Page 1

2013/2014

GRANDE PRAIRIE

ECONOMIC PROFILE

RESOURCEFUL SPIRIT, GROWING OPPORTUNITY


___________________________________________ Prepared by Chelsea Lewis and Brian Glavin, this profile provides relevant information for businesses and industries interested in investing in Grande Prairie. In our efforts to direct and assist in the overall economic growth of the region, the City of Grande Prairie would be pleased to provide you with guidance and information tailored to meet your needs.

Brian Glavin ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

Any questions regarding this publication can be directed to:

City of Grande Prairie, Economic Development Department PHONE

780.538.0475 |

EMAIL

ecdevinfo@cityofgp.com |

WWW.CITYOFGP.COM/ECDEV

Bag 4000 – 10205-98 Street, City Hall, Grande Prairie, AB, Canada T8V 6V3

__________________________________________ The information in this publication has been compiled from sources deemed reliable. While every attempt has been made to ensure the accuracy of this guide, some information is subject to change without notice. This guide is intended as an information source and does not imply endorsement of any service, association or organizations. The City of Grande Prairie will not be responsible for any loss, damage or claim arising from or related to an interpretation, use or reliance on the information contained in this publication.


CONTENTS ______________________________________________________ 04

Profile Highlights

22 Transportation

06

Location & Distance to Markets

23

Environmental Initiatives

08 Demographics

24 Utilities

10 Education

26 Downtown

12

Labour Force

28

Parks & Recreation

13

Innovation & Opportunity

30

Arts & Culture

14

The Grande Prairie Business Advantage

32

Health Care

16

Business Costs

33

Sector Profile: Agriculture

17 Taxation

34

Sector Profile: Forestry

18 Development

35

Sector Profile: Oil & Gas

19 Incentives

36

Sector Profile: Retail

20 Housing

39

Sector Profile: Tourism

03


PROFILE HIGHLIGHTS

04

AERIAL VIEW OF GRANDE PRAIRIE


Demographics

Investment & Amenities

Grande Prairie is the youngest city in Canada with a median age of

Significant recent investments in infrastructure, arts and culture,

30.3 and one of the fastest growing communities in North America.

sport and recreation, and health care facilities include:

The 2011 federal census recorded 55,032 residents and our popula-

• $621 million regional hospital and cancer centre opening 2017

tion continues to grow at more than 4% per year.

• $10 million renovation of the Art Gallery of Grande Prairie • $109 million world-class aquatics and wellness facility

Business Advantages • No sales taxes

• Further expansion to Muskoseepi Park, Grande Prairie’s central green space • Renovation and redevelopment of Revolution Place, Grande Prairie’s largest events and entertainment complex

• A Regional trading area population of over 260,000 people • Most businesses are exempt from business licenses • Ranked as Most Entrepreneurial City in Canada for three years in

a row

Labour Force & Major Industry A young and educated population offers a valuable and highly

Complementary Publications RELOCATION GUIDE WWW.C

ITYOFG

P.COM

A great resource for newcomers to 2014

sidering making the move. This annual

skilled workforce to the region’s major economic sectors. The region boasts extraordinary crop quality with13.6% (or 3.3 million hectares) of Alberta’s cropland, making agriculture an important component of the region’s diverse economy.

Grande Prairie or those who are conpublication is produced for businesses,

RES O URCEFUL S PI RI T, GRO W I N G O PPO RTUN I TY

families and individuals to learn more about why Grande Prairie is an excellent place to live, work, and play. www.cityofgp.com/livehere

Forestry contributes significantly to the region’s economy as northwestern Alberta produces a substantial amount of the province’s pulp, oriented strand board and dimensional lumber. Oil and gas provide tremendous opportunities for companies involved in the extraction and processing of energy resources as well as for supporting companies in transportation, business management, engineering, consulting, information technology, communications, and manufacturing. As a strategic regional hub for retail and industrial trade and commerce, Grande Prairie is a lucrative market for local and multi-national retailers. Retail spending in the city represents $3.5 billion, spread over a retail inventory of 3.88 million square feet. A recent Retail Market Analysis shows the market has a residual demand for 740,000 square feet of new stores. A growing sport tourism industry is developing Grande Prairie into

MEETING SPACE FACILITIES GUIDE You’ll want to refer to this publication when are planning your next event, meeting or conference. Find room dimensions, photos, facility amenities, and accommodation information for every space in Grande Prairie. www.cityofgp.com/livehere

SPORTS FACILITIES GUIDE When you’re planning to host a sporting event, competition or tournament, this is your one-stop guide for information on all Grande Prairie and surrounding area sport facilities, their amenities, map locations, and photos. www.cityofgp.com/livehere

a community of choice for high calibre sport, recreation and cultural events. The city will host the 2015 Alberta Special Olympics and the 2015 Tour of Alberta cycling event.

05


LOCATION & DISTANCE TO MARKETS

06

SUMMER BALLOONS PROFILE LEAVING MUSKOSEEPI PARK | 2013 ECONOMIC

LLOYD DYKSTRA


Location Advantage Grande Prairie is located 456 kilometres northwest of Edmonton and is the largest city between Edmonton and Anchorage, Alaska. The

Distance to Markets CITY

DISTANCE (KM)

DISTANCE (MILES)

city is well positioned to access markets across Canada and beyond.

Edmonton, AB

456

284

Highways 40 and 43 and CN rail connect Grande Prairie to major mar-

Calgary, AB

750

466

Fort McMurray, AB

756

470

The city services a trading area of over 260,000 people spanning

Red Deer, AB

608

378

northwestern Alberta, northeastern British Columbia, and the

Dawson Creek, BC

131

81

Vancouver, BC

1,192

741

Prince Rupert, BC

1,251

777

Toronto, ON

3,830

2,380

Seattle, WA

1,304

810

Portland, OR

1,583

983

kets and ports across North America.

Northwest Territories. As a strategic regional hub for trade and commerce, Grande Prairie proves to be a lucrative market for both local and multi-national retailers with names like Costco, Bed Bath & Beyond, and Target. Air travel continues to expand rapidly, with 13 scheduled daily flights to Calgary and Edmonton.

35 Peace River

Fairview 2

2 49

43

Sexsmith

Hythe

Wembley Beaverlodge

Grande Prairie

34

2 Valleyview

40 43 Whitecourt

Grande Cache

16

44

Edmonton

Hinton

07


DEMOGRAPHICS

08

ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL STREET PERFORMERS FESTIVAL IN DOWNTOWN | WILLIAM VAVREK


Grande Prairie is the youngest city in Canada and one of the fastest growing in North America.

Population

55,032

Several smaller communities bring the total primary trading area population to 150,000 people.

Population division by area 67.1%

City of Grande Prairie

24.8%

County of Grande Prairie #1

2.9%

Beaverlodge

2.6%

Sexsmith

1.7%

Wembley

1.1%

Hythe

The city has more residents under the age of 5 than over 65

City of Grande Prairie

6,000

10 to 14

3,225

1,505

15 to 19

3,675

1,610

20 to 24

5,255

1,005

25 to 29

6,545

1,200

30 to 34

5,225

1,295

35 to 39

4,265

1,485

40 to 44

3,585

1,415

45 to 49

3,760

1,810

50 to 54

3,390

1,825

55 to 59

2,565

1,530

60 to 64

1,680

1,015

65 to 69

1,035

645

70 to 74

790

460

75 to 79

610

300

80 to 84

490

160

85 +

495

85

TOTAL

Age Range

55,032

20,335

County of Grande Prairie #1

4,000

3,000

2,000

1,000

85+

80-84

75-79

70-74

65-69

60-64

55-59

50-54

15-19

10-14

0 5-9

Population

5,000

45-49

1,525

40-44

3,600

35-39

5 to 9

7,000

<5

1,465

3.4%

Population Distribution by Age

COUNTY OF GP

4,840

Unemployment rate

2013

2013

The median age of the community is a youthful 30.3

<5

>4.0%

2011

2000

30-34

CITY OF GP

Population growth

25-29

AGE RANGE

16.8%

2006

20-24

Continuing trend of young families and increasing births

Population increase

09


EDUCATION

10

GRANDE PRAIRIE REGIONAL COLLEGE DURING WINTER | JANICE KRETZER-PRYSUNKA


Grande Prairie Regional College (GPRC) Educational, athletic, and cultural opportunities are all part of the contribution GPRC makes to Grande Prairie and the Peace River region. In response to regional, community, and industry demand, GPRC provides a range of customized non-credit pre-employment programming, skills development, safety training, and community interest courses. The College responds to community and industry demand for specific training through the provision of customized programming. GPRC offers 11 Red Seal trade programs through its campuses for Electricians, Millwrights, Automotive Services, Carpenters, Heavy Equipment Technicians, Instrument Technicians, Motorcycle Mechanics, Parts Technicians, Plumbers, Steamfitter/Pipefitters, and Welders. GPRC WOLVES VOLLEYBALL | JKP IMAGES

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

Population

High School certificate or equivalent

29.7%

College, CEGEP or other non-university certificate or diploma

19.8%

Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma

14.0%

University certificate, diploma or degree

11.5%

University certificate or diploma below the bachelor level

2.8%

Academic upgrading is provided on campus to help students achieve college prerequisites, high school preparation, or competency in English as a Second Language. Instruction is available for foreign students preparing for post-secondary study in Canada. Workforce Development provides hundreds of non-credit career training or personal interest courses annually as well as several certificate programs to enhance the skills of working professionals. These courses are constantly evolving in response to the needs of the community and the job market. www.gprc.ab.ca

MAJOR FIELD OF STUDY

Population

Engineering & Related

6,400

Business

4,230

• Diploma and certificate programs for full or part-time study

Health & Related

3,090

• University transfer, diploma and certificate programs

Education

1,630

Transportation

1,480

Social Sciences & Law

1,290

Programs:

• Students may complete some degrees on campus through

agreements with other institutions

• Apprenticeship and pre-employment trades training • Adult high school equivalency completion; • Credit programs in the areas of Liberal Arts, Science, Education,

Agriculture & Resources

640

Humanities

630

Arts & Communications

410

Science & Technology

375

• Baccalaureate degrees and master degrees in collaboration

Math & Computer Science

330

Physical Education, Nursing, Human Services, Fine Arts, Business,

Technology, Academic Upgrading, Trades and Technical training,

Agriculture and Environmental Sciences

with universities

National Household Survey, 2011

11


LABOUR FORCE

Grande Prairieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s young, educated population offers a valuable and highly skilled workforce to the region's major economic sectors, including agriculture, forestry, oil and gas, retail services, and tourism.

1 2

INDUSTRY

AVERAGE WAGE IN ALBERTA

Agriculture

$17.38/hr

Forestry

$24.37/hr

ALBERTA1

GRANDE PRAIRIE2

Oil & Gas

$31.19/hr

Working Age Population

3,069,900

65,500

Mining

$31.67/hr

Employment

2,149,600

51,800

Utilities

$30.95/hr

Unemployment Rate

4.6%

3.2%

Construction

$27.21/hr

Participation Rate

73.4%

81.8%

Manufacturing

$30.92/hr

Wholesale Trade

$24.38/hr

Retail Trade

$18.67/hr

Transportation & Warehousing

$29.70/hr

GRANDE PRAIRIE

Culture & Recreation

$17.16/hr

Average Household Income

$126,877

Real Estate & Finance

$22.65/hr

Per Capita

$45,906

Professional & Technical

$28.58/hr

Average Discretionary Household Income

$38,466

Business Servicing

$20.38/hr

Education

$27.68/hr

Health Care

$29.28/hr

Accommodation & Food

$12.28/hr

Other Services

$20.32/hr

Public Administration

$31.67/hr

2013 Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey Alberta Labour Market Outlook 2013, Alberta Enterprise and Education, March 2013

FP Markets - Canadian Demographics 2012

12

2012 Annual Alberta Regional Labour Market Review. Alberta Enterprise and Advanced Education.


INNOVATION & OPPORTUNITY MARY DAHR

The Centre for Research & Innovation (CRI)

development, initial patent search and advice, venture assessment,

Grande Prairie is a community that recognizes innovation as an

research initiatives for the College and region: the Pollutants to

important driver of economic development. Opportunity is a word readily used to describe the city, powered by innovative individuals

technical valuation, financial viability, and project valuation. The CRI also manages the development of two major applied Products (P2P) Initiative and the National Bee Diagnostic Centre. www.thecri.ca

and businesses who contribute to the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth and prosperity. Grande Prairie and area files more patents per capita than any other region in Canada. The CRI leads the development of applied research and innovation as part of the Grande Prairie Regional College and for the region. Funded by the College and Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, the CRI provides accessible innovation and technology commercialization services for businesses throughout northwest Alberta. The CRI provides a robust suite of innovation and applied research services for inventors and researchers through provincial, regional, and community partnerships. The agency helps inventors take their ideas from the drawing board to the real world, by connecting innovators to scientists, researchers, investors, and mentors. Individuals, businesses, not-for-profits and communities can approach the CRI for assistance with concept and product

13


BUSINESS ADVANTAGE

14

THE GRANDE PRAIRIE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IS LOCATED WITHIN CENTRE 2000 | JANICE KRETZER-PRYSUNKA


A City of Entrepreneurs Grande Prairie remains one of the top places to find employment, build a business, and integrate into a growing, thriving community. Strong economic conditions and an entrepreneurial business culture offers abundant opportunity. From 2010 to 2012, the Canadian Federation of Independent Business recognized Grande Prairie as Canada’s Most Entrepreneurial City. Boasting the most small businesses per capita in Canada, Grande Prairie’s entrepreneurs are a vital component to maintaining the strong, vibrant business environment that has a proven ability to withstand even the toughest economic climates. As well as being a hotbed for entrepreneurs, Grande Prairie is home to many large retailers not often seen in similar sized municipalities.

214 PLACE DOWNTOWN

The city attracts national retailers such as: •

Bed Bath & Beyond

Best Buy

• Costco

• HomeSense

Old Navy

• PetSmart

Pier 1 Imports

• Target

The Gap

• Wal-Mart

• Winners

Wholesale Sports

Supporting business in Grande Prairie is the Grande Prairie & District Chamber of Commerce. Comprised of over 1,100 members, representing more than 19,000 employees, the Grande Prairie Chamber is the second largest in Alberta. The Chamber is dedicated to connecting business by creating opportunities for networking, business promotion, advocacy, and policy development. www.grandeprairiechamber.com

ORGANIZATION

Aboriginal Business Canada

WEB ADDRESS

PHONE

www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/eng/1100100033404

780.495.2954

BizPal

www.bizpal.ca

Centre for Research & Innovation

www.thecri.ca

780.539.2807

www.cfofgp.com

780.814.5340

Grande Prairie & District Chamber of Commerce

www.grandeprairiechamber.com

780.532.5340

Peace Region Economic Development Alliance

www.peacecountrycanada.com

780.666.1968

Northwest Corridor Development Corporation

www.nwcorridor.com

780.527.6232

Community Futures

15


BUSINESS COSTS

Employee Compensation

Workplace Compensation

Minimum Wage

of work-related injuries. Employers pay premiums on the insurable

In Alberta the minimum wage for general employees is $9.95, with the exception of liquor servers who earn $9.05.

Overtime Employees are paid 1.5 times their regular wage after eight hours a day or 44 hours per week. www.qp.alberta.ca

Mandatory Fringe Benefits Paid by Employer

WCB-Alberta collects premiums from businesses to cover the costs earnings of all workers based on a maximum annual amount per worker plus any personal coverage you purchase. Premiums are not paid on earnings exceeding the Maximum Insurable Earnings amount per worker ($92,300 for 2014). www.wbcb.ab.ca/employers/2014_rates.asp

Vacation Pay After one year of employment, employees are entitled to two weeks of vacation pay, or 4% of employee’s wages. After five years, employees are entitled to three weeks of vacation with pay, or 6% of the employee’s wages for the year. www.qp.alberta.ca > Employment Standards Code, Section 55

Canada Pension Plan (CPP) Employers contribute 4.95% of an employee's wage to a maximum

General Paid Holidays (9 days)

annual contribution of $2,425.50 (2014). www.cra-arc.gc.ca

New Year’s Day

Alberta Family Day

Good Friday

Victoria Day

Employer Contribution Employment Insurance (EI)

Canada Day

Labour Day

Employers deduct EI premiums from insurable earnings paid to

Thanksgiving Day

Remembrance Day

employees. Employers pay 1.4 times the amount of the employee’s

Christmas Day

premiums and stop deducting premiums when the employee’s maximum insurable earnings ($48,600 for 2014) or the maximum

Group Insurance

employee premium for the year ($913.68 for 2014) is reached.

• Life

• Health

www.cra-arc.gc.ca

• Sickness

• Dental

• Vision

16

Physical/Mental Fitness


TAXATION

Low Tax, High Benefits

ALBERTA CORPORATE TAX RATE

2013 TAX RATE

General

10%

ness. Albertaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s distinct advantage over other provinces in Canada is

Manufacturing & Processing

10%

the absence of a provincial sales tax and low cost tax regime.

Small business

3%

Grande Prairie is an attractive place to build and expand your busi-

CITY PROPERTY MILL RATES

2014 TAX RATE

TAX + EDUCATION & SPIRIT FOUNDATION TAX

Low-density residential

9.5496

11.9345

High-density residential

9.5492

11.9345

General Sales Tax (GST)

5%

Industrial/commercial

15.3448

18.8483

Provincial Sales Tax (PST)

0%

Farm

9.5496

13.0531

TAX RATES

2013 TAX RATE

City of Grande Prairie, Property Tax Bylaw

THE WESTGATE CENTRE'S FIRST PHASE INCLUDES BED BATH & BEYOND, HOMESENSE, PIER 1 IMPORTS, BOUCLAIR, DOLLAR TREE, PARTY CITY, CARTER'S, AND THE SOURCE

17


DEVELOPMENT CONSTRUCTION OF THE NEW HOSPITAL | WILLIAM VAVREK

A Growing City Grande Prairie’s vibrant economy has developed with years of steady growth. The City is in an enviable economic position with several large projects in the works, including a new hospital, museum, and transportation hub. New civic investments since 2009 total $1 billion.

RENDERING OF THE PHILIP J. CURRIE DINOSAUR MUSEUM

RENDERING OF THE NEW CHARLES SPENCER HIGH SCHOOL

18

Several projects are under development, including: •

$621.4 million, Grande Prairie Regional Hospital

$41.6 million, Charles Spencer High School

$27 million, Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum

$17 million, Community Knowledge Campus Sports

$58 million, Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrades,

$38.9 million, Hospital Parkade

$5 million, Downtown Transit Terminal


INCENTIVES DOWNTOWN GRANDE PRAIRIE BEAUTIFICATION

Municipal Incentives Business Revitalization Zones (BRZ) exist to allow businesses in a specific area to raise and administer funds to improve and promote their businesses. The City of Grande Prairie collects tax dollars on their behalf to improve, beautify, and maintain municipally owned lands, buildings, and structures in the area, in addition to any improvements, beautification, or maintenance that is provided at the expense of the municipality. There is one BRZ in Grande Prairie,

Grande Prairie's Industrial Attraction Strategy is in place to ensure adequate water, sanitary and transportation capacity in priority expansion areas and the availability for commercial and industrial lands for development. Key priorities include: â&#x20AC;˘ Water and wastewater infrastructure â&#x20AC;˘ enhancing policy and procedures to ensure competitive

standards and costs

operated by the DownTown Association. The City of Grande Prairie is committed to working with its partners to offer a competitive advantage with respect to infrastructure, service levels and costs to commercial and industrial development.

19


HOUSING

20


Local Market Grande Prairie’s local real estate market remains affordable. Home

2013 HOUSING STATISTICS

prices have risen more than 5% over the last year, but remain low relative to the average household income. The overall cost of living

Number of Approved Permits

remains relatively low in comparison to similar cities as well as major

Value of Construction

urban centres.

Average Residential Home Price

In 2013, a total of 4,938 permits were issued for new buildings. The

Average rent 2 bedroom suite

value of construction projects in 2013 increased by 10% from 2012.

Apartment vacancy rate

4,938 $280,406,894 $288,7383 $1,1244 1.3%4

Canadian Real Estate Association Statistics creastats.crea.ca/area/ Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation Rental Market Statistics, Spring October 2013, www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca 3 4

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Value of residential permits

$71,375,061

$71,092,577

$77,487,196

$136,292,548

$117,795,000

Value of commercial permits

$206,688,893

$26,087,910

$53,763,891

$49,042,817

$51,769,025

Value of industrial permits

$5,215,000

$2,364,976

$59,375,165

$8,775,535

$8,538,763

Value of gov’t & institutional permits

$5,484,562

$28,936,620

$6,266,692

$61,956,945

$102,304,256

$288,763,515

$128,482,082

$196,891,944

$256,067,945

$280,407,044

Number of single family dwellings starts

268

270

328

491

393

Number of dwellings starts

314

278

461

611

596

1,105

1,010

1,056

1,405

1,119

TYPE OF CONSTRUCTION

Total permit value

Total number of permits

140,000

16.0%

14.0%

120,000

12.0%

80,000 8.0% 60,000 6.0% 40,000

Household Income Household Discretionary Income

(Income after subtracting taxes and essential expenses)

2 Bedroom Rental (% of income)

4.0%

20,000

2.0%

0 Fort St John

Prince George

Grande Prairie

Red Deer

Lethbridge

Medicine Hat

Alberta

Fredericton

Cape Breton

Charlottetown

St. John’s

0.0% Canada

Income

10.0%

Percent of Income

100,000

21


TRANSPORTATION HIGHWAY 43

Highways

Commodities such as grain, coal, oil, and wood products are com-

Three major highways link Grande Prairie to the rest of Alberta,

monly shipped by rail.

Canada, and the world. This highway infrastructure makes the city the service, retail, and business hub of northwestern Alberta and

Strengthening regional import and export capacity, a new 107 acre

northeastern British Columbia; linking Grande Prairie to Edmonton

Multi-Modal Logistics Park will provide rail-to-truck and truck-to-rail

and British Columbia via Highway 43, the Northwest Territories via

services. Construction is slated to begin in 2014. This new develop-

Highway 2 and the Rocky Mountains via Highway 40.

ment increases options for shippers, reduces costs, and improves market access for regional producers.

The City is located on the CANAMEX trade route, linking Canada with the United States and Mexico. By the end of 2014, the Alberta portion

Grande Prairie Regional Airport

of the trade route will be completely twinned from Grande Prairie to

Grande Prairie Regional Airport connects the region to the Calgary

the border crossing at Coutts, Alberta, allowing for the use of Turnpike

and Edmonton international airports with 13 daily scheduled flights,

Doubles that will reduce shipping costs to and from the region.

provided by Air Canada and WestJet.

The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main commercial and industrial areas are all situated

The airport continues to see rapid passenger growth with an increase

along the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major highways, allowing trucks to be at highway

of 10.6% in 2011 and 7.7% in 2012, ringing in 415,634 passengers.

speeds within minutes.

www.grandeprairieairport.com

Rail

Transit

The Grande Prairie region is served by Canadian National Railway.

The City of Grande Prairie provides scheduled transit service using a

Tracks connect the community with the CN main line at Hinton,

fleet of modern buses. Prospective riders can use Google Transit to

linking us to the ports of Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and the rest of

plan their route to and from any location in the city.

North America.

www.cityofgp.com/transit

This vital transportation system is the most cost effective way of

The Disabled Transportation Society provides door-to-door transpor-

shipping bulk goods out of the region and onto export markets.

tation year-round for persons with limited mobility who are unable to use other forms of public transportation safely and with dignity.

22

www.gpdts.ca


ENVIRONMENTAL INITIATIVES MUSKOSEEPI PARK | JANICE KRETZER-PRYSUNKA

Several annual initiatives take place to keep Grande Prairie clean and green: •  Annual Tree Planting: Each year community groups partner with the City of Grande Prairie to plant trees in urban parks throughout the city, planting 2,000 trees in a single day. • City Scrub: The annual program has over 5,000 participants from

schools, businesses, residents and community groups

volunteer 20 minutes of their time to pick up garbage in and

around the city, helping to make Grande Prairie a cleaner place. COMMUNITY GARDEN

• Rotary Green-a-thon: For the past 40 years, the city’s Rotary

Clubs organize a clean-up. Over 100 volunteers and 350 Grade

4-6 students go out to clean the City’s boulevards, ditches, and

green areas.

• Community Garden: A pilot community garden is located at the

corner of 101 Avenue and 98 Street, supported by the Grande

Prairie Garden Club and TD Friends of the Environment Foundation.

• Yard Makeover Contest: With a goal of increasing awareness of

alternative landscaping methods, promoting unconventional

ground covers, decreasing the dependence on grass as a single or

primary landscape cover, and lowering water consumption. One

lucky resident receives a complete overhaul on their yard

each year.

www.cityofgp.com/environment

ANNUAL TREE PLANTING

23


UTILITIES

24


ORGANIZATION

DESCRIPTION

CONTACT

Local provider of water, wastewater, solid waste and recycling services

780.538.0348 www.aquatera.ca

ATCO Electric

Provides electricity to northern and east-central Alberta

General enquiries: 1.800.668.2248 24 hr. emergency: 1.800.688.5506

ATCO Gas

Provides natural gas to northern and east-central Alberta

General enquiries: 1.800.310.5678 24 hr. emergency: 1.800.511.3447 Line alter & install: 780.539.2400

Aquatera

Electricity & Natural Gas

Water & Sanitary Services

Telecommunications

Alberta’s electricity and natural gas

Aquatera is the regional provider of water

Grande Prairie is served by numerous wire-

systems are owned and operated by a

and wastewater treatment, garbage

less and wire line providers. Most service

mix of investor and municipally owned

collection, and recycling services. Grande

providers include high-speed digital net-

companies. The price paid by consumers

Prairie’s landfill site is also owned and oper-

work internet speeds of up to 150Mbps

is determined by supply and demand with

ated by Aquatera. It manages the garbage

along with competitive local telephone

prices fluctuating monthly. Consumers also

collection process, recycling, and the Eco

services to ensure businesses have access

have the option to enter into contracts to

Centre. Aquatera’s solid waste services

to the communication services they need.

ensure price certainty.

are some of the most comprehensive in Alberta. At the curb you can recycle blue

Alberta residential consumers paid

bag materials, yard waste, pumpkins, and

approximately 30% less before rebates

Christmas trees in addition to garbage

for their natural gas than the average Can-

cart service.5

adian in other provinces in 2007.

www.aquatera.ca

WATER RATES, EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 2014

Water Consumption Based Charge $1.366/cubic metre* Wastewater usage Based Charge $1.838/cubic metre Flow Rate

Rate

Charge/Month

Rate

Charge/Month

1x

$10.07

$10.07/month

$7.70

$7.70/month

¾” meter =

1.5 x

$10.07

$15.11/month

$7.70

$11.55/month

1” meter =

2.5 x

$10.07

$25.18/month

$7.70

$19.25/month

1 ½” meter =

5x

$10.07

$50.35/month

$7.70

$38.50/month

2” meter =

8x

$10.07

$80.56/month

$7.70

$61.60/month

3” meter =

17.5 x

$10.07

$176.23/month

$7.70

$134.75/month

4” meter =

31.5 x

$10.07

$317.21/month

$7.70

$242.55/month

6” meter =

70 x

$10.07

$704.90/month

$7.70

$539.00/month

8” meter =

140 x

$10.07

$1,409.80/month

$7.70

$1,078.00/month

Meter Size 5/8” meter =

SOLID WASTE SERVICES RATE SCHEDULE (CHARGES FOR ONE MONTH PERIOD)

Single Family Dwelling Residential Garbage Collection

$18.49 flat rate monthly

Residential Solid Waste Franchise Recovery Fee* (new)

$1.38 flat rate monthly

Recycling Program - Multi/Single Family Residential

$9.66 flat rate monthly

Recycling Program - Non-Residential

$13.66 flat rate monthly

Cardboard Recycling Program - Non-Residential

$14.25 flat rate monthly

www.aquatera.ca/my-account/rates * Meter readings are in cubic metres. There are 220 gallons in one cubic metre. 5

25


DOWNTOWN

26

DOWNTOWN GRANDE PRAIRIE IN THE WINTER | ANGIE PATTERSON


City Centre As the geographic centre of the City, downtown is a clean, busy, and an attractive place to do business. Unique shops, businesses, and Grande Prairie's largest office buildings attract a diverse group of patrons. Banks, furniture stores, clothing, and jewellery boutiques, as well as a great selection of hand crafted and locally grown products at the year-round farmers' market make for a self-sustaining downtown.

Investment The City of Grande Prairie has invested heavily in the downtown in recent years. Investments have included: • Community Village

ANNUAL GRANDE PRAIRIE INTERNATIONAL STREET PERFORMERS FESTIVAL

$500,000

• Centre for Creative Arts

$1,000,000

• Grande Prairie Curling Club

$1,000,000

• Grande Prairie Live Theatre

$1,000,000

• Protective Services Building

$1,500,000

• Art Gallery of Grande Prairie

$10,000,000

• CAIRN on the Boulevard

$14,000,000

• Montrose Cultural Centre

$26,000,000

The downtown has also witnessed a substantial amount of private investment. Assessed values have increased from $95 million in 2001, to over $205 million in 2011. Downtown vacancy is 2.16%.

Revolution Place At the very centre of the downtown is Revolution Place, comprised of the Bowes Family Gardens and the Revolution Arena. It has over 18,000 square feet of flexible banquet and meeting space, making it an ideal venue to host major fundraisers, gala events, banquets, and balls.

MONTROSE CULTURAL CENTRE | TEEPLE ARCHITECTS, SHAI GIL PHOTOGRAPHY

The Revolution Arena is a 3,228 seat multi-purpose arena, home to the Grande Prairie Storm and concert venue attracting performances such as Keith Urban, Rihanna, Backstreet Boys, Elton John, and more. www.cityofgp.com/crystalcentre

Montrose Cultural Centre The Montrose Cultural Centre houses the Grande Prairie Public Library, the Art Gallery of Grande Prairie, and the Teresa Sargent Hall, one of the largest event spaces in the City. This modern building is a welcome and recent addition to the community, integrating art, culture, and learning under one roof. www.cityofgp.com/montrose

The DownTown Business Association Dedicated to unifying, marketing, promoting, lobbying and liaising on behalf of its members, the DownTown Business Association is a volunteer leadership group that operates as a Business Revitalization Zone and is governed by a board of directors. www.gpdowntown.com

27


PARKS & RECREATION

28

POOL AT EASTLINK CENTRE | SUZANNE SAGMEISTER


Activities for the Entire Family Whether it’s surfing at our state-of-the-art Eastlink Centre, walking the trails of Muskoseepi Park, or planning a camping trip into the great outdoors, Grande Prairie is abundant in recreational opportunities. The city boasts numerous accessible parks, golf courses, and spectacular green spaces, while the foothills south of Grande Prairie provide year-round activity for hikers, bikers, campers, snowmobilers, skiers, and outdoor recreationalists.

Eastlink Centre After opening its doors in 2011, the Eastlink Centre has become Northern Alberta’s destination for aquatics and recreation. Offering over 280,000 square feet of fitness and fun, in two field

Muskoseepi Park

houses, one of Canada’s three Surfing FlowRiders, a 50 metre

Providing 20 kilometres of trails along the Bear Creek corridor,

Olympic-sized pool, 25 metre program pool, indoor splash park,

Muskoseepi Park is Grande Prairie’s central green space. Running

and 200 metre indoor running track. The fitness area boasts 16,000

through the heart of the city, the park features over 1,100

square feet of elite training machines and free weights. To top off

acres of parkland with six distinct areas offering their own

a great day of activities you can go for a ride in the lazy river, or

special opportunities.

enjoy the hot tub, steam room, and sauna room. The list of amenities including retail, food, and beverage as well as services goes

The park includes a 10,000 square foot pavilion, the Grande Prairie

on and on. Since opening, the facility continues to host over 2,000

Museum, tennis courts, playground, spray park, lawn bowling, fish-

visitors daily.

ing pond, skating in the winter, mini golf and amphitheatre. www.cityofgp.com/muskoseepi

The Eastlink Centre is quickly becoming the hub for local, regional and now national sporting events, such as the Junior National

Ski and Bike

Racquetball Championships in April 2014, a first for the Province.

Both the Nitehawk Recreation Area and the Wapiti Nordic Ski Club

www.cityofgp.com/eastlink

are open year around. Skiers, snowboarders and downhill mountain bikers delight in the recreational opportunities provided by the Nitehawk recreation area. Offering nine exciting runs for all abilities and two terrain parks, fully lit for night skiing, the hill is kept open during the summer for lift-assisted downhill mountain biking. www.gonitehawk.com

www.wapitinordic.com

PAVILION AT MUSKOSEEPI PARK | RANDY VANDERVEEN

29


ARTS & CULTURE

30

ART GALLERY OF GRANDE PRAIRIE | TEEPLE ARCHITECTS


Experience the Rich History Art The Art Gallery of Grande Prairie maintains the largest public art collection in the region. It is a gathering place for those interested in arts and culture, and where new and unique experiences are found in every direction. As a category ‘A’ institution, the gallery is permitted to receive donations of works of art of outstanding significance and national importance. The permanent collection stands at approximately 600 works of art, almost exclusively created in Alberta in the mid to late 20th Century. www.aggp.ca

The Centre for Creative Arts provides a variety of art programming to the community and an environment where residents and visitors can gather to experience, create, and celebrate art and culture. www.creativecentre.ca

History Situated in Muskoseepi Park, the Grande Prairie Museum develops

BRIDGE TO GRANDE PRAIRIE MUSEUM | JANICE KRETZER-PRYSUNKA

and hosts educational programs, tours and interactive displays, and temporary exhibits to tell the story of the region’s heritage.

Theatre

The Heritage Village features historical buildings from the area, pro-

Several local theatres add to the thriving art community in Grande

viding visitors with a glimpse of the past. Buildings including the

Prairie. The Showcase Centre is operated by the Grande Prairie

McQueen Presbyterian Church, Grande Prairie Fire Hall, Pipestone

Performing Arts Guild and is home to the Dinner Theatre and Guild

Creek Store, a blacksmith shop, Hudson Bay Outpost, and a display

Gallery. This venue is a pillar of Grande Prairie’s art community.

of agricultural and industrial equipment.

www.showcasecentre.com

www.cityofgp.com/gpmuseum

Grande Prairie Live Theatre operates the 167-seat Second Street The history of the region from the ice age to the present day is

Theatre downtown and is one of Canada’s largest non-profit com-

depicted with an array of interactive displays, information, and

munity theatres. It offers an exciting entertainment venue for date

knowledgeable staff at the Heritage Discovery Centre.

night, family outings, and cultural enrichment. Most uniquely, it pro-

A new museum will serve as a hub for the paleontologists working in the area and showcase a new dinosaur species discovered in the region. Once built, the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum will be an

vides the rare opportunity to experience the talent of local as well as visiting artists and award-winning Canadian and foreign films. www.gplt.ab.ca

extraordinary educational tourism attraction, hosting a world-class

Each year, the theatre hosts the Reel Shorts Film Festival, celebrat-

museum, research facility, and community space.

ing short films and the Canadian, international and local filmmakers

www.curriemuseum.ca

who create these brilliant screen stories.

A facility of this calibre will create a steady flow of top-level scientific

reelshorts.ca

minds into the region, increase tourism and provide residents and

Other productions are held in the Douglas J. Cardinal Performing

visitors with plenty of education and recreation opportunities.

Arts Centre at the Grande Prairie Regional College. www.gprc.ab.ca/theatre

31


HEALTH CARE QUEEN ELIZABETH II HOSPITAL DURING WINTER | WILLIAM VAVREK

Medical Advancements A new regional hospital and cancer centre in Grande Prairie will open its doors in 2017, helping northern patients receive specialized and complex care, closer to home and with shorter wait times. The $620 million regional hospital will function as a regional referral centre, providing health services to the region.

Services • 200 inpatient beds: Including medical, surgical and

rehabilitation, intensive care, cardiac care, neonatal intensive care,

pediatric and mental health beds

• An emergency department: Designed as the primary

emergency facility for the Grande Prairie region, supplemented

by the urgent care services that will be provided at the existing

Queen Elizabeth II Hospital

• Mental health, respiratory therapy, laboratory and pharmacy services • Approximately 4,000 square metres for the nursing and

medical career programs offered by the Grande Prairie

Regional College

The existing Queen Elizabeth II Hospital will continue as a health care facility to be used to provide ambulatory, community, and other health services. The redevelopment provides an opportunity to support integrated, accessible, and family-centred care.

Emergency Medical Services Alberta Health Services (AHS) provides Emergency Medical Services (EMS) through a combination of AHS staff, contracts with municipalities and contracts with private providers. In addition, a comprehensive and responsive emergency medical sys-

• Nine operating rooms: With the ability to expand to 10 in

tem comprised of flight crews, air medical crews, and communications

specialists work to ensure patients across Alberta receive the best care

the future

• A cancer centre: Bringing radiation therapy services to

available in the shortest time possible. STARS is a charitable non-profit

organization that provides 24 hour a day, seven day a week emergency

the community

• Obstetrics: Space for an anticipated 2,150 annual births in the

medical service from bases in Calgary, Edmonton, and Grande Prairie.

www.albertahealthservices.ca www.stars.ca

region by 2025

• Diagnostic imaging: Including an MRI and future

expansion capability

32

HOSPITALS AND FACILITIES

Hospitals

1

Medical Clinics

18


SECTOR PROFILE: AGRICULTURE WHEAT FIELD | LLOYD DYKSTRA

Farmland and Growth

Our region is Alberta’s number two crop producing region and accounted for 5.3% of Alberta’s total value of on-farm livestock and

Grande Prairie was built on a foundation of fertile farmland and 100 years later, agriculture remains an important component of the region’s diverse economy. Despite our northern location, the region boasts extraordinary crop quality.

SHARE OF ALBERTA

Total Cropland (acres)

3,277,256

13.6%

Canola

1,040,997

17.1%

Wheat

878,239

13.1%

Barley

224,618

6.2%

Alfalfa

478,974

13.1%

Oats

173,172

19.4%

Dry Field Peas

128,453

18.2$

Value of Livestock/Poultry

$225 million

5.3%

Cattle and Calves (number)

232,927

4.6%

6,049

1.7%

223,235

1.9%

Pigs (number) Hens and Chickens (number)

6

The cropland acreage totals 3.3 million acres, representing 13.6% of Alberta’s cropland. Agriculture is predominantly concentrated in canola, wheat, barley, and alfalfa.

2011

AGRICULTURE

poultry with a total market value of $335 million in 2011.6

albertacanada.com/business/statistics/peace-country-agriculture.aspx

CANOLA FIELD

33


SECTOR PROFILE: FORESTRY

Economic Engine Grande Prairie’s forestry industry is one of the most important economic engines in the region, with three large operators: Weyerhaeuser, Canfor, and Ainsworth. While it’s unusual to see such a concentration of major operators in a city of Grande Prairie’s size, these operations are among the most competitive in Canada and the top industrial employers in the region.

Contributing significantly to the regional economy through employment opportunities, northwestern Alberta produces 40% of Alberta’s pulp, 64% of its panel board, and 50% of its timber.7 Aspen, Tamarack, Lodgepole Pine, and Black Spruce make up the boreal forest to the south and west of Grande Prairie, serving as a vast reservoir for the local pulp and paper industry. Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd. operates three integrated businesses, including a pulp mill, lumber mill and timberlands division. Over 650 employees contribute to the production of 380,000 tonnes of northern bleached softwood kraft pulp, 340 million board metres of dimensional softwood lumber, and manage 1.1 million hectares of timberland. Ainsworth Lumber Co. Ltd. operates an Oriented Strand Board plant, producing a variety of panel dimensions and grades to suit North American and Asian markets. Production capacity is 730,000 msf-3/8” basis per year. A $300 million expansion will increase the manufacturing capacity to 1.3 billion square feet 3/8” basis per year. Canadian Forest Products Ltd. (Canfor) Canfor harvests logs from tenures located in the interior region of British Columbia and northern Alberta to supply its lumber operations. In 2012, the Grande Prairie sawmill contributed 245.9 MMfbm of lumber produced in Alberta.8

FORESTRY MACHINERY

34

PREDA www.peacecountrycanada.com/forestry.aspx Canfor Corporation, Annual Information Form www.canfor.com/docs/investor-relations/canfor-aif-2012.pdf?sfvrsn=2 7 8


SECTOR PROFILE: OIL & GAS RIVAL TRUCKING

Energy Province Alberta is Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy province. The industry provides tremendous opportunity for companies involved in extraction and processing of energy resources as well as for supporting companies involved in business management, engineering, consulting, information technology, communications and manufacturing. Well known for oil and gas exploration and extraction, Grande Prairie

technology. The Centre for Research and Innovation (CRI) and the Grande Prairie Regional College work to ensure opportunities for innovation and ongoing training and skills development for those working in the industry. An Oil and Gas Certificate, a variety of safety courses as well as Business Leadership certification are available at Grande Prairie Regional College, offering skills development for those interested in a career in the booming industry.

is home to many major oil and gas industry headquarters and oilfield service companies. Multi-national companies such as Conoco Philips, Canadian Natural Resources, Halliburton, Schlumberger, and Trican, in addition to many local entrepreneurs, operate out of the regional hub. The region has approximately 9,000 wells, producing two million cubic meters of oil per year and over 30 billion cubic meters of natural gas. With this significant supply, the region is a major supplier of gas to North American markets.9 With a reserve estimate of over 706 million cubic feet, the McLennan oil sands deposit, located northeast of the city, is slated for further development in the next few years. Unprecedented demands and resource constraints on the energy sector have resulted in companies seeking out new and innovative processes, and an increased focus on research and

9

PREDA www.peacecountrycanada.com/oil-and-gas.aspx

GAS PLANT

35


SECTOR PROFILE: RETAIL THE PRAIRIE MALL

Shopping in the City As a strategic regional hub for retail and industrial trade and com-

Tenant Opportunity Locations on Map MAP LOCATION

VENUE

1

Prudential Lands

local and multi-national retailers. The city is located at the centre of

2

Westgate Centre East

an affluent region consisting of trading area of 260,000 people, fore-

3

Westgate Centre West

4

Vision West Business Park

Retail spending in the total trading area represents $3.5 billion, of

5

Centre West Business Park

which an impressive $2.2 billion comes from the primary trading

6

South 40

7

Stone Ridge

The highest spending is in Comparison Merchandise at 34%, fol-

8

Grande Banks

lowed closely by Groceries and Convenience at 32%. A further 22%

9

Mission Estates

10

Trader Ridge

on clothing, home furnishing and specialty retail signifies a strong

11

Northridge Commercial Centre

disposable income. As our population continues to grow, retail

12

Prairie Mall

13

Cobblestone Lane

14

Downtown Grande Prairie

15

Railtown and Tuscan Square

merce, Grande Prairie has established itself as a lucrative market for

casted to grow by 26,500 over the next decade.

area alone.

is spend on Automotive/RV and Motorsport Parts and Sales and the final 12% on Restaurants and Entertainment. High spending

spending and demand for new stores will continue to be supported by the young, fast growing city. The city has a current retail inventory of 3.88 million square feet, including convenience retail, department stores, entertainment and automotive parts and sales. Total demand for retail is estimated to be 4.63 million square feet, leaving a residual demand for new stores at 740,000 square feet.

36

Other Retail Areas


43

10 1

132 Ave

100 St

R r 63

11

9 4 St

12 116 Ave

116 Ave

92 St

10 t 6S

43

108 Ave

3

2

43

4

14

100 Ave 5

R i c h mo n d Ave 9 9 Ave

100 Ave

13 92 St

100 St

108 St

15

40

Res

8 4 Ave

our

116 St

6

ces Rd

Wapiti

100 St

Road 68 Ave 8 7

9

68 Ave

40

37

670


Retail Market Analysis PRIMARY TRADING AREA (INCLUDING CITY OF GRANDE PRAIRIE)

CITY OF GRANDE PRAIRIE

TOTAL TRADING AREA

Population

Average Income

Population

Average Income

Population

Average Income

2013 Estimated

57,898

$107,026

150,298

$101,553

258,271

$98,894

2016 Projected

62,632

$121,450

156,122

$115,339

265,960

$112,105

2018 Projected

65,863

$128,932

160,030

$122,485

271,359

$118,916

2023 Projected

73,916

$150,149

170,574

$142,478

284,842

$137,703

City of Grande Prairie Retail Trade Area

Residents polled in a recent survey indicated a desire to have more Clothing & Footwear, Full Service Restaurants, Sporting Goods & Toys and Entertainment. Both spending patterns and importance ratings of the respondents validated these sentiments.

Fontas

Sikanni

STA West

STA North

High Level

John D’or Prairie Little Red River Fox Lake Fort Vermilion

Businesses in major retail nodes benefit from traffic counts in excess of

Vermillion Chutes

30,000 to 60,000 vehicles, allowing for high visibility and accessibility.

Keg River

Top responses for full-restaurants: •

Hotchkiss Notikewin

Manning Deadwood Rose Prairie Murdale Clear Prairie Clearh Lone Star ills Charlie Lake Montney Worsel Dixonv y ille Attachie Baldonnel Cherry Hines Creek Point Royce Farrell Creek Weberville FORT ST. Clayhurst Brown Peace Hudson’s Hope vale River Highland Park Roma JOHN Doe River Scotswood Fairview Harmon Valley Moberly Lake Sunset Prairie Rolla Atikameg DAWSON Eaglesham Groundbirch Rycrof t Spring burn CREEK Falher Fellers McLennan Lone Prairie Pouce Coupe Wanham Belloy Donnelly Demmitt Webst Heights Kathleen Grouard Missio er n Lymburn High Prairie Hythe Enilda Wagner Clairmont Kinuso Beaverlodge Lake Tumbler Ridge Wembley Valleyview Smith

PTA

STA East

Red Lobster

Olive Garden

• Montana's10

Cactus Club

Top responses for limited-service restaurants:

Wabasca

• Ethnic Calling Lake

Hondo Chisholm Flatbush Athabasca Swan Hills Fawcett Fox Creek Jarvie Fort Assiniboine Aleza Lake Dapp Sinclair Mills Pibroch Abee Blue Longw Ridge orth Freedom Hutton Whitecourt Penny Green Court Barrhead Vimy Grande Cache Bend Legal Mayerthorpe Birch Cove Gibbons Loos Cherhill Rosevear Peers St Albert Namao Bickerdike Goat River Medicine Lodge Cinema Edson Wildwood EDMONTON Erith Entrance Hinton McBride Cooking Lake Drayton Sunnybrook Pocahontas Dunster New Sarepta Coalspur Barkerville Croydo Valley Red Pass n Station Leyland Foothills Golden Millet Days Junctio n Tete Jaune Cache Keithley Creek Cadom Ma-Me ino -O Beach Jasper Valemount Hoadley Mountain Park Hydraulic Hobbema Albreda Ponoka Rimbey Lempriere Black Creek Bentley Lacombe Williams Lake Horburg Sylvan Lake Thunder River Springhouse

38

Taco Bell

Cafes (Tim Horton’s, Starbucks, Second Cup)

Top responses for comparison retailers: •

Toys "Я" Us

• Chapters •

• IKEA •

American Eagle

Sport Chek

The Retail Market Analysis was prepared by Cushing Terrell Architecture Inc. for the City of Grande Prairie. To view the full report visit www.cityofgp.com/investhere 10

DOWNTOWN GRANDE PRAIRIE

Outback and Old Spagetti Factory

Location Opening in 2014


SECTOR PROFILE: TOURISM KLESKUN HILLS, NORTHEAST OF GRANDE PRAIRIE | LLOYD DYKSTRA

A Growing Industry Tourism is an important and growing industry in Alberta. As one of the province's largest sectors, the industry employs 111,000 people and attracts millions of visitors each year. The Grande Prairie Regional Tourism Association operates the year-round Visitor Information Centre to ensure visitors experience the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s endless opportunities for adventure, discovery, and northern hospitality. www.gptourism.ca

TEEPEE CREEK STAMPEDE | STAR-K PHOTOGRAPHY

With a growing sports tourism industry, Grande Prairie is working to build the capacity of sport organizations to support sport, active living and the economy. Grande Prairie is a community of choice to host international caliber sporting, recreation and cultural events. Past successes include the 1995 Canada Winter Games, 2009 Lieutenant Governor of Alberta Arts Awards and the 2010 Arctic Winter Games. Grande Prairie was recently selected to host the 2015 Alberta Special Olympics and a host community for the 2015 Tour of Alberta. With world class facilities, major airline service, more than 3,000 hotel rooms, dining, and shopping, Grande Prairie is a premier destination for any event.

HYTHE MOTOR SPEEDWAY

39


WWW.CITYOFGP.COM

2014 Grande Prairie Economic Profile  

This profile provides relevant information for businesses and industries interested in investing in Grande Prairie.