Page 1

JUNE 2018

WATER QUALITY REPORT INSIDE


GRADUATING CLASS OF 2018

Thirty Goodyear residents and business owners graduated from this year’s LEAD (Leadership Enrichment And Development) program on March 29. This free, 12-week, 20-hour community leadership program develops individuals to be more effective in their civic life, work with other community groups, and in community building and engagement efforts. More information at goodyearaz.gov/lead

GOODYEAR CITY COUNCIL CALENDAR June 11

4:45 p.m. 5 p.m. 6 p.m.

CFD Board Meeting Work Session Council Meeting

June 18

5 p.m.

Work Session

June 25

6 p.m.

Council Meeting

Work Session times are subject to change. Visit goodyearaz.gov/council-calendar to view updates. Council meetings and work sessions are held at Goodyear Justice Center, Goodyear Municipal Complex, 14455 W. Van Buren St., B101. Visit goodyearaz.gov for meeting schedules and to watch City Council meetings.

GOODYEAR CITY COUNCIL

JUNE 2 FROM 5-9 P.M. GOODYEAR COMMUNITY PARK • 3075 NORTH LITCHFIELD ROAD, 85395

Head out to Goodyear Community Park with your blankets, chairs, family, and friends for Movie Night in the Park! This month’s movie will be played on the outdoor big screen and will begin shortly after dusk. The Splash Pad will be open late for movie night only! Event is pet friendly and free to attend. Food will be available for purchase. For more information call 623-882-7525 or visit goodyearaz.gov/rec

ON THE COVER: The city’s recharge facility at 15600 W. Yuma Road is where treated wastewater goes to be put back into the aquifer. Pictured: Barbara Chappell, environmental services manager (left); Ray Diaz, water conservation specialist; and Gretchen Erwin, water resources planning advisor.

InFocus Magazine Editor: Sherine Zaya Photographer: Geoff Kinnerk

Top row (left to right): Bill Stipp , Joanne Osborne (resigned May 21), Joe Pizzillo, and Brannon Hampton. Bottom row (left to right): Sheri Lauritano, Mayor Georgia Lord, and Vice Mayor Wally Campbell.

2

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus

Layout Production: Sarna OBrien-Trayner Questions or comments, email: communications@goodyearaz.gov


From the Mayor If you’re like me and have piles of recycling to dispose of after your spring cleaning this past season, then please do as I do

and reevaluate what you have gathered. There are many products that can go into your recycling bin and many items that can probably go into your sanitation can for pick up. However, please don’t forget, “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure!”

Mayor Georgia Lord

Did you know there are businesses that will accept the packing peanuts and popcorn, like the UPS store on Estrella Parkway or First Class Business located on Roosevelt Street? Many packing peanuts and popcorn make it into the recycling bin, when they really shouldn’t. Goodwill Industries and Hope’s Closet will accept your used clothing, home items and furniture, and the city of Goodyear has a year round drop-off for those electronic items that are no longer useful! As your mayor, I am very cautious of what is disposed, recycled, or donated and I have to thank the organizations for doing their part in making it easy to drop-off and go. Often times I find treasures in the stores and I am so thankful that a community member did not toss it away, so that I may enjoy the item, too.

Together, we CAN

prevent drownings.

Learn the ABC ’s of water safety: dult Supervision

Supervise children and adults around all water. The caregiver should be sober and know how to swim.

arriers

Block children from unexpectedly getting into water. Make sure drain covers meet standards.

oast-guard Approved Vests and Classes

Take classes to learn how to swim and be able to perform mouth-to-mouth CPR. Wear a life vest while learning to swim.

For more information, visit PreventDrownings.org

Remember to review the guidelines for what may be recycled, and to take a second look at clothing, broken electronics, or items from your home no longer used and donate before disposing. If we all do our part and think before we toss, I truly believe our environment will be beautiful for generations to come!

UNITY INTEGRITY EXCELLENCE

Council Corner

S

ummer is here and I encourage you to get outside and enjoy all that Goodyear has to offer! The environment throughout the city is unique and often times is taken for granted, that I try to remind myself to occasionally slow down and take a look around. The mountain ranges Council Member Sheri Lauritano surrounding our community are full of trails to be explored with your family and friends by bike or foot, or even to camp for a night to sleep under the stars. Bringing along drinking water and healthy snacks to keep your energy high are just a few necessities to ensure your hikes are enjoyable and safe.

After warming up on a trail, why not visit the Loma Linda Park community pool to splash around and cool off? Visiting the community pool is truly stress-free with the certified lifeguard on duty keeping a second set of eyes on your swimmers. The Aquatic staff offers activities throughout the summer months for all ages, from swim lessons to teen nights- just don’t forget the SPF! I’m thankful to be able to spend quality time with my family while participating in the countless activities throughout the city. Goodyear truly is a great place to live, work AND play!

June 2018

3


Traffic Safety Tip This month: Reporting an Accident

A

rizona law (ARS Title 28-661 through 28-664) states that if involved in a collision on the roadway, the driver’s name, address and registration number of the vehicle driven is required for the report. Upon request, the person’s driver license must be presented to the party struck. The driver must stop immediately at the scene of the accident or as close to the accident scene as possible without obstructing traffic more than is necessary to avoid a secondary collision.

When in doubt, contact the Police Department. Many times a driver will panic or think the damage is minor and leave the scene. Keep in mind: leaving the scene of a collision, even on private property, is a crime.

When on private property, or when a vehicle collides with an unattended vehicle, that driver shall immediately stop and either: (a) Locate and notify the operator or owner of the vehicle, providing the name and address of the driver/owner of the vehicle striking the unattended vehicle; or (b) In a conspicuous place on the vehicle struck, leave a written notice with that same information.

#GTK Good To Know

Do you have a traffic-related question or safety topic you would like to appear in the InFocus magazine? Send an email to Goodyear PD Traffic Unit Sgt. J. Seabright at jseabright@goodyearaz.gov or call 623-882-7735.

Outdoor water use likely makes up 50 to 70% of your annual water bill. You can maximize the value of the water you use while reducing usage.

• •

Put water ONLY where you need it – NOT in the street, sidewalk, or patio. Irrigate and sprinkle ONLY when it can be best absorbed – not during the hot sunny hours of the day.

Landscape Watering Guidelines Seasonal Frequency – Days Between Waterings

TREES SHRUBS GROUNDCOVERS AND VINES

Desert Adapted

SPRING Mar-May

SUMMER May-Oct

FALL Oct-Dec

WINTER Dec-Mar

(Typical Root Depth)

14-30 days

7-21 days

30-45 days

36-60 days

24-36 inches

High Water Use

7-12 days

7-10 days

7-12 days

14-30 days

24-36 inches

Desert Adapted

14-30 days

7-21 days

30-45 days

30-45 days

18-24 inches

High Water Use

7-10 days

5-7 days

10-14 days

10-14 days

18-24 inches

Desert Adapted

14-30 days

7-21 days

21-45 days

21-45 days

8-12 inches

High Water Use

7-10 days

2-5 days

10-14 days

10-14 days

8-12 inches

CACTI AND SUCCULENTS

21-45 days

14-30 days

if needed

if needed

8-12 inches

ANNUALS

3-7 days

2-5 days

5-10 days

5-10 days

8-12 inches

WARM SEASON GRASS

4-14 days

3-6 days

15-30 days

15-30 days

6-10 inches

COOL SEASON GRASS

3-7 days

none

7-14 days

7-14 days

6-10 inches

These above guidelines were prepared by Arizona Municipal Water Users Association in consultation with University of Arizona Cooperating Extension Services. The city of Goodyear is one of ten members in AMWUA.

Watering guidelines are for established plants - one year for shrubs; three years for trees. Additional water is needed for new plantings or unusually hot or dry weather. Less water is needed during cool or rainy weather. Drip run times are typically two hours or more for each watering. For more information on healthy landscape watering practices or to find out about water conservation classes offered by the city of Goodyear, visit

goodyearaz.gov/h2o365 4

Watering Depth

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus


Goodyear officials are seeing the light, and more of it is LED. Around the city, in parks, streets and public spaces, traditional lights are being replaced by the far more energy-efficient LED. That stands for “light-emitting diode,” describing a different kind of lighting that produces a lot more lumens per watt, and other things that most of us don’t really need to know. What we do know is that LED lights are better, and last longer, than the old fluorescent or incandescent bulbs as well as traditional outdoor lighting, called high-pressure sodium. story continued on page 6

June 2018

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continued from page 5

While it would be nice to lower energy bills by replacing every single fixture with LED technology, that isn’t the most costeffective approach. Goodyear planners are in the process of assembling an efficient, long-range plan to address the replacements while considering needs throughout the city. Luke Albert has been Goodyear’s city Traffic Engineer for 12 years, and knows his subject thoroughly. He can tell you how many traffic lights (90) and streetlights (9,000) the city has. He understands retrofitting on a wide scale takes time. He also knows it’s worth it. “You have to spend money to retrofit,” he says. “We’ve changed the standards, so all new lights will be LED, providing better visibility at a significantly lower cost.” The new signals have backlit LED street-sign names, and LED luminaires to light the intersections. So far, street name signs at 29 signalized intersections have been retrofitted with LED backlighting, and 27 have had luminaires replaced with LED fixtures. Albert says the savings are already significant, and will continue to grow as the city evaluates future opportunities. “We spend $180,000 per year on electricity for traffic signals, and another $850,000 on street lights. Saving 25 percent of those dollars is a big number,” Albert says. Currently streetlights are the high-pressure sodium, which casts a yellow-tinted light in all directions. LED is a cleaner light, with more of a white or clear color that impacts what colors you see less than the traditional lights. Albert said a secondary saving comes from time spent changing burned-out lights. Since LED lights can last years longer than traditional ones, there is far less maintenance. Goodyear city streets aren’t the only places you can see the gradual conversion to LED lighting. Parks and Recreation Manager David Seid has overseen the change to LED lighting in five parks over the past two years. “When many of our parks were built, standard light bulbs were installed throughout the system. As they age and are need of replacement, that’s the time to convert them to LED technology.” Conversion means saving up to 50 percent in energy consumption. And the technology allows for adjustable illumination similar to a dimmer switch – there’s a lot more besides just “on” and “off.” “What we’ve chosen to do is create a system where we can dim them down, but still have them lit. The system also has the ability to sense motion and respond to nearby activity. So now you have a situation where if police respond to a call for service after park hours, voila – the sensors detect movement, and the lights go on.” The system is smart: a dusk to dawn photocell triggers the light for operation and turns on the light at 30 percent power. Any movement in the immediate area brings them up to 100 percent. After the activity passes, they return to 30 percent. 6

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus

Luke Albert is Goodyear’s Traffic Engineer. He takes a purpose-driven approach to lighting.

And after the parks close at 10 p.m., the lights are on at only 30 percent unless something trips the sensor, at which point the illumination goes up to 60 percent. Seid says with a smile that an occasional dog or rabbit gets extra light, but movement overnight in parks is minimal. Furthermore, LED light is much better at focusing on what is supposed to be illuminated. A standard bulb could have light spillage to a home fairly far from its immediate vicinity. LED bulbs are much more direct, as well as being clearer with fewer shadows, for better visibility. Even if there is light spillage with LED, Seid says the system is built to respond. “Let’s say John Q. Public over at a house near the newer lights, which may be repositioned slightly from the old ones, doesn’t like the brightness of the new lights. We can literally go to the post nearest his home, and adjust that light individually to a more agreeable level. Now he loves the city even more, because we are able to respond to his concern.” Seid displays the Parks Asset Management plan spreadsheet, pointing out that Bullard Wash pathway, for example, has lighting due for replacement in 2028. “As assets are retired, we have every intention of converting everything to LED. It’s in our asset management plan.” Rio Paseo is one park where the lights have been replaced, and the overall effect is cleaner, softer, brighter and more focused light.


“It’s been up for over a year and performed well. We haven’t had any complaints.” Seid says in Loma Linda Park, the tennis courts have been retrofitted with LED lighting as well, and that it may surprise people who go there to play at night. “You can almost be deceived, because as you approach, it looks dark outside the playing surface. But when you walk up, it’s very light. LED focuses very well on the intended area, and doesn’t bleed out into neighborhoods.” He shows the difference between the size of the old traditional light fixture and new LED. “The head of a new light is very small, but those six bulbs illuminate half the court.” Seid says sports courts have higher demands for lighting than the average path. “Some ball fields rolled out LED early on, but the glare, the foot candles, need to be perfected in order for it to be an appropriate application. You need it so someone can track a ball that’s hit, not just traverse a sidewalk.” But tennis courts aren’t the only sports facilities with plans to get upgraded and more energyefficient lighting. Martin Hussey, Superintendent of Facilities for the city of Goodyear, says that at the Goodyear Ballpark, lights are being converted throughout. Walkways outside, as well as offices inside, are now using LED light. While light leak at public buildings and over parking lots isn’t a major concern, he says LED is a big improvement in other ways.

Martin Hussey, Facilities Management Superintendent, stands inside the Cleveland Indian’s development complex at Goodyear Ballpark where several indoor facilities have been changed to LED lighting.

“At night, you can see a clear difference; LED gets rid of shadows, and is a lot cleaner. The old high-pressure sodium lights not only have an orange look and create a lot of shadows even when operating correctly; they also generate a lot of heat.” We all know that’s the last thing desert cities need. So, add a cooler-burning light to the LED advantages of lower maintenance costs and energy savings. One of the areas fully involved in LED conversion is the Goodyear Municipal Complex. Alex Noah, a Tech III, has been involved with the progress over the past few years. “We’ve been working our way around the GMC site, revamping as we go. We started with the library and courts; those were our biggest problem areas with lights going out. “So we hit the areas where security was a concern, and we’re working between buildings now, trying to hit all of our parking areas. We’ve started revamping parking lots and recently have been replacing lights on the buildings.” So as you’re moving through Goodyear after dark, and notice the light is cleaner, cooler, easier to see by, and not casting too many shadows, you can be glad this is only the beginning, and over the next decade the progress will continue to light up the city.

Parks and Recreation Manager David Seid has overseen changes to lighting at city parks for two years.

June 2018

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Ray Diaz wants to have a conversation about conservation. He does not want us to stop using water — just use it more efficiently.

8

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus


Getting More by Using Less Say “water conservation” and people tend to think brown: boulders, sand, gravel. Ray pictures lush desert adaptive landscaping getting the right amount of water, and he wants us to see that as well. As Goodyear’s water demand advisor, he loves getting to help build the city’s best possible future: one where perhaps hiking trails and colorful desert plants have replaced some of the grass. That’s important: grass isn’t a bad thing if done correctly. That means watering grass deeply and less often. “We rely on timers, which are great, but a lot of people move into a new home and never even look at the timer. As plants grow, most people are overwatering and don’t even know it.” Ray says 60 percent of our water use is outdoors. So if you attend Ray’s class or check out the city’s conservation webpage, you’ll learn that you should think of its role like a good soaking rain: get the water deep into the soil. That way it doesn’t evaporate as fast, and roots can use it as needed. Watering less often, but for longer durations, is key.

So it was exciting, and almost seamless, to transition into being the go-to guy for partnering with water users to become the best they can be.

“It’s like going on a diet, or taking care of your body,” he says. “We all know what we should do, and we may even know how, but until there’s a reason, we just don’t do it.” Some cities have found the two key elements that factor into waking your inner water-saver are competition and price. When someone realizes a neighbor is getting to spend more on entertainment because their water bills are lower, they become interested. When the city billing system is replaced, Ray hopes to be able to show consumers comparisons between their monthly water costs and those nearby. Until then, he’s looking for opportunities to share his vision of lovely and wiselywatered landscaping.

Since Goodyear is growing, Ray knows it could be increasingly difficult to rely on groundwater. But until 2021, when Central Arizona Project water will come through the SRP canal to a new city surface water treatment plant, getting every drop’s worth is both Ray’s challenge and his satisfaction.

To that end, a committee that’s been studying water use for two years is wrapping up with recommendations. Developers, city officials, private citizens and business owners have looked at the best possible practices for Goodyear’s future. The new design guidelines and standards, along with eleven other recommendations, will help people do it right the first time, rather than having to go back and make changes.

This year he wants to help people see water as something special and valuable, not just something that comes out of the tap. To reach back to the Old West for a metaphor, it’s sort of like the difference between killing an animal for food and being grateful, or gratuitously shooting at herds of buffalo from a train for sport.

Ray points to Canyon Trails I and II as gold-standard examples of redoing landscaping and reducing annual water consumption. Instead of keeping unused areas of turf, it’s now a meandering urban trail under spreading trees with yellow blossoms, accented by vivid bougainvillea and other flowering plants.

Working as water distribution supervisor for eight years in Goodyear gave Ray a familiarity with billing and customer service.

“They did everything right: they hired the right company, looked at their entire community, figured out what to replace, and made sure their irrigation system was running efficiently. They literally cut their water use in half by being proactive.”

Liberty Utilities Water Reclamation Facility located at 14222 W. McDowell Road hosts a park and a city public art installation, Recyclamation, the first Gallery 37 project in the Valley.

For more information, visit wateruseitwisely.com

Walking the Talk Sure, it’s easy for us to tell you what to do at home but what has the city of Goodyear done to conserve water? Here is just a sample: 1.

Goodyear Community Park’s watering system was converted from potable drinking water to 100 percent remediated groundwater.

2. The practice fields’ water system at the Goodyear Ballpark was converted from potable drinking water to 100 percent remediated groundwater. 3. Established a leak detection program for the water distribution system.

June 2018

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Outdoor Water Use Tips

You don’t need to be a garden guru to have a water efficient garden. Keep these five basic watering tips in mind and you’ll have a blue thumb in no time.

Know when to water. Water early in the morning (before 10 a.m.) or later in the evening (after 6 p.m.) when temperatures are cooler and evaporation is minimized.

Know your plants needs. Learn about landscape watering needs specific to the Arizona desert by visiting

wateruseitwisely.com Water thoroughly and less frequently to develop a more robust root system. Plants that have larger root systems are more effective at accessing water and need less of it.

Prevent runoff by applying only the amount of water your soil can absorb. If puddling occurs when you water, try breaking one long watering session into several shorter ones. For example, instead of watering for 20 consecutive minutes, run sprinklers in four 5-minute sessions. This will allow water to soak into the soil and minimizes runoff.

Add compost or mulch to your soil to help it absorb and store water. Organic mulches (e.g. aged manure, bark chips, wood chips) cover and cool the soil, minimizing evaporation, soil erosion, and weed growth. Composted food scraps and plant debris from your garden (e.g. grass clippings, fall leaves) provide nutrients for your plants and increase the water-holding capabilities of your soil.

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goodyearaz.gov/InFocus


Indoor Water Use Tips Indoor water usage, unlike outdoors, is largely the same year-round. That’s good news because it means a few water-saving measures can have a large cumulative effect.

Check your home for leaks – many leaks are inexpensive and easy to fix.

Switch your bathroom faucet aerator and showerhead to WaterSense-labeled models – they use 20% less water without compromising performance.

Wash only full loads. The average American household uses about 23% of its water running the clothes and dish washers.

Let your dishwasher do the work. An average dishwasher uses about 10 gallons per load. Running the average faucet for just four minutes uses the same amount of water.

Turn the faucet on only to rinse when brushing your teeth, washing your hands or shaving. You will save up to 2.5 gallons a minute.

Take shorter showers. Each minute you shave off your shower time saves up to 2.5 gallons.

Water saving tips courtesy of conserveh2o.org

June 2018

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2 0 1 7

W A T E R

City of Goodyear (PWS# 07-094)

Regulated Substances

units

MCL or MRDL

MCLG or MRDLG

year sampled

running average OR highest value

low

range

high

violation

Disinfectants & Disinfectant By-Products Chlorine (as Cl2)

ppm

4

4

2017

1.1

0.07

1.10

no

Haloacetic Acid (HAA5)

ppb

60

n/a

2017

4.6

2.4

10

no

TTHM’s (total trihalomethanes)

ppb

80

n/a

2017

44.6

19

96

no

Inorganics Arsenic

ppb 10 0 2017 6.5 4.1 10 no

Nitrate

ppm 10 10 2017 9.1 3.2 9.1 no

Barium

ppm 2

Sodium (optional)

ppm

Fluoride*

ppm 4 4 2017 2.13 0.3 2.13 no

Selenium

ppb 50 50 2013 ND ND ND no

Chromium

ppb 100 100 2016 11 4.7 23 no

*Goodyear does not fluoridate the drinking water; it is naturally occuring in the groundwater.

n/a

2 2016 0.078 0.024 0.17 no n/a

2016

111

76

160

no

Microbiological

Total Coliforms 0 2017 1 0% 2% no % positive 5% positive samples

monthly samples

Volatile Organics Trichloroethylene

ppb 5 0 2017 1.2 0.73 1.2 no

Radionuclides Gross Alpha

pCi/l

15

0

2016

6.3+/-0.5

0.7+/-0.2

6.3+/-0.5

no

Combined Radium 226 & 228

pCi/l

5

0

2016

0.5+/-0.1

0.5+/-0.1

0.5+/-0.1

no

Uranium

pCi/l 30 0

units

Action level (90% of homes less than)

MCLG

n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a year sampled

Amt detected 90th %tile

low

range

high

violation

Lead and Copper Copper

ppm 1.3 1.3 2016 0.25 ND 0.39 no

Lead

ppb 15 0 2016 1.7 ND 11.4 no

units

year sampled

Average or detected results

low

range

high

violation

Unregulated Contaminantsâ€

12

Perfluoroctanoic Acid (PFOA)

ppb

n/a

n/a

2014

ND

ND

ND

n/a

Perfluorooctanesulfonic Acid (PFOS)

ppb

n/a

n/a

2014

ND

ND

ND

n/a

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus


Q U A L I T Y

Who is my water company?

R E P O R T

Did you know that there is more than one provider of water in the city of Goodyear? If you are unsure about which company is your water provider, call the city at 623-882-7887.

Liberty Utilities (PWS# 07-046) year sampled

running average OR highest value

low

2017

1

2017 2017

range

high

violation

major sources in drinking water

1

1

no

Water additive used to control microbes

4.4

<2.0

4.4

no

By-product of drinking water chlorination

34.9

10.5

34.9

no

By-product of drinking water chlorination

2017 8 5

8 no Erosion of natural deposits; Runoffs from orchards; Runoffs from glass and electronics production wastes

2017 8

8 no Runoff from fertilizer use;Leaching from septic tanks,sewage; Erosion of natural deposits

4

2016 0.12 0.05 0.12 no Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits 2014

120.2

58

235

no

Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching

2016 1.45 0.43 1.45 no Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories 2016 11 ND 11 no Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits; Discharge from mines 2016 10 ND 10 no Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural deposits

2017 0 0% 0% no Naturally present in the environment

n/a n/a n/a n/a no Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories

2016

6

2

6

no

Erosion of natural deposits

2016

ND

ND

ND

no

Erosion of natural deposits

2010 5 1.3 year sampled

Amt detected 90th %tile

low

range

5

high

no Erosion of natural deposits

violation

major sources in drinking water

2016 0.074 ND 0.166 no Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives 2016 2.5 ND

year sampled

Average or detected results

low

2017

0.005

2017

0.006

range

6.6 no Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

high

violation

ND

0.024

n/a

ND

0.032

n/a

â&#x20AC; Unregulated contaminants are those for which EPA has not established drinking water standards. The purpose of unregulated contaminant monitoring (UCMR) is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is warranted.

June 2018

13


The Source of Your Water

W A T E R

Q U A L I T Y

R E P O R T

The city of Goodyear’s drinking water source is 100% groundwater. The City has production wells, storage facilities, and pressure booster stations. The underground aquifer from which the City receives its water is called the West Salt Valley Sub-Basin. The City of Goodyear also purchases water from Liberty Utilities, which draws from the same West Salt Valley Sub-Basin Aquifer. The aquifer’s depth ranges from 100 to 1,000 feet from the surface. With 12 well sites and ten booster stations, Goodyear’s operating system has a storage capacity of 15.9 million gallons.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.

The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. For more information about contaminants and potential health effects, or to receive a copy of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants, call EPA Safe Water Drinking Hotline (800-426-4791). If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. City of Goodyear is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

While your drinking water meets EPA’s standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. EPA’s standard balances the current understanding of arsenic’s possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems. Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, you should ask advice from your health care provider. This is an alert about your drinking water and a cosmetic dental problem that might affect children under nine years of age. At low levels, fluoride can help prevent cavities, but children drinking water containing more than 2 milligrams per liter (mg/l) of fluoride may develop cosmetic discoloration of their permanent teeth (dental fluorosis). The fluoride in the drinking water provided by the City of Goodyear averages 1.1 mg/l; however one sample had a fluoride concentration of 2.13 mg/l. Dental fluorosis in its moderate or severe forms, may result in a brown staining and or pitting of the permanent teeth. This problem occurs only in developing teeth, before they erupt from the gums. Children under nine should be provided with alternative sources of drinking water or water that has been treated to remove the fluoride to avoid the possibility of staining and pitting of their permanent teeth. You may also want to contact your dentist about proper use by young children of fluoride-containing products. Older children and adults may safely drink the water. Drinking water containing more than 4 mg/l of fluoride (the US Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standard) can increase your risk of developing bone disease. Your drinking water does not contain more than 4 mg/l of fluoride, but we’re required to notify you when we discover that the fluoride levels in your drinking water exceed 2 mg/l because of this cosmetic dental problem. For more information, please call Linda Shapcott, Environmental Compliance Supervisor at 623-882-7565. Some home water treatment units are also available to remove fluoride from drinking water. To learn more about available home water treatment units, you may call NSF International at 1-877-8-NSF-HELP.*

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre el agua que usted bebe. Tradúzcalo ó hable con alguien que lo entienda bien. Para español llame al 623-882-7511.

ANNUAL SEWER RATE ADJUSTMENT City of Goodyear sewer customers south of Interstate 10 may see a rate adjustment this month. Every year, sewer bills are recalculated and adjusted based on water usage billed during the Winter Quarter Average (WQA) months of January, February, and March. The winter quarter is typically the time of year with the lowest water usage, therefore using these months to average the annual cost of sewer could save customers money. Customers who disagree with the rate adjustment can file an appeal from June 1 to Aug. 31; some restrictions apply. If a customer chooses to appeal, the city will mail a decision within 30 business days. For more information and a Sewer Fee Adjustment Self-Audit Form, visit goodyearaz.gov/sewerappeal 14

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus


Residents and business reps come together to discuss smart conservation efforts Recognized as a leader in water conservation, Goodyear’s forward-thinking City Council approved the formation of the Water Conservation Committee in 2016. The Committee – made up of resident water rate payers, and representatives from the landscape, building/development, and property management industries – held its initial meeting on July 19 of that year and met eight to 10 times a year for two years.

Since 60 to 70 percent of water usage is for outdoor purposes, the Committee studied the current water usage patterns with a primary focus on reducing outdoor water use. In June, the Committee will present its recommendations to Council for consideration. For more information, visit

goodyearaz.gov/watercommittee

After serving two years on the Water Conservation Committee to develop recommendations for Council to consider, we asked the members to “name one thing you learned by serving on this committee.” Here’s what a few of them had to say.

Chairman Mario Columbia: Serving on the Water Conservation Committee, I’ve acquired the knowledge to understand that water conservation is using water efficiently and avoiding waste, and that water is at the core of sustainable development, and is critical in integrating water conservation into the city’s core water business.

Vice-Chair Jennifer Barber: Serving on the Water Conservation Committee reminded me of why Goodyear is an All-America City and a leader in collaboration, making important and thoughtful choices toward a sustainable future for generations to come.

Committee Member Jack Gilmore: Conservation for most is a “perception” about saving water, power, recycling, etc….. The one “thing” that I have come to appreciate is a realization that our Committee’s perception about water conservation made a significant jump to “awareness”. June 2018

15


Keeping the environment drug-free In 2011, more than 4.2 BILLION prescriptions were written in the U.S. alone.* – that’s a lot of drugs. While most of these drugs are critical to humans living a healthy life, many end up polluting our waters and soils. Proper disposal of unused drugs is critical to keeping our environment free of contaminants, as well as out of the hands of the wrong individuals. Anyone can drop off their unused prescription drugs in a convenient drop box at either location listed below. In 2017, this drop box collected and sent nearly 1,400 pounds to the incinerator, which means they were kept out of landfills (trash) and the water system (toilet). For more information about the program, call 623-932-1220 or search ‘drug box’ on goodyearaz.gov

The Goodyear Police Department offers a free Prescription Drug Disposal Program so you can safely dispose of unwanted medications without harming the environment.

Two drop box locations: Goodyear Police Administration Building 14455 W. Van Buren St., E101 (Always open) Goodyear Police Operations Building 11 N. 145th Ave. (Open: M-F 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.) Allowed for Disposal: All expired, unused or unwanted controlled, non-controlled, and over the counter medications. Liquid products, such as cough syrup, should remain sealed in their original container.

@GoodyearPolice

@goodyearpolice

Prohibited in Disposal Box: Syringes Intravenous solutions Injectables Illegal substances

LexisNexis Community Crime Map

@Goodyear Police Department *Source: topmastersinhealthcare.com

16

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus


ONLY WATER DOWN THE DRAIN

M

ost of us at home don’t really give much thought to what we put down the drain. But the folks at the city’s wastewater facilities want you to know some items wreak havoc on your pipes and the system overall – more than 3,000 staff hours per year are spent maintaining and cleaning the sewer lines.

Toilet isn’t a trash can

Cease the Grease

Even if they’re small, even if the package says “flushable,” some everyday items can cause messy and expensive problems for your plumbing and the city’s sewer system.

Fats, cooking oils and grease are not water-soluble. They coat household pipes and public sewer mains, causing nasty clogs. To dispose of household fats, oils and grease, carefully pour them into an empty metal can or jar. Let it cool, then throw it in the trash.

Products that might seem safe to flush down the toilet, such as personal care wipes, dental floss and paper towels, don’t dissolve quickly – or at all – and can trigger a sewer backup. Make sure to dispose of personal care products, cleaning supplies and other household waste properly: in the trash can, in the recycling bin, or during the city’s household hazardous waste events.

Other things to consider Syringes and hazardous waste have the possibility to create a hazard to staff working on equipment in the sewer system. And avoid planting trees or bushes along the alignment of sewer lines to avoid root intrusions which can lead to a sewer blockage. Roots will find a water source, aka sewer pipe, if not watered enough.

For more information, visit wef.org

Some content for this article was provided bymwra.com

June 2018

17


Green means

Recycling

Curbside Recycling Service

in Goodyear

THESE ITEMS CAN BE RECYCLED, PUT THEM IN THE GREEN RECYCLING CONTAINER Metal

Glass

Plastic

Steel, tin and aluminum. Beverage or food cans and jar lids

Beverage bottles and food jars

(lightly rinse and remove lids before placing in recycling container)

(lightly rinse and remove lids before placing in recycling container)

Beverage or food containers, household cleaning products, and plastic product packaging

Recycling Checklist Caps and lids are recyclable. Lightly rinse containers. Do not bag recyclables. Keep your recycling container clean.

Cardboard, Paperboard and Paper

(lightly rinse and remove lids before placing in recycling container)

1

2

3

4

PET

HDPE

PVC

LDPE

5

6

7

PP

PS

OTHER

Food boxes such as cereal, snack, and baking mix (remove liner before recycling)

Moving, storage, packing and shipping boxes

(remove any pillow packs or packing peanuts before recycling)

Juice, milk, soy milk, cream, egg substitute, soup or broth, and wine cartons

Look for these symbols to ensure items are recyclable.

Unsure about an item? throw it in the trash container.

Brown or white uncoated paper bags, office paper, newspapers, magazines, catalogs, and junk mail

THESE ITEMS CANNOT BE RECYCLED, PUT THEM IN THE TAN TRASH CONTAINER Pizza and other fast Wrapping paper and food boxes are likely tissue paper likely have contaminated with grease a coating which or other food debris, prevents recycling. preventing recycling.

Paper pet food bags most likely have a plastic barrier which prevents moisture but prevents them being recycled.

Paper towels, used paper plates, paper napkins, and disposable diapers are not recyclable.

Plastic bags, plastic wrap or rigid plastics such as buckets, toys and outdoor furniture should not be put in the curbside recycling container.

Organic waste such as food, pet and yard waste should not be put into the recycling container.

GOT PACKING PEANUTS?

Polystyrene, commonly called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;styrofoamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, is not recyclable. Do not put beverage cups, food containers, or packing peanuts in the recycling container.

Select stores accept and reuse packing material. Contact your local shipping store, such as the UPS Store or Mailboxes, Etc.

Clothing and other textiles are not recyclable curbside. If they are not good enough to donate to Goodwill or other resale outlet, throw them in the trash container.

Check out earth911.com for more recycling resources! 18

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus

Want to learn more about how you can recycle more effectively in Goodyear ? visit goodyearaz.gov/trash or call 623-932-3010, #3


Tan means

Trash

Curbside Trash Service

in Goodyear

BAG TIE AND

GARBAGE AND

GRASS

Container Information Containers are available in two sizes: 95 or 65 gallons. You may request an additional recycling container at no charge. You may change the size of your container once per year at no charge. containers are the property of the city of goodyear.

rules you should follow Keep your containers clean. Help minimize pesky flies, maggots and other critters. Keep container lids closed. Same reason as above and keeps trash from littering your neighborhood. Always bag garbage and grass before putting into the trash container. Same reason as above. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put items next to your container. If an item is too large for the container, hold it for your monthly bulk collection day. If you are unsure about whether to recycle or trash an item, or if it has food residue on it which cannot be removed, put it in the trash container. Contaminated items in the Recycling Container can spoil an entire truckload of recycled material.

City of Goodyear 2016 Recycling Data Mature Trees Saved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69,676 Cubic Yards of Landfill Space Saved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28,493 KWh of Electricity Saved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181,261,292 Metric Tons of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Saved . . . . . . . . 21,380 Gallons of Water Saved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39,263,390

Household Hazardous Waste Goodyear residents can drop off household hazardous waste free of charge twice per year at local waste collection events. Residents will be required to provide proof of residency such as a recent city utility bill or driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license. This event is for residential hazardous waste only. Commercial or medical waste will not be accepted. Materials should be placed in the trunk or truck bed of vehicles for safety considerations at the drop off site. In 2016, residents participated in household hazardous waste collection events helping to protect the environment by properly disposing items which may contain harmful chemicals. Materials collected resulted in:

47%were recycled 43%became alternative fuels 10%were incinerated To find dates for events or alternatives for disposal, visit goodyearaz.gov/trash and click on Hazardous Materials June 2018

19


Bulk Sanitation Services Bulk collections are for waste generated from normal residential activities that are too large to fit into your regular curbside container. Each bulk item, with the exception of furniture and appliances, shall not exceed an accumulation of two cubic yards(about the size of a kitchen table 3’x3’x6’) and be of a shape and size that two men can safely lift.

P S

T

■ Zone A . . . . . 1st Monday ■ Zone B . . . . . .1st Tuesday ■ Zone D . . . . . .1st Thursday ■ Zone E . . . . . .1st Friday ■ Zone G . . . . . 2nd Tuesday

■ Zone J . . . . . .2nd Friday

R

N

H

G

D

M L

I

J

■ Zone F . . . . . .2nd Monday

■ Zone I . . . . . .2nd Thursday

O

K

■ Zone C . . . . . .1st Wednesday

■ Zone H . . . . . 2ndWednesday

Q

■ Zone K . . . . . 3rd Monday ■ Zone L . . . . . .3rd Tuesday

E

■ Zone M . . . . . 3rd Wednesday ■ Zone N . . . . . 3rd Thursday ■ Zone O . . . . . .3rd Friday

F

■ Zone P . . . . . .4th Monday ■ Zone Q . . . . . .4th Tuesday ■ Zone R . . . . . .4th Wednesday ■ Zone S . . . . . .4th Thursday ■ Zone T . . . . . .4th Friday

To find your monthly bulk collection day, visit

C

goodyearaz.gov/trash

and click on the Bulk Trash Zone Map

Slow Down TO GET

B

AROUND

Keep City Sanitation Workers Safe!

A

Map and Zone information shown may not be accurate. Visit goodyearaz.gov/trash for the most up-to-date information.

20

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus


Do you commute from Goodyear to downtown Phoenix?

If you’ve lost that loving feeling for the early morning commute in your car, breaking up is no longer hard to do.

The 562 or 563 Express Bus Service Could Be For You!

The 12-acre Goodyear Park and Ride, just west of Dysart Road on the north side of Interstate 10, features more than 400 covered parking stalls, restrooms, and bike lockers.

three outbound, three inbound, Monday through Friday. Another option is the Valley Metro Route 563 between Buckeye and Phoenix, with a stop in Goodyear.

The Park and Ride will be the departure point for Valley Metro Route 562 non-stop bus service between Goodyear and Phoenix:

Full fare, all-day and monthly passes available. For more information, visit valleymetro.org

No driving necessary – record county documents at library kiosk No longer do customers of the Maricopa County Recorder’s Office have to travel long distances to record their documents or print them out – they simply can go to the Goodyear Branch Library, 14455 West Van Buren Street, Suite 101 to get it done. Documents and payments also are accepted for the Air Quality, Environmental Services, and Planning and Development departments. Not sure if you can do this without assistance? Don’t worry – there is a specialist who can see you and will walk you through the process.

For more information, visit mcldaz.org/goodyear and look for the Recorder KIOSK icon

June 2018

21


FALL YOUTH SPORTS Registration available June 4 Baseball (5-12 yrs) This league will help players develop the skills necessary to become successful players and will cover fielding, catching, hitting, pitching, speed, agility, and hand-eye coordination. Games: September 15 - November 3, Saturdays between 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Cost: Tee Ball & Coach Pitch - $70 ($85 NR); Kid Pitch - $90 ($110 NR)

Volleyball (7-15 yrs) This league will help players develop the skills necessary to become successful players and will cover techniques of serving, bumping, setting, spiking, speed, and agility. Games: September 8 - November 3, Saturdays between 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Cost: 7-9 & 10-12 - $90 ($110 NR) ; 13-15 - $105 ($125 NR)

T-Ball Skills Clinic (4-6 yrs) An introductory 4-week baseball skills class for boys and girls. The goal is to teach the core fundamentals of baseball in a fun, non-threatening environment, while preparing children to play in organized leagues. Parent participation is required. Dates: August 4-25, Saturdays at 8 a.m. Cost: $40 ($50 NR)

YMCA Community Days

Starts June 26

420 E. Loma Linda Blvd., 85338 22

goodyearaz.gov/InFocus

All of our leagues require volunteer coaches to assist in providing young players a fun and exciting opportunity to develop skills necessary to become successful players. Learn more about coaching requirements and incentives on the Become a Coach page at goodyearaz.gov/coach

The Southwest Valley YMCA partners with the City of Goodyear to host complimentary access to the aquatics facility for Goodyear residents on the following days. Proof of residency is required.

June 9, June 23, July 7, July 21

Tuesday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 1p.m. Loma Linda Community Center

Become a Youth Sports Coach!

Follow Your Art Junior, sponsored by Catitude Gallery and the city of Goodyear, is an opportunity for high school art students to develop and expand their portfolio for college applications and scholarships. The emphasis of this intense four-week class will be an understanding of the Elements of Art and the Principles of Design as a basis for composition and critical process. Students will work one-on-one with professional artists to expand their creative ideas, technical potential, and to create more complex visual statements while studying art and its history. To register visit goodyearaz.gov/register


In case you missed it

Download the Clean Air Make More App for iPhone, iPad and Android.

Here is a recap of some of the city events, programs and happenings that recently made headlines. Want more news? Subscribe to updates at goodyearaz.gov/news and join the conversation online by following us on social media.

With the summer season here, ground-level ozone is created when gasoline fumes, car exhaust, and other pollutants that are floating in our air react with intense summer heat and sunlight. Download the app to get real-time information about air quality in Maricopa County and to find out whenever there are High Pollution Advisories and/or Health Watch days.

CleanAirMakeMore.com/app

Did you know… Stormwater can pick up trash, motor oil, grease, pet waste, fertilizers, and yard wastes as it flows over streets and yards. Stormwater does not go to water treatment plants — it is transported by streets, curbs, storm drains, and channels to community stormwater retention basins and rivers. Keeping stormwater clean protects our open spaces and surface water. We can all help by using and disposing of potential stormwater pollutants safely and properly.

FUNDING AVAILABLE TO NONPROFITS Organizations that assist Goodyear residents were able to apply for grant funding through the city’s annual program. If you missed the deadline, mark your calendar for next year’s pot of dollars. For more information, visit goodyearaz.gov and search ‘city grants’.

SMALL BUSINESS WEEK The city

of Goodyear has great resources for entrepreneurs not just during Small Business Week (April 29-May 5) but year-round. 1:1 Mentoring; monthly meetings; ASU Startup School; and the InnovationHub – a co-working space – with expert library fact-finding services and resources. For more information, visit developgoodyearaz.com/resources/ innovationhub.

BUDGET OPEN HOUSE City staff were

on-hand to answer any questions about the proposed fiscal year 2019 budget during the open house on May 3 at City Hall. The complete budget, schedule of events, and other information are available at goodyearaz.gov/ transparency.

For more information on ways to help, visit:

AZ

ORG

SCHOOL, STUDENT SAFETY FOCUS OF CONVERSATION Decision makers from area school districts and cities attended the annual Building Blocks to Great Schools summit, designed to cultivate collaboration between local government and school administrators. For more information, call 623-882-7781 or visit goodyearaz.gov/about-us/education/ building-blocks-to-great-schools. June 2018

23


ECRWSS Postal Customer 190 N. Litchfield Rd. Goodyear AZ 85338 goodyearaz.gov 623-932-3910 A Top 10 Best U.S. City to Live – 24/7WallSt.com

Have Coffee with a Cop! Thursday, June 14 • 8-9:30 a.m. Wildflower Bread Company 1380 N Litchfield Road, 85338 For more information, contact Sgt. Benker at 623-256-2778 or visit

goodyearaz.gov/police

Movie Nightsat the Ballpark

Goodyear Ballpark, 1933 S. Ballpark Way, 85338

Showtime 7 p.m.

Bring a blanket and come decked out in comfy pjs to see a movie under the stars in the outfield of Goodyear Ballpark.

Parking and admission are free Concessions available for purchase Gates open thirty minutes before showtime

June 22 The Lego Batman Movie (PG)

August 31 Despicable Me 3 (PG)

For a calendar of events and a listing of what can be brought into the ballpark, visit

September 21 Black Panther (PG-13)

goodyearbp.com

Tuesday, June 26 7 - 8:30 p.m. Karen Lloyd D’Onofrio

Assistant Director, Deer Valley Petroglyph Preserve

Total Wine, 1416 N. Litchfield Road, 85395 Deer Valley Petroglyph Preserve Through Time Join the Goodyear Arts & Culture Commission to hear from Dr. Karen Lloyd D’Onofrio, Assistant Director of the Preserve and Elizabeth Gerold, Education Coordinator as they share a unique perspective of this sacred Phoenix landscape. The presentation will explore the use of the land from prehistoric times to the present. The lecture is free to attend and does not require registration. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, visit goodyearaz.gov/arts

Infocus - Issue 95 - June 2018  

City of Goodyear, Arizona

Infocus - Issue 95 - June 2018  

City of Goodyear, Arizona