encouraged to lodge questions in advance so that a more complete response can be provided.

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Questions will be put to the Council by the individual posing the question; the question will be answered by the Mayor or CEO, or where appropriate, Councillors or Council Officers. Acceptance of Questions Each person asking a question of Council is required to stand, state their name, and address the Mayor. Public Question Time is not an opportunity for making of statements or other comments. Council’s Meeting Procedure Local Law does not allow for other questions or comments during the remainder of the meeting. 1.

An individual may only ask one question per meeting, a follow-up question may be permitted at the discretion of the Mayor.

2.

In the event that the same or similar question is raised by more than one person, an answer may be given as a combined response.

3.

In the event that time does not permit all questions registered to be answered, questions will be answered in writing or referred to the next meeting if appropriate.

4.

The Mayor and or CEO have the right to decline registration on basis of: • Prosecution, summonses or any other litigation; • Most appropriately addressed by other means; • Vague, irrelevant, insulting or improper, defamatory; • Answer likely to compromise his / her position; • Confidential, commercial-in-confidence.

5.

Each individual whose registration form has been accepted or declined will be advised by the Friday of the week prior to the scheduled meeting.

6.

In the event of a registration form being declined the registration form will be circulated to the Mayor or Councillors for information.

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS That Standing Orders be resumed.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST Pursuant to Sections 77, 78 and 79 of the Local Government Act 1989 (as amended) direct and indirect conflict of interest must be declared prior to debate on specific items within the agenda; or in writing to the Chief Executive Officer before the meeting. Declaration of indirect interests must also include the classification of the interest (in circumstances where a Councillor has made a Declaration in writing, the classification of the interest must still be declared at the meeting), i.e. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

direct financial interest indirect interest by close association indirect interest that is an indirect financial interest indirect interest because of conflicting duties indirect interest because of receipt of an applicable gift indirect interest as a consequence of becoming an interested party indirect interest as a result of impact on residential amenity conflicting personal interest

A Councillor who has declared a conflict of interest, must leave the meeting and remain outside the room while the matter is being considered, or any vote is taken. Councillors are also encouraged to declare circumstances where there may be a perceived conflict of interest.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Tuesday September 4, 2012. The following items were considered at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Tuesday September 4, 2012 at 6:00pm. • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Response to Petition: Dr Harry Little Preschool Eaglehawk Structure Plan Revised Community Plans: Goornong and District - Heathcote and District Woodvale and District Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme Amendment C164 - Rezoning of the Eaglehawk CVGT Site to industrial 3 Zone, Apply the Design and Development and Environmental Audit Overlays - Consideration of Request for Ministerial Authorisation and Exhibition of Amendment Bendigo's Landscapes - Big Hill and Mandurang Valley Landscape Assessment Amended Plans and Permit for Kennington Village Development - Use Land for Offices, Shops, Food and Drink Premises, Signage, Creation of Access, Removal of Vegetation, Partial Waiver Car Parking - 150-158 Condon Street, Strathdale 2 Lot Subdivision - 4 Alpaca Court, Kangaroo Flat Subdivide Land into 2 Lots - 1088 McIvor Highway, Junortoun Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme Amendment C166 Part 2 - Anomaly Amendment - 401-405 High Street, Golden Square - Adoption of Amendment following Panel Report Subdivide Land into 2 Lots - 8 Nankoor Street, Golden Square Construction of 26 Dwellings and Subdivision with Common Property - 443-445 High Street and 110-110A Panton Street, Golden Square Buildings and Works for Alterations and Extension to an Existing Building, Advertising Signage, Removal of Native Vegetation, Consideration of Car Parking Provision and Reduction in Bicycle Facilities - 263-265 High Street, Kangaroo Flat Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan Inaugural Bendigo Writers Festival - Post Event Summary Bendigo Library Redevelopment - Construction Tender Defined Benefits Superannuation Liability Provision of Loan Borrowings Financial Statements, Performance Statements and Standard Statements for the Financial Year 2010/2011 Record of Assemblies Review of Broadcasting of Council Meetings by Phoenix FM Accounts Payable and Contracts Awarded Under Delegation Section 89 Confidential Report - Proposed Development

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The unconfirmed minutes have also been posted on the City of Greater Bendigo website pending confirmation at this meeting.

RECOMMENDATION That the Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on Tuesday September 4, 2012 as circulated, be taken as read and confirmed.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

1.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

1.1 PETITION: REQUEST FOR RELOCATION OF PARTIAL ROAD CLOSURE BARRICADE IN CHRYSLER DRIVE, EPSOM

Petitions and joint letters with ten (10) or more signatures are included in the agenda or tabled at the meeting, unless there is a separate legal process for considering the petition or joint letter, as there is for planning submissions or submissions following public notices (Section 223 LGA)].

A petition has been received from residents, property owners, business operations and affected persons in the area of Chrysler Drive, Epsom, as outlined below:

"Residents, Property Owners, Business Operators and effected persons in the neighbourhood, who want the barricade moved to the half way mark of Chrysler Drive and want the City of Greater Bendigo to require the northern Chrysler Drive residents to asphalt Chrysler Drive from the half way mark to Golf Links Road".

Signatures

-

69

Officer comment: Council received a petition on 12 December 2011 signed by 12 residents from Chrysler Drive requesting that Council resolve the problem of the high number of commercial vehicles and speeding vehicles using the street and requesting that Council make the entry from the south approach and install speed restriction signs and dust signs. An on-site meeting was held with residents on 20 December 2011 at which it was agreed to trial a 3 month temporary closure to through traffic. Following the completion of the trial another on-site meeting was held on 7 August 2012. All residents were in favour of retaining the traffic closure as trialled except one. On this basis, a public notice for a permanent traffic closure was advertised on 22 August 2012 with the submission period ending on 19 September 2012. The attached petition was received as a submission objecting to the proposed permanent closure. A report for Council's consideration will now be presented at the October Council meeting.

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RECOMMENDATION That the petition be received and a response be prepared for consideration at the Council meeting on 17 October 2012.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

BUILT AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

2.1 PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C186 - CONSIDERATION OF AN AUTHORISATION REQUEST TO UPDATE THE PLANNING CONTROLS FOR THE FORMER CRYSTAL ICE AND GILLIES PIE FACTORY SITES Document Information Author

Philip DeAraugo, Activity Centres Place Manager

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose Planning Scheme Amendment C186 proposes to update the planning controls that apply to Precinct D of the Bendigo CBD Plan to facilitate its redevelopment in a format that landowners and key stakeholders have agreed to. The proposed refinements to the planning controls will clearly articulate that the intent of landowners and the City is to work towards a development outcome that will benefit Greater Bendigo for many years to come. This report recommends Council resolve to commence the formal Planning Scheme Amendment process for the former Crystal Ice and Gillies Pie Factory sites in Garsed Street, Bendigo. It recommends Council seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit an Amendment to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme to update the planning controls applying to the site to better reflect the preferred future and key opportunities for redevelopment of the precinct. Policy Context Council Plan 2009-2013 (Update 2012) Built and Natural Environment 1.10. Provide clear planning policy direction and work to improve systems so that sound decisions are made promptly for land use and sustainable development. The previous Council Plan (Update 2011) included an action relating to the Crystal Ice and Gillies sites and working towards development of a scale and type that would complement the remainder of the city centre and ensure heritage values are retained and interpreted when redeveloped.

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Strategy Reference. The Bendigo CBD Plan 2005 is the guiding strategy for all projects in the Bendigo City Centre. The key aim of the Plan is to attract more people to the city centre for longer. The Plan includes a section on the former Crystal Ice and Gillies Pie Factory sites and refers to the combined sites as Precinct D. The Plan identifies the longer term vision for Precinct D as accommodating uses that are suited to large flat sites such as bulky goods, offices and residential, in a format that would be complementary to the remainder of the CBD. Background Information Up until around six or seven years ago, the former Crystal Ice and Gillies sites were still being used for the production of ice and food manufacturing. The facilities were generally appropriate for these activities, as were the planning controls. However, with the closure of these businesses and the sale of the Crystal Ice site to a new owner and the Gillies site being actively promoted for sale, there was a need to review the future uses of the site and to update the planning controls in order to facilitate the redevelopment of the precinct. The Bendigo CBD Plan identified the longer term vision for the combined sites for uses that are suited to large flat sites such as bulky goods, offices and residential. Amendment C86 introduced updated planning controls on 10 May 2007 and changed the zoning of this site from an Industrial Zone to a Business 2 Zone with a shop floorspace limit of 500sqm, applied an Environmental Audit Overlay and a CBD wide Design and Development Overlay (DDO5) to guide building heights and setbacks among other things. A request for the demolition of all of the buildings on the former Crystal Ice site was received from the landowners in October 2010 and an interim Heritage Overlay was subsequently requested from the Minister by the Council to ensure adequate heritage assessments could be undertaken prior to approving any demolition. Following the heritage assessments permanent controls were prepared (Amendment C155) but have not been advanced as negotiations with the landowners have led to an agreement that further work was needed to identify the preferred future use and development of the land. Two landowner and key stakeholder design workshops were held, the most recent in August 2011, to progress the vision. The vision was established within the context of heritage and character values, the need for commercially viable redevelopment of the site, and the critical role that retail floorspace plays in ensuring development viability. The outcomes of these workshops is the basis for the proposed Planning Scheme Amendment. The proposed controls recognise the strategic importance of this major CBD urban renewal site. In addition the new controls provide certainty for decision makers, investors and community in regard to the land use mix, physical scale and requirement to include character and heritage elements when redeveloping the site. All stakeholders are in agreement with what is now proposed. Previous Council Decisions 17 December 2005 – Council adopted the Bendigo CBD Plan 1 December 2010 – Council resolved to seek to apply heritage controls to Precinct D

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Report The Planning and Environment Act 1987 allows for a Planning Scheme Amendment to be initiated by a municipal Council, or a Council can respond to a request for an amendment by any person or body. When requesting authorisation from the Minister for Planning, an Explanatory Report must be submitted that discusses the purpose, effects and strategic justification for the amendment. Key issues identified in the draft Explanatory Report are summarised below.

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Land Affected by the Amendment The subject land is held in two ownerships, the largest relating to the former Crystal Ice Factory and warehouses at 2/93, 95, 97 and 123 Garsed Street (approximately 21,800sqm), and the second being the former Gillies Pie Factory at 125-131 Garsed Street, Bendigo (approximately 3,600sqm). As can be seen in Figure 1, the site has street frontages to Garsed and Arthur Streets, and to a lesser degree to Myrtle Street. The site also has an interface with the Bendigo to Melbourne railway line along its southern boundary. Combined, the precinct has an area of approximately 25,000sqm.

Figure 1: Aerial of the Site

The precinct is zoned Business 2 Zone with a shop floorspace limit of 500sqm, is covered by Design and Development Overlay Schedule 5 (relating to the CBD Plan) and an Environmental Audit Overlay (in recognition of potential contamination of the site due to its former uses). What the Amendment Does The amendment is relatively simple in that it proposes to: • amend the schedule to the Business 2 Zone to increase the retail floorspace limitation from 500sqm to 8,000sqm; • amend the existing Design and Development Overlay Schedule 5 to identify that a site specific control is now in place; • introduce a site specific Schedule to the Design and Development Overlay based on the agreed outcomes of the design workshops and heritage citations; • amend Planning Scheme maps to reflect the above changes. PAGE 13


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It should be noted that the recent announcement by the Minister for Planning relating to the proposed changes to the Victoria Planning Provisions, including the consolidation of the current five business zones into two commercial zones is likely to impact on the progress of this Amendment. The Amendment will therefore need to be drafted to ensure that any local content that was proposed to be implemented in the Schedule to the Business 2 Zone can easily be translated into the site specific Design and Development Overlay (as the proposed Commercial 1 Zone does not have the ability to include local content). Why the Amendment is Required The future development opportunities for these sites have been reappraised by the City and the current landowners and it has been identified that the planning controls need to be updated to better reflect the agreed outcomes of these discussions to stimulate investor interest and attraction. An Urban Design Framework Plan that was prepared as part of the landowners workshop is now proposed to be included in the Schedule to the new Design and Development Overlay together with a number of key site design principles to ensure that the planning controls are clear about the preferred future use and development of the site and the need to incorporate established local character values. Social, Economic and Environmental Effects The principles contained in the proposed Schedule to the Design and Development Overlay propose a mix of land uses including retail, offices and residential at a scale that responds to the warehouse character along street edges, with opportunities for larger scale development in less sensitive parts of the precinct. Revised preferred building heights are proposed that are generally higher than those currently in the Planning Scheme in recognition of the site's context and surroundings. The principles also include a network of streets, laneways and communal spaces, physical linkages to public transport, protection of amenity along the railway frontage and development that complements the remainder of the city centre. An Economic Impact Assessment (Urbis April 2012) has been prepared to consider the potential for retail development on the Crystal Ice site, and the potential impact of development on other retail facilities in the Bendigo CBD (the former Gillies Pie Factory site is proposed for residential development only). The economic analysis concluded that the Crystal Ice site provides a viable location for retail facilities within the CBD, with mixed commercial and residential use representing a positive regeneration of a currently inactive precinct. It is estimated that the site is able to accommodate between 6,000 and 8,000sqm of destination based and local generation retail floorspace (destination based retail could include an Aldi for example, while local generation might be a cafĂŠ catering primarily to employees or residents in the new development). If 8,000sqm of retail floorspace was developed on this site it is estimated that a one-off impact on CBD retailing of up to 5% could be expected. The impact is considered minor in the context of continuing market growth, such that all retail precincts in the CBD would trade at above current levels post development.

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Ministerial Directions The Amendment is consistent with the Ministerial Direction on the Form and Content of Planning Schemes under section 7(5) of the Act, and Ministerial Direction 11 on the Strategic Assessment of Amendments. The Environmental Audit Overlay already applies to the land. As the Amendment does not alter the overlay, the requirements of Minister’s Direction No.1 are therefore satisfied. Strategic Justification The Amendment is consistent with the State Planning Policy Framework, particularly Clause 17.01 (Activity centres) and Clause 18.01-1 (Land use and transport planning), in that it promotes the development of a variety of land uses that are highly accessible by a range of modes of transport and will encourage multi-purpose trip making to the Bendigo City Centre. The Amendment also supports the implementation of the Local Planning Policy Framework, particularly Clause 21.03 (Vision – Strategic Framework), Clause 21.04 (Strategic directions), Clause 21.06 (Housing), Clause 21.07 (Economic development) and Clause 21.09 (Infrastructure). The Amendment does this as it will assist in developing Bendigo as the prime commercial and service centre of the region, it will reinforce the prime role of Bendigo City Centre, it will provide for a range of housing types to meet the diverse needs of the changing demographic composition of the community, it will provide the commercial sector with new opportunities for business development, and it can be developed with appropriate provision of infrastructure. Consultation/Communication Consultation has been limited to landowners and key stakeholders through the two design workshops, and more recently with the State Government’s urban renewal authority, Places Victoria. Places Victoria has expertise in similar projects and have assisted in refining the proposed planning controls. As mentioned earlier, all stakeholders are in agreement as to the form and content of the proposed amendment. The documents will be publicly exhibited for a minimum of a month, as required under the Planning and Environment Act 1987. The City must give notice of Amendments to all owners and occupiers who may be materially affected by an Amendment, together with prescribed Ministers and public authorities. The Amendment will also be exhibited in the Government Gazette and the Bendigo Advertiser newspaper.

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Conclusion Planning Scheme Amendment C186 proposes to update the planning controls that apply to Precinct D of the Bendigo CBD Plan to facilitate its redevelopment in a format that landowners and key stakeholders have agreed to. The current planning controls are believed to be impacting on investor interest as they do not maximise the site potential or enable proposals that will ensure remediation and design outcomes while ensuring commercial viability. The proposed refinements to the planning controls will clearly articulate that the intent of landowners and the City is to work towards a development outcome that will benefit Greater Bendigo for many years to come. It is recommended that Council seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and exhibit the Amendment. Options/Alternatives Council has the option of: • Supporting the amendment proposal and making a request to the Minister for Planning to authorise preparation and exhibition of the amendment. • Refusing the request to prepare an amendment. Under the Planning and Environment Act 1987 there is no right of review of a Council's decision not to support preparation of an Amendment. As the proposed Amendment incorporates urban design principles that support the intent and retention of local significant heritage components, it is no longer necessary to continue to advance Amendment C155 to introduce permanent heritage controls to the site. Amendment C155 will expire on 28 January 2013 if it is not progressed. If the proposed Amendment is supported, it is recommended Council withdraw Amendment C155 following receipt of Ministerial authorisation. Resource Implications Officer time will be required to prepare the Amendment documentation for authorisation, exhibition, manage the exhibition process and liaise with the Minister for Planning. Attachments • •

Explanatory Report Design & Development Overlay Schedule

RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to: 1.

Request the Minister for Planning to authorise Council to prepare Amendment C186 to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.

2.

When Authorised by the Minister, exhibit Amendment C186 to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme giving notification as required for the minimum statutory exhibition period of one month.

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2.2 PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENTS - TO REQUEST INTERIM HERITAGE CONTROLS FOR 52 EDWARD STREET, BENDIGO (C187) AND SEEK AUTHORISATION FOR PERMANENT HERITAGE CONTROLS (C189) FOR 52 EDWARD STREET AND 72 QUEEN STREET, BENDIGO Document Information Author

Emma Bryant, Coordinator Policies and Processes

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose The City has received a planning application that would result in the demolition of red brick stables that are more than 100 years old at 52 Edward Street. These stables are next door to and associated with a brick Edwardian house at 72 Queen Street. Neither of these buildings are currently protected by a Heritage Overlay. This report recommends that the two buildings be protected through application of the Heritage Overlay because of their historical significance to Bendigo. The Heritage Overlay will ensure that the heritage values are considered as part of the application. This report recommends that Council request interim heritage controls for 52 Edward Street and request authorisation to prepare and exhibit permanent heritage controls for 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street, Bendigo Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Background Information 52 Edward Street, Bendigo •

Planning application received on 30 March 2012 for use of land for retail premises, office with ground floor frontage of more than 2 metres and shared access to dwellings. Demolish existing building and construction of a tilt up, concrete, three storey, mixed use complex. Waiver of car parking (DU/183/2012). PAGE 17


Built and Natural Environment - Reports

• • • • •

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Request for further information on 18 April 2012 including information on existing features, a heritage assessment of the existing red brick building to determine if it’s a heritage asset and a structural assessment as evidence that building not suitable to retain. Heritage Advisory Committee (HAC) in May 2012 supported Heritage Advisor and Planning Unit recommendation that the building be protected from demolition and that further information be obtained to support an Interim Heritage Overlay. Verbal response from applicant that they did not want to meet to discuss options that retained the building. City decided to undertake detailed heritage assessment and approached owner for an internal inspection. Granted access early July. Further heritage report provided to HAC early August. HAC again supported recommendations of retaining the building. Applicant provided other further information on 18 July 2012 and confirmed that they still wanted to demolish the stables.

Figure 1: Planning Scheme Amendment process

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Report An Explanatory Report must be submitted to the Minister for Planning when requesting authorisation to prepare and exhibit an amendment to a Panning Scheme. The Explanatory Report details the purpose and effect of the Amendment and provides the strategic justification for the Amendment as required by Ministerial Direction No. 11. Key issues identified in the Explanatory Report are discussed below. Land Affected The site of 52 Edward Street is 390 square metres in area. It is zoned Business 1 and currently contains a red brick stable building at the rear of the site to a height of more than 10m and a single-storey bicycle shop at the front of the building. It is surrounded by Business 1 Zone with the historic 72 Queen Street building to the south east, Department of Human Services (DHS) office and car park to the south west, a small private car park to the north and a 1930/40s building with offices to the north west. 72 Queen Street is 387 square metres in size and also zoned Business 1. It has the private car park to the north, the heritage listed Hunter House to the east, a single storey office complex to the south east, the new Council car park to the south and the DHS office to the west.

Figure 2: 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street

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Figure 3 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street - Edward Street view

Figure 4 72 Queen Street, Bendigo - Queen Street view

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Figure 5 Rear of 52 Edward Street

What the Amendments do • •

Amendment C187 places an Interim Heritage Overlay on 52 Edward Street, Bendigo Amendment C189 proposes to replace the interim control with a permanent Heritage Overlay and place a permanent Heritage Overlay on 72 Queen Street, Bendigo following a public exhibition process.

Why the Amendments are required The Amendments are needed to protect the heritage values of the two properties, which have been assessed as having local heritage significance. C187 is in response to a planning application that would necessitate demolition of the stables at 52 Edward Street. C189 is required to replace the interim Heritage Overlay sites with a permanent Heritage Overlay and apply a permanent Heritage Overlay to 72 Queen Street. A Heritage Overlay will ensure that the heritage values of the sites are considered in any planning application process. The proposed development at 52 Edward Street, in its current form, would have a significant impact on the heritage values of 72 Queen Street as it is proposed to be built right up to the boundary approximately, 1.2m from the rear of 72 Queen Street. The application of a permanent Heritage Overlay to 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street will ensure that any proposed development considers the heritage values of the site. Strategic Justification 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street are in the Business 1 Zone and covered with the Design and Development Overlay Schedule 5 (Central Business District (CBD) area).

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The proposed Amendments are consistent with Clauses 15 Built Environment and Heritage, 15.01-1 Urban design, 15.01-5 Cultural identity and neighbourhood character, 15.03-1 Heritage conservation, 21.08 Environment, 22.06 Heritage Policy and 43.02 Design and Development Overlay Schedule 5 by ensuring that heritage values will be considered, maintained and enhanced while still allowing for increased development intensity. Clause 15 Built Environment and Heritage of the State Planning Policy states that Planning should ensure that all new land use and development appropriately responds to its landscape, valued built form and cultural context, and protect places and sites with significant heritage, architectural, aesthetic, scientific and cultural value. Clause 15.01-1 Urban design includes the strategy Require development to respond to its context in terms of urban character, cultural heritage, natural features, surrounding landscape and climate. Clause 15.01-5 Cultural identity and neighbourhood character includes the relevant strategy Ensure new development responds to its context and reinforces special characteristics of local environment by emphasising the heritage values and built form that reflect community identity. Clause 15.03-1 Heritage conservation has the objective of ensuring the conservation of places of heritage significance. All three properties have been identified as having local heritage significance. This clause includes the following strategies: 

   

Provide for the conservation and enhancement of those places which are of aesthetic, archaeological, architectural, cultural, scientific, or social significance, or otherwise of special cultural value. Encourage appropriate development that respects places with identified heritage values and creates a worthy legacy for future generations. Retain those elements that contribute to the importance of the heritage place. Ensure an appropriate setting and context for heritage places is maintained or enhanced. Support adaptive reuse of heritage buildings whose use has become redundant.

The demolition of the subject buildings is not supported by the above strategies. The Edward Street stables could be retained and incorporated into a new development to achieve high quality urban design and architecture that contributes to local urban character as well as similar development outcomes, as shown by the plans below by the City’s Heritage Advisor. Clause 21.08-1 states that the collection of the City’s heritage assets are the most significant in central Victoria and that Heritage is an important part of the economy due to its role in attracting tourists, renovators and new residents who bring economic development initiatives and assets. Clause 22.06 Heritage Policy contains the following objectives:  

To ensure that Greater Bendigo’s heritage assets are maintained and protected. To ensure that new land uses and developments are sympathetic with the appearance and character of heritage places.

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To encourage sympathetic reuse of heritage places so that such places are maintained and enhanced.

The proposal in its current form does not meet the above Policy. Clause 43.02 Design and Development Overlay Schedule 5 includes the following Design objectives (in relation to heritage consideration) are: 



To allow for increased development densities while ensuring that the heights of new buildings fit reasonably with Bendigo’s character and protect the amenity of public spaces. To ensure the heights of new buildings are generally consistent with the ‘low rise’ character of the CBD while responding to substantial heritage buildings in some locations.

The current proposal in Edward Street allows for increased development density but does not protect Bendigo’s heritage character or respond to either the heritage building on the site or the significant adjoining building. If the present proposal responded more positively to its site and the wider heritage context, it would result in a more creative and innovative development. This could be achieved by making minor changes to the proposal while retaining the existing layout. These changes include integration of redbrick boundary walls, a further set back of 2.3m at ground and first level with balconies at higher levels, rearrangement of lightwells to separate the new development from the stables and a more visually layered and transparent building. The proposal could also include a small fourth storey to the stables in contrasting materials. The increased setback will allow views into the site, provide open space for apartments and more natural light into the development, and a setting for 72 Queen Street.

Figure 6

The sketch above (prepared by the City's Heritage Advisor) and diagrams below are based on the elevations and layout proposed in planning application DU/183/2012. These images illustrate that oblique views to the stable can be achieved from the intersection of Queen and Edward Streets and that the relationship between the house and stable could be maintained.

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The proposed Amendments also support strategic work currently being undertaken by the City’s Strategy Unit. The draft Thematic Environmental History identifies both gold mining and the flour milling industry as important themes in Bendigo’s development and that buildings, landscapes and structures associated with these themes should be conserved. It also identifies the importance of our Victorian/Edwardian buildings to our identity and specifically identifies 72 Queen Street in a list of buildings with potential heritage significance. PAGE 24


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Heritage Victoria has identified that stables are rare across Victoria particularly in CBD locations and has recently added more to the State Heritage Register. This one in Edward Street is the last residential stable complex in Bendigo’s CBD. Heritage Victoria in its ‘Review of Criteria and Thresholds for inclusion of places on the Heritage Overlay’ recommended that buildings from the period 1880 – 1914 be retained where possible, particularly if they are good representative examples. The City’s Heritage Advisor has undertaken assessments of the sites against the recognised heritage criteria and found that all have heritage significance and should be protected under a Heritage Overlay in the Planning Scheme. Her findings are summarised below with full heritage citations attached. Heritage Report - 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street, Bendigo 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street were part of the same Crown allotment and leased and then owned by Mary Donohue from 1864 to 1904 and used as a laundry. William Webb purchased the land in 1904 and constructed a Bendigo boom style house of a rateable value of 50 pounds and substantial two storey stables in Edward Street with a rateable value of 30 pounds. William Webb was a successful mining speculator and flour miller, operating a lucrative industry on the Bendigo goldfields for over 50 years. He owned a number of substantial red brick mills in Bendigo’s CBD, including two still standing within view of the subject site; Wills Street and corner of Queen and Williamson Streets. The stables and house at 72 Queen Street are significant to the City because: • There are only three known remaining residences of grain merchants in Bendigo. • The red brick stables, high boundary walls and adjoining residence are visually prominent and near Hunter House in Queen Street. • The two buildings form an historic group of highly ornate Bendigo boom style residences complete with stables,. • The site demonstrates the changing fortunes of the city as it developed from a gold rush town to a large regional centre. • They exhibit a particular aesthetic characteristic with their construction techniques in brick and demonstrable influence of the Picturesque Art Nouveau style. • The stables and high boundary walls have aesthetic value to community as an historic element of the streetscape located at a principal road intersection. • The buildings are associated with William Webb, a wealthy flour mill owner and successful mine speculator. The residence at 72 Queen Street and former red brick two storey stables at 52 Edward Street and brick boundary walls are of local historical, social and aesthetic/architectural significance to the City of Greater Bendigo as a complex, which is considered rare. The red brick residence and adjoining stables and high boundary walls form one complex which is visually prominent and adjacent Hunter House in Queen Street, a two-storey mine speculators mansion. The two buildings complex both built by highly successful Bendigo mine speculators form a strong visual historic group of highly ornate Bendigo boom style residences complete with stables, which are rare in the centre of Bendigo.

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The house and stables at Edward and Queen Streets represents the zenith of the lucrative returns made possible during the flour milling days in Bendigo. The complex design of residence and stables demonstrates influence by the Picturesque Art Nouveau and Federation style of architecture is a very good example of the distinct hybrid Bendigo boom style. The decorative details shows borrowing from a number of different influences such as the French Second Empire, Edwardian and European Art Nouveau styles, all key architectural motifs present in typical Bendigo architectural style. The former red brick stables, high boundary walls and adjoining residence are of aesthetic/architectural significance for their construction techniques in brick and architectural design. The external integrity of the buildings generally is fairly high. However the lower section of the front external walls has been altered and modified to accommodate the operation of the Bicycle Shop. The significant fabric is the substantial red brick external walls and boundary walls. These walls are of fine quality and clearly indicate their historic relationship with the adjoining residence. The stable building is a rare surviving example of an early twentieth century horse and carriage building. It is a reminder of a means of transport and of an industry, which was essential until the twentieth century, and has now completely disappeared. Such buildings associated with horse transport were once extremely common, but few now survive in the city. There are no known other examples of private stables in the centre of Bendigo city Environmental, Social and Economic Effects These Amendments will have positive environmental effects as they will encourage the retention and reuse of structurally sound historic buildings. Retaining heritage buildings provides a positive social benefit to the broader community in that they provide a link to the past. The Amendments will ensure that heritage is considered in any planning applications for demolition, part demolition or redevelopment. The red brick stables and dwelling at 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street provide connections with Bendigo’s past and visible connections to other historic buildings remaining in the city, particularly those of red brick, including the former mill on Wills Street, Hunter House, etc. (refer to photos in attachments of nearby historic buildings.). The stables are at the rear of the block but are currently visible from Edward Street, Queen Street, Hargreaves Street and from above, eg new car park. A sensitively designed development will still allow a new three or four storey building at the front of the site and keep views of the historic stables. The Amendments will also ensure that any development occurring on 52 Edward Street has regard to the heritage values of the adjoining dwelling. The Amendments overall would have a positive effect on the economy. An amended development at Edward Street that incorporates the stables and provides a set back to 72 Queen Street may cost more in terms of construction but this would be more than offset by the economic contribution of heritage and good quality design to the economy.

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It is recognised that heritage and high quality design contributes to the economy in that it attracts people, often skilled professionals, to visit, recreate, work and live. Bendigo’s rich and diverse heritage landscape, from its small timber cottages to grand public buildings, all contribute to its unique identity and attract people to the City. A recent study by the National Institute of Economic and Industry Research in the Mount Alexander Shire (2012) found that heritage buildings are a significant contributor to the economy in that over 60% of new residents said heritage was an important factor in their decision to live in the Shire, with many moving from Melbourne, and business operators attributed approximately 15% turn over to visitors from attracted by heritage buildings. Consultation/Communication Regular communication has occurred with the owner of 52 Edward Street through the planning application process, including offers of alternative designs that retained the building. The owner has repeatedly said they are not interested in retaining the stables in any development. The owners of 72 Queen Street have been consulted about the proposed Amendment for their property and they are supportive in principle. They recognise that their building has significant local historic significance and are concerned about developments next door impacting on the heritage and structural values. The proposed permanent Heritage Overlays would be notified to the respective owners during the public exhibition phase and any submissions would be considered by Council. The demolition was referred to the Heritage Advisory Committee for a recommendation as the building is older than 1920s. The Committee unanimously agreed that the stables should be retained due to their rarity and condition. Conclusion A heritage assessment has determined that 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street, Bendigo have local significance to the City and should be protected in the Planning Scheme by the application of Heritage Overlays. They each tell a part of Bendigo’s story of development; the gold mining wealth and flour mill development. All buildings are in good condition and structurally sound and can be retained in any future development. It is recommended that an Interim Heritage Overlay be applied for from the Minister for Planning for Edward Street and permanent Heritage Overlays applied to both Edward and Queen Street. The application of permanent heritage controls would allow the full consideration of heritage and planning matters for the site(s) prior to any proposal to demolish, demolish in part and/or development of the site(s).

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Options Council has the following options: Interim Heritage Controls • •

Applying for interim heritage controls on 52 Edward Street (as recommended by officers); Not applying for the interim heritage controls.

Proposed Permanent Heritage Controls • •

Supporting the proposed permanent heritage controls by requesting authorisation from the Minister to prepare and exhibit an Amendment (as recommended by officers); Not supporting the request for authorisation to prepare and exhibit a permanent Amendment.

Resource Implications Statutory fees payable to the Minister for seeking interim and permanent heritage controls would cost the City approximately $5,000. The Department of Planning and Community Development has previously indicated that it would recommend a waiver or partial waiver of fees. An independent panel may be required to consider submissions to the permanent Amendment which would cost approximately $5,000. There would be minimum cost to Council to assess future applications to develop the site with a heritage overlay applied to the land. Attachments   

Draft Explanatory Report Heritage Report/Citation Heritage Context Photos

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RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to: 1. Request the Minister for Planning to prepare and approve an Amendment to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme to apply interim Heritage Overlay controls to 52 Edward Street, Bendigo. 2. Request the Minister for Planning to Authorise Council to prepare an Amendment to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme to apply a permanent Heritage Overlay to the properties at 52 Edward Street and 72 Queen Street, Bendigo. 3. If Authorisation is granted, exhibit the permanent Amendment to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme giving notification as required for the minimum statutory exhibition period of one month. 4. Request the Minister for Planning to waive the statutory fees for the Planning Scheme Amendments.

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2.3 PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENTS - TO ENDORSE REQUEST FOR INTERIM HERITAGE CONTROLS (C188) AND SEEK AUTHORISATION FOR PERMANENT HERITAGE CONTROLS (C189) FOR 27 PALLETT STREET, GOLDEN SQUARE Document Information Author

Emma Bryant, Coordinator Policies and Processes

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning and Development

Summary/Purpose The City has received a building application to demolish 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square. This dwelling has been identified as having local historical significance and was negotiated for retention with the developer previously during a recent subdivision permit application. This report recommends that Council support the request made by the Director of Planning and Development under delegation for interim heritage controls and request authorisation to prepare and exhibit a permanent Heritage Overlay for 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Background Information 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square • • • •

New owners purchase 27 Pallett Street on December 2011. On 23 January 2012 the City receives a request for Report and Consent to demolish a dwelling and two outbuildings. The Planning Unit advised the landholder that it would recommend that Council seek interim and permanent heritage controls for the dwelling. Landholder withdrew the request for Report and Consent to demolish on 2 March 2012 following a request for further information.

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• • • • •

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Application made for subdivision that retained Victorian house on the street on 10 April 2012. Permit issued on June 2012, and plans endorsed on 26 June 2012 (attached.) Application to demolish existing dwelling under Building Act received on 17 July 2012. HAC supported recommendation to retain building. Letter to Minister for Planning to stop application and apply for an Interim Heritage Overlay on 2 August 2012.

Figure 1: Planning Scheme Amendment process

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Report An Explanatory Report must be submitted to the Minister for Planning when requesting authorisation to prepare and exhibit an amendment to a Planning Scheme. The Explanatory Report details the purpose and effect of the Amendment and provides the strategic justification for the Amendment as required by Ministerial Direction No. 11. Key issues identified in the Explanatory Report are discussed below. Land Affected 27 Pallett Street. Golden Square is 2,619 square metres in size. It is zoned residential and surrounded by residential development to the east, a recently approved subdivision to the south, a vacant block to the west and Crown land to the north.

Figure 2: 27 Pallett Street

What the Amendments Do • •

Amendment C188 places an Interim Heritage Overlay on 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square. Amendment C189 proposes to replace the interim controls with a permanent Heritage Overlay following a public exhibition process.

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Why the Amendments are Required The Amendments are needed to protect the heritage values of the dwelling, which have been assessed as having local heritage significance. C188 is in response to an application made under section 29A of the Building Act 1993 to demolish 27 Pallett Street. C189 is required to replace the interim Heritage Overlay with a permanent Heritage Overlay. A Heritage Overlay will ensure that the heritage values of the site are considered in any planning application process and would require a planning permit for demolition. Strategic Justification The proposed Amendments are consistent with Clauses 15 Built Environment and Heritage, 15.01-1 Urban design, 15.01-5 Cultural identity and neighbourhood character, 15.03-1 Heritage conservation, 21.08 Environment and 22.06 Heritage Policy by ensuring that heritage values will be considered, maintained and enhanced while still allowing for increased development intensity. Clause 15 Built Environment and Heritage of the State Planning Policy states that Planning should ensure that all new land use and development appropriately responds to its landscape, valued built form and cultural context, and protect places and sites with significant heritage, architectural, aesthetic, scientific and cultural value. Clause 15.01-1 Urban design includes the strategy Require development to respond to its context in terms of urban character, cultural heritage, natural features, surrounding landscape and climate. Clause 15.01-5 Cultural identity and neighbourhood character includes the relevant strategy Ensure new development responds to its context and reinforces special characteristics of local environment by emphasising the heritage values and built form that reflect community identity. Clause 15.03-1 Heritage conservation has the objective of ensuring the conservation of places of heritage significance. 27 Pallett Street has been identified as having local heritage significance. This clause includes the following strategies: 

   

Provide for the conservation and enhancement of those places which are of aesthetic, archaeological, architectural, cultural, scientific, or social significance, or otherwise of special cultural value. Encourage appropriate development that respects places with identified heritage values and creates a worthy legacy for future generations. Retain those elements that contribute to the importance of the heritage place. Ensure an appropriate setting and context for heritage places is maintained or enhanced. Support adaptive reuse of heritage buildings whose use has become redundant.

Clause 21.08-1 states that the collection of the City’s heritage assets are the most significant in central Victoria and that Heritage is an important part of the economy due to its role in attracting tourists, renovators and new residents who bring economic development initiatives and assets.

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Clause 22.06 Heritage Policy contains the following objectives:   

To ensure that Greater Bendigo’s heritage assets are maintained and protected. To ensure that new land uses and developments are sympathetic with the appearance and character of heritage places. To encourage sympathetic reuse of heritage places so that such places are maintained and enhanced.

The dwelling at 27 Pallett Street is of sound condition and can easily be restored and maintained within the approved subdivision to provide a link to the area’s past. The subdivision was designed to retain the dwelling and allow for increased development density. The proposed Amendments also support strategic work currently being undertaken by the City’s Strategy Unit. The draft Thematic Environmental History identifies gold mining as an important theme in Bendigo’s development and that buildings, landscapes and structures associated with this theme should be conserved. It also identifies the importance of our Victorian/Edwardian buildings to our identity. Heritage Victoria in its ‘Review of Criteria and Thresholds for inclusion of places on the Heritage Overlay’ recommended that buildings from the period 1880 – 1914 be retained where possible, particularly if they are good representative examples. The City’s Heritage Advisor has undertaken an assessment of the site against the recognised heritage criteria and found that it has heritage significance and should be protected under a Heritage Overlay in the Planning Scheme. Her findings are summarised below with full a heritage citation attached. Heritage Report - 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square 27 Pallett Street was built and until recently owned by the Hocking family. The Hocking family worked in the mining industry in the Golden Square area associated with New Chum Mine owned by George Lansell, with William Hocking becoming mine manager of the New Argus Mine. Hocking also worked for George Lansell, operating his private foundry in Lyttleton Terrace. Thomas Hocking became mine manager, and other members of the family lived and mined in Eaglehawk and goldfields in Western Australia. • •

The building has heritage significance as a very good sound example of a late 19th century/early 20th century timber, Victorian style villa weatherboard. The building contributes to the historic character of the area and streetscape, and the identity, collective memory and sense of place of this particular location of Bendigo. There are only a few historic villas left in the area and these are substantial and well built on elevated ground, set in large gardens. Two other similar subdevelopment proposals in the street have been approved with the retention of the historic building. It provides a sense of place of this former gold mine site. The background history of New Chum Gully is particularly interesting as it was one of first alluvial rushes in the area.

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The house has a relatively high level of integrity although there have been internal changes, mid 20th century internal renovations and some side and rear additions. The appearance of the house is typical of Bendigo Boom style Victorian villa, built of traditional materials. The timber is of high quality and the workmanship is excellent. The late 19th century timber frame and weatherboard Bendigo boom style villa at 27 Pallett Street located on the banks of the New Chum Gully is one of a few remaining associated miners’ residences in the upper reaches of New Chum Gully area of Bendigo, once the site of successive waves of intense alluvial mining, puddling and quartz reef mining operations. The property was acquired in 1878 by R.W. Hocking, a local mine driver and engineer. At this time the area was within a thriving mine site surrounded by many other mines’ cottages. Many of these miners worked for the mines of George Lansell and Daniel Barnet Lazarus, who both had houses in nearby Chum Street, Fortuna Villa (1861- 1907) and West End (1868) respectively. The subject building has heritage significance for its history and significance as a representative example of a very good sound example of a late 19th century early 20th century timber weatherboard Victorian style villa associated with a leading Bendigo mine family that immigrated from Cornwall, bringing to the area a long history of mining skills from the copper mines of the Truro area. The building contributes to the historic mining character of the area and streetscape. The area was extensively mined and still is a historic archaeological mine site. It is one of a few extensive historic mining areas left in inner Bendigo that has not been converted into recreation grounds or left undeveloped due to contamination.

Figure 3: 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square

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Environmental, Social and Economic Effects These Amendments will have positive environmental effects as they will encourage the retention and reuse of a structurally sound historic building. Retaining heritage buildings provides a positive social benefit to the broader community in that they provide a link to the past. The Amendments will ensure that heritage is considered in any planning applications for demolition, part demolition or redevelopment. 27 Pallett Street provides a connection to Bendigo’s mining past, which was very significant in Golden Square. Application of the Heritage Overlay would mean that the owner would be eligible for a Heritage Restoration Loan under the Council’s loan scheme which would assist with the cost of restoring the building.

Figure 4: Example of restored Bendigo Boom Style Victorian Villa at 4 Milroy Street, Bendigo

The Amendments overall would have a positive effect on the economy. It is recognised that heritage contributes to the economy in that it attracts people, often skilled professionals, to visit, recreate, work and live. Bendigo’s rich and diverse heritage landscape, from its small timber cottages to grand public buildings, all contribute to its unique identity and attract people to the City. A recent study by the National Institute of Economic and Industry Research in the Mount Alexander Shire (2012) found that heritage buildings are a significant contributor to the economy in that over 60% of new residents said heritage was an important factor in their decision to live in the Shire and business operators attributed approximately 15% turn over to visitors from attracted by heritage buildings.

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Consultation/Communication The owner of 27 Pallett Street was given advice, prior to the subdivision permit application, that demolishing the dwelling would not be supported and it should be retained. The subdivision was then designed to retain the dwelling. The owner has been informed by letter that an Interim Heritage Overlay has been applied for from the Minster for Planning in response to their application for demolition under the Building Act. The proposed permanent Heritage Overlay would be notified to the owner during the public exhibition phase and any submissions would be considered by Council. The demolition application was referred to Council’s Heritage Advisory Committee for comment as it is older than 1920s, which agreed that the building should be retained. Conclusion A heritage assessment has determined that 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square has local significance to the City and should be protected in the Planning Scheme by the application of heritage overlays. The dwelling contributes to the story of Bendigo’s unique great mining history and subsequent development. The building is structurally sound and can be easily restored and retained in any future development. It is recommended that Council endorse the Director’s request for an interim Heritage Overlay from the Minister for Planning and seek authorisation to prepare and exhibit a permanent Heritage Overlay to enable retention of the building. Options Council has the following options: Interim Heritage Controls • •

Endorsing the Director’s request to the Minister for Planning for interim heritage controls on 27 Pallett Street (as recommended by officers); Not endorsing the interim Amendment request.

Proposed Permanent Heritage Controls • •

Supporting the proposed permanent heritage controls by requesting authorisation from the Minister to prepare and exhibit an Amendment (as recommended by officers); Not supporting the request for authorisation to prepare and exhibit a permanent Amendment.

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Resource Implications Statutory fees payable to the Minister for seeking interim and permanent heritage controls would cost the City approximately $5,000. The Department of Planning and Community Development has previously indicated that it would recommend a waiver or partial waiver of fees. An independent panel may be required to consider submissions to the permanent Amendment which would cost approximately $5,000. There would be minimum cost to Council to assess future applications to develop the site with a heritage overlay applied to the land. Attachments  

Heritage Report/Citation Draft Explanatory Report

RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to: 1. Endorse the actions of the Director of Planning and Development in seeking interim heritage protection from the Minister for Planning for 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square. 2. Request the Minister for Planning to Authorise Council to prepare an Amendment to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme to apply a permanent Heritage Overlay 27 Pallett Street, Golden Square. 3. If Authorisation is granted, exhibit the permanent Amendment to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme giving notification as required for the minimum statutory exhibition period of one month. 4. Request the Minister for Planning to waive the statutory fees for the Planning Scheme Amendments.

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Figure 5: Approved subdivision layout plan.

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2.4 USE OF LAND FOR PLACE OF WORSHIP AND PLACE OF ASSEMBLY AND A WAIVER AND REDUCTION IN CAR PARKING - 24-30 VIEW STREET, BENDIGO Document Information Author

Shannon Rosewarne, Senior Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose This application seeks approval to use an existing building at 24-30 View Street for the purpose of a place of worship and place of assembly and seeks a waiver and reduction in car parking. As a result of public notice, one objection was received. The concerns relate to car parking provision, traffic impacts, amenity impacts including noise and the impacts on the View Street Arts Precinct. A consultation meeting with the objectors and applicant was held, but the objection was not able to be resolved. The proposal will provide suitable premises for a place of worship and place of assembly and the waiver and reduction in parking sought will not have a significant impact on the surrounding area. This report recommends that Council resolves to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit subject to appropriate conditions. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Background Information Enjoy Church began operation in Bendigo in 2010. It has previously held services at a number of temporary locations including BRIT theatrette, All Seasons Resort, Bendigo Exhibition Centre, La Trobe Visual Arts Centre, the Old Fire Station and Maple Street Primary School.

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Report Application No: Application Date: Applicant: Land: Zoning: Overlays:

DU/433/2012 22 June 2012 Enjoy Church 24-30 View Street, BENDIGO Business 1 Zone Heritage Overlay 264

Subject Site and Surrounds The subject site is located at 24-30 View Street, Bendigo. It has an area of approximately 1,708 square metres with a frontage of approximately 28 metres to View Street. The site is developed with a two storey rendered brick building of with heritage values of State significance. It was originally the Bendigo Temperance Hall. The land is zoned Business 1 and is affected by Heritage Overlay 264. It adjoins Rosalind Park to the north east, which is zoned Public Park and Recreation Zone. View Street itself is zoned Road Zone 2.

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objector's property is 550m north west of the subject site.

Proposal The proposal involves the use of an existing building (former Temperance Hall) for the purpose of a place of worship and a place of assembly. The proposed activities and hours of operation are: • •

Monday to Thursday 8.00am – 6.00pm – general administration, pastoral care, Monday to Thursday 6.00-pm – 10.00pm – group meetings, music practice

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• • • • •

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Monday to Friday 8.00am – 6.00pm – small group meetings (up to 15 people) Friday 8.00am -3.00pm – general administration and pastoral care Friday 3.00pm-10pm – youth activities Saturday 8.00am–10.00pm group meetings, administration and pastoral care. Sunday 8.00am–10.00pm church service and associated activities, administration, pastoral care

The types of activities undertaken by the church include meetings, music practice, youth groups, like key courses, and men’s and ladies evenings. The church service is planned for 10.30am on Sundays. In business hours, two church staff may utilise offices within the subject building for administrative purposes, pastoral care and small group meetings of up to 15 people, e.g. mothers group. The proposal seeks approval for a reduction of 55 car spaces, with 20 spaces to be provided on site from Monday-Friday between 5.30-10.00pm, Saturday 12.00pm onwards and all day Sunday. During normal business hours, being 9:00am-5.30pm, Monday-Friday and from 9.00am12:00pm Saturdays, the car spaces on site are leased to an adjoining business and will therefore not be available to the subject premises. Essentially this means that a waiver of parking is required for the use during business hours, and a reduction in parking is required for the use outside of these hours. Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: State Planning Policy Framework • • • • • • •

Settlement (Clause 11) Activity centres (Clause 11.01) Regional planning strategies and principles (Clause 11.05-4) Economic development (Clause 17) Business (Clause 17.01) Car parking (Clause 18.02-5) Cultural facilities (Clause 19.02-3)

Municipal Strategic Statement •

Economic development (Clause 21.07)

Local Planning Policies •

Bendigo Special Car Parking Area Policy (Clause 22.10)

Zoning • Business 1 Zone (Clause 34.01) Other Provisions • •

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General decision guidelines (Clause 65.01)

Consultation/Communication Referrals The following internal department has been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising one objection was received, with the grounds of objection being: •

The proposal is not compatible with the View Street Arts Precinct Master Plan.

During the days and the evenings when the venue operates, there will be increased people and car congestion on View Street and surrounding streets. This problem will escalate as users of the venue increase over time.

Most of the church’s activities involve electronic amplification technology, especially Friday night youth rock shows. The level of amplification used will impact on the neighbourhood.

The proposed reduction in parking will push the church’s patrons to seek parking in View Street and surrounding streets, causing competition for parks by other users of the View Street Precinct, especially when events occur at the same time.

Car access to the rear of the venue will be along Park Lane beside the Art Gallery. This is a narrow lane which crosses the View Street footpath increasing risk to pedestrians.

View Street is an arts precinct with small shops and alfresco cafes where people can meet informally without affecting others.

The proposal will impact on the historic, cultural and social character of our area and it is incompatible with the present users of the Arts Precinct, and in particular with the proposed Art Gallery expansion.

The concerns raised are discussed below. Planning Assessment State and Local Planning Policies The site is located on the fringe of the Bendigo CBD, the municipality’s major activity centre. The importance of the central business district is recognised at both State and local level in the Planning Scheme. PAGE 43


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The objective of Clause 11.01-1 Activity centre network is to build up activity centres as a focus for high-quality development, activity and living for the whole community by developing a network of activity centres. Strategies to achieve this objective include developing a network of activity centres that: comprises a range of centres that differ in size and function, is a focus for business, shopping, working, leisure and community facilities, provides different types of housing, including forms of higher density housing, is connected by public transport and cycling networks and maximises choices in services, employment and social interaction. Clause 21.07 of the Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS) relates to Economic Development and the Bendigo CBD is recognised for its role as the largest retail centre in the municipality and north-west Victoria. It states: “This role has been maintained due to the low level of escape expenditure from the city, considerable tourism expenditure, and a net inflow of trade from neighbouring municipalities, particularly to the north and west. Business centres also fulfil a community role and are an outward expression of the amenity and success of the municipality. Therefore ongoing management of the design, visual quality and use of commercial buildings and the way they complement the centre is important.” The objective of Clause 17.01-1 Business is to encourage developments which meet the communities’ needs for retail, entertainment, office and other commercial services and provides net community benefit in relation to accessibility, efficient infrastructure use and the aggregation and sustainability of commercial facilities. The objective of Clause 19.02-3 Cultural facilities is to develop a strong cultural environment and increase access to arts, recreation and other cultural facilities. The objective of Clause 18.02-5 Car parking is to ensure an adequate supply of car parking that is appropriately designed and located. Strategies to achieve this objective include: • Allocating or requiring land to be set aside for car parking subject to the existing and potential modes of access including public transport, the demand for off-street car parking, road capacity and the potential for demand management of car parking. • Encouraging the efficient provision of car parking through the consolidation of car parking facilities, and • Protecting the amenity of residential precincts from the effects of road congestion created by on-street parking. The proposal is not at odds with State and local planning policies. While the proposal is located within an area zoned for business activities, the State policy encourages a range of activities, including community facilities within activity centres. The zoning of the land allows for other non-commercial uses in appropriate locations, and the Bendigo CBD Plan seeks to expand the range of uses beyond shopping and business, and seeks to attract more people to the CBD, and for longer periods. The proposal provides for some car parking on site during the peak demand period generated by the use, and there is sufficient capacity in the surrounding area in terms of on street parking to accommodate the demand generated during peak periods. The proposal will not adversely impact on the View Street Arts Precinct.

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Zoning The site is zoned Business 1 under the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. The purpose of the zone is to encourage the intensive development of business centres for retailing and other complementary commercial, entertainment and community uses. The zone allows for a range of uses, including ‘place of worship’, defined as “Land used for religious activities, such as a church, chapel, mosque, synagogue, and temple” and Place of Assembly defined as: “Land where people congregate for religious or cultural activities, entertainment, or meetings.” Both uses require a planning permit in the Business 1 Zone. Under clause 34.01-4 of the Business 1 Zone, a use must not detrimentally affect the amenity of the neighbourhood, including through the transport of materials, goods or commodities to or from the land, appearance of any building, works or materials and emission of noise, artificial light, vibration, smell, fumes, smoke, vapour, steam, soot, ash, dust, waste water, waste products, grit or oil. The proposal is not likely to generate unreasonable amenity impacts. The hours of operation are not excessive and noise from music can be controlled to minimise amenity impacts on the surrounding area. Before deciding on an application, in addition to the decision guidelines in Clause 65, the responsible authority must consider, as appropriate: •

The State Planning Policy Framework and the Local Planning Policy Framework, including the Municipal Strategic Statement and local planning policies.

The proposal has been assessed against the relevant State and local planning policies as outlined above. •

The effect that existing uses may have on the proposed use.

Existing uses in the surrounding area include various cafes, restaurants, bars, hotel, Bendigo Art Gallery, The Capital Theatre, Rosalind Park, offices and shops. Residential development exists further to the west. The existing uses are not likely to impact on the proposed use. •

The drainage of the land.

Drainage is established. •

The availability of and connection to services.

All services are available to the site. •

The effect of traffic to be generated on roads.

The traffic generated by the proposed use is not likely to have a significant impact on the road network. The site is located on a main road within an established business area and the peak period will be Sunday mornings. •

The interim use of those parts of the land not required for the proposed use.

All parts of the site as proposed to be used as part of the proposal. PAGE 45


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Heritage Overlay The land is affected by Heritage Overlay 264 which relates to the Bendigo Temperance Hall constructed in the 1850s in the Renaissance Revival style. No external buildings and works are proposed as part of the application. Signage is proposed for the building, however this will require a permit from Heritage Victoria as the site is listed on the Victorian Heritage Register. Arts Precinct The site is near the Bendigo Art Gallery and Capital Theatre located on View Street. In 2007, a Masterplan for Bendigo’s View Street Arts Precinct was completed by the City of Greater Bendigo. The precinct is described as “a dynamic one-block area on the edge of the City Centre that comprises: The Capital, the Bendigo Art Gallery, La Trobe University’s Visual Arts Gallery, the significant streetscape and fine architecture of View Street generally, private galleries and shops, Rosalind Park, and restaurants, cafes and bars.” The Masterplan focused on improvements to The Capital and the Bendigo Art Gallery and recognised potential for other important developments in View Street in the future. The Masterplan states that additional and complementary opportunities include, amongst other strategies, the inclusion of some of the buildings to the south of the gallery in the precinct with appropriate conversion to cultural/creative usages. The buildings identified included the Temperance Hall. It was envisaged that such buildings would provide opportunities for storage, education facilities and/or small exhibition space or accommodate independent creative businesses or studios. The proposal is not at odds with this vision. There is currently no proposal to use this site in association with the arts. There is no local policy in the Planning Scheme in relation to the Arts Precinct and the zoning of the land enables other a range of land uses to be considered. Car Parking and Traffic Under clause 52.06 of the Planning Scheme, a place of assembly requires 0.3 car spaces to each patron catered for. The proposal is for a maximum of 250 patrons, as such 75 car spaces are required to be provided. Twenty car spaces are provided on site therefore a reduction of 55 car spaces is sought. An assessment of the car parking demand likely to be generated by the use must have regard to the following factors, as appropriate: • • • • • • •

Multi-purpose trips within an area. The variation of car parking demand over time. The short-stay and long-stay car parking demand. The availability of public transport in the locality. The convenience of pedestrian and cyclist access to the site. The provision of bicycle parking and end of trip facilities for cyclists. The anticipated car ownership rates of likely or proposed occupants (residents or employees).

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Given the range of businesses in View Street, multi purposes trips are common whereby visitors to the area may visit shops, cafes/restaurants/bars and the Capital Theatre or Art Gallery and other businesses in one trip. It is possible that patrons of the place of assembly/place of worship may also make multi purpose trips when visiting the subject site. Youth participating in activities at the premises may be dropped off and picked up by parents or walk, cycle or use public transport to access the site. The actual demand for car parking generated by the use may be further reduced due to the likelihood of family groups travelling together. The subject site is located within the Western Fringe precinct of the Bendigo CBD Parking Strategy (2008), which is bound by View Street, Barnard Street, High Street and Short Street. Surveys undertaken as part of this strategy found 367 short term spaces (<4 hours) which had an occupancy rate of 78% and 62 long term spaces (> 4 hours) with an occupancy rate of 94%, within the available on street parking in this precinct. Further to this, a wider area was surveyed as part of a Traffic and Transport Assessment prepared by Cardno Grogan Richards in August 2011 for the Art Gallery expansion. The area surveyed was bound by Barnard Street, Park Road, Pall Mall and Forest Street (also including part of Rowan Street and Mackenzie Street), and the survey was undertaken in May 2011. The Assessment concluded that within the study area there are approximately 1,300 spaces. On a typical weekday there is a demand for 960 spaces, with no events at the Queen Elizabeth Oval or the Capital Theatre/Gallery. The peak demand on a typical Saturday is 469 spaces. The peak demand on a typical Sunday is 415 spaces at 1:00pm with demand then dropping across the afternoon. The peak demand period for the proposed use will be Sundays when up to 250 people will attend a service at 10:30am. The 55 spaces not able to be provided on site can be found within the surrounding on street parking and in the nearby QEO public car park. It is acknowledged that on days when ‘exceptional events’ are being held at other venues, there will be a significantly higher demand for on street parking. A 2008 survey of parking on an ‘exceptional event’ day was undertaken by the same consultants. At that time there were concurrent events at Queen Elizabeth Oval and the Capital Theatre. The survey found that parking in the study area was close to 90% full. The Cardno Grogan Richards Traffic and Transport Assessment estimated that the Art Gallery expansion will generate an additional parking demand for up to 20 spaces, with demand up to 45 spaces on occasions when the patron cap of 250 people for the gallery is reached. Public transport is available to the area with four bus routes travelling along View Street, and the site is connected to pedestrian and cycling routes. In determining whether to approve a reduction or waiver in parking, an assessment of the appropriateness of allowing fewer spaces to be provided than the number likely to be generated by the use must have regard to the following, as appropriate:

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Any relevant local planning policy or incorporated plan.

The site is outside the area identified within the Bendigo CBD Plan and Bendigo Special Car Parking Area Policy at Clause 22.10 of the Planning Scheme. Within the mapped area of the policy, the responsible authority is able to waive the parking requirements of Clause 52.06 of the Planning Scheme for a range of uses, including a place of worship. The policy will be deleted as part of Amendment C169. The site is within the Bendigo CBD Parking Precinct Plan 2009. The Bendigo CBD Parking Precinct Plan 2009 has been developed in response to an identified lack of car parking in Bendigo’s central business district. The plan provides a framework for the provision and management of car parking within the central business district and its fringe areas and encourages sustainable transport options for the area. The Parking Precinct Plan does not make provision for a reduced car parking rate for a place of assembly or place of worship. As part of Planning Scheme Amendment C169, the Parking Precinct Plan will become an Incorporated Document of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. Amendment C169 has been adopted by Council and was forwarded to the Minister for Planning for approval on 23 August. The Amendment is yet to receive Ministerial Approval. •

The availability of car parking including: o Efficiencies gained from the consolidation of shared car parking spaces. o Public car parks intended to serve the land. o On street parking in non residential zones and streets in residential zones specifically managed for non-residential parking. o On street parking in residential zones for residential use.

There is sufficient on street parking in the surrounding area to cater for the demand generated during business hours and outside business hours. The peak demand generated by the proposed use will occur on Sunday mornings. As stated above, efficiencies can be gained from multi purpose trips to the area. There is a range of short and long term parking available within the vicinity of the site. The nearest residential zone is approximately 150 metres west of the site. •

Any adverse economic impact a shortfall of parking may have on the economic viability of an activity centre.

The building proposed to be used is presently vacant. The proposal would make efficient use of an existing building. •

The future growth and development of an activity centre.

The Bendigo CBD is the major activity centre for the municipality and there is potential for expansion and redevelopment within the city. View Street is on the fringe of the CBD core and contains a significant streetscape and heritage buildings. •

Any car parking deficiency associated with the existing use of the land.

The previous use of the subject site was for offices. Based on a leasable floor area of approximately 800 square metres, there would be a requirement for 28 spaces, and 20 spaces are currently provided on site.

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Any credit that should be allowed for car parking spaces provided on common land or by a Special Charge scheme or cash-in-lieu payment.

The application has not demonstrated that any credit should be applied to the land. •

Local traffic management.

Traffic Management Plans will be prepared for events within this precinct which are expected to generate large crowds. The Planning Permits for the Art Gallery expansion and Bendigo theatre and education centre at Gaol Road both included conditions requiring a traffic and car parking management plan, with the requirements for the theatre including event specific traffic management plans when there are concurrent events. The Art Gallery has also introduced a range of additional measures to manage events which will address the demand for car parking during ‘blockbuster events’. •

The impact of fewer car parking spaces on local amenity including pedestrian amenity and the amenity of nearby residential areas.

A reduction in parking would generate a higher demand for on street spaces in View Street, nearby public car parks and the surrounding street network. While some patrons visiting the site may park in the nearby residential area in Rowan Street and Forest Street, the line-marked, on-street spaces within these streets are not limited to resident parking only, and the utilisation of these spaces by patrons of subject site would be for short periods. It is not likely that patrons would utilise spaces in close proximity to the objector’s property, which is more than 500m north west of the site. •

The need to create safe, functional and attractive parking areas.

There are 20 car spaces at the rear of the subject site, accessed via Park Lane. Park Lane is a single width laneway which provides vehicular access to the rear of three properties which abut Rosalind Park, and pedestrian access via a footpath through to the Park and the café at the rear of the Gallery. The objection received is concerned about pedestrian safety if there is an increase in traffic using this laneway. The applicant has advised that the church uses car park marshals to manage car parks at its other campuses. This method could be employed at the site for Sunday services via a condition of permit to ensure that the number of vehicles entering and exiting Park Lane is controlled. The applicant has also advised that on site spaces would also be reserved for the elderly, disabled and parents with young children. A site plan drawn to scale, detailing the layout of the car park will be required as a condition of permit. •

Access to or provision of alternative transport modes.

There is an existing bus route along View Street. The Bendigo Railway Station is approximately 800 metres from the site. A condition of permit will require the applicant to submit a Green Travel Plan, prior to commencing the use, which must encourage the use of non-private vehicle transport modes. •

The equity of reducing the car parking requirement having regard to any historic contributions by existing businesses.

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There are no records of any historic contributions by existing businesses toward provision of public car spaces. •

The character of the surrounding area and whether reducing the car parking provision would result in a quality/positive urban design outcome.

The site is located within a business area which also houses the City’s cultural precinct, and adjoins Rosalind Park, a large public park zoned for recreation. A reduction in the parking provision for this use would not have an adverse urban design outcome given the context of the site. Amenity Impacts While the objectors are concerned about the impacts of noise from music at the premises on the surrounding area, the site is located within a Business zone and abuts a public park. The site is approximately 150 metres from the nearest residential zone and View Street contains a hotel, bars, cafes and various shops in addition to The Capital Theatre and Bendigo Art Gallery. The use will be required to comply with State Environment Protection Policy N-2 for Control of Music Noise from a Public Premises. The proposed hours of operation are not excessive and the activities undertaken on the site during specified hours and the number of patrons can be limited via conditions of permit. General administration, pastoral care and small group activities are proposed during business hours 8:00am to 6:00pm, with youth activities proposed to be held on Fridays between 3.00-10.00pm. Other meetings and music practices are proposed during the evenings from 6:00pm to 10:00pm throughout the week. The premises will be used for various church activities on Saturdays and Sundays, with services proposed to be held on Sundays, with no more than 250 people present at a service. It is agreed that the proposed use has potential to increase activity in View Street in terms of pedestrians and vehicles to the area, however given the site’s context within a Business zone and on a main road close to the core of the Bendigo CBD, the proposal is not likely to result in unreasonable amenity impacts. The proposal will result in further activity in the CBD area at different times of the week, which is consistent with the objectives of the Bendigo CBD Plan. Conclusion The proposed reduction in parking is satisfactory. The peak period of demand generated by the use will be on Sunday mornings when there is usually significant capacity in the available on street parking within walking distance of the site. Demand generated by the use in business hours will be low. Given the site’s context within a business area, the proposal will not result in unreasonable amenity impacts in terms of noise and increased activity. The hours of operation are reasonable.

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While the site is identified as having potential to become part of the View Street Arts Precinct, this proposal will make efficient use of a vacant building in an area which is well serviced by public transport and pedestrian links, provides for some parking on site and is in a location where on street parking will cater for the shortfall during peak periods of use. Overall, the proposal will add to the activity in and vibrancy of View Street and the Bendigo Central Business District. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority, may resolve to approve or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments •

Objection

RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for the use of land as a place of worship, place of assembly and a reduction and waiver in car parking at 24-30 View Street, Bendigo subject to the following conditions: 1. PLAN REQUIRED Before the use and/or development start(s), plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and two copies must be provided. The plans must show: (a) Car park layout. 2. NO LAYOUT ALTERATION The use and/or development permitted by this permit as shown on the endorsed plan(s) and/or described in the endorsed documents must not be altered or modified (for any reason) except with the prior written consent of the responsible authority. 3. NUMBER OF PERSONS No more than 250 persons may be present on the premises for a church service without the written consent of the responsible authority. 4. NUMBER OF CAR SPACES No fewer than 20 car spaces, including one space clearly marked for use by disabled persons, must be provided on the land for the use during the following hours: • Monday-Friday 6:00pm-10:00pm • Saturday 12:00 noon-10:00pm • Sunday 8:00am – 10:00pm PAGE 51


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5. CAR PARK MANAGEMENT Car park marshals must be in attendance prior to and at the conclusion of the Sunday church service to ensure the orderly departure and arrival of patrons. 6. GREEN TRAVEL PLAN Prior to the commencement of the use, a Green Travel Plan must be prepared to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. The Plan must be prepared by a suitably qualified person and must encourage the use of non-private vehicle transport modes by the occupiers of the land. The plan must address, but is not necessarily limited to the following: (a) A designated ‘manager’ or ‘champion’ responsible for co-ordination and implementation; (b) Possible staff incentives (e.g. provision of subsidised Myki cards) (c) Provision of Public Transport maps, timetables and/or real time information of nearby services; (d) Details of GTP funding and management responsibilities, including ongoing monitoring and review; and (e) Include provisions to be updated not less than every 5 years. When approved, the GTP will form part of the permit and the monitoring and review requirement of dot pint (d) must be submitted to the COGB on an annual basis for appropriate auditing. 7. HOURS OF OPERATION Except with the prior written consent of the responsible authority, the activities permitted by this permit must operate only between the following times: • Monday to Thursday 8:00am – 6:00pm – general administration, pastoral care • Monday to Thursday 6:00-pm – 10:00pm – group meetings, music practice • Monday to Friday 8:00am – 6:00pm – small group meetings (up to 15 people) • Friday 8:00am -3:00pm – general administration and pastoral care • Friday 3:00pm-10:00pm – youth activities • Saturday – 8:00am-10:00pm - group meetings, administration, pastoral care • Sunday 8:00am-10:00pm – church service and associated activities, administration, pastoral care.

Note: Noise levels emanating from the premises must not exceed those required to be met under State Environment Protection Policy (Control of Music Noise from Public Premises), No. N-2.

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Proposed Floor Plan

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Site Layout Plan

Aerial Photo of Site

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2.5 SUBDIVISION OF LAND INTO 52 LOTS AND THE REMOVAL OF NATIVE VEGETATION - 320 HOWARD STREET, EAGLEHAWK Document Information Author

Stephen Wainwright, Coordinator Subdivisions

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose This report concerns a planning permit application to subdivide the land at 320 Howard Street, Eaglehawk into 52 residential lots. Matters relating to traffic and access, neighbourhood character and development density are particularly relevant to the application. There are two objections to the application from local residents in nearby Symbester Crescent. VicRoads has also objected to the granting of a permit because it doesn't want any lots in the subdivision to have driveways onto Howard Street. This report assesses the merits of the proposed subdivision and discusses the issues raised by the objectors. The report concludes that the proposal complies with the Planning Scheme. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Report Application No: Application Date: Applicant: Land: Zoning: Overlays:

DS/92/2012 16 February 2012 Tomkinson Group 320 Howard Street, EAGLEHAWK Residential 1 Zone Abuttal to a Road Zone Category 2 Partially covered by Environmental Significance Overlay 1 Watercourse Protection

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Subject Site and Surrounds

Figure 1: A location map showing the subject site. The objectors' properties are marked with a star.

The following extracts from the applicant's planning report describes the site and its context: "The subject site is known as 320-322 Howard Street, Eaglehawk. The site contains a single title with legal description of Lot 1 PS301085. The site contains a total area of approximately 6.028ha and forms an irregular rectangle shape. The site contains a single dwelling and associated outbuildings in the south-eastern corner of the site (adjacent to the intersection of Howard Street and Eaglehawk-Neilborough Road). The existing dwelling is of brick veneer construction with a tiled hip roof. The adjacent outbuildings are used in conjunction with the existing dwelling. The southern boundary of the site provides a frontage to Symbester Crescent (92m) and Howard Street (320m). A 1,015m2 area of land adjacent to the Howard Street boundary is excised from the remainder of the site. This land contains a weatherboard dwelling and is found on a separate title (CA 18, Se. N, Parish of Sandhurst). The eastern site boundary abuts the Eaglehawk-Neilborough road reserve where a 75m frontage is provided. The northern boundary of the site abuts Crown Land found within the Public Park and Recreation Zone (PPRZ). This parcel contains the Eaglehawk Creek watercourse and scattered native vegetation. The western site boundary abuts residential land containing modern, predominately single storey dwellings.

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The site contains four patches of native vegetation and a number of scattered trees. A vegetation assessment undertaken by Garry and Brenda Cheers has found that two EVC's, low-rises Grassy Woodland (EVC) 175) and Alluvial-terraces Herb-rich Woodland (EVC 67) are found on the site. Patches of native vegetation are evenly distributed across the site. Patches of planted non-indigenous trees are found on the eastern half of the site. The remainder of the site contains some native grasses, annual and perennial exotic grasses and perennial exotic herbs." Proposal The applicant describes the proposal thus: "This proposal seeks to subdivide the land known as Lot 1 PS301085 into 52 residential lots and an open space reserve. The subject land is proposed to be known as Waterville Estate. The existing dwelling and outbuildings will be contained on the proposed Lot 1, having an area of 3,550m2. The remaining 51 lots are vacant and are suitable for the future development of dwellings. Vacant lots will range from 379m2 to 634m2, with an average lot size of 496.5m2. The subdivision is designed to enable future development that would maximise solar access to living areas, habitable room windows and secluded private open space. All lots have the capacity to accommodate a 10m x 15m rectangle, a driveway/carport and at least 40m2 of private open space. An indicative building envelope has been provided for all lots with an area of 500m2 or less. The existing dwelling on Lot 1 will continue to obtain access from EaglehawkNeilborough Road. Proposed Lots 2-4 and 12-23 will obtain direct access from Howard Street. Lots 23-30 will obtain access from Symbester Crescent via an extension of the existing roadway. The remaining 29 lots will obtain access from a new road found adjacent to the northern side of Howard Street. The new road will be constructed with footpaths and two court bowl (to provide appropriate turning areas). The road (including carriageway and footpaths) will have a width varying relative to its use and function. The road will be sealed and of full kerb and channel construction to provide an adequate transport and drainage system across the development site. Where required, all lots will be filled to at least the 1% flood level declared by the [North Central Catchment Management Authority]. A stormwater drainage system incorporating conventional kerb and channel and a swale/retarding basin will be undertaken across the development site. A detailed engineering design will be submitted to Council at a later date. An open space reserve with a total area of approximately 2.43ha is proposed in the northern half of the site. This reserve will act as a buffer between Eaglehawk Creek and residential allotments. The new road will front the reserve to provide a drainage solution that will mitigate the risk of inundation. The reserve will be free of buildings and will contain a 2.5m wide pedestrian walkway which will extend towards the Howard Street frontage. Adjacent residential lots have been designed to overlook the reserve, thus providing passive surveillance to the area. Native vegetation within the reserve area will be retained where possible.

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The proposed subdivision will necessitate the removal of 0.47 Habitat Hectares of native vegetation (including 1 very large tree and 5 large trees). Five medium to small sized scattered trees are also proposed to be removed. An environmental offset program is proposed to achieve an overall net gain to compensate for this loss." Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The site is located in the Residential 1 Zone and it abuts a Road Zone Category 2 (Howard Street). The site is also partially covered by Schedule 1 to the Environmental Significance Overlay - Watercourse Protection. A permit is required to subdivide the site pursuant to the zone and overlay provisions; and a permit is required to remove native vegetation from the site pursuant to the overlay provisions and clause 52.17 in the Planning Scheme. The following clauses in the Planning Scheme are relevant in the consideration of the application: State Planning Policy Framework        

Open space (clause 11.03). Regional development (clause 11.05). Biodiversity (clause 12.01). Floodplains (clause 13.02). Urban environment (clause 15.01). Sustainable development (clause 15.02). Residential development (clause 16.01). Development infrastructure (clause 19.03).

Municipal Strategic Statement        

Municipal profile (clause 21.01). Key issues and influences (clause 21.02). Vision - strategic framework (clause 21.03). Strategic directions (clause 21.04). Settlement (clause 21.05). Housing (clause 21.06). Environment (clause 21.08). Reference documents (clause 21.10).

Local Planning Policies 

Salinity and erosion risk policy (clause 22.04).

Other Provisions      

Residential 1 Zone (clause 32.01). Environmental Significance Overlay (clause 42.01) Native vegetation (clause 52.17). Residential subdivision (clause 56). Decision guidelines (clause 65). Referral and notice provisions (clause 66).

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Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Telstra

No objection subject to conditions

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

CFA

No objection subject to conditions

North Central CMA

No objection subject to conditions

DSE

No objection subject to conditions

VicRoads (notice only)

Objection

Asset Planning & Design (internal)

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification The application was advertised to the public by mail and an on-site notice. Two people have objected to a permit being granted, principally because of concerns about the proposed access arrangements via Symbester Crescent. VicRoads has objected to the subdivision because of the proposal to create new driveways onto Howard Street. The grounds of objection are discussed later in this report. A consultation meeting was held and it was attended by the objectors, the permit applicant and two Councillors. The meeting resulted in the subdivision layout being amended to remove a proposed through-road between Symbester Crescent and Howard Street but the objections stand. Planning Assessment Extension of Symbester Crescent Directly west of the site is a recent housing estate serviced by a cul-de-sac known as Symbester Crescent. The subdivision layout for the subject site originally envisaged an extension of Symbester Crescent, thus making it a through-road connecting to Howard Street. A total of seven lots were proposed to gain access from the extension of Symbester Crescent. This original subdivision layout was opposed by the 2 objectors in Symbester Crescent who wanted the through-road removed. The residents argued that opening Symbester Crescent to through traffic would cause safety and amenity problems for people living in the court.

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Figure 2: Original subdivision layout showing Symbester Crescent as a through-road.

The permit applicant has subsequently revised the plan in response to the objectors. The through-road has been removed and replaced with a court bowl extension that will service six of the proposed lots. The court bowl will be constructed to the design standards of an Access Street to match the existing profile of Symbester Crescent.

Figure 3: Revised subdivision layout showing Symbester Crescent as court bowl.

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It is considered that the proposed court bowl extension will be suitable to service this relatively small section of the proposed subdivision. Adding six new lots to the volume of traffic in Symbester Crescent will not have a significant effect on the street network and the amenity impacts resulting from the road extension will be minimal. While none of the objections have been withdrawn because of the revised plan, it is believed that the deletion of the proposed through-road addresses the central issue of concern to the objectors. Access from Howard Street While most of the lots created by the subdivision will gain access via a new internal road, a total of 16 lots will have driveways directly off Howard Street. VicRoads objects to the Howard Street driveways, stating: "The subdivision proposed plan as designed will have a detrimental impact on the safety of the signed Over-dimensional (O-D) route. This signed O-D Route is also a Higher Mass Limit and a B-Double Route. The plan proposes adding 22 access points [sic?] to the signed O-D route and one new intersection." VicRoads wants the subdivision layout amended so that there is no new access onto Howard Street apart from an intersection to allow for an internal road to be constructed. Howard Street is zoned Road Zone Category 2 under the Planning Scheme. It is not an arterial road (a Road Zone Category 1) and is thus not under the control of VicRoads. With respect to the permit application, VicRoads has the status of an objector rather than a Referral Authority. Council must therefore have regard to the objection but Council is not obliged to refuse to grant a permit as a consequence of the objection.

Figure 4: A plan showing some of the lots that will have driveways off Howard Street (shown in pink)

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The City's traffic engineer has reviewed the proposed subdivision and has no objection to the new driveways. There are already extensive driveways along Howard Street associated with the Evergreen Waters Estate and the Symbester Crescent development. In this context it is difficult to conclude that 16 additional driveways will significantly change the existing road conditions. There are suitable lines-of-sight available from the driveway locations and room within the verge for vehicles to safely wait while reversing onto Howard Street.

Figure 5: Example of existing driveways off Howard Street associated with lots in the Evergreen Waters Estate.

Compliance with Clause 56 The residential subdivision provisions in clause 56 of the Planning Scheme apply to the application. The proposed subdivision complies with all the objectives in the clause, and in particular: 







The subdivision layout provides a sensitive interface with the Eaglehawk Creek. A significant portion of the site will be set aside as a reserve. An internal road will form a buffer between the reserve and the new lots. The reserve will also protect the native vegetation extant along the creek. The site is close to the Eaglehawk town centre and there is convenient access to the Epsom Village shopping centre. The site will be serviced by a bus route upon completion of the neighbouring Evergreen Waters Estate. There are also parks and community facilities near the site. The site is appropriately zoned for residential purposes and it is situated within Bendigo's urban growth boundary. The lots in the subdivision will be fully serviced by reticulated sewerage and water, including recycled water. Electricity, telecommunications and gas will also be supplied to each lot. Public lighting and fire hydrants will be installed within the new internal street. Stormwater run-off from the site will be managed using a detention system that will incorporate water sensitive urban design features. The proposed internal street will be designed to an Access Street standard in accordance with the Infrastructure Design Manual.

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The proposed lots will vary in size between 379m2 and 634m2, excluding the existing house lot. These lot sizes are capable of containing a rectangle measuring 10m by 15m. All the lots will enjoy good opportunities for northern sunlight. The lot layout and density will be in keeping with the preferred neighbourhood character and is comparable to the lot densities proposed for the adjacent Evergreen Water Estate.

Native Vegetation The Ecological Assessment that accompanies the application describes the extent of proposed native vegetation losses on the site thus: "The areas to be cleared are Low-rises Grassy Woodland of High and Medium conservation significance. The sites have some native ground cover and little shrub layer. The remainder of the study area is unimproved pasture and consists of some native grasses, annual and perennial exotic grasses and perennial exotic herbs. There are patches of planted non-indigenous trees on the site that have not been considered in the offsets." It is considered that a native vegetation offset would be a suitable biodiversity outcome for the site because: (1) the cover and diversity of under-storey vegetation is low within the patches, (2) the vegetation on the site lacks connectivity, and (3) it would difficult to develop an effective maintenance regime to protect the biodiversity values of the vegetation. Furthermore, the subdivision layout does minimise native vegetation losses along the creek line through the creation of a reserve.

Figure 6: A plan showing the extent of native vegetation proposed to be removed.

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Conclusion For the reasons discussed above it is concluded that the application meets the requirements of the Planning Scheme and on this basis a permit should be granted. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the planning scheme, may resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit subject to conditions, or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments â&#x20AC;˘

Objections

RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for the subdivision of land and the removal of native vegetation at 320 Howard Street, Eaglehawk subject to the following conditions: 1.

PLANS TO BE ENDORSED The plans to be endorsed and which will then form part of the permit are the plans submitted with the application.

2.

LAYOUT PLANS The subdivision, as shown on the endorsed plans, must not be altered without the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

3.

LANDSCAPE PLAN Before a statement of compliance is issued for the subdivision a landscape plan must be submitted to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. When approved, the plan will be endorsed and then form part of the permit.

4.

COMPLETION OF LANDSCAPING Before a statement of compliance is issued for the subdivision the landscaping works shown on the endorsed must be carried out and completed to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

5.

LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE The landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority for 12 months after the works are completed, including that any dead, diseased or damaged plants are to be replaced. EARTHWORKS All earthworks on the site must comply with AS 3798-2007 Level 1 inspection and testing. Before a statement of compliance is issued a geotechnical report must be approved by the responsible authority confirming the standard of earthworks on the site.

6.

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7.

DETAILED DRAINAGE Prior to the certification of the plan of subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions. The plans must include: (a) Direction of stormwater run off. (b) A point of discharge for each lot. (c) Independent drainage for each lot. (d) Approval from the relevant authority for the point of discharge.

8.

DRAINAGE EASEMENTS The subdivision must provide easements for drainage within and through the subject land for external outfall drainage to a point of lawful discharge to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

9.

STORMWATER DETENTION Prior to the issue of a statement of compliance, the owner or applicant must provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Allowable discharge: Q5 = 30 l/s per hectare of developed land. The responsible authority may deem this condition satisfied by a development contribution towards the acceptance of surface and stormwater discharge from the approved subdivision, building and/or works, whether or not such new drainage infrastructure has been or will be situated within the boundaries of the subject land. Such amount is assessed as $2,000 or such amount applying at the time of payment.

10.

STORMWATER QUALITY Before the use or development is commenced, the owner or applicant must provide a stormwater treatment system to achieve the Best Practice Environmental Guidelines storm water quality (Victoria Stormwater Committee 1999) in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

11.

CONSTRUCTION OF WORKS Road works, drainage and other civil works must be constructed in accordance with the Infrastructure Design Manual and plans and specifications approved by the responsible authority and must include: Internal roads: (a) Fully sealed pavement with kerb and channel. (b) Paved footpaths. (c) Bicycle path with the creek reserve. (d) 5.5m wide concrete access driveways. (e) Underground drainage. (f) Underground conduits for water, gas, electricity and telephone. (g) Appropriate intersection and traffication measures. (h) Appropriate street lighting and signage. PAGE 65


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(i) One high stability permanent survey mark. Howard Street: (a) Pavement widening, including kerb and channel, bike land and parking lane. (b) Paved footpath. (c) Underground drainage. (d) Underground conduits for water, gas, electricity and telephone. (e) Appropriate intersection and traffication measures. (f) Appropriate street lighting and signage. Symbester Crescent: (a) Fully sealed pavement with kerb and channel. (b) Paved footpath. (c) Underground drainage. (d) Underground conduits for water, gas, electricity and telephone. (e) Appropriate intersection and traffication measures. (f) Appropriate street lighting and signage. (g) Reconfiguration of the court bowl to a standard road profile. 12.

DECORATIVE LIGHTING The decorative lighting style is to be consistent with any adjacent decorative lighting. The responsible authority shall determine decorative lighting style where conflicts arise. The applicant shall submit for approval full details of any proposed decorative lighting to the responsible authority prior to commencement of works. Prior to the issue of the statement of compliance the applicant will make payment to the responsible authority in accordance with Table 15 of the Infrastructure Design Manual.

13.

PUBLIC ASSETS Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb and channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development. Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit.

14.

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PLAN Prior to commencement of works the owner or applicant must submit a Construction Management Plan (CMP) for approval by the responsible authority. The plan must include: (a) A site specific plan showing proposed erosion and sedimentation control works. (b) Techniques and intervention levels to prevent a dust nuisance. (c) Techniques to prevent mud and dirt being transported from the site to adjacent streets. (d) The protection measures taken to preserve any vegetation identified for retention. During construction of works associated with the subdivision, the must employ and PAGE 66


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provide the protection methods contained in the CMP to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and the Environment Protection Agency. 15.

COLIBAN WATER (a) The owner is required provide reticulated water and sewerage services to each of the lots within the subdivision. Services are to be provided in accordance with Coliban Waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s specifications. (b) The owner is required to provide reticulated recycled water to each of the lots within the subdivision. Services are to be provided in accordance with our specifications. (c) All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed, are to be protected by an easement in favour of Coliban Region Water Corporation.

16.

POWERCOR (a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act 1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with Section 8 of that Act. (b) The applicant shall: Provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision in accordance with Powercorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s requirements and standards, including the extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply system, as required by Powercor (A payment to cover the cost of such work will be required). In the event that a supply is not provided the applicant shall provide a written undertaking to Powercor Australia Ltd that prospective purchasers will be so informed. (c) The applicant shall: Where buildings or other installations exist on the land to be subdivided and are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be brought into compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry. The applicant shall arrange compliance through a Registered Electrical Contractor. (d) The applicant shall: Provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any amendments which have been required. (e) Any buildings must comply with the clearances required by the Electricity Safety (Network Assets) Regulations. (f) Any construction work must comply with the Officer of the Chief Electrical Inspector No Go Zone rules.

17.

TELSTRA The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to Telstra in accordance with Section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

18.

TENIX The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to SP AusNet (Gas) in accordance with Section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

19.

COUNTRY FIRE AUTHORITY Hydrants: (a) Operable hydrants, above or below ground must be provided to the satisfaction of CFA. (b) The maximum distance between these hydrants and the rear of all building envelopes (or in the absence of the building envelope, the rear of all lots) must PAGE 67


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be 120m and hydrants must be no more than 200m apart. (c) Hydrants must be identified as specified in ‘Identification of Street Hydrants for Firefighting purposes’ available under publication on the Country Fire Authority web site (www.cfa.vic.gov.au). Roads: (a) Roads must be constructed to a standard so that they are accessible in all weather conditions and capable of accommodating a vehicle of 15 tonnes for the trafficable road width. (b) The average grade must be no more than 1 in 7 (14.4%) (8.1 degrees) with a maximum of no more than 1 in 5 (20%) (11.3 degrees) for no more than 50m. Dips must have no more than a 1 in 8 (12%) (7.1 degree) entry and exit angle. 20.

NORTH CENTRAL CMA (a) All new allotments must be filled to at least the declared 1% AEP flood level(s). Prior to issuing a statement of compliance a certified survey plan of the finished surface levels must be submitted to the responsible authority and North Central CMA for its approval. (b) Prior to the commencement of works, appropriate silt control measures must be installed to prevent sediment laden runoff from entering the waterway. The silt control measures must be maintained throughout the construction period. (c) Stormwater runoff arising from the site must be treated to best practice standards prior to discharging to the waterway. The number of new stormwater connections to the waterway must be limited and prior to the commencement of drainage works, a separate “Works on Waterway” permit must be obtained directly from North Central CMA. Please contact North Central CMA on (03) 5440 1896 to obtain a full understanding of the Authority’s requirements. (d) Prior to certification a suitable restriction is to be placed on the title which specifies the minimum floor level of any new dwelling(s) on each new allotment. The minimum floor level must be no lower than 300mm above the declared flood level. (e) Prior to certification a drainage and waterway reserve must be created in favour of the City of Greater Bendigo and registered on the title. The drainage reserve must be generally in accordance with the area shown as “Reserve” on the endorsed plans which form part of this permit. (f) The road abutting the waterway reserve must be designed to cater for the safe passage of flood waters. The finished surface level of the road must be constructed no lower than 350mm below the declared 1% AEP flood level(s). (g) A landscape plan must be prepared for the waterway reserve by a suitably qualified professional and approved by the responsible authority and North Central CMA. Prior to issuing a statement of compliance, the waterway reserve must be shaped and landscaped to the satisfaction of North Central CMA and the responsible authority.

21.

DEPARTMENT OF SUSTAINABILITY AND ENVIRONMENT Adjoining Crown Land: To prevent impacts on Crown allotment 52L Section N and Crown allotment 52H Section N Parish of Sandhurst the applicant must ensure: (a) All works are to be contained within the freehold land and must take place from the freehold side of the boundary. (b) That there is no removal of native vegetation from the adjoining Crown land. PAGE 68


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Fencing: Prior to work commencing, the shared boundary with Crown allotment 52L Section N and Crown allotment 52H Section N Parish of Sandhurst must be fenced to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and the Department of Sustainability and Environment in accordance with the Fences Act 1968 and at the applicant’s expense. Fencing must be erected on the correct boundaries of the land to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority and the Department of Sustainability and Environment. Runoff: No polluted and/or sediment laden run-off or other concentrated flow of water is to be discharged directly or indirectly into the adjoining Crown land. Offsets: (a) In order to offset the removal of: • 0.07 habitat hectares of native vegetation of Low Rises Grassy Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of medium conservation significance within the Goldfields Bioregion. • 0.45 habitat hectares of native vegetation of Low Rises Grassy Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of high conservation significance including one Very Large Old Tree and five Large Old trees within the Goldfields Bioregion. • 0.06 habitat hectares of native vegetation of Alluvial-Terraces Herbrich Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of high conservation significance within the Goldfields Bioregion. • One medium scattered tree of Low Rises Grassy Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class (EVC) of medium conservation significance within the Goldfields Bioregion. • Two small scattered trees of Alluvial-Terraces Herbrich Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class (EVC) of low conservation significance within the Goldfields Bioregion, approved for removal as part of this permit, the applicant must provide for the protection and management for conservation purposes of: • 0.07 habitat hectares of native vegetation of Low Rises Grassy Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of medium conservation significance within the Goldfields Bioregion. • 0.68 habitat hectares of native vegetation of Low Rises Grassy Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of high conservation significance including 28 Large Old trees within the Goldfields Bioregion. • 0.09 habitat hectares of native vegetation of Alluvial-Terraces Herbrich Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of high conservation significance within the Goldfields Bioregion. • The recruitment of 15 plants of Low Rises Grassy Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of medium conservation significance within the Goldfields Bioregion. • The recruitment of 20 plants of Alluvial-Terraces Herbrich Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class (EVC) of low conservation significance within the Goldfields Bioregion, or an alternative to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. (b) To provide the required offset, within twelve (12) months of the vegetation PAGE 69


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22.

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removal or before the statement of compliance is issued under the Subdivision Act 1988 which ever is sooner, the applicant or the owner must either: • Provide to the responsible authority, an Allocated Credit Extract issued by the Department of Sustainability and Environment Native Vegetation Credit Register which satisfies the required offset, or • Have prepared an offset plan endorsed by the responsible authority. The offset plan must be prepared to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. The offset plan must include a: • Description of the site where the offset will be provided, including a site plan. • Schedule of works to achieve the offset over a 10 year period, detailing the: • Management actions to be performed (e.g. fencing, weed control, pest control, revegetation). • Person(s) responsible for implementing the specific management actions. • Timeline for the implementation of the management actions. • Method by which management actions will be undertaken. • Standard to which management actions will be undertaken. When approved, the offset plan will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. (c) Within 12 months of vegetation removal or prior to the issue of statement of compliance which ever is sooner: • The endorsed offset site must be permanently protected to the satisfaction of the responsible authority, ie. via an encumbrance on title. • A copy of the endorsed plan and protection mechanism, eg. title showing encumbrance, must be lodged with the Department of Sustainability and Environment. (d) Before commencement of earthworks, a protection fence must be erected around the retained native vegetation at a distance of twelve times (12 x) the diameter at breast height of the edge trees between two (2) and fifteen (15) metres from the bases of the retained vegetation. The delineated area will define a ‘Tree Protection Zone’. The protection fence must be constructed of appropriate temporary fencing materials and be to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. The tree protection fence must remain in place until all earthworks are completed to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Adequate signage to indicate the ‘Tree/Vegetation Protection Zone’ must be attached to the protection fence and maintained until all works are completed. (e) Except with the written consent of the responsible authority, within the Tree/Vegetation Protection Zone: • No vehicular or pedestrian access, trenching or soil excavation is to occur. • No storage or dumping of tools, equipment soils and/or waste is to occur. • No construction activities are to occur. • No activities which may result in the removal or damage of vegetation are to occur. EXPIRY OF THE PERMIT This permit will expire 7 years from the date it is issued. All development described in this permit must be completed before the expiry date. The responsible authority may extend this time limit if a request is made in writing before the permit expires or within three months afterwards. PAGE 70


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NOTE: Flood levels for the 1% AEP probability (100 year ARI) have not been designated or declared for this area under the Water Act 1989. However, North Central CMAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best estimate of the 1% flood level for the location described above grades from 198.60m AHD at the upstream boundary down to 196.30m AHD at Neilborough Road. NOTE: Third party offsets may be available from Bushbroker Over the Counter program. Please contact Greg Waddell on (03) 5430 4353, or visit www.dse.vic.gov.au/nativevegetation for further information. NOTE: As part of this application the is removal of vegetation from the road reserve this may trigger works or other activities on public land which may impact on protected native plants will require a Protected Flora Licence or Permit in respect of the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988. (FFG) All native vegetation likely to be impacted should be checked against the Protected Flora List (DSE 2010) to determine whether FFG approvals are required. Protected Flora Permits can be obtained through the regional DSE office. NOTE: The adjoining Crown land is not to be used for access, storage of materials or rubbish. Any private use of Crown land requires consent and/or licensing from the Department of Sustainability and Environment. NOTE: This site contains vegetation that may be part of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Commonwealth) listed Grey Box (Eucalyptus microcarpa) Grassy Woodlands and Derived Native Grasslands of South-eastern Australia. If this community occurs on site there maybe a need for a referral to the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities under this legislation.

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2.6 STAGED SUBDIVISION OF LAND AND THE REMOVAL OF NATIVE VEGETATION (A PERMIT AMENDMENT TO CREATE AN ADDITIONAL LOT) ELSWORTH PARK ESTATE, STRATHFIELDSAYE Document Information Author

Stephen Wainwright, Coordinator Subdivisions

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose This report concerns a planning permit application to amend the approved subdivision layout for the Elsworth Park Estate in Strathfieldsaye in order to create one additional house lot. Specifically it is proposed to subdivide Lot 23, which is located on the corner of Taylors Lane and Elsworth Drive, into two lots of around 430m2 each. The Elsworth Park Estate is approved under permit DS/1100/2005 and when completed the estate will yield 56 residential lots. There is one objection to the application from a local resident in Taylors Lane who is concerned about traffic problems in Taylors Lane. This report assesses the merits of the proposed subdivision and discusses the issues raised by the objector. The report concludes that the proposal complies with the Planning Scheme. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Report Application No: Application Date: Applicant: Land:

AM/1100/2005/B 31 May 2012 Regional Property Group Pty Ltd Elsworth Park Estate

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Zoning: Overlays:

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71-75 Taylors Lane and 77-79 Bassett Drive STRATHFIELDSAYE Residential 1 Zone Nil

Subject Site and Surrounds The site is located on the east side of Taylor Street between Tannery Lane and Bakers Lane, Strathfieldsaye. The site is being developed for housing and is known as the Elsworth Park Estate. The estate will include a through-link between Taylor Street and Bassett Drive via a new internal road called Elsworth Drive. The main entry into the estate will be via Elsworth Drive. A new reserve will be situated on the north side of the Elsworth Drive entry, while on the south side there will be a 863m2 house lot described as Lot 23 on the approved plan. Lot 23 is a corner lot and is the subject of the current amendment application There is no other significant development activity in Taylors Lane. Lots along Taylors Lane tend to be large thus creating a semi-rural character.

Figure 1: A location map showing the site. The objector's property is marked with a star.

Proposal It is proposed to amend the current approved plan to allow for the subdivision of Lot 23 into two lots of 429m2 and 434m2 respectively. The lots will be fully serviced and will be suitable for accommodating a single dwelling on each lot.

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Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The site is within the Residential 1 Zone and it is not affected by any overlay controls. A permit is required to subdivide Lot 23 pursuant to the zone provisions. The following clauses in the planning scheme are relevant to the application: State Planning Policy Framework   

Regional development (clause 11.05). Residential development (clause 16.01). Movement networks (clause 18.02).

Municipal Strategic Statement       

Municipal profile (clause 21.01). Key issues and influences (clause 21.02). Vision - strategic framework (clause 21.03). Strategic directions (clause 21.04). Settlement (clause 21.05). Housing (clause 21.06). Reference documents (clause 21.10).

Local Planning Policies 

Salinity and erosion risk policy (clause 22.04).

Other Provisions    

Residential 1 Zone (clause 32.01). Residential subdivision (clause 56). Decision guidelines (clause 65). Referral and notice provisions (clause 66).

Consultation/Communication Referrals There was no requirement to refer the application to any referral authority or internal department. Public Notification The application was advertised to the public by mail and an on-site notice. One person has objected to a permit being granted because of concerns about traffic problems in Taylors Lane. The grounds of objection are discussed later in this report. Planning Assessment The objection to the amendment application centres on the capacity of Taylors Lane to adequately cater for existing traffic as well as new traffic resulting from the proposed Elsworth Park Estate. The objector states, in part:

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"The small road called Taylors Lane has very steep drop-offs and no road shoulder, and is narrow. When the garbage truck has to collect bins, it's a wait your turn drive down the road. There is no where to park, and I think adding more traffic congestion would only make things worse, especially on a corner block. Most of the residential traffic coming and going from Elsworth Drive and part of Bassett Drive is going to use Taylors Lane, because it is quicker and easier supposedly than going out through Bassett Drive onto the main road being Wellington Way [sic]. We have already seen what small scale blocks not 200m up the road from us can do. The residents don't have anywhere to park extra cars, thus parking their cars on the road, and halfway in a gutter, making it very dangerous." Taylors Lane is a 20m wide road reserve with a 6.7m wide bitumen carriageway and no shoulders. Taylors Lane may be described as an Access Street in Council's road hierarchy. The standard design criteria for this street type, as defined in the Infrastructure Design Manual, is shown below. As can be seen in the table Taylors Lane is less than the preferred 7.5m width for an Access Street and there is currently no provision for onstreet parking.

Figure 2: Extract from the Infrastructure Design Manual

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According to traffic counts conducted in 2000, Taylors Lane carries 172 vehicle movements per day. This is very low relative to the traffic volumes normally expected for an Access Street and provides justification for the current 6.7m width of Taylors Lane. Even upon completion of the Elsworth Park Estate the amount of traffic within Taylors Lane isn't expected to exceed the design limits of the street, although traffic volumes will no doubt increase. The addition of one lot, as proposed by the amendment application, will not have a practical impact on these anticipated traffic volumes.

Figure 3: Extract from the approved engineering plan showing design details for Lot 23

Having regard to the wider residential subdivision matters relevant to the amendment application it is considered that the proposal is an appropriate planning outcome for the site. In particular it is noted that:    

The two lots created by the subdivision of Lot 23 will be fully serviced. The lots will enjoy good access to services and community facilities in the Strathfieldsaye township. The lots will add to the diversity and supply of lots within the Elsworth Park Estate and the Strathfieldsaye area more broadly. The size and dimensions of the lots will be capable of accommodating a future dwelling on each lot.

Conclusion For the reasons discussed above it is concluded that the amendment application meets the requirements of the Planning Scheme and on this basis an amended permit should be granted.

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Options Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may resolve to: grant an amended permit, grant an amended permit subject to conditions (the conditions must relate to the amendment), or refuse to grant an amended permit. Attachments â&#x20AC;˘

Objection

RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Amend a Permit for the Elsworth Park Estate Strathfieldsaye to allow for the subdivision of Lot 23 within the estate into two lots, subject to the following conditions: 1.

PLANS TO BE ENDORSED The plans to be endorsed and which will then form part of the permit are the plans submitted with the application.

2.

LAYOUT PLANS The subdivision, as shown on the endorsed plans, must not be altered without the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

3.

STAGED SUBDIVISION The subdivision must proceed in the following stages unless otherwise agreed in writing by the responsible authority: (a) Stage 1 - Lot 1 on PS 549462X. (b) Stage 2 - Lot 2 on PS 549462X. (c) Stage 3 - Lot 3 on PS 549462X.

4.

PLAN OF SUBDIVISION The Plan of Subdivision submitted for certification must show: Stage 2: (a) 5m wide drainage reserve along the northern boundary of Lot 19. (b) 3m x 3m splays on all road intersections. (c) Easements as required. Stage 3: (a) 5m wide drainage reserve along the northern boundary of Lot 51. (b) 30m wide drainage reserve along Emu Creek, including the "horseshoe area".

5.

EASEMENTS Easements in favour of the City of Greater Bendigo or servicing authority must be created on the plans to the satisfaction of such authority.

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6.

COUNCIL RESIDENTIAL DRAINAGE Provision must be made for the drainage of each lot in the subdivision to the requirements and satisfaction of the responsible authority. Drainage of the subdivision for residential purposes must be provided by underground drainage systems catering for a 1 in 5 year storm return period. Flows in excess of 1 in 5 year storm return periods, up to and including 1 in 100 year storm return periods must be accommodated in separate channel and / or within the road reserves and / or within the provided drainage system and must include provision of drainage retardation to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

7.

PAYMENT OF DRAINAGE CONTRIBUTION Arrangements satisfactory to the Council must be made with regard to the provision and funding of drainage facilities, including levies for main outfall drainage systems for the acceptance of stormwater drainage from the subject land. Such levy is assessed as $2,000 per additional lot created, or such amount applying at the time of payment.

8.

FENCING WORKS Before a statement of compliance is issued the applicant must provide the following to the satisfaction of the responsible authority: Stage 2: (a) Post and plain wire fence along the northern boundary of the drainage and recreation reserve. (b) 1.8m high solid fences along the 8m wide drainage / walkway reserve between Lots 20 and 21, and 24 and 25, and along the northern boundary of Lot 19. (c) Open style fence not exceeding 1.2m in height along the rear of Lots 18, 23, 24, 25 and 26. Stage 3: Post and plain wire fence along Emu Creek Reserve and the drainage reserve / walkway along the northern boundary of Lot 51.

9.

DEVELOPER CONTRIBUTIONS Prior to the issue of a Statement of Compliance for the subdivision, Developer Contributions are required to be paid to Council, for the following: (a) Re-establishment of a road reserve and construction of Uxbridge Street between Bassett Street and Wellington Street. Such contributions will be based upon the purchase value of the land required and construction costs, calculated on the ratio of lots created by the subdivision and lots proposed within the ODP No. 3. (b) Construction of roundabouts at the intersection of Wellington Street and Blucher Street and Wellington Street and Uxbridge Street, based upon the traffic generation of lots created by the subdivision, lots proposed within ODP No. 3 and existing traffic.

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CONSTRUCTION OF WORKS Road works, drainage and other civil works must be constructed in accordance with plans and specifications approved by the Responsible Authority and must include: Stage 1 (a) 1.4 metre wide footpaths on the Taylors Lane frontage and one side of new streets, except for Bassett Drive where footpaths must match the existing profile in Bassett Drive (b) Drainage of the subdivision stage. (c) Street trees. (d) Nature strip top soiling. Stage 2 (a) Fully sealed pavement with roll-over kerb and channel to match the existing profile in Bassett Drive. (b) Construction of turning circles capable of handling garbage trucks at the end of all dead end roads. (c) 1.4m wide footpaths on the Taylors Lane frontage and one side of new streets, except for Bassett Drive where footpaths must match the existing profile in Bassett Drive (frontage of Lot 2 only in Taylors Lane and excluding footpath on eastern side of continuation of Bassett Drive). (d) Construction of walkway 1.4 metre wide bitumen with grassed open swale drain adjacent. (e) Appropriate intersection and traffication measures including a roundabout at the intersection of Bassett Drive and internal road or alternative engineering solution as approved by the Responsible Authority. (f) Drainage of the subdivision stage. (g) Underground conduits for water, gas, electricity and telephone. (h) Appropriate street lighting and signage. (i) High stability permanent survey mark. (j) Street trees (excluding eastern side of Bassett Drive). (k) Nature strip topsoiling (excluding eastern side of Bassett Drive). Stage 3: (a) Post and plain wire fence along Emu Creek Reserve and the drainage reserve / walkway along the northern boundary of Lot 51. (b) Drainage of the subdivision stage. (c) Street trees (on eastern side of Bassett Drive). (d) Nature strip topsoiling (on eastern side of Bassett Drive).

11.

DUST All works under this permit must be undertaken so as to prevent dust being blown onto nearby land.

12.

EROSION CONTROL During construction of works associated with the subdivision, the owner or applicant must employ and provide erosion protection methods and silt trap techniques to reduce dust and sediment being emitted or transported from the subject land, in accordance with the City of Greater Bendigoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Urban Stormwater PAGE 82


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Policy document, to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and EPA. 13.

MOBILITY AND ACCESS All works must include design for access and mobility, including tactile indicators in accordance with AS/NZS 1428.4:2002 or as amended.

14.

FILLING (a) Prior to the issue of a statement of compliance for the subdivision, the owner of the land must lodge with the responsible authority a plan showing depths of fill exceeding 300mm. (b) The owner must provide to any prospective purchaser of any lot affected by depths of fill exceeding 300mm, a soil test report prepared by a Qualified Engineer. (c) The owner must include in every Contract of Sale of any lot affected by depths of fill exceeding 300mm, a special condition that the Vendor must provide to the Purchaser a copy of the soil test report for the lot sold and such condition must require any Purchaser of any lot to include a similar condition in a Contract for the resale of any lot which is resold to the erection of a dwelling upon such lot.

15.

LANDSCAPE PLAN Before a statement of compliance is issued for each stage of the subdivision a landscape plan for that stage must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plan will be endorsed and then form part of the permit.

16.

COMPLETION OF LANDSCAPING Before a statement of compliance is issued for each stage of the subdivision the landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be carried out and completed for that stage to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

17.

LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE The landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority for 12 months after the works are completed, including that any dead, diseased or damaged plants are to be replaced.

18.

DEPARTMENT OF SUSTAINABILITY AND ENVIRONMENT Offsets: Prior to the commencement of works for Stage 2 and 3, an Offset Plan to the satisfaction of the Department of Sustainability and Environment must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. The Offset Plan must show a minimum number of offsets planting of 1780 locally indigenous plants. All plants are to be protected by tree guards. When approved the plan will be endorsed and form part of this permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and three copies must be provided. The offset plans must show appropriate offsets to compensate for the loss of 33 mature trees. The Offset Plan must include details of the following: (a) Locations where offsets will be provided (the offsets are to be located to assist with control of saline water tables. (b) Details of revegetation including number of trees, shrubs and other plants. PAGE 83


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Species mix and density. Means of interim protection for newly established vegetation until established. Methods of permanent protection for the offsets. Persons responsible for implementing and monitoring the offset plans. Timeframes for implementing the offset plans. Details of any earthworks, drainage and other works.

Maintenance and replanting of vegetation stands to be retained and the disturbance zone must be clearly marked with temporary fencing or tape. The prescribed works area will be outside the zone of native vegetation stands to be retained. Remnant vegetation protection: (a) The boundary of all native vegetation stands to be retained and the disturbance zone must be clearly marked with temporary fencing or tape. The prescribed works area will be outside the zone of native vegetation stands to be retained. (b) To prevent damage to remaining native vegetation, no machinery or associated equipment must be permitted outside the prescribed works. Area. Truck turning areas, parking areas and temporary stack sites are to be established on existing disturbed areas away from trees. (c) Any areas with remnant native vegetation must not be used when stockpiling materials. Native vegetation: (a) The clearing of native vegetation within the prescribed works area must only be to the minimum extent necessary to allow the construction of the road way and infilling of the dam to the satisfaction of the responsible authority upon the advice of the Department of Sustainability and Environment. (b) Vegetation must be felled inside the prescribed works area to avoid damaging remaining vegetation located outside this area. (c) Felled timber containing hollows must be retained and laid on the ground either a) at the site where clearing occurs or b) on the offset site. Briefing of works: Works engineers, design engineers, works crews, contractors and particularly plant operators must be properly briefed on all the Planning Permit conditions of the project, prior to commencement of clearing works. A copy of the planning permit is to be made available to all employees working on the project. Weeds and pathogens: To prevent the spread of weeds and pathogens all (1) earth moving equipment and associated machinery must be made free of soil, seed and plant material before being taken to the works site, (2) structure-making and maintenance material such as rock, gravel and sand required for the project must come from an area free of weeds and (3) excavated material, including topsoil, taken from the works site to be retuned later must be stored on a clean site free of weeds. 19.

COLIBAN WATER (a) The applicant or owner is required to reach agreement with Coliban Water for the provision of reticulated water and sewerage services to each of the lots PAGE 84


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(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

20.

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within the subdivision and comply with any requirements arising from any effect of the proposed development on Coliban Water assets. The applicant is to provide evidence to the satisfaction of Coliban Water that existing private water pipes and sanitary drains do not cross the boundaries between lots. Where modifications to pipes or drains are required in order to satisfy this requirement, all work is to be carried out in accordance with AS3500 National Plumbing and Drainage Code of Australia and the relevant requirements of Coliban Water. Works to modify Coliban Water assets may only commence with prior approval by Coliban Water. All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed, are to be protected by Registered Easement in favour of Coliban Region Water Corporation. All proposed sewers must be located at least 1 metre from an existing or proposed structure/boundary.

COUNTRY FIRE AUTHORITY Hydrants: (a) Operable hydrants, above or below ground must be provided to the satisfaction of CFA. (b) The minimise distance between these hydrants and the rear of all building envelopes (or in the absence of the building envelope, the rear of all lots) must be 120m with the exception of lots 43, 45, 48 and 51 (see below) and hydrants must be no more than 200m apart. (c) A street hydrant must be installed within 30 metres to the entry point of lots 43, 45, 48 and 51. (d) Hydrants must be identified as specified in “Identification of Street Hydrants for Firefighting purposes” available under publications on the Country Fire Authority web site (www.cfa.vic.gov.au). Roads: (a) Roads must be constructed to a standard so that they are accessible in all weather conditions.

21.

POWERCOR (a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act 1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with Section 8 of that Act. (b) The applicant shall: Provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision in accordance with Powercor’s requirements and standards, including the extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply system, as required by Powercor (A payment to cover the cost of such work will be required). In the event that a supply is not provided the applicant shall provide a written undertaking to Powercor Australia Ltd that prospective purchasers will be so informed. (c) The applicant shall: Where buildings or other installations exist on the land to be subdivided and are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be brought into compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry. The applicant shall arrange compliance through a Registered Electrical Contractor. (d) The applicant shall: Set aside on the plan of subdivision for the use of PAGE 85


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Powercor Australia Ltd reserves and/or easements, and/or leases, satisfactory to Powercor Australia Ltd where any electric substation (other than a pole mounted type) is required to service the subdivision. (e) The applicant shall: Provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any amendments which have been required. 22.

TELSTRA The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to Telstra in accordance with Section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

23.

TENIX (a) Easements in favour of SP AusNet (Gas) must be created on the plan to the satisfaction of SP AusNet (Gas). (b) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to SP AusNet (Gas) in accordance with Section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

24.

EXPIRY OF THE PERMIT (STAGED SUBDIVISION) This permit will expire 10 years from the date it is issued. All plans of subdivision must be certified and all stages of the subdivision must be completed before this expiry date. The responsible authority may extend this time limit if a request is made in writing before the permit expires or within three months afterwards.

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2.7 SUBDIVISION OF LAND INTO TWO LOTS - 24-28 HOLMES ROAD, NORTH BENDIGO Document Information Author

Liz Commadeur, Subdivision Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose This application seeks approval for a two lot subdivision of the land at 24-28 Holmes Road, North Bendigo. Fourteen neighbours have objected to the subdivision principally because of concerns about the neighbourhood character, amenity and traffic issues. This report recommends that Council oppose the subdivision on neighbourhood character grounds and amenity issues, and that no permit be granted. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Report Application No: Application Date: Applicant: Land: Zoning: Overlays:

DS/247/2012 19 April 2012 Hadden Farren Land Surveyors Pty Ltd 24-28 Holmes Road, NORTH BENDIGO Residential 1 Zone Abuts Road Zone 1 There are no overlays.

Subject Site and Surrounds The subject site is located in an established residential area of North Bendigo on the eastern side of Holmes Road. The site is irregular in shape with an area of 1,403 square metres. The vacant site has two frontages to Holmes Road. The site is part of a large property which comprises of four parcels. Only one parcel is being subdivided. PAGE 89


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This section of Holmes Road is generally fully developed with modest sized dwellings, with lots ranging in size from 616 square metres to 3,500 square metres. The site is constrained by the steep nature of the site. The land slopes significantly from the north to the south of the site. A small number of large pine trees are located over the eastern part of the site and form an appealing background feature to the area. A large terraced garden is located over the balance of the site. A dwelling with a double storey extension is located at 22 Holmes Road which is encapsulated by the site (as shown in the plan below). Overall, six properties abut the site. Services, including reticulated water and sewerage, power, gas and telecommunications are able to be connected to the site. Holmes Road is a sealed road with no kerb and channel along the frontage. A footpath is constructed along the frontage of the site.

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objectorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; properties marked with a star.

Proposal The applicant seeks approval to subdivide the land into two lots, with Lot 1 being 1,012 square metres and Lot 2 being 391 square metres. It is proposed to subdivide an area currently used as a driveway off from an existing conventional piece of land, to create two new vacant lots each suitable for a dwelling. Both lots will have separate access from Holmes Road. Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The site is in the Residential 1 Zone and it abuts a Road Zone Category 1. The proposed subdivision of the site triggers the need for a permit due to the following clauses in the planning scheme:

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• •

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Clause 32.01-2 (Residential 1 Zone) Clause 52.29 (Land adjacent to a road zone).

The following provisions of the Planning Scheme are relevant to the application: State Planning Policy Framework: • • • • •

Regional development (clause 11.05) Urban environment (clause 15.01) Sustainable development (clause 15.02) Residential development (clause 16.01) Movement networks (clause 18.02)

Municipal Strategic Statement: • • • • • • • •

Municipal profile (clause 21.01) Key issues and influences (clause 21.02) Vision - strategic framework (clause 21.03) Strategic directions (clause 21.04) Settlement (clause 21.05) Housing (clause 21.06) Infrastructure (clause 21.09) Reference documents (clause 21.10)

Local Planning Policies: • •

Salinity and erosion risk policy (clause 22.04) North Bendigo residential character policy (clause 22.20)

Other relevant provisions:     

Residential 1 Zone (clause 32.01). Land adjacent to a road zone, category 1, or a public acquisition overlay for a category 1 road (clause 52.29). Residential subdivision (clause 56). Decision guidelines (clause 65). Referral and notice provisions (clause 66).

Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

VicRoads

No objection subject to conditions

Asset Planning and Design Unit No objection subject to conditions (Drainage)

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Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising, fourteen objections were received, with the grounds of objection being: •

Neighbourhood character

Amenity issues

Traffic safety

Devaluation of properties

A consultation meeting was not conducted. The objections are discussed below. Planning Assessment Neighbourhood Character The site is located within Precinct 1 of North Bendigo residential character policy. The precinct is described as being: “An area of housing built since the 1950s, in which roof shapes and position on the site are often important as they provide a consistent theme. The horizontal emphasis of the dwelling form results from the long, low elevations of the buildings in relation to their height. Low and transparent front fences create an open feel to the streetscape”. The desired future character for the precinct is to maintain the horizontality and articulation of the dwellings, and the openness of streetscapes. This part of Holmes Road generally reflects the description of this character policy and is comprised of lots that range in area from 615 square metres to 3,500 square metres. The eastern side of Holmes Road is located between Hoy Street to the south and Kookaburra Avenue to the north. The types of housing in Holmes Road are a mixture of modest brick and weatherboard dwellings with reasonable front and side setbacks, constructed through the 1950’s and 1970’s. Gardens tend to be small to medium in size, with low and transparent front fences. Holmes Road is quite steep, with the road having a steep decline towards the intersection of Hoy Street. Abutting the site to the north is a property with a large dwelling in the same ownership as the subject site.

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Figure 2: Location map showing subject site

The proposal is to create two lots on a site which is relatively steep. Lot 1 is a conventional rectangular shape, while Lot 2 is narrow and irregular in shape. The site has two frontages to Holmes Road with the proposed lots having a width of 20.12 metres (Lot 1) and 3.35 metres (Lot 2) and a depth of approximately 50 metres. The area of Lot 1 is 1012 square metres, while Lot 2 will be 391 square metres. The driveway to Lot 2 has an area of approximately 166 square metres, which leaves a balance of approximately 225 metres for the construction of a dwelling. Plans were submitted showing how a double storey dwelling can be located on Lot 2. The northern boundary of Lot 2 is 9 metres wide, which restricts the width of any future dwelling. In addition a retaining wall proposed to be constructed along the eastern boundary will further constrain the site. There has been no explanation on how future dwellings on the lots, in particular Lot 1, will impact on the landscape, especially in regards to the visual bulk. It is considered that whilst Lot 1 is of an acceptable size and shape, the main concern to the proposed subdivision is the limitations posed by Lot 2. Most of the objectors are concerned that the proposed dwelling on Lot 2, as shown on the notional house plans, will not be in keeping with the surrounding area. It has been argued that Lot 2 is too small and it is inappropriate to site a dwelling in an area known for being a secondary access to the land at 24-28 Holmes Road. In addition to this, the residents of 1 Sherrard Court are concerned about the visual impact of the proposed dwelling when viewed from their property.

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Having regard to the proposed subdivision and the objectors’ concerns, it is considered that the proposed subdivision is not in keeping with this neighbourhood character. The likely scale and bulk of any dwelling would be considered excessive. Indeed the indicative plans submitted with the application show the rear wall being located the full length and 1.5 metres from the common boundary with the property at 1 Sherrard Court. The scale and bulk of a double storey dwelling on Lot 2 will not respect the desired future character for the precinct because it will result in a high, box-like building located in an elevated position on the site. Overall, the two lot subdivision proposed on the site will not respect the objectives of the North Bendigo residential character policy and will detract from the character of the existing streetscape for the following reasons: • • •

The narrowness and shape of Lot 2 will result in a dwelling having a large footprint over the lot, as evidenced by the indicative plans submitted with the application. There are no similar type battle-axe subdivisions in the area. The area of Lot 2 is 391 square metres which is much smaller than the prevailing lot sizes in the area, including the lots along Holmes Road.

Amenity Issues Some of the objectors are concerned about potential overlooking of their properties which abut the site. One objector states that “… the erection of a double storey dwelling overlooking this area will detract from the ambience and design that we have incorporated into our backyard area… Our privacy in our own backyard, which we value immensely, will be lost…”. The objectors at 22 Holmes Road are clearly concerned about the potential for overlooking and overshadowing of their property. In this case, overlooking could occur if any approved house plan does not adequately address the issue as the site is at a higher elevation than the property at 22 Holmes Road. The house plans submitted addresses overlooking and any approval could tie this plan to the subdivision by permit condition. The issue of overshadowing would be minimal, with the rear yard of 22 Holmes Road experiencing some overshadowing only in the morning. Traffic Safety Issues The objectors are concerned that the proposed subdivision will present traffic problems, with vehicles entering and exiting Lot 2. This concern is heightened due to the steepness and narrowness of the driveway to Lot 2. Council’s Traffic Engineer has identified that the sight distance at the front property boundary is unsatisfactory. Should a permit be issued, a condition will be required ensuring that the sight distance be appropriate at the property exits onto the road.

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The application was referred to VicRoads who have not objected to the proposed subdivision, however require a number of conditions be included on the permit. The applicant would be required to demonstrate that all vehicles are driven in a forward direction when entering and exiting the land. In addition, access to Lot 2 must be via a sealed driveway to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Devaluation of Properties in the Neighbourhood Devaluation of property is not a town planning consideration as has been repeatedly tested at VCAT. Rescode Some Rescode requirements for subdivision including solar orientation, access and servicing can be achieved. However, the proposal does not comply with Clause 56.03-5, as noted above the neighbourhood character will be compromised by the proposed frontage and small size of Lot 2. The house plans submitted do address overlooking issues but the site is so constrained that very limited and usable private open space will be provided and would result in an extremely poor level of amenity for any future residents. Conclusion The existing conditions make it extremely difficult to subdivide the land without affecting neighbourhood character and residential amenity. For the reasons above, it is considered that the proposed subdivision does not comply with the Planning Scheme and a permit should not be granted. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority, may resolve to approve or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments â&#x20AC;˘

Objections

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RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to Section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to Refuse to Grant a Permit for a two lot subdivision at 24-28 Holmes Road, North Bendigo on the following grounds: 1. The development density that will result from Lot 2 of the proposed subdivision will have a detrimental impact on the amenity of neighbouring properties. 2. The proposed subdivision, in particular Lot 2, does not respect the desired future character of Precinct 1 of the North Bendigo Residential Character Policy due to the small and irregular shape of Lot 2.

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Proposed plan of subdivision

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Proposed dwelling site on Lot 2

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Elevations of proposed dwelling on Lot 2

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Site Plan

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2.8 SUBDIVISION OF LAND INTO 5 LOTS AND CONSTRUCTION OF 5 TWO STOREY DWELLINGS AND A WAIVER OF VISITOR PARKING REQUIREMENT - 46 NOLAN STREET, NORTH BENDIGO Document Information Author

Chris Duckett, Co-ordinator Land Use

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Planning permission is sought for a 5 lot subdivision and construction of 5 two storey dwellings and a waiver of visitor car parking requirements at 46 Nolan Street, North Bendigo. The key issues are as follows: • • • •

The principle of residential development in this location. Whether the proposed subdivision and development is a good urban design outcome which will preserve neighbourhood character. Whether the proposal will adversely affect residential amenity. Whether there will be an adverse impact on traffic safety and car parking availability in the area.

The application is before Council as objections to the proposal have been received from 35 local residents. A consultation meeting was held with six residents in attendance along with the applicant and two Councillors. All concerns were discussed and this resulted in the applicant agreeing to provide additional plans on overlooking and clarification on survey information. This information was provided and re-advertised to local residents. Two of the residents who attended the meeting provided further letters of objection. The site is in a good location to provide new housing in terms of accessibility to employment opportunities, leisure and shopping facilities and public transport. The proposal will have the positive effect of providing additional, much needed housing in an urban area, whilst preserving neighbourhood character. This report considers the permit application and recommends that the Greater Bendigo City Council issues a Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: PAGE 101


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• • •

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Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Report Application No: Application Date: Applicant: Land: Zoning: Overlays:

DSD/273/2012 1 May 2012 Baenziger Coles Pty Ltd 46 Nolan Street, NORTH BENDIGO Residential 1 Zone None

Subject Site and Surrounds The site is a relatively regular shaped allotment with frontage of 32m and an area of 906m2. The site is currently vacant and has a diagonal cross fall of around 3-4 metres from front to back. The surrounding land uses are wholly residential and the site is within the area covered by North Bendigo 6 Residential Character Policy which describes the neighbourhood as follows: "An area of mostly post war housing, in which consistency of setbacks within streetscapes is important. Roof shapes are also important as they are prominent in streetscapes and provide a consistent theme. Front fences are low in height or transparent, creating an open feel to the streetscape." To the immediate north of the site Nolan Street is effectively split into two sections by a 6.5m wide median strip. It is likely that this road construction was necessitated by the varying topography of the land which has resulted in some of the residential lots on the western side of the road being in the region of 2-4m higher than those on the eastern side.

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Figure 1:

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Location map showing subject site. Objectors' properties marked with a star. objectors not shown as they are located outside the scope of the map.

Note: 13

Proposal It is proposed to subdivide the block into 5 lots and construct a terrace of 5 two storey dwellings. The lots would be in the range of 150m2 to 241m2. The dwellings would have a living/dining/kitchen area and laundry on the ground floor, with three bedrooms and two bathrooms on the first floor. Four of the dwellings would have a single garage with a second car space in front of the garage. The fifth dwelling would have a double garage with parking for a third vehicle in front. Secluded private open space would be in the form of rear gardens in the range of 4-8m in depth and first floor balconies at the front of the dwellings. The dwellings would be of modern, flat roof design using a variety of materials including render at ground floor, light coloured weatherboard at first floor, timber cladding on entry points and balconies, flush-panelled garage doors and feature projecting box windows/balconies at first floor. Although the proposal will result in five dwellings on the site, the development has been designed in such a way as to give a perceived appearance of three dwellings due to the siting of various architectural features such as the projecting box window and flushpanelled garage doors. The dwellings would be accessed via three crossovers, two shared doubles and a single. A waiver for a visitor's parking space is also sought as part of the application.

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Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: State Planning Policy Framework • • • •

11.05 Regional Planning 15.01 Urban environment 15.02 Sustainable environment 16.01 Medium density housing

Municipal Strategic Statement • •

21.05 Settlement 21.06 Housing

Local Planning Policies •

22.20 North Bendigo Precinct 6

Other Provisions • • • •

32.01 Residential 1 Zone 55 Two or more dwellings on a lot and residential buildings 56 Residential Subdivision 65 Decision Guidelines

Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

Telstra

No objection subject to conditions

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers.

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As a result of advertising 35 objections were received, with the grounds of objection being: Residential Amenity • • • • • • •

Visual intrusion of flank wall Overlooking/loss or privacy Overshadowing Loss of view Lack of private open space Noise from air conditioning units Non compliance with ResCode

Neighbourhood Character • • • • • • • •

Box appearance-doesn't suit the area Two storey dwellings out of keeping Monolithic Impact on streetscape Doesn't fit guidelines of North Bendigo 6 Residential Character Policy Inappropriate roof form Inappropriate materials, design and layout Density limits possibilities for trees and gardens

Traffic and Parking • • •

Increase in traffic Pedestrian and vehicular hazard from cars reversing onto Nolan Street Inadequate parking and impact on parking availability

Other Issues • Loss of property values • Adverse possession of part of site has been claimed Planning Assessment Principle of Residential Development Clause 11.05-4 Regional planning strategies and principles has the objective of developing regions and settlements which have a strong identity, are prosperous and are environmentally sustainable. Of particular relevance to this application is the strategy to limit urban sprawl and direct growth into existing settlements, promoting and capitalising on opportunities for urban renewal and redevelopment. Clause 16.01 Residential development has objectives which promote a diverse range of housing that meets community needs in locations that offer good access to services and transport and that is both water and energy efficient. The importance of energy and resource efficiency is also referenced in Clause 15.02 Sustainable development.

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The City's Settlement and Housing policies within the Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS) are supported by a residential development strategy which advocates for urban consolidation in the form of high quality, medium density in-fill housing. The land is zoned Residential 1 and lies within the Urban Growth Boundary and the proposal meets the overarching objectives of housing policies within the State Planning Policy Framework (SPPF) and the Residential Development Strategy as it would provide for urban consolidation in an area which has good access to local services and facilities. In addition the applicant has submitted a sustainable design statement which details a number of energy and resource efficiencies. The Residential Strategy highlights key inner urban locations such as the CBD, Railway station, hospital and university precincts where an increase in residential density is appropriate. The site is not within the indicative boundary of the hospital precinct as mapped in the Residential Strategy. However it is within walking distance of the hospital and can readily be considered as part of the precinct. Whilst the location is appropriate for medium density infill development, it is important to balance this against other objectives in the Planning Scheme as set out in the MSS. This includes the need to ensure developments achieve high standards of urban design and meet the identified neighbourhood character of areas. This is discussed further below. Urban Design and Neighbourhood Character This is a proposal which requires consideration of the familiar challenge of balancing State and Local policies which encourage consolidation of new housing within established urban areas whilst at the same time requiring development to be respectful of existing neighbourhood characteristics. Neighbourhood character is referenced as an important consideration throughout the Planning Scheme including Clauses 15.01 Urban Environment, 16.01 Residential Development, 21.06 Housing, 22.20 North Bendigo Residential Character Policy, 32.01 Residential 1 Zone, 43.05, 55 Two dwellings on a lot and 56 Residential Subdivision. This proposal will introduce a contemporary, relatively dense form of urban development in a terrace style not commonly found in many residential locations in Bendigo. However it is clear that the design intent does not aspire to produce 'more of the same' and indeed preserving neighbourhood character does not require such an approach. This has been established as a principle in many VCAT cases. An assessment therefore needs to be made as to whether the development is so different and so contrasting that it would be harmful to existing neighbourhood character. In the absence of a Neighbourhood Character Overlay, the application needs to be assessed against Residential Character Policy Clause 22.20 which applies to land in the suburb of North Bendigo.

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The character policy has a number of objectives which call for an appropriate landscape plan, buildings which follow the contours of the land, compatible front and side setbacks, buildings which respect the predominant building height in the street and complementary building materials, finishes and fencing. These objectives are assessed below: Landscape Plan Although the site coverage has placed some limitations on the extent of the landscaping, the applicant has engaged a landscape architect who has designed an extensive and varied design. One area of concern is the concrete driveways, which cover a large amount of the frontage. A less obtrusive material would soften the impact in the streetscape and it is proposed to impose a condition to this effect if a permit is granted. Contours The design has successfully integrated the dwellings so that they follow the contours along the street frontage and from the front to the rear of the block. Setbacks The front setback is greater than the dwelling at 48 Nolan Street and equal to the dwelling at 44 Nolan Street. The side setback objective seeks distances of between 1 and 3 metres from both side boundaries, based on the predominant pattern in the streetscape. The development largely complies with this objective as a 1.2m setback is provided along the northern side boundary although at the front of the block there is a wall on part of the boundary. On the southern boundary the setback is in the range of 0.9m and 2.7m. It is noted however that this is a terraced style development which by design does not provide setbacks between dwellings. Building Height and Form In addition to respecting the predominant building heights this objective encourages the use of low pitched roof forms. One of local residents' concerns is the introduction of two storey dwellings in an area predominated by single storey dwellings. This is a concern that is often raised by local residents. However two storey dwellings are rarely seen as inappropriate in principle, even in areas where single storey dwellings are the common building typology. Moreover the test is whether or not the dwellings are respectful of neighbourhood character. The height of the development is respectful of neighbourhood character in that although the dwellings are two storey, the use of flat roof design and the height of the adjoining dwellings would result in a development which would be of a similar height to the surrounding development. The concept of the use of flats roofs in an area where pitched roofs are common was an issue that was discussed at the consultation meeting. The applicant's rationale was that having pitched roofs on two storey dwellings would increase the height and bulk significantly which would adversely impact on the character of the area. In light of this and the fragmented nature of the Nolan Street streetscape discussed below it is agreed that flat roofs is an appropriate design response for this site.

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Building Materials, Finishes and Fencing The proposed materials are a mix of render, timber and cement sheeting with neutral and subdued colours. This would fit in with the existing character of the area. No fencing is proposed. This is a high quality well-designed development which although in contrast to surrounding dwellings in terms of design and density it is respectful of neighbourhood character in regard to its scale and use of materials and colours. This part of Nolan Street has some characteristics which provide some opportunity to design a development which varies from other dwellings in the area. For instance, were this a quiet suburban street with a traditional, uniform streetscape it may be more difficult to accommodate this type of development. However, Nolan Street is a wide road in which one side of the street is significantly higher than the other and has a central reservation. This has the effect of making the existing streetscape less cohesive than it might otherwise be. In addition, around 100m to the north of the site on the eastern side of Nolan Street is Bendigo North Primary School which has a poor presentation to the street, comprising high stone walls, chain link fencing and a long bank of water tanks. Opposite the school is a large piece of land owned by the Department of Education. These two sites combined add a further disruptive element in the rhythm of the streetscape which makes a more intensive development such as this less intrusive and more appropriate. Residential Amenity The purpose of Clause 55 Two or more dwellings on a lot and residential buildings includes the need to achieve residential development that respects neighbourhood character and provides reasonable standards of amenity for existing and new residents. It is a requirement of Clause 55 that a development must meet all of the objectives of the clause and should also meet all of the standards. All objectives have been assessed and have been met. The objectives relevant to the issues raised by objectors and not covered elsewhere in this report and the standards which require a variation are considered below: B14 Access The access provision includes the objective of ensuring the safe, manageable and convenient vehicle access to and from the development. The City's traffic engineer has assessed the proposal and is satisfied that access for the dwellings is safe and manageable and will not impact on road safety. Residents have mentioned a fatal accident which occurred in the vicinity of the site but it is understood that high speed was a major factor and this incident should be disregarded in any considerations of traffic safety.

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This clause has a standard which seeks accessways that do not exceed 33% of the street frontage. The proposed crossovers total 13.6m which equates to 43% of the frontage. Whilst there will be no traffic impact as a result of this, it does have the potential to adversely impact on neighbourhood character. As discussed under landscaping above with an appropriate surface material other than concrete, the impact on neighbourhood character could be negated. B18 Walls on Boundary The objective is to ensure that the location, length and height of a wall on a boundary respects the existing or preferred neighbourhood character and limits the impact on the amenity of existing dwellings. The issue of neighbourhood character has been addressed above. In terms of residential amenity, the wall on the boundary adjoining 48 Nolan Street is within the limits of the length set out in the standard but exceeds the average height restriction by 500mm. However this will not have a detrimental impact on residential amenity as it adjoins an area which is used for vehicular access to a carport and garage to the rear. B20 North-Facing Window The objective is to allow adequate solar access to existing north-facing habitable room windows. There are two north-facing windows at 44 Nolan Street. One of these windows will be partially affected by the wall closest to the boundary and will not meet the desired standard under the clause. This is demonstrated in Figure 2 below.

Figure 2: Section showing North facing window

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As this is very minor area of non-compliance it is reasonable to vary this standard as the loss of amenity is likely to be insignificant in the context of the remainder of the wall which is well within what is allowable under ResCode. The owner of 44 Nolan Street has raised additional concerns following the consultation meeting relating to the inaccurate representation of the size of the windows on the side elevation of his dwelling. The size of the windows is not the relevant consideration in this assessment; it is the distance from the affected window to the ResCode envelope as shown above B21 Overshadowing The objective is to ensure buildings do not significantly overshadow existing buildings. The standard requires that at least 40% of private open space receives a minimum of 5 hours of sunshine measured between 9am and 3pm on September 22nd. The only property affected by overshadowing is 44 Nolan Street. In a worst case scenario only 31% of the private open space would be overshadowed at 3pm on September 22nd. The proposal therefore comfortably complies with the standard. B22 Overlooking The objective is to limit views into existing secluded private open space and habitable room windows. The development has been designed to meet the overlooking standard. At ground floor level all views to adjoining properties would be obscured by existing and proposed fencing. At first floor level overlooking is prevented by either acceptable distances to adjoining properties, obscure glazing and/or use of fixed louvres which direct views downwards into the site rather than into neighbouring properties.. It would therefore be unreasonable to refuse the proposal on this basis. B28 Private Open Space The objective is to provide adequate private open space for the reasonable recreation and service needs of residents. The standard required is for each dwelling to have a minimum of 25 m2. The amount of private open space provided is in the range of 33m2 to 78m2 thus exceeding the standard. B24 Noise Impact The objective is to protect residents from external noise and contain noise in developments. Of relevance to local residents' concerns is potential noise from air conditioning units and there is a standard in this clause which requires air conditioning units to be located away from bedrooms in adjacent dwellings. This will be required by condition on any permit granted.

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Other Issues â&#x20AC;˘

Loss of property value

There is no evidence that approval of this proposal will affect the value of private property and in any case the effect of a planning decision on property values is generally not a material consideration. â&#x20AC;˘

Loss of view

The loss of a view is rarely a consideration in planning matters and there are no controls in the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme which protect existing views. â&#x20AC;˘

Adverse possession

The existing fence line on the boundary between 46 and 48 Nolan Street is incorrectly sited according to licensed survey information submitted. The owner of 48 Nolan Street has made a claim for adverse possession of a strip of land on the application site which is in the range of 80mm to 330mm wide. Adverse possession is a legal matter between the affected parties and not a planning consideration. If a planning permit is granted and the adverse possession is subsequently granted, the applicant would need to seek an amendment to the plans as it would require a slight reduction (330mm) in the width of Unit 1. Car Parking Clause 52.06 Car parking requires 2 spaces for dwellings with 3 or more bedrooms. Four of the dwellings have 2 spaces and the fifth has space for 3 cars. For developments of five or more dwellings a visitor car parking space is required. The applicant is seeking a waiver of this requirement. Requiring the provision of a visitor parking space may make it difficult to achieve an optimal design outcome which makes an efficient use of the site. There is adequate capacity to accommodate visitor parking on nearby streets and therefore it would be unreasonable to refuse it for this reason. Conclusion This development seeks to introduce a modern, diverse and denser form of development in North Bendigo whilst aiming to be respectful of neighbourhood character. Balancing increased densities and innovative design with neighbourhood character is not an uncommon challenge and one which will inevitably become more commonplace and arguably unavoidable as the City seeks to achieve a sustainable increase in densities in urban areas to meet population growth.

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Council will recall approving an application for residential development for Bendigo Hospital at Hunt Street in the same suburb on 29 February earlier this year. The hospital development was of a far greater scale than this proposal yet shares some similarities in respect of the need to balance neighbourhood character within the context of the need to provide new types of housing. Local residents do have valid concerns over the potential impact of the proposal on existing neighbourhood character. However the impact needs to be considered alongside the need to embrace change and diversity in the type of dwellings that are provided and an increase in the density of development where it is encouraged by planning policy as is the case here. It is concluded that Council should support the proposal. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority, may resolve to approve or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments â&#x20AC;˘

Objections

RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for the subdivision of land into 5 lots, construction of 5 dwellings and waiver of visitor parking requirement at 46 Nolan Street, North Bendigo subject to the following conditions: 1.

MODIFIED PLAN REQUIRED Before the use and/or development start(s), amended plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and three copies must be provided. The plans must be generally in accordance with the plans submitted with the application but modified to show: (a) An alternative surface treatment for the driveway which reduces the expanse of concrete/hard surfacing. (b) Location of air condition units which must not be sited next to bedrooms in adjacent dwellings. (c) Minimum sightline for pedestrian safety, pursuant to AS/NZ 2890.1-2004 Fg 3.3, must be provided at circulation roadway exits onto the street.

2.

NO LAYOUT ALTERATION The use and development permitted by this permit as shown on the endorsed plans and/or described in the endorsed documents must not be altered or modified (for any reason) except with the prior written consent of the Responsible Authority.

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3.

SCHEDULE OF MATERIALS Prior to the commencement of development a sample board of the proposed materials and colours to be used for the building shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the responsible authority.

4.

LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE The landscaping shown on the endorsed plans must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority, including that any dead, diseased or damaged plants are to be replaced.

5.

COMPLETION OF LANDSCAPING Before the occupation of the development starts or by such later date as is approved by the responsible authority in writing, the landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be carried out and completed to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

6.

GENERAL EXTERIOR TREATMENT The exterior treatment of the buildings permitted by this permit including all exterior decoration, materials, finishes and colours must be to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. The exterior treatment of the building(s) must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

7.

REFRIGERATION & AIR-CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT Any equipment required for refrigeration, air-conditioning, heating and the like must be suitably insulated for the purpose of reducing noise emissions and must be located so as to not be highly visible from the street to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

8.

CONSTRUCTION PHASE All activities associated with the construction of the development permitted by this permit must be carried out to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and all care must be taken to minimise the effect of such activities on the amenity of the locality.

9.

DETAILED DRAINAGE PLANS Prior to the certification of the plan of subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions. The plans must include: (a) direction of stormwater run off (b) a point of discharge for each lot (c) independent drainage for each lot

10.

STORMWATER DETENTION Prior to the connection of any building to the responsible authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drainage system, the owner or applicant must provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Allowable discharge Rate PAGE 113


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Q10 =

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14 l/s

The responsible authority may deem this condition satisfied by a development contribution towards the acceptance of surface and stormwater discharge from the approved subdivision, building and/or works, whether or not such new drainage infrastructure has been or will be situated within the boundaries of the subject land. Such amount is assessed as $3000 or such amount applying at the time of payment. $2,000 per additional lot > 500sq m $1,000 per additional lot < 500sq m 11.

STORMWATER QUALITY Before the use or development commences, the owner or applicant must provide a stormwater treatment system to achieve the “Best Practice Environmental Guidelines” storm water quality (Victorian Stormwater Committee, 1999) in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. The responsible authority may deem this condition satisfied by a development contribution towards the acceptance of surface and stormwater discharge from the approved subdivision, building and/or works, whether or not such new stormwater treatment infrastructure has been or will be situated within the boundaries of the subject land or in its immediate catchment. Such amount is assessed as $805 or such amount applying at the time of payment.

12.

DRAINAGE WORKS Prior to the issue of the Statement of Compliance for the subdivision, drainage works must be constructed in accordance with plans approved by the responsible authority in condition 9 above.

13.

SECTION 173 AGREEMENT – ON SITE DETENTION SYSTEM Should the applicant opt to install on-site stormwater detention or water quality treatment then, prior to the issue of statement of compliance, the applicant/owner must enter into an Agreement under Section 173 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. Such Agreement must covenant that; (a) The on-site treatment system and/or detention system shall be designed by a qualified engineer and must be approved by the responsible authority prior to construction. (b) Each onsite-treatment system and/or detention system must be constructed either prior to, or currently with, the construction of any dwelling on the specified lots. (c) Each system must be completed prior to connection to the responsible authority’s drainage system. (d) The owner will maintain each on-site treatment system and/or detention system and not modify without prior written approval from the responsible authority. (e) The owner shall allow duly authorised officers of the responsible authority to inspect the systems at mutually agreed times. (f) The Owner will pay for all costs associated with the construction and PAGE 114


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maintenance of each on-site treatment and detention system. 14.

CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ASSETS Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb & channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development. Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit.

15.

VEHICLE CROSSINGS (a) Vehicular access to the subject land from any roadway or service lane (and vice versa) must be by way of a vehicle crossing(s) constructed at right angles to the road, to suit the proposed driveway(s) and vehicles that will use the crossing. (b) If the existing layback is not used, it must be removed and barrier kerb reinstated. (c) The driveway must be 1m clear of the stormwater pit. (d) A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve.

16.

SEALED CAR PARK Areas set aside for the parking of vehicles together with the aisles and drives must be properly formed to such levels that they can be utilised in accordance with the endorsed plan and must be drained and provided with an impervious all weather seal coat. The areas must be constructed, drained and maintained in a continuously useable condition to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

17.

USE OF CAR PARKING AREAS Areas set aside for the parking and movement of vehicles as shown on the endorsed plan must be made available for such use and must not be used for any other purpose.

18.

FENCING OF SITE The fence(s) as shown on the endorsed plans(s) must be erected and maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

19.

NO MUD ON ROADS In the event of mud, crushed rock or other debris being carried onto public roads or footpaths from the subject land, appropriate measures must be implemented to minimise the problem to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

20.

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE CONTRIBUTION The applicant or owner must pay to the City of Greater Bendigo an amount equivalent to 5% of land in the subdivision. This payment must be made before a Statement of Compliance is issued and may be varied under section 19 of the Subdivision Act 1988. PAGE 115


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21.

TELSTRA The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to Telstra in accordance with section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

22.

TENIX The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to SP AusNet (Gas) in accordance with section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

23.

POWERCOR (a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act 1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with section 8 of that Act. (b) The applicant shall provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision in accordance with Powercor’s requirements and standards, including the extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply system, as required by Powercor (a payment to cover the cost of such work will be required). In the event that a supply is not provided the applicant shall provide a written undertaking to Powercor Australia Ltd that prospective purchasers will be so informed. (c) The applicant shall where buildings or other installations exist on the land to be subdivided and are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be brought into compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry. The applicant shall arrange compliance through a registered electrical contractor. (d) The applicant shall provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any amendments that have been required. (e) Any buildings must comply with the clearances required by the Electricity Safety (Network Assets) Regulations. (f) Any construction work must comply with the Officer of the Chief Electrical Inspector “No Go Zone” rules.

24.

COLIBAN WATER (a) The owner is required to provide reticulated water and sewerage services to each of the lots within the subdivision. Services are to be provided in accordance with our specifications. (b) All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed, are to be protected by Registered Easement in favour of Coliban Region Water Corporation.

Telstra Note Approval does not cover alterations to existing Telstra plant or network. Locations of existing network can be obtained from Dial Before You Dig – Ph: 1100 For co-ordinated Telstra plant reticulation in this development, please refer to www.telstrasmartcommunity.com to register your development and apply for reticulation.

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City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Note A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve. CONSENT FOR WORK ON ROAD RESERVES The applicant must comply with: (a) The Road Management Act 2004, (b) Road Management (Works and Infrastructure) Regulations 2005, and (c) Road Management (General) Regulations 2005 with respect to any requirements to notify the coordinating authority and/or seek consent from the coordinating authority to undertake â&#x20AC;&#x153;worksâ&#x20AC;? (as defined in the Act) in, over or under the road reserve. The responsible authority in the inclusion of this note on this planning permit is not deemed to have been notified of, or to have given consent, to undertake any works within the road reserve as proposed in this permit.

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Proposed Site Plan / Ground Floor

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Proposed First Floor Plan

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Front Elevation

Rear Elevation

Side Elevation (viewed from 44 Nolan Street)

Side Elevation (viewed from 48 Nolan Street)

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2.9 SUBDIVISION OF LAND INTO FOUR LOTS AND CONSTRUCTION OF FOUR DWELLINGS - 24 HARPIN STREET, STRATHDALE Document Information Author

Chris Duckett, Co-ordinator Land Use

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Planning permission is sought for a 4 lot subdivision and construction of 1 single storey dwellling and 3 two storey dwellings at 24 Harpin Street, Strathdale. The key issues are as follows: • • • •

The principle of intensification of residential development in this location. Whether the proposed subdivision and development is a good urban design outcome which will preserve neighbourhood character. Whether the proposal will adversely affect residential amenity. Whether there will be an adverse impact on traffic and car parking availability in the area.

The application is before Council as 2 objections to the proposal were received from adjoining property owners. A consultation meeting was held with the one objector and the applicant in attendance. Some minor changes to the proposal were discussed which may have made the development more acceptable to the objector, however further to the meeting the applicant declined to make any changes. The site is in a good location to provide new housing in terms of accessibility to employment opportunities, leisure and shopping facilities and public transport. The proposal will provide additional, much needed housing in an urban area, whilst preserving neighbourhood character. This report considers the permit application and recommends that the Greater Bendigo City Council issues a Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success. PAGE 122


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Report Application No: Application Date: Applicant: Land: Zoning:

DSD/215/2012 5 April 2012 G K House 24 Harpin Street, STRATHDALE Residential 1 Zone

Subject Site and Surrounds The site is a rectangular allotment with frontage of 32m and an area of 1,350m2. The site has an existing single storey dwelling of limited heritage value, circa 1955 located at the front of the block and there is a fall of around 3 metres from front to back. The surrounding land uses are wholly residential with single storey detached dwellings being the typical built form. The site is within the area covered by Strathdale/Kennington 8 Residential Character Policy which describes the neighbourhood as follows: "This area, developed mostly from the 1960s to the 1980s, is one in which the horizontal emphasis of dwelling form is important, resulting from the long, low elevations of the buildings in relation to their height. Brick and tile is the predominant building material. Most have similar, modest front and side setbacks, creating a more intimate street feel, combined with an absence of front fencing in most instances."

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objectors' properties marked with a star.

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Proposal It is proposed to subdivide the block into 4 lots and construct 4 dwellings. The development would be laid out with a single storey dwelling fronting Harpin Street and 3 two storey dwellings to the rear, accessed via a common property driveway. The existing dwelling will be demolished to accommodate the new dwellings. The lots would be in the range of 232m2 to 322m2 with a common property of 192m2. All dwelling would have a living/dining/kitchen area, three bedrooms, laundry and two bathrooms with a double garage. Secluded private open space would be in the form of rear/side gardens. The dwellings would be of modern angular roof design using a variety of colours and materials including render, metal cladding and facebrick. Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: State Planning Policy Framework • • • •

11.05 Regional planning 15.01 Urban environment 15.02 Sustainable environment 16.01 Medium density housing

Municipal Strategic Statement • •

21.05 Settlement 21.06 Housing

Local Planning Policies •

22.24 Strathdale/Kennington 8 Residential Character Policy

Other Provisions • • • •

32.01 Residential 1 Zone 55 Two or more dwellings on a lot and residential buildings 56 Residential Subdivision 65 Decision Guidelines

Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal:

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Referral

Comment

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

Telstra

No objection subject to conditions

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising 2 objections were received, with the grounds of objection being: Residential Amenity •

Loss of privacy

Unreasonable increase in noise from increased density and construction

Neighbourhood Character • Two storey dwellings and density out of keeping with the area • Impact on streetscape • Inappropriate materials, design and layout Traffic and Parking •

Increase in traffic

No visitor parking has been provided

Other Issues •

Impact on property values

Assumption that lots in the area have restrictions which limit development to one dwelling per lot.

Planning Assessment Principle of Residential Development Clause 11.05-4 Regional planning strategies and principles has the objective of developing regions and settlements which have a strong identity, are prosperous and are environmentally sustainable. Of particular relevance to this application is the strategy to limit urban sprawl and direct growth into existing settlements, promoting and capitalising on opportunities for urban renewal and redevelopment. PAGE 125


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Clause 16.01 Residential development has objectives which promote a diverse range of housing that meets community needs in locations that offer good access to services and transport and that is both water and energy efficient. The importance of energy and resource efficiency is also referenced in Clause 15.02 Sustainable development. The City's Settlement and Housing policies within the Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS) are supported by a residential development strategy which advocates for urban consolidation in the form of high quality medium density in-fill housing. The land is zoned Residential 1 and lies within the Urban Growth Boundary and the proposal meets the overarching objectives of housing policies within the State Planning Policy Framework (SPPF) and the Residential Development Strategy as it would provide for urban consolidation in an area which has good access to local services and facilities. Whilst the location is appropriate for medium density, infill development, it is important to balance this against other objectives in the Planning Scheme as set out in the MSS. This includes the need to ensure developments achieve high standards of urban design and meet the identified neighbourhood character of areas. This is discussed further below. Urban Design and Neighbourhood Character This is a proposal which requires consideration of the familiar challenge of balancing State and Local policies which encourage urban consolidation within established urban areas whilst at the same time requiring an assessment against existing neighbourhood characteristics. In the absence of a Neighbourhood Character Overlay the relevant policy consideration is Clause 22.29 Strathdale/Kennington residential character policy which seeks to ensure that development is responsive to the desired future character of the area in which it is located and to retain and enhance the identified elements that contribute to its character. The policy sets out how the desired future character is to be achieved by the following objectives and design responses. Objectives

Suggested Design Response

To strengthen the garden settings of the Prepare a landscape plan to accompany dwelling. all applications for new dwellings. Retain large, established trees and provide for the planting of new indigenous and native trees whenever possible. Comment: Although there are limited opportunities for landscaping, the plan that has been submitted for the small areas that are to be landscaped is not of adequate quality or substance to meet the objective. The applicant has agreed to submit a revised plan which would meet the objective. There is no significant vegetation on the site. To minimise site disturbance and impact Buildings should be designed to follow of the building on the landscape. the contours of the site or step down the site. PAGE 126


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Objectives

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Suggested Design Response

Comment: The dwellings have been stepped down the site to reduce the level of cut and fill required. To maintain the consistency, where The front setback should be not less than present, of building front setbacks. the average setback of the adjoining two dwellings. Comment: The proposed setback at 4.6m is less than the average setback. However there is considerable variety in setbacks within the street and the existing dwelling has a setback of around 2m. As this proposal would increase the setback by 2.6m it is difficult to argue that the objective is not met. To maintain the rhythm of dwelling Buildings should be setback between 1 spacing. and 3 metres from both side boundaries, based on the predominant pattern in the streetscape. Comment: The front dwelling would have a setback of 6 metres to the southern side boundary and zero setback to the northern side boundary. Although this does not follow the suggested design response, many dwellings in the area have a zero setback to one side boundary so it is deemed acceptable. To ensure that buildings and extensions Respect the predominant building height do not dominate the streetscape. in the street and nearby properties. Use low pitched roof forms. Comment: The predominant building height in the area is single storey and therefore the two storey dwellings to the rear will be noticeably higher than most dwellings. However low pitched roof forms have been used and this will ensure that the development does not dominate the streetscape. To ensure front fences are appropriate to Provide open style front fencing. the era of the dwellings and maintain the Front fences should not exceed 1.2 openness of the streetscape. metres other than in exceptional case. Comment: No front fence is proposed. This proposal will introduce a very contemporary development into an established suburb. The design is different to much of the existing housing stock in the immediate area but this does not mean that the proposal does not respect neighbourhood character. There is mix of architectural styles in the area and much of the built form dates from the later half of the twentieth century. Given the variety of building styles and materials in the locality, a development with a modern design can be readily accommodated into the area. Residential Amenity The purpose of Clause 55 Two or more dwellings on a lot and residential buildings includes the need to achieve residential development that respects neighbourhood character and provides reasonable standards of amenity for existing and new residents. It is a requirement of Clause 55 that a development must meet all of the objectives of the clause and should also meet all of the standards. All objectives have been assessed and have been met. The objectives relevant to the issues raised by objectors and not covered elsewhere in this report are considered below: PAGE 127


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B22 Overlooking The objective is to limit views into existing secluded private open space and habitable room windows. The development has been designed to meet the overlooking standard. At ground floor level all views to adjoining properties would be obscured by existing and proposed fencing. The two storey dwellings all have the upper level setback to ensure compliance with the ResCode standard. It would therefore be unreasonable to refuse a proposal on this basis. B15 Parking Location The objectives include the need to protect residents from vehicular noise within developments. Of relevance to one objector's concerns is the potential noise impact from the vehicular access. This clause has a standard which requires shared accessways to be located at least 1.5 metres from the windows of habitable rooms. The objector's dwelling is located around 12m from the accessway and therefore acceptable in terms of the objective. Traffic and Car Parking One objector has raised a concern regarding the absence of visitor parking and the increase in traffic in the area. There is no requirement under the Planning Scheme to provide visitor parking for a development of this size. The amount of traffic generated by a small subdivision such as this can be accommodated in an urban residential area, and the proposal will not generate an adverse impact on the street network. Other issues Loss of Property Value There is no evidence that approval of this proposal will affect the value of private property and in any case the effect of a planning decision on property values is generally not a material planning consideration. Conclusion The proposal would result an efficient use of an infill development site which is in a good location to provide new housing in terms of accessibility to employment opportunities, leisure and shopping facilities and public transport. This proposal seeks to introduce a modern development in an established residential area whilst aiming to be respectful of neighbourhood character. The development is well designed, heavily articulated and has interesting variety in the materials to be used. PAGE 128


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In summary, the proposal respects neighbourhood character and preserves residential amenity whilst providing for much needed additional housing in an accessible location. It is concluded that Council should support the proposal. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority, may resolve to approve or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments â&#x20AC;˘

Objections

RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for a four lot subdivision and construction of four dwellings at 24 Harpin Street, Strathdale subject to the following conditions: 1.

MODIFIED PLAN REQUIRED Before the use and/or development start(s), amended plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and two copies must be provided. The plans must be generally in accordance with the plans submitted with the application but modified to show: (a) Amendments to the site layout, landscaping and colour schedule in accordance with the letter submitted by 'Conceptz' dated 25th May 2012 and condition 2 of this permit. (b) The minimum sight line for pedestrian safety, pursuant to AS/NZ 2890.1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2004 Fig 3.3, at circulation roadway exits onto the street. This can be achieved by lowering the side fence height to 900mm.

2.

LANDSCAPE PLAN REQUIRED Before the development starts, a landscape plan to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plan will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The plan must be drawn to scale with dimensions and three copies must be provided. The plan must show: (a) Details of surface finishes of pathways and driveways (b) Planting schedule of all proposed trees, shrubs and ground covers, including botanical names, common names, pot sizes, sizes at maturity, and quantities of each plant.

3.

NO LAYOUT ALTERATION The use and development permitted by this permit as shown on the endorsed plans and/or described in the endorsed documents must not be altered or modified (for any reason) except with the prior written consent of the PAGE 129


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responsible authority. 4.

LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE The landscaping shown on the endorsed plans must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority, including that any dead, diseased or damaged plants are to be replaced.

5.

COMPLETION OF LANDSCAPING Before the occupation of the development starts or by such later date as is approved by the responsible authority in writing, the landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be carried out and completed to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

6.

REFRIGERATION & AIR-CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT Any equipment required for refrigeration, air-conditioning, heating and the like must be suitably insulated for the purpose of reducing noise emissions and must be located so as to not be highly visible from the street to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

7.

CONSTRUCTION PHASE All activities associated with the construction of the development permitted by this permit must be carried out to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and all care must be taken to minimise the effect of such activities on the amenity of the locality.

8.

DETAILED DRAINAGE PLANS Prior to the certification of the plan of subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions. The plans must include: (a) direction of stormwater run off; (b) a point of discharge for each lot; (c) independent drainage for each lot.

9.

STORMWATER DETENTION Prior to the connection of any building to the responsible authority’s drainage system, the owner or applicant must provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Allowable discharge Rate: Q100 =

10.

14 l/s

STORMWATER QUALITY Before the use or development commences, the owner or applicant must provide a stormwater treatment system to achieve the “Best Practice Environmental Guidelines” storm water quality (Victorian Stormwater Committee, 1999) in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. The responsible authority may deem this condition satisfied by a development PAGE 130


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contribution towards the acceptance of surface and stormwater discharge from the approved subdivision, building and/or works, whether or not such new stormwater treatment infrastructure has been or will be situated within the boundaries of the subject land or in its immediate catchment. Such amount is assessed as $850.00 or such amount applying at the time of payment. 11.

DRAINAGE WORKS Prior to the issue of the Statement of Compliance for the subdivision, drainage works must be constructed in accordance with plans approved by the responsible authority in condition 8 above.

12.

SECTION 173 AGREEMENT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ON SITE DETENTION SYSTEM Prior to the issue of statement of compliance, the applicant/owner must enter into an Agreement under Section 173 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. Such Agreement must covenant that; (a) The on-site detention system and/or treatment system shall be designed by a qualified engineer and must be approved by the responsible authority prior to construction. (b) Each detention system and/or treatment system must be constructed either prior to, or currently with, the construction of any dwelling on the specified lots. Each system must be completed prior to connection to the responsible authorityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drainage system. (c) The owner will maintain each on-site detention system and/or treatment system and not modify without prior written approval from the responsible authority. (d) The owner shall allow duly authorised officers of the responsible authority to inspect the systems at mutually agreed times. (e) The Owner will pay for all costs associated with the construction and maintenance of each on-site detention system and/or treatment system.

13.

CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ASSETS Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb & channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development. Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit.

14.

VEHICLE CROSSINGS Vehicular access to the subject land from any roadway or service lane (and vice versa) must be by way of a vehicle crossing(s) constructed at right angles to the road, to suit the proposed driveway(s) and vehicles that will use the crossing. A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve.

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15.

SEALED CAR PARK Areas set aside for the parking of vehicles together with the aisles and drives must be properly formed to such levels that they can be utilised in accordance with the endorsed plan and must be drained and provided with an impervious all weather seal coat. The areas must be constructed, drained and maintained in a continuously useable condition to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

16.

NO MUD ON ROADS In the event of mud, crushed rock or other debris being carried onto public roads or footpaths from the subject land, appropriate measures must be implemented to minimise the problem to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

17.

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE CONTRIBUTION The applicant or owner must pay to the City of Greater Bendigo an amount equivalent to 5% of land in the subdivision. This payment must be made before a Statement of Compliance is issued and may be varied under section 19 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

18.

TELSTRA The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to Telstra in accordance with section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

19.

TENIX The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to SP AusNet (Gas) in accordance with section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

20.

POWERCOR (a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act 1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with section 8 of that Act. (b) The applicant shall provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision in accordance with Powercor’s requirements and standards, including the extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply system, as required by Powercor (a payment to cover the cost of such work will be required). In the event that a supply is not provided the applicant shall provide a written undertaking to Powercor Australia Ltd that prospective purchasers will be so informed. (c) The applicant shall where buildings or other installations exist on the land to be subdivided and are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be brought into compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry. The applicant shall arrange compliance through a registered electrical contractor. (d) The applicant shall provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any amendments that have been required. (e) Any buildings must comply with the clearances required by the Electricity Safety (Network Assets) Regulations. (f) Any construction work must comply with the Officer of the Chief Electrical Inspector “No Go Zone” rules.

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21.

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COLIBAN WATER (a) The owner is required to provide reticulated water and sewerage services to each of the lots within the subdivision. Services are to be provided in accordance with our specifications. (b) All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed, are to be protected by Registered Easement in favour of Coliban Region Water Corporation.

Site Layout

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Unit 1 Perspective

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Unit 2/3 Perspective

Unit 4 Perspectives

Site Perspective

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2.10 CONSTRUCTION OF A DWELLING AND ASSOCIATED SHEDS ON LOT 2 AT 1000 AXEDALE-GOORNONG ROAD, FOSTERVILLE Document Information Author

Frank Casimir, Statutory Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose This application seeks planning permission to construct a dwelling and associated sheds on Lot 2 at 1000 Axedale-Goornong Road Fosterville. The size of the lot is 19.67 hectares and it is zoned Farming Zone. The application is before Council because two objections were received from nearby property owners. Both objectors declined the offer of consultation. The main issues with this application are: • Whether the proposed dwelling will promote the use of the land for agricultural purposes. • Whether the proposed dwelling will inhibit the existing farming practices on the adjoining lands. This report recommends that the City of Greater Bendigo Council issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit for the application. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Background Information A similar application on this site was refused by Council at its ordinary meeting of 5 May 2010. The main reason for the refusal was that the application did not satisfactorily respond to the decision guidelines for the construction of dwellings on lots smaller than 40 hectares in the Farming Zone.

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The applicant has amended their application to include additional supporting information regarding the type of agricultural use that they would carry out on the site to justify the construction of a dwelling on the site. They are now proposing to use the land also for Agriculture (the propagation of plant seedlings in greenhouses) once the dwelling is constructed. Report Application No: Application Date: Applicant: Land: Zoning: Overlays:

DR/407/2011 10 June 2011 CPG Australia Pty Ltd Lot 2 1000 Axedale-Goornong Road, FOSTERVILLE Farming Zone Road Zone 2 Environmental Significance Overlay 1

Subject Site and Surrounds The site is zoned Farming Zone with an Environmental Significance Overlay Schedule 1 (Watercourse Protection) along its eastern boundary. It has a frontage of approximately 180 metres with Axedale-Goornong Road to the west and extends to the bank of the Campaspe River to the east. The Environmental Significance Overlay affects only a strip of land along this river bank. There is an existing unsealed driveway which links some existing sheds on the site to Axedale-Goornong Road. The total area of the site is approximately 19.67 hectares. Axedale-Goornong Road is in a Road Zone Category 2. The site is flat and contains a few mature trees along its eastern and western boundaries and has a rural-type fence all round except along the eastern boundary. The site is being used for cattle grazing but to a smaller scale than other land uses in the area, which also include cropping for grain and hay production on lots ranging from 24 to 54 hectares. At approximately 1,250 metres to the west, is the underground portal of the operating Fosterville Gold Mine, whose mining license extends up to approximately 20 metres west of the site. There is an existing dwelling at approximately 350 metres to the north of the site.

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Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objectorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; properties marked with a star.

Proposal The proposal is for the construction of a single storey, four-bedroom, brick veneer dwelling and two associated sheds. The proposed dwelling will be constructed with a setback of at least 125 metres from Axedale-Goornong Road. The dwelling will be used in association with the agricultural use (propagation of plant seedlings) of the site. A Planning Permit is required to construct the dwelling and its associated sheds because the total area of the site is less than 40 hectares. Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: State Planning Policy Framework Clause 11.05 Regional Development Clause 14.01 Agriculture Municipal Strategic Statement Clause 21.04 Strategic Directions Clause 21.05 Settlement Clause 21.07 Economic Development Local Planning Policies Clause 22.01 Rural Dwellings Policy

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Other Provisions Clause 35.07 Farming Zone Clause 65 Decision Guidelines Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authority and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

Department of Primary Industries

The proposed dwelling will not be closer to the mine than other existing dwellings and therefore no objection to a permit being issued for the proposed dwelling subject to a note to be put on any permit that may be issued.

Environmental Laws

Health

&

Local No objection subject to a note to be put on the permit

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions.

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising, 2 objections were received, with the main grounds of objection being summarised as: •

Potential risk to our ‘right to farm’ because of the scale, nature and hours of operation of our agricultural activities.

Inaccuracy of the information provided with the application.

Permanent loss of agricultural land.

Disruption to the visual amenity of the area.

Construction of a dwelling and of associated sheds and of up to four greenhouses in the Farming Zone is an inappropriate use of valuable agricultural land.

The application will lead to a proliferation of similar dwellings in the area.

The objections are discussed below. Planning Assessment There are a number of clauses in State Planning Policy Framework which support this application. The two most relevant ones are Clause 11.05-3 - Rural Productivity and Clause 14.01-2 - Sustainable Agricultural Land Use.

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The objective of Clause 11.05-3 is to manage land use change and development in rural areas to promote agriculture and rural production. The strategies to achieve this objective include to prevent inappropriately dispersed urban activities in rural areas and to limit new housing development in rural areas. The proposed dwelling will not be used exclusively for rural living purposes but to support the proposed seedling propagation which is an agricultural use of land. The applicants have explained in their application that they have the skills for the proposed agricultural use of the land and that they need to live on the site to better manage and sustain their agricultural production. The proposal is therefore consistent with this clause. Clause 14.01-3 has the objective to encourage sustainable agricultural land use and strategies that further strengthen the need to sustainably manage rural lands for the long term. The applicant has provided a Land Management Plan for the development of the site and a Business Plan for the proposed agricultural use demonstrates that the land can be used in a sustainable manner for agricultural production and for a dwelling. At a local level, Clause 21.04 Strategic Directions outlines Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five key land use themes. Key Theme 1 (Settlement) and Key Theme 4 (Economic Development) are particularly relevant to this proposal. The objectives and strategies of Key Theme 1 are at Clause 21.05. The objectives and strategies set by this clause are primarily to protect rural areas including agricultural lands from residential development. The rationale that underpins these objectives and strategies is that rural areas play an important role in the economy of the municipality. The objectives of Clause 21.07 Economic Development include a number of objectives and strategies whose aims are principally to protect rural industry from residential development and to maintain potential for agricultural production. Although a dwelling would be constructed on the land, the primary use of the land would, in the context of this proposal, remain agricultural. The propagation of plant seedlings will require on-going on-site management for its sustainability and this legitimate agricultural use will not affect other nearby farming operations. Clause 22.01 Rural Dwellings Policy has as a basis that the Greater Bendigo rural areas have economic significance and that isolated dwellings have the potential to disrupt agricultural activities. The site is currently not being put to its full potential agricultural use. The applicants have reported that the proposed use of the site for plant seedlings propagation will put the site to a more intensively productive regime. The proposed dwelling will be occupied by the applicants who are skilled primary producers and there is an expectation that they already have a sense of the level of amenity in the area. Given the scale of the residential development and that of the proposed agricultural use of the land, the proposal does not have the potential to disrupt any surrounding agricultural activity Despite the above, the proposal has attracted two objections from the neighbouring property owners/occupiers. The objections are essentially about the compatibility of the proposed use of the land with the adjoining, existing land uses.

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There are long established farms around the subject site. Two of the nearby farmers are concerned that the residents of the new dwelling may not be capable of coping with the all-year round farming activities that occur in the area. When responding to the decision guidelines of Clause 35.07 of the Planning Scheme as an application requirement, the applicants have acknowledged that they are aware of the existing surrounding large scale farming activities. Their main reason to live on the site is that the proposed use of the land for the propagation of plant seedlings requires ongoing and all-year round management. This is consistent with the Planning Scheme which requires that new dwellings in the Farming Zone should support and enhance agricultural production. There are also concerns from one of the adjoining farmers about the accuracy of the information provided by the applicant with their application regarding the existing use of the land for hay production. However, the decision whether or not to grant a planning permit for this application cannot be based solely on the existing or previous uses of the land but also on its proposed uses and development. The permanent loss of agricultural land and inappropriate use of valuable agricultural land are the other concerns raised by the objectors. The applicant has prepared a Land Management Plan for the development of the site and also justified the siting of all permanent structures on the site. In this context, when considering the area of the land to be covered by the footprint of the dwelling and the sheds and the balance of the land to be used for agricultural purposes, it can be concluded that most of the land would remain under agricultural use. Therefore the agricultural use of the land would remain its primary use in accordance with the purposes of the Farming Zone. There are also concerns from the objectors about the impact of the proposal on the visual amenity of the area. The applicants have submitted indicative plans which show that the dwelling and all buildings and works would be setback at least 125 metres from the public road and 250 metres from the existing dwelling to the north. There are already some mature eucalyptus trees in the public road reserve and this can be augmented by more tree plantings on the land to further screen the development from views. All buildings and works are in excess of the required setbacks from other existing dwellings or public road. Given the topography of the site and the proposed and existing vegetation along its boundaries, this proposal would cause minimal disruption to the visual amenity of the area. Rural Areas Strategy The Rural Areas Strategy adopted by Council in 2009, recommends that new dwellings should not be supported in the Farming Zone unless they would support an agricultural use of the land. The Strategy has a set of criteria that must be used to test applications for dwellings in the Farming Zone. This application satisfies the criteria as it would promote the agricultural use of the land and will not fragment or adversely affect the agricultural use of the land. Similarly, agriculture will remain the primary use of the land and the risk that it will detrimentally affect the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;right-to-farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the adjoining farmers is minimal and this application is very unlikely to create a rural enclave.

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Conclusion The proposal meets the requirements of the Planning Scheme for use of dwellings in the Farming Zone. The applicants have demonstrated that they are primary producers and that the proposed dwelling is required for the sustainable management of the agricultural use of the land. This application is consistent with the policies of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme and the purposes of the Farming Zone and it is therefore recommended that Council should approve the proposal. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority, may resolve to approve or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments â&#x20AC;˘

Objections

RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for the construction of a dwelling and two associated sheds on Lot 2 at 1000, Axedale-Goornong Road, Fosterville subject to the following conditions: 1.

PLAN REQUIRED Before the use and/or development start(s), plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and two copies must be provided. The plans must show: (a) The site, floor and elevation plans for the proposed dwelling and two associated sheds. (b) The site plan must also show the driveway including location of cross-over and setbacks from all lot boundaries.

2.

NO LAYOUT ALTERATION The use and/or development permitted by this permit as shown on the endorsed plan(s) and/or described in the endorsed documents must not be altered or modified (for any reason) except with the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

3.

BUILDING SETBACKS All building and works shall be setback at least 125 metres from AxedaleGoornong Road and at least 20 metres from any lot boundaries.

4.

UPGRADE OF EXISTING DRIVEWAY The existing driveway must be upgraded to provide an all-weather access to the

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dwelling with dimensions adequate to accommodate emergency vehicles. 5.

POTABLE WATER SUPPLY The dwelling must be connected to a reticulated potable water supply or have an Alternative potable water supply with adequate storage for domestic use as well as for fire fighting purposes.

6.

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY The dwelling must be connected to a reticulated electricity supply or have an alternative energy source.

7.

LANDSCAPE SCREENING A minimum two-metre high vegetation screen must be provided within the site along the frontage of the site to limit views of the proposed buildings from the roadside and from neighbouring properties where appropriate. Appropriate plants compatible with existing vegetation in the vicinity of the site must be used to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

8.

MAINTENANCE OF LANDSCAPE SCREENING Once established, the landscape screen must be maintained in good condition to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

9.

LOADING AND UNLOADING The loading and unloading of plants/goods from vehicles must only be carried out on the land.

Department of Primary Industries Note: The subject site lies adjacent to Mining Licence MIN5404, which was granted under the Minerals Resources (Sustainable Development) Act 1990. Mining operations can generate ground and air vibration, dust, noise traffic and changes to the topography and landscape. Should you require any additional information please contact DPI on 136 186. Environmental Health Note: Before a building permit is issued for any works at the property, a septic tank permit to install must be issued by the responsible authority.

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SITE

Figure 2: Aerial photo showing the subject site and its surrounding

Figure 3: Indicative proposed site layout plan

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2.11 2-LOT SUBDIVISION, DEMOLITION OF OUTBUILDING AND PART OF DWELLING; CONSTRUCTION OF CARPORT AND FENCES - 19 MILROY STREET, BENDIGO Document Information Author

Simon Francis, Statutory Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose This report concerns a planning permit application to subdivide the land at 19 Milroy Street, Bendigo into two lots, demolition of an outbuilding, part demolition of existing dwelling, construction of a carport and fences. An existing dwelling at the front of the site will be retained on Lot 1 and one new lot will be created behind it with access via a new driveway. The location of a property boundary is particularly relevant to this application. There were two objections received from adjoining land owners. Both objectors met with the applicant on separate occasions which resulted in one party withdrawing their objection. This report assesses the merits of the proposed subdivision and discusses the issues raised by the objector. It is concluded that the proposal complies with the Planning Scheme. Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009 – 2013 (updated 2012) 1.

Built and Natural Environment Strategic Objectives: • Value, conserve and enhance the rich built and natural heritage. • Achieve high quality outcomes in planning and policy activities. • Encourage and foster high quality design to create environments that support public wellbeing and economic success.

Report Application No: Application Date: Applicant: Land: Zoning: Overlays:

DSD/456/2012 28 June 2012 CPG Australia Pty Ltd 19 Milroy Street, BENDIGO Residential 1 Zone Heritage Overlay 13

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Subject Site and Surrounds The subject site is located in an older, established residential area of Bendigo. The site is generally rectangular in shape with an area of 752 square metres. A weatherboard dwelling is located on the north eastern corner of the site. Services, including reticulated water and sewerage, power, gas and telecommunications are able to be connected to the site. Milroy Street is a sealed road with kerb and channel. There is a formal footpath along the site frontage. The site slopes from south to north of the site. Lot sizes in the area generally range from 200 to 1,000 square metres. The dwellings in the area tend to be conventional homes with reasonable side setbacks. The site is located within close proximity to the CBD, educational facilities, hospital and recreation facilities.

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objector's property is marked with a star.

Proposal The applicant seeks approval for a two lot subdivision at 19 Milroy Street, Bendigo. It is proposed to subdivide the rear yard off from the existing dwelling to create a new vacant lot suitable for a dwelling. Both lots will have direct access from Milroy Street. The areas of the lots are: â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Lot 1 Lot 2

327 square metres 424 square metres

Permission to demolish a galvanized iron outbuilding to the rear of the lot and a lean-to extension located on the northern side of the dwelling is also sought. A corrugated iron fence will be constructed to separating the lots. A new access way and skillion roofed carport will be constructed near the southern boundary to serve the existing dwelling.

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Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The site is within the Residential 1 Zone and covered by the Heritage Overlay Schedule 13 (Stevenson Street Precinct). A permit is required to subdivide the site pursuant to the zone and overlay provisions. A permit is also required for the development proposed pursuant to the overlay provisions. The following clauses in the Planning Scheme are relevant in the consideration of the application: State Planning Policy Framework • • • • •

Regional development (clause 11.05). Urban environment (clause 15.01). Sustainable development (clause 15.02). Residential development (clause 16.01). Development infrastructure (clause 19.03).

Municipal Strategic Statement • • • • • • •

Municipal profile (clause 21.01). Key issues and influences (clause 21.02). Vision - strategic framework (clause 21.03). Strategic directions (clause 21.04). Settlement (clause 21.05). Housing (clause 21.06). Reference documents (clause 21.10).

Local Planning Policies •

Central Bendigo Residential Character Policy Schedule 2 (clause 22.11)

Other Provisions     

Residential 1 Zone (clause 32.01). Heritage Overlay (clause 43.01) Residential subdivision (clause 56). Decision guidelines (clause 65). Referral and notice provisions (clause 66).

Consultation/Communication Referrals The following internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to standard conditions relating to minimum site line for pedestrian safety which could be a permit condition.

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions.

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Referral

Comment

Heritage Advisor

Heritage Advisor comment: The issue with the subdivision becomes the design of the new building on the subdivided portion of land. The subdivision should only be approved subject to an appropriate design for a building in terms of its potential visual impact upon the heritage values of the Precinct. Such a design should be contemporary, but should also be visually recessive, have pitched roofs, and acknowledge the materials, scale and character of its immediate environs. Heritage Advisor recommendations: The proposed demolition of the outbuildings and rear portion of the main dwelling will not adversely impact upon the heritage values of the Stevenson Street Heritage Precinct (HO13); the proposed subdivision of the land could potentially have an adverse impact upon the heritage values of the Stevenson Street Heritage Precinct (HO13) but there is insufficient information to provide a definitive response; the proposed subdivision should only be considered subject to an appropriate design for a new dwelling on the subdivided portion of land. Assessing Officer comment:: There is sufficient space to accommodate a dwelling on the proposed 424sqm lot 2. The applicant's choice for any future development must undergo a separate planning permit process and be assessed against the decision guidelines of the Heritage Overlay.

Public Notification The application was advertised to the public by mail to the adjoining land owners and an on-site notice. One objected was maintained and related to property boundary alignment. The grounds of objection are discussed later in this report. Planning Assessment Compliance with Clause 56 The residential subdivision provisions in clause 56 of the Planning Scheme apply to the application. The proposal meets all the Standards in clause 56. In particular it is noted that:   

The lots will be fully serviced; The site is close to services and community facilities; The lot created by the subdivision will add to the diversity and supply of residential land in Bendigo.

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Heritage The proposal meets the requirements of the Heritage Overlay. The City's Heritage Advisor's comments and recommendations on the design of the new house will be addressed when a planning permit application is received for development of lot 2. Grounds of Objection: Existing boundary fence between 19 & 21 Milroy Street is not constructed along the actual property boundary Both the applicant and the objector have raised the issue of the current fence not being constructed along the surveyed title boundary. This issue is a civil matter and one that can be addressed separately to the planning permit process. The applicant and objector are working towards addressing this issue. What is important to note is that even if the property boundary is to follow the current fence line, the subdivision would still meet the requirements of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. Conclusion For the reasons discussed above it is concluded that the permit application meets the requirements of the Planning Scheme and on this basis a permit should be granted. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority, may resolve to approve or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments â&#x20AC;˘

Objection

RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to Section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for a two lot subdivision, demolition of outbuilding and part of dwellings; construction of carport and fences at 19 Milroy Street, Bendigo subject to the following conditions: 1.

MODIFIED PLAN REQUIRED Before the use and/or development start(s), amended plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and three copies must be provided. The plans must be generally in accordance with the plans submitted with the application but modified to show: (a) The minimum sight line for pedestrian safety, pursuant to AS/NZ 2890.1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2004 Fig 3.3, must be provided at circulation roadway exits onto the street (b) Accurate site plan detailing where the boundary fence between 19 & 21 Milroy Street will be located and subsequently the lot size of each site. PAGE 149


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2.

LAYOUT PLANS The subdivision, as shown on the endorsed plans, must not be altered without the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

3.

PROVISION OF SERVICES The owner of the land must enter into agreements with the relevant authorities for the provision of water supply, drainage, sewerage facilities, electricity, gas and telecommunication services to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in accordance with the authoritiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; requirements and relevant legislation at the time.

4.

REFERRAL OF PLAN The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act 1988 must be referred to the relevant authority in accordance with section 8 of that Act.

5.

DETAILED DRAINAGE Prior to the certification of the plan of subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions. The plans must include: (a) Direction of stormwater run off. (b) A point of discharge for each lot. (c) Independent drainage for each lot. (d) Drainage easements over any private property for outfall drainage.

6.

STORMWATER DETENTION Before the use or development is commenced, the owner or applicant must provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. OR The responsible authority may deem this condition satisfied by a development contribution towards the acceptance of surface and stormwater discharge from the approved subdivision, building and/or works, whether or not such new drainage infrastructure has been or will be situated within the boundaries of the subject land. Such amount is assessed as $1000 or such amount applying at the time of payment.

7.

STORMWATER QUALITY Before the use or development is commenced, the owner or applicant must provide a stormwater treatment system to achieve the Best Practice Environmental Guidelines storm water quality (Victoria Stormwater Committee 1999) in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. The responsible authority may deem this condition satisfied by a development contribution towards the treatment of surface and stormwater discharge from the approved subdivision, building and/or works, whether or not such new stormwater treatment infrastructure has been or will be situated within the boundaries of the subject land or its immediate catchment. Such amount is PAGE 150


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assessed as $750 or such amount applying at the time of payment. 8.

DRAINAGE WORKS Prior to the issue of the statement of compliance for the subdivision, drainage works must be constructed in accordance with plans approved by the responsible authority.

9.

SECTION 173 AGREEMENT Should the applicant opt to install an on-site stormwater detention system or water quality treatment system then, prior to the issue of statement of compliance, the applicant/owner must enter into an agreement under section 173 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. Such agreement must covenant that: (a) The system shall be designed by a qualified engineer and must be approved by the responsible authority prior to construction. (b) Each system must be constructed either prior to, or currently with, the construction of any building on the specified lots. (c) The system must be completed prior to connection to the responsible authority’s drainage system. (d) The owner will maintain each system and not modify without prior written approval from the responsible authority. (e) The owner shall allow duly authorised officers of the responsible authority to inspect the system at mutually agreed times. (f) The owner will pay for all costs associated with the construction and maintenance of the system.

10. PUBLIC ASSETS Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb and channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development. Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit. 11. CONSENT FOR WORK ON ROAD RESERVES The applicant must comply with: (a) The Road Management Act 2004. (b) Road Management (Works and Infrastructure) Regulations 2005. (c) Road Management (General) Regulations 2005. with respect to any requirements to notify the coordinating authority and/or seek consent from the coordinating authority to undertake “works” (as defined in the Act) in, over or under the road reserve. The responsible authority in the inclusion of this condition on this planning permit is not deemed to have been notified of, or to have given consent to undertake any works within the road reserve as proposed in this permit. Any driveway must be 1.0m clear of the power pole. The bluestone gutter is not to be disturbed.

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Aerial Photograph of site

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2.12 RESPONSE TO PETITION: REQUEST FOR SPEED HUMPS IN BOBS STREET, WHITE HILLS

Document Information Author

Andrew Smith, Transportation Engineer

Responsible Director

Darren Fuzzard, Director Presentation and Assets

Summary/Purpose The purpose of the report is to respond to the petition presented to Council on 15 August 2012 from concerned residents in the Bobs Street, White Hills area. Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009-2013 (updated 2012) Built and Natural Environment Strategy 1.12

Develop a sustainable integrated transport network.

Background Information The following petition has been received from concerned residents in the Bobs Street, White Hills area, as outlined below: "We the undersigned Residents and Ratepayers of Greater Bendigo City Council formally request Council to install speed humps along Bobs Street from Powells Street to Lyons Street" "Mr Gordon Hunter, a resident of Bobs Street, has called on local authorities to do something about speeding vehicles in the street. The residents of Bobs Street fear someone will be killed or injured by speeding drivers on their street. With racing and overtaking two abreast on the rises in Bobs Street it is impossible to see oncoming traffic until atop the rises. 'Hooning traffic racing each other along our street, sometimes in broad daylight and occasional night time, use Bobs Street as a speedway, equal to Bathurst.

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You hear them absolutely tear past here, reaching speeds of well over the speed limit of 50km and it is simply not safe. It is impossible to get their number plate to report them as they go past too quick. Bobs Street residents and residents in Grace Street with young children are fed up with trying to turn onto Bobs Street with speeding traffic. It is only a matter of time before a very serious accident occurs'. Camera cars have been in Bobs Street frequently over time but after a week or so the speeding starts again". Signatures - 46 An accompanying letter with the petition also raised issues about: • • •

Cars parking too close to the intersection of Bobs Street & Powell Street; B-doubles using Bobs Street; and Trucks using Heywood Street cutting through Cambridge Crescent.

Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s): At the Council meeting on 15 August 2012, a motion was passed that a report be prepared within two meetings. Report A traffic count was undertaken between 19 July and 1 August 2012 in Bobs Street between Grace Street and Cahill Street. On average, 1333 vehicles per day (vpd) use this section of Bobs Street; 3.8% of them being commercial vehicles. The traffic count indicated that a large portion of the traffic in this section of Bobs Street exceed the default speed limit and some by a considerable amount. This information has been passed on to the Police who have been targeting the area since then. It is understood that a number of drivers have been fined for exceeding the speed limit. During the two week traffic count, one b-double was recorded in Bobs Street. Four mini b-doubles also used Bobs Street during that time. The request to install road humps in Bobs Street has been investigated. To effectively control the speed of vehicles, 8 road humps would be required between Powell Street and Lyons Street; 4 of these would require additional street lighting. The cost for the installation of road humps and associated lighting would be approximately $60,000. While the installation of road humps would address the speeding problem, the disbenefit of these is two-fold and ongoing. For many residents in the street, they would become a source of annoyance/frustration as they would be required to drive over them several times each day. For those residents who have the humps installed near their houses, the noise generated by traffic over them can become quite intrusive. Given the unintended consequences that come with installing road humps, discussions were held with Mr Hunter about the option to first observe what impact the realignment of Heywood Street at Bobs Street will have on traffic flow and behaviour in Bobs Street. PAGE 158


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This 2012/13 funded project involves connecting Heywood Street and Lyons Street through a new intersection with Bobs Street (as shown below)

The most recent traffic volume recorded in September 2000 on Heywood Street was 147vpd. Given that Heywood/Lyons Street traffic will be given priority at the intersection with Bobs Street, and that access to the Highway from Lyons Street is via a signalised intersection, it is expected that this route will attract traffic away from Bobs Street. This effect is expected to increase over time as traffic builds in Lyons/Heywood Street due to this also becoming the preferred traffic route over Heinz Street and as the consequent delays in Bobs Street grow. Mr Hunter has agreed that it is worth waiting to see what the results of the above works are before further considering the installation of road humps. Subject to V/Lineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program for works at the Heywood Street crossing, the realignment of Heywood Street is intended to commence in November. The request to install No Standing signs in Bobs Street at the intersection of Powell Street is supported and is currently being arranged. The '50km/h in Built-Up Areas' sign at the rear of the funeral parlour (currently obscured by a tree) will also be relocated so that it can be more easily seen. The Police has indicated a willingness to continue undertaking enforcement activity in Bobs Street to improve driver behaviour. Resource Implications $500 from road maintenance budget for signs as nominated.

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Conclusion Speeding vehicles in Bobs Street is a significant problem that requires a response from both the Police and Council to achieve an effective ongoing change. The Police has shown a strong willingness to undertake enforcement activity in Bobs Street and to continue doing so as required. The installation of road humps would help reduce the speeding problem in Bobs Street, however this would also have unintended negative impacts on residents. The realignment of Heywood Street across Bobs Street has the potential to improve driver behaviour in Bobs Street and this is the preferred initial infrastructure response. RECOMMENDATION: That Council: 1. Note that the Police will continue to undertake enforcement activity in Bobs Street to reduce the amount of speeding that is occurring. 2. Review the behaviour of traffic in Bobs Street following the Heywood Street/Lyons Street realignment project that is funded in the 2012/13 budget. 3. Notifies the submitters of the petition of Council's decision.

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2.13 MITCHELL STREET BUS STOPS & STREETSCAPE REDEVELOPMENT Document Information Author and Responsible Director

Darren Fuzzard, Director Presentation and Assets

Summary/Purpose This report considers the public submissions made following exhibition of a new proposal to address the problem of over-crowding at bus stops in Mitchell Street. It recommends that Council adopts the amended concept attached as a basis for detailed design and construction. Within the scope of the recommended concept, a number of items for further community input are proposed to occur as part of the detailed design stage. The report recommends that the introduction of an Intelligent Transport System (MetLink) and new bus waiting facilities be funded from the State Governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $900,000 contribution to the project and that these works be delivered as soon as possible. The report also recommends that the associated and substantial civil infrastructure works required in Mitchell Street be fully designed and developed for intended construction in 2013/14. Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013 (updated 2012) Built and Natural Environment Strategy 1.12

Develop a sustainable integrated transport network.

Strategy Reference: CBD Plan 2005 Theme 1: Reinforcing the CBD as the centre of activity Theme 2: Celebrating cultural and heritage identity Theme 3: Creating an accessible place Theme 4: Designing a high quality urban environment

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Under these themes there are many 'key' actions nominated that are directly or indirectly relevant to Mitchell Street. These include: •

Committing to Mitchell Street as the primary location for bus stops in the CBD.

Introducing real time technology for public transport in the CBD.

Using traffic calming techniques (such as reducing lane widths) to improve the pedestrian environment.

Upgrading bus terminus facilities in Mitchell Street and widening footpaths to achieve this.

Undertaking a program of streetscape upgrades using consistent palettes and treatments.

Background Information Previous Consideration by Council At its ordinary meeting on 25 July 2012, Council resolved to: 1. Approve advertisement of the alternative proposal to address the problems of overcrowding at bus stops in Mitchell Street for the purpose of public comment. 2. Write directly to the following special interest groups to seek comment on the proposal: a. All traders in Mitchell Street (between Pall Mall and Queen Street), Hargreaves Street (between Mitchell and Edward Streets), Bath Lane (between Mitchell and Edward Streets) and those in the Mall. b. The new CBD traders association. c. Backhaus Estate. d. Dungey Carter Ketterer Estate Agents. e. Girton Grammar, Bendigo Secondary College, the Catholic College and BTEC. f.

Christian's Bus Co.

3. Make details of the proposed works available to passengers on Christian's bus services throughout the consultation period and invite formal comments. 4. Receive submissions for a period of four weeks from the date of advertising. 5. Note that a report summarising the submissions received will be tabled for further consideration before 30 September 2012. Community Consultation In October and November 2011, the Director - Presentation & Assets and the Ward Councillor, James Reade, met individually with 34 traders in Mitchell Street, Hargreaves Street and Bath Lane. Meetings were also held with representatives of the Backhaus Estate (given the large property ownership) and Dungey Carter Ketterer Real Estate (given the large portfolio of properties in Mitchell Street managed by this agent). PAGE 162


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Sessions were also held with Council's Youth Advisory Committee and students from Girton Grammar and Bendigo Secondary College. Christian's Bus Co. (public transport provider to PTV) was also consulted. The concept resolved by Council for exhibition was developed using the feedback provided from these meetings. In accordance with that resolution, letters forwarding a copy of the proposal were sent to 115 traders, 99 property owners and the eight other nominated parties. Approximately 500 flyers were made available on all Christians Bus Co. services during the four week exhibition period. The proposal was advertised in the Bendigo Advertiser on Saturday 28 July 2012 and was exhibited on the front page of Council’s website throughout the exhibition period. In addition, the proposal received significant media coverage including: 1. The lead story on Win News on 25 July 2012. 2. Various articles in both the Bendigo Weekly and Bendigo Advertiser prior to and during the exhibition period. 3. A ‘live from the Mall’ ABC morning radio segment on 10 August 2012. 4. An in depth interview about the proposal on Phoenix FM on 8 August 2012. A presentation was also made to the Bendigo Downtown Traders on 14 August 2012. The exhibition period closed on 24 August 2012. A total of 14 submissions in response to the exhibition were received. included traders, property owners, bus users and other interested parties.

Submitters

An additional submission that relates to the Mitchell Street proposal was received in November 2011 when a progress story on the project was run in the Bendigo Weekly. The writer was advised at the time that this would be considered as part of the current submission process. All submissions received are attached in full for the information of Councillors. Report Consideration of Submissions The submissions have been considered in the order that they were received.

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Submitter 1 This submission proposes that Mitchell Street be operated one way between Mollison Street and Pall Mall; except that buses would be permitted in both directions. Further, that Williamson Street operate one way between Pall Mall and Queen Street and that Lyttleton Terrace be closed off at Mitchell Street. All parking is proposed to be removed from Mitchell Street over its length. The writer concludes that the benefits of this arrangement would include: •

Better flow of vehicle traffic in Mitchell Street.

Stopping traffic travelling from Hargreaves Street into Mitchell Street then Queen Street.

Better pedestrian flow in Williamson Street as traffic is only one way.

Officer Comment: The proposal offered would involve a significant change to traffic flow patterns within the CBD and a detailed traffic model would be required to fully understand the implications. However, some observations can be made about the likely impacts: -

While making Mitchell Street one way would improve the efficiency of flow in that direction, the flow in other CBD streets would increase as a result and they are less likely to cope given that Mitchell Street has the benefit of traffic signals to manage the load.

-

Charing Cross and Pall Mall / Williamson Street intersections are under considerable pressure and this proposal could be expected to increase the demand on them.

-

Considerable reconfiguration of roads throughout the CBD would be necessary to accommodate the changed flows in each road and particularly at intersections. The cost to deliver this would be substantially higher than the exhibited proposal.

Based on Council’s previous experience, the proposal to remove all parking in Mitchell Street could be expected to receive extreme resistance from CBD traders. Similarly, the proposed installation of bus shelters in front of Mitchell Street shops has not been well received in the past. Overall, for a change of this magnitude to be warranted there would have to be significant deficiencies in the current CBD traffic operations that this proposal overcomes. This is not considered to be the case. Submitter 2 This submission proposes that a ‘Transit Centre’ be established in Lyttleton Terrace between Mitchell and Williamson Streets. This would cater for both buses and taxis with all other vehicles excluded between the Coles car park entrance and Mitchell Street. Access to the Centre would be from Williamson Street and exit via Mitchell Street. Also proposed is a free ‘city circle’ shuttle bus and the removal of all bus stops from Mitchell Street.

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The writer concludes that benefits would include: â&#x20AC;˘

Increased car parking in Mitchell Street.

â&#x20AC;˘

Removal of the footpath congestion in front of shops.

â&#x20AC;˘

Removal of the conflict between buses and other vehicles.

Officer Comment: The suggested Transit Centre has merit for the reasons offered by the submitter. In addition to creating more parking in Mitchell Street, it would relocate the existing bus stop congestion problems to a less constricted location. Toilet facilities are also in close proximity. Again, although only a preliminary analysis of this has been undertaken, some important observations can be made about the concept: -

From a bus user perspective, the relative remoteness to the centre of the CBD (compared with the exhibited proposal) is significant. In 2008, the then Department of Transport conducted a survey of bus users and the overwhelming feedback (70 percent of the near 300 respondents) indicated that the preferred location for the bus stops was in Mitchell Street between Pall Mall and Queen Street.

-

The suggested site would have less passive surveillance than Mitchell Street and the Mall which would result in a feeling of being less safe at that location.

-

The proposal suggests that access from Mitchell Street would be maintained. However, to accommodate bus movements, the closure of Lyttleton Terrace from Mitchell Street is likely to be required. All current parking between Mitchell Street and beyond the entrance to the undercover Coles car park is lost in this proposal and overall this means there would be less parking than in the exhibited proposal.

-

The proposal suggests that buses would enter Lyttleton Terrace via Williamson Street. For many services, this introduces a right turn at the Pall Mall signals and requires all buses to traverse through two roundabouts and five uncontrolled pedestrian crossings that buses would be required to yield to.

Alternatively, if buses entered via Mitchell Street, site constraints would require the buses to exit from the Williamson Street end of Lyttleton Terrace. In addition to the poor geometry of the roundabout in Williamson Street for buses, there are three existing pedestrian crossings that buses would be required to yield to. A further right turn through traffic signals at Williamson / Myer Street and a left turn back into Mitchell Street (against the priority movement along Mitchell Street) would also be required. In either instance, it is concluded that the Williamson Street route would introduce greater uncertainty into the timetable, higher operating costs and increase the route length for bus passengers. The considerable loss of parking in Lyttleton Terrace is also likely to receive strong opposition from nearby traders. Substantial infrastructure upgrade works would be required in Lyttleton Terrace and at various locations along Williamson Street to accommodate this proposal. These would be in addition to those proposed for Mitchell Street which must still occur due to the poor condition of that infrastructure. PAGE 165


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It is considered that this option is less favourable than the exhibited option. Submitter 3 This submission expresses concern about the detrimental effect that a bus waiting area located in the Mall would have on the visibility and access to the Sussan store. Concern is also noted about noise, litter and anti-social behaviour. Officer Comment: The view of the Sussan store on the corner of Mitchell Street and Hargreaves Street is partially obscured by the existing â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;obeliskâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; structure. However, the concern expressed by the owners of Sussan is appreciated. If the proposed concept is adopted, this matter will be considered in the detailed design stage for the new passenger waiting facility and ongoing consultation with nearby traders will be undertaken. During previous interviews with traders who currently have bus stops in front of their businesses, the problem of noise has not been raised. Some traders did express concern about the language used at times however, noise as such does not appear to be a problem. Notwithstanding that, it is proposed that this aspect be considered in the detailed design stage for the new facility. Litter control is an ongoing challenge for Council throughout the city. Given its proposed location however, the appropriate provision of bins together with normal cleaning routines in the Mall are expected to appropriately manage this problem at the proposed new facility. Similarly, the need to address anti-social behaviour in the Mall and nearby areas is not new to Council. Existing processes are in place to respond to this and these are coordinated through the Bendigo Safe Community Forum. More recently, the Police announced the establishment of an anti-social behaviour tactical unit to further address the problem. Notwithstanding this, as indicated in the previous report, it is acknowledged that the design of the proposed new facility must ensure that it does not create a haven for anti-social behaviour. Submitter 4 The writer of this submission has been travelling on buses for around 35 years and supports the position that all bus services should terminate at the train station. The submitter suggests that diverting some buses away from Mitchell Street should be considered but also supports them being in Mitchell Street due to their value to young and old shoppers. The submitter also notes that the bus drivers do a great job. Officer Comment: This submission offers first hand experience as to why it is important to retain the buses in Mitchell Street. It is the most convenient and direct route possible for bus users in the CBD and if we wish to give public transport its best chance at competing with private vehicles then this is where they must stay.

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The effects of removing all buses from Mitchell Street have already been discussed. However, if Council was to consider diverting some buses away from Mitchell Street, there are two further primary concerns that would need to be addressed: equity for bus users and duplication of waiting facilities. Neither of these aspects can be addressed to the extent that they are in the exhibited proposal and therefore this is not recommended. Submitter 5 This submission suggests that rather than investing in upgrading bus infrastructure, Council should reinstate tramway infrastructure in Mitchell Street and implement a tram service from Charing Cross to the railway station. The proposal includes constructing ‘centre-of-road’ tram platforms in Mitchell Street and the intention is that commuters would be ferried along Mitchell Street to the corner of Mitchell and Mollison Streets where they could then walk to the train station to catch their bus. The writer concludes that benefits would include: •

Enabling bus services to be re-routed to other roads in the CBD.

Improved connection between the Mall and Marketplace that may increase the patronage of the Mall.

Increased tourism by the trams returning to the train station.

A copy of the document “Destination: railway station” was also provided with the submission. Officer Comment: There is no question that trams are an iconic feature of Bendigo and the notion of seeing more in our streets is one that many find attractive. A meeting was held with the submitter in which the proposal was discussed in detail. It is understood that the intent is to run the trams in each of the right lanes in Mitchell Street (at ten minute intervals) with a central waiting area servicing both directions. Operationally, assuming it was effective in attracting passengers, this proposal would have a similar impact on the traffic flow in Mitchell Street to Council’s previous concept of stopping buses in the left lane. A further level of complexity would be added to intersections due to the interaction with right turn lanes and at the roundabout as the tram must continue in a straight line. To accommodate the area needed in the median for passengers, parking lanes and/or footpath widths would be affected. Therefore, while the suggested removal of bus stops from Mitchell Street would create the potential for more parking, this would be at least partially offset by losses elsewhere.

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From a public transport perspective, the proposal introduces an additional interface between modes (i.e. tram to bus) and requires people to walk some distance between the two. The relocation of buses away from Mitchell Street lessens the attractiveness of these services for the reasons previously noted. The reintroduction of trams to Mitchell Street is not considered to offer a better solution to managing the various user demands on it and does not contribute as strongly to improving public transport in Bendigo as the exhibited proposal. It is therefore not recommended. Submitter 6 This submission is from a frequent bus user who offered a number of suggestions: •

Install signs at Toyworld to advise commuters to catch the bus to the train station rather than wait in Mitchell Street.

Install a sign at the train station to address a problem with cars parking where buses must u-turn.

Number the bus stops so that people don’t have to know street names.

Remove parking in Lyttleton Terrace between Mitchell Street and Williamson Street and construct bus parking bays.

The submitter also notes that “the bus service is great, I try to encourage a lot of people to catch the buses”. Officer Comment: Installing signs in Mitchell Street to advise bus users to catch any bus to the train station has merit for informing visitors on how the system works. However, the vast majority of users who congregate in Mitchell Street are from Bendigo and understand that this is what happens. In the case of the students, there is a far more ‘convenient’ bus stop located near to the schools which many of them pass on their way to their preferred stop in Mitchell Street. Changes are currently being made at the train station to improve the flow of buses and traffic at the location noted. This is a situation that Public Transport Victoria continues to monitor. Making the public transport system more user friendly is a fundamental premise of the exhibited proposal. In particular, the introduction of real time technology (Met Link) will allow LED displays to be installed in buses to alert passengers to upcoming stops. If needed, more information about bus routes can be provided in the proposed new waiting facility in the Mall in addition to that usually provided at each stop in Mitchell Street. The response to the suggestion for a bus stop in Lyttleton Terrace is as previously stated.

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Submitter 7 This submission is from the Bendigo Downtown Traders and offers the following comments/proposals: •

Support most of the concept plan.

Concerned about security for users of the new waiting area in the Mall given the concentration of people that occurs at times.

The opportunity to incorporate the new waiting area structure into a pedestrian walkway connecting both sides of the Mall at the Mitchell Street end should be investigated. If that is not possible then the design of the structure must be such that it protects bus users and shoppers from the sun, wind and rain.

A sign saying “Welcome to Hargreaves Mall” should be considered in the new structure.

Appreciate that there is a net gain of car spaces in the overall design.

Recognise that existing trees are a problem with footpaths and the road but ask that trees be part of the ultimate streetscape treatment.

Prefer works to occur at night or during quieter times of the day only but also acknowledge the complexity of the task and the difficulty in pleasing all stakeholders.

Strong preference for the ‘obelisk’ to be removed as part of this project.

Officer Comment: Many traders in the Mitchell Street/Hargreaves Mall area have already made significant contributions to the development of the exhibited proposal and for this project to be successful their ongoing close involvement is critical. Security for users of the new waiting facility was also identified as a concern by students and traders during the early consultation phase. As noted earlier, the design of the facility will be critical to ensuring that it does not create a haven for anti-social behaviour and feels/is safe. If approved by Council, the detailed design stage would include consultation with representatives from bus user groups and traders to ensure that the design addresses these important concerns. As Council appreciates, the question of whether there is adequate cover in the Mall is one that regularly comes up. The proposed introduction of the new waiting facility in the Mall offers an opportunity to explore one possible response to this. Accordingly, if approved, it is proposed that concept plans for both a free-standing facility and one incorporated into a covered walkway be developed for the further consideration of Council. The submitter’s suggested design intent for the structure is agreed. Opportunities for branding of the Mall can be readily included in the detailed design stage of the waiting facility.

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Unfortunately, there are many problems being caused by the existing trees in Mitchell Street and this is also common in many CBD streets. The practical response from the submitters to the proposed removal of these trees is appreciated. If approved, it is intended that the detailed design of the landscape treatment would include a consultation process whereby the opportunities for new trees and other options would be fully explored. As appreciated by the submitters, completion of the physical works will be very difficult. It is intended that an extensive planning process will occur in partnership with the traders to identify the best delivery plan for minimising impacts on businesses while efficiently completing the works. Options such as working at night will be fully explored in this process and this will occur well before construction commences. Removal of the existing obelisk has been suggested by many people during the initial consultation phase. Most people indicated that they don’t understand what it is for and that they consider it to be ugly. The current role of the obelisk is to house the compressor for the bollards and for general storage. The benefit to removing the obelisk is that a purpose built waiting facility can then be constructed and this would offer far greater ability to respond to the design objectives noted in this report. Removal is therefore supported. Submitter 8 This submission is from a bus user who offered the following comments: •

The proposal looks like a great improvement.

As a regular user of public transport in Melbourne, finds smart screens very helpful and although not perfect, once you understand their limitations, they are great.

Prefers that the trees be retained but acknowledges free flowing traffic, safety of buses, passengers and other vehicles is paramount.

Waiting for buses in Mitchell Street is very user-unfriendly with no shade or shelter from wind and rain. The opportunity to wait in a shelter with updated information is a big improvement.

A functional, attractive bus station in place of the obelisk would be a big improvement.

Officer Comment: This submission is very representative of the informal feedback received during preliminary discussions with bus users who have experience using real time information systems and also those exposed to the current conditions at bus stops in Mitchell Street. As previously noted, the opportunity to incorporate trees into the new streetscape will be investigated during the detailed design stage for the landscape treatment.

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Submission 9 This submission is from a trader and landowner in Mitchell Street who offered the following comments: •

Tree roots are causing problems with the drainage in their property and Council’s footpaths and leaves regularly block the down pipes. Removing the tree would fix these long standing problems and this should happen as part of the Mitchell Street project.

A fully weatherproof building for bus users is a good idea.

More seats at bus stops would also help get students up off the footpaths.

Footpaths could be cleaner as some areas are very grotty.

Would be nice to reduce the speed limit.

Would like toilets to stay central.

Other parts of the proposal are ok.

Officer Comment: The tree referred to in this submission requires removal irrespective of the Mitchell Street project. Arrangements will be made for this to occur in the coming months. It is agreed that some level of seating is still required at the bus stops. However, initial feedback about the previous proposal to widen footpaths and offer more seats suggested that the behaviour of students sitting against shop fronts was unlikely to change from this. There was considerably stronger support for drawing passengers away by offering a high quality facility with genuine protection from the weather. This trader is located in the area of Mitchell Street where the footpath is old and in very poor condition. The proposed works would substantially improve the appearance of the footpath in that area. While there is no intention to reduce the speed limit from the current default of 50km/hr, the proposed redesign of Mitchell Street includes reducing the lane widths. Currently they are quite variable in width and very wide in some areas. Reducing lane widths is a common and effective approach to calming traffic speed by making the driving environment ‘feel’ slower. As part of improving the pedestrian environment, it is also intended to investigate adjusting the traffic signals in Mitchell Street to permit better pedestrian flows across Mitchell Street outside of peak vehicle traffic times. The toilet facilities located in Hargreaves Street opposite the Telstra shop did not attract much discussion during the formal consultation process and opinions were quite varied in the preceding informal process. As indicated in the previous report, it is also unclear whether a second bus waiting facility will be needed on the south side of Mitchell Street in the new pedestrian area created in Hargreaves Street. The need for a toilet in that location is therefore proposed to be determined when construction of the second bus waiting facility is considered.

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Submission 10 This submitter is a resident who offered the following comments: •

Traffic lights are needed at the corner of Furness Street and the Calder Highway.

The Coles car park should be undergrounded and have a drive through bus station at ground level.

A free tram down the middle of Mitchell Street should be provided.

A free merry go round in the Mall would brighten it up.

A ring road would benefit future generations.

Officer Comment: The matters not related to the Mitchell Street proposal will be responded to in the letter of reply following Council’s decision. Responses to the proposal to use the Coles car park and to install a tram in Mitchell Street are as previously indicated. Submission 11 This submitter is a trader in the Mall and reiterates the comments made by the Bendigo Downtown Traders. Officer Comment: As indicated in the response to the submission from the Bendigo Downtown Traders. Submission 12 This submission is from a property owner in Mitchell Street who offered the following comments: •

The project is an attempt to rejuvenate the Mall rather than to create a ‘bus hub’.

The proposal will restrict future development of the area.

The plan significantly affects the accessibility to all areas but the bus stop.

The obstructive design of the bus bays will compound the current problem and increase risky driver behaviour thereby decreasing pedestrian and cyclist safety.

The proposal conflicts with the proposed integrated transport and land use plan.

Removal of the trees would adversely impact the amenity and conflict with the image / identity of Bendigo.

Queen Street should be utilised.

Mitchell Street must be beautiful, inviting and pedestrian friendly.

Flashing lights (Smart Bus technology) is not necessary.

Making the Mall inconvenient for drivers and convenient for those catching the bus is targeting the wrong market.

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The proposal is costly and underdeveloped.

Officer Comment: Given the breadth of the matters raised in this submission, a 1½ hour meeting was held with the submitter to further explore the comments made and to discuss the content of the exhibited proposal and the reasons for each element included. One of the strong underlying premises for what is included in the exhibited proposal is to achieve multiple benefits wherever possible. The proposal to establish the waiting facility in the Mall was initially due to this being a location with the room to accommodate a substantial structure. However, during early consultation with the traders it became evident that an opportunity existed to also use the facility to respond to the demand for more cover in the Mall. It is considered that the proposal can achieve both very successfully and efficiently if well designed. Another strong premise for the exhibited proposal was not to change the current operation of Mitchell Street and the intersecting streets. Early consultation included discussions with the largest Mitchell Street property owner (the Backhaus Estate), its real estate agents, and with the majority of directly affected traders. Restriction to development of the area as a result of the proposal was not identified by any of these parties. The exhibited proposal makes little change to the current accessibility to Mitchell Street. All current movements into and out of Mitchell Street are retained. Opportunities to improve accessibility on/off buses will be investigated as part of the detailed design stage. While there is little change proposed to the location of the bus bays along Mitchell Street, the exhibited proposal will rectify the current problem of buses not always being fully contained within the bus stop area outside the left lane of traffic. The proposed integrated transport and land use plan is in its infancy; however it is considered that the exhibited proposal is highly consistent with the likely objectives that will be in that plan. Council’s strong commitment to retain bus stops in Mitchell Street to make them the most useable and convenient possible is testament to this. The trees that have been identified for removal are non indigenous and most must be removed irrespective of this project. They have caused significant damage to roads, footpaths, kerbing, underground drainage and some properties. However, the contribution of trees to the streetscape is appreciated and the opportunity for their replacement will be investigated during the detailed design of the landscaping. Developing a ‘bus hub’ in Queen Street offers similar benefits and dis-benefits to the Lyttleton Terrace proposal previously discussed. Overall this is considered less attractive than the exhibited option. After clarifying the intention of the real time traffic information system with the submitter, this component to the proposal was strongly endorsed (verbally).

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There is little change to the convenience of accessing the Mall by motorists to that which currently exists. However, as previously noted it is expected that the provision of appropriately sized bus bays in the new arrangement will improve traffic flow for all motorists in Mitchell Street. The cost of the works included in the exhibited proposal is significant. However, the intelligent transport system and the bus waiting facilities in the Mall will be funded by the State Government and the civil works in Mitchell Street are required infrastructure renewal projects irrespective of this proposal. By retaining the bus stops in Mitchell Street, Council will be implementing the most cost effective solution possible. Submitter 13 This submission is from the La Trobe University Student Planners Association who offered the following comments: •

Support Council’s move to improve public transport infrastructure in this important transport corridor.

Consider the lack of bicycle infrastructure a significant oversight in the plan. Believe that Mitchell Street provides a genuine opportunity to deliver infrastructure that promotes a safe and comfortable environment for cyclists.

Should provide advance stopping lines at traffic signals, bike parking and bikes lanes (or shared lanes where space is limited).

Officer Comment: Providing a safe and comfortable environment for cyclists into the CBD is very important. The demands on Mitchell Street are very high and often competing: it is the most significant route across the highway through the CBD for motor vehicle traffic (of all types); it accesses and services several cross streets; it is deemed to be the primary route for public transport; it has high pedestrian traffic; and at this time, the retention of its on street car parking is considered not negotiable by traders and many others. Without compromising at least one of these demands it is not possible to construct dedicated bicycle lanes in Mitchell Street. However, when determining the role of each road corridor it is important to consider it in a system rather than discretely. I.E. It is not necessary to provide for all modes of traffic on all roads. It is on this basis that Williamson Street has begun its development as the primary bicycle access route to the CBD from the east and south east of Bendigo. Dedicated bicycle lanes have already been installed from Condon Street to Queen Street and Council has committed funds to the construction of a bicycle path along Back Creek that will connect south east Bendigo to Williamson Street. Early work on the Sustainable Transport and Land Use Plan suggests that it will be many years before a genuine mode shift away from motor vehicles is realised in Bendigo. While this must continue to be our objective, it is also important to recognise the needs of the community in the short-medium term and to provide a balanced response.

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In recognising all of the above, including dedicated bicycle lanes in Mitchell Street is not considered appropriate at this time. Given this, the inclusion of advance stopping lines at traffic signals for cyclists is not supported. If included, cyclists would be at the front of the queue in a shared traffic lane which would be neither comfortable nor safe. The opportunity to provide more bicycle parking in the CBD and as part of this project should be explored and it is proposed that this work be included in the detailed design stage of the streetscape project. That said, such facilities have now been provided in the Edward Street multi storey car park and those in the Hargreaves Street multi-storey car park are currently under-utilised. Submitter 14 This submission is from a trader in the Mall and reiterates the submission from the Bendigo Downtown Traders. The submitter also notes concern about the re-introduction of the u-turn in Hargreaves Street as the previous one attracted hoon behaviour many years ago. Officer Comment: As noted, the hoon behaviour in Hargreaves Street occurred many years ago. Since that time the Police has significantly increased its presence and focus on hoon behaviour in Bendigo. The raised pedestrian crossings halfway along Hargreaves Street have also been introduced since that time which restricts speed considerably. Re-introducing a u-turn in Hargreaves Street offers an improved level of service to shoppers and therefore traders in Hargreaves Street and also reduces the amount of unnecessary traffic entering Mitchell Street. Given the benefits that will be derived and the changes since the previous u-turn was removed, the re-introduction of a u-turn in Hargreaves Street is considered appropriate. Submitter 15 This submission is from a trader in Mitchell Street and reiterates the submission from the Bendigo Downtown Traders. Officer Comment: Comments are as per the previous response to the Bendigo Downtown Traders submission. Resource Implications The 2012/13 budget includes $800,000 which approximates the remaining funds from those committed by the State to this project. As previously indicated, PTV estimates that the Intelligent Transport System would cost around $500,000 to implement in Bendigo. PAGE 175


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The preliminary estimate for a free standing high quality building in the Mall on the site of the obelisk is $300,000. If Council ultimately chooses to incorporate a covered walkway into the scope of works then this cost will rise. Subject to Council resolving to develop both options, a further detailed report will be presented to Council for consideration in due course. The concept estimate for the streetscape work (excluding the bus waiting facilities) is $3Million. This includes all roadworks, footpaths, drainage, kerbing, street furniture, traffic signal modifications and landscaping in Mitchell Street between Pall Mall and Queen Street (as generally shown on the attached plan) and includes an allowance for associated modifications in Queen Street, Hargreaves Street, Bath Lane and Pall Mall. A contingency allowance of 25 percent has been applied. Subject to Council approval, these works would be funded from the normal civil infrastructure renewal program and will be recommended as a high priority for the 2013/14 budget. Conclusion The demands on Mitchell Street are many and often competing. While the proposal recommended for adoption does not accommodate all of the possible inclusions identified through the public consultation process, it: •

Offers a response that maintains Mitchell Street as an efficient thoroughfare for buses and motorists;

Addresses the problem of overcrowding at bus stops;

Substantially improves safety and amenity for both pedestrians and public transport users;

Is financially achievable in the short term; and

Substantially delivers on the objectives and actions nominated for Mitchell Street in the CBD Plan.

It also offers significant additional benefits such as real time bus information (via smart phone) for any bus stop on the Bendigo public transport network, protection from the weather for visitors to the Mall and, a new high quality streetscape in one of Bendigo’s most prominent streets. Attachments 1. Concept plan for adoption. 2. Copy of submissions received.

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RECOMMENDATION That Council; having considered the submissions received as a result of exhibiting the draft Concept Plan: 1. Adopts the attached concept design as its response to overcrowding of bus stops in Mitchell Street; including the introduction of an Intelligent Transport System for the Bendigo public transport bus network. 2. Requests Public Transport Victoria to commence the introduction of its Intelligent Transport System to Bendigo’s public transport bus network as a matter of urgency and utilises part of the funds allocated by the State Government for this purpose. 3. Approves developing two concept designs for the bus passenger waiting facility/covered area for shoppers that will be located at the Mitchell Street end of the Hargreaves Mall (approximately on the site of existing ‘obelisk’ structure), as follows: a. The first design shall provide for a free standing structure only. b. The second design shall incorporate the structure into a covered pedestrian walkway spanning the width of the Mall. c. Each design shall be developed using a targeted consultation process involving bus users groups (with representatives from nearby schools and older bus patrons), nearby traders and property owners and, the Bendigo Downtown Traders. 4. Approves development of the detailed design of the streetscape in accordance with the approved concept plan; including a further public consultation process for the landscape component. 5. Notes that funds for construction of the streetscape works will be sought as a high priority in the 2013/14 budget. 6. Writes to each of the submitters acknowledging their contribution and advising of its decision.

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ATTACHMENT 1 - CONCEPT PLAN

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3.

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Nil.

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4.

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COMMUNITY AND CULTURE

4.1 EAGLEHAWK REGIONAL PLAY SPACE - PRESENTATION OF CONCEPT DESIGN AND RELEASE FOR PUBLIC CONSULTATION CONTRACT NO: 2494-2011/12 Document Information Author

Karoline Klein, Landscape Architect Aaron Lindsay, Co-ordinator Landscape & Open Space Planning

Responsible Director

Darren Fuzzard, Director Presentation and Assets

Summary/Purpose To present the concept design for a future Eaglehawk Regional Play Space to Council and to seek Council’s approval to advertise the Draft Concept Plan for the purpose of public consultation. Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009–2013 (updated 2012) Built and Natural Environment Strategy 1.7

Develop and enhance public places, open spaces and recreation facilities to meet community needs.

Action

Undertake planning for the provision of Recreation Services using needs and trends analyses, feasibility studies, participation census and Master Plans.

1.7.2

Strategy Reference: Play Space Strategy 2009 Recommendation 12.1

Eaglehawk Skate Park is retained as regional play space, but is joined by Canterbury Park/Lake Neangar to form a larger regional play space.

Eaglehawk Open Space Precinct Master Plan 2011 The development of a Regional Play Space is a key short term priority identified by the Master Plan.

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Recommendation 8.5 “Regional Play Space”

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Expand opportunities for the precinct to cater for a broad range of age groups and play experiences having regard to the linear spaces and native character of the reserve.

Increase opportunities for picnicking and family gatherings.

Background Information The Eaglehawk Open Space Precinct comprises of a heritage garden (Canterbury Gardens), several significant sports facilities (including Canterbury Oval), two important water bodies (Lake Neangar and Tom Thumb) and a range of both active and passive leisure and sports facilities. Two adopted strategic documents (the Play Space Strategy [2009] and the Eaglehawk Open Space Precinct Master Plan [2011]) recommend the establishment of a regional play space in Eaglehawk, to be located between Lake Neangar and Napier Street. By definition, a regional play space is a “destination” play space that will attract visitors from across the municipality due to the substantial variety of play opportunities and high quality park infrastructure. The Play Space Strategy recommends the development of four regional play spaces across Greater Bendigo. The development of the Eaglehawk Regional Play Space will be Bendigo’s third regional play space and will compliment the existing two regional play spaces at Lake Weeroona and Cooinda Park and the future Bendigo Botanic Gardens Regional Play Space. The Eaglehawk Open Space Precinct Master Plan (2011) calls for the following design principles to be applied to the regional play space: •

“Establish… an integrated linear play and community activity space…

Maximise use of existing infrastructure…

Supplement existing infrastructure with additional play equipment and park furniture for greater appeal.

Install carefully planned landscaping and barriers to improve safety of the area (preventing direct access to the road and lake)...

Commission a specialist play space design for the precinct…

Ensure the play space maximises opportunities for creative play, sensory elements and adventure activities.”

Outline Landscape Architects in co-operation with Ric McConaghy and Urban Colour Arts & Cultural Heritage Consultants have been engaged to undertake community consultation, to develop a concept design based on community feedback and to provide detailed construction documentation for the Eaglehawk Regional Play Space. PAGE 181


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Report A community engagement framework was developed to help inform the play space design and development. Two community engagement phases have been included in the design process: Phase 1 was undertaken between March and May 2012 prior to the commencement of any design works. The intention of this round of community engagement was to ascertain the community’s aspirations and needs. Phase 2 will commence immediately after the release of the tabled concept plans in order to invite public comment on the proposal. Internal Consultation Phase 1: Three steering group meetings have been undertaken to date with representatives from Recreation, Building and Property, Parks and Natural Reserves, Landscape and Open Space Planning and Children’s Services to ensure compatibility with the respective planning requirements. External Consultation Phase 1: The first round of community engagement was conducted prior to the commencement of any design and included the following activities: •

Consultation with children across four schools (Eaglehawk North Primary School, Eaglehawk Primary School, Eaglehawk Secondary School, Kalianna Special Development School).

Listening posts during the Eaglehawk 3556 event (3 in total).

A media release and on-site promotion via display boards.

A community group meeting in Eaglehawk.

Distribution of bulletins and a survey throughout Eaglehawk (approx. 700).

Web-posting of the bulletin and survey, feeds via Twitter and Facebook.

Engagement with the various indigenous groups and representatives, and attendance at a Bush Culture Day at Happy Jacks Reserve (co-ordinated by the cultural heritage consultants).

Phase 1 Community Engagement Outcomes: The consultation with the children clearly revealed a preference for play equipment that allows physically stimulating activities like climbing, jumping, bouncing or sliding. A high central play/climbing element was exceptionally popular. In addition, the idea of exploration and discovery attracted interest from the children. Traditional movement play like swinging or riding on a flying fox were also marked as desirable.

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128 survey responses were received from adults over the age of 19 years. The survey results clearly showed a preference for themed play. There was also a strong desire for a play space that engages family groups (including adults) to share in the play experience i.e. equipment that can facilitate multiple age users such as climbing nets or swings. Sand play was a very popular choice, followed by sensory play (i.e. sound elements, sculptures, etc.). Picnic facilities and shade were considered very important elements in the overall play space design. The inclusion of electronic play or senior exercise equipment was least valued. There is an existing toilet located within 150m of the proposed play space site. The need for a toilet at the play space was investigated with a majority of the respondents believing that a new toilet block in direct proximity to the future play space at the expense of play opportunities was not required. Consultation undertaken with the local indigenous groups helped to inform a potential theme for the play space based on a local creation story whilst creating further ownership within the greater community. For a detailed report on the first phase of community engagement, please refer to Attachment 1 – Eaglehawk Regional Play Space Concept Plan. The Draft Concept Design: The concept plan for the future Eaglehawk Play Space has been informed by the Eaglehawk Open Space Precinct Master Plan and feedback from the first community engagement phase. The play space incorporates the following key elements: •

A series of graduated play zones with the junior play zone located adjacent to the Peter Krenz car park. As the proximity to this extends so does the level of difficulty. A variety of safety barriers including fences, planting and mounding are located adjacent to the play space. The different treatments correspond with the intended user age group of the different play zones.

A junior play zone featuring the existing play equipment of a see-saw, junior play combination unit and a swing. These existing facilities will be complimented by a new sand pit and a hand activated water pump. The junior play area will be partially enclosed by a fence that incorporates additional play elements.

A swinging zone that caters for all abilities access and will incorporate traditional swings and a large bird nest swing which can accommodate multiple users simultaneously.

An adventure and movement play zone that includes a large iconic net play structure (5.5m tall) with a large slide, flying fox and a “mouse wheel”.

A retreat zone located at the northern end of the site which incorporates hammocks and a break out space for older children.

A concrete path network will incorporate the various play elements and will incorporate stencil art. PAGE 183


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Extensive tree plantings for natural shade will be located throughout the site. Established trees will be installed in-lieu of shade sails which are prone to vandalism.

A number of picnic tables will be provided throughout the play space with extensive seating, bins, drinking fountains and bike parking.

A theme of "the bat" will be adopted for the overall play space, with low level customisation being suggested for park furniture and play equipment. This theme references the local Dja Dja Wurrung creation story of Boelang the bat, the watcher and protector of visitors.

Please refer to Attachment 1 – Eaglehawk Regional Play Space Concept Plan. Community Consultation Phase 2: It is proposed to invite the community to comment on the draft concept plan for a period of three weeks commencing on 27 September 2012. Consultation will involve the following: •

A media briefing.

Display of the draft concept plan in various prominent locations in Eaglehawk.

Mail-out of a project bulletin to residents within close proximity (approx. 460).

Web-posting of the draft concept plan on Council’s website with the opportunity to provide comment.

A community group meeting.

Two listening posts will be conducted on-site, one during the week and one on the weekend.

Responses will be taken in the forms of written, email or web feedback (preferred). Contents of informal conversations during listening posts or from phone calls will be recorded on feed-back forms. Priority/Importance: The Eaglehawk Open Space Precinct Master Plan recommends the implementation of the regional play space as a short term priority. Risk Analysis: The site contains a number of sugar gum trees. An arboriculture examination was undertaken to determine the health of the trees and any potential safety implications. A number of trees have been identified as high risk and will be removed and replaced within the current financial year with a more appropriate tree species.

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Conclusion The Eaglehawk Open Space Precinct Master Plan recommends the development of a regional play space in Eaglehawk as a short term priority. Once developed, the Eaglehawk Regional Play Space will be a significant attraction. It will incorporate a diverse variety of play opportunities that will cater for children from 3 to 15 and family activities, whilst improving existing amenities such as seating and picnic facilities. The concept design to be presented for public display has been largely informed from the first phase of community engagement. Following the second phase of community engagement, the concept design will be updated to incorporate feedback from the public display period. A detailed documentation package will be produced which will allow for a staged implementation. A budget bid for the play space implementation will be prepared for Council consideration within the subsequent financial year. Resource Implications Budget Allocation in the Current Financial Year: The 2012/13 budget includes a carry forward allocation of $35,000 to complete the play space design and documentation. External Funding Sources: External funding opportunities such as government grants and community partnership opportunities with organisations such as Empowering Eaglehawk and Rotary will be investigated upon the completion of detailed documentation. Current Estimate or Tender Price: The current preliminary cost estimate to construct the play space is $900,000 (ex. GST) this includes a contingency of 10%. The play space documentation will allow for a staged project delivery. Please refer to Attachment 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Eaglehawk Regional Play Space Concept Plan. Any Ongoing Recurrent Expenditure Required: A regional play space requires a daily site visit and maintenance inspection. The implementation of the Eaglehawk Open Space Precinct Master Plan will require some additional human and financial resources for the ongoing precinct maintenance. Attachments 1. Eaglehawk Regional Play Space Concept Plan

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RECOMMENDATION That Council recognises the community input that has occurred in the development of the draft Eaglehawk Play Space concept design and adopt the draft for public consultation.

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4.2 GATEWAY PARK MASTER PLAN - RESULTS OF COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AND FINALISATION OF MASTER PLAN Document Information Author

Aaron Lindsay, Co-ordinator Public Space Design

Responsible Director

Darren Fuzzard, Director Presentation and Assets

Summary/Purpose This report informs Councillors of the results of the community engagement process for the Draft Gateway Park Master Plan and recommends that the amended Gateway Park Master Plan be adopted. Policy Context The preparation of this Master Plan is a result of key recommendations from the Open Space Strategy (2005) and the City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009-2013. Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2009â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013 (updated 2012): Built and Natural Environment Strategy 1.6

Complete and progress local structure plans and development strategies to manage growth.

Action

Continue to implement Master Plans and Strategies for designated sites.

1.6.5

Strategy 1.7

Develop and enhance public places, open spaces and recreation facilities to meet community needs.

Action

Undertake planning for the provision of Recreation Services using needs and trends analyses, feasibility studies, participation census and Master Plans.

1.7.2

Strategy Reference: Open Space Strategy 2005 recommendations: Action

1.21

Prepare plans for major open spaces.

Action

2.1

Develop Master Plan for Kangaroo Flat Lions Park â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gateway Park complexes.

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Play Space Strategy 2009 – 2014: Vol. 1, page 62

Redevelop Cooinda Park / Gateway Park as a linear regional play space.

Vol. 2, page 59

Remove Beverley Street Playground and rebound wall and sell land.

Background Information Gateway Park is located in Kangaroo Flat along the Bendigo Creek Linear Trail and adjacent to the Calder Highway. Its prominent location as the southern ‘gateway’ park to Bendigo and the presence of itinerant traders makes it a popular rest stop. Gateway Park is a municipal park that incorporates a lake, function centre (formerly the Kangaroo Flat Tourism Centre), public toilets, car parking, barbeque and picnic facilities. The meandering Bendigo Creek and native vegetation helps create a unique natural character for a park located within a residential area. Gateway Park is comprised of four different crown land parcels. Two of these parcels are the responsibility of the City of Greater Bendigo (CoGB) as the Committee of Management (CoM) to the Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE) with the larger parcels currently the responsibility of the Rotary Club of Kangaroo Flat (as CoM to DSE). Notwithstanding this, the CoGB currently undertakes maintenance across the entire site. CoGB officers undertook significant community engagement to develop a Draft Master Plan for Gateway Park to help prioritise and guide the ongoing development and management. Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s): 28 September 2011 – Agreement to release the Draft Master Plan for community comment and consultation. Previous community consultation undertaken to inform the Draft Master Plan: A community engagement framework was developed in consultation with the CoGB Strategy Unit to ensure an effective community engagement process was undertaken. Preliminary community engagement was undertaken prior to the development of the Draft Master Plan to ascertain and further a greater understanding of the community’s aspirations, needs, likes and dislikes in regards to Gateway Park. The following is a summary of the initial consultation that occurred prior to the development of the Draft Master Plan:

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Individual meeting with the key stakeholders

Project Steering Group meetings

Public notices displayed through local media and onsite

Mail out of flyers to residents and ratepayers within the lake area (approx. 1300)

Listening posts conducted at Gateway Park (2 total)

Youth worker consultation with local users of the dirt jump / BMX area

The preliminary consultation was successful with 50 submissions received. Draft Master Plan Community Consultation The Draft Master Plan and accompanying report was placed on public exhibition inviting submissions for a period of four weeks from 30 September to 28 October 2011. The following processes were used to promote awareness of the draft report / plans and encourage community feedback: Media Release: A media release was undertaken to ensure that a wide coverage was given through the local print media, television, radio and digital formats. Advertisements were placed in the Bendigo Advertiser promoting the Draft Master Plan consultation. Mail Drop: A mail drop was conducted to inform approximately 1300 residents within close proximity to the precinct and key stakeholders that the Draft Master Plan was available for comment. Copies of the Draft Master Plan were also made available through the CoGB website, offices and the Kangaroo Flat and Bendigo branches of the Goldfields Library. Display Boards: 3 display boards were located across the precinct to help raise awareness of the Draft Master Plan. Listening Posts: Two listening post were conducted onsite on Wednesday 5 October 2011 from 3:30 till 5:30pm and Saturday 8 October from 2.00 till 4.00pm to receive direct feed back about the plan. Key Stake Holder Meetings: A presentation of the Draft Master Plan was conducted at the Rotary Club of Kangaroo Flat’s ordinary meeting. A following meeting was conducted with the club executive to discuss the revisions to the Draft Master Plan following the second phase of community engagement. The Draft Master Plan was also presented directly to regular itinerant traders. PAGE 189


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Internal Consultation A Project Control Group with representatives from Recreation, Building and Property, Parks and Natural Environment and Engineering and Public Space as well as the local Councillor ensured the development of the Master Plan addresses planning requirements for the respective Units. Report A total of 42 submissions were received as a result of the exhibition period and promotional activities for the proposed plan. The consultation process was extensive and the receipt of 42 submissions that substantially support the proposal is considered to reflect a very successful process. Feedback received (in order of prevalence) was as follows: •

General support for the plan

Support for the retention of the dirt jumps area

Support for the proposed circuit path around the lake

Support for the proposed boardwalks

Support for the acquisition of 12 Browning St

Support for a fence/barriers around the Play Space

In addition to the general support for the Draft Master Plan and encouragement for works to proceed, the following is a summary of comments that have been incorporated into the Master Plan: •

Development of interpretive signage

Provision of power connection outlets within the southern car park for itinerant traders

Amendment to the southern car park layout to better facilitate traders and improve user safety

Consideration of partial fence/barriers adjacent the play space

Relocation of the circuit path outside of the play space

Consideration to future land acquisitions on High and Browning St

Identify an alternative storage solution for Rotary and remove shipping containers.

Potential inclusion of art/sculptures within the park

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The Master Plan takes into consideration the comments made during the community engagement process and incorporates them into the plan. The exception was a request from the Rotary Club of Kangaroo Flat for a regional scale play space to be located adjacent the existing toilet block and picnic area. The CoGB has invested significantly in the development of a play space at Cooinda Park. Cooinda Park is located 500m away from the centre of Gateway Park and can be accessed via the Bendigo Creek Shared Trail. The development of a regional play space at Gateway Park was not supported due to itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proximity to the Cooinda Park play space. A detailed summary of all responses to the draft master plan is attached. Comments, issues or suggestions raised are analysed and a recommended response together with justification for that response is provided. Information from this stage of consultation helped inform the priority order of the Master Plan recommendations. Risk Analysis: In order to implement the Master Plan the existing CoM agreements will need to be reviewed to clarify future management responsibilities and liabilities. Although CoGB is currently only responsible for two of the four crown land parcels within Gateway Park, CoGB undertakes maintenance across the entire Park. Discussions have commenced with DSE and the Rotary Club of Kangaroo Flat regarding CoGB becoming Committee of Management for the entire Park. Conclusion The Draft Master Plan has had a very effective consultation process with extensive involvement from stakeholder groups and the wider community. The Draft Master Plan has been updated to include a priority framework that was formulated following consideration of feedback received from public submissions and is considered to reflect the broad desires of the community that has an interest in Gateway Park. Resource Implications The adoption of the Master Plan in itself has no immediate budget implications. However bids for projects that deliver on the plan will be an ongoing activity. Budget Allocation in the Current Financial Year: There is no budget allocation within the current financial year however, in house design works will commence on the high priority recommendation of developing a new picnic area with shelter, barbecues, seating and a viewing platform for a budget bid in 2013-14.

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Projected costs for future financial years: The Master Plan incorporates a framework for staging and prioritisation. The recommendations are categorised into high, medium and low priorities and do not include timescales. Given this, indicative capital costs are not included in the plan but are provided as an attachment to this report for general information. Detailed designs and costings will be undertaken on each priority as part of developing bids for Council budgets in future years. Indicative costings based on current market rates for the implementation of the different Master Plan priorities are listed below. There are a number of ongoing recommendations that will be funded out of recurrent operation budgets and are not included within the indicative costings. Note all costs are GST exclusive. High Priorities Recommendations

$820,000

Medium Priorities Recommendations

$925,000

Low Priorities Recommendations

$605,000

Total Master Plan Implementation

$2,350,000

Attachments 1. Gateway Park Master Plan prioritisation and indicative costings. 2. Gateway Park analysis of responses to Draft Master Plan. A copy of the revised plan is available for viewing in the Councillorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room.

RECOMMENDATION That Council having considered the submissions received in regard to the draft, adopt the Gateway Park Master Plan.

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4.3 MUNICIPAL FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN 2012/2015 Document Information Author

Eric Smith, Municipal Fire Prevention Officer

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose The purpose of this report is to: 1.

Advise Council that the exhibition and consultation process for the draft Municipal Fire Management Plan (MFMP) has ended.

2.

Recommend that the revised Municipal Fire Management Plan (MFMP) be formally adopted in accordance with CFA Act 1958 Section 55A and Emergency Management Manual Part 6A.3.

Policy Context This report is consistent with the following strategies within the Council Plan 2009/13 (Updated 2012): 3.7 Work collaboratively to promote community safety and healthy living. 4.7.1 Review and refine emergency management policy and practices. Legislative Context â&#x20AC;˘

Country Fire Authority Act 1958 (CFA Act) - Requires Councils to prepare and implement a Municipal Fire Management Plan.

â&#x20AC;˘

Emergency Management Act 1986 and Emergency Management Manual Part 6A.3.

Background Information Expectation and responsibility on Local Government in the area of emergency management planning has increased due to recent events and learnings. With climate data showing a trend to an increasing frequency of severe weather events, it highlights the need to undertake an improved risk based approach to emergency management planning. On behalf of the community the City of Greater Bendigo Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee (MFMPC), has coordinated the development of the Municipal Fire Management Plan (MFMP) using the Integrated Fire Management Project model. This has resulted in broader stakeholder buy in, in an endeavour to prevent, plan for, respond to and recover from fire events.

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Living in a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;City in the Forestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; means that our landscape presents a number of complex fire risks at a time when it is high on the political and community agenda. The MFMP provides the City with a risk based approach to fire management planning which aims to instigate active and cooperative participation in the planning process by community and stakeholders, in order to reduce the impact of fire on communities and the environment through various management options. The Plan identifies treatment strategies that revolve around the prevention, preparedness, response and recovery which are clusters of inter related emergency management planning. Report The key component of the MFMP is to build community resilience through engaging the community in planning so that people understand the hazards, exposures and vulnerabilities of our community, hence the significant engagement process that has been undertaken during the finalisation of this plan. On 23 May 2012 at its Ordinary Meeting the Council received the Draft Municipal Fire Management Plan for information prior to the public exhibition and community engagement process. The Plan was made available on the website and people were invited to make written and / or verbal comment. As a result of this process two written submissions were received. The first submission called for the plan to refocus on fire prevention action on private property, rather than undertaking fire prevention works in bushland. This submission was not supported as nationally it is recognised that more significant risk to the community comes from fires in Bushland. All stakeholders identify that it is a combination of prevention activities on both public and private land which mitigates fire risk. The Plan acknowledges this through identifying that the CFA undertakes this through their Fire Ready Program and the City of Greater Bendigo through the fire inspection process. The second submission was from a DSE Department, which asked the Plan to consider the impact of control burns and fire prevention activity on flora and fauna. . The Department made this submission to all Local Governments within the Loddon Mallee Region, as a result the matter was referred to the Loddon Mallee Regional Strategic Fire Management Group for response as it was a matter that effected the whole of region. Further to the written submissions, six community workshops were conducted across the municipality. Staff also attended Small Township Engagement Meetings and local CFA brigade meetings to further engage the community. This process resulted in some valuable local knowledge being fed into the Plan to identify risk areas and treatment possibilities, improving the Planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s content. The Plan has been prepared over a 10 month period though an extensive stakeholder and community engagement process. This has resulted in a plan that provides a more relevant, risk based document with improved treatments than had existed in the previous Municipal Fire Prevention Plan which was prepared using historic approach.

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The MFMP is a document that has been collated using a variety of information sources and evidence such as local knowledge, historical data, geographical information and extensive stakeholder input. The document aims to protect life, reduce impact of fire on property whilst considering the environment. The plan identifies a number of strategies for action which will involve all stakeholders to achieve this. The finalised MFMP was endorsed on 4 September 2012 unanimously by all key stakeholders of the Municipal Emergency Management Planning Committee and the Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee at their respective meetings. These committees include response, relief and recovery agencies It is now appropriate to recommend that the plan be formally endorsed and adopted by Council. Consultation/Communication Internal Consultation Staff have been involved in the development of the plan through the Municipal Fire Management Planning Committee, resulting in enhancement of processes and mapping which will allow for improvements in targeting of risk treatment strategies. External Communication: Initially, 260 surveys were received through the consultation phase utilising the Small Township Engagement Meetings, Fire Ready Victoria meetings, Elmore Field Days and online surveys. The draft Plan was made available from late May through to August for comment and a series of community workshops were conducted across the municipality, with the appropriate feedback incorporated into this final plan. Attendance of staff at Small Township Engagement Meetings and local CFA brigade meetings has further enhanced the consultation process. The Draft Plan was extensively reviewed in light of the community and stakeholders input throughout the process. Resource Implications The budgetary allocation for fire prevention will be continually reviewed in light of the outcomes from the risk based data. We need to ensure our fire prevention activities are targeting our highest risk areas and are working in partnership and complimentary to works being completed by other agencies and the community. Attachments â&#x20AC;˘

Municipal Fire Management Plan 2012/2015

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RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to adopt and implement the City of Greater Bendigo Municipal Fire Management Plan 2012/2015 in accordance with the requirements of the CFA Act 1958 Section 55A and Emergency Management Manual Part 6A.4.

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4.4 COMMUNITY FACILITIES FUNDING PROGRAM (MINOR) 2013-2014 Document Information Author

Kendyl Hopley, Recreation Project Officer

Responsible

Pauline Gordon, Director Community Wellbeing

Summary/Purpose The Community Facility Funding Program, minor category, is an annual grant program conducted by the Department of Planning and Community Development. The Councils role in the funding program is to assist clubs with developing submissions, select up to three projects for consideration by Sport and Recreation Victoria and include any further relevant information to the application and submit. Policy Context We will increase the accessibility and availability of public spaces by providing appropriate recreation facilities to meet the needs of the community such as sports facilities, playgrounds and walking trails. Council Plan Reference: Council Plan 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2013 Strategy Reference: 1.6. Develop and enhance public places, open spaces and recreation facilities to meet community needs 1.11. Continue to implement initiatives to manage maintain and provide physical assets and infrastructure to meet Community and Organisational needs. 1.11.11 Work with the community to make the best use of assets and facilities through shared use, high levels of use, good maintenance, improved accessibility and replacement programs. Background Information The Sport and Recreation Victoria (SRV) minor facilities funding is designed to provide assistance to local clubs or associations to improve their venue infrastructure. Councils can submit up to three applications with a total maximum funding of $200,000 under the category. Projects can seek up to $100,000 from SRV, however smaller projects which achieve the objectives of this program will be highly regarded.

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The funding ratio has been set at an SRV contribution of $1.50 for every local dollar contributed. Council is usually required to contribute funding towards the local component of the project. Clubs applying are expected to make a10% financial contribution towards the project. The projects are required to be assessed in accordance with criteria as stipulated by the State Government. The submissions are assessed on the following common criteria: Why? (20%) The extent, to which the planning process responds to community needs and issues, considers community strengthening, meets a gap in local facilities and is supported by Council planning. How? (20%) The extent to which the project is supported by a project scope, schematic plans, cost estimates ad quotations, able to demonstrate a commitment of all financial resources, addresses issues around OHS and anti discrimination legislation. Who? (10%) The extent, to which the project involves all stakeholders, is based on broad consultation and is managed by an integrated team. What will it achieve? (50%) The extent, to which the project increases participation, maximises the use or multi use of a facility, increases the range of sport opportunities and encourages the broadest possible community participation in sport and recreation activities. Report The City of Greater Bendigo received five expressions of interests from various clubs/community groups across the municipality, wishing to submit an application through the community facilities funding program minorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s category. Each project was assessed and scored by Recreation staff using the following established criteria; Community benefit, demographic significance, risk management, planning, participation levels and potential growth, environmental management, economic impact, meeting a gap, cultural and heritage significance, self support, and ability to attract external funding. As a result of applying this test, the following projects are considered worthy of support.

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1. Hockey Central Victoria Inc Replacement to the wet synthetic surface Hockey Central Victoria (HCV) is proposing to replace the existing wet pitch synthetic which is rapidly approaching its serviceable life. The current surface is being “nursed” through the 2012 season with patch works being carried out as necessary. The new surface will be water turfed and meet current standards and compliance. The existing wet synthetic surface was originally owned by the Department of Sport and Recreation and through negotiations with the HCV the four year old synthetic was purchased and installed in Bendigo. HCV acknowledged and has financially planned for a replacement of this surface over the past six years. The clubs significant financial contribution outlines their commitment to continue to improve and provide an internationally accredited pitch in a regional city. Club contribution SRV requested contribution Council contribution Total project cost

$240,000 $70,000 $40,000 $350,000

2. Strathfieldsaye Dodgers Baseball Club – Batting tunnel and team dugout upgrade The Strathfieldsaye Dodger’s Baseball Club is proposing to improve training facilities at the Club Court baseball diamonds by constructing an all weather batting tunnel and all weather player dugouts. The upgrade to the diamonds will cater and further attract a growing membership, provide accessible access and furthermore provide facilities that can be used all year round offering protection from the weathers elements. The club over the past few years has experienced severe hardships with their ground being flooded. The club was forced to relocate for a period of time where player membership severely decreased. Strathfieldsaye is identified as a growth corridor and an upgrade to the baseball facilities at club court would cater for this along with providing the only baseball facilities in the Eppalock ward. Club contribution SRV requested contribution Council contribution Total project cost

$8200 $48,000 $23,800 $80,000

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3. Heathcote Tennis Club Lighting Infrastructure â&#x20AC;&#x201C; four tennis courts The Heathcote Tennis Club is proposing to upgrade and install lighting infrastructure to two netball courts and two tennis courts at the Heathcote tennis facility. Heathcote has limited sporting recreation outlets for district residents and being located some distance from larger towns and cities the local residents rely on utilising the existing facilities. The Heathcote Tennis Club is part of the Redesdale and District Tennis Association (RDTA). The club caters for juniors through to seniors in competition and also has a coaching program, supervised trainings Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights, the Tennis Australia Hot Shots program aimed at grass roots level along with social tennis on Wednesday morning and afternoons. The upgrade and installation of lighting to the two netball and two tennis courts would increase participation in winter and summer for both netball and tennis trainings and competition. Club contribution SRV requested contribution Council contribution Total project cost

$16,000 $96,000 $48,000 $160,000

Two other projects were considered, however because of insufficient planning and other priorities are not supported. Such projects are as follows; 4. Bendigo Bowls Club Lighting Infrastructure - two bowling greens The Bendigo Bowls Club is proposing to upgrade its non compliant lighting on two of its show greens. The existing lighting is dilapidated, non compliant and 60 years of age. The new lighting infrastructure would ensure that the new lights meet current bowling standards and guidelines. Council Officers see this as a worthy project however through the assessment process conducted by Recreation staff this project just narrowly missed out due to factors such as participation numbers and limited multipurpose use. The Recreation unit believe this project is worthy and will submit as a bid in the next financial years capital works program.

5. Lake Weeroona Pavilion management Committee Install an operable wall at the lake weeroona pavilion The Lake Weeroona Pavilion Committee proposes to install an operable wall to create an additional space to cater for current tenants and cater for additional user groups. This is a positive move that Council Officers support however it fails to meet crucial aspects of the funding criteria. The CoGB is currently undertaking a Master Plan for Lake Weeroona and once this is complete the Recreation unit will assess recommendations and submit various projects for funding.

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Priority/Importance: The above projects are considered as priority projects for funding as part of the CFFP – minor facilities category. The above projects were assessed by Recreation staff and scored using the following established criteria; community benefit, demographic significance, risk management, planning, participation levels and potential growth, environmental management, economic impact, meeting a gap, cultural and heritage significance, self support, and ability to attract external funding. The above projects strongly meet the CFFP – Minor facilities guidelines through; - Encouraging participation through innovative facility initiatives - Community involvement in planning and developing facilities - Cooperation between local government, state sporting associations and local sporting clubs and associations - Development of sustainable sport and recreation facilities - Encourage female participation Options/Alternatives: The CoGB is eligible to submit up to three applications under the minor facilities category. Council Officers believe that the following projects are priority projects to service the current and future community needs and meet the criteria for the 2013/2014 grant round; - Hockey Central Victoria Inc - Replacement to the wet synthetic surface - Strathfieldsaye Dodgers Baseball Club- Batting tunnel and team dugout upgrade - Heathcote Tennis Club - Lighting Infrastructure – two netball and two tennis courts Commencement Date: If successful, funding would be available to the CoGB from 1 July 2013. Subject to council deliberations, an optimistic construction timeline could be September 2013 with a completion in June 2014. Risk Analysis: Local clubs and sporting organisations who have submitted an expression of interest to apply for funding through the CFFP minor category for various projects have been involved in the planning of their proposed project, consulted with their clubs, engaged contractors for quotes and committed to a ten percent financial contribution towards their project. If funding is not obtained to support these medium projects, Council may not be in a financial position to complete construction. Consultation/Communication Internal Consultation Recreation staff

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External Consultation Sport and Recreation Victoria, key user groups and potential new user groups have been consulted for the purposes of the applications. Grants were advertised through the Bendigo Advertiser community notices, a media release, twitter and the Recreation newsletter. Commencement Date Submissions are due to Sport and Recreation Victoria on September 26, 2012 Conclusion All projects submitted for the 2013/2014 CFFP minor grants have merit and demonstrate that there is a growing need to deliver these “medium” sized projects as part of the CoGB capital works program. Ultimately Council Officers have recommended projects that strongly meet the criteria guidelines, address risk issues and clearly identify a lack of basic facilities required for a venue to function. Resource Implications Hockey Central Victoria Inc Strathfieldsaye Dodgers Baseball Club Heathcote Tennis Club

$ 40,000 $ 23,800 $ 48,000

TOTAL

$ 111,800

These implications will affect the 2013/2014 capital works program

Attachments Nil

RECOMMENDATION That Council support the applications as listed below for the 2013/2014 Community Facility Funding Program - minor category: -

Hockey Central Victoria Inc - replacement to the wet synthetic surface Strathfieldsaye Dodgers Baseball Club- batting tunnel and team dugout upgrade Heathcote Tennis Club - lighting Infrastructure – two netball and two tennis courts.

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4.5 COMMUNITY POLICING VEHICLE Document Information Author

Deb Simpson, Acting Manager Community and Cultural Development Vanessa Wait, Safe Communities Officer

Responsible Director

Pauline Gordon , Director Community Wellbeing

Summary/Purpose The purpose of this report is to seek Council approval for the renewal of the vehicle lease agreement between City of Greater Bendigo and Victoria Police for the Community Policing Vehicle. Policy Context Council Plan 2009 - 2013 Under the theme area ‘Community and Culture’, there is a strategy to ‘work collaboratively to promote community safety and healthy living. Two actions under this strategy are to ‘support the Bendigo Safe Community Forum and assist with the delivery of agreed actions that support community safety’ and ‘develop community safety programs and initiatives throughout the municipality’. Bendigo Safe Community Forum Strategic Directions 2010 - 2012 Under the Bendigo Safe Community Forum’s Strategic Directions there is a priority area ‘to promote safe and connected communities’ with the identified role as being ‘to increase community connections’. Background Information In 2008, City of Greater Bendigo (CoGB) entered into a vehicle lease agreement (agreement) with Victoria Police for a Community Policing Vehicle. It was considered that the establishment of this agreement would better enable the local Proactive Policing Unit (Unit) to progress activities identified as priorities by the Bendigo Safe Community Forum (Forum) and to deliver the range of programs and services the Unit offers across Central Victoria. Victoria Police remains an active member of the Forum and is a significant contributor in the delivery of its Strategic Directions. The range of programs and services the Unit offers is largely proactive in nature. The Unit therefore plays a key role in promoting community safety. Some of the activities Victoria Police has utilised the lease vehicle for in recent months include: PAGE 203


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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Youth Corp Program Restorative Justice Program Youth engagement – outside library Cyber safety presentations at Catholic College, Girton Grammar, Crusoe, Eaglehawk and Weeroona Secondary Colleges. Suicide prevention presentations and network meetings CoGB Rural Support Network meetings Presentations at My Place / Men’s Sheds Emergency Services Presentation – Monash Medical Students Blood challenge presentations Family violence presentations – La Trobe University Social Work students Living safer sexual lives presentations – Bendigo Kids Character Carnival Baptist Girls Brigade presentations White Ribbon Day promotions Respondents Court Support Program CEPA farm safety expo Our Plan Our Future activities and meetings Presentation ‘Policing in our community’ – Glenvale School SAFE week activities YSS referrals – St Lukes Ropes Program Fit to Drive presentation – Malmsbury Emergency Services Day – Golden Square Armed task force presentation – Bendigo Sister’s day out presentation – Bendigo Mental Health Week events. Rochester farm safety expo Indigenous family violence awareness campaign Safe plate days – Golden Square, Maiden Gully, Eaglehawk, Strathfieldsaye. Elmore Field Days Neighbourhood watch activities – Inglewood, Golden Square, Long Gully, North Bendigo. Cultural Diversity Week activities Bunnings Safety Day Attendance at a number of meetings relating to youth engagement, family violence and crime prevention activities.

The lease vehicle could be viewed as a tool for articulating the strong community safety partnerships between CoGB and Victoria Police as it has been branded with both CoGB and Victoria Police logos. Report The initial agreement was for a two year term (August 2008 to August 2010), however in 2010 CoGB approved a further one year term (August 2010 to August 2011).

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As the previous agreement has now expired, Officers have moved to a month by month arrangement until the way forward is determined. Under the terms of the previous agreement Victoria Police was responsible for: • The costs of fueling and maintaining the service schedule for the vehicle. • Keeping the vehicle garaged when not in use. • Operational procedures for usage and care of the vehicle. • Quarterly reports to CoGB outlining activities that the vehicle has been utilised for. The lease vehicle has now traveled approximately 120,000 kilometres. Although it has been serviced regularly throughout is life at a local dealership (at Victoria Police’s expense), the lease vehicle is reportedly experiencing some mechanical issues and is also showing normal signs of wear and tear. The issues that have been noted include : • The lease vehicle surges and cuts out even though it has been serviced regularly. This issue has been investigated by the local dealership however the problem has not been pinpointed / rectified. • There is difficulty starting (particularly on cold mornings) and restarting the lease vehicle. • Several parts of the branding have peeled off the lease vehicle. • Included in the lease vehicle badging are the words ‘community policing’ and ‘living our potential’ which are no longer relevant. Victoria Police has requested that CoGB give consideration to entering into a new agreement and upgrading the lease vehicle. Victoria Police have explored other options for sourcing a vehicle for the Proactive Policing Unit, including requesting a replacement vehicle through Victoria Police and seeking corporate sponsorship through local businesses. The Proactive Policing Unit have advised that there is no capacity for a replacement vehicle to be sourced through Victoria Police due to the high demand that is already in place statewide from other operational (reactive) policing units. Given the current State Government budgetary climate, this situation is unlikely to change within the foreseeable future. It must be acknowledged however that the local government sector is also facing many financial challenges (in particular, the current Vision Superannuation funding shortfall) and that the inability of Victoria Police to provide a replacement vehicle could be viewed as a State Government cost shift. If Council were to approve a new agreement in this instance in acknowledgment of the positive outcomes that can be attributed to this successful partnership, consideration should be given to making it the final agreement. It is the Officer’s position that such an arrangement would strike a balance between CoGB reducing some of its future financial liabilities whilst also giving the Proactive Policing Unit further opportunity to try and broker alternative arrangements. The Proactive Policing Unit has advised that its efforts to date to attract corporate sponsorship for a replacement vehicle have also been unsuccessful.

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Risk Analysis: The Proactive Policing Unit is currently heavily reliant on the lease vehicle arrangement in order to undertake their community based work outlined earlier in this report. Victoria Police have a limited supply of vehicles internally and vehicles are allocated based on the level of priority: in all cases reactive policing functions take priority over proactive policing functions. It is difficult to draw direct correlations between the impacts of the Proactive Policing Unit’s functions on crime rates, but anecdotal information that crime rates increase when proactive policing functions are reduced. Since the agreement has been in place the Proactive Policing Unit has been able to build the level of their community based work considerably. Consultation/Communication Internal Consultation CoGB’s Finance Unit has assisted in the preparation of this report through the provision of forecast costings if a new agreement were to be entered into. External Consultation: Victoria Police (and particularly the Proactive Policing Unit) has indicated that they are very grateful for the support CoGB has provided through the agreement and wish to continue to foster this partnership. At the Bendigo Safe Community Forum meeting on 7 September 2012, the Community Policing lease vehicle arrangement was tabled. Victoria Police members present at the meeting declared a conflict of interest and left the room when the item was discussed. The Forum indicated that they supported the continuation of the vehicle lease agreement between Victoria Police and the City of Greater Bendigo. Resource Implications If Council were to approve a final five year vehicle lease agreement, CoGB’s Finance Unit would seek to trade the existing Community Policing Vehicle in due to its age and unresolved mechanical issues, and replace it with a new Toyota Camry Altise. The cost of the new vehicle has been quoted at $24,385 (excluding GST). This would be a capital expense to be taken up in 2012/13. Based on a five year vehicle lease agreement and allowing for a 40% residual vehicle value of $9,754, the forecast total capital cost to CoGB over the proposed five year term is $14,631 (or $2,926 in depreciation per annum). Allowing for a one off cost of $1,800 for branding of the new vehicle, plus estimated insurance costs of $600 per year, the total costs (capital and operational) per annum are forecast to be $3,886. If a shorter vehicle lease agreement were to be considered (eg: three years), it is anticipated that the residual value of the vehicle would be higher however this would be offset by higher annual depreciation rates. It is therefore considered that a five year agreement would be the most cost effective.

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Conclusion The work that the Proactive Policing Unit undertakes aligns well with many CoGB initiatives and also contributes to the achievement of the Bendigo Safe Community Forum’s Strategic Directions. CoGB has previously entered into a vehicle lease agreement with the local Proactive Policing Unit. This previous agreement expired in August 2011, with a month by month arrangement instigated in the interim. Victoria Police has requested that CoGB give consideration to entering into a new agreement and upgrading the existing lease vehicle due to ongoing mechanical issues. The Proactive Policing Unit is heavily reliant on the lease vehicle arrangement to deliver its current portfolio of programs and services. The Unit has attempted to broker alternative resourcing arrangements however those attempts have been unsuccessful to date. Council needs to be mindful of the financial challenges our organisation is currently facing in considering whether to approve a new vehicle lease agreement. This is particularly pertinent given the Vision Superannuation shortfall that CoGB is currently grappling with. However, the immediate withdrawal of the lease vehicle arrangement would have a significant impact on the Proactive Policing Unit’s functions. If Council were to approve a final vehicle lease agreement, this could strike a balance between reducing some of our organisation’s future financial liabilities whilst also giving the Proactive Policing Unit further opportunity to try and broker alternative resourcing arrangements. Based on the forecast costings provided by the Finance Unit, a five year vehicle lease agreement would be the most cost effective. If Council were to endorse the Officer recommendation for a new five year vehicle lease agreement, it is proposed that the term be from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2017. As per the previous vehicle lease agreement, it would be a stipulation that the vehicle be used for programs and services that fall within the realm of the Proactive Policing Unit and not for other operational (reactive) policing uses. It is understood that the vehicle would generally be utilised for: • • • • • •

Crime prevention information and education sessions Safety audits Community-based activities and events Youth and indigenous community engagement activities Project-related activities Neighbourhood House and Neighbourhood Watch initiatives

Under the proposed new vehicle lease agreement, Victoria Police would be responsible for: • • •

The costs of fueling and maintaining the service schedule for the vehicle. Keeping the vehicle garaged when not in use. Operational procedures for usage and care of the vehicle.

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Quarterly reports to CoGB outlining activities that the vehicle has been utilised for. CoGB’s Community Safety Officer would be responsible for monitoring this reporting.

In line with previous agreements, CoGB would be responsible for continuing to provide insurance coverage under the existing policy. The vehicle would be branded to reflect the partnership arrangement and would include the CoGB logo, Victoria Police logo and the wording ‘Local Priority Policing’. The costs to brand the vehicle would be shared between Victoria Police and the CoGB. Attachments Nil RECOMMENDATION That Council approve a new vehicle lease agreement with Victoria Police effective from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2017, on the basis that it constitutes the final agreement to be offered in light of the significant financial challenges that the local government sector is facing.

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4.6 KIDS CHARACTER CARNIVAL Document Information Author

Maureen Tessier, Acting Manager, Children and Family Services

Responsible Director

Pauline Gordon , Director Community Wellbeing

Summary/Purpose To provide Council with a brief summary of the 2011 Kids Character Carnival and to seek Council’s support to progress with future planning of the event. Policy Context Council Plan Strategy 3.4: Develop the cultural and creative aspirations of the community to make a significant contribution to the City’s Social and Economic prosperity and quality of life for all. Specifically 3.4.5: states: Implement Arts for Health and Arts for Children initiatives. In its policy intent, the Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2009 – 2013 states that the City of Greater Bendigo is committed to working in partnership with the community, government agencies, charitable organisations and business to strengthen the health and wellbeing of all citizens. The City of Greater Bendigo embraces the diversity of its roles: to advance the commitment to develop Greater Bendigo as a ‘Child Friendly City.’ Background Information The Kids Character Carnival (KCC) has been an annual event which originated in 2000 as a fundraiser for SCOPE Loddon Mallee, a non profit, charitable organisation providing support for children and adults with disability. It started as an event showcasing a number of celebrity characters that children become familiar with, primarily through television. These Characters visit Bendigo and children get to meet and be up close and personal with their “heroes”. The City of Greater Bendigo has been managing the event since 2003 when it outgrew the capacity of SCOPE and to ensure the opportunity was not lost to Bendigo. As part of the City of Greater Bendigo’s commitment to sustaining its Child Friendly City status, the Children and Family Services Unit has been responsible for organising this community event. The Carnival remains a major fundraiser for SCOPE through the sale and proceeds of food and drinks at the Carnival.

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The KCC is a free event for children birth to 8 years and their families, providing a range of quality entertainment and activities in addition to the Characters. The Carnival is conducted in partnership with local businesses, early year’s service providers, volunteers, children and their families, though council officers spend many months organising the event and on the day. It is the only community event in Bendigo that specifically targets children from birth to 8 years of age. Initially the event was held in the Civic Gardens. Driven by the Carnival’s success and growth in attendance the KCC was moved to Rosalind Park in 2009. Although tickets are not sold for the event it is estimated the KCC now attracts in excess of 10,000 participants. Report The KCC is essentially a combination of entertainment, activities and early years service provider exhibitions. The Carnival aims to promote community connectedness, engagement and education. Additionally it aims to elevate the importance of play by providing creative play activities rather more traditional carnival pursuits such as rides. The philosophy guiding the KCC is a commitment to creating a long term investment into a more caring community that actively commits to children, social inclusion, healthy lifestyles and community capacity building. One of the key aims of the KCC is to help create a link between vulnerable families and service providers. The inclusion of free entertainment allows families with young children the opportunity to interact and socialise in a community event atmosphere as well as educating families about leading healthy, active lives and to encourage play rather than non physical pursuits. The focus on healthy food and spending quality family time in one of Bendigo’s beautiful outdoor spaces also promotes healthy lifestyles and communities. In 2011, officers endeavoured to survey those in attendance at the Carnival. However, this proved difficult given the competing exciting activities on offer and the need for those parents to supervise their young children. 97 participants including children were surveyed with an overwhelmingly positive response. Ideally, the majority wanted to see the continuance of a high calibre event. Those who worked or volunteered, said the priority was for an event which meets community expectations and ensures health and safety of all staff, volunteers and participants. However, with the increasing size and associated costs of the KCC there has been equivalent increase in reliance on volunteers and time contributed by staff and early childhood officers. Whilst skilled at early childhood program content these staff are not best positioned to organise and deliver on such a large scale event, nor is it the most appropriate use of resources. The KCC has been dependent on fundraising and sponsorship outside of the City of Greater Bendigo budget allocation. Expenditure to conduct the 2011 event totalled $48,582. The City of Greater Bendigo’s contribution was $12,500. In addition officer time of in excess of 26 weeks was taken to organise and conduct the event.

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External contributions totalled $36,082. Major sponsors from within the local business community have continued to support this event sustained by a second tier of minor sponsors. In 2011 the event involved 15 cash sponsors. Major Sponsors 2011 plus their contributions were: BUFS Pharmacy $5,000, GJ Gardner Homes $5,000, Bendigo Advertiser $5,000 and WIN Television $7,500. Minor Sponsors plus their contributions were: The Bendigo Media Centre $2,000, Safe Community Forum $1,000, Schools as Hubs $1,000, St Luke’s $1,000, Department of Human Services $1,000, SCOPE $1,000, Major Marketing and Events CoGB $1,472, Animal Control CoGB $1,000, Bolton’s Office National $700, Capital Theatre $600, Rural Access $500, Children’s Art Network CoGB $500,Children’s Week State Government funding $500, Modern Teaching Aids $500, Good One Graphics $360, Bendigo Access Employment $250 and Jenny’s Kindergarten$150. In addition there were many in-kind sponsors including: The Bendigo Advertiser, WIN Television, The Bendigo Media Centre, Bolton’s Office National, Modern Teaching Aids, Good One Graphics, Bendigo Bank, Challenges Accepted, LEGO Australia, Coliban Water, Café Twenty 2, Café Essence, Science and Discovery Centre, Gold Fields Mine, Dragon Lanes Bowling, The Fun Factory, The Ironbark Riding Centre, Cold Rock Ice Creamery, Bendigo Cinema, Clark Rubber, Family Videoland Eaglehawk, Retravision, The Zone, Bendigo Pottery and Favourite Flavours. The success of the event was largely attributable to those local businesses as well as the 20 early year’s service providers involved including: Australian Breast Feeding Association, Off to an Early Start Program, Australian Literacy Educators, Bendigo Aboriginal Education Consultation Group, Bendigo YMCA, Out of the Box Toy Library, Golden Square Kindergarten, Jenny’s Kindergarten, Kelly Sports, Loddon Mallee Presschool Association, Long Gully Community House, Parks Victoria, Peace Incorporated, Victoria Police, Bendigo Health, Early Intervention, Playgroup Victoria, Noahs Ark Toy Library, Kennington Primary School Deaf Facility, Camp Hill Primary School, Children and Family Services City of Greater Bendigo including Child Care Centres. The success of the event is also strongly linked to its reliance on large numbers of volunteers. On the day 162 people (many of whom were youth) volunteered to work in some capacity , handing out balloons, undertaking surveying, face painting, escorting the Characters, wearing Character suits, assisting children’s play in the LEGO tent and many other event activities. In 2011 the call for volunteers was not responded to as well as was hoped and in the end many volunteers were council officers who saw this as another opportunity to get involved with their community and to ensure that the event continued with a sufficient team in place. In addition to the 120 volunteers there were 42 City of Greater Bendigo staff, 12 of whom were from departments outside of the Children and Family Services Unit. (See attached document: 2011 KCC City of Greater Bendigo Volunteers) The volunteers came from: Girton Grammar School 59, Eaglehawk Secondary College 19, Crusoe Secondary College 16, Weeroona Secondary College 10, Early Childhood Studies TAFE 6, Latrobe University 6, and 4 from The 15 Transport Squadron.

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Due to the increased size and costs, difficulty attracting volunteers, event management and administrative requirements to deliver this Carnival, officers are no longer in a position to provide the event on an annual basis. The KCC is organised at the same time as staff are performing their other duties and so are unable to focus solely on one event for such a lengthy period of time. The CoGB has been extremely grateful to the generous businesses who have donated so willingly but appreciate that this has taken a significant toll on those businesses, some of whom have indicated they may no longer be able to maintain the same level of funding or in kind support for the event. The success of this event is at a point where Council needs to make a decision about its ongoing direction. As a key leader in and having a commitment to working in partnership with the community, government agencies, charitable organisations and business to develop Greater Bendigo as a ‘Child Friendly City’, this is one event which showcases that commitment. The event has grown to a size where it is a major attraction to families with young children. However, in order to maintain or grow the event into the future it will require a significant injection of resourcing. In order to meet this growing expectation to become better each year, it is therefore proposed that the KCC occurs bi-annually with the next event scheduled for October 2013. Council would be able to allocate resources every second year, potentially with some key performing attractions. Volunteers’ enthusiasm could be engaged and better utilised to deliver on one event every two years and there potentially would not be such a drain on local businesses. It is also proposed that this event moves under the umbrella of the major events team within CoGB to ensure the event continues and is delivered by those skilled in event management. It is proposed that the organising committee comprise early childhood specialists to ensure the intent is maintained and to continue to harness the enthusiasm of volunteers. Timelines: The KCC has traditionally run in October each year. This report proposes the next Kid’s Character Carnival occurs in October 2013. This allows sufficient time to plan and develop an event plan and secure performing artists, activities, sponsors, volunteers and most significantly the resourcing required for it to be successful. Risk Analysis: The Kids Character Carnival (KCC) has been an annual event which originated in 2000 as a fundraiser for SCOPE and remains a key fundraiser, though they also struggle with their volunteer base who work tirelessly on the day providing food and drink for sale to attendees.

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The City of Greater Bendigo has been managing the event since 2003 when it outgrew the capacity of SCOPE and to ensure the opportunity was not lost to Bendigo. The event has continued to grow in popularity and with it came the expectations of what a large scale event of this nature would offer. To the credit of a handful of Children and Family Services officers Karen Cresswell (KCC Coordinator), Maureen McMahon, Kristy Bennett, Maureen Tessier, Kara Mamouney Brown and Suezanne Martin they have endeavoured to meet these growing expectations. In 2011 it became difficult to manage hours of work given the demands placed on this small number of officers to deliver. The eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s success has outgrown the capacity of the team who need to focus on the event program content rather than the various aspects of event management which is not their core business. The reliance on businesses and volunteers to contribute on an annual basis has the potential to diminish with increasing demands on their time and generous contributions. In short of losing the Carnival altogether, the delivery of an event on a bi-annual basis with the next event in 2013 is proposed to ascertain if it is a more sustainable model and to maximise resources. A strong evaluation framework will be developed to assess all aspects of the event throughout its planning and delivery. This will be done to provide a full analysis to Council about its ongoing future including impact for business, sponsors and any possible increase in participation of services. Going forward, there needs to be consideration given to either providing more resources and allowing the event to continue to grow, or reviewing the primary aims of the Carnival with a view to containing the event within current resources to a lesser scale. Conclusion The KCC is now a large much anticipated event that showcases one of Bendigoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier open spaces, Rosalind Park. The delivery of high calibre entertainment, activities and Characters for families that otherwise may not be able to afford their children such an experience demonstrates protective factors such as social inclusion and community connectedness. These factors are linked not only to the health of the individual but to the health of communities. This event is well established on Victoriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calendar of events for children and its success and development over the years is undoubtedly a triumph for our community. Going forward, there may need to be consideration given to either providing more resources and allowing the event to continue to grow or reviewing the primary aims of the Carnival with a view to containing the event within current resources. Attachments 1.2011 KCC City of Greater Bendigo Volunteers 2.2011 Kids Character Carnival Photos 3.2011 Kids Character Carnival Poster

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RECOMMENDATION The recommendation is to: 1. Thank all those involved in the success of the 2011 Kids Character Carnival. 2. Support the continuance of the Kids Character Carnival for 2013 under the umbrella of the major events team, in collaboration with the Early Childhood Team. 3. Consider a budget allocation to deliver the event as part of the 2013-2014 budget estimates.

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Attachment 1: 2011 KCC City of Greater Bendigo Volunteers Anne Marie Roberts Anthony Schofield Kristy Bennett Pauline Birch Catherine Cluff Theresa Cox Karen Cresswell Melanie Grant Colleen Hildebrandt Kara Mamouney-Brown Suezanne Martin Claire McCann Maureen McMahon Roselyn Mutimbe Carmel Pearce Rosalie Rogers Maureen Tessier Chris Walters Kelsey White Lynn Maher Deborah Blake Justine Armstrong Rosalie Clift Craig Wright Annette Wilson Delina Anstee Sarah Colewell Debbie Hercus Diane Murphy Rachael Hamilton Katrina Howley Shaun Kellow Lynne McArdle Kristen Muir Pauline Gordon Fiona Deveraux Marion Holmes Marg Rinaldi Kylie Cheal Samantha Stanton Sarah Watts Steven Abbott

Aged / Disability Animal Control Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services (Student) Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services Children & Family Services (Student) Children & Family Services Capital Theatre Cultural & Community Development Cultural & Community Development (Student) Cultural & Community Development Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care Child Care Community Wellbeing Director Maternal Child Health Maternal Child Health Maternal Child Health People & Learning People & Learning Statutory Planning Strategy

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Attachment 2: 2011 Kids Character Carnival Photos

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Attachment 3: 2011 Kids Character Carnival Poster

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

5.

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

OUR PEOPLE, OUR PROCESSES

5.1 ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND CONTRACTS AWARDED UNDER DELEGATION Document Information Author

Janet Worthington, Accounts Payable Officer Leeanne Taig, Administration Assistant, Contract and Project Coordination

Responsible Director

Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support

Summary/Purpose The purpose of this report is to provide information on accounts payable issued under delegation. Policy Context Provide high quality professional services by undertaking responsible business planning to ensure long-term sustainability. Report Cheque Nos.

155047

to

155165

$343,255.72

Electronic Funds Transfer

087875

to

088548

$15,610,854.86

The pre-payments as listed above totalling $343,255.72 and Electronic Funds Transfer $15,610,854.86 are submitted for the information of Council. Contracts Awarded under Delegation The following contracts subject to public tender, have been issued under delegation by the officer as listed (Instrument of Delegation - August 5, 2009):

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Contract No 2564

2568

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Successful Contractor

Project Supply of Home and Community Care (HACC) Services – Heathcote Area O’Keefe Rail Trail Gravel Pathway in Axedale

Value (GST Excl)

Heathcote Health

Schedule rates

Monigatti Cartage Pty Ltd

Delegated Officer of

Date Signed

Craig Niemann

22/08/2012

65,080.40

Brett Martini

23/08/2012

2565

Ewing Park Cricket Nets

Shelton Fencing

99,996.00

Lincoln Fitzgerald

27/08/2012

2570

O’Keefe Rail Axedale Pathway

Aara Construction

181,031.00

Darren Fuzzard

29/08/2012

Trail – Asphalt

Attachments 1.

A listing of the cheques and electronic funds transfer are included in the attachments to the Business Paper.

RECOMMENDATION That the Delegated Authority for Accounts Payable and Contracts, as outlined in this report, be endorsed by Council.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

5.2 RECORD OF ASSEMBLIES Document Information Author

Peter Davies, Manager Executive Services

Responsible Officer

Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer

Summary/Purpose The purpose of this report is to provide the record of any assembly of Councillors, which has been held since the last Council Meeting, so that it can be recorded in the Minutes of the formal Council Meeting. Policy Context An amendment to the Local Government Act 1989, which came into effect on September 24, 2010, requires the record of any assembly of Councillors to be reported to the next practicable Council Meeting and recorded in the Minutes. Background Information The Local Government Act provides a definition of an assembly of Councillors where conflicts of interest must be disclosed. A meeting will be an assembly of Councillors if it considers matters that are likely to be the subject of a Council decision, or, the exercise of a Council delegation and the meeting is: 1. 2.

A planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors (5) and a member of Council staff; or an advisory committee of the Council where one or more Councillors are present.

The requirement for reporting provides increased transparency and the opportunity for Councillors to check the record, particularly the declarations of conflict of interest. Report Outlined below are the details of assemblies of Councillors held since the last meeting.

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Meeting Information Positive Ageing Advisory Group Thursday August 9, 2012 1. Resignation of Julie Hopper 2. City of Greater Bendigo Aged and Disability Services Review 3. Monash University ASPREE Clinical Trial 4. Advocacy training feedback from participants 5. ZOOM newsletter update 6. Senior's Week 'Hub' update 7. Advisory Group proposal 8. Statewide Local Government Forum on Positive Ageing November 14, 2012 Attendees/Apologies Cr Alec Sandner Pauline Gordon Deb Simpson Kir Larwill Rod Flavell Di Parker Cheryl Axell Audrey Drechsler Dennis Robinson Elaine Herbert Helen Gobbe John Lennon Lillian Alden Peter Eisen Robyn Warren Ruth Hosking Joanne Washbourne Apologies: Terry Howard Sue Spencer Lyn Turner Luke Bennett

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting No.

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Meeting Information Bendigo Easter Festival Advisory Board Meeting Monday August 13, 2012 1. Correspondence re Advisory Board decision 2. Staff report 3. Risk assessment for CFA fire truck rides and Hidden Creatures in Rosalind Park 4. Leave of absence request - David Wright 5. Cost benefit analysis for continuation of 3-day festival format 6. Bendigo Easter Festival Advisory Board Terms of Reference and Instrument of Appointment 7. Media releases 8. Education process for festival format Attendees/Apologies Cr Rod Fyffe Terry Karamaloudis Lyn Brown Raph Beh Fiona Chibber Paul Rohan David Wright Gary Frank Gail Hardy Ken Deveraux Phil Redmond Apologies: Rory Somerville, Association representative

Bendigo

Chinese

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting No.

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Meeting Information Councillors' Forum Wednesday August 22, 2012 1. Presentation by Neighbourhood Houses 2. Big Hill and Mandurang Valley Landscape Assessments 3. Presentation by Victorian Local Governance Association 4. Victory College 5. Design Guidelines 6. Rosalind Park Master Plan 7. California Gully drainage 8. Showgrounds 9. Maiden Gully Industrial Land 10. EPA Levy 11. Food vans 12. T'hooft CafĂŠ 13. Aquatic facilities 14. Marong Business Park 15. Capital Works Policy 16. Easter Festival 17. Finn Street Industrial Land Attendees/Apologies Cr Alec Sandner Cr Rod Campbell Cr Peter Cox Cr Rod Fyffe Cr Barry Lyons Cr Bruce Phillips Cr James Reade Cr Keith Reynard Cr Lisa Ruffell Craig Niemann Pauline Gordon Stan Liacos Marg Allan Prue Mansfield Peter Davies Alison Campbell Apology: Darren Fuzzard

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting No. 8. Cr Reade Yes

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Meeting Information Councillors' Forum Wednesday August 29, 2012 1. Planning matters and draft Ordinary Meeting agenda review 2. Library development 3. Consultation meetings 4. Victorian Local Governance Association 5. Clearance of powerlines 6. Fire Insurance Levy 7. Exhibition Centre shed 8. Small Township meetings 9. Property valuation 10. Coliban Water infrastructure development 11. Works at Kronk Street 12. Proposed New Planning Zones 13. Funding Defined Benefits Superannuation Liability 14. Regional Development Australia Fund Application Attendees/Apologies Cr Alec Sandner Cr Rod Fyffe Cr Rod Campbell Cr Peter Cox Cr Barry Lyons Cr Bruce Phillips Cr James Reade Cr Keith Reynard Cr Lisa Ruffell Craig Niemann David Lloyd Marg Allan Nick Byrne Darren Fuzzard Peter Davies Alison Campbell Apologies: Pauline Gordon Stan Liacos Prue Mansfield

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter Councillor/community representative Councillor/community No. making disclosure representative left meeting 7. Cr Reade Yes

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Meeting Information Bendigo Airport Advisory Committee Tuesday September 11, 2012 1. Planning Amendment Statutory Process 2. Rates and valuation 3. Terminal building 4. Committee Lobbying 5. Release of sites update 6. Minister for Aviation's visit (September 5) Attendees/Apologies Cr Alec Sandner Apology: Cr Lisa Ruffell Brian Gould Bridget Conroy Jack Moore Neil Sammons Chris Gobel Steve Musgrove Rob Jarvis Apologies: Stan Liacos Ken Belfrage Matt Lawrence Ray Walters

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter Councillor/community representative Councillor/community No. making disclosure representative left meeting

RECOMMENDATION That Council endorse the record of assemblies of Councillors as outlined in this report.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

5.3 APPOINTMENT OF INDEPENDENT MEMBER OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE Document Information Author

Janine Gould, Executive Assistant to Director Organisation Support

Responsible Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support Director

Summary/Purpose To recommend the reappointment of an existing Independent Member of the Audit Committee. Policy Context Council Plan 2009-2013 (20120: 4.5 Demonstrate strong corporate governance. Background Information The Audit Committee Charter states that the Audit Committee will consist of five (5) members comprised of three suitably qualified independent representatives and two (2) Councillors. The appointment of independent representatives shall be made by Council and be for a term of three years. Mr Ken Belfrage was appointed as an independent member of the Audit Committee on 14 December 2011 for a period of one (1) year following the resignation of Toni Riley who had completed two of the three years of her term. The term of appointment of Mr Belfrage expires on 1 October 2012. As per the Internal Audit Charter, the first reappointment of an existing member does not require the position to be publicly advertised. The evaluation of reappointment is to be performed by the Chief Executive Officer and two (2) Councillor representatives, Crs Lyons and Ruffell, with a recommendation for an appointment being put to Council. Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s): 14 December 2011 Report Mr Belfrage has served as an independent member of the Audit Committee since 14 December 2011 with his term of appointment due to expire on 1 October 2012. Mr Belfrage has indicated that he is willing to renominate for the position.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Mr Belfrage has extensive relevant experience and is making a valuable contribution to the Audit Committee. He is a retired qualified chartered accountant with extensive experience in providing business advisory and audit services to public companies, private businesses, government and local government bodies, financial institutions superannuation funds and benevolent organisations. He is currently a Board Member of Haven (Loddon Mallee Housing Services), Girton Grammar School, Calder Regional Waste Management Group and the Bendigo Art Gallery, Company Secretary for Bendigo Community Telco, and member of the City of Greater Bendigo Airport Advisory Committee, and Loddon and Mount Alexander Shire Audit Committees. Mr Belfrage has made an important contribution to the Audit Committee to date. Crs Lyons and Ruffell, and the Chief Executive Officer recommend that he be reappointed to the Audit Committee for a three (3) year term.

Commencement Date: 1 October 2012

RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council reappoint Mr Ken Belfrage as an independent member of the Audit Committee for a term of three (3) years concluding on 1 October 2015.

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

5.4 BENDIGO REGIONAL ARCHIVE CENTRE ANNUAL REPORT 2011/2012 Document Information Author

Michael Smyth, Manager Information Services

Responsible Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support Director

Summary/Purpose To provide Council and the community with a summary of 2011/12 achievements of the Bendigo Regional Archive Centre and an outline of key strategies guiding the future operation and development of this service. Policy Context Council Plan 2009-2013 (2012): 4.1 Delivery of responsible financial management and business planning practices to ensure long term sustainability. Background Information The Bendigo Regional Archive Centre(BRAC) was established on 24 October 2007 to retain records of the local region in a document repository suitable for storage of permanent records. The BRAC aims to collect, preserve and make available regional records of community and local interest, including records of the state and local government, private industry, community groups and individuals in their place of origin, and make them accessible to all researchers. The Bendigo Regional Archive Centre comprises of a public access point (reading room) in the Goldfields Library and an Archive Building in Nolan St North Bendigo. The BRAC employs two staff on a part time basis and is open to the public on Wednesday and Thursday 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm. Responsibility for the Bendigo Regional Archive Centre rests with the BRAC Board which meets quarterly. The Board comprises two members from each of the partners, the City of Greater Bendigo (Cr Rod Fyffe and Marg Allan), Public Record Office Victoria (Justine Heazlewood and Graeme Hairsine) and Goldfields Library Corporation (Carolyn Macvean and Vivien Newton). BRAC daily operations are undertaken by the BRAC staff with assistance from each of the partners.

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Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Report Key Achievements in 2011/12 Key achievements or milestones achieved in 2011/12 include: • • • •

Increased visitation by 14%. Total number of records accessed 1506 an increase of 21%. 20 Petitions were digitized and published on the BRAC website during the “Petitions of the People” project. Volunteers have transcribed the petitions and translated the petitioner’s signatures into searchable lists.

Year 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012

No. of Researchers 186 258 293

No. of Records used 821 1241 1506

Resources Bendigo Regional Archive Centre

2011/12

Expenditure Electricity Employee Benefits Plant & Equipment Administration & Maintenance Depreciation Total Expenditure

$ 24,727 $ 64,180 $ 10,210 $ 5962 $ 23,135 $$128,214.00

The BRAC did not have any income in 2011/2012. All BRAC expenditure commitments are met by the City of Greater Bendigo. Current or emerging challenges Current or emerging challenges for the BRAC include: • •

Operational space is limited during the Library redevelopment both at the interim public access point and the Nolan St Archive facility which is shared with the Bendigo Historical Society. Revenue sources continue to be investigated. Access to the records continues to be free to researchers.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Strategic Direction Key matters being addressed are: • • • •

Continued delivery of service during Library redevelopment. Develop a policy for the storage of private records. Further develop procedures for the operation of the Nolan St Archive centre. Investigate the potential to provide secure storage for documents on a commercial basis utilising spare capacity in the Nolan St Archive centre.

RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge the positive impact of the BRAC and its role in preserving our local heritage.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

5.5 IMPROVING THE WAY WE DO THINGS - 2011/12 ANNUAL REPORT Document Information Author

Sharon Morrison, Principal Organisation Development Adviser

Responsible Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support Director

Summary/Purpose To inform councillors of the productivity improvements within the organisation during the 2011/12 financial year. Policy Context Section 208A of the Local Government Act 1989 requires councils to comply with the Best Value Principles. Section 208B(d) states that one of the Best Value Principles is that a Council must achieve continuous improvement in the provision of services for its community. In applying this Best Value Principle, Council may take into account, among other factors: a) the need to review services against the best on offer in both the public and private sectors; and b) an assessment of value for money in service delivery; and c) community expectations and values; and d) the balance of affordability and accessibility of services to the community; and e) opportunities for local employment growth or retention; and f)

the value of potential partnerships with other Councils and State and the Commonwealth governments; and

g) potential environmental advantages for the Council's municipal district. The Best Value principles are applied to planning at the Service Unit level. This report captures that part of the City of Greater Bendigoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response to the Best Value Principle related to continuous improvement.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Background Information In the 2010-2011 Annual Report, a section was included which listed the organisational improvements implemented in the 2010/11 financial year. A similar report has been prepared for the 2011/12 financial year. The report outlines some of the key initiatives which have either been implemented within the current financial year or are in the process of being introduced into the organisation. Report Local government is continually being asked to do more with the same or less resources. In order to maintain services at a quality and cost which is responsive to the needs of the community and accessible financially and physically to those members of the community for whom the service is intended, organisational improvements are an essential part of â&#x20AC;&#x153;business as usualâ&#x20AC;?. Each unit at the City of Greater Bendigo strives to deliver services in the most efficient and effective way to ensure that revenue is expended in a fiscally responsible manner which leads to both the achievement of strategic objectives and the financial sustainability of the City of Greater Bendigo. Listed below are some of the productivity improvements implemented or initiated in the past 12 months. Units are listed in alphabetical order. Responsible Unit/s

Aged and Disability Services

Aged and Disability Services

Asset Planning and Design

Asset Planning and Design

Initiative

Staff flexibility across aged care services

Planned Activity Group Staffing

Design Software

Design Hardware

Service Improvement Staff are offered the opportunity to gain skills and experience across the services when other staff take leave reducing service downtime and increasing efficiency Staffing of PAG sessions has been monitored more closely to ensure that overstaffing does not occur when client attendances are down. This has resulted in labour savings of $90,000 Consolidation of all design staff onto the same design package ensuring efficient transfer of information and projects. Acquisition and implementation of new design computers to ensure that designs can be undertaken with the latest version of software in the most efficient timeframe

PAGE 234

Estimated Savings

$10,000

$90,000

$5,000

$40,000


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s Asset Planning and Design

Community and Cultural Development Community and Cultural Development

Community and Cultural Development

Contracts and Projects Coordination Unit

Contracts and Projects Coordination Unit

Contracts and Projects Coordination Unit

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Initiative

Service Improvement

Forward Designs

Undertake forward designs to enable accurate estimates and gain approvals for works to allow timely construction of capital works.

Online community grant applications Shared Distribution Lists Internal Review of Grants Process

Electricity Contracts

Total Cost of Ownership Policy

Contract Management System

Increased automation of processes resulting in increased efficiency Reduced duplication of effort and increased accuracy of records This internal review has the objective of ensuring that all grants programs and other forms of financial assistance are delivered in an effective, equitable and transparent manner. New electricity contracts established with estimated $380,000 saving over the term of the contracts. The savings enabled funds to be directed into energy saving projects to further reduce energy consumption. This has been further leveraged to obtain an additional $380,000 grant from the State Government to expand the energy saving projects. Development of the Total Project Cost policy for new capital works to ensure all costs associated with capital works are available to Council when considering approval and monitoring the ongoing management of capital projects. Purchase of the Technology One Contracts module to assist with improved contract management processes and integrate with existing systems.

PAGE 235

Estimated Savings $50,000

$5,000

$2,500

Currently undertaking a process to ascertain savings.

$380,000 over the life of the contract

Service Enhancement/Improve ment

Service Enhancement/ Improvement


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s Contracts and Projects Coordination Unit

Contracts and Projects Coordination Unit Contracts and Projects Coordination Unit

Initiative

Tender Evaluation Training

Social Procurement

Contract delegations

Food Environmental Premises Health and Inspection Local Laws Policy

Environmental Food Health and Inspection Local Laws Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Service Improvement Tender evaluation training provided to staff to ensure both the principles of good probity and “Best Value” are understood and applied by staff participating in the tender awarding process. Development of Social Procurement based tendering schedules to assist with issue of local procurement and community building via procurement. Updated officer contract delegations to improve clarity and reduce administrative issues/delays.

Development of inspection policy for Food Premises which clearly explains process and options to staff to allow for inspection, follow up and enforcement of registered premises contributing to a 31% increase in number of food premise inspections and 3 successful prosecutions for non-complying premises.

Development and use of Triplicate Food Inspection Report book – reduces the time taken for staff to record and direct compliance with Food Act breaches. Proprietors given written direction at the time of the inspection, reports are then scanned into system and recorded and the need to produce written letters has been reduced – contributing to the 31% increase in inspections.

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Estimated Savings Service Enhancement/ Improvement

Service Enhancement/ Improvement

Service Enhancement/ Improvement

• Service Enhancement/ Improvement. • Enhancement done to improve inspection numbers - 10/11 – 776 inspections • 11/12 – 1017 inspections • 3 successful prosecutions $52,000 in fines & costs • Service Enhancement / Improvement. • Enhancement done to improve inspection numbers - 10/11 – 776 inspections • 11/12 – 1017 inspections


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s

Initiative

Environmental Food Health and Sampling Local Laws Procedure

Environmental Food Health and Premises Local Laws Newsletter

Food Environmental Premises Registration Health and Local Laws Renewal Procedure

Environmental Septic Final Health and Inspection Local Laws

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Service Improvement Development of Food Sampling procedure and implementation of timed program – 55% increase in meeting statutory requirements for food sampling. Timed program has also resulted in better coordination of resources and decrease expenditure on freight to Melbourne. Quarterly Newsletter for Food Premises – provides up to date and timely reminders to food premises and staff on food safety issues – newsletter distribution via e-mail and web has seen wider distribution and reduced costs. Development of Registration Renewal Procedure – clearly identifies time and steps which need to be taken and has resulted in a more timely and efficient service with built in reminder process that has seen the number of late renewals reduced and only one enforcement action for unpaid registration. Septic Final Inspection request process – team has developed and implemented a process that is designed to reduce the number of unnecessary inspections and chasing of paperwork for final septic inspections. Applicants must now make formal application and submit all documentation which has resulted in an improved and faster system for applicants/homeowners to receive approval for use.

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Estimated Savings • Service Enhancement / Improvement. • Approximate saving of $1500 on freight.

Service Enhancement/ Improvement.

• Service Enhancement / Improvement. • Reduction of late fees received approx - $7000 • Saving of - $2500 in legal fees. Service Enhancement/ Improvement.


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s

Initiative

Environmental Planning Health and Referral Local Laws Process

Environmental Food Act Health and Reporting Local Laws

Executive Services

Multi-skilling

Executive Services

International Placement

Executive Services

Executive Services

Restructure

Website content

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Service Improvement Review and improvement of planning referral process â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to improve quality and timeliness of response to planning development applications. This has been achieved through development of initial checklist review to determine if permit application needs to be referred and then improving the ECM response process. Statutory requirement has seen the upgrade of the Pathways system to allow timely reporting on food regulation activity, which can be used to monitor performance against statutory requirements and track officer activity. Further work has been undertaken to train staff in the roles of others in the team to cover absences. The team hosted an international public administration student for three months at no cost. The Media and Communications staff were brought together within the Executive Services Unit to improve coordination and effectiveness of communications. It has also resulted in reduced expenditure on external consultants. The team is working towards having most of our sites all on the one platform. This saves having to administer multiple platforms and train staff in multiple content management systems to maintain the content.

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Estimated Savings Service Enhancement/ Improvement.

Service Enhancement/ Improvement. - previously not undertaken

Service Enhancement/ Improvement

$8,000 additional value

$16,000 p.a. saving on consultants and Service Enhancement/ Improvement

Service Enhancement/ Improvement and potential savings in future years for training of $1,600 p.a.


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Responsible Unit/s

Initiative

Service Improvement

Information Technology

Systems and hardware improvements – ECM (Document management) Upgrade

ECM now integrates better with file manager and Outlook making it easier to register documents into ECM. Improved tools for finding documents in the ECM system.

Estimated Savings $20,000

$5,000 p.a.

Information Technology

Information Technology

Information Technology

Information Technology

The Capital multifunction device was replaced with a redeployed device from Systems and another unit. hardware This reduced the cost per improvements copy and monthly rental – Capital charge which would have Theatre resulted from adding printing another device. One less multifunction device also reduced overall power consumption.

Tickets.com was upgraded to allow patrons to pick their Pick your own own seat improving service seat. and reducing the workload on the box office. Optical fibre links between the office and both multistorey car parks allow one person to manage both car Optical fibre parks at the same time. to MSCP’s The link allows both the ticket system and the video surveillance to be operated from either site. Internet connections have been reconfigured to provide separation between public and private traffic. This ensures a level of Systems and service for MACH’s centres, hardware Childcare Centres and other improvements offices. – Internet The new connections have been setup with greater capacity for a lower cost. Internet connections are now through BCT and Telstra.

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$3,000

$50,000

$40,000


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s

Initiative

Information Technology

Systems and hardware improvements â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tablets

Information Technology

Upgraded link to the Hopetoun Mill.

Information Technology

Information Technology

Landfill weighbridge software

Immunisation data in the field

Organisation Support

Hardship policy

Organisation Support and Community Wellbeing Directorate

Aged Care Services On Call Work After Hours via Enterprise Agreement

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Service Improvement Tablet computers have been given to strategic areas to improve mobility, improve productivity, reduce printing and reduce cost of equipment. The capacity of the link has been increased to improve response times for all users in the Hopetoun Mill office. Waste going to landfill is now weighed and costed more efficiently. Landfill data is much more accurate and can be accessed by Finance in a more timely manner. Video data capture improves the security of the system Mobile data access has been setup for use by Immunisation allowing access to all immunisation data as it is updated. This reduces the need for additional manual enquiries and ensures data is accurate. Improves the understanding of how hardship cases are handled and results in more effective handling Renegotiation of arrangements has resulted in a $120,000 saving in 12/13 budget and will be ongoing.

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Estimated Savings $4,000

$5,000

$5,000

$1,000

Process improvement

$120,000 (12/13)


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s

Organisation Support Directorate

Parking and Animal Control Parking and Animal Control Parking and Animal Control Parking and Animal Control

Parking and Animal Control

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Initiative

Service Improvement

Structural review

• Streamlined access to services for internal clients • Enhanced IT software development as a key organisational tool • Achieved a seamless end to end process for recruitment, incident & injury management and OHS through improved coordination between Risk Management, Human Resources and Payroll services • Consolidated Financial Accounting and Management Accounting services • Consolidated functions from 8 units into 6 units reducing the number of managers.

Pedal power

Barking dogs

Dog Safety Parking meters

Electronic notebooks

Replaced the motorcycles used for parking enforcement with push bikes Introduced an on-line process for barking dog nuisance Introduced a ‘Be Safe Around Dogs Program’ Replaced 192 parking meters with 29 efficient solar powered ticket machines Introduced electronic notebooks for Animal Control Officers which replace hard copy spreadsheets for registration database. Provides more accurate registration data for the ACO.

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Estimated Savings • Will have time savings and increased efficiency in future years as staff from across the organisation access the services they need quicker • Dedicated resources to IT service will increase organisational efficiency as software enhancements are implemented in shorter timeframes • The reduced number of managers achieves increased coordination, and increased direct service focus $3,000 (ongoing)

Service Improvement

Service Improvement

Service Improvement & protects income Service Improvement


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s

Parking and Animal Control

Parks and Natural Reserves

Initiative

Microchip Scanner

Drought Tolerant turf

Parks and Natural Reserves

Surface Selection

Parks and Natural Reserves

Irrigation Systems

Parks and Natural Reserves

Parks and Natural Reserves

Parks and Natural Reserves

Street Trees

Service Delivery Standards

Old Infrastructure

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Service Improvement Introduced microchip scanner for CoGB Rapid Response Crew to scan cats and dogs found dead on the road. Negates the need for an ACO to attend the scene and also enables owners of the animal to be contacted and advised of the incident Installation of drought tolerant turf species at selected locations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; E.g. Mitchell Street, Lake Neangar Skatepark, Harry Trott Oval Removal of selected garden beds and other surfacing that are difficult to maintain and replacing with suitable hard surfacing Upgrade of automated irrigation systems to ensure efficient water usage in numerous locations Removal of old and unsuitable street trees that require extensive pruning works around powerlines. These are to be replaced with suitable species as part of Street Tree Planting and Maintenance Program The development of the Service Delivery Plan for the Parks and Natural Reserves Unit summarising our operations and implementing prescribed standards for the management of assets under the care of our Unit Removal of old infrastructure from selected locations that had reached the end of its operational life. E.g. old seats and picnic tables

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Estimated Savings Service Improvement

$10,000

$10,000

$10,000

$30,000

Improved level of service.

$5,000 due to not having to maintain old items of infrastructure


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s

People and Learning

People and Learning

People and Learning

Presentation and Works

Presentation and Works

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Initiative

Service Improvement

Employee Self Service

The corporate human resources system has been upgraded to allow staff to check their own entitlements such as annual leave, sick leave etc. Provides electronic processing of leave applications and the ability for staff to change their own personal data such as address and phone number. Implementation has streamlined processes and reduced our carbon footprint

Learning Management System

Commenced implementation of Learning Management System to assist with the booking of training and data entry of training evaluations

Corporate Learning

Introduced a centralised budget and developed a 12 month learning calendar to improve buying power and reduce administration costs

Street Sweeping

Total review of residential street sweeping with city zoned in 3 areas with dedicated sweepers. Resulted in sweeping frequency going from twice per year to 4 times per year.

Landfill compaction

Re-tendered lease for landfill compactor for Eaglehawk which resulted in a bigger compactor at the same lease rate and the replaced machine being located at Heathcote Landfill on an as used hourly rate. Improved compaction efficiency at both landfills.

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Estimated Savings 2.5 hours processing time per fortnightly pay cycle saved ($1700 per annum)

1 day per week better utilisation of staff resources in training booking and collating training evaluations. Improved service delivery. ($9,000 per annum) 1hr per invoice cross charged. ($1000 based on 43 invoices to be paid for scheduled 12/13 Learning Calendar courses) Improved level of service at same cost.

Machine at Heathcote would have cost $5000 per month to lease. New arrangements have been achieved at no cost. Estimated savings over the life of the new cell at Eaglehawk landfill will be in the order of $200,000 in increased compaction.


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s Presentation and Works

Presentation and Works

Presentation and Works

Presentation and Works

Presentation and Works

Presentation and Works

Rates

Initiative

Pit and Drain Clearing

GPS on Garbage Trucks

Bituminous edge repairs

Drainage Construction

Drainage Construction

Stabilised pavement Construction

Online Vendor Certificates

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Service Improvement Introduction of a proactive pit cleaning program. Some pits that have never been cleaned will be cleaned at least biennially. Collection routes programmed into trucks allows operators to undertake new runs without training. Also live tracks collection vehicles and produces collection log. Assists in providing accurate advice to customers. Fitted emulsion spray bar to vehicle. Eliminated manual spraying with a hand lance. Combined with Depot made edging machine significant productivity improvements and reduction in manual handling. The use of HDPE pipe in place of concrete pipes in certain applications. Long lengths and light weight allow for manual placing of pipe in restricted sites. Increased productivity and better resistance to tree root penetration than concrete pipes. Use of crushed recycled concrete to replace crushed rock for bedding and backfilling underground drainage lines. Saves on new materials and promotes recycling. Increased use of in situ stabilisation of sub grades. Reduces excavation, cartage and disposal of existing material and reduces the importation of new pavement material Introduced Vendor Certificates online software for issuing SAI Global Land Information Certificates online resulting in faster turnaround and less paper usage.

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Estimated Savings Improved level of service at the same cost.

Saving in new operator training is $10,000. Improved customer service.

Productivity increase of 200%

Productivity increase of 50%

No $ saving

Reduces sub base costs from $12 to $6 per square metre.

$500 in postage and stationery.


Our People, Our Processes - Reports

Responsible Unit/s

Rates

Initiative

Debt Collection

Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

Service Improvement Introduced streamlined debt collection procedure for instigating legal action, less time spent by staff initially at an individual assessment level. Allocation of street numbers for new subdivisions via SPEAR software resulting in less time spent on notifying Land Victoria of street numbers.

Rates

Street Numbers

Recreation

Project design development

Undertook detailed design and costing prior to seeking Council funding of projects

Recreation

Project management and delivery

Increased emphasis upon project management and delivery

In-house publishing

Production of more documents in house rather than using consultants. Undertook more graphic design and printing in house instead of externally. Printed less copies of the Council Plan and Annual report More online engagement and less need for hard copies.

Strategy

Strategy

In-house graphic design

Strategy

Published documents

Strategy

Online engagement

Estimated Savings Saving in staff time is being redirected to undertake other Rates tasks in shorter timeframes Saving in staff time is being redirected to undertake other Rates tasks in shorter timeframes Improved level of service – costs to saved on individual projects into the future Improved level of service – costs to saved on individual projects into the future $13,000

$7,000

$2,000

$2,000

Conclusion Section 208G requires Council to report to the community at least once every year on what it has done to ensure that it has given effect to the Best Value Principles. Traditionally, Council reports to the community through a Best Value section in Council’s Annual Report. The information contained in this report will assist in developing the content for this year’s Best Value section of the Annual Report, and reports on the Best Value principle related to continuous improvement. The organisational improvements listed in this report assist in containing organisational costs as service delivery demands continue to increase. Recommendation That Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledges the organisational initiatives implemented in the past 12 months, and supports the continued focus on efficiency improvements.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

6.

URGENT BUSINESS

Nil. 7.

NOTICES OF MOTION

Nil. 8.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

9.

MAYOR'S REPORT

10. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT 11. CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS Nil.

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Ordinary Meeting - 26 September 2012

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Council Meeting Agenda 26 September 2012  

Council Meeting Agenda 26 September 2012

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