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2016 ANNUAL REPORT

EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT


2016 ANNUAL REPORT

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

edmondpd.com/annualreport My 2016 Annual Report is being submitted with mixed emotions as this will be my last report after 13 years of serving as Edmond’s Chief of Police. It has been a privilege to have had the opportunity to lead the best men and women in law enforcement. This past year was another successful year for the Edmond Police Department. Again, the support from our community has been beyond measure. It is our belief that we continue to be the best trained, equipped and most professional Department in the state. We strive to deliver every day “trustworthy service,” and we believe that none of this would be possible without the partnership that we have with the community we serve.

BOB A. RICKS, POLICE CHIEF FROM 2003 TO 2016

In FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) for 2015, which is the latest report issued, Edmond was reported as the 48th safest city nationwide for reporting cities above 75,000, when comparing violent crime statistics. Edmond is safer than 89.36% of those reporting. One troubling area in our crime statistics is that in 2016 our violent crime rate increased by 17.42%. On a positive note, our property crime rate for 2016 decreased by 6.22%; therefore, our total crime rate for the City decreased by 4.55%. A new Chief of Police will begin his service on May 1, 2017. My hope is that he will receive the unconditional support that I received, and that the great success of the Edmond Police Department will continue unabated. It has been a blessing for me to have been your Chief of Police for the past 13 years, and I know that any success I had was due to the exceptional efforts of the men and women of the Edmond Police Department. Thank you for the opportunity I have had to serve.

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT

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CONTENTS 1 3 7 10 19 25 27 34 35 36 37

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF BUDGET & PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION PATROL DIVISION SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION AWARDS AND RECOGNITIONS GRAPHS & CHARTS TRAINING EDMOND CITIZENS POLICE ACADEMY SPECIAL THANKS COLLAGE


2016 ANNUAL REPORT OFFICE OF THE CHIEF

The Office of the Chief is comprised of the Chief of Police, two Deputy Chiefs of Police, Professional Responsibility Major, Public Information Officer, Planning and Research Officer, Crime Analysis Officer, one civilian Administrative Assistant, one civilian Technology Services Supervisor, and one civilian Technology Services Technician. The Chief and Deputy Chiefs provide guidance and direction to the Police Department enabling the accomplishment of its goals and objectives. The Public Information Officer (PIO) is responsible for disseminating information to the public and the media. The PIO is also responsible for grant writing for the Police Department and is a member of the City’s grant writing team.

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3 Technical Investigators (Non-sworn)

16 Detectives/ Sergeants

3 Lieutenants

Captain

Administrative Specialist

3 Lieutenants

19 Patrol Officers/ Sergeants

3 Lieutenants

20 Patrol Officers/ Sergeants

1 Officers/ Sergeants

Training Lieutenant

2 Property Clerks

Technology Services Technician

11 Detention Officers

Detention Supervisor

2 Custodians

Administrative Specialist

3 Records Specialists

Records Supervisor

Bailiff/Warrant Officer

Community Services Officer/ Sergeant

Special Services Major

Deputy Chief Administration

Technology Services Supervisor

PIO Grants Administrator

Organizational Chart Reflects Full Strength

4 Traffic Officers/ Sergeants

6 Motor Officers/ Sergeants

19 Patrol Officers/ Sergeants

6 School Resource Officers/Sergeants

Lake Officer/ Sergeant

Traffic Lieutenant

Shift Three Captain

Planning & Research Officer/ Sergeant

Chief of Police

Shift Two Captain

Crime Analysis Officer/Sergeant

2 Lieutenants

Shift One Captain

Patrol Major

Deputy Chief Operations

Administrative Assistant

School/Lake Lieutenant

Administrative Specialist

Criminal Investigations Major

(effective July 1, 2016)

FY16-17

Police

3 Animal Shelter Specialists

4 Animal Services Officers

Administrative Specialist

Animal Services Supervisor

Professional Responsibility Major

EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT DEPUTY CHIEF LARRY CAMPBELL

BUDGET

The primary responsibilities of this office are to provide oversight for the Police Department budget, administrative investigations and internal audits. This office works directly under the supervision of the Police Chief and also oversees Planning and Research, Crime Analysis and Uniform Crime Reporting for the Department.

BUDGET

The funding for the Police Department is defined by the City of Edmond Public Safety Sales Tax Ordinance of 2000. The section of that ordinance which details revenue sources for Police Department operation is cited below. “Future funding for the Police Department shall, at a minimum, be set at an amount equal to the projected revenues generated by the tax established by this Ordinance ( 1/8 of 1%), plus the baseline funding equal to 36.8% of the General Fund revenues. General Fund revenues are those which currently come from the following sources: taxes, licenses and permits, fines and forfeitures, charges for services, interest and miscellaneous revenues. Expenditures will not be charged against the public safety tax revenues until said 36.8% General Fund revenues have first been used or encumbered.”

for all Department employees, both uniformed and civilian are paid from this budget category. The Materials and Supplies portion of the Police Department FY 16/17 budget is $1,096,724; accounting for 4.66% of the total budget. Fuel for Department vehicles, ammunition, uniforms, body armor, technical investigation supplies and all other necessary materials is paid from this budget category.

The Other Services and Charges portion of the Police Department FY 16/17 budget is $567,279; accounting for 2.41% of the total budget. Utilities for all Police Department buildings is paid from this budget category as well as maintenance and repair of the buildings and equipment, consulting and professional services, contract services and other services and charges incurred during the operation of The Edmond Police Department the Department. budget is divided between the Special The Capital expenditures portion of the Services Division, Patrol Division, Criminal Police Department FY 16/17 budget is Investigations Division and the Animal $70,000; accounting for .30% of the total Welfare Unit. This division of funds budget. Capital funds in this year’s budget provides accurate tracking and forecasting are for the demolition and removal of the of expenses for the various operations old lake patrol house. Capital expenditures within the Department. The Edmond are those assets with a value of more Police Department budget for FY 16/17, as than $7,500 and a life expectancy of at adopted in June of 2016, is $23,558,398. least two years or those costs to acquire, The budget is separated into five budget construct or improve an asset which are categories; Personnel Services, Materials more than $7,500. and Supplies, Other Services and Charges, The Transfers portion of the Department Capital Outlay and Transfers. FY 16/17 budget is $4,254,937; accounting The Personnel Services portion of the for 18.06% of the total budget. Transfers Police Department FY 16/17 budget is are the allocations from other City $17,569,458; accounting for 74.58% of departments which provide services the total budget. Salaries and benefits

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT DEPUTY CHIEF LARRY CAMPBELL

BUDGET

to the Police Department. The largest portion of these allocations is spent on Administrative Support and totals $2,789,383. The Police Department portion of the cost for Dispatch, Human Resources, Finance, Facility Maintenance and other City departments is paid from this budget category. The Police Department Insurance Assessment is also paid out of the Transfers and this year it totaled $507,714. The other areas of the Transfers cover the cost to maintain and replace the vehicle fleet. The vehicle maintenance portion of the Transfers is $412,000 and the Fleet Lease Assessment paid is $545,840. Although the Police Department’s budget is $23,558,398 the Department actually has direct control of a much smaller portion of that total budget. Police Personnel Services expenses and allocations total $21,824,395 and accounts for 92.64% of the total budget. The remaining $1,734,003 or 7.36% of the total budget is used to purchase the necessary supplies and services to operate the Department and provide law enforcement services to the residents of Edmond.

PLANNING & RESEARCH The Planning and Research Section worked throughout the year researching new equipment for various units and Divisions within the Department. Keeping up with the latest technology and equipment enables Officers to perform their job assignments in the safest and most efficient manner possible. Some of the other major research projects for the Planning and Research section this year include: • Various technology for the new public safety center • Body cameras • Rifle rated body armor for the Department • Personal flotation devices for Department members

• Equipment for all Department vehicles • Various Department replacement vehicles

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR BOB PRATT

PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY CRIME ANALYSIS

The Crime Analysis and Intelligence Section responded to internal requests for information as well as from external sources such as City Council Members, City departments and others. Officer safety and intelligence bulletins were distributed to assist Officers in performing their duties. This section also is the Department’s primary contact for the Benchmark Cities Group with whom we are a member. These duties involve the collection and dissemination of various statistical data concerning the operation of our Department.

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR BOB PRATT

PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY It is the policy of the Edmond Police Department to completely investigate all allegations of misconduct involving members of the force in order preserve the integrity and reputation of the department as well as to defend personnel against unjust accusations. As the department recognizes that the general public has a vested interest in its police department, an Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) has been created with direct accountability to the Office of the Chief of Police. Police Auditing is a responsibility of the OPR. Auditing meets the need of police administrators to know about the economic, efficiency and effectiveness of their operational programs. Whether the police organization and programs are functioning economically, efficiently and effectively is the natural concern of police administrators. To assess the value of oversight and ensure that resources are being directed in line with priorities will enhance the accountability of commanding officers and the quality of their services. Secondly, police auditing provides an important tool for the public and its elected representatives to fulfill their oversight responsibilities. Police auditing answers the questions raised by the public as well as elected officials, by examining how well the police are using taxpayer money and what are the results and outcomes of the department’s use of resources made available to it. Following the relocation of the Property Room to the newly constructed and expanded location known as PD South, the OPR conducted a 100% property audit of the new, state-of-the-art property facility. This audit confirmed that a complete and successful transport of property and evidence was conducted by the Edmond Police Department. The audit also confirmed that the current storage of evidence is concurrent with international standards. Policy composition and updating of current policy and procedure is an on-going endeavor of the OPR. This critical function is necessary to maintain accreditation standards set forth by the Oklahoma Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP).

During calendar year 2016, the OPR was charged with the composition of the promotional testing process for department supervisory ranks as well as detective promotions. As a direct result of OPR oversight, two (2) successful promotional processes were accomplished this past year.

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR C.J. WISE

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION The Criminal Investigations Division (CID) is responsible for the follow-up investigation of criminal incidents that are reported to the Edmond Police Department. These investigations cover a wide range of crimes from simple property crimes to homicides, rapes, and other major crimes. Investigators are trained on how to conduct interviews and interrogations, as well as, receive advanced training in the investigations of white-collar crime, cyber-crime, sex crimes, crimes against children, auto theft, arson, and narcotics CID investigated 1,967 incidents in 2016. There were 775 cases involving part one crimes, and 1,192 cases involving part two crimes assigned to CID in 2016. CID had a clearance rate of 40.8% for part one crime cases and a 54.4% clearance rate for part two crime cases in 2016. CID includes technical investigators. Technical Investigators are responsible for forensic crime scene investigation. The Technical Investigators perform technical investigation duties along with operating our digital imaging and fingerprint services. In 2016, the Technical Investigators were called to a total of 192 incidents. They booked into property 1,779 items of evidence and submitted 352 items of evidence to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigations for analysis. The Technical Investigators also took 21,379 photographic images at crimes scenes in 2016.

CID partners with the University of Central Oklahoma to provide a practicum program for the UCO Forensic Science Department. A practicum for UCO students majoring in Digital Forensics is also provided. Students are selected to participate and receive background and training in the practical application of forensic science and crime scene investigation or digital forensics. The students are trained by the Technical Investigators of the Edmond Police Department. Detective Sergeant Jason Kushmaul, who is a certified forensic computer examiner, trains the digital forensic students. The students also get exposure to the various divisions and units of the department. Recent practicum students had the following to say about the program; “I would describe the Edmond Police Department as a high-functioning, professional, and learning enriched environment. I was treated with the utmost respect by everyone and every department and learned a great deal of knowledge from everyone I met.

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR C.J. WISE

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION

Words cannot describe how much I enjoyed my time with the Edmond Police Department and I hope to one day return as an employee.” “Interning at Edmond Police Department for Digital Forensics was a very rewarding experience. I don’t think any other place can offer more than learning how to use tools and examine evidence. It gives you overall experience in the forensic field and legal system. Detective Kushmaul is excellent at what he does and also a great teacher and mentor.” from the other group and shot and killed one of the members of the group. Two subjects were arrested that night on felony murder charges. Subsequent EXAMPLES OF INVESTIGATIONS IN 2016: investigation revealed which subject perpetrated the Detective Sergeant Jimmy Gwartney was actual shooting. An arrest warrant was obtained for the investigator assigned to investigate the suspect, and with the assistance of the United two officer involved shootings. Detective States Marshalls he was taken into custody on April Gwartney presented the findings of the 1, 2016. investigation to District Attorney David Detective Sergeant Marion Cain was assigned Prater. DA Prater cleared the actions a bomb threat at the Coin Op Laundromat (320 of the officers involved and DA Prater South Kelly). The suspect walked into the Coin Op complimented Detective Gwartney on the Laundromat and told customers and employees that thoroughness and completeness of the she had a bomb in her backpack and told everyone investigation. to evacuate the business. She then pulled a knife Detective Gwartney investigated a homicide at Oxford Oaks Apartments (1920 E. 2nd Street). On March 18, 2016 three individuals set up a drug deal with three other subjects in the parking lot of Oxford Oak Apartments. During the drug transaction one group stole the drugs

on the owner of the business. All employees and customers fled the business and several called 911. Responding officers secured a perimeter around the business and evacuated adjoining businesses. The suspect was taken into custody. The Bomb Squad was activated and conducted diagnostic procedures and determined there were no explosive

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR C.J. WISE

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION

components inside the backpack. The suspect was Detective Sergeant Greg Hunt investcharged with Making Terrorist Threats and Assault igated a shooting on Christmas night at with a Dangerous Weapon. 322 Belmont. A domestic disturbance Detective Sharla Bradley investigated a kidnapping resulted in a male shooting his exat 2500 N. Thomas Drive. The victim had just broke girlfriend twice. The suspect fled the up with her boyfriend. On 12-06-16, the suspect scene and the victim was rushed to the forced the door open and pulled the victim by her hospital. The victim survived her injuries. hair and shirt forcing her to leave her apartment. Detective Hunt obtained an arrest warrant The suspect took the victim to a vacant apartment for Shooting with Intent to Kill on the in OKC. Edmond Police and Oklahoma City Police suspect. The United States Marshalls searched this complex for several hours, but never office apprehended the suspect in South located the victim or the suspect. After several hours, Carolina. a friend of the suspect convinced him to allow the The Edmond Police Department’s victim to leave the apartment, and got a ride for her Criminal Investigation’s Division promotes back to her apartment, where she called her mom a team mentality when it comes to saying she was home. Detective Bradley obtained investigations, which has been a key an arrest warrant for the suspect for kidnapping, component to solving crimes. The division Burglary I, Aggravated Assault & Battery, Possess strives to promote that same mentality Firearm AFCF and Felony Pointing a Firearm. within the entire department.

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

The Patrol Division is the largest and most visible element of the Edmond Police Department, operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Our personnel strive to suppress crime and resolve problems by being proactive and focusing on community based policing. The men and women of the patrol division take pride in centering their efforts on professional, courteous and unbiased enforcement. The Patrol Division is divided into three shifts: Days (6:45am to 3:00pm), Evenings (2:45pm to 1:00am), and Nights (8:45pm to 7:00am). An overlap of Evenings and Nights exists from 8:45pm to 1:00am, allowing for better coverage during peak times of police service. The Patrol Division also consist of specialized units including Traffic, School Resource Officers, Lake Patrol, K-9 and the Crisis Intervention team. The Lake Officers patrol Arcadia Lake during the summer months and fill the School Resource Officers positons for the Public Schools during the school year. The Patrol Division ended the year with 87 certified police officers assigned to the Division. 73 Patrol Officers, 10 Lieutenants, 3 Captains and 1 Major. At full strength, the Patrol Division is authorized 89 Officers. Calls for Service by Shift in 2014: Shift 1 Shift 2 Shift 3

11,657 14,530 5,742

Calls for Service by Shift in 2016:

37% 46% 18%

Total CFS - 31,929

Shift 1 Shift 2 Shift 2 & 3 Overlap Shift 3

10,388 11,464 5,704 3,712

Total CFS - 31,268

39% 35% 15% 11%

Total CFS - 38,316

Calls for Service by Shift in 2015: Shift 1 Shift 2 Shift 2 & 3 Overlap Shift 3

14,736 13,442 5,809 4,329

33% 37% 18% 12%

In addition to the Calls for Service there were Officer Initiated Calls / Traffic Stops

Officer Initiated Calls

2013 8,400 2014 7,974 2015 7,249 2016 6,173

Traffic Stops 38,028 32,281 26,005 39,661

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

Calls for Service by Shift, Officer Initiated Calls and Traffic Stops:

Emergency Non-Emergency Officer Traffic Stops Total Calls Calls Generated

Shift 1

45

Shift 2

58 13,384

2-3 Overlap 60 Shift 3

14,691 5,749

11,265 1,036 25,743 10,503 2,072 18,348

26 4,303

2,556 1,219 8,104

189

39,661

38,127

RESPONSE TIMES: Response times Emergency Calls: 3:17 Non-Emergency Calls: 7:12

PUBLIC RELATIONS Edmond Police Officers continue their great service to the community by attending and participating in community projects throughout the year. Some of the programs include Special Olympics, Cops & Kids, Meals on Wheels, United Way, Angel Trees, and Share the RoadMotorcycle Survival. The continued success of these programs underscores the dedication and heart of the men and women who make up the Edmond Police Department.

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15,337 1,846 31,919

6,173

84,150


EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

SCHOOL PROTECTION Protecting our schools and children has always been a top priority of the Edmond Police Department. In addition to our full time School Resource Officers, our Patrol Officers regularly conduct school visits to ensure student safety and build strong relationships with students, parents and administrators. Our officers conducted 2,688 school visits in 2016.

TOP TEN CALLS FOR SERVICE LOCATIONS FOR 2016: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1225 WEST I-35 FRONTAGE RD 229 2200 W DANFORTH RD 181 1200 E 2ND ST 74 1901 W 15TH ST 63 1305 S BROADWAY, Apt. 3 45 1 S BRYANT AVE 43 2501 S BROADWAY 40 900 S BRYANT AVE 39 7900 E 2ND ST 39 2201 W DANFORTH RD 39

TOP TEN CALLS FOR SERVICE TYPES FOR 2016: 1 Alarm Loud 2 Motorist Assist 3 Check Welfare 4 Domestic 5 Suspicious Subject 6 Fraud 7 Larceny 8 Suspicious Vehicle 9 Disturbance Loud Noise 10 Disturbance

3,543 1,550 1,528 1,388 1,080 1,049 1,018 853 769 745

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

TRAFFIC UNIT

DRIVER EDUCATION

The primary duty of the Traffic Unit is the enforcement of traffic laws in order to reduce the number and severity of vehicle collisions and to facilitate the safe and expedient flow of vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

Through a joint program with The Edmond Municipal Court and the National Safety Council the Traffic Unit conducted 18 “Alive at 25” driver improvement training sessions during 2016. Alive at 25 is a 4 hour driver improvement course aimed at 16-24 year olds and is assigned through the municipal court as a term of sentencing for first time young traffic offenders. The format is an open and candid conversation with a police officer on topics ranging from impaired driving, speeding, and driver distractions to fatigue, risk taking, and peer pressure. The course is highly respected and well received by the students, court, and instructors.

In 2016 the unit issued 9,905 citations and 2,879 written warnings. 1,262 Oklahoma State Vehicle Collision reports were written as well as 483 “white sheets.” White sheets document collisions that don’t meet the criteria for a full station collision report.

TRAFFIC ACCIDENT REDUCTION PROGRAM (TARP) The Edmond Police Department receives a yearly grant through the Oklahoma Highway Safety Office to provide special enforcement and traffic safety programs aimed at making our roadways safer. Through this program Edmond Officers participated in programs like “Click it or Ticket” and “ENDUI” as well as directed traffic enforcement and special Driving Under the Influence (DUI) enforcement. Under these special assignments and programs Officers made 5,079 enforcement contacts.

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY CLASSES Civilian Motorcycle Safety Classes: The Edmond Traffic Unit continues to provide its nationally known and respected Motorcycle Survival Program through grants by the Oklahoma Highway Safety Office. 2016 was a highly successful year for the program and included both Level 1 (basic) and Level 2 (advanced) courses being presented throughout the State of Oklahoma. The courses continue to be held for free at several locations and are a significant contributor to overall motorcycle safety statewide! Law Enforcement Motorcycle Classes: In addition to the traditional civilian motorcycle safety classes the motorcycle unit also developed and implemented a unique and much needed program dubbed the “Motor Officer Survival Course.” The senior motorcycle officers saw a need for a motorcycle specific firearms and tactics program. Drawing on nearly 40 years of police experience as well as 20+ years of military training and experience this program addresses numerous tactical and weapons issues unique to motorcycle officers. Topics addressed include items like sympathetic reflex, equipment issues unique to motorcycle officers, tactical advantages and disadvantages as well as incorporating significant amounts of riding and live fire to acclimate officers to the challenges of a motor officer in an armed encounter. The initial class of students included several Oklahoma City motor officers and was so well received that scheduling is underway to provide all of Oklahoma City’s motor offices with this training during 2017.

2016 TRAFFIC COLLISIONS HAVE BEEN TABULATED AND SHOW THE FOLLOWING:

(Note: these are collisions that occur on public rights-of-way and do not include private property collisions)

Total number of collisions:

1524 (up .4% from 2015)

Time of day of most collisions: 4-5 pm (164) Friday (288)

Total number of 5 (up 25% from 2015) fatality collisions: Collision 1,096 no injury Severity: 268 possible injury 139 Non-Incapacitated injuries 15 incapacitated injuries 5 fatal Auto/pedestrian collisions: 9 (up 50% from 2015) Auto/bicycle collisions: 6 (up 20% from 2015) Auto/animal collisions: 7 deer (up 17% from 2015) Motorcycle collisions: 15 (up 25% from 2015)

December (144) Rear end (587)

Left turn at intersections (259)

The top five collision intersections were: 1. Edmond Rd and Santa Fe, 39 2. 15th and Broadway, 37 3. Danforth and Kelly, 35 4. 15th and Santa Fe, 30 5. Bryant and Danforth, 30

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

SCHOOL RESOURCE OFFICER (SRO) School Resource Officers provide a safe learning environment in our schools, provide valuable resources to school staff, foster a positive relationship with students, and develop strategies to resolve issues affecting our youth. The SRO position encompasses three major components: law enforcement, education, and counseling. Having a police presence in the schools provides a feeling of security for students, staff and parents. The schools have come to rely on the SRO’s as an integral part of their school staff and call on their expertise on a regular basis. We ended the year with five full time SRO’s. Each of the three high schools and the Boulevard Academy had an SRO assigned to it. In addition, an SRO was assigned to work at the middle schools. We also had Day Shift Patrol Officers and K-9 handlers make regular visits to our schools to help provide a significant police presence.

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

ARCADIA LAKE The Lake Patrol Unit provides police service both on the shore and on the water at Arcadia Lake. The lake has a surface of 1,820 acres and is bordered by 26 miles of shoreline. The area encompasses 4 recreational parks, 17 miles of multi-use trails, and several public swimming areas. The goal of the unit is to provide a safe environment for guests while enforcing city ordinances and state laws. This year, particular emphasis was on enforcing rules and regulations pertaining to children younger than 13 wearing Personal Flotation Devices (PFD) while in the water. Lake Enforcement and Activity:

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Citations for Child 138 144 60 90 94 36 w/o Personal Flotation Device Child Swimming Unsupervised NA NA NA NA NA 4 Drowning -0- 1 -0- -0- 1 -0-

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

SOCIAL HOST ORDINANCE In an effort to reduce underage drinking the Social Host Ordinance was passed in 2007. Edmond was the first city in the state to pass such an ordinance, and since that time, many other cities in the state have passed a similar law.

2009 2010 201l 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Citations Issued: 39 10 38 34 21

26 12

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Officers will continue to aggressively enforce the Social host Ordinance in 2016. Continued education and enforcement of this ordinance will reduce underage drinking in Edmond, and promote a safer environment for our younger drivers.

PATROL OFFICER INVOLVED VEHICLE COLLISIONS Vehicle operations are one of the most dangerous tasks officers perform, especially in emergency situations. Officers will continue annual training in vehicle operations with particular focus on emergency vehicle operations.

2016 - ARREST TOTALS Felony Bookings: 590 Misdemeanor Bookings: 2,256 DUI Bookings: 253 Shoplifting Arrests (citations): 105 CDS: 1,039 (up 10.4% from 934 in 2015)

Year

Officer Involved Collisions

2016 24 2015 20 2014 24 2013 17 2012 18 2011 7 2010 13 2009 17 2008 15 2007 13 2006 26

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Auto Burglaries: 2016 = 470 (up 48.3%) Officer At Fault

Officer Not at Fault

13 11 10 4 4 4 11 10 8 9 10

11 9 14 13 14 3 2 7 7 4 16

2015 = 317 Business Burglaries:

2016 = 45 (up 18.4%) 2015 = 38


EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR TIM BARNTHOUSE

PATROL DIVISION

MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS INTERVENTION The Edmond Police Department trains its law enforcement officers to respond safely and effectively to individuals with mental illnesses. Our officers work with the consumer, their families, and mental health professionals in an effort to coordinate and enhance services to people with mental illness. Mental Patient Calls

2016 2015 2014

Suicidal Subject Calls

2016 2015 2014 Attempted Suicide Calls 2016 2015 2014 Transports Mental Health for Transports Miles Traveled

39 36 34 241 221 200 84 50 49 2013 2014 2015 2016 149 242 357 336 201l 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 3,573 4,675 4,666 9,340 12,720 15,621

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR THERESA PFEIFFER

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION The primary responsibilities of this office are to provide oversight for the Police Department Training Unit, Records Unit, Property/Evidence Management Unit, Detention Unit, Animal Services Unit and Building Facilities Management. This office operates directly under the supervision of the Special Services Deputy Chief of Police.

TRAINING UNIT:

The Training staff developed a new in-service training program that will begin in January 2017. This program ensures that each officer who attends mandatory quarterly training will meet not only exceed the minimum state standards for continuing education, but also help carry on with the progressive and current event style of training that Edmond officers have come to expect. With this new program, each Edmond officer will be receiving a minimum of 32 hours continuing education for a total of over 38,000 man hours of training for our agency in 2017. In addition to our own training events, the Edmond Police Department Training Center is host to many different local, state and federal law enforcement agencies who train here. These partnerships with our fellow professionals continue to improve our facility and abilities to serve our community.

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR THERESA PFEIFFER

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION PROPERTY & EVIDENCE CONTROL Two Property Officers are responsible for maintaining the custody and control of all evidence and property to be transported by the Edmond Police Department. Secondly, The EPU has been responsible for maintaining the efficiency of the city’s existing property and evidence facility. This includes maintaining a chain of custody and organization for all evidence. During the first quarter of this year the Edmond Property Unit (EPU) inventoried, secured, and finished preparation of all property in the evidence room for transport to the new location of PD South Support Facility. In the second quarter of this year, the move and set up of the new location was complete. A 100 percent audit was conducted during the third quarter. In the fourth quarter the EPU has conducted research for disposition of cases. The Edmond Property Unit is responsible for submitting evidence to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation as requested by the requesting officer for testing. In 2016, 1,173 items were submitted for testing and 948 test were completed and returned to our agency. In 2016, 9,913 items were booked into the Edmond Police Department property room. Included in this number are items such as drugs, firearms, found property, and items of evidentiary value. The disposal of property is handled in several ways. Property that is no longer needed as evidence is disposed of. Drugs are securely delivered to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation for destruction. Other ways of property disposal are for items to be returned to the appropriate owner, auctioned through an outside source (propertyroom.com), or destroyed by the Edmond Property Unit. In total, 4,572 items were disposed of during 2016.

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR THERESA PFEIFFER

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION RECORDS UNIT The Records Unit is comprised of a Records Supervisor and three Records Specialists. Each performs a vital role in the day to day operation for the needs of the residents of Edmond and their Police Department. The Unit works closely with the Edmond Municipal Court, the City Attorney’s Office and the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation (OSBI) by processing subpoenas, open records requests, expungements and arrestee fingerprints. The unit also validates stolen or missing articles in the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) on a monthly basis. The services provided by the unit to both the public and other official agencies are criminal history checks, good conduct letters, collision, detailed case and arrest reports as well as civilian fingerprinting. The staff also oversees the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics (OBN) drug take back box located in the lobby. This large white box is provided for the public to safely and responsibly dispose of unused medications. The Records Unit also supervises civilian volunteers that staff the front lobby security office. The Volunteer staff consists of the combination of 25 Citizen Police Academy graduates and the Edmond Police Post #655 Explorers. The volunteers provide a very valuable service to the Police Department by assisting residents with questions and directions to other official buildings in the downtown area. The Records Unit will continue to greet each resident with a smile and provide excellent customer service by upholding Edmond Police Department’s core value of “Trustworthy Service”.

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR THERESA PFEIFFER

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION DETENTION UNIT The detention staff moved into the detention center at the new Police Department on April 19, 2016. The detention center staff consists of 11 full-time detention officers and 1 detention supervisor. The detention center has hired three new female detention officers during the past year, bringing the unit to full-staff. In 2016, 1,870 persons were booked into the Edmond Detention Center. The current fifteen cell lockup facility with holding tank provides the ability to house up to 38 prisoners at any given time. With the construction of the new detention center, detention staff now have the ability to house 4 times as many inmates than we have in previous years. During the booking process, the detention staff is responsible for inventorying all prisoners’ personal property and securing it until release. A thorough medical screening is conducted and documented to allow detention officers to provide appropriate medical attention if required. Fingerprints and mug shots are recorded on every person who is brought to the Edmond Detention Center. The implementation of the new corrections management system will provide a more detailed booking report and allow detention officers to be more specific in reference to an inmate’s descriptors (tattoo’s, marks, and scars).

CRIME PREVENTION Our Crime Prevention and Community Relations officer was very busy in 2016. He attended 20 Community events. These included Touch a Truck, OK county TRIAD luncheon, church carnivals, UCO Criminal Justice Day, WINGS Fall Festival, Downtown Edmond Fall Festival, Santa Shots, ENA Summit, Chapplewood Banner Presentation, Heard on Hurd events, Edmond Mobile Meals, UCO Spring Football carnival, Heritage Hall Diabetes event, and Chesapeake Kids’ event. Additionally he administered 45 tours of our new Police Station and facilities. He also spoke to 23 Different groups. Our Community Officer Randy Payne is responsible for the data entry of training into records management, and then the subsequent reporting of that information to supervisors upon their request. Crime Prevention and Community Relations is also solely responsible for the recruiting, logistics and instructional blocks for each Citizens Police Academy. We held two in 2016 with a total of 63 participants graduating.

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT MAJOR THERESA PFEIFFER

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION

ANIMAL SERVICES UNIT The Edmond Police Department’s Animal Services Unit is responsible for both animal control duties within the corporate city limits of Edmond and the management of the Edmond animal shelter. The Unit is staffed by a Supervisor, four Animal Services Officers, three Animal Shelter Specialists and an Administrative Specialist. The core function of Animal Services is to help ensure a safe community environment in regards to the relationships between people and animals. Animal Services Officers are responsible for enforcing both state laws and municipal ordinances that pertain to animals. The thousands of calls for service each year handled by animal services officers involve both domestic animals and wildlife. In 2016, Animal Services Officers responded to 2,581 calls. The animal shelter, located at 2424 Old Timbers Drive in the Crosstimbers Municipal Complex, houses both stray animals awaiting reclaim by owners and animals that are available for adoption to the public. 1,596 animals were booked into the shelter in 2016 for an average of 133 per month. As the animal shelter was built to house just 22 dogs and approximately 25 cats, the actual numbers of animals handled by shelter staff each month routinely cause an overpopulation

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problem. In late 2016, it was revealed that a long-desired expansion to the shelter facility was high on a list of approved capital improvement projects for the City of Edmond. The Animal Services Staff eagerly anticipates this expansion. The Staff of Edmond Animal Services does its very best to maintain a “low-kill” shelter by maintaining adoptable animals indefinitely as long as their health and behavior continue to render them suitable for adoption. The Shelter Staff explores creative ways to help with our constant over-crowding situation by soliciting help from foster families, sending animals to rescue groups, and promoting the adoption of animals from the shelter through various mediums such as Facebook, media outreach, and special adoption events. The standard adoption fee for animals at the Edmond Shelter continues to be one of the very lowest in the area at only $25.00. Edmond Animal Services is fortunate to have a dedicated cadre of caring volunteers who help provide shelter dogs and cats with much needed socialization, exercise and play. Volunteers also help


EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT MAJOR THERESA PFEIFFER

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION spread the word about animals who need homes and work alongside staff at off-site adoption events. There is always a need for energetic and committed volunteers who would like to help improve the quality of life and adoptability of the animals in the Shelter. A common sentiment shared among volunteers is a great sense of satisfaction in helping the animals and in giving back to the community. Edmond Animal Services continues a great partnership with Paws for Life, Inc. – a local non-profit group dedicated to helping homeless animals. Paws for Life, Inc. (PFL) graciously funds many unique medical procedures for adoptable animals that just need a little extra care to give them a second chance. PFL also helps spread the word about ways the public can help the animals at the shelter through donations of food, towels, bedding and other “consumable” items. Edmond Animal Services is very appreciative of the generosity of Paws for Life, Inc. in helping the animals in our community.

2016 Animal Services Statistics Animals booked into the shelter:

1,596

Animals adopted:

928

Animals sent to rescue groups or transferred to another agency:

175

Animals reclaimed by owners:

555

Animals euthanized:

174

Calls for Service:

2,581

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT 2016 AWARDS & RECOGNITIONS

THE FOLLOWING EMPLOYEES RECEIVED RECOGNITION AND HONORS IN 2016 Gerald Dixon (Employee of the Month) Aaron Randall (Employee of the Month) Greg Jaggi (Employee of the Month) Joe Rice (Employee of the Month) Chris Brown (Lifesaving Award) Ben Daves (Employee of the Month & Medal of Valor) Joseph Wells (Medal of Valor) Torrey Rowe (Lifesaving Award) Jason Carroll (Medal of Valor & Employee of the Month) Grant Gilbert (Lifesaving Award)

Jeff Morefield (Lifesaving Award) Patricia DeMoss (Lifesaving Award) Page Hussey (Lifesaving Award) Kelsey Duncan (Lifesaving Award) Dillon Roberts (Lifesaving Award) Brenton Brown (Medal of Valor) Matt Tipton (Medal of Valor) Chad Langley (Medal of Valor) Neil Martin (Medal of Valor) Greg Hunt (Employee of the Month)

LIFESAVING AWARD RECIPIENTS

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PROMOTIONS

Ben Daves

Chris Brown

Joseph Wells

Kelsey Duncan

Grant Gilbert

Torrey Rowe

Oak

Langley


EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT

CHIEF BOB RICKS RETIREMENT Chief Bob Ricks announced his retirement in 2016. He faithfully lead our department for 13 years. We had the honor of celebrating his 47 year law enforcement career with hundreds showing up to express gratitude for the way he has shaped their lives.

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT GRAPHS

Edmond Census Population 2020

97,034

2010

81,405

2000

68,315

1990

52,315

1980

34,637

1970 1960

16,633 8,577

2013 Census Bureau Population Estimates Oklahoma City

610,613

Tulsa

398,121

Norman

118,197

Broken Arrow Lawton Edmond

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103,500 97,151 87,004

Moore

58,414

Midwest City

56,756

Enid

50,725

Stillwater

47,186


EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT GRAPHS

2016 FBI UCR / Part One Crimes 2,500 2,300 2,100 1,900 1,700 1,500

2,051

1,943

1,871 1,885 1,758

1,710

1,770

1682 1627

1,559 1,533

1,300 1,100 900 700 500

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Rape

Robbery

1

1

3

3

1 2 2 3 2 1 5 3 -

23 18

1 January 1 February 3 March AprilMay2 June1 July1 1 August 6 September 1 October November 21 December 17

2016 Totals 2015 Totals

20

74

6

2

25

110

10

1

23

74

3

-

15

83

8

-

25

76

8

-

34

95

6

-

23

79

8

-

5

12 11 12 7 17 7 16 6

13

69

2

-

88 74

133 110

258 279

1,073 1,118

65 49

4 3

-

2

3

7

-

3

-

8

-

2

2

8

2016 ANNUAL REPORT

-

1

1

5

-

5

1

11

GRAPHS

May June July August September October November December

-

-

1

6

-

3

6

7

-

-

1

2016 Totals 2015 Totals

1 1

23 18

21 17

Aggravated Violent Crime Assault Total

23 Robbery

-

7 Rape 18 81 12 3 12 1 11 2 12 2 73 17 2 71 16 5 6-

-

3

6

5Homicide

12 5

-

9

-

7

1

8

-

8

-

5

-

11

-

6

-

7

-

5

88 74

B&E

-

133 110

1 1

23 18

18

Larceny

Vehicle Theft

Aggravated Violent 101 2 Crime Assault Total 63 3

1 19 3 20 1 20 1 25 3 23 - 15 2 25 1 34 1 23 1 13 1 258

279

21 17

133 5 116 12 574 110 9 774 883 876

595 79 11 669 7

1,073 5 1,118 88 74

2 7 7 18 6 8

1012 3 12 8 11

*Arson B&E -

-23 118 219 120 -20

8 12

-25 -23

2 7

-34

6 7 8 17

16 65 6 49 133 110

-15 -25 23

413 3 258 279

Property Month Crime Totals Total Vehicle 126 133 Larceny *Arson Theft 84 102 Crime Rates 154 162 101 2 144 156 63 3 Population 102 Edmond 114 133 2 146 157 116 7 1 2016 Population = 91,504 100 112 74 6 2 106 113 110 10 1 2015 Population = 89,930 109 126 74 3 135 142 83 8 110 126 76 8 84 95 690 -

Part One Total Crime -Rate 79 8

1,400 1,533 69 2 1,449Total Crime 1,559 Rate = 17.83 2016 1,073

65

Property Crime Total 126 84 154 144 102 146 100 106 109 135 110 84

4

1,118Total Crime 49 2015 Rate =3 18.68

1,400 1,449

Total Crimes decreased by 4.55%

Crime Rates

Part One Violent Crime Rate

Edmond Population

Crime Rates

2016 Violent Crime Rate = 1.45

2016 Population = 91,504

Edmond Population 2015 Violent Crime Rate = 1.22

2015 Population = 89,930

2016 Population = 91,504 Violent Crime increased by 20.91% 2015 Population = 89,930

Part One Total Crime Rate

Part One Property Crime Rate

2016 Total Crime Rate = 17.83 Part One Total Crime Rate 2016 Property Crime Rate = 16.28 2015 Total Crime Rate = 18.682016 Total Crime Rate = 2015 17.83Property Crime Rate = 17.36 Total Crimes decreased by 4.55% 2015 Total Crime Rate =Property 18.68 Crime decreased by 6.22% Total Crimes decreased by 4.55% Part One Violent Crime Rate 2016 Violent Crime Rate = 1.45 Part One Violent Crime Rate 2015 Violent Crime Rate = 1.222016 Violent Crime Rate = 1.45 Violent Crime increased by 20.91% 2015 Violent Crime Rate = 1.22 Violent Crime increased by 20.91%

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Part One Property Crime Rate 2016 Property Crime Rate = 16.28 Part One Property Crime Rate

Month Totals 133 102 162 156 114 157 112 113 126 142 126 90 1,533 1,559


2016 Totals 2015 Totals

35 30 32 33 34 28 34 30 29 31 34 37

22 13 20 23 14 16 19 14 15 11 5 6

46 33 57 74 43 47 31 38 42 54 43 27

387 348

178 66

535 462

3 1 3

6 3 7 6 5 2 11 2 3 9 5 3

20 12 15 22 12 28 14 13 16 19 18 9

6 6 8 2 4 5 8 5 6 6 8 3

42 28

62 39

198 247

67 52

-

7

-

-

2

2

-

10 5 1 3 3 4 1 5 6 2 3 4

29 20 10 24 20 26 26 22 18 14 20 23

7 4 1 6 5 9 8 6 8 4 12 4

19 24 23 22 24 38 33 40 24 31 32 28

48 42

1,343 758

-

47 51

252 237

74 42

338 240

5 7 3 7 8

28 31 30 31 30 26 32 22 27 19 27 30

59 19

333 592

-

6 6 3 8 4 2

-

-

1 3 5 1 3 2 2 5 3 2

27 11

-

al Tot

ffen ses Cur fe w a Loi teri nd ng Run a wa ys

All

oth er O

rly

Con

duc t

151 131 109 114 126 110 103 79 101 103 114 102

ord e

ss

5 8 2 5 1 1 2 4 9 5 5 1

Dis

Dr u nke ne

uor law s Liq

Dom e Off sti c/F a en s mil es y D. U . I.

blin g Gam

bu s e

Dr u gA

ffe n ses Sex O

tion titu Pro s

ap o ns We

dal ism

Van

nP rop e r ty

nt 5 4 2 6 9 2

Sto le

O th er A January February March April May June July August September October November December

lem e

1,533 1,559

GRAPHS

bez z

1,400 1,449

EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT

Em

114 157 112 113 126 142 126 90

ssau l ts For g er Cou y nte rfei tin g Fra ud

102 146 100 106 109 135 110 84

1

396 333 326 381 340 346 328 295 322 317 336 289

17 51

4,009 3,285

-

-

1 1 3 4 3 4

Part Two Crimes

Part Two Crimes 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021

3,773 4,660 4,430 4,581 4,186 3,677 3,820 3,109 3,605 3,454 3,278 3,285 4,009 3,257 3,291 3,335 3,335 3,391

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT GRAPHS

31


EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT GRAPHS

32


2016 ANNUAL REPORT GRAPHS

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT TRAINING

2016 TOTAL TRAINING HOURS General (Firearms & Driving & Mental Health) 9,091 SWAT 1,344 Bomb Squad 1,344 Negotiators 960 K9 960 Total Training Hours

13,699

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2016 ANNUAL REPORT EDMOND CITIZENS POLICE ACADEMY

The goal of the Citizens Police Academy is to provide residents with a better understanding about what a police officer does on a daily basis as well as to provide information about the Edmond Police Department. The Edmond Police Department has conducted 39 Citizens Police Academies since its inception in February 1997.

EDMOND CITIZENS POLICE ACADEMY ALUMNI

Board members are elected in October and take office in January, along with the officers.

CPA OFFICERS:

Chairperson Vice Chairperson Secretary Treasurer

Ken Kappers Marcus Whitt Jacqueline Braun Lorna Lorna Fulton

CPA CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS Gene Duck

Norman Jason Paul Wehrenberg Tim Kawakami Richard Jurey

The Police Department would like to recognize our own Citizens Police Academy Alumni for all of their hard work and dedication to the employees of the Edmond Police Department. The Citizens Police Academy Alumni Association has several activities every year including the Annual Golf Tournament, Annual Banquet and several family picnics for our employees and families. The service they provide for the Edmond Police Department is invaluable and we all appreciate their efforts very much.

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT SPECIAL THANKS

We’d also like to thank the hundreds of residents of Edmond who came out in great support of law enforcement this year. From business owners, to the downtown shops, church groups, and just the individual residents that sent notes, emails and gave a simple thank you – we are grateful. We serve an incredible community and this past year you’ve made that known like no other. We were especially blessed this year by resident and business owner Phil Parduhn. He generously gave $30,000 so we could purchase 100 rifle protected vests to protect our officers from higher powered weapons.

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EDMOND POLICE : A PHOTO COLLAGE 2016 ANNUAL REPORT

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EDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT

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Profile for City of Edmond

Edmond Police Department - 2016 Annual Report  

Edmond Police Department - 2016 Annual Report