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AGENDA Ordinary Meeting of Council 6.00pm Wednesday 28 May, 2014

*** Broadcast live on Phoenix FM 106.7 ***

VENUE: Reception Room, Bendigo Town Hall, Hargreaves Street, Bendigo

NEXT MEETING: Wednesday 18 June 2014 Bendigo Town Hall Copies of the City of Greater Bendigo Council’s Agendas & Minutes can be obtained online at www.bendigo.vic.gov.au

PAGE 1


Council Vision Our residents can live healthy and satisfying lives in our vibrant City and region, confident in its growth and future.

Council Purpose and Values Councillors have made a commitment in their Code of Conduct to working and leading together in:           

Making informed, balanced and objective decisions Acting honestly Taking responsible financial decisions Ensuring good governance Being inclusive in their activities and sharing information with others Learning from each other Respecting each other's undertakings Being respectful in their interactions with others Communicating clearly about decisions that have been made Fulfilling their undertakings and being clear when this is not possible Working positively with the media to ensure community members are provided with accurate information

Themes     

Planning for Growth Liveability Productivity Sustainability Good Governance and Decision-Making

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ORDINARY MEETING WEDNESDAY 28 MAY 2014

ORDER OF BUSINESS: ITEM

PRECIS

PAGE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY

5

PRAYER

5

CODE OF CONDUCT

5

PRESENT

5

APOLOGIES

5

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS

5

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME

5

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS

6

CR FYFFE'S REPORT

6

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST

7

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES

8

1.

9

BUDGET FOR 2014/2105

PRESENTATION OF THE BUDGET REPORT BY MARG ALLAN, DIRECTOR ORGANISATION SUPPORT 1.1 2.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS 2.1

3.

PROPOSED BUDGET FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDING 30 JUNE 2015

9 17

PETITION FOR SAFE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING ON THE MIDLAND HIGHWAY IN HUNTLY

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

17 19

3.1 PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C158 - ADVERTISING AND SIGNAGE POLICY CONSIDERATION OF SUBMISSIONS AND REFER TO PANEL 3.2

9

19

PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C204: FORTUNA - CONSIDER PANEL REPORT AND ADOPT 28

3.3 181 ARNOLD STREET, NORTH BENDIGO 3550 - 4 LOT SUBDIVISION, CONSTRUCTION OF 3 TWO STOREY DWELLINGS, PARTIAL DEMOLITION AND EXTENSION TO EXISTING DWELLING 35 3.4 131 OLINDA STREET, QUARRY HILL 3550 - TWO LOT SUBDIVISION, CONSTRUCTION OF DWELLING, DEMOLITION OF OUTBUILDING AND FRONT FENCE AND CONSTRUCTION OF NEW FRONT FENCE 49

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3.5 24 AND 28 CANNON LANE, LOT 2 OF PLAN OF SUBDIVISION 442363V (FRONTING MINERS REST) AND 5 ALLUVIAL PLACE, KANGAROO FLAT 3555 - SUBDIVISION OF LAND INTO 13 LOTS AND CONSTRUCTION OF 8 DWELLINGS (STAGED) 66 3.6 14 RENWICK STREET, GOLDEN SQUARE 3555 - 12 LOT SUBDIVISION AND DEVELOPMENT OF 6 DWELLINGS 81 3.7 41 GLADSTONE STREET, QUARRY HILL 3550 - TWO LOT SUBDIVISION AND CONSTRUCTION OF ONE DWELLING 102 3.8 43 SULLIVAN STREET, ASCOT - SUBDIVISION OF THE LAND INTO 20 LOTS AND THE REMOVAL OF NATIVE VEGETATION 115 4.

LIVEABILITY

132

4.1

SPRING GULLY AND SURROUNDS RECREATION PLAN

132

4.2

FOOD SECURITY REPORT

140

4.3 COMMUNITY CAMPAIGN SEEKING NATIONAL PARK STATUS FOR WELLSFORD STATE FOREST REQUESTS COUNCIL SUPPORT 149 5.

PRODUCTIVITY

160

6.

SUSTAINABILITY

160

7.

GOOD GOVERNANCE AND DECISION-MAKING

161

7.1

COUNCIL PLAN 2013-2017 - THIRD QUARTER REPORT, JANUARY TO MARCH 2014

161

7.2

PROGRESS REPORT INDEPENDENT REVIEW IMPLEMENTATION

208

7.3

CONTRACTS AWARDED UNDER DELEGATION

224

7.4

RECORD OF ASSEMBLIES

226

7.5

ADOPTION OF ANNUAL FEES AND CHARGES FOR 2014/15

235

7.6

LOAN BORROWINGS

238

7.7

FINANCIAL REPORT AS AT 31 MARCH 2014

243

7.8

ASSET CAPITALISATION POLICY AND ASSET VALUATION AND REVALUATION POLICY

249

8.

URGENT BUSINESS

270

9.

NOTICES OF MOTION

270

10.

COUNCILLORS' REPORTS

270

11.

MAYOR'S REPORT

270

12.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT

270

13.

CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS

270

____________________________ CRAIG NIEMANN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY PRAYER CODE OF CONDUCT PRESENT APOLOGIES

SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDERS That Standing Orders be suspended to allow the conduct of Public Question Time.

PUBLIC QUESTION TIME Public Question Time Guidelines Public Question Time – Purpose Council has provided the opportunity for members of the public to ask questions of broad interest to Council and the community. Matters relating to routine Council works should be taken up with Council’s Customer Service Officers through its Customer Request System. By the time planning matters have reached the council agenda, they have been through an extensive process as required by the Planning and Environment Act. In addition, in most instances mediation has been held between the parties involved. Throughout the process there are many opportunities for the people to ask questions. Therefore, no questions relating to planning matters on the Agenda will be accepted. Public Question Time – Where, When And Who The public question time is held at every Ordinary Meeting of Greater Bendigo City Council. Meetings of Council commence at 6.00pm in the Reception Room, Bendigo Town Hall, Hargreaves Street, Bendigo. The public question time is held at the start of the meeting as close as practical to 6:00pm. A maximum of 30 minutes has been provided for registered and unregistered questions. Residents are encouraged to lodge questions in advance so that a more complete response can be provided. Questions will be put to the Council by the individual posing the question; the question will be answered by the Mayor or CEO, or where appropriate, Councillors or Council Officers.

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Acceptance of Questions Each person asking a question of Council is required to stand, state their name, and address the Mayor. Public Question Time is not an opportunity for making of statements or other comments. Council’s Meeting Procedure Local Law does not allow for other questions or comments during the remainder of the meeting. 1.

An individual may only ask one question per meeting, a follow-up question may be permitted at the discretion of the Mayor.

2.

In the event that the same or similar question is raised by more than one person, an answer may be given as a combined response.

3.

In the event that time does not permit all questions registered to be answered, questions will be answered in writing or referred to the next meeting if appropriate.

4.

The Mayor and or CEO have the right to decline registration on basis of:  Prosecution, summonses or any other litigation;  Most appropriately addressed by other means;  Vague, irrelevant, insulting or improper, defamatory;  Answer likely to compromise his / her position;  Confidential, commercial-in-confidence.

5.

Each individual whose registration form has been accepted or declined will be advised by the Friday of the week prior to the scheduled meeting.

6.

In the event of a registration form being declined the registration form will be circulated to the Mayor or Councillors for information.

RESUMPTION OF STANDING ORDERS That Standing Orders be resumed.

CR FYFFE'S REPORT

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

DECLARATIONS OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST Pursuant to Sections 77, 78 and 79 of the Local Government Act 1989 (as amended) direct and indirect conflict of interest must be declared prior to debate on specific items within the agenda; or in writing to the Chief Executive Officer before the meeting. Declaration of indirect interests must also include the classification of the interest (in circumstances where a Councillor has made a Declaration in writing, the classification of the interest must still be declared at the meeting), i.e. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

direct financial interest indirect interest by close association indirect interest that is an indirect financial interest indirect interest because of conflicting duties indirect interest because of receipt of an applicable gift indirect interest as a consequence of becoming an interested party indirect interest as a result of impact on residential amenity conflicting personal interest

A Councillor who has declared a conflict of interest, must leave the meeting and remain outside the room while the matter is being considered, or any vote is taken. Councillors are also encouraged to declare circumstances where there may be a perceived conflict of interest.

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Wednesday 7 May, 2014. The following items were considered at the Ordinary Council meeting held on Wednesday 7 May, 2014 at 6:00pm.           

Planning Scheme Amendment C209 (Council Surplus and Other Land Rezonings) To Consider Authorisation Request 34-36 Havlin Street West, Bendigo - 26-Lot Subdivision, Construct 26 Dwellings, Construct and Use of Food Drink Premise (Café), Removal of Native Vegetation, Works (Filling of Land) and Parking Reduction 105 View Street, Bendigo - Partial Demolition, Extension to Existing Building, Waiver of Car Parking Requirement and Earthworks 104 Vine Street, Bendigo - Construct 2 Storey Dwelling and Fencing Traffic Management in Strathfieldsaye Response to Petition: Parking In Leslie Street, Marong Contract No: CT000114 Canterbury Park Project - Stage 1 and 2 Record of Assemblies Contracts Award Under Delegation Response to Recommendations of a Councillor Conduct Panel Section 89 - Confidential Attachment (contractual matter)

The unconfirmed minutes have also been posted on the City of Greater Bendigo website pending confirmation at this meeting.

RECOMMENDATION That the Minutes of the Ordinary Meeting of Council held on Wednesday 7 May, 2014, as circulated, be taken as read and confirmed.

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

1.

BUDGET FOR 2014/2105

PRESENTATION OF THE BUDGET REPORT BY MARG ALLAN, DIRECTOR ORGANISATION SUPPORT

1.1 PROPOSED BUDGET FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDING 30 JUNE 2015 Document Information Author

Bradley Thomas, Senior Management Accountant

Responsible Director

Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support

Summary/Purpose The report recommends that Council give public notice of its intention to adopt a budget for the financial year ending 30 June 2015. Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017: Theme: 5

Good Governance and Decision Making

Strategic Objective: 5.1

Council demonstrates good governance and leadership.

Strategic Objective: 5.2

The financial and physical resources of the organisation are managed efficiently and well.

Legislative Requirements In accordance with the Local Government Act 1989, Council must:   

Prepare a budget for each financial year commencing 1 July (Section 127). Declare the amount it intends to raise by general rates (Section 158). Comply with guidelines established under Sec 161; Ministerial Guidelines for Differential Rating.

As soon as practicable after Council has prepared its budget, the Council must advertise that the budget has been prepared. The notice must: 1.

State that a person has a right to make a submission under Section 223 of the Local Government Act 1989 on any proposal contained in the budget.

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

2.

Advise that copies of the budget are available for inspection at the Council's main office and any District office during normal business hours for at least 28 days after the publication of the public notice.

Background Information The draft Council Plan 2013 - 2017 (updated 2014) includes a Strategic Resource Plan (SRP) that provides a financial framework for meeting the objectives established in the Council Plan. The key objective of the SRP is to achieve the Council's strategic objectives, while ensuring financial sustainability in the medium to long term. The 2014/15 budget has been developed based on the SRP, to facilitate the achievement of the Annual Actions listed in the Council Plan. Prior to the preparation of the budget, a review of the Council Plan was undertaken which informed the budget content. The following budget principles have guided the budget development:  

    

Take account of Best Value Principles. Implement the Council Plan and other strategic plans for:  New Capital Works using the agreed criteria of the Capital Evaluation Framework.  New and expanded services funded through the Operating budget, using the Business Case submission process. Aim to balance the demand for services and infrastructure with the community's ability to pay. Identify new revenue sources where possible. Ensure existing levels of service can be maintained, as a minimum. Achieve a Working Capital ratio of no less that 150%; there will be $1.50 of current assets to every $1 of current liabilities, to maintain a low risk rating with VAGO. Comply with existing financial policy by:  Investing in renewing existing assets will be to the level of depreciation, in accordance with the COGB's Asset Management Policy.  Maintaining debt servicing costs at less than 10% of rate revenue, in accordance with the COGB's Borrowing Policy.  Determining User Fees in accordance with the COGB's Pricing Policy.

Report Key Impacts on 2014/15 Budget When preparing the 2014/15 budget, consideration has been given to the matters which will impact on Council during the budget period. Economic influences include:  Constrained Federal and State Government fiscal environment.  Consumer Price Index (CPI) increases on goods and services of 2.7% through the year to December quarter 2013.  Impact of the 2014 State and Federal Government budgets.  Increases in insurance premiums. PAGE 10


Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

   

The increasing regulatory environment which requires City of Greater Bendigo to meet legislation standards. Managing the impact of being a growing city with associated community needs. Opportunities/incentives provided through government grant programs to deliver further programs and projects, such as the Street Lighting conversion project. Increase in the Environmental Protection Authority levy to be applied to landfill operations.

There are a number of internal influences which have had a significant impact on the preparation of the 2014/15 budget being:  Budget principles.  The Independent Review of the City of Greater Bendigo. There were a number of recommendations for the Independent Review conducted in 2013 which have been taken into account during the 2014/2015 budget process:  Create a standardised Matter for Decision template for investment and business case proposals (capital works, operational expenditure, service provision, upgrades/renewals, direct requests from Council and asset maintenance) to be applied across all Directorates.  A Capital Evaluation Framework was developed to improve the transparency of allocation of funding to capital projects.  A selection of financial ratios have been used to monitor the financial sustainability of decision making. The ratios relate to the 2014/15 budget.  Prioritisation by Council of several large Capital Works projects that will require funding through rate revenue and loan borrowings. 2014/15 Budget The proposed budget has been prepared in accordance with relevant statutory requirements, including the Local Government Act 1989 (the Act) and Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014 (the Regulations). The key features of the proposed budget are: 1. Capital and Major Works of $62.29M. During 2014/15, Council will continue to deliver on commitments to undertake significant capital projects which improve the liveability of the City. These include the redevelopment of Canterbury Park, Eaglehawk - Stages 1 and 2, Bendigo Ulumbarra Community Theatre, Bendigo Botanic Gardens, Bendigo Airport and further planning for the Bendigo Aquatic Centre. While $10.0M will be contributed to the Bendigo Community Theatre, and $6.2M to the Lighting the Region Projects in 2014/15, the net financial impact on the City of Greater Bendigo is $2.2M, due to grants received in previous years. 2. An operating surplus of $12.6M including capital revenue of approximately $6.6M. 3. Repayment of debt of approximately $2,141,000. 4. An increase in income from Rates and Charges of $6.9M, made up of a rate increase of 6%, supplementary rates, garbage and recycling charges. PAGE 11


Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

The City of Greater Bendigo applies the general rate for residential land, and 5 differential rates, aiming to achieve the differentials as indicated by the percentages as follows: a. Commercial/Industrial land A for suburban properties is 185% of the general rate. b. Commercial/Industrial land B for townships is 180% of the general rate. c. Commercial/Industrial land C for CBD properties is 190% of the general rate. d. Farm Land is 85% of the general rate. e. Vacant Residential and Rural Residential Land is 125% of the general rate. 5. An amount of $93.39M to be raised by general rates and service charges as follows: General Rates $79.46M Service Charges $12.00M Supplementary Rates $ 1.93M (estimated to be raised during the year) 6. The budget includes differential rates to be declared as follows: General

0.3927% of CIV

Commercial/Industrial A (Urban/non-CBD)

0.7264% of CIV

(185% of General)

Commercial/Industrial B (Rural areas)

0.7068% of CIV

(180% of General)

Commercial/Industrial C (CBD)

0.7460% of CIV

(190% of General)

Farm Land

0.3338% of CIV

(85% of General)

Vacant Residential Land

0.4908% of CIV

(125% of General)

7. In accordance declared: Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5

with the Cultural and Recreation Lands Act 1963, the following be 0.1964% of Capital Improved Value 0.08185% of Capital Improved Value 0.03927% of Capital Improved Value $362.30 $475.30

8. The Municipal Charge is discontinued ($32.40 in 2013/14), to assist owners of lower valued properties. 9. An increase in the Garbage Charge of 5.47% for 140 litre bins and 5.94% for 240 litre bins, and the Recycling Charge of 2.50%. 10. Services Charges to be declared as follows: Garbage Charge 240 Litre Bin Garbage Charge 120/140 Litre Bin Garbage Charge 240 Litre Bin (other Commercial) Garbage Charge 120/140 Litre Bin (other Commercial) Recycling Charge Additional Recycling Charge (per additional bin) PAGE 12

$ $ $ $ $ $

232.00 135.00 255.20* 148.50* 61.50 46.00


Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Recycling Bin – change from 240Litre to 360Litre Garbage Charge (Business Areas) One Day per Week Garbage Charge (Business Areas) Two Days per Week Garbage Charge (Business Areas) Three Days per Week Garbage Charge (Business Areas) Five Days per Week Garbage Charge (Business Areas) Seven Days per Week

$ 46.00 $ 255.20* $ 510.40* $ 765.60* $1,276.00* $1,786.40*

* Includes GST

11. An early full rate payment discount of 1.5% on current year rates and charges will be granted if full payment (including any arrears and interest) is received on or before 30 September 2014. Differential Rate for Retirement Villages Council has received a request from Bendigo Domain Village to introduce a Differential Rate for Retirement Villages on the basis that they contribute to the upkeep of civil infrastructure and other services within the village. The residents of such villages enjoy access to Council services in a similar way to other ratepayers, even though they reside within a complex. Council has considered requests from Bendigo Domain Village in previous years and determined to retain the current rating structure. Councillor Conflicts of Interest in the Budget for 2014/15 Section 79C (2) of the Local Government Act indicates that if a budget or revised budget to be approved by Council includes funding for a matter of which a Councillor has a Conflict of Interest, the Councillor is taken not to have a Conflict of Interest for the purposes of approving the budget or revised budget if: a. The Council approved the matter and proposed funding previously; and b. The Councillor disclosed the nature of the Conflict of Interest when the decision in respect of the funding was originally considered and made. This Section of the Act means that if a Councillor has not previously declared a Conflict of Interest in the allocation in which they have a conflict, prior to considering the budget, the Councillor will have a Conflict of Interest in the budget and will therefore need to leave the Council Chamber and not vote on the budget. The first three parts of the report recommendation enables Councillors to declare their Conflicts of Interest prior to considering the other recommendations relating to the draft budget. This will then allow Councillors to vote on the other draft budget recommendations. Development Works for Mitchell Street, Bendigo Cr Ruffell has a conflict of interest (indirect financial interest) in the proposed development works for Mitchell Street, Bendigo, as she operates a business in Mitchell Street.

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Waste Management and Workspace Australia Limited Cr Cox has a conflict of interest in the operation of transfer stations at Goornong, Strathfieldsaye and Heathcote (indirect financial interest) as he is a part-time employee of Future Employment Opportunities who manage these facilities on behalf of Council. Marong Business Park Cr Chapman has a conflict of interest in the Marong Business Park (residential amenity) as she owns property in close proximity to the proposed development. Priority/Importance: The Council must adopt its budget and forward a copy to the Minster for Local Government by 31 August 2014. Consultation/Communication Internal Consultation: The budget has been prepared by the Senior Management Accountant and Manager Finance with extensive input from Councillors, the Executive Management Team and Managers. External Consultation: The Council is required to give public notice of its intention to declare the rate and adopt the budget. Section 223 of the Local Government Act provides that any person can make a submission to Council for consideration in respect to the budget within a 28 day period of formal notification. Council must hear any person requesting to be heard in respect to their submission. Formal notification of the budget will be given in the Bendigo Advertiser on 31 May 2014. Submissions will close on 27 June 2014. During the public exhibition process, the budget will be available for inspection at the City of Greater Bendigo offices and on the City of Greater Bendigo’s website at www.bendigo.vic.gov.au. Publicity will be undertaken in the local media during the exhibition period. The hearing of any submission to the budget will be held from 4pm on Wednesday 2 July 2014, in the Reception Room of the Council Offices, prior to the adoption of the budget on 30 July 2014. Conclusion As formal documentation has now been prepared, the Council is in a position to proceed with the adoption of the proposed budget for the purpose of public advertisement and the consideration of public submissions. Attachments 1.

Proposed budget document (included under separate cover).

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

RECOMMENDATION 1. That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledges the allocation of $1.83M for works associated with the redevelopment of Mitchell Street, Bendigo, as part of the proposed 2014/15 Budget. 2. That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledges the allocation of approximately $265,000 associated with the operation of the transfer stations at Goornong and Strathfieldsaye and the Heathcote Landfill, awarded through a tender process, as part of the proposed 2014/15 Budget. 3. That the Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledges an allocation of $80,000 for further strategic work associated with the Marong Business Park. 4. That the Greater Bendigo City Council, having considered the 2014/15 proposed budget resolves: a. That the budget, annexed to this resolution and initialled by the Mayor for identification, be the budget prepared for the 2014/15 financial year for the purposes of Section 127 of the Local Government Act 1989 to be presented to the Council for adoption prior to 31 August, 2014. b. To give public notice of the proposed budget in accordance with Section 129 of the Local Government Act, and make available for public inspection the information required by the Local Government Act 1989 (as amended) and the Local Government (Planning and Reporting) Regulations 2014. c. To display the proposed budget at City of Greater Bendigo offices and on the City of Greater Bendigo website. d. To receive submissions on the budget until close of business on Friday 27 June 2014. e. To appoint a Committee of the Whole Council to hear and consider any submissions received on the Proposed Budget at 4pm on Wednesday 2 July 2014, in the Reception Room of the Council Offices. f.

To implement a differential rate to be struck as follows: General Commercial/Industrial A (Urban/non-CBD)

0.3927% of CIV 0.7264% of CIV

(185% of General)

Commercial/Industrial B (Rural areas)

0.7068% of CIV

(180% of General)

Commercial/Industrial C (CBD)

0.7460% of CIV

(190% of General)

Farm Land

0.3338% of CIV

(85% of General)

Vacant Residential Land

0.4908% of CIV

(125% of General)

g. In accordance with the Cultural and Recreation Lands Act 1963 the following be declared:

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4 Class 5

0.1964% of Capital Improved Value 0.08185% of Capital Improved Value 0.03927% of Capital Improved Value $362.30 $475.30

h. That there will be no Municipal Charge for each rateable assessment. i.

To reaffirm its previous decision to continue to apply the General Rate to Retirement Villages.

j.

Services Charges to be declared as follows: Garbage Charge 240 Litre Bin Garbage Charge 120/140 Litre Bin Garbage Charge 240 Litre Bin (other Commercial) Garbage Charge 120/140 Litre Bin (other Commercial) Recycling Charge Additional Recycling Charge (per additional bin) Recycling Bin – change from 240Litre to 360Litre Garbage Charge (Business Areas) One Day per Week Garbage Charge (Business Areas) Two Days per Week Garbage Charge (Business Areas) Three Days per Week Garbage Charge (Business Areas) Five Days per Week Garbage Charge (Business Areas) Seven Days per Week

$ 232.00 $ 135.00 $ 255.20* $ 148.50* $ 61.50 $ 46.00 $ 46.00 $ 255.20* $ 510.40* $ 765.60* $1,276.00* $1,786.40*

* Includes GST

k. That an early full rate payment discount of 1.5% on current year rates and charges be granted, if full payment (including any arrears and interest) is received on or before 30 September 2014.

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

2.

PETITIONS AND JOINT LETTERS

2.1 PETITION FOR SAFE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING ON THE MIDLAND HIGHWAY IN HUNTLY

[Petitions and joint letters with ten (10) or more signatures are included in the agenda or tabled at the meeting, unless there is a separate legal process for considering the petition or joint letter, as there is for planning submissions or submissions following public notices (Section 223 LGA)].

A petition has been received from residents of Huntly (with a copy also provided from the State Member for Bendigo East, Jacinta Allan), as outlined below: “Huntly needs a pedestrian crossing on the Midland Highway because:  There is no safe place for pedestrians to cross the Midland Highway in Huntly outside of school crossing hours.  There is a high and growing housing density on the opposite side to the school, shops and post office.  New shared cycle/pedestrian paths have been constructed on the eastern side of the highway (eg. on Gungurru Road) to encourage more sustainable travel options but these lead users to unsafe locations to cross the highway.  New housing estates and in-filling will further increase vehicle traffic density.  The Midland Highway is a truck route and many heavy vehicles regularly pass through.  Community consultation during the development of the Huntly Township Strategy 2009 identified the desire for pedestrian crossings.  There is an imminent risk of an accident. We, the undersigned, call on the City of Greater Bendigo and VicRoads to install a permanent pedestrian crossing on the Midland Highway in Huntly”.

Signatures

-

258

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Officer Comment (Darren Fuzzard, Director Presentation and Assets): The petition requests a pedestrian crossing on the Midland Highway, Huntly and accordingly is a matter for the State Government and VicRoads to address. A letter advising VicRoads of this petition, together with a letter from Jacinta Allan MP on the matter, has therefore been forwarded to VicRoads for consideration. To assist VicRoads in making an informed decision about the need for such a crossing, the City's Engineering & Public Space Unit will undertake a vehicle and pedestrian traffic count and will compile relevant data on predicted growth and development in the area as soon as possible. VicRoads has been advised that this information will be provided when available and a formal response in due course has been sought. Council will be updated on the matter when a response from VicRoads is received. RECOMMENDATION That Council: 1. Acknowledge the petition from concerned residents about the need for a pedestrian crossing of the Midland Highway, Huntly. 2. Note that this is a matter for the State Government and VicRoads to address and that the City has committed to undertake a vehicle and pedestrian traffic count and to compile relevant data on predicted growth and development in the area to assist them in consideration of the request. 3. Note that an update will be provided to Council for further consideration following a response from VicRoads. 4. Advise the petitioners of the above.

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Planning for Growth - Reports

3.

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

PLANNING FOR GROWTH

3.1 PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C158 - ADVERTISING AND SIGNAGE POLICY - CONSIDERATION OF SUBMISSIONS AND REFER TO PANEL Document Information Author

Alison Kiefel – Council Projects Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Amendment details:

Amends the Municipal Strategic Statement and local planning Policy framework to guide the location, scale and type of advertising in the municipality, to maintain a quality public environment and to support business. The amendment specifically proposes to:  Amend Clause 21.07 Economic Development;  Amend Clause 22.08 Highway Entrances and Boulevards Policy; and  Insert a new Clause 22.29, Advertising and Signage Policy.

Proponent:

City of Greater Bendigo initiated.

No. of submissions:

14

Key issues:

 Balance the needs of business with the desire for quality presentation of our City.  Provide guidance on signage that enhances our streetscapes, whilst providing an attractive space to visit for shopping and business.  The Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme currently has limited guidance for applicants on types of signage that would be supported.  Encourage rationalisation of signage with quality over quantity.  Encourage placement of signage that is suitable to the building and area.  Issues raised during public exhibition, relating to the Policy: The permit process takes too long Terminology is vague Windows and obscuring/signage

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Planning for Growth - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Corporate colouring and how much. Enforcement of non-compliance

Recommendation:

Council adopt the officer recommendations in this report and request the Minister for Planning to appoint an Independent Panel to consider the outstanding submissions.

Policy Context Draft Council Plan 2013-2017 (2014/15 update) The overall plan on what the aspirations are for our municipality. Council Vision Greater Bendigo - Working together to be the most liveable regional city in Australia. Theme 3 – The presentation and vibe of our City Relevant Strategic Objectives:  Greater Bendigo is a place of great places that celebrates people’s active artistic, cultural, sporting and social lives.  Greater Bendigo is a community that values its heritage and supports arts and cultural experience.  The Greater Bendigo region is a drawcard for visitors. Bendigo CBD Plan (2005) This adopted plan identifies four key themes about the growth, diversity and presentation of the CBD. Key objectives and themes that are in common with the Policy include;  promotion of good streetscape presentation,  retention of heritage buildings and surrounds,  active shop frontages that invite visitors and shoppers Background Information The key steps in the amendment process are summarised below:

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Amendment application prepared

Council decides whether to seek Ministerial Authorisation

Public Exhibition of Amendment and permit application

Submissions received

Council requests an Independent Panel to consider submissions

We are at this point

Council decides to Adopt or Abandon the Amendment

Send to Minister for Approval and Gazettal

The Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme currently provides limited guidance for planners and applicants for signage applications. A local planning Policy will assist applicants and decision makers resulting in a fairer and more efficient system. The State section of the Planning Scheme determines if a sign is prohibited, allowable subject to conditions or is allowable without planning permission, dependant on the Zone of the property. The Policy only applies when a permit is already required under the Zone. The Policy will give the advertising industry and business community confidence in the location, placement and type of signage that is preferred and likely to be approved. The Policy will also help protect the municipality’s high amenity and historic streetscapes, while also balancing the need for advertising signs that are capable of attracting customers and providing a competitive and viable business environment. More Policy guidance will help reduce timeframes of permit approvals. Preparation of the Policy involved consideration of the following matters:  Ensuring that businesses can attract customers with advertising while balancing the need to protect the amenity and character of the surrounding area;  Providing guidance on appropriate signs within a heritage precinct, neighbourhood character precinct or heritage place. PAGE 21


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 Identifying the preferred location on buildings for adverting signs.  Emphasising the use of quality advertising signs rather than investing in a proliferation of signs.  Review of over 10 other Council policies from across the state.  The existing state controls, and requirements of state government in writing new policies.  History of non-compliance issues and appeal cases regarding signage.  The views of other departments within the City of Greater Bendigo. Previous Council Decisions 8 May 2013 Council resolved to seek authorisation from the Minister for Planning to exhibit the amendment. Report An Explanatory Report is attached and details the purpose and effect of the amendment and provides the strategic justification for the amendment as required. Key issues identified in the Explanatory Report are summarised below. Land affected by the Amendment The new Policy applies to all land within the municipality of City of Greater Bendigo. What the Amendment does The amendment proposes to amend the Municipal Strategic Statement and local planning Policy to guide the location, scale and type of advertising in the municipality, to maintain a quality public environment. The amendment proposes to:  Amend Clause 21.07 (Economic Development) to include objectives, strategies and an implementation statement relating to the new advertising and signage Policy.  Amend Clause 22.08 (Highway Entrances and Boulevards Policy) to delete the section regarding signage; and  Insert a new Clause 22.29, an Advertising and Signage Policy, to guide the location, scale and type of advertising. Consultation/Communication Prior to the formal commencement of the amendment, three consultation meetings were held with stakeholders. Invites were forwarded to the business community, heritage groups, tourism associates and sign writers. Discussions were also held with the marketing and real estate industries. The Amendment (including Policy) was publicly exhibited for a month, including several media articles.

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A copy of the Policy has also been forwarded to the Strategy Unit and Economic Development Unit, with minor changes and clarifications requested, which have been addressed. A further three meetings were held with submitters to discuss issues raised. These meetings highlighted that the submitters had opposing views and there was no clear way to satisfy all concerns. The meetings also demonstrated that the submitters have other issues with signage, business development and the planning system outside of the Policy. As a result of the submissions and meetings, the Policy was amended and forwarded back to submitters for comment. No further written comments on the Policy were received. Exhibition Procedures The Amendment was exhibited for one month from 29 August 2013 to 30 September 2013. Notice was provided in the following manner:  Individual notices to owners and occupiers of land affected by the Amendment.  Notices to prescribed Ministers under Section 19(1)(c) of the Planning and Environment Act.  Notices to all authorities materially affected under Section 19(1)(a) of the Act.  Public notice of the Amendment in the Bendigo Advertiser on 28 August 2013 and 31 August 2013.  Publication of the notice of the Amendment in the Government Gazette on 29 August 2013.  Access on-line. Submissions Fourteen submissions were received during the exhibition period (including 2 late submissions). A summary of submissions and all copy of submissions are attached. All submissions, except No. 3, DEPI are recommended by officer to be referred to an Independent Panel. After Exhibition Meetings were held with submitters on 7 November 2013, 25 March 2014, and 15 April 2014 to discuss issues. Some of the submission issues were able to be resolved, and only required clarification (eg. A Frames are permitted under Local Laws not the Planning Scheme). A revised Policy was drafted after the November meeting and forwarded to all submitters incorporating the responses in Table 2 below. In revising the Policy we have balanced State Government requirements and local views, which have varied from wanting more prescriptive guidelines for simplicity to wanting less prescriptive to allow creatively and innovation.

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Table 2 – Submission issues and Changes to Policy Submission Comments

Change to Policy/ Officer Recommendation

Policy not business friendly.

Changed Policy to include objective to support business.

Out of town sign companies/some All proposed signage applications are businesses aren’t subject to the same subject to the same rules and the rules as us. proposed policy equally. When does it apply; existing signage, A Doesn’t apply to existing, legally Frames? erected signs or to A frames which get a permit under a local law. Only applies when a planning permit is needed; eg signs in a Heritage Overlay, residential areas. Support sign location diagrams.

Retain diagrams with minor changes for high wall signs.

Definitions and language, eg visual clutter and encourage/discourage. Not descriptive enough, or open to interpretation, or too restricting.

Changed Policy to removed statement about visual clutter. Encourage / discourage wording is the same as Planning Scheme.

Different areas should have different Disagree. The Policy should rules, eg Heathcote. consistent throughout municipality.

be

How is the policy policed?

The City of Greater Bendigo is responsible for compliance and enforcement of the Planning Scheme, including the new policy.

Corporate colour amounts too restrictive.

Changed Policy to remove percentages and to consider the individual circumstances. Bright colours are strongly discouraged.

Window coverage too restrictive.

Exemptions available for uses that require privacy or demonstrate the need for higher coverage. Signage still allowed on building. Coverage is balanced with need for window openings for pedestrian interaction and active street frontages.

Against illuminated signs being turned off Changed Policy to remove turning off at night time and being generally illumination except near residential discouraged. areas. This was originally included to encourage less power usage across the sector.

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Submission Comments

Change to Policy/ Officer Recommendation

Pole and sky signs should be allowed.

Changed Policy to allow in certain circumstances where scale is proportionate.

Animated, flag and banner should be Changed Policy to allow small allowed. amounts. It is preferred that these types of advertising be minimal as they can be highly distracting for vehicles, impede pedestrian movements, and damage the building by how they are affixed and quickly become worn and weathered. More 'Major Promotion' signs should be Major promotion signs are those above allowed, and animated/variable signs. 18m2 in size (billboards). Where these are permitted is set by the Zone, and therefore already restricted. The policy does request that these signs are located at least a 1km from each other, due to their oversize and dominance in the landscape. Retail shops should be allowed advertise as much as possible.

Signage planning permits take too long.

to The State section of the Planning Scheme sets when a permit is required for signage, and what is or isn’t allowed subject to the Zone. Commercial shopping areas have the least restrictions on signage. The policy guides applicants in what signs are preferred, their amount of coverage on the building/frontage, including limiting signage when excessive, and therefore what is likely to be supported when a permit is required. The City’s planning department has taken a number of steps over recent years to improve timeframes and its customer service and will continue this work. The City is above the state average in processing times for permits. The Policy will assist applicants and assessors by providing more certainty and guidance, so timeframes should reduce.

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Submission Comments

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Change to Policy/ Officer Recommendation

Consider policies from other We have reviewed other municipalities' municipalities including new policy in policies, and incorporated relevant Geelong. sections. Geelong and Ballarat have out dated controls, which no longer relate to the current technology or State Provisions. Geelong is therefore working on new guidelines; however this has not proceeded as yet and is not available to view. We received two further responses to our revised Policy, both not changing their original submissions. Two further meetings were held in an attempt to resolve outstanding issues. The meetings demonstrated that many of the submitters’ concerns sit outside of the Policy, including; the time it takes to obtain a planning permit, and that signwriters from outside the municipality are not held accountable to the same rules. It was also demonstrated and agreed by those involved, that the opinions of the group are different and they could not reach agreement. The only way to resolve this is to refer the submissions to an Independent Panel, ie the umpire. In response to these issues officers agreed to prepare a checklist that would assist applicants. Also, officers explained the City’s Policy in regard to enforcement action taken when persons have not obtained permissions or a permit, which does apply to all, and is more stringent for repeat offenders. As no submissions were withdrawn following review of the Policy, we recommend referral of all submissions (except no. 3 DEPI) to an independent Panel. This will provide a structured opportunity for submitters to have their views further considered via an independent panel process. Even if a majority of issues were resolved or withdrawn, a panel would still be necessary for just one outstanding submission. Conclusion It is recommended that Council consider the submissions from the signage and business community, support the officer recommendation and refer the submissions to an independent panel appointed by the Minister of Planning. This will continue the statutory process required to implement the Policy and may result in additional changes. The Panel will provide an opportunity for submitters to express their opinion of the Policy in a structured and independently considered manner. Options Section 23(1) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 requires that in consideration of submissions received in relation to an amendment, the Council must either:

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 Change the amendment in the manner requested by the submitters and adopt the amendment with changes; or  Refer the submission(s) to an Independent Panel appointed by the Minister; or  Abandon the Amendment, or part of the Amendment. Section 22(2) of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 advises that Council has the option of accepting late submissions, but must do so if requested by the Minister for Planning. As we believe the Policy is required, and will assist applicants and assessors in the longer term, we recommend referral of the submissions to an independent panel. Resource Implications Overall the benefits of the Policy should reduce the demand on resources as applicants and planners will have clear outline of what signage is likely to be supported before they make an application, meaning less time spent negotiating and redrafting proposals. Officer time will be required to prepare the Amendment documentation for panel and liaise with the Minister for Planning. The City is responsible for payment of statutory fees ($798) and costs incurred in the processing of the amendment. This will include additional estimated charges of $5,000 for the Panel member and Planning Panels Victoria costs. Resources and officer time which has not been budgeted for will also be required to improve the existing checklist for signage planning permit applications. Attachments    

Submissions Summary Submissions Explanatory Report Proposed Advertising and Signage Policy.

RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to: 1. Accept all late submissions. 2. Request the Minister for Planning to appoint an Independent Panel to consider all outstanding submissions.

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3.2 PLANNING SCHEME AMENDMENT C204: FORTUNA - CONSIDER PANEL REPORT AND ADOPT Document Information Author

Emma Bryant, Co-ordinator Planning Policies & Processes

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Amendment details:

Rezone land known as Fortuna at 22-48 Chum Street, Golden Square from part Public Use Zone 7, part Residential 1 Zone and part Special Use Zone 3 to Comprehensive Development Zone, and remove the Neighbourhood Character Overlay from a small portion of the site.

Proponent:

Fortuna Villa Pty Ltd

No. of submissions:

6

Key issues:

     

Recommendation:

That Council adopt Amendment C204 to the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme, with minor changes as recommended by the Panel, and request Approval from the Minister for Planning.

Support redevelopment and restoration of Fortuna Heritage protection and management Contaminated land management High density residential development Traffic management Exemptions to notice and appeal rights

Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 – 2017 (2013) Planning for Growth  Our quality of life is maintained as our City's population and economy grows. Productivity  A diverse, strong and growing economy supports community resilience. Sustainability  Strengthen the links between Greater Bendigo's past and future by protection and contemporary re-use of our heritage assets.

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Background Information The key steps in the Amendment process are summarised below:

Amendment prepared

Council decides whether to seek Ministerial Authorisation

Public Exhibition of Amendment

Submissions received

Council requests an Independent Panel to consider submissions

Council decides to Adopt or Abandon the Amendment

We are at this point

Send to Minister for Approval and Gazettal

Previous Council Decisions 10 July 2013 - Council resolved to make a submission to Heritage Victoria regarding heritage objectives and the proposed registration for the site. 31 July 2013 - Council resolved to adopt a submission to the Heritage Council on the Heritage Victoria Registration of the site. The main recommendations were that buildings 8f and 8g (Defence printing buildings) be protected and that the Registration discuss subdivision and interpretation. 23 October 2013 - Council resolved to request authorisation from the Minister for Planning to prepare and publicly exhibit the Amendment for one month. 12 February 2014 - Council resolved to request the Minister for Planning to appoint a Panel to consider unresolved submissions.

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Report The attached Explanatory Report details the purpose and effect of the Amendment and provides the strategic justification for the Amendment. Key issues identified in the Explanatory Report are discussed below. Land affected by the Amendment The subject site known as ‘Fortuna’ is located at 22-48 Chum Street, Golden Square. It is 7.57ha in area, made up of two titles and currently zoned Public Use Zone 7 (PUZ7), with a small portion of land in the east on Booth Street zoned General Residential and the land on the eastern portion, known as the ‘bush block’ zoned Special Use Zone 3 Telecommunications (SUZ3).

Figure 1: Aerial photo 22-48 Chum Street, Golden Square

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The main Fortuna Villa title is covered by a Heritage Overlay and is on the Victorian Heritage Register. The small portion of residential zoned land is also affected by a Neighbourhood Character Overlay. What the Amendment does The Amendment proposes to rezone ‘Fortuna’ to Comprehensive Development Zone, remove the Neighbourhood Character Overlay from a small portion of the site and include the new incorporated document “Fortuna Comprehensive Development Plan May 2014”. Consultation/Communication Exhibition Procedures The Amendment was exhibited for one month from 14 November 2013 to 16 December 2013. A public information session was also held and attended by approximately 30 people. Submissions Six submissions were received during the exhibition period. A summary of the submissions is provided below. Submitter

Supports/Objects

Officer Recommendation

Environment Support with changes to Agree to changes in principle. Protection Authority documentation requested, Referred to independent panel Victoria (EPA) including remove the for review. Environmental Audit Overlay and make changes to the Comprehensive Development Zone. P A Thwaites

Initially objected on No change heritage grounds and required. economic viability. Submission withdrawn following discussions.

Coliban Region Neutral. Water Corporation

No change required.

to

amendment

to

amendment

VicRoads - Northern Support subject to changes Changes made as requested. Region to the Comprehensive Development Zone schedule regarding traffic requirements. R Purtill on behalf of Object. Issues raised: Some changes made to Zone. local Booth Street noise, medium - high Referred to independent panel. residents (6 density residential, traffic,

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Submitter

Supports/Objects

signatories).

third party notice and appeal rights, permit exemptions.

North Central Support. Catchment Management Authority

Officer Recommendation

No change required.

to

amendment

The Panel Hearing The Minister for Planning appointed an Independent Panel to consider the Amendment. The Panel held a Directions hearing on 27 February 2014, where it directed Council to:  Draft new Comprehensive Development Zone schedule in consultation with the EPA to implement the requirements of the three environmental audits for the site prior to the Panel Hearing.  Provide an amended Zone schedule that included changes as negotiated with VicRoads, EPA and Rodney Purtill.  Council’s submission to include detailed responses particularly regarding traffic issues. The City met these requirements. The Panel hearing was held on 24 March 2014. The Panel considered all written and oral submissions and material presented to it in connection with the Amendment. The Panel Report and Recommendations The Panel Report was received on 16 April 2014 (Refer to attached). Under Section 26 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987, the Panel Report was automatically released on 14 May 2014 to the public, 28 days following its receipt. In response to the submissions referred to it, the Panel found that the new Zone schedule, prepared by the City in consultation with the EPA, was a more transparent and effective approach to addressing contamination then the originally proposed Environmental Audit Overlay. The Zone requires all sensitive uses and buildings and works that disturb the ground to have planning permission and that permits reflect the conditions in the Statement of Environmental Audit Fortuna Villa, prepared by Coffey Environments (2012). The Zone also requires that any prepared Fortuna Residential Development Plan address the requirements of the Audit. In response to the other submission, the Panel found that the issues raised by Booth Street residents, although valid, were overstated.

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"While the Panel acknowledges the issues raised by Booth Street residents, it believes that their concerns about possible off-site impacts have been overstated. The Panel is satisfied that there are adequate processes and requirements in place to identify and address potential development impacts, particularly the requirement that a further development plan be prepared for Precinct 2. The Panel is also satisfied that a prima facie case has been made that vehicular access can be provided between Booth Street and the western area of Precinct 2." The Panel also concluded by stating it agreed with the proponent’s representative "that the development and use of the Fortuna Villa site will be a significant and positive outcome for the City, and that the amendment provides a sound basis on which this can occur." In summary, the Panel supports Council’s position and recommends that Amendment C204 be adopted subject to the following minor changes: 1.

Delete the Environmental Audit Overlay.

2.

Substitute the revised Comprehensive Development Zone Schedule 1 at Appendix C for the exhibited schedule (revised schedule attached).

3

Modify the Fortuna Comprehensive Development Plan, September 2013 to: • Include a notation that the provision of vehicular access between Booth Street and Precinct 2 will be determined following further investigations. • Delete the reference to the existing cross-over to Booth Street. • Include a notation that the role and function of the Marble Street access to the site (Precinct 1 and/or Precinct 2) will be determined following further investigations. (see attached)

The revised Comprehensive Development Zone schedule includes changes proposed by the City in response to submissions, and minor changes recommended by the Panel to improve its clarity. The Panel also included an extra requirement that owners and occupiers in the vicinity of the site be directly notified of preparation of a development plan and that a notice be placed on site. It is suggested that the Panel recommendations be accepted. Conclusion It is recommended that Council adopt the Amendment with changes as recommended by the Panel and forward the adopted Amendment to the Minister for Planning to approve. Options Council has the option of  Adopting the Amendment in accordance with the Panel’s recommendations and sending to the Minister for Planning for Approval.  Adopting the Amendment in part.  Abandoning the Amendment under the Planning and Environment Act 1987. There is no right of review of a council's decision not to support the Amendment but the Council must provide its reasons to the Minister if the recommendation is a different decision to the Panel recommendation. PAGE 33


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Resource Implications The proponent has agreed to pay for the amendment statutory fees and the extra costs incurred by the City for holding the panel as per the Policy for Private Planning Scheme Amendments adopted by Council. In the future, the City will have to review development plans and assess planning permit applications for use, subdivision and buildings and works that will be partly off-set with fees. Attachments     

Panel Report Explanatory Report. Comprehensive Development Zone Schedule Fortuna Comprehensive Development Plan Amendment Maps

RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to: 1. Adopt Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme Amendment C204 with changes. 2. Forward the adopted Amendment to the Minister for Planning for Approval, together with the prescribed information pursuant to Section 31(1) of the Planning and Environment Act, 1987.

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3.3 181 ARNOLD STREET, NORTH BENDIGO 3550 - 4 LOT SUBDIVISION, CONSTRUCTION OF 3 TWO STOREY DWELLINGS, PARTIAL DEMOLITION AND EXTENSION TO EXISTING DWELLING Document Information Author

Bryce Kilian, Statutory Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Application details:

4 Lot subdivision, construction of 3 two storey dwellings, partial demolition and extension to existing dwelling

Application No:

DSD/903/2013

Applicant:

G F Hough

Land:

181 Arnold Street, NORTH BENDIGO 3550

Zoning:

General Residential Zone Road Zone 1

Overlays:

Heritage Overlay 4

No. of objections:

0

Consultation meeting held:

No consultation meeting held as no objections received.

Key considerations:

Whether the proposal complies with;  Residential development provisions of the Planning Scheme;  The character of the area;  The heritage nature of the area.

Conclusion:

The proposal does not represent an acceptable design outcome for the area from a neighbourhood character and heritage perspective. This report recommends the Council refuse the application.

Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 – 2017 (2013) Planning for Growth  Our quality of life is maintained as our City's population and economy grows.

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Productivity  A diverse, strong and growing economy supports community resilience. Sustainability  Strengthen the links between Greater Bendigo's past and future by protection and contemporary re-use of our heritage assets. Background Information A pre application meeting was held between the land owner’s consultant (applicant), the Planning Officer and the Heritage Advisor. The advice provided was based on plans largely identical to those submitted with this application. The advice given indicated that the proposal was not an acceptable outcome for the location as it did not meet the Neighbourhood Character, Heritage and some ResCode provisions of the Scheme. Report Subject Site and Surrounds The site at 181 Arnold Street, North Bendigo is located on the corner of Arnold and Niemann Streets, 530 metres north west of the intersection of Arnold and Barnard Streets. The site is located 1.8 km generally north of the Bendigo CBD, and 250 metres generally north of the site of the new Bendigo Hospital. This site is within the area considered within the Draft Bendigo Hospital Precinct Plan. The site is an irregular shaped allotment which has street frontages to both Arnold and Niemann Streets. The site contains a frontage to Arnold Street of 8 metres and a frontage to Niemann Street of 52 metres, with a total area of 650 square metres. The site is orientated in a north east to south west direction along its longest axis and has a fall of 2 metres towards Arnold Street The site contains a single storey dwelling which presents to Arnold Street and is currently being renovated. The ‘cottage style’ dwelling is constructed from weatherboards with a hipped corrugated iron roof. The weatherboards were previously clad in asbestos cement faux brick cladding. The front bull nose verandah and cast iron lace has been recently removed as it was in danger of collapse, and is proposed to be restored and reinstated as part of the overall development of the site. An old extension had been added to the dwelling at the rear under a skillion roof. The extension is constructed from the same materials as the original dwelling, with two chimneys established along the southern elevation. Vehicle access to the site is at the rear via a single crossover from Niemann Street. There is no formalised driveway or parking facilities on the site. Pedestrian access to the site is available from Arnold Street as well as Niemann Street. Arnold Street is a sealed Category 1 Road which contains bluestone kerbing and channelling in front of the site. A footpath is present along both sides of the street. A bus stop is located 10 metres north west of the site. A number of established trees are present along both sides of the street.

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Niemann Street is also a sealed local road which contains bluestone kerbing and channelling. There are no formalised footpaths along either side of the street. Some scattered trees are present, predominantly along the north western side of the street, of varying sizes and ages. The site is serviced by reticulated water, electricity, sewer and telecommunications. A sewer line runs near the northern boundary of the site from Arnold Street through to adjoining properties Neighbourhood Description The site is located within an area broadly zoned General Residential. Lot sizes range greatly in size from 160 square metres to 1,200 square metres. All lots adjoining the site are developed for residential purposes. Both Arnold Street and Niemann Street contain a mixture of architectural styles providing diversity along the streetscapes. The site is located within a broad heritage precinct. A small area 40 metres north west of the site fronting Arnold Street is within the Commercial 1 Zone. Number 183 Arnold Street adjoins the site to the north / north west and south west. The property is an irregular shaped allotment with an area of 710 square metres. A single storey cottage known as ‘Tilly’s Cottage’ is developed on the site. The cottage is constructed from weatherboards and contains a tin sheeting roof. A small verandah extends along the Arnold Street frontage. Two large trees are present in front of the dwelling, with additional formalised landscaping along the frontage. Access to the property is provided from Niemann Street. Number 4 Niemann Street is located to the south west of the site. The property is a rectangular shaped allotment with an area of 1,180 square metres. The property contains a large weatherboard dwelling with a corrugated iron roof. A small verandah extends along the north eastern corner of the dwelling. The dwelling is setback 2.5 metres from the street and a crossover and driveway extends generally along the western boundary to an established garage.

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Figure 1: Aerial photo showing subject site.

Proposal The application is for a four lot subdivision, demolition of part of the existing dwelling, extension to existing dwelling and development of three dwellings on the site. Subdivision The proposal is to subdivide the property into four (4) lots.  Lot 1 – 231.93 square metres  Lot 2 – 140.02 square metres  Lot 3 – 139.51 square metres  Lot 4 – 140.92 square metres Lot 1 will contain the existing dwelling which will continue to have its primary frontage to Arnold Street, as well as a side presentation to Niemann Street. Lots 2, 3, and 4 will be to the rear of the existing dwelling and present to Niemann Street. No common property is proposed as part of this application. Demolition & Works to Existing Dwelling The rear skillion section of the existing dwelling is proposed to be removed to facilitate a new, more functional, modern and attractive extension. A single storey extension is proposed for the rear of the existing dwelling and the internal layout is proposed to be changed. The proposed extension will have an area of 21.57 square metres, with the dwelling having a total area of 93.16 square metres.

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The existing dwelling will comprise two bedrooms, one bathroom and one ensuite, an open plan living, meals and kitchen area, a laundry and a single car port. The extension will consist of horizontal and vertical timber boards, colorbond roof cladding and a blockwork parapet wall on the boundary. The extension is of a modern design and will be constructed under a separate roof form to the original building utilising materials and finishes sympathetic to the original dwelling. New Dwellings The new dwellings will have the following approximate floor areas (numbers are shown as square metres). TH2

TH3

TH4

Total Area

147.5

166.8

152.1

Ground Floor

73.4

79.0

76.1

First Floor

59.7

75.1

60.2

Balcony

14.5

17.7

15.7

The townhouses will each contain the following;  Two bedrooms  Ensuite  Bathroom  Powder room  Open plan kitchen and meals area  Sitting room (study in dwelling 4)  Laundry  Garage  Balcony Townhouses 2 and 4 will have similar presentation to the street and will be constructed from materials including vertical timber boards, selected brickwork, selected wall panelling and colorbond. Townhouse 3 which will be located between Townhouses 2 and 4 will have a different presentation to the street. The frontage of this townhouse is proposed to be constructed from aluminium composite panelling with part consisting of a mirror finish (refer to elevation plans) Access and Parking Vehicle access to all lots will be provided via Niemann Street. A single crossover is currently established to the site and will be utilised to provide access to Lot 3. The crossover will be required to be widened to facilitate access to the existing dwelling. Three new crossovers and driveways are proposed to be constructed, providing individual access to the proposed lots. PAGE 39


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No vegetation from the road reserve will be required to be removed to facilitate the accesses. Lot 1 will be provided with a single carport. Lots 2, 3 and 4 will be provided with single garages, with additional off-street parking available in front of each garage. Landscaping A Landscape Plan has been prepared to accompany this application. Landscaping will be providing along the Arnold and Niemann Street frontages, as well as at the rear (and side of Lot 2). Landscaping will consist of a mixture of low scale plants and bushes including sweet apple-berry, ruby saltbush, inland pigface and sticky everlastings. Fencing Fencing along the Arnold Street frontage, north western / western and south western boundaries of the site are proposed to be retained. Existing fencing along Niemann Street is proposed to be removed. A new 1.8 metre Colorbond fence is proposed along part of the north eastern boundary (Niemann Street frontage) of Lot 1, which denotes the side of the existing dwelling. The only other fencing proposed to be constructed will be the internal boundaries between the four lots.

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Figure 2: Proposed site layout.

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Figure 3: Proposed alterations to existing dwelling.

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Figure 4: Elevations to Niemann Street (Note these elevations do not show the proposed new fence for the side boundary of the existing dwelling only. No front fence is proposed for the units).

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: State Planning Policy Framework  11 Settlement  15 Built Environment and Heritage  16 Housing Municipal Strategic Statement  21.06 Housing Local Planning Policies  22.06 Heritage Policy  22.20 North Bendigo Residential Character Policy Other Provisions       

32.08 General Residential Zone 36.04 Road Zone 43.01 Heritage Overlay 52.06 Car Parking 55 Two or more dwellings on a lot and residential buildings 56 Residential subdivision 65 Decision Guidelines

Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal:

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Referral

Comment

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

VicRoads

No objection

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Heritage

The proposal is not supported in its current form.

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising, no objections were received. Planning Assessment Is the site appropriate for residential development? The State and Local Policy framework of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme lends support for an intensification of development on well serviced sites which are in proximity to a full range of urban services including public transport and local convenience shopping. In this regard, the policy attributes of the application are excellent. The local provisions of the Planning Scheme, Clause 21.06 (Housing) and the referenced Bendigo Residential Development Strategy 2004 identify the site as being within existing urban zoned land (being in the General Residential Zone) hence policy support for medium density development on this site exists, subject of course to consideration of whether the proposed development is site responsive and appropriate with regard to character. The General Residential Zone has purposes to: encourage development that respects the neighbourhood character of the area; implement neighbourhood character policy and adopted neighbourhood character guidelines; provide a diversity of housing types and moderate housing growth in locations offering good access to services and transport; and allow educational, recreational, religious, community and a limited range of other non-residential uses to serve local community needs in appropriate locations. In this case, the proposed development is viewed as being in partial accordance with the zone purposes with the exception of respecting the neighbourhood character of the area, and implementing the neighbourhood character policy. This is discussed in the next section of this report.

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The site and the broader area are contained within the Draft Bendigo Hospital Precinct Plan. This plan, as a theme, aims to "preserve the precinct's heritage and neighbourhood character." Whilst this strategy is not at a stage where it has been formally adopted by Council it does provide direction which is helpful when considering this proposal. Does the proposal comply with the Character Policy and Character Provisions of ResCode? The proposal is located within the North Bendigo Residential Character Policy Precinct 7 which describes the character of the area as: “This precinct has a mixed character, making a transition from the more consistently Victorian inner areas to the inter-war period of development and beyond. Some of it has a ‘cottage’ character, derived from the modest scale of the dwellings and small garden setbacks, and the open front fences. Setbacks vary according to the size of the lot and house, but are often consistent with a particular streetscape.” The statement of desired future character for this precinct states: “the distinctive characteristics of each streetscape will be maintained and strengthened”. An assessment of the proposal against Clause 22.20 North Bendigo Residential Character Policy Precinct 7 has been undertaken and is included below; Objectives

Suggested Design Response

To maintain and strengthen the garden Prepare a landscape plan to accompany all settings of the dwellings. applications for new dwellings. Retain large, established trees and provide for the planting of new trees where possible. Comment: All of the established trees and plants in the rear yard space of the existing dwelling were recently removed. The development has large expanses of hard surface areas rather than landscaping and the submitted landscape plans show small areas of landscaping with low scale plantings. The development does not allow enough room for any substantial landscaping nor the planting of new trees. The proposal arguably doesn’t comply. To maintain the consistency, where The front setback should be not less than present, of building front setbacks. the average setback of the adjoining two dwellings. Comment: The adjoining dwelling fronting Niemann Street has a setback of 5.8 metres. The proposed dwellings are setback at 2.5 metres which does not comply with this element of the policy. To reflect the existing dwelling spacing.

rhythm

of Buildings should be offset from at least one side boundary.

Comment: The proposal for three attached dwellings does not comply with this element of the policy. Lot 2 has a 1 metre setback from one side boundary with Lot 3 having no side setbacks at all and Lot 4 being 150mm off one side boundary only. The proposal does not comply.

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Objectives

Suggested Design Response

To ensure that buildings and Respect the predominant building height in extensions do not dominate the the street and nearby properties. Where streetscape. there is a predominance of single storey, the height of the dwelling at the front of the dwelling should match the typical singe storey wall height. Comment: The predominant character in the area is for single storey dwellings with pitched roofing. The proposal is for double storey dwellings with shallow pitched, skillion profile roofing. Whilst the second storey of all three proposed new dwellings is setback between 1.7 and 3.5 metres, the adjoining nature of the designs and the balustrading on the upper storey balconies gives the dwellings the appearance of double storey at the street frontages. The proposal does not comply with this element. To use building materials and finishes In streets dominated by weatherboard that complements the dominant pattern dwellings, use timber weatherboards or within the streetscape. other non-masonry cladding materials where possible and render, bag or paint brick surfaces. Comment: Buildings in the area are a mixture of weatherboards and masonry cladding. The proposed extension to the existing dwelling is to be constructed of brick and timber boards and is appropriate as are the materials for Lots 2 and 4 (being brick and timber boards), however, the proposed Lot 3 being a ‘aluminium composite panel with a mirror finish’ is inappropriate as it does not reflect the character of the area. Maintain an streetscape.

openness

to

the Provide open style front fencing. Front fences should not exceed 1.2 metres other than in exceptional circumstances.

Comment: No front fence is proposed. The above assessment (linked and related to the considerations at Clause 55.01-2) of the proposal demonstrates that overall the proposal does not meet the objectives and design responses required. The distinctive characteristics of both the Niemann and Arnold Streetscapes will not be maintained nor strengthened through the chosen design. This outcome may be different if the proposal were for one less dwelling. Is the design appropriate for a heritage area? The purpose of Clauses 22.06 Heritage Policy and 43.01 Heritage Overlay, relevant to this proposal is to ensure that development does not adversely affect the significance of heritage places. The most relevant decision guideline being the following:  Whether the location, bulk, form or appearance of the proposed building will adversely affect the significance of the heritage place and is in keeping with adjacent buildings. PAGE 46


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In addition to the above Planning Scheme considerations, heritage advice provided by the City’s Heritage Architect / Advisor concluded that: “There is insufficient space between the existing dwelling and the new units. The form and appearance of the proposed buildings is not sufficiently in keeping with the character and appearance of adjacent buildings and the heritage place. The central portion is proposed to be clad with mirror finished aluminium. This would be an inappropriate finish in the heritage precinct. Other issues: Existing house The proposal retains one of two visible chimneys on the Niemann Street side of the house. As both appear to be original and are clearly visible from the public realm, both should be retained. Painting of the existing red brick chimney is also not supported.” The assessing officer is in agreement with the expert opinion provided by the City’s Heritage Advisor. The proposed buildings will be visible from the public realm introducing a new two storey element to the streetscape, which is currently single storey. It is assessed that the attached, double storey dwellings will unreasonably impact the existing dwelling on the site and the adjoining dwellings in Niemann Street as they will be constructed in such a manner that creates a large, dominating built form. One positive element from a heritage perspective is the retention of the existing dwelling on the site and the general architectural style of the extension will not detract from the adjoining dwellings. The Burra Charter stipulates that new buildings in a heritage area should be clearly identifiable as modern without detracting from or dominating existing heritage buildings. Through the double storey design, lack of spacing between the dwellings and in the case of the dwelling proposed on Lot 3, inappropriate materials and finishes, the proposal would detract from and dominate the existing heritage buildings in the street. Consequently, the proposal does not meet the requirements of the Heritage Overlay or Heritage Policy. ResCode and Residential Amenity Generally, modern development is encouraged and supported, however, consideration must be given to balancing the requirements of not only heritage and character but ResCode and the amenity of the area. In this case, the development fails to appropriately address Clause 55.02 Neighbourhood Character and Infrastructure as the proposal does not comply with the relevant Character Policy (discussed in depth above).

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The proposal also fails to appropriately address the front setback standard (Standard B6) as the adjoining dwelling fronting Niemann Street is setback 5.8 metres and the proposed dwellings have a maximum setback of 2.45 metres. Conclusion The property is suitable for some form of medium density development which is encouraged by policy, however, the design proposed does not warrant support. The proposal fails to respond appropriately to its site and context, does not respect the existing or preferred Neighbourhood Character and does not represent a good planning outcome regarding the Heritage Policy nor Heritage Overlay. It is recommended that Council refuse the application. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments  Pre Application Notes  Heritage Advice RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to refuse the 4 lot subdivision, construction of 3 two storey dwellings, partial demolition and extension to an existing dwelling at 181 Arnold Street, NORTH BENDIGO 3550 on the following grounds: 1.

The proposal does not comply with; (a) Clause 22.20 North Bendigo Character Policy Precinct 7 as the proposal is neither in keeping with nor respectful of the current and preferred future character of the area. (b) Clause 22.06 Heritage Policy owing to the dominance of the design in the streetscape. (c) Clause 43.01 Heritage Overlay as the proposal does not respect the built form of the area, is dominating in the streetscape and proposes inappropriate materials and finishes. (d) Clause 55.01-2 Design Response as the proposal does not comply with the North Bendigo Residential Character Policy Precinct 7.

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3.4 131 OLINDA STREET, QUARRY HILL 3550 - TWO LOT SUBDIVISION, CONSTRUCTION OF DWELLING, DEMOLITION OF OUTBUILDING AND FRONT FENCE AND CONSTRUCTION OF NEW FRONT FENCE Document Information Author

Bryce Kilian, Statutory Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Application details:

Two lot subdivision, construction of dwelling, demolition of outbuilding and front fence and construction of new front fence

Application No:

DSD/718/2013

Applicant:

e+ architecture

Land:

131 Olinda Street, QUARRY HILL 3550

Zoning:

General Residential Zone

Overlays:

Heritage Overlay 30

No. of objections:

7

Consultation meeting held:

3 February 2014

Key considerations:

 The appropriateness of a contemporary design in the heritage precinct.  The appropriateness of infill development in the area.  Compliance with ResCode.  Whether the proposal fits with the character of the area.

Conclusion:

The proposal is an appropriate design which clearly delineates the heritage buildings from the modern building and increases housing stock in close proximity to the CBD, services and infrastructure. This report recommends that the Greater Bendigo City Council issues a Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit.

Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 – 2017 (2013) PAGE 49


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Planning for Growth  Our quality of life is maintained as our City's population and economy grows. Productivity  A diverse, strong and growing economy supports community resilience. Sustainability  Strengthen the links between Greater Bendigo's past and future by protection and contemporary re-use of our heritage assets. Report Subject Site and Surrounds The site is a rectangular allotment measuring approximately 20 metres across its frontage with Olinda Street, has a 15.7 metre depth for a total size of 317 square metres and contains an existing dwelling and outbuilding. The dwelling on the site is a miner's cottage and was constructed in the late 1800 or early 1900’s. The outbuilding on site was constructed around the 1940’s Surrounding dwellings are from a mixture of eras ranging from the late 1800’s to the late 1900’s although most are from the early 1900’s. The surrounding area contains mostly residential properties with the exception of a hotel located within 75 metres of the site and a school within 146 metres.

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objectors' properties marked with a star.

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Figure 2: Aerial photo showing subject site.

Figure 3: Aerial photo showing the greater area.

Proposal The proposal is for a two lot subdivision and construction of a dwelling and replacement of the front fence.

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Subdivision The proposed subdivision will excise the yard space to the north east of the existing dwelling creating a lot of 139 square metres on which the new dwelling will be constructed. The balance of the land containing the existing dwelling will be 180 square metres. Dwelling A double storey dwelling will be constructed on the newly created lot. The dwelling will feature two bedrooms, bathroom and ensuite on the ground level which will be mostly sunk into the ground. The first floor, slightly higher than natural ground level, will feature the main kitchen, meals and living areas as well as an outdoor courtyard. The building will be constructed of brick with some surfaces being rendered and with a wooden slat feature wall fronting Olinda Street. A carport will also be integrated into the design, providing space for one vehicle. The design of the dwelling is modern and square edged. The construction of the dwelling will require the removal of non-native vegetation within the lot. Fence The front fence existing is to be removed and replaced by a 1,200mm high, timber fence.

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Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: State Planning Policy Framework  11 Settlement  15 Built Environment and Heritage  16 Housing Municipal Strategic Statement  21.06 Housing Local Planning Policies  22.06 Heritage Policy

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 22.21 Quarry Hill Residential Character Policy Other Provisions      

32.08 General Residential Zone 43.01 Heritage Overlay 52.06 Car Parking 55 Two or More dwellings on a lot and residential buildings 56 Residential subdivision 65 Decision guidelines

Consultation/Communication Referrals The following internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

Heritage Architect / Advisor

Comments related to the application being acceptable noting that materials and finishes will play an important role in the overall look of the proposal. A condition should be imposed requiring the submission of a schedule of materials and finishes for endorsement.

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising, seven objections were received and a consultation meeting was held with five of the seven objectors in attendance along with one Ward Councillor. Subsequent to this meeting, the applicant prepared a written response and revised plans attempting to address the concerns raised, however, no objections were revised or withdrawn. The grounds of objection can be summarized as:  Proposed dwelling is not heritage and doesn’t fit within the area;  The site is too small for a subdivision and construction of a second dwelling;  The proposal will create drainage issues as the water will not be able to flow from the site;  The proposal will result in a loss of on street car parking spaces;  Overlooking issues created by the new development. The objections are discussed below.

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Planning Assessment Is the site appropriately located for some form of infill residential development? The State and Local Policy framework of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme lends support for an intensification of development on well serviced sites which are in proximity to a full range of urban services including public transport and local convenience shopping. In this regard, the policy attributes of the application are excellent. The local provisions of the Planning Scheme, Clause 21.06 (Housing) and the referenced Bendigo Residential Development Strategy 2004 identify the site as being within existing urban zoned land (being in the General Residential Zone) hence policy support for medium density development on this site exists, subject of course to consideration of whether the proposed development is site responsive and appropriate with regard to character. The General Residential Zone has purposes to: encourage development that respects the neighbourhood character of the area; implement neighbourhood character policy and adopted neighbourhood character guidelines; provide a diversity of housing types and moderate housing growth in locations offering good access to services and transport; and allow educational, recreational, religious, community and a limited range of other non-residential uses to serve local community needs in appropriate locations. In this case, the proposed development complies with the zone purposes, the neighbourhood character of the area, and implementing the neighbourhood character policy discussed later in this report. Design and context Height The proposed dwelling sits 1.1 metres below the existing dwelling. This is due to it being constructed in such a manner that ‘sinks’ the lower level mostly into the ground. This has the effect of significantly reducing the overall height of the development compared to the dwelling on the subject site. As part of the application documentation a streetscape elevation was submitted showing the heights and positioning of adjoining and adjacent dwellings. It is clear from this plan that the proposed dwelling will be of comparable height to the other nearby properties within the street. The new lot proposed measures 7.8 metres across the frontage with Olinda Street, which is much smaller than any other frontage in the street with the average block width being approximately 20 metres. Owing to this relatively small frontage the proposed dwelling has the impact of being more upright as opposed to being lower and wider like other dwellings in the street. The proposal features horizontal wooden cladding across the frontage and a thick fascia board running across the roof of the carport and into the main form of the building to create the appearance of building width rather than building height. This enables the proposal to present and sit well in the streetscape.

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Roof form The proposed design has a flat roof form. All surrounding and nearby properties have either hipped or gabled pitched roofing. The flat roof design was intended to reduce the height and bulk of the design and the applicant submits that a pitched roof would look out of place on a modern designed dwelling and would create an odd design which would detract from the heritage dwellings in the area. The assessing officer agrees with this statement as a pitched roof on a ‘boxy’ modern design would look out of place and would increase the height of the new dwelling and increasing its dominance in the heritage area. Presentation to the street The proposal does not present to the street in the same manner as other surrounding and nearby properties which have traditional centrally located front doors and conventional window locations (either side of the front door). This proposal presents to the street with a carport and an area of horizontal wood cladding, effectively hiding the glazed entry point to the building and a window. Whilst this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it is very different to what is already contained within the street. With consideration to this it is assessed that the double storey dwelling will not unreasonably impact either the site or precinct. Size of the block and the character of the area The block is currently 319 square metres in size with the proposed subdivision creating blocks measuring 180 square metres and 139 square metres. These blocks are quite small in size with this smaller lot size not being particularly common in this part of Quarry Hill. The proposal is located within the Quarry Hill Residential Character Policy Precinct 1 which describes the character of the area as: “The area forms an extension of the inner ring of suburbs that exemplify the distinctive character of early Bendigo. Some of it has an intimate 'cottage' character, derived from the modest scale of the dwellings and the small garden setbacks, and the open front fences. Elsewhere, larger houses, particularly from the Edwardian, Inter war and later eras, produce a more 'middle' suburban character. Setbacks vary according to the size of lot and housing, but are often consistent within a particular streetscape. Lots often extend from street to street. Some streets have mature trees, either exotic or native. Much of the area has heritage significance.” The statement of desired future character for this precinct states; “the heritage qualities and the combination of intimate, cottage feel and ‘middle’ suburb character will be maintained” An assessment of the proposal against Clause 22.021 Quarry Hill Residential Character Policy Precinct 1 has been undertaken and is included below;

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Objectives

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Suggested Design Response

To retain buildings that contribute to Retain and restore wherever possible, the valued character of the area intact Victorian, Edwardian, Federation and Inter war era dwellings. Alterations and extensions should be appropriate to the dwelling era. Comment: The existing dwelling will be retained and restored. To maintain and strengthen the garden Prepare a landscape plan to accompany all settings of the dwellings. applications for new dwellings. Comment: Whilst a number of existing trees will be removed from the site (which does not require planning approval) a landscape plan will be a conditional requirement of the planning permit to ensure compliance with this objective. To maintain the consistency, where The front setback should be not less than present, of building front setbacks. the average setback of the adjoining two dwellings. Comment: The new dwelling at its closest point will have a setback of 3 metres. The existing dwelling on the site also has a 3 metre setback. The adjoining building (fronting Russell Street) has a setback of approximately 3 metres from Olinda Street also. As this is the case the proposal complies with this objective. To reflect the existing rhythm of Buildings should be offset from at least one dwelling spacing. side boundary. Comment: The proposed dwelling will have zero setback on the south western, south eastern and half of the north eastern boundaries. The remainder of the north eastern boundary will contain the carport and balconies. Whilst the car port and balcony will effectively be built to the boundary, owing to their openness the appearance of space will be preserved. The proposal arguably complies with this objective. To respect the identified heritage Where the streetscape contains identified qualities of the streetscape or adjoining heritage buildings, reflect the dominant buildings building forms in the street, including the roof forms, in the building design. Comment: This objective of the character policy is not achieved as the proposal has a flat roof and a square boxy appearance. Specifics of this design were discussed in detail earlier in this report. To ensure that buildings and Respect the predominant building height in extensions do not dominate the the street and nearby properties. The streetscape. height of the dwelling at the front of the dwelling should match the typical single storey wall height. Comment: The new dwelling being constructed in such a manner that ‘sinks’ the lower level mostly into the ground. This has the effect of significantly reducing the PAGE 59


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Objectives

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Suggested Design Response

overall height of the development compared to the adjoining dwelling (on the subject site). Because of this, the new development proposed is 1.1 metres lower in overall height than the existing dwelling which complies with this element of the policy. To use building materials and finishes In streets dominated by weatherboard that complements the dominant pattern dwellings, use timber weatherboards or within the streetscape. other non-masonry cladding materials where possible and render, bag or paint brick surfaces. Comment: The proposal utilises horizontal wooden boards along the frontage and fence as a design element to create a more natural fit with the existing weatherboard dwellings in the area. Brick elements of the design will be rendered. A full schedule of materials and finishes will be submitted as part of a permit condition to ensure the colours chosen are appropriate to the area. The proposal complies with this objective. To ensure front fences are appropriate Provide open style front fencing. to the era of the dwellings and maintain Front fences should not exceed 1.2 metres an openness to the streetscape. other than in exceptional circumstances. Comment: The front fence is constructed of timber and will measure 1.2 metres in height which complies with this objective. The proposal complies with the majority of the above objectives, however in this instance there needs to be a balance between the current character of the area and the future character of the area with increased residential development and infill pressures. This development meets these pressures and creates a balance between the current and future character owing to the retention of the existing dwelling and lower scale of the proposed new dwelling ensuring that the proposal ‘fits’ with the existing character of the area. Is the design appropriate for a heritage area? The purpose of Clauses 22.06 Heritage Policy and 43.01 Heritage Overlay, relevant to this proposal is to ensure that development does not adversely affect the significance of heritage places. The most relevant decision guideline being the following:  Whether the location, bulk, form or appearance of the proposed building will adversely affect the significance of the heritage place and is in keeping with adjacent buildings. In addition to the above Planning Scheme considerations, heritage advice provided by the City’s Heritage Architect / Advisor concluded that: "The proposal is acceptable. Materials and finishes will be important, and a condition requiring approval of materials and finishes is suggested if a permit be granted. No car park structure should be constructed between the two dwellings, i.e. between the existing house at 131 Olinda Street and the proposed new dwelling”

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The assessing officer is in agreement with the expert opinion provided by the City’s Heritage Architect / Advisor. The design has been ‘dug’ into the ground situating the ground floor below natural surface level which respects the predominant building height and uses materials appropriate for the area. It is assessed that the proposal will not unreasonably impact the existing dwelling on the site and the adjoining dwellings in Olinda Street owing to the abovementioned design, siting and proposed materials. Another positive element from a heritage perspective is the retention of the existing dwelling on the site. The Burra Charter stipulates that new buildings in a heritage area should be clearly identifiable as modern without detracting from or dominating existing heritage buildings. Consequently, the proposal meets the requirements of the Heritage Overlay and Heritage Policy. ResCode and residential amenity The proposal is compliant with all relevant aspects of Clause 55 ResCode, however an objector raised concerns with potential overlooking from the proposed balcony into the rear yard of 28 Russell Street. The balcony in question is screened to a height of 1.7 metres above floor level and is not more than 25% transparent (compliant) however, in an effort to address the objector's concerns, the applicant agrees to make this screening solid. On street car parking and drainage Approximately 2 on street car parking spaces will be lost through the creation of a new vehicle access for the existing dwelling with the new dwelling utilising the existing vehicle cross over. Both the existing and proposed dwellings are able to provide on-site parking spaces that comply with the requirements of the Planning Scheme. A complaint of local residents related to people illegally parking whist attending the nearby hotel. Whilst this is a legitimate complaint it is not necessarily something that planning has control over owing to the pre-existing nature and age of the hotel. Notwithstanding this, other areas of the City can enforce illegally parked vehicles as can the Police. One other area of concern raised in objections and at the consultation meeting was drainage. Being an older area and due to the undulating topography, water will flow differently compared to newer and more modern subdivisions, however, conditions will be placed on any permit that issues requiring a drainage plan be prepared by a suitably qualified drainage engineer and submitted to the City for approval that addressing any drainage issues for this site. Conclusion The proposal is an appropriate design that retains the heritage values of the original dwelling whilst creating a modern in fill development in an established residential area. This report recommends that the Greater Bendigo City Council approves the proposal. PAGE 61


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Options Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments  Objections  Heritage Advice RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for a two lot subdivision, construction of dwelling, demolition of outbuilding and front fence and construction of new front fence at 131 Olinda Street, QUARRY HILL 3550 subject to the following conditions: 1.

NO LAYOUT ALTERATION The development permitted by this permit as shown on the endorsed plan(s) and/or described in the endorsed documents must not be altered or modified (for any reason) except with the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

2.

LANDSCAPE PLAN REQUIRED Before the development starts, a landscape plan to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plan will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The plan must be drawn to scale with dimensions and three copies must be provided. The plan must show: (a) A survey (including botanical names) of all existing vegetation to be retained and/or removed (b) Details of surface finishes of pathways and driveways (c) Planting schedule of all proposed trees, shrubs and ground covers, including botanical names, common names, pot sizes, sizes at maturity, and quantities of each plant All species selected must be to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

3.

CAR PARK CONSTRUCTION Before the occupation of the development starts, the area(s) set aside for the parking of vehicles and access lanes as shown on the endorsed plans must be: (a) Constructed (b) Properly formed to such levels that they can be used in accordance with the plans (c) Surfaced with an all-weather-seal coat (d) Drained Car spaces, access lanes and driveways must be kept available for these purposes at all times. PAGE 62


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4.

SCHEDULE OF MATERIALS Prior to the commencement of development a schedule of the proposed materials and colours to be used for the building, including samples, shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the responsible authority.

5.

VEHICLE CROSSINGS Vehicular access to the subject land from any roadway or service lane (and vice versa) must be by way of a vehicle crossing(s) constructed at right angles to the road, to suit the proposed driveway(s) and vehicles that will use the crossing. A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve.

6.

PEDESTRIAN SIGHT LINES The minimum sight line for pedestrian safety must be provided at the exit lane frontage so as to accord with Clause 52.06-8 of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.

7.

GENERAL EXTERIOR TREATMENT The exterior treatment of the building(s) permitted by this permit including all exterior decoration, materials, finishes and colours must be to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. The exterior treatment of the building(s) must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

8.

CONCRETE BUILDINGS All tilt slab or pre-cast concrete buildings must be painted, treated, textured and maintained thereafter to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

9.

REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT Any equipment required for refrigeration, air-conditioning, heating and the like must be suitably insulated for the purpose of reducing noise emissions and must be located so as to not be highly visible from the street to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

10.

BAFFLED LIGHTING External lighting must be designed, baffled and located so as to prevent any adverse effect on adjoining land to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

11.

NO MUD ON ROADS In the event of mud, crushed rock or other debris being carried onto public roads or footpaths from the subject land, appropriate measures must be implemented to minimise the problem to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

12.

CONSTRUCTION PHASE All activities associated with the construction of the development permitted by this permit must be carried out to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and all care must be taken to minimise the effect of such activities on the amenity of the locality.

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13.

DETAILED DRAINAGE PLANS Prior to the commencement of works, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions. The plans must include: (a) direction of stormwater run off (b) a point of discharge to the responsible authority’s drainage system

14.

STORMWATER DETENTION Before the use or development is commenced, the owner or applicant must provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Allowable discharge rate: Lot 2 Q5 =

2 l/s

15.

DRAINAGE WORKS Prior to connection to the City of Greater Bendigo’s drainage system, drainage works must be constructed in accordance with plans approved by the responsible authority in condition 16 above.

16.

SECTION 173 AGREEMENT Should the applicant opt to install on-site stormwater detention or water quality treatment, then prior to connection to the City of Greater Bendigo’s drainage system, the applicant/owner must enter into an agreement under section 173 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987 for each lot that will contain a treatment or detention facility. Such agreement must covenant that: (a) The on-site treatment system and/or detention system shall be designed by a qualified engineer and must be approved by the responsible authority prior to construction. (b) Each on-site treatment system and/or detention system must be constructed either prior to, or currently with, the construction of any dwelling on the specified lots. Each system must be completed prior to connection to the responsible authority’s drainage system. (c) The owner will maintain each on-site treatment system and/or detention system and not modify without prior written approval from the responsible authority. (d) The owner shall allow duly authorised officers of the responsible authority to inspect the systems at mutually agreed times. (e) The owner will pay for all costs associated with the construction and maintenance of each on-site treatment and detention system.

17.

CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ASSETS Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb & channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development. PAGE 64


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Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit. 18.

COMPLETION OF LANDSCAPING Before the use/occupation of the development starts or by such later date as is approved by the responsible authority in writing, the landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be carried out and completed to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit Note A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve. CONSENT FOR WORK ON ROAD RESERVES The applicant must comply with: (a) The Road Management Act 2004, (b) Road Management (Works and Infrastructure) Regulations 2005, and (c) Road Management (General) Regulations 2005 with respect to any requirements to notify the Coordinating Authority and/or seek consent from the Coordinating Authority to undertake “works� (as defined in the Act) in, over or under the road reserve. The responsible authority in the inclusion of this condition on this planning permit is not deemed to have been notified of, or to have given consent, to undertake any works within the road reserve as proposed in this permit.

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3.5 24 AND 28 CANNON LANE, LOT 2 OF PLAN OF SUBDIVISION 442363V (FRONTING MINERS REST) AND 5 ALLUVIAL PLACE, KANGAROO FLAT 3555 - SUBDIVISION OF LAND INTO 13 LOTS AND CONSTRUCTION OF 8 DWELLINGS (STAGED) Document Information Author

Peter O'Brien, Senior Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Application details:

Subdivision of land into 13 lots and construction of 8 dwellings (staged)

Application No:

DSD/697/2013

Applicant:

Penno Drafting & Design

Land:

24 and 28 Cannon Lane, Lot 2 of Plan of Subdivision 442363V (fronting Miners Rest) and 5 Alluvial Place, KANGAROO FLAT 3555

Zoning:

General Residential Zone

Overlays:

Nil

No. of objections:

9 outstanding (6 have been withdrawn)

Consultation meeting held:

25 February 2014, all Ward Councillors were apologies for the meeting.

Key considerations:

 Does the proposal accord with Planning Scheme policy relating to medium density housing?  Whether the proposed subdivision and development is an acceptable neighbourhood character outcome;  Does the proposal comply with ResCode and provide an acceptable level of amenity for existing and future residents; and  Whether there will be any adverse and unacceptable impacts with regard to traffic safety and car parking availability in the area.

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Conclusion:

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The site is in a good location to provide new housing in terms of accessibility to employment opportunities, leisure, shopping (Kangaroo Flat Central Activity and Charter Hall Lansell Square) and public transport. The proposal provides for eight, three bedroom dwellings and sets aside four lots which can also be developed for dwellings. This report considers the permit application and concludes that the proposal represents an orderly and acceptable planning outcome, subject to the conditions contained in the recommendation. It is recommended that the Greater Bendigo City Council issues a Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit.

Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 – 2017 (2013) Planning for Growth  Our quality of life is maintained as our City's population and economy grows. Productivity  A diverse, strong and growing economy supports community resilience. Background Information This permit application was first publically advertised in November 2013 and seven objections were received. From the objections it became clear that confusion existed as to what land was actually the subject of the application. This affected how residents responded to the application. It was decided that the application documents should be amended to clarify this issue and the application was publically advertised a second time in December 2013 with 12 objections received (this number includes further objections from several of the initial objectors. Six objections were withdrawn and at this time nine objections remain. Report Subject Site and Surrounds The application site consists of four portions of land. 24 and 28 Cannon Lane, 5 Alluvial Place and Lot 2 of PS 442363 V which fronts Miners Rest and Cannon Lane and backs onto six dwellings which front Barnett Drive. The total area of the land is 14,480 square metres. Lot 2 of PS 442363 V fronting Miners Rest is where the bulk of the development is proposed and this lot is largely vacant with the exception of some vegetation on the boundary with 24 Cannon Lane.

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Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objectors' properties marked with a star.

The broader context of the area is an interesting one. Land to the west (Cannon Lane and beyond) is within the Low Density Residential Zone and has a vegetated amenity. Land to the east and south of the application site has been developed as a conventional residential subdivision with lots containing detached dwellings. To the north of the site is vacant General Residential Zoned land where the City is currently considering a planning application proposing the creation of 67 lots. The application site is accessible from Furness Street (which intersects with High Street) via either Barnett Drive or Cannon Lane. Recreational opportunities such as the Crusoe Reservoir and bush land and shopping at Charter Hall Lansell Square are walkable from the site (within 1.4 kilometres of the site) to the west and north east respectively. The application site is less than 200 metres from bus stops located on the corner of Cannon Lane and Furness Street. The frequency of service peaks during weekdays at between 26 and 30 minutes, with hourly services operating on weekends and public holidays. All bus services are wheelchair accessible.

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Proposal

Figure 2: Site plan.

The application proposes to subdivide and develop the land as follows:  Lot 1 (4,726 square metres) to be a separate lot for the existing dwelling at 24 Cannon Lane;  Lots 2-9 (inclusive) to be subdivided with lots ranging from 276 to 401 square metres. PAGE 69


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 Each of lots 2-6 and 9 are to be three bedrooms dwellings and lots 7 and 8 are to be two bedrooms.  All dwellings are to be single storey detached with either an attached double garage (lots 2 -6) or a single garage with tandem space in front of the garage (lots 7 -9);  Each dwelling is to be brick clad with hipped colorbond clad roofs  Lots 2, 3 and 4 will be accessed by new crossovers created to Miners Rest;  Lots 5-9 (inclusive) will be accessed by an area of common property which will also include two visitor parking spaces;  Lots 10-13 (inclusive) are to be separate vacant lots which can be developed for one dwelling without planning approval once separately titled; and  Lots 10-13 range between 429 and 688 square metres in and two of the lots (lot 10 and 13) front Miners Rest, the other two lots (11 and 12) are proposed to be battle axe shaped lots behind lots 10 and 13.

Figure 3: Streetscape perspective (looking north from Miners Rest).

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: The site is within a General Residential Zone which triggers the need for a permit to subdivide land and to construct the dwellings. The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: State Planning Policy Framework    

11.05 Regional Planning 15.01 Urban environment 15.02 Sustainable environment 16.01 Medium density housing

Municipal Strategic Statement  21.05 Settlement  21.06 Housing Local Planning Policies  N/A Other Provisions    

32.08 General Residential Zone 55 Two or more dwellings on a lot and residential buildings 56 Residential Subdivision 65 Decision Guidelines

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Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic & Design

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising, 15 objections were received (6 of which have been withdrawn, which occurred before the consultation meeting conducted on 25 February 2014). The remaining 9 objectors advance issues of objection being:     

Character concerns Increase in density Lack of visitor parking Local traffic concerns Bushfire issues

The objections are discussed below. Planning Assessment Does the proposal accord with Planning Scheme policy relating to medium density housing? Clause 11.05-4 (Regional planning strategies and principles) has objectives to limit urban sprawl and direct growth into existing settlements, promoting and capitalising on opportunities for urban renewal and redevelopment. The objective of Clause 15.01 (Urban environment) aims to create urban environments that are safe, functional and provide good quality environments with a sense of place and cultural identity and subdivisions that are attractive, liveable, walkable, cyclable, diverse and are sustainable neighbourhoods.

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Clause 15.02 Sustainable development seeks to achieve energy and resource efficiency in development proposals and encourages development that is consistent with the efficient use of energy and the minimisation of greenhouse gases. Clause 16.01 Residential development has objectives which promote a diverse range of housing that meets community needs in locations that offer good access to services and transport and that is both water and energy efficient. The local provisions of the Planning Scheme, Clause 21.06 (Housing) and the referenced Bendigo Residential Development Strategy 2004 identify the site as being within existing urban zoned land (being in the General Residential Zone) hence policy support for a form of medium density development on this site exists, subject of course to consideration of whether the proposed development is site responsive and appropriate with regard to character. The State and Local Policy framework of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme lends support for an intensification of development on well serviced sites which are in proximity to a full range of urban services including public transport and local convenience shopping. Whether the proposed subdivision and development is an acceptable neighbourhood character outcome. The application site is not within a Residential Character Policy Precinct. Dwellings in the immediate surrounds of the site have been constructed since 2010 onwards. The only exception to this is the dwelling on the application site at 24 Cannon Lane which appears to have been constructed in the 1980s or 1990s. In considering character of the new dwellings it is highly relevant to have regard to the character of existing dwellings. Being a newly developed area, all the new dwellings assume a similar form being single storey with attached garages and hipped roofs. Some of the existing dwellings have a wall constructed on the boundary, and these walls are generally garage walls. Whilst faรงade treatments and colours of the established dwellings in the area vary the fact that the dwellings have been developed in a relatively short period of time means that there is a consistent character that can be observed in the area. One of the objector concerns related to the increase in density. The dwellings proposed are on lots which are not as large as the more recently developed lots. Current lots range between 335 to 654 square metres in size and the proposed lots range from 276 to 688 square metres (excluding the largest lot for the established dwelling at 24 Cannon Lane proposed to be 4,726 square metres). The applicant has had regard to how the proposed dwellings are sited within their respective lots with no walls on boundaries despite there being a good case to allow such construction given walls on boundary are a common feature in the surrounds of the site. The proposed development has been assessed as representing an appropriate outcome with regard to neighbourhood character. PAGE 72


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Does the proposal comply with ResCode and provide an acceptable level of amenity for existing and future residents? The proposed development has demonstrated full compliance with ResCode and provides for both two and three bedroom dwellings as well as four lots which will be developed separately. Being single storey means no external or internal amenity impacts will be caused by way of overlooking and overshadowing. Amenity for the residents of the proposed dwellings is provided by way of appropriately located and dimensioned areas of secluded provide open space. Whether there will be any adverse and unacceptable impacts with regard to traffic safety and car parking availability in the area. Traffic impacts are a commonly raised concern for residents, in particular in more recently subdivided areas as a result of the width of roadways which are not as wide as more historically established streets. The City’s Transport Engineer has reviewed this proposal and the impact of additional crossovers and the generation traffic as a result of the common property accessing the dwelling. The conclusion of the Transport Engineer is that subject to conditions, the traffic impacts of the proposal are acceptable. In terms of parking impacts, the development provides for two visitor spaces, which exceeds what the Planning Scheme requires which is only one. All proposed dwellings provide the Planning Scheme required number of spaces which for lots 2-6 and 9 are two spaces owing to them being three bedroom dwellings. In the case of lots 7 and 8, two spaces are also provided which exceeds what the Planning Scheme requires as only one space per two bedroom dwelling is required. Other objector issues: An issue not previously canvassed in this report is the issue of bushfire risk. This issue has not been considered by the application as the application site is outside of the Bushfire Management Overlay which is the tool used to identify and trigger consideration of this important issue. Broader issues associated with this risk were addressed at the time the land around the site has been developed with Barnett Drive and Miners Rest being designed to meet Planning Scheme standards for resident and emergency vehicles, as well as services (including fire hydrants) for emergency use. Whilst the absence of the Bushfire Management Overlay means this application is not required to consider this matter, it must be noted that the standard of dwelling construction in terms of its assessed Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) is a mandatory consideration at the Building Approval stage.

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Conclusion The housing policy directions in the State Policy (Clauses 11.02 and 16.01) and the Municipal Strategic Statement of the Planning Scheme generally support medium density housing in appropriate locations such as this. This proposal has been assessed as representing an appropriate response to character where the impacts have been limited to reasonable levels as required by ResCode. The proposal is recommended for approval. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments  Objections. RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to Grant a Permit for the staged subdivision of land into 13 lots and construction of 8 dwellings at 24 and 28 Cannon Lane, Lot 2 of Plan of Subdivision 442363V (fronting Miners Rest) and 5 Alluvial Place, KANGAROO FLAT 3555 subject to the following conditions: 1.

NO LAYOUT ALTERATION The subdivision and development permitted by this permit as shown on the endorsed plans and/or described in the endorsed documents must not be altered or modified (for any reason) except with the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

2.

LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE The landscaping shown on the endorsed plans must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority, including that any dead, diseased or damaged plants are to be replaced.

3.

COMPLETION OF LANDSCAPING Before the occupation of the development starts or by such later date as is approved by the responsible authority in writing, the landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be carried out and completed to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

4.

GENERAL EXTERIOR TREATMENT The exterior treatment of the buildings permitted by this permit including all exterior decoration, materials, finishes and colours must be to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. The exterior treatment of the building(s) must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

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5.

REFRIGERATION & AIR-CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT Any equipment required for refrigeration, air-conditioning, heating and the like must be suitably insulated for the purpose of reducing noise emissions and must be located so as to not be highly visible from the street to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

6.

CONSTRUCTION PHASE/ CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PLAN (a) All activities associated with the construction of the development permitted by this permit must be carried out to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and all care must be taken to minimise the effect of such activities on the amenity of the locality. (b) Prior to commencement of works the owner or applicant must submit a Construction Management Plan (CMP) for approval by the responsible authority. This plan shall include, but not be limited to: A site specific plan showing proposed erosion and sedimentation control works. Proposed hours where construction activity will be undertaken. How the site will be accessed. Construction vehicle access must be from Furness Street along Cannon Lane. Techniques and intervention levels to prevent a dust nuisance. Techniques to prevent mud and dirt being transported from the site to adjacent streets. Details as to how adjoining and nearby property occupiers will be briefed on the progress of the development to minimize disruption of day to day activities. Details of the dispute resolution process to be used in the event of complaint from adjoining and nearby property occupiers. During construction of works associated with the development, the must employ and provide the protection methods contained in the CMP to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

7.

DETAILED DRAINAGE PLANS Prior to the certification of the plan of subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions. The plans must include: (a) direction of stormwater run off (b) a point of discharge for each lot (c) independent drainage for each lot

8.

STORMWATER DETENTION Prior to the connection of any building to the responsible authority’s drainage system, the owner or applicant must provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Allowable discharge Rate Q5 =

Q5 = 18.5 l/s

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9.

STORMWATER QUALITY Before the use or development commences, the owner or applicant must provide a stormwater treatment system to achieve the “Best Practice Environmental Guidelines” storm water quality (Victorian Stormwater Committee, 1999) in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

10.

DRAINAGE WORKS Prior to the issue of the Statement of Compliance for the subdivision, drainage works must be constructed in accordance with plans approved by the responsible authority in conditions above.

11.

SECTION 173 AGREEMENT – ON SITE DETENTION SYSTEM Prior to the issue of a Statement of Compliance, the applicant/owner must enter into an agreement under section 173 of the Planning & Environment Act 1987. Such agreement must covenant that:  The on-site detention system and/or treatment system shall be designed by a qualified engineer and must be approved by the responsible authority prior to construction.  Each detention system and/or treatment system must be constructed either prior to, or currently with, the construction of any dwelling on the specified lots. Each system must be completed prior to connection to the responsible authority’s drainage system.  The owner will maintain each on-site detention system and/or treatment system and not modify without prior written approval from the responsible authority.  The owner shall allow duly authorised officers of the responsible authority to inspect the systems at mutually agreed times.  The Owner will pay for all costs associated with the construction and maintenance of each on-site detention system and/or treatment system.

12.

CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ASSETS Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb & channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development. Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit.

13.

VEHICLE CROSSINGS Vehicular access to the subject land from any roadway or service lane (and vice versa) must be by way of a vehicle crossing(s) constructed at right angles to the road, to suit the proposed driveway(s) and vehicles that will use the crossing. A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve.

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14.

SEALED CAR PARK Areas set aside for the parking of vehicles together with the aisles and drives must be properly formed to such levels that they can be utilised in accordance with the endorsed plan and must be drained and provided with an impervious all weather seal coat. The areas must be constructed, drained and maintained in a continuously useable condition to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

15.

USE OF CAR PARKING AREAS Areas set aside for the parking and movement of vehicles as shown on the endorsed plan must be made available for such use and must not be used for any other purpose.

16.

PEDESTRIAN SIGHTLINES The minimum sight line for pedestrian safety must be provided at the exit lane frontage so as to accord with Clause 52.06-8 of the City of Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.

17.

FENCING OF SITE The fence(s) as shown on the endorsed plans(s) must be erected and maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

18.

NO MUD ON ROADS In the event of mud, crushed rock or other debris being carried onto public roads or footpaths from the subject land, appropriate measures must be implemented to minimise the problem to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

19.

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE CONTRIBUTION The applicant or owner must pay to the City of Greater Bendigo an amount equivalent to 5% of land in the subdivision. This payment must be made before a Statement of Compliance is issued and may be varied under section 19 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

20.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS (a) The owner of the land must enter into an agreement with: a telecommunications network or service provider for the provision of telecommunication services to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in accordance with the provider’s requirements and relevant legislation at the time. a suitably qualified person for the provision of fibre ready telecommunication facilities to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in accordance with any industry specifications or any standards set by the Australian Communications and Media Authority, unless the applicant can demonstrate that the land is in an area where the National Broadband Network will not be provided by optical fibre. (b) Before the issue of a Statement of Compliance for any stage of the subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, the owner of the land must provide written confirmation from:  a telecommunications network or service provider that all lots are connected to or are ready for connection to telecommunications services in accordance with the provider’s requirements and relevant legislation at the time. PAGE 77


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 a suitably qualified person that fibre ready telecommunication facilities have been provided in accordance with any industry specifications or any standards set by the Australian Communications and Media Authority, unless the applicant can demonstrate that the land is in an area where the National Broadband Network will not be provided by optical fibre. 21.

TENIX The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to SP AusNet (Gas) in accordance with section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

22.

POWERCOR (a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act 1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with Section 8 of that Act. (b) The applicant shall: I. Provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision in accordance with Powercor’s requirements and standards, including the extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply system, as required by Powercor (A payment to cover the cost of such work will be required). II. In the event that a supply is not provided the applicant shall provide a written undertaking to Powercor Australia Ltd that prospective purchasers will be so informed.  Where buildings or other installations exist on the land to be subdivided and are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be brought into compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry. You shall arrange compliance through a Registered Electrical Contractor.  Any buildings must comply with the clearances required by the Electricity Safety (Network Assets) Regulations.  Any construction work must comply with Energy Safe Victoria’s “No Go Zone” rules.  Set aside on the plan of subdivision for the use of Powercor Australia Ltd reserves and/or easements satisfactory to Powercor Australia Ltd where any electric substation (other than a pole mounted type) is required to service the subdivision.  Provide easements satisfactory to Powercor Australia Ltd, where easements have not been otherwise provided, for all existing Powercor Australia Ltd electric lines on the land and for any new powerlines required to service the lots and adjoining land, save for lines located, or to be located, on public roads set out on the plan. These easements shall show on the plan an easement(s) in favour of "Powercor Australia Ltd" for “Powerline Purposes” pursuant to Section 88 of the Electricity Industry Act 2000.  Obtain for the use of Powercor Australia Ltd any other easement external to the subdivision required to service the lots.  Adjust the position of any existing easement(s) for powerlines to accord with the position of the line(s) as determined by survey.

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 Obtain Powercor Australia Ltd’s approval for lot boundaries within any area affected by an easement for a powerline and for the construction of any works in such an area.  Provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any amendments which have been required. 23.

COLIBAN WATER (a) The applicant or owner is required to reach agreement with Coliban Water for the provision of reticulated water and sewerage services to each of the lots within the subdivision and comply with any requirements arising from any effect of the proposed development on Coliban Water assets. (b) The applicant is to provide evidence to the satisfaction of Coliban Water that existing private water pipes and sanitary drains do not cross the boundaries between lots. Where modifications to pipes or drains are required in order to satisfy this requirement, all work is to be carried out in accordance with AS3500 National Plumbing and Drainage Code of Australia and the relevant requirements of Coliban Water. Works to modify Coliban Water assets may only commence with prior approval by Coliban Water. (c) All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed, are to be protected by Registered Easement in favour of Coliban Region Water Corporation. (d) All proposed sewers must be located at least 1 metre from an existing or proposed structure/boundary.

24.

EXPIRY OF THE PERMIT - SUBDIVISION AND DWELLINGS This permit will expire if: (a) The plan of subdivision is not certified within two years from the date of this permit; or (b) The subdivision is not completed within five years from the date of certification of the plan of subdivision; or (c) Construction of the approved dwellings is not completed within ten years from the date of this permit. The responsible authority may extend the time for certification of the plan, or for the completion of the dwellings, if a request is made in writing before the permit expires or thereafter, within the period allowed by section 69 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987.

Telstra Note Approval does not cover alterations to existing Telstra plant or network. Locations of existing network can be obtained from Dial Before You Dig – Ph: 1100 For co-ordinated Telstra plant reticulation in this development, please refer to www.telstrasmartcommunity.com to register your development and apply for reticulation. City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Note A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve.

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CONSENT FOR WORK ON ROAD RESERVES The applicant must comply with: (a) The Road Management Act 2004, (b) Road Management (Works and Infrastructure) Regulations 2005, and (c) Road Management (General) Regulations 2005 with respect to any requirements to notify the coordinating authority and/or seek consent from the coordinating authority to undertake “works� (as defined in the Act) in, over or under the road reserve. The responsible authority in the inclusion of this note on this planning permit is not deemed to have been notified of, or to have given consent, to undertake any works within the road reserve as proposed in this permit.

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3.6 14 RENWICK STREET, GOLDEN SQUARE 3555 - 12 LOT SUBDIVISION AND DEVELOPMENT OF 6 DWELLINGS Document Information Author

Chris Duckett, Land Use Coordinator

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Application details:

12 Lot subdivision and development of 6 dwellings

Application No:

DSD/1020/2013

Applicant:

S W Pilcher

Land:

14 Renwick Street, GOLDEN SQUARE 3555

Zoning:

General Residential Zone

No. of objections:

3

Consultation meeting held:

As no substantive new issues were raised by the objectors from the previous application, the applicant did not see any value in holding another consultation meeting. The planning department agrees with this view.

Key considerations:

 The principle of intensification of residential development in this location.  Whether the proposed subdivision and development is a good urban design outcome which will preserve neighbourhood character.  Whether the proposal will adversely affect residential amenity and comply with ResCode requirements.

Conclusion:

This report considers the permit application and recommends that the Greater Bendigo City Council issues a Notice of Decision to Grant a Planning Permit.

Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 – 2017 (2013) Planning for Growth  Our quality of life is maintained as our City's population and economy grows. Productivity  A diverse, strong and growing economy supports community resilience.

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Sustainability  Strengthen the links between Greater Bendigo's past and future by protection and contemporary re-use of our heritage assets. Background Information Council refused an application for a similar development at the meeting of 19 June 2013 for the following reasons: 1.The proposal would be harmful to existing neighbourhood character by reason of the height, bulk and layout contrary to the objectives of Clauses 21.06 Housing, 22.15 Golden Square Residential Character Policy, 32.01 Residential 1 Zone, 55 Two or more dwellings on a lot and 56 Residential Subdivision of the City of Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. 2.The proposal would result in a harmful impact on residential amenity by reason of the height, design and appearance of the development abutting 2/21A Pallet Street contrary to the objective and standard of Clause 55.04-2 (walls on boundaries) of the City of Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. 3.The proposal does not make efficient use of energy and solar gain contrary to the objectives of Clause 55 of the City of Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. Sufficient changes have been to the application in respect of height, bulk and amenity to improve the outcome so that the proposal now meets planning scheme requirements. Refer to planning assessment section for details. Report Subject Site and Surrounds The site comprises a rectangular block of land with an area of 3,832m 2. The block is elevated and has significant variety in topography. The frontage of the block rises 5 metres towards the centre and then drops around 4 metres to the rear. The block is adjoined by dwellings to the north and to the west, with a vacant block to the south. The area comprises predominantly single storey, post war dwellings although there are also some recently constructed two storey dwellings nearby. Renwick Street is accessed off Maple Street and is a no-through road which has only been partially constructed. The site is within the area covered by Golden Square 4 Residential Character Policy which describes the neighbourhood as follows: This area, mostly developed between the 1950s to 1980s with some exceptions, is one in which the horizontal emphasis of dwelling form is important, resulting from the long, low elevations of the buildings in relation to their height. Most have reasonably spacious front and side setbacks with established gardens. This sense of spaciousness is emphasised by low or transparent front fences, or, in some cases absence of a fence. PAGE 82


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Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objectors’ properties marked with a star.

Figure 2: Aerial of subject site.

Proposal The proposal is to subdivide the land into 12 lots and construct 6 two storey dwellings. The undeveloped lot sizes would be in the range of 300m2 to 312m2. Three lots would face onto Renwick Street with the remaining lots orientated towards common property. The other 6 lots proposed to have dwellings built on them would be located to the rear of the property and each have an area of 208m2. A large amount of fill is proposed to be placed on the block in order to construct the dwellings. PAGE 83


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Common property would be located centrally, running the entire length of the property with a section running the full width of the property at the rear for access to the dwellings. The dwellings would be in the form of a terrace with living accommodation on the ground floor with two bedrooms and a further living room and/or study on the second floor. Each dwelling would have an integral garage with a second car space in front.

Figure 3: Proposed site layout / subdivision plan.

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Figure 4: CURRENT PROPOSAL - Front elevation

Figure 5: PREVIOUS PROPOSAL - Front elevation

Figure 6: CURRENT PROPOSAL - Rear elevation

Figure 7: PREVIOUS PROPOSAL - Rear elevation

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Figure 8: Perspective views

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses of the Planning Scheme are relevant in the consideration of the proposal. State Planning Policy Framework    

11.05 Regional development 15.01 Urban environment 15.02 Sustainable development 16.01 Residential development

Municipal Strategic Statement  21.05 Settlement  21.06 Housing Local Planning Policies  22.15 Golden Square Residential Character Policy Other Provisions  32.08 General Residential Zone  55 Two or more dwellings on a lot and residential buildings

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 56 Residential Subdivision  65 Decision Guidelines Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral

Comment

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

CFA

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of notice on the site and letters to adjoining and nearby owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising 3 objections were received, with the grounds of objection being:  Construction of the two storey dwellings 3 metres from the western boundary is not site responsive and causes visual and amenity issues and appears to be inconsistent with predominant existing built form within elevated landscape.  Characteristic of residential development in Golden Square is primarily single storey.  Proposal would dominate the immediate surroundings viewed from Wilmot, Dellbridge, Pallett, Renwick and Chum Streets. Dominant presence would not be in keeping with neighbourhood character.  Concerns over drainage/run-off and the intended roadworks.  Inaccuracy of plans.  Potential for erection of future fence to contravene covenants.  Access issues for garbage and emergency vehicles.  Possible overlooking from future dwelling on lot 8. The objections are discussed below. Planning Assessment Principle of Residential Development

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Clause 11.05-4 Regional planning strategies and principles has the objective of developing regions and settlements which have a strong identity, are prosperous and are environmentally sustainable. Of particular relevance to this application is the strategy to limit urban sprawl and direct growth into existing settlements, promoting and capitalising on opportunities for urban renewal and redevelopment. Clause 16.01 Residential development has objectives which promote a diverse range of housing that meets community needs in locations that offer good access to services and transport and that is both water and energy efficient. The importance of energy and resource efficiency is also referenced in Clause 15.02 Sustainable development. The City's Settlement and Housing policies within the Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS) are supported by a residential development strategy which advocates for urban consolidation in the form of high quality medium density in-fill housing. The land is zoned General Residential and lies within the Urban Growth Boundary. The proposal meets the overarching objectives of housing policies within the SPPF and the Residential Development Strategy as it would provide for urban consolidation in an area which has good access to local services and facilities. Whilst the location is appropriate for medium density, infill development, it is important to balance this against other objectives in the Planning Scheme as set out in the MSS. This includes the need to ensure developments achieve high standards of urban design and meet the identified neighbourhood character of areas. This is discussed further below. Urban Design and Neighbourhood Character This is a proposal which requires consideration of a familiar challenge of balancing State and Local policies which encourage consolidation of new housing within established urban areas whilst at the same time requiring development to be respectful of existing neighbourhood characteristics. Neighbourhood character is referenced as an important consideration throughout the Planning Scheme including Clauses 15.01 Urban Environment, 16.01 Residential development, 21.06 Housing, 22.15 Golden Square Residential Character Policy, 32.08 General Residential Zone, 55 Two dwellings on a lot and 56 Residential Subdivision. In the absence of a Neighbourhood Character Overlay the relevant policy consideration is Clause 22.15 Golden Square residential character policy which seeks to ensure that development is responsive to the desired future character of the area in which it is located and to retain and enhance the identified elements that contribute to its character. The policy gives guidance as to how the desired future character should be achieved by the following objectives and design responses. Objectives

Suggested Design Response

To maintain and strengthen the garden Prepare a landscape plan to accompany settings of the dwellings. all applications for new dwellings.

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Objectives

Suggested Design Response

Comment: An adequate landscaping plan has been provided. To minimise site disturbance and impact of Buildings should be designed to follow the the building on the landscape. contours of the site or step down the site. Comment: The objective has not been met due to the proposed amount of site disturbance and proposed fill. The buildings do not follow the contours or step down the site. This is discussed in greater detail below. To maintain the consistency, present, of building front setbacks.

where The front setback should be not less than the average setback of the adjoining two dwellings

Comment: The front lots are for subdivision only and therefore front setback has not been assessed. This would be considered at the building permit application stage. To reflect the rhythm of dwelling spacing.

Buildings should be setback between 1 and 3 metres from both side boundaries, based on the predominant pattern in the streetscape.

Comment: This objective is not met. The terrace of two storey dwellings is built boundary to boundary. As the dwellings are to the rear this proposal is unlikely to impact on Renwick Street. The built form will be visible from surrounding areas as identified by an objector, however the development will not be part of a streetscape as such and therefore with the changes made from the previous proposal it is considered acceptable To ensure that buildings and extensions do Respect the predominant building height in not dominate the streetscape. the street and nearby properties. Use low pitched roof forms. Comment: As discussed above the proposed dwellings to the rear will not impact significantly on the streetscape of Renwick Street but the height and bulk of the dwellings will impact on the streetscapes of the wider area. The question is whether or not this impact would be harmful. This is discussed further below. To use building materials and finishes that In streetscapes where weatherboard complement the dominant pattern within predominates, use timber or other nonthe streetscape. masonry cladding materials where possible, and render, bag or paint brick surfaces. Comment: It is proposed to use brick, tile and timber cladding as the predominant faรงade material with some concrete tilt panel on the side elevations. To maintain streetscape.

the

openness

of

the Provide open style front fencing. Front fences should not exceed 1.2 metres other than in exceptional case.

Comment: No front fences are proposed.

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Although some of the objectives of the Residential Character Policy have not been met it should be noted that this policy is for guidance only and failure to comply with the objectives does not automatically mean the application should be refused. As with the previous application assessing this proposal from a neighbourhood character perspective is not straightforward for a number of reasons. 1. The site is an area in transition and largely underdeveloped. 2. The proposal is for a mix of straight subdivision on 6 lots as well as subdivision and development on the rear lots. This means that it is not known what the overall development will appear like when completed. 3. The site is elevated and has greatly varying topography. 4. The site is able to be viewed from surrounding streetscapes and therefore a wider assessment in addition to the consideration from Renwick Street is required. 5. There is a character consideration when viewing the properties from adjoining backyards. Subdivision The fact that the site is in an area of Golden Square undergoing change provides some merit to the argument that a subdivision of this nature is acceptable. The lots proposed are smaller than is characteristic in the area but the area’s transitionary nature and the requirement to make efficient use of urban infill sites supports lots of this size. Whilst many lots in the area are significantly larger than proposed here, it is not unreasonable to expect further infill development on many of these sites. Indeed a number of developments of small lots, some with two storey dwellings have been constructed in the area in recent years. It would therefore be difficult to sustain an argument that the lot sizes are out of keeping with neighbourhood character. Some concerns were raised regarding the lack of detail on the cut and fill in the application and how any development that proceeds on the site would impact on the surrounding area. The applicant addressed this through the provision of an earthworks plan which indicates that only cuts in the land will be required towards the front of the site and therefore the impact of future development will be lessened. Development The development component of the proposal is located to the rear of the site some 58m from Renwick Street. Given this distance and the fact that 6 dwellings will be built on the proposed front lots at some point in the future, the development will have a minimal impact when viewed from Renwick Street. However, when viewed from the wider area, in particular Delbridge and Wilmot Streets and to a lesser extent Pallet Street, the rear and side of the development will have a more dominant presence on the landscape due to the elevated nature of the site and the fall of the land towards those streets. The key question that Council must consider is whether the changes to the development have addressed the neighbourhood character concerns which were documented in the refusal to grant a planning permit.

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There were three particular issues of concerns. Height, bulk and layout. Height: The height of the dwellings to the rear on the original proposal was 8 metres. This proposal has reduced the height by 0.6 metres to 7.4 metres. In addition to this, the flank elevations on the boundary have been reduced from two storey to single storey. Although the dwellings will still be of a noticeable height from surrounding streetscapes the changes made are sufficient to overcome concerns of height. Bulk and layout: The applicant has made the following changes in an attempt to address these issues.  Dwellings 1 and 6 (end of terrace) - have been stepped off the boundary by 2 metres at first floor level with the rear corner stepped in further, a total of 3.6m.  Dwellings 3 and 5 - the bulk has been reduced at the rear by replacing what was previously built form with an open balcony area.  Introduction of an improved rear fencing design with reduced height. In pre-application advice as with the previous application, officers did raise concerns about the fact that the dwellings do not follow the contours of the site. It was suggested that the dwellings step down the site to reduce the impact. The applicant is of the view that this is not required and the changes made address the reasons for refusal. The proposed design when viewed from the rear is well articulated with good use of recesses and variety of materials. The changes made are certainly an improvement to the previous proposal and go some way to address the design concerns. On balance the bulk and layout concerns have been addressed. There was an additional character concern about the 'backyard scape' with the impact of a 16.5m long, sheer, two storey concrete wall constructed on the boundary with 2/21A Pallet Street. This would have resulted in a wall with a height ranging from 6.2m to 7.8m. This issue has now been addressed with the setbacks discussed above and the introduction of a variation in materials. Residential Amenity and other ResCode Issues Applications of this type must be assessed against and meet the objectives of Clause 55 and Clause 56 (ResCode) and should meet all standards. The application now meets all of the objectives in ResCode. Those that were a concern on the previous application are considered below, together with the objectives which are relevant to residents’ objections. B4 Infrastructure objective The objective of this clause is to ensure development is provided with appropriate utility services and does not unreasonably overload the capacity of utility services and infrastructure.

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One local resident has raised some concerns regarding stormwater and sewerage. There is an existing problem in the area due to the lie of the land and the runoff that results. Referral responses from Coliban Water and the City’s drainage engineer have raised no concerns and with appropriate conditions the proposal would meet the applicable infrastructure requirements. Moreover it is likely that the development on site would reduce stormwater runoff in the area. B10 Energy efficiency objectives The objective of this clause is to achieve and protect energy efficient dwellings and residential buildings and to ensure the orientation and layout of development reduce fossil fuel energy use and make appropriate use of daylight and solar energy. The standard of the clause is the buildings should be:  Oriented to make appropriate use of solar energy.  Sited and designed to ensure that the energy efficiency of existing dwellings on adjoining lots is not unreasonably reduced.  Living areas and private open space should be located on the north side of the development, if practicable.  Developments should be designed so that solar access to north-facing windows is maximised. This objective was not met in the previous application as the siting and design did not ensure that solar access from the north was maximised. For instance all habitable rooms faced either east or west resulting in the dwellings receiving no northern sunlight. It is recognised that there are some constraints on the site in terms of orientation but there are alternative design solutions which could be used to improve solar gain and energy efficiency and address the previous ground of refusal. The applicant has attempted to address the ground of refusal through the revised layout which provides greater solar access to dwellings 3 and 5. However this still leaves 4 dwellings with no northern solar again. Through negotiation the applicant has agreed to conditional changes which require a north facing high level window to a bedroom to dwelling 6 as well as the positioning of skylights over the first floor study of dwellings 1, 2 and 4. With the changes made it can be argued that the design has improved the solar gain and energy efficiency of each of the dwellings to a degree which is sufficient to overcome the ground of refusal. B14 Access objectives A resident has expressed concerns about access for emergency vehicles. This clause requires consideration of access for service and emergency vehicles. The development has been designed with an 8m wide access and Renwick Street will be made up to the City’s design standards. Therefore access will not be an issue and this objective is met.

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In addition the CFA were consulted on the application and do not object to the proposal subject to conditions. B18 Walls on boundaries objectives The standard of this clause includes a requirement that the height of a wall on a boundary should not exceed an average of 3 metres with no part higher than 3.6 metres. As discussed above, the previous proposal had a wall with a length of 16.5m and was between 6.2 metres and 7.8 metres in height giving an average height of 7 metres. The walls on boundaries have now been reduced in length and height. The length of the wall at 6.9m is now well under the required standard. However the height of the walls at a range of between 3.2m and 4.2m does exceed the standard. Given the significant reduction in the length of the wall on boundary, the height breach of the standard is acceptable and overall the wall will not significantly impact on the amenity of the adjoining dwelling. B22 Overlooking objective The objective is to limit views into existing secluded private open space and habitable room windows. The development has been designed to meet the overlooking standard. At ground floor level all views to adjoining properties would be obscured by existing fencing. The windows in the upper level have all been setback sufficiently to ensure compliance with the ResCode standard. An objector has raised concerns about potential overlooking from a future dwelling on one of the undeveloped lots. This matter will be addressed at the Building Permit stage as no planning permit is required to build a dwelling on this lot. It would therefore be unreasonable to refuse a proposal on this basis. B29 Solar access to open space objective The objective of the clause is to allow solar access into the secluded private open space of new dwellings. The standard has a requirement that the private open space should be located on the north side of the dwelling or residential building, if appropriate. Each dwelling has relatively generous private open space in that all have front and rear balconies in addition to a rear garden. The rear gardens all achieve northern solar gain. Therefore this objective is deemed to be met.

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Other Issues  Fencing 12 Renwick Street has a restrictive covenant that prevents the construction of a front fence on their property. As part of their front boundary would form the side boundary to lot 8 of the subdivision, the owner has concerns that any fencing on that lot could contravene the covenant. Should a planning permit be granted a condition could be imposed which would require either no fence on that part of the land or resolution of the covenant issue at the expense of the applicant. Conclusion The principle of an infill development in this location is fully supported by planning policy. Although design of the subdivision and development is not entirely site responsive in terms of the topography, it is on balance respectful of existing neighbourhood character and the applicant has adequately addressed the previous grounds of refusal. As such the proposal complies the requirements of the Planning Scheme and it is recommended that the planning application is approved. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority, may resolve to approve or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments  Objections RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to issue a Notice of Decision to grant a planning permit for a 12 lot subdivision and construction of 6 dwellings at 14 Renwick Street, Golden Square subject to the following conditions: 1.

MODIFIED PLAN REQUIRED Before the use and/or development start(s), amended plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and two copies must be provided. The plans must be generally in accordance with the plans submitted with the application but modified to show alterations to the design of to provide the following: (a) A high level window to bedroom 1 of dwelling 6 on the northern elevation. (b) Skylight windows to the study area of dwellings 1, 2 and 4.

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2.

FENCING REQUIREMENT No fence must be erected to the northern boundary of lot 8 where it abuts 12 Renwick Street unless the relevant covenant on that property is removed with the agreement of the owner of 12 Renwick Street. Should the covenant be removed, the process for removing it and the expenses incurred must be borne by the applicant.

3.

NO LAYOUT ALTERATION The use and development permitted by this permit as shown on the endorsed plans and/or described in the endorsed documents must not be altered or modified (for any reason) except with the prior written consent of the responsible authority.

4.

SCHEDULE OF MATERIALS Prior to the commencement of development a sample board of the proposed materials and colours to be used for the building shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the responsible authority.

5.

LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE The landscaping shown on the endorsed plans must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority, including that any dead, diseased or damaged plants are to be replaced.

6.

COMPLETION OF LANDSCAPING Before the occupation of the development starts or by such later date as is approved by the responsible authority in writing, the landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be carried out and completed to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

7.

REFRIGERATION & AIR-CONDITIONING EQUIPMENT Any equipment required for refrigeration, air-conditioning, heating and the like must be suitably insulated for the purpose of reducing noise emissions and must be located so as to not be highly visible from the street to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

8.

CONSTRUCTION PHASE All activities associated with the construction of the development permitted by this permit must be carried out to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and all care must be taken to minimise the effect of such activities on the amenity of the locality.

9.

DETAILED DRAINAGE PLANS Prior to the certification of the plan of subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions. The plans must include: (a) Direction of stormwater run off (b) A point of discharge for each lot (c) Independent drainage for each lot

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STORMWATER DETENTION Prior to the connection of any building to the responsible authority’s drainage system, the owner or applicant must provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Allowable discharge Rate: To pit 147610 at Northwest corner of site Q10 =7.0 l/s Drainage to existing 300mm pipe in Renwick St Q10 = 21.0 l/s

11.

STORMWATER QUALITY Before the use or development is commenced, the owner or applicant must provide a stormwater treatment system to achieve the “Best Practice Environmental Guidelines” storm water quality (Victorian Stormwater Committee, 1999) in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority.

12.

DRAINAGE WORKS Prior to the issue of the Statement of Compliance for the subdivision, drainage works must be constructed in accordance with plans approved by the responsible authority in condition 8 above.

13.

CONSTRUCTION OF WORKS Road works, drainage and other civil works must be constructed in accordance with plans and specifications approved by the Responsible Authority and must include:Renwick Street (a) Construct & Seal Renwick Street, including Kerb, channel and footpath, to the southern boundary of the property; (b) Construct turning area towards the Southern end of Renwick Street in a location to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. (c) Underground drainage;

14. CCOUNTRY FIRE AUTHORITY Hydrants Prior to the issue of Statement of Compliance under the Subdivision Act 1988 the following requirements must be met to the satisfaction of the CFA: 1.1 Above or below ground operable hydrants must be provided. The maximum distance between these hydrants and the rear of all building envelopes (or in the absence of building envelopes, the rear of the lots) must be 120 metres and the hydrants must be no more than 200 metres apart. 1.2 The hydrants must be identified with marker posts and road reflectors as applicable to the satisfaction of the Country Fire Authority. Vehicle access 2.1 Vehicle access must be constructed to a standard so that it is accessible in all weather conditions and capable of accommodating a vehicle of 15 tonnes for the trafficable width.

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2.2 A turning circle with a minimum radius of 8 metres (including roll-over kerbs if they are provided) or a T or Y head with dimensions to the satisfaction of CFA. 2.3 Curves in driveway must have a minimum radius of 10 metres. 2.4 Must provide a minimum trafficable width of 3.5 metres, be clear of encroachments 4 metres vertically and have no obstructions within 0.5 metres either side of the formed width of the road, to the satisfaction of the Responsible Authority. 15.

SECTION 173 AGREEMENT – ON SITE DETENTION SYSTEM Should the applicant opt to install on-site stormwater detention or water quality treatment then, prior to the issue of statement of compliance, the applicant/owner must enter into an Agreement under Section 173 of the Planning and Environment Act 1987. Such Agreement must covenant that;  The owner will maintain each on-site treatment system and not modify without prior written approval from the responsible authority.  The owner shall allow duly authorised officers of the responsible authority to inspect the systems at mutually agreed times.  The Owner will pay for all costs associated with the construction and maintenance of each on-site treatment and detention system.

16.

CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ASSETS Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb & channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development. Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit.

17.

WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN Prior to commencement of development, a Waste Management Plan (WMP) to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved in writing by the responsible authority. The WMP must document the following: (a) That the collection is to be undertaken by a private service in perpetuity which will be the responsibility of the applicant/owner/s of the land. (b) Details of mechanisms which are to be used to show how future owner/occupiers of the lots/dwellings will be made aware of the requirements of this obligation. The storage and collection of waste must be undertaken in accordance with the approved WMP to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

18.

PEDESTRIAN SIGHTLINES The minimum sight line for pedestrian safety must be provided at the exit lane frontage so as to accord with Clause 52.06-8 of the City of Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. PAGE 97


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19.

VEHICLE CROSSINGS (a) Vehicular access to the subject land from any roadway or service lane (and vice versa) must be by way of a vehicle crossing(s) constructed at right angles to the road, to suit the proposed driveway(s) and vehicles that will use the crossing. (b) If the existing layback is not used, it must be removed and barrier kerb reinstated. (c) The driveway must be 1m clear of the stormwater pit. (d) A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve.

20.

SEALED CAR PARK Areas set aside for the parking of vehicles together with the aisles and drives must be properly formed to such levels that they can be utilised in accordance with the endorsed plan and must be drained and provided with an impervious all weather seal coat. The areas must be constructed, drained and maintained in a continuously useable condition to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

21. LBOLLARD LIGHTING Common property areas must be provided with bollard lighting to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. 22.

USE OF CAR PARKING AREAS Areas set aside for the parking and movement of vehicles as shown on the endorsed plan must be made available for such use and must not be used for any other purpose.

23.

NO MUD ON ROADS In the event of mud, crushed rock or other debris being carried onto public roads or footpaths from the subject land, appropriate measures must be implemented to minimise the problem to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

24.

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE CONTRIBUTION The applicant or owner must pay to the City of Greater Bendigo an amount equivalent to 5% of land in the subdivision. This payment must be made before a Statement of Compliance is issued and may be varied under section 19 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

25.

TELECOMMUNICATIONS (a) The owner of the land must enter into an agreement with: a telecommunications network or service provider for the provision of telecommunication services to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in accordance with the provider’s requirements and relevant legislation at the time.

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a

suitably qualified person for the provision of fibre ready telecommunication facilities to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in accordance with any industry specifications or any standards set by the Australian Communications and Media Authority, unless the applicant can demonstrate that the land is in an area where the National Broadband Network will not be provided by optical fibre. (b) Before the issue of a Statement of Compliance for any stage of the subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, the owner of the land must provide written confirmation from: a telecommunications network or service provider that all lots are connected to or are ready for connection to telecommunications services in accordance with the provider’s requirements and relevant legislation at the time. a suitably qualified person that fibre ready telecommunication facilities have been provided in accordance with any industry specifications or any standards set by the Australian Communications and Media Authority, unless the applicant can demonstrate that the land is in an area where the National Broadband Network will not be provided by optical fibre. 26.

TENIX The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to SP AusNet (Gas) in accordance with section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988.

27.

POWERCOR (a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act 1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with Section 8 of that Act. (b) The applicant shall:  Provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision in accordance with Powercor’s requirements and standards, including the extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply system, as required by Powercor (A payment to cover the cost of such work will be required).  In the event that a supply is not provided the applicant shall provide a written undertaking to Powercor Australia Ltd that prospective purchasers will be so informed.  Where buildings or other installations exist on the land to be subdivided and are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be brought into compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry. You shall arrange compliance through a Registered Electrical Contractor.  Any buildings must comply with the clearances required by the Electricity Safety (Network Assets) Regulations.  Any construction work must comply with Energy Safe Victoria’s “No Go Zone” rules.  Set aside on the plan of subdivision for the use of Powercor Australia Ltd reserves and/or easements satisfactory to Powercor Australia Ltd where any electric substation (other than a pole mounted type) is required to service the subdivision.

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 Provide easements satisfactory to Powercor Australia Ltd, where easements have not been otherwise provided, for all existing Powercor Australia Ltd electric lines on the land and for any new powerlines required to service the lots and adjoining land, save for lines located, or to be located, on public roads set out on the plan. These easements shall show on the plan an easement(s) in favour of "Powercor Australia Ltd" for “Powerline Purposes” pursuant to Section 88 of the Electricity Industry Act 2000.  Obtain for the use of Powercor Australia Ltd any other easement external to the subdivision required to service the lots.  Adjust the position of any existing easement(s) for powerlines to accord with the position of the line(s) as determined by survey.  Obtain Powercor Australia Ltd’s approval for lot boundaries within any area affected by an easement for a powerline and for the construction of any works in such an area.  Provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any amendments which have been required. 28.

COLIBAN WATER (a) The owner is required to provide reticulated water and sewerage services to each of the lots within the subdivision. Services are to be provided in accordance with our specifications. (b) All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed, are to be protected by Registered Easement in favour of Coliban Region Water Corporation.

NOTES: WORKS ON ROAD RESERVES A Works within Road Reserves permit must be obtained from the City of Greater Bendigo Asset Planning & Design Unit prior to any work commencing in the road reserve. CONSENT FOR WORK ON ROAD RESERVES The applicant must comply with: (a) The Road Management Act 2004, (b) Road Management (Works and Infrastructure) Regulations 2005, and (c) Road Management (General) Regulations 2005 with respect to any requirements to notify the coordinating authority and/or seek consent from the coordinating authority to undertake “works” (as defined in the Act) in, over or under the road reserve. The responsible authority in the inclusion of this note on this planning permit is not deemed to have been notified of, or to have given consent, to undertake any works within the road reserve as proposed in this permit.

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CFA CFA’s requirements for identification of hydrants are specified in ‘Identification of Street Hydrants for Firefighting Purposes’ available under publications on the CFA web site (www.cfa.vic.gov.au)

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3.7 41 GLADSTONE STREET, QUARRY HILL 3550 - TWO LOT SUBDIVISION AND CONSTRUCTION OF ONE DWELLING Document Information Author

Lachlan Forsyth, Statutory Planner

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Application details:

Two lot subdivision, construction of one dwelling and relocation of one outbuilding.

Application No:

DSD/964/2013

Applicant:

Udevelop Property Development Consultancy

Land:

41 Gladstone Street, QUARRY HILL 3550

Zoning:

General Residential Zone (formerly Residential 1 Zone )

Overlays:

Heritage Overlay 30

No. of objections:

1

Consultation meeting held:

No - the applicant / owner did not wish to participate in a consultation meeting.

Key considerations:

  

Conclusion:

Whether the proposal accords with Planning Scheme policy relating to medium density infill housing; Whether the proposal represents an appropriate outcome with reference to Residential Character Policy and ResCode. Whether the proposal respects the heritage values of the precinct.

The application is recommended for refusal on the basis that it represents an unacceptable planning outcome with regard to policy, neighbourhood character, ResCode, Council’s Heritage Policy and the Heritage Overlay. This report considers the permit application and recommends that the Greater Bendigo City Council refuses to grant a permit.

Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 – 2017 (2013) PAGE 102


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Planning for Growth  Our quality of life is maintained as our City's population and economy grows. Productivity  A diverse, strong and growing economy supports community resilience. Sustainability  Strengthen the links between Greater Bendigo's past and future by protection and contemporary re-use of our heritage assets. Background Information An identical application was lodged with Council on 18 September 2013. The planning officer raised a number of concerns with this original application which related to ResCode compliance, neighbourhood character and heritage. The officer also requested a range of additional documentation which was required to assess the proposal. The applicant failed to respond to this request which resulted in the application lapsing. The current application was subsequently lodged without the previously requested supporting documentation and without regard to the previously raised ResCode, neighbourhood character and heritage concerns. Following discussions centred on these concerns, the applicant has amended the plans in an attempt to make the proposal compliant. Despite this, the proposal still fails to comply with ResCode, neighbourhood character and heritage provisions, as discussed below. Report Subject Site and Surrounds The subject site is an irregular shaped parcel of residential land located on the southeastern side of Gladstone Street, Quarry Hill. The site has a frontage of 16.77 metres to Gladstone Street, an average depth of 30.50 metres and a rear abuttal to Hoskins Street of 16.94 metres. The total area of the lot is approximately 494m². A single storey dwelling occupies the land which according to City records, was constructed in 1967. The dwelling is characterised by a steeply pitched gable roof and brick veneer cladding. A carport is incorporated into the roof structure of the dwelling on the south-western side, with unconstructed vehicle access points from both Gladstone and Hoskins Streets. A small outbuilding is located to the rear of this dwelling. Adjoining properties to the west, south east and north-east all contain single storey dwellings. The two adjoining properties to the west were constructed in 1900 and 1930 respectively, with both contributing to the heritage character of the area. The dwelling opposite, to the south (fronting Olinda Street), was constructed in 1885, with properties further east on Olinda Street also of heritage significance. The property abutting the subject land to the north east (facing Gladstone Street) is of modern design, with City records indicating it was constructed 1974.

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The wider precinct holds a noticeable heritage character which is reflective of Bendigo’s early settlement. Land to the southern side is mostly residential in nature, except for the Quarry Hills Bowls Club, which is located 50 metres south of the subject land. The northern side of Gladstone Street houses the Bendigo Train Station rail yards which contain a range of industrial railway infrastructure, sheds and sidings.

Figure 1: Location map showing subject site. Objector’s property marked with a star.

Proposal The applicant proposes to subdivide the land into two lots and construct one double storey dwelling. An existing small shed is also proposed to be relocated to the eastern side of the dwelling. The proposal is detailed as follows: Lot sizes:  Lot 1 = 349m²  Lot 2 = 151m² Development:  Construction of a double storey dwelling to the rear of the existing dwelling: o Ground floor to comprise meals/lounge/kitchen, laundry and single vehicle garage. o First floor to comprise two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a second lounge with balcony.

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 Materials include a mixture of dark brown brick at ground floor level, grey and white prefabricated panelling at first floor level, aluminium window and door frames, grey/white garage door and grey Colorbond® roof.  Dwelling is to be of a contemporary design and include pitched skillion roof forms.

Figure 2. Proposed Streetscape Elevation (Hoskins Street)

Figure 3. Proposed site plan (showing first floor plan and roofline of ground floor).

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Figure 4. Three Dimensional representation of the proposed dwelling.

Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The following clauses are relevant in the consideration of this proposal: State Planning Policy Framework  Clause 11.05 - Regional development  Clause 15.01 - Urban environment  Clause 15.02 - Sustainable development  Clause 15.03 - Heritage Conservation  Clause 16.01 - Residential development Municipal Strategic Statement  Clause 21.01 - Municipal profile  Clause 21.02 - Key issues and influences  Clause 21.03 - Vision - strategic framework  Clause 21.04 - Strategic directions  Clause 21.05 - Settlement  Clause 21.06 - Housing  Clause 21.08 - Environment (Heritage)  Clause 21.09 - Infrastructure  Clause 21.10 - Reference documents Local Planning Policies  Clause 22.06 – Heritage Policy  Clause 22.21 – Quarry Hill Residential Character Policy, Precinct 1

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Zone  Clause 32.08 – General Residential Zone Other Provisions  Clause 52.06 – Car Parking  Clause 55 and 56 – ResCode  Clause 65 – Decision guidelines Consultation/Communication Referrals The following internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: Referral Engineering Design

Comment -

Traffic

Engineering - Drainage

& No objection conditions.

subject

to

pedestrian

sight

line

No objection subject to detailed drainage design conditions.

Public Notification The application was advertised by way of 2 noticeboards on the site (Gladstone and Hoskins Street frontages) and by mailing letters to adjoining and adjacent owners and occupiers. As a result of advertising, one objection was received, with the grounds of objection being:     

Boundary setbacks Overlooking Overshadowing Parking concerns Drainage concerns

The grounds of objection are discussed in the body of this report. Planning Assessment Does the proposal accord with Planning Scheme policy relating to medium density housing? Statewide Policies Clause 11.05 (Regional development) seeks to promote the sustainable growth and development of regional Victoria.

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Clause 15.01 (Urban environment) seeks to create urban environments that are safe, functional and provide good quality environs with a sense of place and cultural identity. Clause 15.02 (Sustainable development) seeks to encourage land use and development that is consistent with the efficient use of energy and the minimisation of greenhouse gas emissions. Clause 15.03 (Heritage Conservation) has the objective of ensuring the conservation of places of heritage significance. A key strategy is to encourage appropriate development that respects places with identified heritage values and creates a worthy legacy for future generations. Clause 16.01 (Residential development) seeks to provide for housing diversity, affordability and to ensure the efficient provision of supporting infrastructure. New housing should have access to services and be planned for long term sustainability, including walkability to activity centres, public transport, schools and open space. Council’s settlement and housing policies detailed within the Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS) are supported by the City’s Residential Development Strategy, which promotes urban consolidation for high quality medium density in-fill housing. The subject land is zoned General Residential and is situated within the Bendigo Urban Growth Boundary. The property is within an established urban area of Bendigo which is within 1km of the CBD and is serviced by a wide range of infrastructure, local services and facilities. The proposed development would allow for urban consolidation which will utilise existing services and infrastructure. Despite this, it is considered that the negative impacts on amenity, neighbourhood character and heritage outweigh the benefits of urban consolidation in this instance. This is expanded upon later in this report. Local Policies Clause 21.04, 21.05 and Clause 21.06-1 sets out the policies which aim to provide sufficient housing to support a forecasted increase in population for Bendigo of nearly 43,000 individuals by 2030. The policy and associated Residential Development Strategy have been prepared primarily to guide future residential development in the urban area of Bendigo. Relative to this application the Strategy promotes an increase in density on land which is suitable for infill development. Clause 21.06-1 also notes that ‘in terms of urban design and neighbourhood character, Council acknowledges that as the potential for an increased housing capacity within Bendigo is realised through higher density housing, it will become more critical for each new development to effectively respond to its surroundings and contribute to the adjoining streetscape character. Higher standards of design need to be adopted with consideration to issues such as privacy, amenity and neighbourhood character’.

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Clause 22.06 – Heritage Policy builds on the MSS objective in Clause 21.08-2 to protect and enhance the municipality’s built heritage for future generations. The policy also states that protecting cultural and natural heritage assets is important in maintaining the municipality’s character and sense of place. Council’s Heritage Policy has the following objectives which are relevant to the subject site and application:  To ensure that Greater Bendigo’s heritage assets are maintained and protected.  To ensure that new land uses and developments are sympathetic with the appearance and character of heritage places. It is policy to:  Ensure that a proposal for the use and development of land demonstrates how it maintains and supports the cultural and natural heritage of Greater Bendigo. In consideration of Council’s referenced Bendigo Residential Development Strategy 2004, the proposed development would allow for consolidation of residential land in an established urban area which is close to numerous services and infrastructure. A balance must be struck, however, between accommodating residential growth and respecting neighbourhood character and areas of heritage significance. It has been assessed that the proposal is not an acceptable neighbourhood character or heritage outcome, as detailed below. Neighbourhood Character The site is located within Quarry Hill Precinct 1, which is described under Clause 22.21 as: The area forms an extension of the inner ring of suburbs that exemplify the distinctive character of early Bendigo. Some of it has an intimate 'cottage' character, derived from the modest scale of the dwellings and the small garden setbacks, and the open front fences. Elsewhere, larger houses, particularly from the Edwardian, Inter war and later eras, produce a more 'middle' suburban character. Setbacks vary according to the size of lot and housing, but are often consistent within a particular streetscape. Lots often extend from street to street. Some streets have mature trees, either exotic or native. Much of the area has heritage significance. The statement of desired future character seeks to ensure that the heritage qualities and the combination of intimate, cottage feel and 'middle' suburb character will be maintained. The desired future character is to be achieved by the following objectives and design responses: Objectives

Response

To retain buildings that contribute to the Retain and restore wherever possible, valued character of the area. intact Victorian, Edwardian, Federation and Interwar era dwellings. Alterations and extensions should be PAGE 109


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Response appropriate to the dwelling era.

Comment: The proposal does not include the demolition, alteration or extension of any contributory buildings so in this case complies. To maintain and strengthen the garden Prepare a landscape plan to accompany settings of the dwellings. all applications for new dwellings. Comment: The proposal will effectively remove all opportunities for landscaping in the rear of the site. No landscape plan has been submitted with the application to detail how the proposal maintains or strengthens the garden settings of dwellings. To maintain the consistency, where The front setback should be not less than present, of building front setbacks. the average setback of the adjoining two dwellings. Comment: The proposed dwelling is to front Hoskins Street, which is predominately used as a rear laneway to gain access to lots which front Gladstone Street and Olinda Street. There are a limited number of dwellings fronting Hoskins Street. The adjoining dwelling to the west has a setback not dissimilar to the proposed dwelling. Although the proposed setback of 1.5 metres is small, it is acceptable given the laneway character of the street and the adjoining dwelling’s setback. To maintain the rhythm of dwelling Buildings should be off-set from one side spacing. boundary. Comment: The proposed dwelling is setback from one boundary, however the opposite side boundary is constructed at ground floor level and has a 0.7m setback at first floor level. Given the small size of the proposed lot and the siting of the existing dwelling, the site is somewhat crowded by the proposed development. This highlights the constraints of the site and raises doubts over its capability of accommodating a second dwelling, whilst respecting neighbourhood character and complying with ResCode. To minimise the dominance of car Locate garages and carports behind the storage facilities. line of the dwelling. Use rear access where possible. Comment: The proposal includes a garage door which forms a major focal point of the dwelling’s façade. Again this highlights the constraints of the site, namely being the proposed lot’s small size. To respect the identified heritage Where the streetscape contains identified qualities of the streetscape or adjoining heritage buildings, reflect the dominant buildings. building forms in the street, including roof forms, in the new building design. Comment: The proposal is not respectful of the identified heritage dwellings in the street and the immediate surrounds. The overall height and bulk of the buildings coupled with the small lot size are symptomatic of overdevelopment and have the potential to overwhelm or detract from the valued heritage character of the precinct. The use of a contemporary building design is not of particular concern, rather the dominant size and bulk of the building is out of keeping with neighbourhood PAGE 110


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Response

character. Further to this, the proposed roof forms and window sizes and shapes are foreign to the precinct and do not reflect the dominant forms of the surrounding heritage dwellings. Prefabricated, lightweight cladding materials pose further detraction from the heritage qualities of the area, which is predominated by red brick and weatherboard period homes. It is acknowledged that there are examples of modern houses in the area, such as the existing onsite dwelling. Despite this, the proposed dwelling’s scale, fenestration, materials and roof form are all considered to be out of keeping with the heritage qualities of the precinct. To ensure that buildings and extensions Respect the predominant building height do not dominate the streetscape. in the street and nearby properties. Where there is a predominance of single storey, the height of the dwelling at the front of the dwelling should match the typical single storey wall height. Comment: The use of skillion roofs has been incorporated into the design in an attempt to reduce the overall height of the dwelling. Despite this, the dwelling is still 0.648 metres higher than the adjoining property fronting Hoskins Street. Given the location, the proposed dwelling would be highly visible from Olinda Street, which features numerous heritage buildings, of which many are single storey. In consideration of the height, form, materials and context of the surrounds, the proposal may dominate the ‘streetscape’ and cause detriment to its heritage character. To use building materials and finishes In streets dominated by weatherboard that complement the dominant pattern dwellings, use timber or other nonwithin the streetscape. masonry cladding materials where possible, and render, bag or paint brick surfaces. Comment: As mentioned above, the use of contemporary cladding materials is not reflective of, or complimentary to the dominant pattern within the streetscape and wider area. The proposed materials will not be appropriately integrated within the heritage precinct. To ensure front fences are appropriate to Provide open style front fencing. the era of the dwellings and maintain an Front fences should not exceed 1.2 openness to the streetscape. metres other than in exceptional cases. Comment: No front fencing is proposed to Hoskins Street. The proposal includes the removal of an existing rear fence which would serve to ‘open up’ the Hoskins Street laneway.

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In summary, the proposal is not considered to be in keeping with the existing or desired future character of the Quarry Hill Precinct due to its height, scale, roof form materials and overall form. Does the proposal comply with ResCode? The proposal has been assessed as being in general accordance a number of Clause 55 ResCode standards and objectives in terms of internal and external amenity provision and building siting considerations. With reference to the objector's concerns, the proposal is compliant with overshadowing and overlooking requirements. There are a number of areas in which the proposal fails to comply with ResCode Standards however, which are detailed below. 

Clause 55.02-1 Standard B1 – Neighbourhood character As discussed above, the proposal is not considered to be appropriate for the neighbourhood and the site, and does not respect the existing or preferred neighbourhood character.



Clause 55.03-1 Standard B6 – Front Setback To comply with this standard, the dwelling would have to match the existing setback of the adjoining property which faces Hoskins Street (2.8 metres). The proposed setback of 1.5 metres does not comply with this standard. Given the laneway character of Hoskins Street, and the lack of dwellings fronting this street, a reduced setback is considered to be acceptable. The need to have a reduced setback does, however, highlight the constrained area in which the dwelling is proposed.



Clause 55.03-8 Standard B13 – Landscaping objectives As discussed above, the proposal leaves minimal room for landscaping on the proposed lot due to the amount of built form on the land. This leaves little or no opportunity for screening planting to soften the visual appearance of the proposed dwelling.



Clause 55.04-1 Standard B17 – Side and Rear Setbacks The south-east first floor wall is setback 0.7 metres from the property boundary, where a 1.54 metre setback is required. This non-compliance highlights that the site is not large enough to accommodate the proposed dwelling.



Clause 55.06-1 Standard B31 – Design detail As discussed in the neighbourhood character section of this report, the design detail is not considered to be respectful of the existing or preferred neighbourhood character. In particular, window shapes and proportions, the split skillion roof form, solid portico and contemporary façade detailing are not visually compatible with the wider precinct.

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Does the proposal respect the heritage values of the precinct? The purpose of Clause 43.01 Heritage Overlay, relevant to this proposal is to ensure that development does not adversely affect the significance of heritage places. The decision guidelines of the clause reflect this with the most relevant being the following:  Whether the location, bulk, form or appearance of the proposed building will adversely affect the significance of the heritage place.  Whether the location, bulk, form or appearance of the proposed building will adversely affect the significance of the heritage place and is in keeping with adjacent buildings. Heritage advice provided by the City’s Heritage Architect / Advisor is that the proposal will have an adverse impact on the place or precinct. The heritage advice concluded that: "The location and bulk of the building will potentially have some negative impact on the heritage precinct. The proposed subdivision doesn’t allow for any space at the rear of the existing dwelling, and while this house doesn’t have any apparent heritage value, this is contrary to the predominant pattern in the precinct. The proposal is not supported because of its potential adverse effect on the heritage precinct." The assessing officer is in agreement with the expert opinion provided by the City’s Heritage Architect / Advisor. It is recognised that the proposed dwelling will add a new, contemporary double storey element to the precinct, which is higher than adjoining dwellings. Although the proposed development is contemporary in its appearance, its overall size, shape, bulk and building site coverage are the major areas of concern. Fine grain design elements such as window shapes and first floor cladding materials are also considered to be out of character with the heritage precinct. Due to the site’s location at the intersection of Hoskins, Kilwinning and Olinda Streets, the development will be highly visible from Olinda Street, which is an important avenue in terms of heritage values. As such, the significant character of Olinda Street may be detrimentally impacted due to the size, bulk and massing of the proposed building, which is to be set on a very small allotment. For the reasons discussed throughout this report, the proposal is not considered to represent an appropriate planning outcome with regards to heritage. Neighbour’s objections not already discussed  Parking Concerns: The proposal complies with Clause 52.06 (Car parking) as only one car space is required to be provided to a dwelling with two or less bedrooms. The provision of one garage satisfies this requirement.

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It is noted, however, that the proposed first floor lounge room could easily be used as a third bedroom due to its size, relative privacy and the existence of the ground floor lounge area. Such an occurrence is problematic to regulate and is not a predictable outcome.  Drainage concerns: The City’s drainage engineers have raised no objection to the proposal, subject to a range of detailed drainage design conditions which could be included on a permit if one were to be granted. Conclusion In conclusion, this site is extremely small and although it is in an excellent location in terms of meeting infill development objectives, the application should be refused on the basis that it represents an unacceptable planning outcome with regard to neighbourhood character, ResCode, Council’s Heritage Policy and the Heritage Overlay. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may resolve to: grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments  Objection  Heritage Architect / Advisor report. RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987), Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to refuse to Grant a Permit for a two lot subdivision, construction of one dwelling and relocation of one outbuilding at 41 Gladstone Street, QUARRY HILL 3550 on the following grounds: 1. The proposal would have an adverse impact on the significance of the heritage values of the place contrary to Clauses 21.08, 22.06 and 43.01 of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. 2. The proposal fails to respect existing and preferred neighbourhood character of the place contrary to Clause 22.21 of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. 3. The proposal fails to comply with Clause 55 of the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme.

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3.8 43 SULLIVAN STREET, ASCOT - SUBDIVISION OF THE LAND INTO 20 LOTS AND THE REMOVAL OF NATIVE VEGETATION Document Information Author

Stephen Wainwright, Coordinator Subdivisions

Responsible Director

Prue Mansfield, Director Planning & Development

Summary/Purpose Application details:

The subdivision of the land into 20 lots and the removal of native vegetation

Application No:

DS/76/2012

Applicant:

Tomkinson Group acting on behalf of Austin Investments

Land:

43 Sullivan Street, Ascot

Zoning:

General Residential Zone

Overlays:

Development Plan Overlay Schedule 2 - Epsom and Ascot Land Subject to Inundation Overlay

No. of objections:

4

Consultation meeting held:

24 June 2013

Key considerations:

 Traffic  Lot density / neighbourhood character  Flooding

Conclusion:

The application proposes a suburban residential development in a recognised growth area in close proximity to the Howard Street activity centre. The original plan has been revised to better integrate with the existing street network to the north and south of the site. The proposed lot sizes will be compatible with the character of the area and the flood constraints of the site can be overcome. Overall the plan is consistent with the Planning Scheme.

Policy Context City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013 – 2017 (2013) Planning for Growth  Our quality of life is maintained as our City's population and economy grows. Productivity PAGE 115


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 A diverse, strong and growing economy supports community resilience. Report Subject Site and Surrounds The site is described by the permit applicant thus: “The subject site is known as 43 Sullivan Street, Ascot. The site contains a single title with the legal description Crown Allotment 11, Section 1, Township of Ascot. The site contains a total area of approximately 1.7ha and is rectangular in shape. The site contains a single dwelling and outbuildings found adjacent to the southern boundary. The dwelling is of dilapidated weatherboard construction and is not currently used. A small patch of planted vegetation is found north of the dwelling. A patch of native Floodplain Riparian Woodland vegetation is found adjacent to the north-eastern boundary of the site. Scattered vegetation is also found adjacent to the site boundaries. The remainder of the site is otherwise cleared. The eastern boundary of the site is found approximately 60m to 130m west of the Back Creek waterway. An eastern portion of the site is affected by the Back Creek floodway and the 100 year ARI declared flood level. The site exhibits relatively flat topography with a very slight fall exhibited towards the eastern boundary. The site does not contain any ridges, slopes or other topographical features. No areas of saline discharge or areas of existing erosion have been located on site. The site is found 500m north-east of the Epsom town centre and approximately 8km north-east of the Bendigo CBD. The site is located within a growing residential area zoned for Residential 1 use. The surrounding development pattern generally exhibits single storey modern residential dwellings on lots ranging between 450m2 and 600m2. The surrounding area has undergone considerable residential development over the past 5 years and represents a key growth corridor within the City of Greater Bendigo.”

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Figure 1: A location map showing the site. The objectors’ properties are marked with a star.

Proposal It is proposed to subdivide the site into 20 residential lots. The lots will be accessed via two new internal roads which will be extensions of Elandra Drive and Sullivan Street respectively. The new roads will terminate as court bowls. The lot sizes will range between 365m2 and 680m2 and will be fully serviced. The existing dwelling on the site will be demolished as part of the subdivision and with the exception of some selected trees all native vegetation on the site will be removed.

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Figure 2: The plan of proposed subdivision

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Planning Controls - Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme The site is in the General Residential Zone (GRZ) and is covered by two overlays: Schedule 2 to the Development Plan Overlay (DPO2) - Epsom and Ascot, and the Land Subject to Inundation Overlay (LSIO). A permit is required to subdivide the land under the GRZ and the LSIO provisions. A permit is also required to remove native vegetation under clause 52.17. Under the DPO2 provisions a subdivision permit may not be granted until a development plan has been approved. The following clauses in the planning scheme are relevant to the permit application. State Planning Policy Framework  Regional development (clause 11.05).  Biodiversity (clause 12.01).  Floodplains (clause 13.02).  Urban environment (clause 15.01).  Sustainable development (clause 15.02).  Residential development (clause 16.01).  Movement networks (clause 18.02).  Development infrastructure (clause 19.03). Municipal Strategic Statement  Municipal profile (clause 21.01).  Key issues and influences (clause 21.02).  Vision - strategic framework (clause 21.03).  Strategic directions (clause 21.04).  Settlement (clause 21.05).  Housing (clause 21.06).  Environment (clause 21.08).  Reference documents (clause 21.10). Local Planning Policies  Salinity and erosion risk policy (clause 22.04). Other Provisions  General Residential Zone (clause 32.08).  Development Plan Overlay (clause 43.04).  Land Subject to Inundation Overlay (clause 44.04).  Native vegetation (clause 52.17).  Residential subdivision (clause 56).  Decision guidelines (clause 65).  Referral and notice provisions (clause 66). Consultation/Communication Referrals The following authorities and internal departments have been consulted on the proposal: PAGE 119


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Referral

Comment

Coliban Water

No objection subject to conditions

Powercor

No objection subject to conditions

Tenix

No objection subject to conditions

Telstra

No objection subject to conditions

North Central CMA

No objection subject to conditions

DEPI

No objection subject to conditions

CFA

No objection subject to conditions

Traffic engineer (internal)

No objection subject to conditions

Drainage engineer (internal)

No objection subject to conditions

Public Notification The original plan submitted with the permit application showed a subdivision layout whereby Elandra Drive and Sullivan Street would be connected via a through-link. This plan was advertised and attracted 3 objections. The issue of the through-link was a key concern for the objectors. Following a consultation meeting with the objectors the plan was amended to delete the through-link and the amended plan was advertised. Two of the original objectors lodged fresh objections to the amended plan and one new objection was received. Overall there are now 4 objections to the proposed subdivision. The objections mainly focus on the issues of drainage, traffic and lot density. These issues are discussed later in this report. Planning Assessment Does the proposal satisfy the requirements of the Development Plan Overlay? The site is within a Development Plan Overlay area. The purpose of this planning control is to coordinate development in the localities of Epsom and Ascot so that land uses and infrastructure are well linked and integrated. Subdivisions in the Development Plan Overlay area must accord with the “outline development plan� (ODP) that has been approved for the area and lots must be fully serviced and have access to sealed roads. An extract from the approved ODP is reproduced below. The ODP is very broad. It shows two road connections to the site, north and south, some existing scattered trees and part of a possible open space reserve towards the south west corner of the site.

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The development plan submitted for approval generally matches the ODP. The proposed plan takes advantage of the north and south road connections thereby providing linkages to Howard Street and Myrtle Road. The open space reserve shown on the ODP has already been provided within an adjoining housing estate (at the end of Arinya Close). The proposed plan will nonetheless add to the supply of open space in the area by the inclusion of a drainage reserve along the east boundary of the site. Overall the proposed plan will deliver a development outcome consistent with that envisaged under the Development Plan Overlay.

Figure 3: The approved outline development plan

Will the subdivision be properly integrated with the existing street network? The question of how to link the subdivision to the existing street network has been a point of contention for this permit application. PAGE 121


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The site has two street abuttals: Elandra Drive to the north and Sullivan Street to the south. Neither streets are through-links. Elandra Drive forms part of a contemporary housing estate off Myrtle Road while Sullivan Street services an older collection of houses off Howard Street. On paper Elandra Drive has the potential to be constructed through to Strickland Street to the east but this outcome is unlikely due to significant vegetation in the road reserve and flooding constraints. While not strictly a street abuttal, the site is also adjacent to Arinya Close to the west. The original plan submitted with the permit application utilised both of the site’s street abuttals to create a through-link between Elandra Drive and Sullivan Street. This plan was not well received by local residents because Elandra Drive would be opened up to through traffic under the plan. The current plan dispenses with the through-link and proposes to create two court bowl extensions off Sullivan Street and Elandra Drive respectively. The Sullivan Street court bowl will service Lots 1 to 13 while the balance of the lots will be accessed via Elandra Drive. The Elandra Drive court bowl will encroach into a strip of Crown Land and a Council Reserve located adjacent to Arinya Close. Emergency access will be available between this court bowl and Arinya Close. The encroachment has been proposed as a means of incorporating a tree protection zone around a significant tree located at the end of Arinya Close. Most of the objectors now appear to be satisfied with the revised access arrangements. However, one resident of Sullivan Street maintains that Arinya Close should be used to access the subdivision instead of Sullivan Street with the aim of protecting the “country feel, open space and minimal traffic flow” that is said to characterise Sullivan Street. Having regard to the existing street network and the general desire by local residents to minimise the traffic impact of the proposed subdivision it is this planning officer’s view that the revised plan is acceptable. The proposed subdivision layout will disperse the lots relatively evenly between Sullivan Street and Elandra Drive such that neither street will be excessively burdened by additional traffic. Both streets have the capacity to cater for the new traffic subject to the developer upgrading a short section of Sullivan Street. The existing amenity values of Sullivan Street do not warrant quarantining it from the subdivision as argued by one of the objectors. Sullivan Street is the site’s main point of access and it offers a direct link to a significant collector road, namely Howard Street. Accessing the subdivision from Arinya Close, as suggested, would undermine the status of Arinya Close as a court. Arinya Close doesn’t legally abut the site and it is reasonable for residents to expect that it will remain as a court in this context. One objector wants to ensure that the proposed emergency accessway between the subdivision and Arinya Court does not become a thoroughfare for general vehicles. This can easily be achieved by installing bollards within the accessway.

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Is the lot density in keeping with the character of the area? Some of the objectors believe that the lots being proposed are too small in comparison with the prevailing pattern of subdivision in the area. They argue that lot sizes around 600m2 are called for in the area. In contrast the proposed subdivision will yield lot sizes between 365m2 and 680m2, with most of the lots being around 425m2. The proposed subdivision represents a fairly conventional suburban development. This is not an unreasonable response to the site context. The area has undergone significant change with large greenfield sites progressively transformed into housing estates. The proposed subdivision is part of that change. The proposed subdivision offers diversity in the suburban housing market, perhaps catering for people who want a smaller than average house. Providing such lot diversity will not come at the expense of a desirable neighbourhood character. All of the proposed lots will be large enough to accommodate a single dwelling with front and side setbacks, providing the opportunity for garden planting and separation between dwellings. The presence of a vegetated drainage reserve and large trees within the subdivision layout will also contribute positively to the future character. It is also noted that the density of the proposed subdivision will not be readily apparent from a streetscape perspective until one actually enters the estate. The subdivision will thus have limited visual impact on the existing streetscape in Elandra Drive and elsewhere. In this context there is no compelling reason why the proposed lot sizes should be made to exactly match those found in the surrounding estates. It is enough that the lots are compatible with the general pattern of suburban development in the area and that they will produce positive built form outcomes. Does the subdivision address the flood prone nature of the site? The proximity of the site to Back Creek means that the site is prone to inundation in times of flood. All of the site is covered by the Land Subject to Inundation Overlay for this reason. The estimated flood level for the “1 in 100 year flood� is between 185.0m AHD to 185.8m AHD. The flood extent is shown in blue on the plan of proposed subdivision. The plan reveals that the proposed drainage reserve and the Sullivan Street road extension will be within the flood affected area along with the front portion of Lots 5 to 10. The North Central Catchment Management Authority is the relevant flood authority in this instance. The CMA does not object to the proposed subdivision subject to permit conditions. Amongst these conditions is the requirement that lots are filled to at least the estimated flood level and dwellings are constructed 300mm above the flood level. The Sullivan Street road extension will also need to be designed to cater for the safe passage of flood waters. Based on the advice from the North Central CMA Council can be satisfied that the flood conditions of the site can be overcome by elevating the floor level of future dwellings and through a moderate degree of filling. Importantly this outcome can be achieved without having a detrimental impact on properties upstream or downstream of the subject site.

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Does the subdivision comply with clause 56 in the Planning Scheme? The proposal complies with all the subdivision design objectives in clause 56 of the Planning Scheme. The lots in the subdivision will be fully serviced and they will enjoy a good standard of amenity owing to their solar orientation and outlook. The site has many locational advantages that make it a strong candidate for residential development, including access to a shopping centre in Howard Street and public transport linkages. All the lots will be large enough to contain a suburban dwelling with a backyard. Are the proposed vegetation losses acceptable? The subdivision will result in native vegetation losses comprising a 0.3ha patch of riparian woodland and 16 scattered trees. Removal of the vegetation is justified because the vegetation lacks connectivity from a biodiversity perspective and is largely surrounded by residential development. Conclusion The proposed subdivision complies with the requirements of the Planning Scheme for the reasons discussed above. On this basis the submitted development plan should be approved and a permit should be granted for the proposal. Options Council, acting as the responsible authority for administering the Planning Scheme, may resolve to: approve or refuse the submitted development plan. Subject to the development plan being approved Council may then grant a permit, grant a permit with conditions, or refuse to grant a permit. Attachments  Objections RECOMMENDATION Pursuant to section 61 of the Planning and Environment Act (1987) Greater Bendigo City Council resolve to approve the submitted development plan and grant a permit that allows for the subdivision of the land and the removal of native vegetation at 43 Sullivan Street, Ascot, and Reserve No.2 on Plan of Subdivision PS 620347 and Crown Allotment 13A Section 1 Township of Ascot, subject to the following conditions: 1.

PLAN TO BE ENDORSED The plan to be endorsed and which will then form part of the permit is the Revision F plan submitted with the application.

2.

PLAN MUST NOT BE ALTERED The layout of the subdivision as shown on the endorsed plan must not be altered without the written consent of the responsible authority.

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3.

PUBLIC OPEN SPACE CONTRIBUTION Before a statement of compliance is issued for the subdivision the owner of the land must pay to the responsible authority a sum equivalent to 5% of the site value of all the land in the subdivision.

4.

LANDSCAPE PLAN Before a statement of compliance is for the subdivision a landscape plan to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plan will be endorsed and then form part of the permit.

5.

COMPLETION OF LANDSCAPING Before a statement of compliance is issued the landscaping works shown on the endorsed landscape plan must be carried out and completed to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

6.

LANDSCAPING MAINTENANCE The landscaping works shown on the endorsed plans must be maintained to the satisfaction of the responsible authority for 12 months after the works are completed, including that any dead, diseased or damaged plants are to be replaced.

7.

DETAILED DRAINAGE Before a plan of subdivision is certified for the approved subdivision detailed drainage plans to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. When approved, the plans will be endorsed and then will form part of the permit. The plans must be drawn to scale with dimensions and must include (a) direction of stormwater runoff (b) a point of discharge for each lot (c) independent drainage for each lot (d) approval from the relevant authority for the point of discharge.

8.

FLOOD STUDY Before a plan of subdivision is certified for the subdivision a flood study to the satisfaction of the responsible authority must be submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. The flood study must show how the subdivision roads meet the relevant flood hazard standards.

9.

DRAINAGE EASEMENTS The subdivision must provide easements for drainage within and through the subject land for external outfall drainage to a point of lawful discharge to the satisfaction of the responsible authority.

10. STORMWATER DETENTION Before a statement of compliance is issued for the subdivision the developer must provide onsite surface and stormwater detention to pre-development levels in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. Allowable discharge: Q5 = 15 l/s per hectare.

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11. STORMWATER QUALITY Before the subdivision starts the developer must provide a stormwater treatment system to achieve the Best Practice Environmental Guidelines storm water quality (Victoria Stormwater Committee 1999) in accordance with plans and specifications to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. 12. CONSTRUCTION OF WORKS Road works, drainage and other civil works must be constructed in accordance with the Infrastructure Design Manual and plans and specifications approved by the responsible authority and must include: Internal road (a) fully sealed pavement with kerb and channel (b) paved footpaths (c) shared pedestrian/bicycle path on creek frontage (d) underground drainage (e) underground conduits for water, gas, electricity and telephone (f) appropriate intersection and traffication measures (g) appropriate street lighting and signage (h) high stability permanent survey mark Sullivan Street (i) fully sealed pavement from the property boundary to the existing sealed section. 13. DECORATIVE LIGHTING The decorative lighting style is to be consistent with any adjacent decorative lighting. The responsible authority shall determine decorative lighting style where conflicts arise. The applicant shall submit for approval full details of any proposed decorative lighting to the responsible authority prior to commencement of works. Prior to the issue of the statement of compliance the applicant will make payment to the responsible authority in accordance with Table 15 of the Infrastructure Design Manual. 14. PUBLIC ASSETS Before the development starts, the owner or developer must submit to the responsible authority a written report and photos of any prior damage to public infrastructure. Listed in the report must be the condition of kerb and channel, footpath, seal, street lights, signs and other public infrastructure fronting the property and abutting at least two properties either side of the development. Unless identified with the written report, any damage to infrastructure post construction will be attributed to the development. The owner or developer of the subject land must pay for any damage caused to any public infrastructure caused as a result of the development or use permitted by this permit. 15. CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT PLAN (a) Prior to commencement of works the owner or applicant must submit a Construction Management Plan (CMP) for approval by the responsible authority. The plan must include: a site specific plan showing proposed erosion and sedimentation control works techniques and intervention levels to prevent a dust nuisance PAGE 126


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techniques to prevent mud and dirt being transported from the site to adjacent streets the protection measures taken to preserve any vegetation identified for retention. (b) During construction of works associated with the subdivision, the must employ and provide the protection methods contained in the CMP to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and the Environment Protection Agency. 16. COLIBAN WATER (a) The owner is required to provide reticulated water and sewerage services to each of the lots within the subdivision. Services are to be provided in accordance with Coliban Water’s specifications. (b) All Coliban Water assets within the subdivision, both existing and proposed, are to be protected by an easement in favour of Coliban Region Water Corporation. (c) The owner is to provide evidence to the satisfaction of Coliban Water for the cut and sealing/abandonment/amendment of services in accordance with Coliban Water’s specifications. 17. POWERCOR (a) The plan of subdivision submitted for certification under the Subdivision Act 1988 shall be referred to Powercor Australia Ltd in accordance with Section 8 of that Act. (b) The applicant shall: Provide an electricity supply to all lots in the subdivision in accordance with Powercor’s requirements and standards, including the extension, augmentation or re-arrangement of any existing electricity supply system, as required by Powercor (A payment to cover the cost of such work will be required). In the event that a supply is not provided the applicant shall provide a written undertaking to Powercor Australia Ltd that prospective purchasers will be so informed. (c) The applicant shall: Where buildings or other installations exist on the land to be subdivided and are connected to the electricity supply, they shall be brought into compliance with the Service and Installation Rules issued by the Victorian Electricity Supply Industry. The applicant shall arrange compliance through a Registered Electrical Contractor. (d) The applicant shall: Set aside on the plan of subdivision for the use of Powercor Australia Ltd reserves and/or easements, and/or leases, satisfactory to Powercor Australia Ltd where any electric substation (other than a pole mounted type) is required to service the subdivision. (e) The applicant shall: Provide easements satisfactory to Powercor Australia Ltd, where easements have not been otherwise provided, for all existing Powercor Australia Ltd electric lines on the land and for any new powerlines required to service the lots and adjoining land, save for lines located, or to be located, on public roads set out on the plan. These easements shall show on the plan an easement(s) in favour of "Powercor Australia Ltd" for “Powerline Purposes” pursuant to Section 88 of the Electricity Industry Act 2000. (f) The applicant shall: Obtain for the use of Powercor Australia Ltd any other easement external to the subdivision required to service the lots.

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(g) The applicant shall: Adjust the position of any existing easement(s) for powerlines to accord with the position of the line(s) as determined by survey. (h) The applicant shall: Obtain Powercor Australia Ltd’s approval for lot boundaries within any area affected by an easement for a powerline and for the construction of any works in such an area. (i) The applicant shall: Provide to Powercor Australia Ltd, a copy of the version of the plan of subdivision submitted for certification, which shows any amendments which have been required. (j) Any buildings must comply with the clearances required by the Electricity Safety (Network Assets) Regulations. (k) Any construction work must comply with the Officer of the Chief Electrical Inspector No Go Zone rules. 18. TENIX The plan of subdivision submitted for certification must be referred to SP AusNet (Gas) in accordance with Section 8 of the Subdivision Act 1988. 19. TELECOMMUNICATIONS (a) The owner of the land must enter into an agreement with:  a telecommunications network or service provider for the provision of telecommunication services to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in accordance with the provider’s requirements and relevant legislation at the time  a suitably qualified person for the provision of fibre ready telecommunication facilities to each lot shown on the endorsed plan in accordance with any industry specifications or any standards set by the Australian Communications and Media Authority, unless the applicant can demonstrate that the land is in an area where the National Broadband Network will not be provided by optical fibre. (b) Before the issue of a statement of compliance for any stage of the subdivision under the Subdivision Act 1988, the owner of the land must provide written confirmation from  a telecommunications network or service provider that all lots are connected to or are ready for connection to telecommunications services in accordance with the provider’s requirements and relevant legislation at the time  a suitably qualified person that fibre ready telecommunication facilities have been provided in accordance with any industry specifications or any standards set by the Australian Communications and Media Authority, unless the applicant can demonstrate that the land is in an area where the National Broadband Network will not be provided by optical fibre. 20. COUNTRY FIRE AUTHORITY (a) Subdivision plan not to be altered (b) The subdivision as shown on the endorsed plans must not be altered without the consent of CFA. Hydrants Prior to the issue of a Statement of Compliance under the Subdivision Act 1988 the following requirements must be met to the satisfaction of the CFA PAGE 128


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i. the maximum distance between these hydrants and the rear of all building envelopes (or in the absence of the building envelope, the rear of all lots) must be 120 metres and hydrants must be no more than 200 metres apart ii. the hydrants must be identified with marker posts and road reflectors to the satisfaction of the Country Fire Authority. Roads i. Roads must be constructed to a standard so that they are accessible in all weather conditions and capable of accommodating a vehicle of 15 tonnes for the trafficable road width. ii. The average grade must be no more than 1 in 7 (14.4%) (8.1 degrees) with a maximum of no more than 1 in 5 (20%) (11.3 degrees) for no more than 50m. Dips must have no more than a 1 in 8 (12%) (7.1 degree) entry and exit angle. 21. NORTH CENTRAL CMA (a) All new allotments must be filled to at least the estimated 1% AEP flood level(s). Prior to issuing a statement of compliance a certified survey plan of the finished surface levels must be submitted to the responsible authority and North Central CMA for its approval. (b) Prior to the commencement of works, appropriate silt control measures must be installed to prevent sediment laden runoff from entering the waterway. The silt control measures must be maintained throughout the construction period. (c) Stormwater runoff arising from the site must be treated to best practice standards prior to discharging to the waterway. The number of new stormwater connections to the waterway must be limited and prior to the commencement of drainage works, a separate “Works on Waterway� permit must be obtained directly from North Central CMA. Please contact North Central CMA on (03) 5440 1896 to obtain a full understanding of the Authority’s requirements. (d) Prior to certification a suitable restriction is to be placed on the title which specifies the minimum floor level of any new dwelling(s) on each new allotment. The minimum floor level must be no lower than 300mm above the estimated flood level. (e) Prior to certification a drainage and waterway reserve must be created in favour of the City of Greater Bendigo and registered on the title. The drainage reserve must be generally in accordance with the area shown as on the endorsed plans which form part of this permit. (f) The road abutting the waterway reserve must be designed to cater for the safe passage of flood waters. The finished surface level of the road must be constructed no lower than 350mm below the declared 1% AEP flood level(s). (g) A landscape plan must be prepared for the waterway reserve by a suitably qualified professional and approved by the responsible authority and North Central CMA. Prior to issuing a statement of compliance, the waterway reserve must be shaped and landscaped to the satisfaction of North Central CMA and the responsible authority.

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22. DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND PRIMARY INDUSTRIES (a) In order to offset the removal of: • 0.08 habitat hectares of vegetation of Floodplain Riparian Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class, including a large old tree of high conservation significance • 1 medium old scattered tree of the Plains Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of high conservation significance • 8 small scattered trees of the Floodplain Riverine Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of low conservation significance • 7 small scattered trees of the Plains Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class of low conservation significance the applicant must provide for: • the protection and management of 4 large old trees and 0.12 habitat hectares of native vegetation of high conservation significant of the Floodplain Riparian Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class • the planting and protection of 80 trees of the Floodplain Riverine Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class • the planting and protection of 140 trees of Plains Woodland Ecological Vegetation Class or an alternative to the satisfaction of the responsible authority. (b) To provide the required offset, within 12 months of the vegetation removal, or before the statement of compliance is issued under the Subdivision Act 1988 whichever is sooner, the applicant or the owner must either • provide to the responsible authority, an Allocated Credit Extract issued by the Department of Environment and Primary Industries Native Vegetation Credit Register which satisfies the required offset or • have prepared an offset plan endorsed by the responsible authority. The offset plan must be prepared to the satisfaction of the responsible authority and submitted to and approved by the responsible authority. The offset plan must include a • description of the site where the offset will be provided, including a site plan • schedule of the works required to achieve the offset over a 10 year period, detailing the • management actions to be performed (e.g. fencing, weed control, pest control, revegetation) • person(s) responsible for implementing the specified management actions • timeline for the implementation of the management actions • method by which the management actions will be undertaken • standard to which the management actions will be undertaken When approved, the offset plan will be endorsed and will then form part of the permit. (c) Within 12 months of the vegetation removal or before the statement of compliance is issued under the Subdivision Act 1988, whichever is sooner the endorsed offset site must be permanently protected to the satisfaction of the responsible authority (i.e. via an encumbrance on title) and a copy of the endorsed offset plan and protection mechanism (e.g. title showing encumbrance) must be lodged with Department of Environment and Primary Industries.

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23. EXPIRY OF THE PERMI This permit will expire if: (a) the plan of subdivision is not certified within 2 years from the date of this permit or (b) the subdivision is not completed within 5 years from the date of certification of the plan of subdivision. The responsible authority may extend the time for certification of the plan if a request is made in writing before the permit expires or within six months afterwards.

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Liveability - Reports

4.

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LIVEABILITY

4.1 SPRING GULLY AND SURROUNDS RECREATION PLAN Document Information Author

Lincoln Fitzgerald, Coordinator, Active Communities

Responsible Director

Pauline Gordon, Director Community Wellbeing

Summary/Purpose This report seeks Council to formally receive the Spring Gully and Surrounds Recreation Plan (formerly titled Spring Gully Plan) following community consultation. The Spring Gully and Surrounds Recreation Plan (the Plan) considers the future needs, desires and prioritisation of projects within the Spring Gully area and some surrounding areas. Policy Context This project is consistent with the Council Plan 2013 -17. The project is consistent with the themes of planning for growth which aims to maximise external funding, Liveability which supports the health and wellbeing of the community and the Sustainability theme which supports planning and investment in community assets. Council Plan Reference: Council Plan 20013 – 2017 1.1 - Our City undertakes successful lobbying and maintains its excellent reputation 1.3 - Our quality of life is maintained as our City’s population and economy grows 2.2 - Our communities have active and vibrant places in which to meet 2.3 - Open space and recreation facilities are well designed, extensively used and maintained.

well

2.5 – Our community’s health and wellbeing improves over time 4.1- Existing infrastructure and assets are well maintained and appropriately to sustain them for future generations.

Strategy Reference (include weblink as applicable): Spring Gully Creek and Landscape Management Plan 2001. Council Policy Reference (include weblink as applicable): None. PAGE 132

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Regional Strategic Plan Reference: This project is consistent with Strategic Directions of the Southern Loddon Mallee Regional Strategic Plan and is closely aligned with the Priority Actions. The strongest links are with the following Strategic Directions: Direction 1: Manage our population growth and settlements Direction 2: Strengthen our communities, especially in our small towns Direction 4: Improve our infrastructure Background Information In 2001 Council developed the Spring Gully Creek Landscape and Management Plan to develop a shared vision, goals and actions for the management of the Spring Gully Creek. However since its development it has become evident that current formal sporting facilities located along the creek are not sufficient for demand. Research has also recognised that there is a strong preference for participation in nonorganised/informal physical activities. Recognising the importance of providing a range of facilities and infrastructure that support both formal and informal physical activities a draft recreation plan has been developed that not only focuses on the scope of facilities and open space available within the Spring Gully Creek Reserve, but explores opportunities for use of formal sporting facilities elsewhere in the immediate surrounding areas. These opportunities would include partnerships with other providers (e.g. Bendigo East Secondary College and La Trobe University) to maximise shared use of facilities. Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s): At its Ordinary meeting on 2 October 2013 Council resolved that the Spring Gully Plan be placed on public display for community comment and feedback. At its Ordinary meeting of 5 March 2014 Council considered a petition from 236 people seeking information and funding to implement the Wolstencroft Master Plan. Council resolved to consider the project as part of the budget process. Report The draft Spring Gully Recreation Plan was placed on public exhibition between 12 November and December 16 with submissions received up until 28 January 2014 following direct engagement. The community were invited to review the draft report and provide comments, suggestions and feedback for consideration in the final report. Existing sports clubs and groups along the corridor were also invited to make comment. The table below summarises the formal community and club submissions received and provides a comment on how each item has been addressed in the final report. Submission

Summary of key comments

Changes incorporated into the Final Report

Sporting Clubs / Groups Spring Gully  The club does not support the draft report Tennis Club recommendations, specifically not to plan for PAGE 133



Council may need to consider a more comprehensive review of tennis


Liveability - Reports

Submission

Summary of key comments

 



Athletics Bendigo

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014



Bendigo Mountain Bike Club (MTB)



Spring Gully Soccer Club.





an additional two tennis courts at the existing site. The submission suggests that potential site constrains (i.e. topography and requirements for vegetation removal) can be overcome. The submission acknowledges the national trend for declining tennis participation, however presents membership figures to indicate that the club continues to grow and that further growth is constrained by a lack of court availability. The club acknowledge that an additional two courts may not be considered a high priority in light of other competing demands, however retaining capacity for future expansion is critical to long term operational sustainability. The submission listed a number of site specific items for consideration in any future improvements to the Latrobe University Bendigo Athletics site, specifically: o Track lighting. o Development of a warm-up track at the southern end of the current site. o Terracing the bank on the back straight for spectator seating. o Development of an additional equipment shed. o Additional toilets and change rooms, including possible redevelopment of existing buildings on the eastern side (back straight), even if the boundary fence needs to be amended. Supports development of the Spring Gully Corridor as a connecting route for mountain bikers to access other trails in the area, including development of trail head facilities at former pony club site. Very pleased that there is recognition that change rooms and amenities are needed for the female players. The estimated costs seem to be very low compared that what was considered. Additional change rooms and some additional storage (also necessary) would be closer to $350 or $400K. Upgrading of the LUBAC ground (internal area) is a waste of funds. Even during practice times there was constant conflict between athletics training and soccer players. This facility should remain as a “last resort” backup if the other grounds are out of action. Funds should be reallocated to the change rooms at Stanley Ave. SGUSC will not support allocating funds to improve soccer opportunities at LUBAC. We think soccer is better served elsewhere (due to the

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Changes incorporated into the Final Report facilities throughout the entire City to guide future court provision priorities i.e. development of a Tennis Strategy.  The final report has been amended to incorporate provision for the possible long-term establishment of an additional two tennis courts, however implementation of this action will be subject to resolution of site specific constraints and further evidence of increasing demand.





The improvement suggestions will be noted for possible future consideration, however these will need to be addressed in a detailed site specific master plan as part of possible future planning for this site. Lighting of the Athletics Track is achievable with conduits and pits already in place. Lighting would increase the availability of the venue for winter use by other sports such as soccer.



Support noted, no changes required to the final report.



Increase the cost allowance for additional change rooms and storage to $350,000. Participation in Soccer within Spring Gully and Strathdale highlights the under supply of fields both currently and into the future. It is likely that both BSESC and LaTrobe Athletics Complex will be required. Clear shared use agreements and governance training can overcome conflict between users. Soccer is a winter sport whereas Athletics is a summer sport. Clear shared use arrangements (similar to cricket and football can be arranged to overcome conflict). Support review of fencing to allow establishment of junior pitches. No








Liveability - Reports

Submission

Summary of key comments 



Community Resident

    

Resident



     Residents

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014





potential ongoing conflicts) The joint use agreement with Bendigo South East, particularly for training, would be a great step forward in spreading the wear and tear on the grounds. To be effective it will need lights. The fencing at the Spring Gully Oval needs to continue to accommodate 2 junior grounds (90X45). If further fencing was to be installed it should keep the grounds “open” by placing the fence on the creek line. Supports further improvement to the Spring Gully Corridor, particularly to enhance walking, cycling and natural values. Recommends the walking / cycling path connection must link (end) at Lake Weeroona. Minimise / avoid road crossings, utilise the creek line to go under roads/bridges where needed. Maximise environmental values, including rehabilitation of creek and drainage lines (e.g. removal of concrete drains). Support development of Wolstencroft reserve. Acknowledges that the sporting facilities are a great asset and generally good quality, however does not want the area to be taken over by sport facilities. Maximise, retain and enhance the natural values of the corridor, including native vegetation and informal play opportunities. Establish wetland features, including water filtration. Improve play facilities. Support interpretive signage and responsible dog ownership. Encourage community involvement in vegetation improvements. Strongly supports the existence and value of the Spring Gully Reserve, particularly the creek, and it associated riparian zone and the open space amenity along its pathway. Issues and suggestions included: o Inadequate weed control / management. Additional resources appear required. o Focus on reinstating the native flora of the riparian zone through comprehensive and staged revegetation programs. Where possible this should involve community participation. o Install directional and interpretive signage along existing bike and walking tracks. o Consider lighting at strategic

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Changes incorporated into the Final Report change required.

  







  

Comments and support noted. No changes required to the final report. Existing recommendations related to Wolstencroft Reserve, development of a continuous shared trail with connections to surrounding areas and vegetation management already reflect the issues raised.

The final report emphasises the importance of a balance between sporting use/development and enhancing the natural values of the corridor. Opportunities for ongoing community involvement will need to be considered by Council as part of the ongoing implementation process. No changes required to the final report.

Comments and support noted. The issues raised have already been identified and addressed at a strategic level in the report. No changes required to the final report.


Liveability - Reports

Submission

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Summary of key comments

Changes incorporated into the Final Report

locations to extend hours of use. Reinstate the natural hydrology of the creek-line through the removal of the concrete lined channel and promotion of pools and riffles. o Improve stormwater run-off treatment before it reaches the creek. o Support implementation of the Wolstencroft Reserve master plan. The submission points out a number of inconsistency or inaccurate titles and reference names used in the draft report e.g. references to Stanley Street reserve/pitches etc. o

Resident





Titles and references have been updated where required.

Further consultation was undertaken on site with approximately 30 casual users of the reserve for a mixture of passive uses such as dog walking, commuting or exercising. Feedback from these groups / individuals was generally supportive of the principles by which decisions in the plan have been made. The most notable concern raised was protection and enhancement of the natural values within the reserve. Many cited these aspects as the rationale as to why they utilise and live in that area of Bendigo. Priority/Importance: No change to the direction of the document or recommended works has been proposed following community consultation. Options/Alternatives: Council has the opportunity to formally receive the Plan. Alternatively, if Council believes further consideration of any issue(s) are required or further consultation is necessary it may seek further investigation into some or all aspects. Timelines: The Plan has been developed over a significant period of time due to competing staff priorities. Community consultation has demonstrated that the plan has withstood the test of time and there is a high level of acceptance across the breadth of recommendations. There is no suggested change to the projects listed within the Short, Medium, Long term, Future action or Ongoing categories of prioritisation. Progress: The Spring Gully Recreation Plan has been under development for a long period of time. The plan recognises proposed projects in context with the other requests from local sporting groups and residents.

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Formally receiving the document will conclude the planning and prioritisation stage for these projects. High priority projects will now be considered alongside other projects across the City for design and construction in future budgets. Risk Analysis: Development of an overarching recreation plan for the Spring Gully area provides guidance to Council around investment in sport and leisure infrastructure within this suburb. Over many years, ad-hoc development of sporting infrastructure has occurred and with some detriment. It is believed that by having this guiding document best use of land and resources will be achieved.

Consultation/Communication Internal Consultation: The project was managed by an internal steering committee. The project brief required Insight Leisure Planning to consult with representatives of community groups, stakeholders and the local community. Details of the consultation can be found in the background and reference document. External Consultation: Submissions were received, a community survey was administered and public meeting held in developing the plan. A further round of public comment has been completed following Council release of the draft Plan in October 2013. External consultation is the topic of this report and is summarised in the Report section of this document. Resource Implications Adoption of the Plan in itself has no budget implications; however the community expectations are that funding will be made available through the budget process as considered on an annual basis. The value of works listed are as follows based on a 2013 opinion of probable cost from the consultant. Short Term Medium Term Long Term Future Action Total

$945,000 - $1,430,000 $1,821,000 - $2,385,000 $650,000 -- $920,000 Further investigation/ feasibility required on some items $3,416,000 - $4,735,000

Further detailed costing would be developed as part of the design phase of each project to provide specific total costs.

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Changes which have occurred as a result of community feedback have resulted in the total cost increasing from $4,455,000 to $4,725,000. This increase of $270,000 can largely be attributed to the cost of female & referee change room facilities at Stanley Avenue pavilion which were believed to be too modest based on facility guidelines and previous examples. The 2013/2014 budget included the following recreation facility works located within the study area:    

renewal and upgrade of the pavilion at Spring Gully oval (complete) demolition of former Pony Club shed (contract awarded) installation of a new hard cricket pitch at Spring Gully oval (complete) upgrade of the Hammer Throw cage at LaTrobe University Bendigo Athletics Complex (complete)  installation of a defibrillator at LaTrobe University Bendigo Athletics Complex (complete) Business cases that have been submitted for consideration as part of the 2014/2015 budget process include:  design of female and referee change rooms and storage at Stanley Avenue

   

soccer fields repairs to LaTrobe University Bendigo Athletics Complex running track civil works as part of the Ewing Park redevelopment survey and design of facilities at Kennington Recreation Reserve to support senior competition Compliance works at Spring Gully Tennis Club

These projects are supported within the Plan however; given limited resources Council will consider the priority of funding requests against other projects across the municipality as part of budget deliberations. Council will release the Active Living Census in April – May 2014 to better understand residents’ health and physical activity habits and to plan, develop and enhance public open spaces across the municipality. Outcomes of the census will assist Council to prioritise future investment across the municipality. Conclusion Implementation of the Spring Gully and Surrounds Recreation Plan will reinforce the significance of the Spring Gully Creek Reserve for local residents in meeting a diverse range of community recreation needs, including walking, cycling and passive enjoyment. The plan also outlines a number of opportunities for increased use of other reserves and venues for formal sports within the region, including partnerships with other providers and maximising shared use of facilities. The plan has an indicative costing across the short, medium and long term of up to $4,735,000 however, additional feasibility and costing of some significant projects is required.

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Attachments 1.

Spring Gully and Surrounds Recreation Plan

RECOMMENDATION That Council: 1. Recognise the importance sport and leisure facilities make to the health, wellbeing and liveability of Greater Bendigo. 2. Formally receive the Spring Gully and Surrounds Recreation Plan. 3. Taking into consideration any outcomes of the Active Living Census, refer works associated with the sequencing, staging and cost plan for consideration as part of current and future budget deliberations.

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4.2 FOOD SECURITY REPORT Document Information Author

Dana Thomson, Communities Health Promotion Officer Patrick Jess, Manager Active & Healthy Communities

Responsible Director

Pauline Gordon, Director Community Wellbeing

Summary/Purpose The purpose of this Report is to: (a) Provide Councillors with information on the accessibility of healthy food in Greater Bendigo (b) Seek Council’s endorsement of the Food Security Report (Attachment 1) and its recommendations which aim to improve access to healthy food Policy Context Council Plan 2013-2017 Liveability 2.5 Our community’s health and wellbeing improves over time; 2.5.1 – Implement the agreed priorities of the Health and Wellbeing Plan 2.5.3 – Continue to implement and evaluate the “Healthy Together” program Council Plan 2014-2015 (draft) The presentation and vibe of our city 3.5 People, especially those who are vulnerable and people moving into new growth areas, are enabled to be the healthiest they can be 3.5.3 – Implement recommendations from the Greater Bendigo Food Security Report 2014 including investigation of establishing a Regional Food Hub and Distribution Centre 3.6 Residents have access to environments and settings that support safe and healthy living Related Greater Bendigo Liveability Indicators  Reverse the negative trend in Bendigo compared to state-wide or national obesity benchmarks  Decrease to 50% or less the proportion of Greater Bendigo people who do not meet fruit and vegetable dietary guidelines  Increase in municipal-wide average SEIFA index of disadvantage

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Strategy Reference: Greater Bendigo Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2013-2017 www.bendigo.vic.gov.au/healthandwellbeing Active and Healthy Lifestyles Framework 2012 Regional Strategic Plan Reference: Loddon Mallee Regional Strategic Plan - Southern Region: 2. Strengthen our communities, especially in small towns, by improving community safety, health and wellbeing. Federal Policy Context: National Partnership Agreement on Preventive Health (NPAPH) 2008-2018 The NPAPH is a Council of Australian Government (COAG) Agreement that aims to address rising obesity rates and lifestyle related chronic disease. Under this Agreement, City of Greater Bendigo received 3.47M in federal and state government funding. The resulting initiative, Healthy Together Bendigo is a partnership between the City of Greater Bendigo and Bendigo Community Health Services.

Background Information Healthy eating is the most important lifestyle factor for preventing chronic diseases including, but not limited to, obesity, diabetes and heart disease. In Greater Bendigo, 90% adults do not eat the recommended 5 serves of vegetables per day while 70% do not eat the recommended 2 serves of fruit per day. Consumption of fast food, such as burgers, pizza or chips, is the most significant behaviour contributing to overweight and obesity in Greater Bendigo. Food security can be defined as the state in which all persons have access to a nutritionally adequate, culturally appropriate diet at all times through local nonemergency food sources. Decreased access to healthy food and greater exposure to unhealthy foods can influence the choices people make. There is an abundance of unhealthy foods (high fat/sugar/salt foods) in the Australian food supply that have market dominance through marketing, advertising, price and accessibility. Healthy Food Connect, a key deliverable of Healthy Together Bendigo, is the multifaceted model provided by the Victorian Department of Health to address local food system changes (refer to Figure 1 below).

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Figure 1. Healthy Food Connect model

Healthy Food Connect aims to: improve access to a healthy food supply, create supportive environments to make healthy food choices the easy choice, influence policy and planning, develop programs to strengthen community action, and have a priority focus on fruit and vegetables. The local food access needs assessment undertaken through Healthy Food Connect completes one recommendation in the ‘A Thought for Food, Food Security Research Paper 2012’ (see Attachment 2). Healthy Food Connect aligns with the Greater Bendigo Public Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2013-2017. Theme 3 of the Plan, Productivity (page 16) includes “supporting community initiatives to increase access to healthy food and develop knowledge and skills around healthy eating. This includes:  Undertaking a community wide project to improve healthy eating;

 Using current evidence to undertake a number of small actions relating to food supply, access, and affordability; and  Considering the development of a Food Coalition and Food Information Portal” Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s): 9 November 2011 – Council accepted the State Government’s offer to partner with the Department of Health to implement the Healthy Together initiative over a three year period from 2011-2012 – 2014-15. 23 January 2013 – Council received A Thought for Food, Greater Bendigo Food Security Research Paper which recommended exploring the Healthy Food Connect model to undertake detailed assessment, establish local food coalition and create supportive program and policy environment to address local barriers to food security. 23 October 2013 – Council adopted the Greater Bendigo Public Health and Wellbeing Strategy 2013-2017. Report The Victorian Local Governance Association created a tool to undertake a local food access needs assessment in municipalities. This was completed in Greater Bendigo between May - June 2013. For full results please refer to the attached Food Security Report. A snapshot of key results is provided below.

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Food insecurity is high  9,466 or 9.4% of the Greater Bendigo population (adults plus dependent children) are considered ‘food insecure’, meaning that they’re without reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious and culturally appropriate food. (This is higher than the Victorian average of 5.6% for adults) High and variable cost of healthy food  The average cost of the healthy food basket for the typical family was $423.74 per fortnight. In Greater Bendigo 14.3% of households earn less than $400/week. For these households, a healthy food basket for a typical family would cost 53% of their income.  The range of the healthy food basket across 21 supermarkets was $397.36 to $513.04.  Supermarkets in outer areas such as Heathcote, Elmore, Huntly and Strathfieldsaye were more expensive than supermarkets in Bendigo.  Healthy food was cheaper at Aldi than other large chain supermarkets (this is consistent with previous data collection in the City of Knox).  The total cost of 10 common fruit and vegetables in 8 greengrocers across Greater Bendigo ranged from $16.32 to $63.50 with outlying towns and organic options being more expensive.  Supermarkets were more expensive than greengrocers for fruit and vegetables. Low exposure to healthy food, high exposure to unhealthy food and alcohol  For every one fresh food outlet (supermarket or greengrocer) there are 4.8 take away or fast food outlets in Greater Bendigo.  Per 10,000 people in Greater Bendigo there are 2.9 fresh food outlets (supermarkets and greengrocers), 13.8 take away / fast food outlets and 30.6 liquor licenced outlets / premises.  ‘Food deserts’ exist in residential areas where there is limited access to daily food needs such as fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods. A ‘food desert’ is a 400m2 radial area without access to these daily food needs. Food deserts usually occur due to a lack of supermarkets, green grocers, fresh food markets or other healthy food providers within the specified area. High community interest in community food initiatives  8 operational community gardens  20+ community interest groups or food related initiatives  3+ requests for nature strip edible planting received by Council in the past 12 months  Also refer to community consultation section The Food Security Report recommends the following actions: Short term (Nov 2013 – Dec 2014) 1. Continue implementation of Department of Health’s Healthy Food Connect Model by forming a food coalition from a broad base of sectors (as recommended in GBPHWP 2013-2017)

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a. Review models (Coalition membership recommends 1/3 government, 2/3 non-government) b. Identify key projects c. Seek Governance Group and Executive Management Team (EMT) input and feedback d. Provide recommendations for action, so as not to over script activities for coalition 2. Investigate feasibility of a regional food distribution centre 3. Further strengthen the already high level of community food interest through the development of a Food Information Portal; for example a website page (as recommended in GBPHWP 2013-2017) Medium to long term (Nov 2013 – Nov 2018) 4. Develop City of Greater Bendigo position and guidelines on nature strip edible planting 5. Contribute to creating a supportive environment for local food producers (for example through the development of a young farmers network) 6. Develop and implement a City of Greater Bendigo organisational Food Policy 7. Develop and implement a City of Greater Bendigo organisational Healthy Catering and Procurement Policy 8. Continue to consider Food Sensitive Planning and Urban Design (FSPUD) principles when developing Council plans and policies 9. Improve access to healthy food by supporting the community to access produce from local suppliers 10. Investigate incentives for local food businesses to reformulate menus and/or dishes to promote healthy options 11. Improve access to healthy food at food outlets through healthy living strategies such as Green Light, Eat Right 12. Create a supportive environment for breastfeeding by implementing the healthy living strategy Breastfeeding Friendly Communities via Workplaces Achievement Program engagement 13. Investigate opportunities to improve transport options to access fresh food supplies, prioritising rural areas and disadvantaged communities 14. Investigate opportunities to rescue and distribute excess produce from local growers (prioritising areas with limited healthy food access) 15. Continue to monitor healthy food cost through the Victorian Healthy Food Basket surveys to contribute to state wide Monash University research Priority/Importance: Endorsing the recommendations within the Food Security Report is high priority to: a) ‘Support implementation of agreed priorities of the Health and Wellbeing Plan’ (Council Plan 2013-2017 2.5.1) b) Support the implementation of Healthy Food Connect, a key deliverable in ‘implementing Healthy Together Bendigo’ (relevant to Council Plan 2013-2017 2.5.3). c) Achieve the Greater Bendigo Liveability Indicators to:  Reverse the negative trend in Bendigo compared to state-wide or national obesity benchmarks.

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 Decrease to 50% or less the proportion of Greater Bendigo people who do not meet fruit and vegetable dietary guidelines  Increase in municipal-wide average SEIFA index of disadvantage Options/Alternatives: Council could choose not to adopt the food security report recommendations. However this would result in Council not having a coordinated approach to addressing food insecurity. Implementation of the recommendations would assist Council in achieving its goal of becoming the most liveable city in regional Australia. Progress: Table 1 below highlights progress relevant or complimentary to food security to date: Table 1. Progress Timeline Event Jan 2013 Food security identified as priority in Strategy’s ‘A Thought for Food Greater Bendigo Food Security Research Paper.’ This paper recommends Healthy Food Connect as an action to address food insecurity. Jan 2013 Jamie’s Ministry of Food Mobile Kitchen hosted in Bendigo (552 participants completed 5 week cooking lessons) Connecting with Food in Greater Bendigo flyer developed and distributed Mar 2013 Connect with cooking forum hosted (supporting community kitchens) May Healthy food basket surveys completed 2013 May - Jul Local food needs assessment completed 2013 Jun 2013 Hosted Bendigo Food Forum (over 85 community members attended) Aug Food/alcohol access mapping completed 2013 Aug New ‘Healthy’ community grants category valued at $17,000 in total 2013 Sept Kids Growing Food Forum and Network commenced (supporting 2013 preschool and school gardens) Oct 2013 Investigation into the feasibility of a regional food hub commenced Oct 2013 New Golden Plate ‘Healthy category’ award 2013 (incentive for healthy food in restaurants) Nov IGA supermarkets partnership developed (with aim to implement traffic 2013 light system) Dec 2013 Jan 2014

Food Security Report finalised with recommendations for actions Food Security Report endorsed by Healthy Together Bendigo Governance Group

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Consultation/Communication Internal Consultation Internal consultation was open to all staff members between May and June 2013. 18 semi-structured interviews were completed during this time. Staff provided referrals to relevant documents, plans and resources to incorporate into research. External Consultation: Bendigo Food Forum: As part of the Healthy Food Connect Project, the Bendigo Food Forum ‘Grow Share Cook Source – Greater Bendigo Let’s Connect!’ was held on 3 June 2013. Over 85 participants attended to discuss food in Greater Bendigo. A variety of people interested in food participated including local farmers, food business owners, university students, restaurateurs, community members and representatives from local food networks. The forum had presentations from Healthy Together Bendigo, Dr Jennifer Alden as a guest speaker and a panel of local food leaders. Results of the Food Forum have been considered in developing the Food Security report’s recommendations. Attachment 2 provides a summary of participant’s ideas. Indepth Food Forum results can be found in the Appendix of the attached Food Security Report. Existing Data: The Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan (MPHWP) community consultation (conducted by the Strategy Unit, February - March 2013) results were analysed for relevant content and incorporated into research. Comments relating to food are listed in Appendix 4. Proposed Dissemination of Results The communication objective will be to inform the community of recent food security research and encourage the Greater Bendigo community to demand access to healthy food sources. Key messages will be developed following Council’s decision with respect to the Report. The key communication tool to be utilised for spreading the results and healthy messages of the Food Security Report will be paid promotion. Media releases will also be utilised following Council’s decision on the Report and accompanying recommendations. In the interim, a series of community bulletins will be developed, each focusing on different aspects of the Report results and information that is both relevant and interesting to the Greater Bendigo community. Radio and newspaper advertisements may be developed around these topics once they have been approved and would go to air and print as the bulletins are released. It is proposed that five of these bulletins be developed and one rolled out every two months leading up to June 2015.

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It is also proposed that a series of GIS overlay maps be developed that combine the health/food security/physical activity results of the Food Security Report and Active Living Census. These maps would be publically available on the City of Greater Bendigo website and used in other communication tools such as the community bulletins. The Active Living Census will provide further valuable data in regards to access to fruit and vegetables, and the results will be timely with the implementation of recommendations. The City of Greater Bendigo will host a second Food Forum as a community consultation method to present the results of the Food Security Report, along with those of the Active Living Census. This forum would be a follow up to the June 2013 Food Forum hosted by Healthy Together Bendigo that provided initial scoping for the Report. Social media will also be a key communication tool utilised to disseminate the results of the Food Security Report. Resource Implications This Food Security Report was developed in-house within existing staff resources.. Budget Allocation in the Current Financial Year: No allocation Previous Council Support: No previous allocation External Funding Sources: Healthy Together Bendigo is a state and federally funded initiative. The Healthy Food Connect project to date has been allocated $29,500 and 0.5EFT through Healthy Together Bendigo. Projected costs for future financial years: A detailed action plan will be developed and some actions will require responsible managers to seek an appropriate budget for implementation. Conclusion Issues relevant to food security discussed in this report included cost, availability and accessibility. The attached Food Security Report outlines key recommendations to increase access to healthy food in Greater Bendigo. Recommendations align with the Greater Bendigo Public Health and Wellbeing Plan 2013-2017, and Councils objective of being the most liveable regional City in Australia. Attachments 1.

2. 3. 4.

Food Security Report (separate document) A Thought for Food, Food Security Research Paper 2012 (separate document) Bendigo Food Forum: Summary of participant’s ideas Municipal Public Health and Wellbeing Plan (MPHWP) community consultation: comments relevant to food

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RECOMMENDATION That Council adopt the attached Food Security Report and its recommendations which aims to improve access to healthy food.

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4.3 COMMUNITY CAMPAIGN SEEKING NATIONAL PARK STATUS FOR WELLSFORD STATE FOREST REQUESTS COUNCIL SUPPORT Document Information Author

Robyn Major, Manager Sustainable Environment

Responsible Director

Darren Fuzzard, Director Presentation and Assets

Summary/Purpose 

Inform Councillors of a community campaign seeking to have the Wellsford State Forest declared National Park (Victorian Legislation - National Parks Act 1975), in a bid to increase the likelihood that its natural values will be managed to a higher level of protection; and



Provide Councillors with information relating to the Wellsford State Forest; past investigation, changes since that investigation; current uses and the implications for those uses if the Wellsford State Forest is declared National Park.

Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017: Theme: 4

Sustainability

Opportunities

We will continue to value our unique natural and built environment assets.

Background Information The author of this report declares an indirect conflict of interest by close association with – David Major, Ranger in Charge Northern Goldfields Parks Victoria – who was consulted in the preparation of this report. Box-Ironbark Forests and Woodlands Investigation In 1997, the Victorian Government gave the Environment Conservation Council (ECC) (now known as the Victorian Environmental Assessment Council (VEAC)) the task to: 

Identify and evaluate the extent, condition, values and uses of the Box-Ironbark forests and woodland areas in northern Victoria;



Make recommendations on the balanced use of these areas; and

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Propose an appropriate system for the protection and management of the BoxIronbark and Woodlands, and in doing so consider the economic and social value of any existing and proposed development or use of the land or resources; and the nationally agreed criteria for the establishment of a comprehensive, adequate and representative reserve system.

The ECC considered all views put to it over nearly six years, including 1,500 written submissions along with views expressed in community and stakeholder meetings. The final outcome not only produced a system of parks and reserves, but also recommended a change in management practices for the whole region, with a focus on protection of species; considering this to be ‘critical in reversing the present pattern of loss’. Recommendations of the Box-Ironbark Forests and Woodlands Investigation Final Report, June 2001 (BIB report) were adopted by the Victorian Government in 2002. Creation of the Greater Bendigo National Park, Bendigo Regional Park and BendigoCastlemaine-Maldon State Forests were part of a suite of recommendations adopted. The Wellsford was included in the network of forests that make up the BendigoCastlemaine-Maldon State Forest (27,000ha). State Forest is a land use category that recognises economic productive uses such as timber production more highly than conservation. However, the BIB report recognised that the Wellsford had specific biodiversity values and recommended that the following ‘special features’ of the Wellsford be specifically protected for biodiversity conservation: Williamson’s wattle, Ausfeld’s wattle, sand rush, cane spear-grass, swift parrot, brush-tailed phascogale, one large old tree site, one fauna refuge. The Wellsford was not excluded from the Box-Ironbark National Parks because of low environmental values, but due to the necessity to balance competing demands. As the BIB report states in the ECC’s message, ‘The ECC recognises that public land forest areas contain significant timber resources, but they also have biodiversity values of great significance. The ECC’s view is that it cannot provide adequately for biodiversity conservation, and also retain all timber resources available for harvesting. The ECC is, however, required to balance the competing demands on the forest and to consider social and economic issues including the likely impacts on those now employed in BoxIronbark timber industries.’ Community Activity Since 2002, conservation groups have continued to lobby successive Victorian Governments to protect the Wellsford under a land use category that recognised the preservation of natural values as the highest use i.e. national or state park. One group, Bendigo and District Environment Council Inc. (BDEC) has been particularly proactive in this pursuit along with Bendigo Field Naturalists Club and Landcare groups. BDEC is a non-profit organisation whose main interest is the conservation of the natural environment and Australia’s progress towards the achievement of ecological sustainability. BDEC has fought for the preservation of biota within the Box-Ironbark Forests and Woodlands, before, during and after the ECC began its Box-Ironbark and Woodlands Investigation.

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Currently, together with the Victorian National Parks Association, BDEC has re-activated their campaign in support of improving the conservation status of the Wellford to that of National Park. BDEC, Bendigo Field Naturalists Club, various Landcare groups and concerned citizens have come together to form the Wellsford Forest Conservation Alliance (WFCA) to progress the campaign. At a recent event ‘A Summit to Preserve the Wellsford Forest for Future Generations’ approximately 60 people gathered to show support and to contribute to plan the campaign. The group requested that the WFCA seek Greater Bendigo City Council support for this community driven campaign (a letter seeking this support was received in early April). WFCA has also engaged the Bendigo community in support of the campaign and up to mid-April had gathered approximately 460 signatures calling for action. Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s): Nil Report It is 12 years since the Box-Ironbark Forests and Woodlands Investigation was conducted and some changes have occurred in the social, economic and environmental arenas that warrant consideration when discussing whether to support this community led campaign or not. The following two questions will be explored further to help focus the issues: 1. What has changed in the 12 years since the BIB recommendations were adopted by the Victorian Government that is relevant to the current Wellsford discussion? 2. What would change if the Wellsford State Forest became National Park? Changes since 2002: Social 

Firewood can now be collected free (no permit required) from the designated firewood collection areas, within designated collection periods.



The proportion of households using wood as an energy source is decreasing; 18% in 2002, decreased to 14% in 2008 (ABS 2008) and further decreasing to 10% by 2011 (ABS Energy Use and Conservation Survey conducted in March 2011).



Only 3.4% of the lowest household income earners (less than $25,000 per year) used wood compared to 12% of the highest income earners ($110,000 or more per year). ABS 2009.



Rented households were less likely to use wood as an energy source, with only 4.5% stating they used it in Victoria. ABS 2009.

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

One in ten households nationally used wood as the main source of energy for heating (10%) and of those households, an estimated 42% reported 'comfort/convenience' when citing the main reason for choice of heater across all types of heaters. ABS Energy Use and Conservation Survey conducted in March 2011.



The importance of eco-system services (e.g. clean air and water) for human preservation is becoming increasingly understood, e.g. paramount in food security, soil and water provision, oxygen production.

 The role large tracts of forest play in providing heat sinks in our hotter climate is now recognised. Economic 

There is no longer a large scale mill dependent upon the Wellsford for timber supply – Rushworth mill closed in approximately 2005.



It is evident that the availability of free firewood has a negative impact on the firewood plantation industry. The plantation timber producers are seeking to be competitive in a market place undercut by the government continuing to provide free firewood. This group is currently lobbying the government to stop the supply of free firewood.



Improvements have been made in science for measuring and quantifying environmental benefits of forests particularly for carbon (storage and sequestration) and water (quality and quantity) demonstrating greater benefits under a conservation management system.

Environmental 

Victoria’s native forests are the most carbon rich forests in the world creating the potential for these forests to be managed as massive carbon stores (Mackay et al 2008, Keith et al 2009).



Habitat is being destroyed through timber cutting and firewood collection impacting on the wider ecology of the area.



National Parks receive a higher level of funding for management than State Forests, particularly for activities such as visitor services and weed management.



The areas listed as ‘special features’ such as the large old tree site cannot be readily recognised or defined by the general public who assume the primary use of the whole area is one of timber production. This can lead to inadvertent damage to areas set aside specifically for conservation purposes within the State Forest i.e. ‘Special Features’ gazetted under the Crown Lands (Reserves) Act 1978 within the State Forest gazetted under the Forests Act 1958.

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What would change if the Wellsford State Forest became National Park? Access and Uses As part of the BIB report the uses and values of the forests were identified, land use category determined and permitted uses defined. A table comparing these uses according to land category is attached along with the relevant BIB investigation recommendations and comments of relevance to this discussion. This table also lists other benefits of the forest that were not considered through the BIB process e.g. mental health, pollination services and carbon sinks. The table was used to identify the permitted uses of the Wellsford State Forest that would not be permitted under National Park status, and of those permitted uses, which activities are currently occurring in the Wellsford that would be impacted by a change in land use category i.e. What is happening now that wouldn’t be allowed if it became National Park? Most of the activities currently permitted within the Wellsford can continue in some form (some with conditions applied) however, two current activities; hunting and the harvest of wood products (sawlogs/pole/fence post cutting and firewood collection) can only continue if the Wellsford remains State Forest (further discussion below). Activities such as horse riding, prospecting, and dog walking can be considered, and if appropriate, catered for through management conditions identified and specified as part of the management planning process. Mineral exploration and mining was considered by the ECC with recommendations made that demonstrate how exploration and mining could be possible under National Park status e.g. Greater Bendigo National Park extends to only 100 metres below the surface, allowing exploration and mining tenements under these areas (subject to conditions). If the area remains State Forest, then new mineral exploration and mining applications can occur. If it is transferred to National Park, then only the existing licences will be valid i.e. no new applications are possible. Hunting While organised hunting can occur as a management activity for the control of feral animals, hunting as a recreational activity would not be permitted in the Wellsford if changed to National Park status. As identified in the BIB report ‘recreational shooting will continue to be generally excluded from Box-Ironbark parks and reserves’, making it highly unlikely that hunting would be considered a permitted use under a conservation land use category. While hunting is currently allowed in Wellsford State Forest its proximity to Bendigo’s large population base with many people undertaking passive recreational pursuits in such as bike riding or bushwalking in the forest, reduces the sites suitability for viable hunting.

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Wood Products – Posts and Firewood Under National Park status the Wellsford could not be used for timber production, including collection of firewood. Currently the Wellsford State Forest is managed according to the Bendigo Forest Management Area (FMA) - Forest Management Plan (FMP) which provides a vision and direction to guide sustainable management of the forest. A Wood Utilisation Plan (WUP); a 3 year works plan for commercial timber production, is also applied to the FMP. As a FMA, the Wellsford is managed under a silviculture system primarily for the production of wood products on a 40-60 year rotation. A simplified explanation of the system is as follows: areas of the forest (coupes) are felled of large timber for logs or posts; 4-8 years later the coppice is reduced to two stems and let grow for 10-15 years until 100-200mm in diameter; then thinned to leave the best remaining logs. The ‘thinnings’ are made available for firewood. The trees are then allowed to grow until large enough to harvest for logs or posts, and the cycle starts again. During the ‘growing’ phase the area is systematically managed by cutting out less than ideal logs which are also made available for firewood. This management regime abides by a series of prescriptions ensuring representative large trees and habitat trees remain. While the prescriptions are understood by trained foresters they are not the ones conducting the timber cutting. Currently pole and post cutting businesses do operate within the Wellsford and licences are also given for commercial harvest of firewood. Up until July 2014 licences have been issued for 3 years but a new licensing system is planned for implementation this year (no details yet public) and it is suggested that these licences will be issued for 10 years. The significance of this to the Wellsford campaign is that if the land status changed, any existing licences would have to be paid out by the government. Timber felling in wood utilisation coupes for the provision of firewood is undertaken by commercial contractors and/or Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI) staff (primarily Project Firefighters (PFF)) at a direct cost to DEPI. The Bendigo WUP allows for the following volumes of wood to be harvested for commercial use from the Wellsford over the 13/14 and 14/15 financial years: 100m3 sawlogs (grade 1), 580m3 minor produce logs (sawlogs grade 2) and 1300m 3 firewood to supply commercial licenses. Note: 1m3 is approximately a 1.8m (6’) x 1.2m (4’) trailer of split firewood neatly stacked to a height of 0.5m (20”). The Designated Firewood Collection Area for 2014 is in Longlea State Forest where ‘thinnings’ along with fallen timber is made available for firewood collection, therefore no firewood collection should occur in the Wellsford State Forest this year. Currently, collection of firewood from the designated areas is unlicensed and unsupervised usually resulting in all the wood being collected within one week, with no way to ensure that it is for local or indeed domestic supply.

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Impact of Management Systems As previously mentioned the Wellsford is managed under a silviculture system for the production of timber, if gazetted under the National Parks Act the area would be managed to conserve and protect biodiversity and natural processes. These two systems while sympathetic are not compatible. Currently the impact of the silviculture system on the natural values is evident through the following: 

Systematic thinning, lopping and harvesting of timber within the wood utilisation sites impacts on the ecology of that site and the surrounding forest by reducing habitat, opening up the canopy, damaging the understorey and displacing wildlife;



Removal of fallen timber and standing dead timber for firewood reduces important fauna habitat. A Department of Environment and Sustainability scientific review found fallen trees and branches are vital habitat for birds and some threatened reptile species; there are nine times more birds in central Victorian box and ironbark forests when woody debris is left intact. The collection of firewood has been identified as a threatening process for 19 native bird species listed under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (DEPI).



The harvest of summer and autumn flowering ironbarks reduces the availability of nectar; a valuable food source for some fauna species as well as degrading honey production.

On the basis of these points it is considered that the management of the area for the conservation of biodiversity (National Park) would result in: 

An increase in floristic diversity and faunal habitat;



The protection of ecological processes improving the areas capacity to provide ecosystem services and act as a drought refuge for wildlife; and an



Improved capacity to store carbon long-term.

Priority/Importance: This campaign is important to those in the community who place a high value on protecting environmental assets for their intrinsic value and for providing ecosystems services to sustain life and support community wellbeing. The WFCA recognises that Council’s position on this matter will be important to the State Government as it considers its own response. Options/Alternatives: Council has three options: 1. Declare a position of support for the campaign. 2. Remain neutral; do not declare a position of support or opposition.

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3. Decline support for the campaign. Timelines: The City received correspondence from the Wellsford Forest Conservation Alliance on 9 April 2014, and the alliance has been advised that the matter will be discussed by Council with a response sent pending the outcome. Consultation/Communication Internal Consultation: 

Information Paper circulated to CEO and Executive Management Team



Sustainable Environment Unit staff

External Consultation: 

Natural Environment Advisory Committee – The committee discussed the campaign at their April meeting and expressed support for the aim of the campaign. The following motion was unanimously supported by NEAC: ‘That the Natural Environment Advisory Committee supports the community campaign to have the Wellsford Forest included into the Greater Bendigo National Park and recommends that the Greater Bendigo City Council also supports the campaign’.



Bendigo and District Environment Council (Stuart Fraser, Simon Perrin, and Wendy Radford), Wellsford Forest Conservation Alliance, Bendigo and District Field Naturalist (Rod Orr) and Victorian National Parks Association (Nick Roberts) provided information, research and presentation supporting their perspectives.



Department of Environment and Primary Industries (Callum Walker, Forest Officer) – discussed current management system and future directions.



Parks Victoria (David Major, Ranger in Charge Northern Goldfields) – discussed land management according to designated land status. Specifically what would change if the Wellsford was to be included in the Greater Bendigo National Park?

Resource Implications: Nil. Conclusion The Box-Ironbark Woodlands have been reduced to less than 17% of their original cover within Victoria. The ECC in its 2001 Final Report aimed to strike a balance between effective conservation of natural values and the provision of resources to the community. Since the adoption of the ECC recommendations in 2002, there has been a reduced need for commercial timber extraction from the forests, and the move to provide free PAGE 156


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firewood has increased the pressure on the natural values of the forest and reduced the viability of plantation firewood production. In determining the ongoing value of these forests to the community, consideration must go beyond the perspective of economic and natural values conservation and should also include consideration of social and community wellbeing. Attachments 1. Permitted uses within each Land Use categories and the ECC Box-Ironbark Forests and Woodlands Investigation Final Report 2001 recommendations. 2. Wellsford State Forest Photos and Map. RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council supports the community campaign to see the Wellsford State Park protected under the National Parks Act 1975 by writing to the Victorian Government requesting consideration of the matter.

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PRODUCTIVITY

Nil. 6.

SUSTAINABILITY

Nil.

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GOOD GOVERNANCE AND DECISION-MAKING

7.1 COUNCIL PLAN 2013-2017 - THIRD QUARTER REPORT, JANUARY TO MARCH 2014 Document Information Author

Dr Lyn Talbot Corporate and Community Planner

Responsible Officer

Craig Niemann Chief Executive Officer

Summary/Purpose Attached please find the third quarter report to Council on Council Plan 2013-2014 progress, which covers the period January 1st to March 31st 2014. This is the first report to be produced from the new Interplan performance monitoring and reporting software program. Comments on progress against each item in the Council Plan have been entered directly by the responsible officers. Council officers have reported finding the software accessible and easy to use. Reporting was completed in a timely manner. The attached report has been taken directly from Interplan with minimal editing and formatting. There has been no need to extract and reconfigure each comment to produce a quarterly report, as was the case in the past. The overall process has resulted in significant efficiency gains in producing a more comprehensive report. Policy Context The Council Plan 2013-2017 was adopted by Council on 19 June 2013. The Council Plan identifies the key issues to be pursued by Council over the next four years to address the community’s needs and aspirations and its own organisational activities. The measurable commitments set out in the actions in the Council Plan are based on a yearly basis and generally relate to those activities which are above and beyond daily service provision. The Council Plan is based around five broad themes, each with a number of strategies. Each strategy has actions that are relevant for the current year. The five themes and strategic objectives are: 1: Planning for Growth 2: Liveability 3: Productivity 4: Sustainability PAGE 161


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5: Good Governance and Decision Making Background Information In accordance with Section 125 of the Local Government Act 1989, regular reporting about service delivery and performance is an obligation to Council and community members. Report Additional guidelines to assist reading this report The report is structured in the same way as the Council Plan with the five major themes which each have a series of Strategies and Actions. Numbering Each action in the Interplan system is allocated a unique number by the software program- this is the first number in the box for each action- Ignore this number. The second number in the box denotes the plan or strategy where this action has originatedin the case ‘CP’ indicates it is a Council Plan action. The figures next to it relate directly to the numbering system in the Council Plan. In the following months all adopted strategies and plans that have actions that are still current will be loaded into Interplan; where a Council Plan action derives from one of these strategies or plans, the prefix letters and number will indicate this origin. Status and % complete These columns reflect progress for that action for the current year.  Where a strategy will extend over a series of years, the report relates to progress against the actions that were expected to be completed this year. When the Council Plan is loaded for the next year the columns will go back to zero reflecting the status of progress for a new year.  Where an action is unable to be commenced during this year, the officer will report why this is the case. If a small amount of activity has been undertaken that will contribute to the overall action, but nothing further is planned for the year, this will be reported. Where an action is finished this will be reported. When the % is moved to 100, the officer is no longer prompted to report against the item, so it will not feature in the report for the next quarter. Priority/Importance: Reporting on progress towards completion of Council Plan actions is important for Councillors and community members because of the ongoing commitments to comprehensive reporting and the links to previous budget decisions. Regular reporting is also a legislative requirement of the Local Government Act.

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Timelines: The Interplan system has enabled more efficient production of this report than was previously possible. This, along with the more detailed format will facilitate the need for Councillors, staff and members of the public to have up-to-date information about progress on the activities that are being undertaken on behalf of the community. Progress: This is the third quarterly report for the 2013-2014 actions in the Council Plan. Significant progress on most actions is demonstrated. Risk Analysis: Risk analysis will be undertaken with regards specific projects, as a normal part of project planning. Resource Implications Items that are included in the Council Plan are also considered in budget planning for the same period. Where external funds are sought or available this is documented. Conclusion This third quarter report for the 2013-2014 financial year provides details of many projects and activities that are significantly progressed. Attachments 1. City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan Progress Report January to March 2014 RECOMMENDATION That Council acknowledge progress against the actions set out in the 2013-2014 City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan.

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7.2 PROGRESS REPORT INDEPENDENT REVIEW IMPLEMENTATION Document Information Author

Peter Hargreaves, Project Coordinator, Independent Review Implementation

Responsible Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer Director

Summary/Purpose The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the Independent Review Implementation. Policy Context Council demonstrates good governance and leadership Council Plan Reference: 5.1.1 – Consider the recommendations of the Independent Review 2013 and implement the agreed actions. Independent Review: Recommendation 1 – Implementation and communication Background Information Council has delivered on its commitment to independently review the City of Greater Bendigo to see what improvements can be made to its operations. In June 2013 Aurecon delivered its final report including 69 recommendations for Council to consider. Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s): On 21 August 2013 Council resolved to adopt in principle the 69 recommendations and that a Committee of all Councillors supported by the Chief Executive officer and Manager Executive Services be established as the Independent Review Implementation Committee. On 23 October 2013 Council adopted Terms of Reference for the Independent Review Implementation Committee, committed to responding to all 69 recommendations within the current Council term and acknowledged the completion of six – numbers 17, 22, 30, 39, 44 and 53. On 22 January 2014 Council acknowledged completion of a further seven recommendations – numbers 4, 12, 16, 25, 26, 28 and 34.

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On 5 March 2014 Council: a) Acknowledged the progress on Recommendations 1, 3, 14, 18, 31, 36, 45 and 47 completion of actions associated with Recommendations 35, 48, 52, 59, 60, 62, 63, 64, 65, and 66. b)

Approved the actions proposed to respond to the Governance Recommendations numbers 32, 40, 41, 43, 56, 57 and 67 as outlined in the report.

On 16 April 2014 Council acknowledged the progress on Recommendations 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, 10, 15, 20, 32, 38, 42, 49, 51, 57, 58 and 61. The number of completed recommendations stands at 23. Report Since the last progress report on 16 April 2014 further progress with implementation of the Review was considered at Councillors Forums on 23 April 2014 and 30 April 2014. Matters considered were:  Recommendations 6, 15, 20 - Aged and Disability Services Review,  Recommendation 8 – City Futures Directorate,  Recommendation 11 – Advocate and plan for the consolidation of CoGB offices  Recommendation 32, 40 and 43 and – Governance training,  Recommendation 36 - Develop a detailed business case for the upgrade of Bendigo Airport to define the most cost effective funding mechanism,  Recommendation 58 – Reiterate the process for Councillors obtaining information, providing guidance on what is considered reasonable in relation to the matter under consideration. Completed actions Council acknowledges a recommendation is ‘completed’ when either: • all associated actions have been completed, or • where the work is ongoing, when Council is satisfied all initial actions have been completed and there is a framework in place to ensure future work is undertaken and completed in a structured manner, or • where the recommendation has been addressed and Council has responded in a different way that better aligns with Council’s objectives. Details of newly completed actions are as follows: Recommendation 18 – Financial Reporting Monitor the revenue and expenditure associated with Ben Con, the Livestock Exchange and Bendigo Airport for annual reporting to Council

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Action: A revised reporting template has been prepared for annual reporting of the Bendigo Livestock Exchange and Bendigo Airport. The template responds to the review’s objective for transparency in trends associated with the cost of service delivery to the community. The reporting template will require: • Role of the venue, • Key achievements for the year ended, including annual attendance or other quantitative and qualitative performance measures, • Resource implications for the year ended, • A three year historic trend of revenue and expenditure, and • Current and emerging challenges and policy/strategic directions. Annual reporting for these entities is now scheduled for the period immediately after the completion of the annual audit and Councillors can expect to see reports before Council around September/October each year. The new reporting template will not only apply to the Bendigo Livestock Exchange and the Bendigo Airport, but also The Capital and associated venues, Bendigo Art Gallery, Bendigo Visitors Centre; along with Related Entities, specifically Goldfields Library Corporation, Bendigo Trust and Bendigo Stadium Ltd. As previously reported to Council, the new reporting arrangements will not apply to BenCon (now known as Works Unit) as it does not compete with the private sector, as described in the report of the Independent Review. The Works Unit no longer tenders for work from external agencies, as it once did, nor does it carry the associated risks of an independent commercial entity. In BenCon’s place is ‘Works’ which is simply another internal business unit of the City like Waste Services, Building and Property Services or Parking and Animal Control. As a consequence, Works forms part of the existing and comprehensive framework of prudential management of the city’s finances. In summary the formulation of the new reporting template and the scheduling of annual reporting for the various entities exceed and complete the actions associated with this recommendation.  Recommendation 33 – Directorate and Business Unit Names Review Directorate and Business Unit names to increase clarity around roles and responsibilities.

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Action: At a Glance – Actions completed Descriptions of all City Directorates and Business Units and an explanation of the philosophy behind the creation of the current Organisation structure and Directorate names are now posted on the City website. It is the Chief Executive Officer’s view that Directorate and Unit names are not fixed, but change over time as roles and responsibilities evolve. A number of Directorates and Business Units have changed over time to better reflect their roles and responsibilities. Further, it is not necessary to know the Organisation structure before calling or visiting CoGB because the City has a single point of entry for receiving/handling visitors, callers, complaints and inquiries and it is the role of Customer Support Staff guide callers/visitors to the right Unit. Any further review of names without any change in roles and responsibilities is unnecessary. Whilst the organisation should remain open to name changes on a needs basis to reflect any changes in roles or responsibilities, no further action is required to complete this recommendation. This recommendation along with the current list of Directorate and Business Unit names has been reviewed by the Executive Management Team. Descriptions of the role and responsibilities of all City Directorates and Business Units were completed and posted on the City of Greater Bendigo website earlier this year and help to guide residents and staff. An explanation of the Organisation structure including the philosophy behind the creation of the current Directorates in 2005 has also been posted on the webpage. Whilst avoiding public confusion about names is a worthy objective it is not essential to how residents and other callers interact with the City. This is because the City has a single point of entry for receiving/handling visitors, callers, complaints and inquiries. This relieves people of the need or obligation to know the organisation structure, or even the role or function of the various Units or Directorates. With a single point of entry there is no expectation any caller will know where to direct their inquiry. It is the responsibility the Customer Support Team to identify the issue and the need and to connect all callers/visitors with the appropriate person or Business Unit. This is very different proposition from that facing State or Federal Government services, for example, where there is no single point of entry and it behoves the caller or visitor to know which department they should contact. It is the CEO’s view that Directorate and Unit names are not fixed, but change over time as roles and responsibilities change and evolve. A number of Directorates and Business Units have undergone name changes since 2010 to better reflect their roles and responsibilities.

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These Unit name changes include: 2010 2010 2010 2011 2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 2013 2013 2013

Special Projects to Major Projects Parks & Natural Environment to Parks & Natural Reserves Environment to Sustainable Environment People & Learning and Risk units along with Payroll function (from Finance ) became People & Performance Communications and Governance units became Executive Services Marketing & Major Events became Major Events and Marketing function transferred into Tourism Customer Service to Customer Support Asset Planning and Design to Engineering & Public Space Children & Family Services and Aged & Disability Services merged to Community Services Recreation and Healthy Communities units became Active & Healthy Communities Community & Cultural Development to Community Partnerships Presentation & Works split off Waste Services and Works Rates and Valuations units became Rating & Valuation Services

In nearly all cases the name changes followed a review, realignment or reorganisation to better reflect the Unit’s new role and responsibilities. To embark on any further review of names without any change in roles and responsibilities is considered by the CEO to be unnecessary and a waste of resources. In summary, it is the CEO’s recommendation that whilst the organisation should remain open to name changes on a needs basis where required to reflect any changes in roles or responsibilities, no further action is required to complete this recommendation.  Recommendation 42 – Planning & the Public Consider opportunities to improve the relationship between the planning team and public/applicants. This may include educating the community on the planning process and timelines so as to manage community expectations. Action: At a Glance – Actions completed A comprehensive response to the recommendation has resulted in: • Planning Unit realignment to building capacity and flexibility to better respond to the needs of community and applicants • Overhaul of the pre-application process to provide greater transparency and certainty for applicants and planners • Review of processes ensuring the quality of applications • Posting of more detailed information for the public and applicants

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Development of further measures to inform the community about the planning process and to address Councillor inquiries relating to counter inquiries, quality of responses and privacy.

The Statutory Planning Unit has developed a staged response to this recommendation after a careful study of the report. The report makes a number of observations about the planning permit assessment process and notes the improvements achieved since an independent audit was initiated in 2008. The report identifies several areas of interest to the Independent Review including the preapplication process, the quality of applications, what it termed the mediation process and community expectations around timelines for decisions. The Project Plan developed to respond to the Recommendation includes a number of elements, most of which have been completed, as follows (mediation/consultation is addressed in a separate recommendation): • • • •

Realignment of the Statutory Planning Unit teams, Review and reforms to the pre-application process, Review of the application lodgement and receipt process (quality review), Information for applicants

Unit Realignment As an initial step the Unit is to be reorganised. It was previously based around three teams – a small specialist subdivisions team which concentrated solely on subdivisions; a generalist land use team which handled all other permit applications, a policy and processes team which handled private planning scheme amendments, compliance and in house applications and heritage matters. After a review, it is proposed to combine the subdivisions and land use teams and create two generalist teams that will handle all forms of planning permit applications. The policy and processes team has undergone some minor realignment and the administration team is currently under review and some realignment might result. The creation of two generalist planning teams has a number of benefits and responds to the report in the following ways: • It broadens the skills base of the statutory planning unit by increasing the capacity of the planners to handle a broader range of inquiries and applications of both a subdivision and more general nature, and • Improves the flexibility of the unit to respond to an unexpected or rapid increase in applications in one area such as subdivisions and thus has the potential to reduce turnaround times. Pre-application process The previously ad-hoc pre-application process has been reviewed and formalised. Proponents wishing to discuss an application in detail prior to lodgement must now complete a formal request for a meeting and include plans and information to allow for a more comprehensive discussion of the proposal. Feedback from the meeting is also formalised and included as a permanent record against the property. This then informs the assessment process once the application is logged. Further, the information can be made available to a new owner if the land is sold.

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The system is more transparent and more efficient as it provides an expected timeframe for applicants. Requests are assigned to planners on the basis of experience and availability and it avoids applicants from ‘shopping’ around for the advice they want (See attached Pre-application Meeting request form). The new pre-application process supplements, but does not replace existing planning enquiry service which is strongly supported by the Statutory Planning Unit. The enquiry service is resourced to allow members of the public to make inquiries and get advice on the full range of planning matters from the simple to the more complex – over the counter, by phone, by email and in writing Monday to Friday from 8.30am to 5.00pm (excluding public holidays). Providing such an accessible enquiry service is challenging and not without its risks given the combined effects of highly complex Victorian planning schemes, the need to remain abreast of changes and amendments and the need for the enquirer to have a clear understanding about their plans. This approach is consistent with Council's customer service policy and approach. There have been some suggestions of a more formal approach. This altered approach might include elements such as:  An appointment based system, rather than "open counter" or advice over the phone;  A greater degree of formal written advice to enquirers, rather than verbal advice;  Requiring enquirers to provide information before the meeting, such as a recent copy of the property title, and a clear idea of what was proposed. This information is necessary to written advice can be accurate. As with any such change, there are positives and negatives and the implications need to be considered. Appointment times would better spread demand and avoid the short queues that sometimes happen. But it would inconvenience some customers, especially those who phone in. Written advice would help avoid confusion and "changing advice" would be able to be better explained. But it would be much more time consuming. This would either further lengthen decision timeframes or require greater resourcing to maintain the same decision timeframes. Before such significant changes were made, Council would want to be well informed on the evidence of customer preferences and an analysis of the investment required in staff time, technology upgrades and other costs to meet any proposed new standard. The Unit prides itself on its commitment to providing a quality, accurate and accessible service and to minimising the potential for discrepancy or conflicting advice. Junior staff are mentored and there is an active program of training throughout the year to enhance technical as well as interpersonal skills for all staff. The realignment will also enhance the quality of advice given ‘over the counter’ by broadening the skills and knowledge base of all planners. Quality of applications The Review commented on the variation in the quality of applications and how the standard might be improved. It is important to note that the planning scheme itself sets out what information is required to be lodged with various types of applications. The requirements vary depending on the nature and complexity of the application. PAGE 214


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Applications that do not meet the minimum requirements of the scheme are returned to the applicant with an explanation of what is required before lodgement again. If the information provided complies with the scheme it must be accepted. A review of the lodgement and acceptance process has confirmed that the first opportunity is taken to seek further information or improve the quality of an application regardless of whether it arrives by post, over the counter or via the online lodgement system known as Spear. Educating and informing the community Some additional and updated information has been posted on the CoGB website to inform the community about the planning process (see attached). It covers the difference between planning and building permits, pre application meetings and how to book a meeting, getting planning advice, demolition information, lodging an application, the assessment process, what happens if there are objections, the appeal process before VCAT and timelines. This is regularly updated. Further information is being prepared around timelines for processing and assessment and will be posted before the end of the financial year. Privacy Feedback has been provided that some people have expressed concern about the lack of privacy at the front counter. As well as verbally advising customers that if they pre-book an appointment a meeting room can be arranged, a notice will be placed on the counter advising of this fact. Even without an appointment, if meeting rooms are not booked out or occupied, people can be taken to those on request. The floor plan and design of the foyer for customer service is reconsidered periodically. About 4 years ago the meeting room off the foyer was constructed. Many options were considered; eg using Hopetoun Street as the main entrance; how to have the boardroom come off the foyer and how to fit more meetings rooms. The final design is always a compromise between customer needs, staff needs, budget and the constraints of a leased building. Further steps Additional steps are planned for 2014-15 to help inform the community: • On line planning register, • On line access to applications so residents do not need to visit the planning office to view an application or submit an objection. In summary the initiatives outlined above including the commitment to ongoing development of public information complete the actions required to respond to this Recommendation.  Recommendation 58 – Access to Information Reiterate the process for Councillors obtaining information, providing guidance on what is considered reasonable in relation to the matter under consideration.

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Action: A new policy on Councillor Access to Information was adopted at Council’s Ordinary Meeting on 7 May 2014. The adoption of the policy completes the required actions associated with this recommendation.  Recommendation 61 – Stakeholder Register Identify and regularly maintain a comprehensive and representative cross section stakeholder register. Action: At a Glance – Actions completed In September 2013 the Information Management Unit expanded the Customer Relations Management (CRM) system to make it available to all parts of the organisation. Staff are progressively transferring data to the new system. The progressive transfer is being achieved without the need of additional resources and is expected to be completed within three years. The acquisition of the new system and the planned progressive transfer of data achieve the outcomes envisaged by the review. Numerous databases are developed and maintained by the City’s various Business Units. Some are developed for a single project whilst others have a life that is ongoing. They serve a wide variety of purposes. The following is just a small sample:  People and organisations with an emergency response and recovery responsibility,  Civic and community leaders,  Hargreaves Mall traders,  Committees of management for CoGB properties and facilities,  Sporting clubs, organisations and associations,  Marong Business Park stakeholders,  Local schools and their key contacts,  Landcare and ‘Friends of’ groups,  Local businesses,  Bendigo Easter Festival volunteers, supporters, participants, and  Bendigo Airport leaseholders. Until 2013 there was no single piece of software available to be used uniformly across the organisation to develop, maintain and use this information.

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The review expected the establishment of a cross sectional register would streamline the process of community engagement and the identification of key contacts. In September 2013 the Information Management Unit expanded the Customer Relations Management (CRM) system to make it available to all parts of the organisation. The software offers a number of benefits:  It allows for all databases to be stored in a centralised system that is easier to update and manage,  While the data is centralised it still allows staff to manage each list separately and protect the confidentiality of the information where required,  Where information on an entity is updated, the system automatically scans for other listings of that entity to avoid duplicate entries and ensure data consistency and integrity,  Because all data on the system is compatible, staff can create new databases to support a new project by ‘scanning’ or ‘filtering’ for particular interests or subject matters, and  It standardises the method of data capture and ensures better accessibility and consistency across the organisation. Since the acquisition of the expanded CRM system, IM has begun helping staff to transfer their data to the new system. It now includes a range of data including membership of Bendigo Tourism and Bendigo Inventor Awards stakeholders. Progressive transfer of the information is being achieved without the need of additional resources and is expected to be completed within three years. In summary, the acquisition of the new customer relations management system and the progressive transfer of data across to the single system achieve the outcomes envisaged by the review and complete the required actions associated with this recommendation. Progress Progress is noted on the following recommendations: Recommendation 1 - Review Communication Create and continually update an implementation strategy and Communications Plan to address and action the recommendations of this review. Action: A further Project Bulletin was issued and the relevant web pages updated following Council’s receipt of the progress report on 16 April 2014.

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 Recommendation 5 – Waste Strategy Facilitate the development and finalisation of the Waste Strategy to determine the best way to manage waste going forward, and undertake analysis to determine the cost and requirements for the rehabilitation of historic sites and current sites once they reach capacity. Action: Progress on this recommendation was last reported in April 2014. Council adopted the new Waste and Resource Management Strategy on 26 March 2014. The last report indicated that further information would be provided on the specific issue of rehabilitation of historical waste management activities such as old landfills. A timetable of works has now been developed which includes the following: -

A rehabilitation plan for the current Eaglehawk landfill will be developed during 2014-15

-

Investigation of the former White Hills and Miller Street landfills is currently being undertaken to determine what, if any, further rehabilitation works are required to address any quantifiable risks

-

The remaining former landfill sites have all been identified to the best of the city’s knowledge

-

Funding for a risk assessment of the remaining former landfills to better understand whether they pose any unacceptable environmental or health risk will be proposed for the 2015-2016 financial year.

 Recommendation 8 – City Futures Investigate the option to separate the Economic Development Unit, Tourism, Bendigo Art Gallery, The Capital and Major Events from the City Futures Directorate into a separate entity. This investigation must include an implementation plan which would provide strategies and direction for the entity and underlying Business Units to aspire to become a self-funding operation within five years of separation. It must also include a plan to incorporate Major Projects into another Directorate of CoGB. Action: Councillors received and discussed a further progress briefing on 30 April 2014. It was agreed Councillors would provide further feedback and that subsequently a formal report be prepared to address the recommendation in its entirety along with the observations and various economic development models offered by Aurecon.

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Councillors were advised that the report would be completed in approximately three months and will be considered by Council at an Ordinary Meeting.  Recommendation 27 – Asset Management Plans Finalise Asset Management Plans for the following assets: - Roads - sealed/unsealed roads, footpaths, kerb and channel, street furniture, urban street trees - Bridge and major culverts - Drainage systems, flood levees and pump systems - Parks and recreation facilities - Waste disposal and resource recovery systems - Plant and fleet - Office systems and furniture. Action: In responding to this recommendation the City has listed all capitalised assets under 10 categories. Asset management plans for five of the categories: sealed roads, unsealed roads, bridges, pathways, and drainage are expected to be finalised by the end of July 2014. Plans for the final five categories: public furniture, land improvements, play spaces, plant & equipment and buildings are expected to be finalised by December 2014. Urban street trees and office systems and furniture are not included as they are not capitalised items. Waste systems are recognised under a general asset management plan for Plant and Fleet.  Recommendation 36 – Bendigo Airport Develop a detailed business case for the upgrade of Bendigo Airport to define the most cost effective funding mechanism. Action: Councillors were briefed on a working draft of the business case at Councillors Forum on 30 April. The purpose and content of the document is to address the background, policy alignment, level of investment required, and demonstrable long-term demand to undertake Stage Two (Runway) of the Bendigo Airport Redevelopment project. Councillors provided input on the business case and the report is expected to be finalised and presented to Council in July 2014.

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 Recommendation 45 – In-house Graphic Design Explore opportunities to use the services of an in-house graphic design resource. Action: A review of the City’s annual spending on out-sourcing graphic design and an examination of projected future needs has identified the potential for net savings estimated conservatively at between $50,000 and $70,000 per annum through the employment of an in-house graphic designer. Provision for the employment of an in-house graphic designer has been included in the 2014-15 budget which was placed on public exhibition on 21 May 2014. Resource Implications There are no resource issues arising directly from this report. Where recommendations have resource implications, steps are in place to ensure that any proposed new capital or operating expenditure arising from the recommendations is considered in the budget process for 2014-15. Upcoming briefings The following progress reports or further briefings for Councillors are scheduled: 4 June – Recommendation 54 – Priorities for planning scheme amendments June – Recommendation 3 - Create a standardised Matter for Decision template for investment and business case proposals. June – Recommendation 32 - Governance training July – Recommendation – Business case Bendigo Airport upgrade Conclusion The number of completed recommendations now stands at 28; progress has been reported on more than 60 of the 69 recommendations. RECOMMENDATION That Greater Bendigo City Council: a)

Acknowledge the completion of actions associated with Recommendations 18, 33, 42, 58 and 61 and progress on Recommendations 1, 5, 8, 27, 36 and 45 as outlined in the report, and

b)

Inform the community of this progress.

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ATTACHMENT: TEMPLATE FOR ANNUAL REPORTING OF CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ENTITIES (within the standard Council report template) Title ANNUAL REPORT        

Bendigo Livestock Exchange Bendigo Airport The Capital Visitor Information Centre Bendigo Art Gallery Goldfields Library Corporation Bendigo Trust Bendigo Stadium Ltd

Document Information Author Responsible Director

Summary/Purpose To provide an overview of performance of xxxxxx for the year ended xxxxxx. Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017: Theme: 5

Good Governance and Decision Making

Strategic Objective: 5.1

Council demonstrates good governance and leadership.

Strategic Objective: 5.2

The financial and physical resources of the organisation are managed efficiently and well.

Independent Review: Recommendation18 – Annual reporting of City of Greater Bendigo entities. Background Information Include the role and purpose of the venue/entity/service. Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s):

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ATTACHMENT: TEMPLATE FOR ANNUAL REPORTING OF CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ENTITIES (within the standard Council report template) (continued)

Report Key Achievements Include the key achievements of the function for the year ended This can include:   

Annual attendance/breakdown by demographic or geographic location (use graphs if relevant) Relevant quantitative and qualitative measures of performance. Report on performance against KPIs from Council Plan &/or specific KPIs established for the function & LGPRF

Financial Performance for the year ended xxxxxx The financial data (where appropriate) to be in the format of an income statement (align with statutory annual reporting and corporate reporting method to Finance Committee and Council) comparing Annual Budget and Actual Income and Expenditure. Include graphs of financial performance comparing the last three years. Future Look Provide an outline of the future direction of the business and emerging challenges. Risk Analysis (as applicable) <<Risk analysis should consider social, economic and environmental risks. Risks to be discussed may include failure of the project or initiative, any uncertainties associated with funding or cost estimates, impacts on adjoining properties or groups of residents affected, and any potential adverse community reaction. This section should also included how the risks will be managed.>> Consultation/Communication (as applicable) <<Decision-making should be based on appropriate consultation. This section of a Council report should outline the consultation which has been undertaken - both outside and within the organisation. In terms of consultation conducted within, it should be demonstrated that a whole of organisation view has been taken. That is, all relevant sections have had the opportunity to contribute to the report.>> Internal Consultation: External Consultation:

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ATTACHMENT: TEMPLATE FOR ANNUAL REPORTING OF CITY OF GREATER BENDIGO ENTITIES (within the standard Council report template) (continued) Resource Implications (as applicable) <<Councillors need to be aware of the resource implications of a proposal - financial, physical and human. Therefore, the following questions need to be answered. Is the proposal incorporated in the budget? What funding is available for the project from various sources? If not, is a means of financing proposed? Has the project or initiative previously received funding from Council? Are there ongoing human resources implications for maintenance etc? If this proposal is introduced, are there activities or programs currently being undertaken which will cease? Also consider communications costs (if required) eg printing or mail. If the project/initiative has already commenced, is it proceeding in accordance with the budget (over/under).

Conclusion <<The conclusion should be the logical outcome/s of the arguments that have been put forward. A clear link should be able to be drawn between the conclusion/s and the recommendations.>>

Attachments 1.

The report can be supported by the attachment of associated reports, photographs or plans

RECOMMENDATION That Greater Bendigo City Council acknowledge the performance of the xxxxxx.

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7.3 CONTRACTS AWARDED UNDER DELEGATION Document Information Author

Leeanne Taig, Administration Assistant, Project Coordination

Responsible Director

Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support

Summary/Purpose The purpose of this report is to provide information on contracts recently awarded under delegation. Policy Context Provide high quality professional services by undertaking responsible business planning to ensure long-term sustainability. Report The following contracts subject to public tender, have been issued under delegation by the officer as listed (Instrument of Delegation - August 5, 2009):

Contract No

Project

Successful Contractor

Value (GST Excl)

Delegated Officer

Date Signed

Panel of Providers:

CT000093

CT000121

*Rowan Fitzgerald Plumbing & Gas Fitting Pty Ltd Plumbing & Gas *Perez Plumbing Pty Ltd Schedule of Fitting Marg Allan *Houston Plumbing Pty Rates Maintenance Ltd *Phoenix Plumbing & Solar Hot Water Pty Ltd *Lonergan Plumbing *EL & R Kennedy Pty Ltd Roundabout Construction â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Avard Civil Pty Ltd Carolyn Way & Beckham Road

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300,081.00

Darren Fuzzard

30 2014

April

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Panel of Providers:

CT000096

Provision Electrical Maintenance Services

*Moore & Moore Electrical Pty Ltd *All state Facility Management of *BG & RM Williams Electrical Schedule of Marg Allan *Lahn Electrics Rates *Eascom Electrical Bendigo Pty Ltd *DeAraugo & Lea Electrical Contracting (Vic) Pty Ltd *RACE Services *Laser Electrical Bendigo

9 May 2014

RECOMMENDATION That the contracts award under delegation, as outlined in this report, be acknowledged by Council.

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7.4 RECORD OF ASSEMBLIES Document Information Author

Peter Davies, Manager Executive Services

Responsible Officer

Craig Niemann, Chief Executive Officer

Summary/Purpose The purpose of this report is to provide the record of any assembly of Councillors, which has been held since the last Council Meeting, so that it can be recorded in the Minutes of the formal Council Meeting. Policy Context Council demonstrates good governance and leadership. Background Information The Local Government Act provides a definition of an assembly of Councillors where conflicts of interest must be disclosed. A meeting will be an assembly of Councillors if it considers matters that are likely to be the subject of a Council decision, or, the exercise of a Council delegation and the meeting is: 1. 2.

A planned or scheduled meeting that includes at least half the Councillors (5) and a member of Council staff; or an advisory committee of the Council where one or more Councillors are present.

The requirement for reporting provides increased transparency and the opportunity for Councillors to check the record, particularly the declarations of conflict of interest.

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Report Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Meeting Information Consultation meeting 10 April 2014 Planning application DSD/23/2014 8-lot subdivision and development of 8 dwellings at 17A Lobb Street, North Bendigo Attendees/Apologies Cr James Williams Cr Peter Cox Apology: Cr Lisa Ruffell Lachlan Forsyth/ Applicant Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter No. Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting Nil

Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Meeting Information Consultation meeting 25 March 2014 Planning application DC/947/2013 Partial demolition, extension to existing building, waiver of car parking requirement and earthworks at 105 View Street, Bendigo Attendees/Apologies Cr James Williams Cr Peter Cox Apology: Cr Lisa Ruffell Lachlan Forsyth/ Applicant Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter No. Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting Nil

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Meeting Name/Type

Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Meeting Information Heritage Advisory Committee (no quorum for meeting, matters for consideration were referred to the next meeting) 17 April 2014 1. Council Plan presentation 2. Residential Strategy Review presentation Attendees/Apologies Cr Peter Cox Apology: Cr Mark Weragoda Mr Trevor Budge Mr Andrew Cockerall Dr Dannielle Orr Ms Megan McDougall Dr Lyn Talbot/ Ms Elaine Doling Mr Jordan Grenfell Mr Darren Wright Apologies: Ms Emma Bryant/ Ms Helen Ashby Mr David Bannear Mr Laurie Brown Mr Peter Ellis Ms Kay MacGregor Dr Di Smith Mr Rod Spitty Mr Calum Walker Mr David Mulqueen

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter No. Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting Nil

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Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Meeting Information Consultation Meeting 28 April 2014 Planning application - DS/1033/2013 The staged subdivision of the land into 27 lots, the removal of native vegetation and the removal of the water channel easement (shown red and green on Title Plan 741172X) at 19 Lee Street, Kangaroo Flat Attendees/Apologies Cr Barry Lyons Cr Rod Fyffe Cr Elise Chapman Stephen Wainwright/ Applicant Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter No. Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting Nil

Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Meeting Information Consultation meeting 2 May 2014 Planning application - DS/1032/2013 The staged subdivision of the land into 87 residential lots and the removal of native vegetation at 134-166 Aspinall Street, Golden Square Attendees/Apologies Cr Barry Lyons Cr Peter Cox Cr Elise Chapman Apology: Cr Rod Fyffe Stephen Wainwright/ Applicant Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter No. Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting Nil

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Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Meeting Information Consultation meeting 8 May 2014 Planning application - DU/79/2014 Use and development of land for the purpose of a medical centre (4 practitioners). Display of signage and reduction in car parking requirements at 145 St Aidans Road, Kennington Attendees/Apologies Cr Rod Campbell Cr Helen Leach Apology: Cr Mark Weragoda Lachlan Forsyth/ Applicant Objectors

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter No. Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting Nil

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Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Meeting Information Councillors' Forum / Governance Meeting 23 April 2014 1. Meeting with representatives of the RSL 2. Council Plan 3. Budget 4. Meeting with Howard Street residents 5. Final copy of Waste Strategy 6. Economic Development Strategy 7. Extranet -v- Good Reader 8. Urban Design Manual 9. Forestry plantations 10. Wellsford Forest 11. Sign - McCrae and Chapel Streets 12. Airport 13. Bendigo Trust - water pumping 14. Update on Marong Business Park 15. Confidential motion (last meeting) 16. VCAT hearing 17. Rotary BBQ - Bull Street/ 1. Section 89 of the Local Government Act 2. Enterprise Agreement 3. Hopley matter 4. Policy for Councillor Access to Information 5. Councillor Support Policy 6. CEO performance objectives 7. Local Government Amendment (Governance and Conduct) 8. Independent Review governance recommendations 9. Amended Communications and Media Policy 10. Visit to Canberra 11. VCAT hearing 12. Assessment and investigation of complaints Attendees/Apologies Cr Barry Lyons Cr Rod Campbell Cr Peter Cox Cr Elise Chapman Cr Rod Fyffe Cr Helen Leach Cr Mark Weragoda Cr James Williams Apology: Cr Lisa Ruffell Mr Craig Niemann Mr Stan Liacos Ms Prue Mansfield Ms Pauline Gordon Ms Marg Allan Mr Peter Davies PAGE 231


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Mrs Alison Campbell Apology: Mr Darren Fuzzard Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter No. Councillor/Officer making disclosure Councillor/Officer meeting Governance Cr Chapman Yes Item 12. Cr Leach Yes Mr Craig Niemann Yes

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Meeting Name/Type Meeting Date Matters discussed

Councillors

Staff/ Community Representatives

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Meeting Information Councillors' Forum 30 April 2014 1. Planning reports and review of draft Ordinary Meeting agenda Adjournment for conduct of Special Meeting of Council 2. Aged and Disability Services review 3. Racial Discrimination Act 4. Quarry Hill Golf Club 5. Advertising of Ward meeting at Strathfieldsaye 6. Active Living Survey 7. Bendigo South East College 8. Mosque development 9. Aboriginal group sub-committee 10. Waste Strategy 11. Curtin Street development 12. Access and Information Policy 13. Bendigo Airport Business Case 14. City Futures Report 15. Bendigo Exhibition Centre 16. Insurance coverage related to community committees of management 17. Epsom soccer ground 18. Mosque Attendees/Apologies Cr Barry Lyons Cr Rod Campbell Cr Peter Cox Cr Elise Chapman Cr Rod Fyffe Cr Helen Leach Cr Lisa Ruffell Cr Mark Weragoda Cr James Williams Mr Craig Niemann Mr Stan Liacos Ms Prue Mansfield Mr Travis Harling Ms Pauline Gordon Mr Darren Fuzzard Mr Peter Davies Mrs Alison Campbell Apology: Ms Marg Allan

Conflict of Interest disclosures Matter No. Councillor making disclosure Councillor left meeting Nil

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RECOMMENDATION That Council endorse the record of assemblies of Councillors as outlined in this report.

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7.5 ADOPTION OF ANNUAL FEES AND CHARGES FOR 2014/15 Document Information Author

Travis Harling, Manager Finance

Responsible Director

Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support

Summary/Purpose This report recommends that Council adopts the revised Fees and Charges applicable for the 2014/15 financial year. Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017: Theme: 5

Good Governance and Decision Making

Strategic Objective: 5.1

Council demonstrates good governance and leadership.

Strategic Objective: 5.2

The financial and physical resources of the organisation are managed efficiently and well.

Background Information Fees and Charges are an important source of income for the City of Greater Bendigo. In 2013/14, Fees and Charges were budgeted to raise 16.8% of Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s income. Fees and Charges are applied to generate income for the provision of services that are used by specific groups of people, or not generally accessed by the entire community. The income from this source assists in offsetting the costs of the provision of the specific service. Each year, Council reviews the level of Fees and Charges that are applied across City of Greater Bendigo services, with a view to achieving a balance between affordability and raising sufficient revenue to support the delivery of services. Report The proposed Fees and Charges of the City of Greater Bendigo for 2014/15 have been reviewed by Service Unit Managers. The following budget principle has been applied: Determine User Fees in accordance with CoGB's Pricing Policy. Where CPI increases have been applied, these are at 2.7% (for year ended December 2013). PAGE 235


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The new Fees and Charges will be effective from 1 July 2014. The 2014/15 Fees and Charges are presented for adoption to provide adequate time to advise service recipients of increases. Consultation/Communication Internal Consultation: All Directors and relevant Service Unit Managers have been consulted in the development of the proposed Fees and Charges for 2014/15. The proposed Fees and Charges for 2014/15 formed part of the budget review with Councillors over two days in April 2014. External Consultation: The new Fees and Charges will be communicated to the service recipients before their introduction on 1 July 2014. Resource Implications Fees and Charges form part of the City of Greater Bendigo’s revenue and make a significant contribution towards funding the delivery of services. The annual revenue budgeted to be received from Fees and Charges in 2014/15 is $27,675,000. Major areas of the organisation where this income is derived, for the 2014/15 budget are: 

Child Care Services - $3.81M. Full day child care will increase from $105 per day to $109 per day, while Occasional care will increase from $11.50 per hour to $11.90 per hour. Weekly child care services for children under 3 years of age will increase by $15 per week from $415 to $430, weekly child care services for children over 3 years of age will increase by $15 from $405 per week to $420. In addition to any Child Care benefit that is means tested, parents are also entitled to a 50% Federal Government child care rebate up to $7,500 per child, per year.



The Capital - $1.99M. The Capital manages a number of venues for performances, as well as offering facility hire for corporate or private events such as weddings. In addition to The Capital, the operations of the new Community Theatre, Ulumbarra, will generate user fees when construction is finalised later in the financial year.



Building and Property - $1.644M. The majority of income is derived from ongoing rental arrangements, while additional User Fees and Charges have been included to facilitate any commercial use of the Bendigo Airport.



Waste Services - $5.68M. Proposed increases to User Fees are approximately 6.08%, which takes into account CPI, as significant costs are incurred within the waste services sector including waste disposal, cartage of waste, EPA Levy and provision of rehabilitation costs.

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Proposed increases to User Fees include: Trailer, Van and Utes increased from $31 to $33 per load, Tandem Trailers increased from $57 to $61 per load and Domestic Asbestos has increased by 6.9% to $62 per load. ď&#x201A;ˇď&#x20AC; 

Parking and Animal Control - $4.60M. Car Parking Fees for both Zone 1 and 2 remain the same as the 2013/14 User Fees, at $1.40 per hour and $5.20 per day for Zone 1 and $0.60 per hour and $2.60 per day for Zone 2. Non concessional Animal Registrations have increased by an average of 2.80% and this is the same for concessional registrations. The 2014/15 budgeted fee for a nonconcessional desexed dog is $40 per animal and $20 per animal for concession holders.

Conclusion The User Fees and Charges for 2014/15 require adoption by Council for commencement on 1 July 2014. Attachments 1. Fees and Charges 2014/15 (separate document on website)

RECOMMENDATION That Greater Bendigo City Council: (a) Adopt the Landfill recycling fees for 2014/15, effective 1 July 2014, as set out in the Fees and Charges Schedule attached. (b) Adopt all other Fees and Charges for 2014/15, effective 1 July 2014, as set out in the Fees and Charges Schedule attached. (c) Confirm the Council resolution of 8 May 2013, to suspend the fee for the use of Parks and Reserves by community organisations holding community events, pending consideration of a report outlining the impact of commercial and community organisations using those facilities.

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7.6 LOAN BORROWINGS Document Information Author

Travis Harling, Manager Finance

Responsible Director

Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support

Summary/Purpose To approve participation in the Municipal Association of Victoria’s (MAV) new Victoria Local Government Funding Vehicle (LGFV), for access to loan funds at a competitive rate. Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017: Theme: 5

Good Governance and Decision Making

Strategic Objective: 5.1

Council demonstrates good governance and leadership.

Strategic Objective: 5.2

The financial and physical resources of the organisation are managed efficiently and well.

Council Policy Reference: Council’s Borrowing Policy provides clear direction to management, staff and Council in relation to the treasury function and establishes a decision framework that directs CoGB to:  Ensure that the appropriate level of funds are available at the appropriate time to support its strategic objectives.  Consider the optimum time to borrow, taking into account interest rates, construction cost inflation rates, and economic stimulus issues.  Be financially responsible and prudent in borrowing matters ensuring that all risks are managed appropriately.  Minimise its costs of borrowings.  Ensure, where possible, that the structure of the borrowing is appropriate for the nature of the assets being funded.  Consider inter-generational ‘user pays’ principles as part of determining the most appropriate way to fund activities.  Ensure Council’s funding activities are in accordance with its legislative and common law responsibilities.

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Background Information The Local Government Act gives Council the power to borrow funds. The Council has previously borrowed money to meet its annual Capital Works budget, with the last borrowed funds in the 2012/13 financial year totalling $11,300,000. Council’s budgeted debt balance at 30 June 2014 is $31,408,000. A Working Party established by MAV has investigated a mechanism for joint access to loan funds by councils. The Working Party has been working with Ernst and Young, specialists in the area of debt. To this point they have:  Established an interim funding program for use while the remainder of the exploration of the program is conducted (Council has the option to take advantage of this program for its current borrowings totalling $7M in the 2013/14 financial year). Tested the market appetite for Local Government backed bonds in terms of:  The savings available to the sector from the establishment of the program.  The liquidity levels required for the program to be a success.  The scale or size of borrowings required to make the program a success.  The level of interest from councils to participate in the scheme. The above work has concluded that for every $100M in debt procured via this program, it is forecast the sector would save $10M over a ten year period, the typical life of a bond of this nature. With 23 councils participating in the interim arrangement (2013/14) for a total in excess of $200M, the total savings, if this alone was to roll over into the program, are significant and yet this is only a fraction of the sector’s current and planned future borrowings. The financial arrangements have been negotiated to enable councils to access funds for any approved purpose. Previous Council Decision(s) Date(s): Council Meeting 31/07/2013 – Adoption of 2013/14 Budget which included new borrowings totalling $7M. Report The 2013/14 annual budget includes new loan borrowings of $7M, which were approved by Council to fund the 2013/14 Capital Works program. The end of year result forecast at 28 February 2014, indicates that the original budgeted loan amount of $7M will be required for Council to meet its future commitments. The MAV is seeking a commitment from Council no later than the 30 May 2014, if it intends to take up the opportunity to access funds through this method. Indication at this point will allow the MAV to decide if the required amount of debt ($150M) will be achieved to enable access to the bond market in 2014/15.

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Commitment to the LGFV will allow Council to access a short term facility with the Commonwealth Bank Australia (CBA) to fund the 2013/14 budgeted borrowings of $7M. The short term facility will mature in line with the issuance of the bond and the $7M will then be incorporated into the LGFV. Discussions with representatives from the CBA indicate the turnaround time to access the short term facility will be 1-2 weeks, with an expected longer time as 30 June approaches. Comparisons with current forms of borrowing and the LGFV, as it has been proposed by the MAV, have been undertaken. Historically councils, including the City of Greater Bendigo, have entered into longer term loans with a fixed interest rate and repayments consisting of principal and interest. The LGFV is a shorter term loan (7 years) with fixed interest and interest only repayments. To enable the funds to be drawn down by 30 June 2014, Council must now notify the MAV that it seeks to participate in the joint funding arrangement. The Chief Executive Officer requires authorisation to enter into a funding agreement. Priority/Importance: The drawdown of the budgeted loan is a high priority, as these loan funds are included in calculating the 30 June 2014 forecast. Options/Alternatives: The alternative to participation in the LGFV is to continue to source funds via an annual tender process with the retail section of major banks, as the Council and sector has done historically. The benefit to sourcing funds through the LGFV is the anticipated saving achieved by aggregating the amount required with other councils, enabling access to the wholesale market through bonds. Risk Analysis: Should the Council elect to join the proposed LGFV, Council would be required to enter into a short term arrangement with the CBA for immediate 2013/14 debt requirements. The short term arrangement would be in place until the LGFV is established (July – September 2014). Should the LGFV not be established due to a lack of commitment by other councils, the City of Greater Bendigo would be required to refinance the short term arrangement in the 2014/15 financial year. On the current advice of MAV, indication is that the required commitment will be achieved. Consultation/Communication External Consultation: Council’s Finance Manager attended a briefing by the MAV, Ernst and Young, National Australia Bank and the CBA on 31 March 2014 at the MAV offices. Representatives of the MAV and Ernst and Young presented to members of Council’s Executive Management Team, Audit Committee Members, Finance Committee Members and officers on 30 April 2014. PAGE 240


Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

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The LGFV was discussed at a recent Audit Committee meeting held on 15 May 2014. Resource Implications Budget Allocation in the Current Financial Year:

$7M Loan drawdown

Current Estimate or Tender Price:

4.3% - 4.7% Interest Rate

Any known or anticipated variance to budget:

Interest rate will depend upon the market at time of Bond issue.

Projected costs for future financial years:

Interest rate of 4.7% and 7 year term, monthly interest payments of $27,416.67 would be required. Additional $7M would be required at the end of year 7.

Any ongoing recurrent expenditure required:

Annually $329,000.04 interest expense for 7 years.

Conclusion The issuance of a bond by the MAV is a positive initiative for the entire Local Government Sector of Victoria. The LGFV provides a mechanism for Council to access loan funds at a competitive rate, due to the aggregation of borrowings required by a number of councils, enabling access to the wholesale bond market. Currently, with the level of borrowings of CoGB, only access to the retail fund market is available. To set up the LGFV, the MAV has initial borrowing capacity established in 2013/14. As loan demand grows, the borrowing capacity will be converted to a bond share. Accessing this bond provides CoGB with the benefit of a joint sector borrowing compared to individual Council borrowings from the retail market when required. Given the savings in debt costs, it is recommended that Council participate in the LGFV to access current year and future borrowings. In 2013/14 Council should access the interim funding arrangements by MAV to borrow $7M.

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RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council: 1. Agree to participate in the Victoria Local Government Funding Vehicle, which is proposed to be established by the Municipal Association of Victoria. 2. Advise the Municipal Association of Victoria that Council has determined to access the interim arrangement for $7,000,000 budgeted for in 2013/14. 3. Authorise the Chief Executive Officer to enter into a funding agreement for the loan of $7,000,000 in 2013/14, through the Municipal Association of Victoria joint loan arrangement.

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7.7 FINANCIAL REPORT AS AT 31 MARCH 2014 Document Information Author

Travis Harling, Manager Finance

Responsible Director

Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support

Summary/Purpose To provide Council with: 1. An analysis of the financial position of the City of Greater Bendigo (CoGB) for the financial year to 31 March 2014 2. A review of the forecast financial position as at 30 June 2014 Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017: Theme: 5

Good Governance and Decision Making

Strategic Objective: 5.2

The financial and physical resources of the organisation are managed efficiently and well.

Background Information In accordance with Section 138 of the Local Government Act 1989: “At least every 3 months, the Chief Executive Officer must ensure that a statement comparing the budgeted revenue and expenditure for the financial year with the actual revenue and expenditure to date is presented to the Council at a Council meeting which is open to the public.” A review of the 31 March 2014 result and 30 June 2014 forecast was undertaken by CoGB’s Finance Committee on 15 May 2014. Report This report provides an update on the financial performance in comparison to the adopted budget for the 2013/14 financial year. The report also provides a financial forecast to 30 June 2014, together with an analysis and recommendations.

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1. Actual Year to Date Financial Performance (01/07/13 - 31/03/14) CoGB's operating result for the first three quarters of the financial year is $12,768,522 favourable to budget as at 31 March 2014. Operating Result - YTD Actual vs YTD Budget Operating Result is a measure for accounting for an organisation's profit or loss for a given period. An Operating Result recognises all revenue and operating expenditure; it includes non-cash expenditure such as depreciation and non-cash revenue of donated assets. YTD Budget 31/03/2014 $15,886,781

YTD Actual 31/03/2014 $28,655,303

Variance $12,768,522 Favourable

Income Statement for the period 01/07/13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 31/03/2014 is presented below:

Operating Income Statement - City of Greater Bendigo As at 31 March 2014 Actual 30 June

Annual Budget

YTD Budget

YTD Actual

2013

2014

2014

2014

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

YTD Variance $'000

%

REVENUE Rates and Charges

79,910

86,492

86,447

86,219

(228)

User Charges, Fees and Fines

24,963

27,120

19,673

20,257

584

3%

5,478

4,050

2,762

3,667

905

33%

19,279

11,000

-

-

-

0%

406

334

255

160

(94)

-37%

Government Grants - Operating

25,549

18,472

13,766

13,651

(114)

-1%

Government Grants - Capital and Major

12,553

12,549

5,699

5,976

277

5%

1,592

1,820

1,288

990

(298)

-23%

21,544

16,177

17,720

1,543

10%

-

-

-

0%

183,881

146,066

148,640

2,574

2%

Contributions - Cash Contributions - Non Monetary Assets Reimbursements

Interest on Investments Other Revenue (Inc. Internals) Share of Other Comprehensive Income of

(44)

500

0%

Associates Accounted for by the Equity Method Total Revenue

169,686

EXPENSES Employee Benefits

47,855

54,167

40,381

40,411

(31)

0%

Contract Payments, Materials and Services

54,169

64,245

48,071

39,466

8,605

18%

Plant and Equipment Operating Expenses

4,841

8,013

6,031

5,814

217

4%

27,285

29,839

22,248

21,505

742

3%

Borrowing Costs

1,154

1,432

1,082

1,024

57

5%

Net Loss on Disposal of Property, Plant,

4,465

3,000

1,407

84

1,323

94%

1,071

15,866

10,960

83

124

Depreciation / Amortisation

Infrastructure and Assets Held for Sale Other Expenses (incl Internals) Bad Debts Total Expenses Operating Result

140,922

(720)

-7%

-

-

-

0%

176,685

130,179

119,985

10,194

8%

7,196

15,887

28,655

12,768

80%

-

-

-

0%

15,887

28,655

12,768

80%

28,764

11,679

Other Comprehensive Income Net asset revaluation increments Comprehensive Result

40,971

10,000

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Major variances that contribute to the favourable result include: Area User Charges, Fees and Fines

Fav / Unfav Favourable

Contributions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Cash

Favourable

Internal Charges (Revenue)

Favourable

Contract Payments, Materials and Services

Favourable

Net Loss on Disposal of Property Plant and Infrastructure

Favourable

Details Eaglehawk Landfill is $565,937 favourable to budget. This is largely due to increased Category 'C' waste being deposited at the Landfill. A number of government grants have been received earlier than expected, including additional funding in relation to the regional streetlight project, and unbudgeted revenue of $240,000 for Bendigo Hockey Complex. An additional $793,360 has been charged by the Works Unit for capital works as a result of completing projects in the current year, that were budgeted for in 2012/13. There is also an additional charge of $600,490 for the internal cost of plant due to higher rates of utilisation and increased operating costs. Relates to timing in a number of projects, particularly the development of the Community Theatre where payments of $8,250,000 have not yet been required. Due to timing with sales of a number of properties that are expected to settle late in the financial year.

$ $584,000

$905,000

$1,543,000

$8,605,000

$1,323,000

Cash Result - YTD Actual vs YTD Budget CoGB's cash result is $10,480,649 favourable to budget as at 31 March 2014. The Cash Result takes the Operating Result and removes non cash transactions. It also includes Capital Works expenditure, loan repayments, new loan drawdowns and Reserve transfer movements.

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YTD Budget 31/03/2014 $10,941,207

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

YTD Actual 31/03/2014 $20,971,856

Variance $10,480,649 Favourable

Major Variances that reduce the operating surplus of $12,768,522 to the above cash result include: Area Net Transfers from Reserves

Fav / Unfav Unfavourable

Capital Works

Favourable

Cost of Assets Sold

Unfavourable

Details Transfers to Reserves are higher than budget due to a grant received ($1.2M) to manage the Lighting the Regions Project. Transfers from Reserves are below budget ($3.2M) due to timing of payments for the construction of the Community Theatre. Timing of Capital Works payment behind budget schedule. Due to timing of sales of land.

$ $5,030,919

$5,641,113 $2,186,435

2. Forecast Performance (01/07/13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30/06/14) The forecast for 31 March 2014, is reported in the same format as the year to date actual comparison to budget, operating and rate results. Operating Result - Forecast v Annual Budget Annual Budget 30/06/2014 Surplus $7,196,132

Forecast 30/06/2014 Surplus $11,133,000

Variance

$3,936,868

Major variances that contribute to the forecast unfavourable operating result include: Area Grants Commission

Fav / Unfav Favourable

Parks Unit

Unfavourable

Building and Property Unit

Unfavourable

Developer Levies

Favourable

Details The annual financial impact from revised allocations by the Federal Government, actual amount to be received was not known when the Council budget was prepared. Watering costs due to current weather trends, and additional tree maintenance costs. Increased necessary building maintenance, and service contracts as a result of new or extended buildings. Increased property development within the municipality resulting in PAGE 246

$ $242,000

$880,000

$142,000

$125,000


Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Major Projects

Favourable

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

increased contributions from Developers, transferred to Reserves to assist in funding of capital works in future years. Major Project expenditure in relation to works at the Community Theatre is expected to be behind schedule. Works funded by grant income received in the prior financial year and held in Reserve fund.

$3,718,000

Cash Result - Forecast v Annual Budget Annual Budget 30/06/2014 Deficit ($9,583,390)

Forecast Result 30/06/2014 Deficit ($10,987,000)

Variance

($1,403,610) Unfavourable

Major variances that contribute to the unfavourable result include: Area Capital Works

Fav / Unfav Unfavourable

Details Annual Budget does not include Carried Forward projects from 2013. These projects are funded from the Accumulated Surplus. Forecast includes Carried Forward projects.

$ $3,071,000

3. Progressive Cash Surplus/Deficit Summary The cash result must be managed on an ongoing basis rather than annually, as the impact from previous year's results, will affect the following year's budget. With this in mind the table below shows:

Accumulated Surplus Carried Forward 30/06/13 Carried Forward Capital Work Projects from 2012/13 2014 Cash Result Capital Projects identified at 31/03/14 as requiring Carried Forward in to 2014/15 Forecast Accumulated Surplus/(Deficit) Carried Forward 30/06/14

Annual Budget Surplus/(Deficit) $14,516,937

Forecast Result Surplus/(Deficit) $14,516,937

($8,118,339) ($9,583,390)

($10,987,000) ($2,085,730)

($3,184,792)

$1,444,207

The Cash Result forecasts $1,444,207 surplus by year end.

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Expenditure approved at the mid-year review is included in the 30 June forecast. Priority/Importance: Legislative requirement and Financial Management, as it is considered of high importance that Council undertake this quarterly review of the budget. Conclusion The Finance Committee has reviewed the Statement comparing Budgeted and Actual Revenues and Expenses to 31 March 2014, and the Financial forecast for 2013/14. For the remaining period of the financial year it is important that expenditure is managed within the budget, and that Management continue to rigorously monitor the financial performance on a monthly basis to achieve the forecast surplus.

RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council receive the Statement comparing Budgeted and Actual Revenues and Expenses to 31 March 2014, in accordance with the requirements of the Local Government Act.

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7.8 ASSET

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

CAPITALISATION POLICY REVALUATION POLICY

AND

ASSET

VALUATION

AND

Document Information Author

Travis Harling, Manager Finance

Responsible

Marg Allan, Director Organisation Support

Director

Summary/Purpose To request that Council adopt the revised City of Greater Bendigo Asset Capitalisation Policy and Asset Valuation and Revaluation Policy. Policy Context Council Plan Reference: City of Greater Bendigo Council Plan 2013-2017: Theme: 5

Good Governance and Decision Making

Strategic Objective: 5.2

The financial and physical resources of the organisation are managed efficiently and well.

Council Policy Reference: Australian Accounting Standards Local Government (Finance and Reporting) Regulations 2004 Background Information The recent internal review of Capital and Recurrent Expenditure recommended a review of The Accounting Policy for Recognition of non-current assets. Council is also required to review and update its non-current Asset Policy to ensure compliance with the National Assessment Framework for Local Government Asset Management and Financial Planning (NAF). The framework has been developed to evaluate progress with implementation of the Local Government Financial Sustainability Nationally Consistent Frameworks (LGPMC Financial Sustainability Frameworks) initiated by the Local Government and Planning Ministersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Council (LGPMC) and adopted in 2007. The Sustainability Frameworks provide nationally consistent elements for local government to manage its community infrastructure more sustainably through effective asset management and financial planning.

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Through the LGPMC, the State and Territory Governments have agreed to facilitate implementation of the LGPMC Financial Sustainability Frameworks across the nation. Report Asset Capitalisation Policy: The Asset Capitalisation Policy is to provide staff involved in budgeting and expenditure decisions with clear guidance when classifying expenditure in the corporate Finance system and ensure compliance with relevant Accounting Standards and State Government Policy. It establishes the capitalisation criteria at the point of recognition of an asset. The policy:   

Identifies the Council's Asset Classes, and the assets within each Asset Class; Specifies the principles for recognising an asset for capitalisation; States what ‘measurement after recognition' model Council applies to its assets.

Accounting standards (particularly AASB 116 – Property, Plant and Equipment) require a distinction to be made between expenditure that is consumed immediately in operations (or within one financial year) and expenditure on physical assets that will provide service over more than one financial year. Typical non-current physical assets managed by Council include roads, bridges, footpaths, drains, parks and buildings used by the community. Asset Valuation and Revaluation Policy: The Asset Valuation and Revaluation Policy is to provide staff involved in finance and asset management decisions, clear guidance when undertaking financial valuations of Council’s non-current assets. This Policy specifies the City of Greater Bendigo's approach, in accordance with relevant Australian Accounting Standards and other State Government requirements, to undertaking financial valuations of non-current assets. The Policy also assists Council’s commitment to sustainable financial planning. The Policy covers financial valuation of non-current physical assets, subsequent to initial recognition, including:  

Frequency and method of valuation and revaluation; and Roles and responsibilities.

This Policy excludes insurance valuations and ‘Held for Sale’ valuations. Conclusion Both the Asset Capitalisation Policy and Asset Valuation and Revaluation Policy have been reviewed by the appropriate officers of the City of Greater Bendigo and are recommended by the Service and Asset Management Steering Committee. The Audit Committee, at its meeting held on 15 May 2014, recommended that Council adopt the revised policies.

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The timing of the finalisation of each of the policies enables the policies to be in place for the commencement of the 2014/15 financial year on 1 July 2014. Attachments 1. Asset Capitalisation Policy 2. Asset Valuation and Revaluation Policy

RECOMMENDATION That the Greater Bendigo City Council adopts the amendments to the Asset Capitalisation Policy and the Asset Valuation and Revaluation Policy, as recommended by the Audit Committee.

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ASSET CAPITALISATION POLICY Approval Date:

May 2014

Review Date:

May 2017

Author:

Manager Finance

Responsible Officer:

Director Organisation Support

Purpose To provide consistent guidelines, in accordance with relevant Accounting Standards and State Government Policy, regarding which Council assets are to be capitalised (as opposed to expensed). The policy:   

States what Council's Asset Classes are, and the assets that each Asset Class contains; Specifies the principles for recognising an asset for capitalisation; States what ‘measurement after recognition' model Council applies to its assets.

Scope This policy only applies to non-current physical assets. This policy directs those Council officers who are charged with accounting for Council's Assets and related purposes. Background Accounting standards (particularly AASB 116 – Property, Plant and Equipment) require a distinction to be made between expenditure that is consumed immediately in operations (or within one financial year) and expenditure on physical assets that will provide service over more than one financial year. Typical non-current physical assets managed by Council include roads, bridges, footpaths, drains, parks and buildings used by the community. This policy is to provide staff involved in budgeting and expenditure decisions clear guidance when classifying expenditure in the corporate Finance system. It establishes the capitalisation criteria at the point of recognition of an asset. The recording of expenditure as an asset means that it is recorded in the Council’s balance sheet and the details are entered into the corporate asset register. The process is often referred to as capitalisation. Such expenditure on assets is referred to as capital expenditure. Importantly, capital expenditure is divided between renewal, upgrade and new expenditure classifications. This distinction provides information to assist the organisation to determine whether it is maintaining assets to a sustainable level of service. Related Council Documents There are a number of other related Council documents which should be read in conjunction with this Asset Capitalisation Policy, as follows:   

Asset Capitalisation Procedure Asset Management Strategy Asset Valuation and Revaluation Policy

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Asset Hierarchy (Accounting Perspective) The Asset Hierarchy forms the basis for the structure of Asset Registers, for Asset Management Plans and for Capital Budgeting. The structure will depend both on external linkages (for example, adopted data interchange arrangements with developers) and on the range and number of assets in different classes owned by Council. The hierarchy componentisation is discussed in relation to the specific Asset Categories. Table 1 provides a summary of the Asset Hierarchy for Council, including how assets are categorised into their respective Asset Group, Asset Category and Asset Components. Context of Capitalisation Capitalisation rules relate to the treatment of asset values recognized in the current financial year, that is, whether they are capitalised or expensed. However, it should be noted that when the asset group is re-valued, the net effect of (expensed) maintenance work will be reflected in the asset condition, and hence in the new value assigned to the asset. Recognition Measurement at Recognition The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment shall be recognised as an asset if, and only if: a)

It is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the entity; and

b)

The cost of the item can be measured reliably.1

In accordance with AASB 116: a) b)

An item of property, plant and equipment that qualifies for recognition as an asset shall be measured at its cost. Not-withstanding this, where an asset is acquired at no cost, or for a nominal cost (as is the case with developer and other contributed assets), the cost is its fair value as at the date of acquisition.

Existing assets identified as not being reported in the financial statements for the preceding financial reporting period (found assets), will be treated in accordance with b) above. Recognition Cost AASB 116 defines the cost of an item of property, plant and equipment as comprising: a) b) c)

Its purchase price, including import duties and non-refundable purchase taxes, after deducting trade discounts and rebates; Any costs directly attributable to bring the assets to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management; The initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located, the obligation for which an entity incurred either when the item is acquired or as a consequence of having used the item during a particular period for purposes other than to produce inventories during that period.2

Examples of costs that are not costs of an item of property, plant and equipment are: a) b) 1 2

Costs of opening a new facility; Costs of introducing a new product or service (including advertising);

AASB 116 paragraph 7, p 13 AASB 116 paragraph 16, p 15 PAGE 253


Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

c) d)

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Costs of conducting business in a new location; Administration and other general overhead costs.

Activities associated with acquisition/creation of new assets are detailed in the table below. Recurrent Expenditure

Capital Expenditure

Strategic planning reports Project scoping and investigation, valuation reports, planning approvals

          

Survey and design Professional fees Site preparation Construction Contract payments Council direct costs, wages, salaries, plant hire, materials, on-costs, traffic management Overheads Supervision Transport, installation, assembly and testing Project Management Future dismantling and removing item and site restoration (where applicable)

It should be noted that the capital value of a project (and thus the value of assets) may be significantly different than the revalued amount. This is due to the fact that the revaluation is undertaken using the Greenfield’s valuation approach.

Materiality Omissions or misstatements of items are material if they could, individually or collectively, influence the economic decisions that users make on the basis of the financial statements. Materiality depends on the size and nature of the omission or misstatement judged in the surrounding circumstances. The size or nature of the item, or a combination of both, could be the determining factor. In the context of materiality it is not necessary to recognise every non-current asset. For example, a calculator may have a useful life greater than 12 months but its value is small and does not warrant the cost of recording in the asset register, so it is more appropriate to expense it. Where a non-current asset is not material and as such is not capitalised, it is referred to as a minor asset. Expenditure may still be capitalised on items that are individually immaterial, however are significant when considered as a group of assets, such as signs or reserve furniture. The purpose of setting capital expenditure threshold levels is to provide the greatest balance between efficiency in administrative effort associated with maintaining records and the need to ‘expense’ items, through depreciation. The general principle applied to the capitalisation thresholds within this policy, is that if the asset has been replaced in full, then it is generally treated as Capital expenditure. If only part of the asset has been replaced, then the decision to capitalise or expense the costs will be based in the first instance on any capitalisation rules defined in terms of physical work activities and subsequently in accordance with the capitalisation threshold, for the relevant Asset Category / Asset Component. To aid clarity, examples of physical work activities that are considered operating or maintenance expenditure have also been provided. Council’s capitalisation thresholds for assets are contained in the following pages, to guide staff in applying consistent approaches for asset recognition. A Summary of the Capitalisation Thresholds is listed in Table 1.

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Corporate Asset Register Rules for Full Renewals The renewal/replaced Asset Component will be disposed, and remaining value will be written off. A new Asset Component will be created at cost. A new assessment of Condition and Useful Life is required. Corporate Asset Register Rules for Partial Renewals Rule 1: Segmentation (typically for linear assets i.e. Roads, pipes, kerb, etc.) Where partial renewal is considered capital renewal, as per Asset Category / Asset Component tables, the following applies: 1. 2.

3.

The existing asset is re-segmented. For the renewed portion of the old asset, the relevant portion/segment of the old asset is retired from the corporate asset register and the renewal capital expenditure is settled to a new asset. For the remaining portion of the old asset, the written down value will reflect the remaining value recorded in the corporate asset register. A new assessment of Condition and Useful Life is required.

Rule 2: Reapportionment (typically for non-linear assets i.e. part of a building component) Where partial renewal is considered capital renewal, as per Asset Category / Asset Component tables, the following applies: 1. 2. 3.

For the renewed portion of the asset, the written down value of the relevant renewed portion of the old asset is retired from the corporate asset register. The renewal capital expenditure is added to the written down value of the current asset. A new assessment of Condition and Useful Life is required.

Rule 3: Asset Network 1.

Where individual items of an asset network are renewed and/or replaced, the average written down value of these items is subtracted from the written down value of the asset network and the cost of the renewal and or replacement is added.

Capital Projects with Multiple Asset Categories For capital projects, which include multiple asset Categories or Components, the capital expense for each Asset Category or Asset Component needs to be separated out in order to apply the asset recognition rules within this Asset Capitalisation Policy. This process will be assisted via:  

The adoption of a robust Project Handover procedure, which details the minimum data required to be entered into the corporate Asset Register for each asset type. The analysis of post-construction contract schedules detailing actual values of assets, and components, and an appropriate allocation of costs.

Capitalisation for Asset Groups Council’s Asset Management Plans and Long-Term Financial Plan will be developed as per the Asset Groups described in Table 1. Schedule of Changes & Amendments: Version

Date

Changes / Amendments

1.10

Mar. 2014

Draft

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TABLE 1: Asset Group (AM Plan) ROADS - SEALED

ROADS UNSEALED

ASSET HIERARCHY WITH CAPITALISATION THRESHOLDS - SUMMARY Asset Category

Asset Class (For Finance)

Capitalised

Depreciated

Capitalisation Threshold $ Measure

Wearing Course - Asphalt

Sealed Roads

Y

Y

$20,000

400 m2

(Incl. on-road parking, aerodrome runways, taxiways & aprons, and roads at livestock exchange)

Wearing Course - Spray Seal

Sealed Roads

Y

Y

$5,000

400 m2

Pavement (Incl. E/Works/ Formation)

Sealed Roads

Y

Y

$20,000

400 m2

Sealed Car parks

Wearing Course - Asphalt

Sealed Roads

Y

Y

$20,000

400 m2

(Incl. car parks at aerodrome & livestock exchange)

Wearing Course - Spray Seal

Sealed Roads

Y

Y

$5,000

400 m2

Pavement (Incl. E/Works/ Formation)

Sealed Roads

Y

Y

$20,000

400 m2

Kerb and Channel

Kerb and Channel

Sealed Roads

Y

Y

$5,000

50 m

Unsealed Roads

Wearing Course (>60mm depth)

Unsealed Roads

Y

Y

$10,000

120 m

Earthworks & Formation

Unsealed Roads

Y

N

$5,000

-

Wearing Course (>60mm depth)

Unsealed Roads

Y

Y

$10,000

400 m2

Earthworks & Formation

Unsealed Roads

Y

N

$5,000

-

Concrete Floodways (Incl. E & F)

Unsealed Roads

Y

Y

$10,000

200 m2

Sealed Floodways – Spray Sealed

Unsealed Roads

Y

Y

$2,500

200 m2

Sealed Floodways – Pavement (Incl. E & F)

Unsealed Roads

Y

Y

$10,000

200 m2

Rigid Pathways

Concrete/Brick/Bluestone/ Pavers

Pathways

Y

Y

$5,000

50 m x 1.5 m = 75 m2

Non-Rigid Pathways

Asphalt Pathways

Pathways

Y

Y

$5,000

50 m x 1.5 m = 75 m2

Unsealed Pathways (>50mm depth)

Pathways

Y

Y

$5,000

50 m x 1.5 m = 75 m2

Miscellaneous Paved Areas

Pathways

Y

Y

$5,000

50 m x 1.5 m = 75 m2

Y

Y

$10,000

N/A

Y

Y

$20,000

N/A

Y

Y

$20,000

N/A

Y

Y

$10,000

N/A

Floodways

BRIDGES & MAJOR CULVERTS

Asset Component

Sealed Roads

Unsealed Car parks

PATHWAYS

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Bridges

Super-Structure

(Incl. footbridges & boardwalks)

Sub-Structure

Major Culverts

Super-Structure

Bridges

Abutments Bridges PAGE 256


Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Asset Group (AM Plan)

BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES

PUBLIC FURNITURE & FIXTURES

Capitalised

Depreciated

Sub-Structure

Y

Y

$10,000

N/A

Abutments

Y

Y

$10,000

N/A

Asset Category

Asset Component

Asset Class (For Finance)

Capitalisation Threshold $ Measure

Buildings

Structure

Buildings

Y

Y

$20,000

N/A

(Incl. buildings at aerodrome, livestock exchange & landfill)

Roof

Buildings

Y

Y

$10,000

N/A

Building (Mechanical) Services

Buildings

Y

Y

$10,000

N/A

Fit Out

Buildings

Y

Y

$10,000

N/A

Pool Structure (Shell)

Buildings

Y

Y

$20,000

N/A

Pool Pump & Water Treatment Systems

Buildings

Y

Y

$10,000

N/A

Poppet Heads

Poppet Heads

Buildings

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Stormwater Drainage

Pipes

Drainage

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Pits & Endwalls

Drainage

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Minor Culverts

Drainage

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Open Channel Drains (Lined Only)

Drainage

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Gross Pollutant Traps

Drainage

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Drainage Pumps & Housings

Drainage

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Flood Control

Dam/Retardation Basin Walls & Levies

Drainage

Y

Y

$20,000

N/A

Open Space Amenities

Residential Bins

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

N/A

Total

Bins & Surrounds

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N

N/A

N/A

Outdoor Picnic Sets

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Outdoor Furniture

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N

N/A

N/A

Barbeques

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Bus Shelters

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Township & Boundary Signs

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Christmas Decorations

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N

N/A

N/A

Traffic Calming Devices

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N

N/A

N/A

Traffic Lights

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$5,000

Each

Guardrails

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$5,000

Each

Traffic Islands/ Roundabouts *

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y*

Y*

N/A

N/A

Heritage Street Lighting

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Swimming Pools

STORMWATER DRAINAGE

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Traffic Control

Street Lighting

PAGE 257


Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Asset Group (AM Plan)

Asset Category

Asset Class (For Finance)

Asset Component

Capitalised

Depreciated

Capitalisation Threshold $ Measure

Decorative Street Lighting

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Sports & Flood Lighting

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Public Lighting (Including Security Lighting)

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Other Public Furniture & Fixtures

Miscellaneous

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$2,000

-

Water Supply

Irrigation Pumps & Housings

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$2,000

Each

Irrigation

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$2,000

200 m2

Stand Pipes

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$5,000

Each

Land - Freehold

Land

Y

N

NA

All

Land - Controlled

Land

Y

N

NA

All

Land Under Roads – Roads Pre 1/07/2008

Land

N

N

N/A

All

Land Under Roads – Roads Post 1/07/2008

Land

Y

N

N/A

All

Easements

Land

N

N

NA

All

Playing Surface (Grassed)

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Playing Surface (Synthetic)

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Playing Surface (Sealed)

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Spectator Areas – Concrete & Sealed

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

(Incl. garden beds, trees, nature reserves and nonsporting surfaces)

Miscellaneous Landscaping

Land Improvements

N

N

N/A

N/A

Walls

Retaining Walls

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Wharves, Jetties & Pontoons

Wharves & Jetties

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Pontoons

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A -

Fences & Gates

Fences & Gates

Land Improvements

N

N

N/A

N/A

Utilities

Optic Fibre Cable

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Livestock Exchange Yards

Yard Pavements (Concrete & Sealed)

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

100 m2

Fences & Structures

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Electrical Utilities

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Plumbing (Gas, Water & Sewer)

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Public Lighting

LAND IMPROVEMENTS

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Land

Sports Fields & Courts Spectator Areas Landscaping

PAGE 258


Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Asset Group (AM Plan)

PLAY SPACES

CULTURAL (No AM Plan)

Asset Category

Asset Component

Asset Class (For Finance)

Capitalised

Depreciated

Capitalisation Threshold $ Measure

Other Land Improvements

Miscellaneous

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Play Spaces

Play Grounds

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Skate Park

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

BMX Track

Land Improvements

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Monuments & Statues

Monuments, Statues & Fountains

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Plaques

Monuments, Statues & Fountains

N

N

$5,000

N/A

Fountains (Including Drinking Fountains)

Monuments, Statues & Fountains

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Water Features

Monuments, Statues & Fountains

Y

Y

$5,000

N/A

Internal Artworks

Artworks

Y

N

N/A

All

External Artworks

Artworks

Y

N

N/A

All

Antique Items

Miscellaneous Antique Items

Artworks

Y

N

N/A

All

Plant and Equipment

Plant

Plant and Equipment

Y

Y

$1,000

N/A

Light Vehicles

Plant and Equipment

Y

Y

$1,000

N/A

Other Equipment

Plant and Equipment

Y

Y

$1,000

N/A -

Furniture and Office Equipment

Office Equipment, Furniture & Fittings

Y

Y

$1,000

N/A

Software (licensed)

Office Equipment, Furniture & Fittings

Y

Y

$1,000

N/A -

Monuments, Statues & Plaques

Fountains & Water Features

Artworks

PLANT & EQUIPMENT

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Furniture and Office Equipment

*Note: Asset components, associated with a traffic island / roundabout installation, such as kerb and channel, pathway, pavement, wearing course, landscaping, irrigation, etc., will be capitalised separately under the relevant sections within this Asset Capitalisation Policy.

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Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

ASSET VALUATION AND REVALUATION POLICY Approval Date:

May 2014

Review Date:

April 2017

Author:

Manager Finance

Responsible Officer:

Director Organisation Support

1. Purpose and Scope of the Policy This Policy specifies City of Greater Bendigo Council’s approach, in accordance with relevant Australian Accounting Standards and other State Government requirements, to undertaking financial valuations of non-current assets. The Policy also assists Council’s commitment to sustainable financial planning. The Policy covers financial valuation of non-current physical assets subsequent to initial recognition, including:  Frequency and method of valuation and revaluation; and  Roles and responsibilities. This Policy excludes:  Insurance valuations; and  ‘Held for Sale’ valuations.

2. Policy Commitment Council will undertake periodic revaluation of all non-current physical assets owned or managed by Council in accordance with relevant Australian Accounting Standards and State Government Guidelines. This Policy and the associated Asset Valuation and Revaluation Procedure direct Council officers who are charged with accounting for Council’s Assets and related purposes. In implementing this Policy, Council will: 

Review annually the need for revaluation of Council owned or controlled non-current asset classes, based on the materiality of valuation movement;



Require valuations in accordance with the Asset Valuation and Revaluation Procedure, ensuring that each Asset Class is re-valued in a consistent manner and with appropriate frequency.



Apply the valuation method for each Asset Class as specified in the Asset Valuation and Revaluation Procedure.



Require that the frequencies of condition assessments, for each Asset Class, are conducted in accordance with the Asset Valuation and Revaluation Procedure.

3. Reference to Council Plan The Council Plan identifies the following themes (goals) which relate to this policy;

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Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014



Sustainability: Encouraging good use of all our resources, so that the decisions made today do not limit the choices of future generations. Assets and finances must also be managed in a way so that existing infrastructure and assets are well maintained and appropriately upgraded to sustain them for future generations;



Good Governance and Decision Making: Strong commitment to demonstrating good governance and leadership and to assure the community that there is transparent and wellinformed decision-making for the long term, sound management of resources, diverse and effective engagement with community members, and the flexibility to plan for and manage emerging issues.

4. Related Legislation/Policies/Guidelines The Asset Valuation and Revaluation Procedure associated with this Policy fully complies with relevant State Government Legislation and Guidelines and with Australian Accounting Standards, including: 

Local Government Act 1989, Section 131, which provides that Council must prepare Financial Statements in accordance with the Act.



Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) Standards:  AASB 116 Property, Plant and Equipment;  AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement;  AASB 1041 Revaluation of Non-Current Assets;  AASB 136 Impairment of Assets;  AASB 1051 Land Under Roads;  AASB 138, Intangible Assets  AASB 5, Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations  AASB 1049 Whole of Government and General Government Sector Financial Reporting.



State Government Financial Guidelines.



Department of Treasury and Finance - Financial Reporting Directions and Guidance Notes: FRD 19, Private Provision of Public Infrastructure - 2003 FRD 100, Financial Reporting Directions – Framework – 2005 FRD 103D, Non-Current Physical Assets - 2009 FRD 106,Impairment of Assets - 2005 FRD 109, Intangible Assets - 2005 FRD 118B, Land Under Declared Roads – 2010



Department of Planning and Community Development Guidelines: 2004, Guidelines for Developing an Asset Management Policy, Strategy and Plan 2005, Guidance Note – Fair Value Asset Valuation Methodologies for Victorian Local Governments 2006, Guidelines for Reporting and Measuring the condition of Road Assets

PAGE 261


Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

2006, Accounting for non-current physical assets under AASB 116 2010, Model Financial Report 

Victorian Auditor-General's Office Reports: 2004, Beyond the Triple Bottom Line – Measuring and Reporting on Sustainability; 2014, Asset Management and Maintenance by Councils; Local Government: Results of previous Audits

Frequency and Method of Valuation In implementing this policy Council will:  Review financial valuation of Council owned or controlled non-current asset classes, as at 30 June each year, including assessment of impairment, and maintain supporting documentation for audit purposes;  Conduct Asset Revaluations in accordance with Appendix A -Condition and Valuation Table, in this Policy;  Adopt Asset Standard Lives in accordance with Appendix A -Condition and Valuation Table, in this Policy;  Apply the adopted valuation method and frequency for each Asset Class, as per Appendix A -Condition and Valuation Table, in this Policy;  Ensure that condition assessments for each Asset Class are conducted in accordance with Appendix A -Condition and Valuation Table, in this Policy;  Ensure that corporate systems record current asset values for reporting in audited financial statements within the Annual Report.

5. Responsibilities and Delegations The following key roles, positions and groups have defined functions as follows: 

Council:

Responsible for:  Policy approval;  Responsible for stewardship of community services and associated sustainment of infrastructure assets; and  Responsible for providing resources for Policy implementation. 

Chief Executive and Executive Team:

Responsible for:  Procedure approval. 

Directors responsible for Asset Groups:

Responsible for:  Coordination of corporate financial valuation process. Managers Finance: Responsible for: 

Coordination of corporate financial valuation process;

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Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

 

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Managing and keeping the corporate Finance System up to date; and Reporting Fair Value in the financial statements, including impairment.

Coordinator GIS and Asset Information: Responsible for:  Managing and keeping the corporate Asset Management System up to date;  Coordinating collection of asset inventory and condition data;  Valuation of all Council assets except for building and land assets; and  Assessment of asset impairment.

6. Audit and Review This policy will be monitored continuously to ensure its relevance in terms of community needs and expectations, Council goals and targets and statutory requirements. The Chief Executive / Executive Team shall review compliance with this policy on an ongoing basis and amend the policy if it is no longer deemed relevant. The Asset Valuation and Revaluation Policy shall be reviewed every four (4) years, in line with Council elections and review of the Council Plan, and within six months of the adoption of the Council Plan. Asset Valuation and Revaluation Procedures shall be reviewed annually.

7. References Internal: This Policy is to be read in conjunction with the following Council documents:     

Council Plan 2013-2017 (June 2013) Asset Management Policy (Oct. 2013) Asset Capitalisation Policy Asset Valuation and Revaluation Procedure Asset Management Plans

External: This Policy is to be read in conjunction with the following External documents:       

Local Government Act 1989 Australian Accounting Standards Board, Accounting Standards, 2004 Department of Treasury and Finance: Financial Reports and Guidance Notes Department of Planning and Community Development Guidelines State Government Financial Guidelines Victorian Auditor General’s Reports Australian Infrastructure Financial Management Guidelines – Edition 1.0, 2009

Schedule of Changes & Amendments: Version

Date

Changes / Amendments

1.10

May 2014

Draft

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Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

APPENDIX A - CONDITION AND VALUATION TABLE Valuation Method Asset Group1

ROADS - SEALED

Asset Class 4

Recognised (Y/N) 5

Fair Value Method 6

If DRC Age-based or Cond-Based

Condition Assessment Frequency (Years)

What % Condition Inspection Annually

Revaluation Frequency (Years)

Adopted Asset Life

Depreciation Method

Wearing Course - Asphalt

Sealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

25

Condition-Based

Wearing Course – Spray Seals

Sealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

15

Condition-Based

Pavement (Incl. E/Works & Formation)

Sealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

100

Condition-Based

Wearing Course - Asphalt

Sealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

25

Condition-Based

Wearing Course – Spray Seals

Sealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

15

Condition-Based

Pavement (Incl. E & F)

Sealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

100

Condition-Based

Kerb and Channel

Kerb and Channel – All Types

Sealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

50

Condition-Based

Unsealed Roads

Wearing Course

Unsealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

20

Condition-Based

Earthworks & Formation

Unsealed Roads

Y

GRC

N/A

N/A

1

Indefinite

Not Depreciated

Unsealed Car parks

Wearing Course

Unsealed Roads

Y

DRC

3

33

1

30

Condition-Based

Earthworks & Formation

Unsealed Roads

Y

GRC

N/A

N/A

1

Indefinite

Not Depreciated

Floodways

Concrete Floodways (Incl. E & F)

Unsealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

100

Condition-Based

Sealed Floodways – Spray Seals

Unsealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

15

Condition-Based

Sealed Floodways – Pavements (Incl. E & F)

Unsealed Roads

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

100

Condition-Based

Asset Category 2

Sealed Roads (Incl. aerodrome runways, taxiways & aprons, and roads at livestock exchange

Sealed Car parks (Incl. car parks at aerodrome & livestock exchange)

ROADS UNSEALED

PATHWAYS

Condition Assessment

Asset Component 3

Condition

Rigid Pathways

Concrete/Brick/Bluestone/P aver P/Ways

Pathways

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

50

Condition-Based

Non-Rigid Pathways

Asphalt Pathways

Pathways

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

25

Condition-Based

Unsealed Pathways

Pathways

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

25

Condition-Based

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Valuation Method Asset Group1

BRIDGES & MAJOR CULVERTS

Asset Category 2

STORMWATER DRAINAGE

Asset Component 3

Asset Class 4

Fair Value Method 6

If DRC Age-based or Cond-Based

Condition Assessment Frequency (Years)

What % Condition Inspection Annually

Revaluation Frequency (Years)

Adopted Asset Life

Depreciation Method

Miscellaneous Paved Areas

Pathways

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

50

Condition-Based

Bridges

Super-Structure

Bridges

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

50

Condition-Based

(Incl. footbridges & boardwalks)

Sub-Structure

Bridges

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

100

Condition-Based

Abutments

Bridges

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

100

Condition-Based

Super-Structure

Bridges

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

50

Condition-Based

Sub-Structure

Bridges

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

50

Condition-Based

Abutments

Bridges

Y

DRC

Condition

3

33

1

50

Condition-Based

Structure – Long Life (Heritage)

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

150

Condition-Based

Structure – Long Life (Other)

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

100

Condition-Based

Structure – Short Life

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

50

Condition-Based

- Shade Sails

Major Culverts

BUILDINGS & STRUCTURES

Condition Assessment

Recognised (Y/N) 5

Buildings (Incl. buildings at aerodrome, livestock exchange & landfill)

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

20

Condition-Based

Roof

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

50

Condition-Based

Building Services (Mechanical)

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

25

Condition-Based

Fit Out

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

25

Condition-Based

Swimming Pools

Pool Structures (Shells)

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

80

Condition-Based

Pool Pumps & Water Treatment Systems

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

1

30

Condition-Based

Poppet Heads

Poppet Heads

Buildings

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

80

Condition-Based

Stormwater Drainage

Pipes

Drainage

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

1

100

Straight-Line

Pits & Endwalls

Drainage

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

1

100

Straight-Line

Minor Culverts

Drainage

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

1

50

Straight-Line

Open Channel Drains (Lined Only)

Drainage

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

1

25

Straight-Line

Gross Pollutant Traps

Drainage

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

1

100

Straight-Line

Drainage Pumps & Housings

Drainage

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

1

30

Straight-Line

Dam/Retardation Basin Walls & Levies

Drainage

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

1

100

Straight-Line

(Incl. drainage systems at livestock exchange)

Flood Control

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Valuation Method Asset Group1

PUBLIC FURNITURE & FIXTURES

Asset Category 2

Open Space Amenities

Traffic Control

Street Lighting

Condition Assessment

Asset Class 4

Recognised (Y/N) 5

Fair Value Method 6

If DRC Age-based or Cond-Based

Condition Assessment Frequency (Years)

What % Condition Inspection Annually

Revaluation Frequency (Years)

Adopted Asset Life

Depreciation Method

Residential Bins

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

1

15

Straight-Line

Bins & Surrounds

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Outdoor Picnic Sets

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

20

Condition-Based

Outdoor Furniture

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Barbeques

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

25

Condition-Based

Bus Shelters

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

30

Condition-Based

Township & Boundary Signs

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

10

Condition-Based

Bollards

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Christmas Decorations

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Power Distribution Boxes

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Bicycle Racks

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Flagpoles

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Traffic Calming Devices

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Traffic Lights

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

40

Straight-Line

Guardrails

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

30

Straight-Line

Traffic Islands / Roundabouts

Public Furniture & Fixtures

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Heritage Street Lighting

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

40

Straight-Line

Decorative Street Lighting

Public Furniture &

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

25

Straight-Line

Asset Component 3

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Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

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Valuation Method Asset Group1

Asset Category 2

Condition Assessment

Recognised (Y/N) 5

Fair Value Method 6

If DRC Age-based or Cond-Based

Condition Assessment Frequency (Years)

What % Condition Inspection Annually

Revaluation Frequency (Years)

Adopted Asset Life

Depreciation Method

Sports& Flood Lighting

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

25

Straight-Line

Public Lighting (Incl. Security Lighting)

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

25

Straight-Line

Miscellaneous

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

20

Straight-Line

Irrigation Pumps & Housings

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

30

Straight-Line

Irrigation

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

25

Straight-Line

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

20

Straight-Line

Land - Freehold

Land

Y

MV

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

Indefinite

Not Depreciated

Land - Controlled

Land

Y

MV

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

Indefinite

Not Depreciated

Land Under Roads - Roads pre 1/7/2008

Land

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Land Under Roads - Roads post 1/7/2008

Land

Y

MV

N/A

N/A

N/A

1

Indefinite

Not Depreciated

Easements

Land

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

35

Condition-Based

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

25

Condition-Based

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

25

Condition-Based

Asset Component 3

Asset Class 4

Fixtures Public Lighting

Other Public Furniture & Fixtures Water Supply

Stand Pipes Land

Sports Fields and Courts

Playing surface (Grassed) Playing surface (Synthetic) Playing surface (Asphalted)

LAND IMPROVEMENTS

Spectator Areas

Spectator Areas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Concrete & Sealed

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

25

Condition-Based

Landscaping (Incl. garden beds, trees, nature reserves and non-sporting surfaces)

Landscaping

Land Improvements

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

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Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Valuation Method Asset Group1

Asset Category 2

CULTURAL

(No associated AM Plan)

Fair Value Method 6

If DRC Age-based or Cond-Based

Condition Assessment Frequency (Years)

What % Condition Inspection Annually

Revaluation Frequency (Years)

Adopted Asset Life

Depreciation Method

Retaining Walls

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

30

Condition-Based

Wharves, Jetties & Pontoons

Wharves & Jetties

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

80

Condition-Based

Pontoons

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

40

Condition-Based

Fences and Gates

Fences & Gates

Land Improvements

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Utilities

Optic Fibre Cable

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

20

Straight-Line

Livestock Exchange Yards

Yard Pavements (Concrete & Sealed)

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

30

Condition-Based

Fences & Structures

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

50

Condition-Based

Electrical Utilities

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

50

Straight-Line

Plumbing (Gas, Water & Sewer)

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

10

Straight-Line

Miscellaneous

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Age

N/A

N/A

3

20

Straight-Line

Play Grounds

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

20

Condition-Based

Skate Parks

Public Furniture & Fixtures

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

20

Condition-Based

BMX Tracks

Land Improvements

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

20

Condition-Based

Monuments & Statues

Monuments, Statues & Fountains

Y

MV

Age

N/A

N/A

2

100

Straight-Line

Plaques

Monuments, Statues & Fountains

N

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Drinking Fountains

Monuments, Statues & Fountains

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

10

Condition-Based

Water Features

Monuments, Statues & Fountains

Y

DRC

Condition

3

N/A

3

100

Condition-Based

Internal Artworks

Artworks

Y

MV

N/A

N/A

N/A

3

N/A

Not Depreciated

Artworks

Y

MV

N/A

N/A

N/A

3

N/A

Not Depreciated

Play Spaces

Monuments, Statues & Plaques

Fountains & Water Features Artworks

External Artworks

PLANT &

Asset Class 4

Walls

Other Land Improvements PLAY SPACES

Asset Component 3

Condition Assessment

Recognised (Y/N) 5

Antique Items

Miscellaneous Antique Items

Artworks

Y

MV

N/A

N/A

N/A

3

N/A

Not Depreciated

Plant and

Plant - Heavy

Plant and

Y

HC

Age

N/A

N/A

N/A

20

Straight-Line

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Good Governance and Decision-Making - Reports

Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

Valuation Method Asset Group1

EQUIPMENT

Asset Category 2

Asset Component 3

Equipment

Asset Class 4

Condition Assessment

Recognised (Y/N) 5

Fair Value Method 6

If DRC Age-based or Cond-Based

Condition Assessment Frequency (Years)

What % Condition Inspection Annually

Revaluation Frequency (Years)

Adopted Asset Life

Depreciation Method

Equipment Plant - Light

Plant and Equipment

Y

HC

Age

N/A

N/A

N/A

10

Straight-Line

Light Vehicles

Plant and Equipment

Y

HC

Age

N/A

N/A

N/A

3

Straight-Line

Other Equipment

Plant and Equipment

Y

HC

Age

N/A

N/A

N/A

5

Straight-Line

Furniture & Office Equipment

Office Equipment, Furniture & Fittings

Y

HC

Age

N/A

N/A

N/A

5

Straight-Line

Software (licensed)

Office Equipment, Furniture & Fittings

Y

HC

Age

N/A

N/A

N/A

5

Straight-Line

WATER RIGHTS

Water Rights

Y

MV

N/A

N/A

N/A

1

N/A

N/A

PLANTATION TIMBER

Forestry Plantation

Y

NPV

N/A

N/A

N/A

1

N/A

N/A

Furniture and Office Equipment

Notes: 1. Asset Management Plans are typically developed at the Asset Group level. 2. Assets will be recognised at the Asset Category level if there is no further Asset Component breakdown in the Asset Hierarchy. A lifecycle management plan is typically developed for each Asset Category, within the relevant Asset Management Plan. 3. Assets will be recognised at the Asset Component level. Renewal modelling will typically be considered at the Asset Component level. 4. Asset Class is a term defined in Australian Accounting Standards and is used in financial valuation and capitalisation processes. Asset Class defines the level at which council's Balance Sheet will be reported. This is also defined in the Asset Group sections of the Asset Capitalisation Policy. 5. Recognition of an individual asset may be at either the Asset Category of the Asset Component level. This is further defined in the Asset Capitalisation Policy. 6. Fair Value Acronym Definitions: DRC = Depreciated Replacement Cost GRC = Gross Replacement Cost (i.e. Recognised but not depreciated) HC = Historical Cost (Held at Cost) MV = Market Value NPV= Net Present Value

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Ordinary Meeting - 28 May 2014

8.

URGENT BUSINESS

Nil. 9.

NOTICES OF MOTION

Nil.

10. COUNCILLORS' REPORTS 11. MAYOR'S REPORT 12. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER'S REPORT 13. CONFIDENTIAL (SECTION 89) REPORTS Nil.

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20140528 council meeting agenda 28 may 2014