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city of edmond » fire department

2012 annual report “The future depends on what you do today.” mahatma ghandi


trustworthiness “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.� george santayana


city of edmond Âť fire department

2012 annual report table of contents

3 from the fire chief 4 fire chief history 6 mission. vision. values. 9 organizational chart 10 list of personnel 13 training division 17 prevention division 21 operations division 24 emergency medical services 26 goals and visions 28 budget 30 city council & ward map

32 fire stations 34 response performance measurements

36 retirements 38 promotions 39 service awards 40 services provided 43 citizens fire academy 44 commission on fire

accreditation international

45 honor guard 47 data and graphs 67 maps

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from the fire chief It is my extreme honor to present the 2012 Edmond Fire Department Annual Report. A year of transition is the theme for this year’s report as the department has experienced retirements and promotions that provide both immediate and long term impact on the organization. These retirements allowed opportunities to review interpersonal and organizational communication mediums and implement changes in the form of command staff, officer and shift meetings, as well as opportunities for members of the department and community to provide input into the improvement and direction of the organization. The development and revision of department policy was identified as a top priority for consistency, accountability and transparency. I would like to extend a special thank you to the Mayor, City Council and City Manager for all of the support provided to the Edmond Fire Department. This unwavering support allows the firefighters to be in a position to do what they do best. This support does not go unnoticed by the members of the Edmond Fire Department. It definitely does not go unnoticed by the citizens of the city of Edmond when services are delivered in a time of need regardless of the emergency. The exceptional level of service that we provide does not happen without the support that the department receives from the city of Edmond. The Annual Report is an opportunity to reflect upon the accomplishments and the performance from 2012 and also look into the future to improve the level of service that our department delivers to the city of Edmond. Continuous improvement throughout the organization is the Edmond Fire Department’s main focus and goal for 2013. The development and implementation of the 2013-2018 strategic plan will provide a road map for improvement as identified by internal as well as external stakeholders. In addition, an organizational analysis will provide department and city leaders with information for the future of the organization. The Edmond Fire Department is striving to identify areas of improvement, recognizing members for performance and accomplishments and providing assistance in specialized services and mutual aid which allows the presence and professionalism of the Edmond Fire Department to be recognized throughout the state. I would like to thank the members of the Edmond Fire Department for their dedication, compassion and level of professionalism for what they do on a daily basis. They pay attention to the details and sweat the small stuff because in the fire service, details mean the difference between life and death. I look forward to the future of the Edmond Fire Department and working to improve the level of service provided to the city of Edmond and the state of Oklahoma. In Service,

Jake Rhoades Fire Chief City of Edmond, Oklahoma

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1930–2012 cit y of edmond

fire chiefs

1930–1934

C.J. Steen

1934–1951

Lotahr Smith

1951–1963

Jewell Payne

1963–1964 1971–1975

Elmo Thornbrue

1964–1971

Vernon Beecham

1975–1978

Steve Tinberg

1978–1993

Ronnie Lloyd

1993–2001

Dwight Maker

2001–2012

Gil Harryman

2012–Present

Jake Rhoades

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fire chief history

Jake Rhoades was selected as the tenth Fire Chief in Edmond Fire Department history on October 22, 2012. The city of Edmond working with the Mercer Group, Inc. conducted a national search before selecting Rhoades to fill the vacant position left by the retirement of 35 year veteran Fire Chief Gil Harryman. Chief Rhoades began his twenty (20) year career with Stillwater Fire Department in Oklahoma in 1992. He promoted through the ranks to the position of Training Officer before accepting the position of Assistant Chief with the city of Jenks. In 2008, Chief Rhoades was offered the position of Deputy Fire Chief of Special Operations and Training with the Rogers (AR) Fire Department where he assisted the department in achieving accreditation status from the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE), as well as the Commission on Accreditation of Ambulance Services (CAAS). He graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree from Oklahoma Christian University and also received a Masters Degree in Executive Fire Service Leadership. In addition, he graduated from the Executive Fire Officer (EFO) program at the National Fire Academy and has attained designations from the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE) as a Chief Fire Officer (CFO), Chief Medical Officer (CMO) and Chief Training Officer (CTO). He also received the designation of member (MIFireE) from the US Branch of the Institute of Fire Engineers and was awarded my Professional Instructor designation through the International Association of Fire Service Instructors. Jake has taken the opportunity to serve in a variety of areas of the fire service such as Oklahoma Task Force One, Oklahoma and Arkansas Advocate for the Everyone Goes Home Program and serve as a Regional Presenter for the Firefighter Near Miss Program. Rhoades is active in many aspects of the fire service as an active author for Fire Rescue magazine and presents in a number of national forums including Fire Rescue International, The Excellence Conference and Fire Department Instructors Conference and is a member of the Board of Academic Advisors for Columbia Southern University. Chief Rhoades was recently re-elected to serve as a member of the board of directors for the International Association of Fire Chiefs Safety, Health, and Survival Section and serves as a technical member on the NFPA committee for Risk Management.

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mission. vision. values. Mission To faithfully provide trustworthy service necessary to safeguard life, health, property and the welfare of our community through preparedness, emergency response, prevention, education and training.

Vision The vision of the Edmond Fire Department is that, by the year 2018, the department will be recognized as an agency that reflects best practices in the delivery of services to our customers. In honoring our community’s trust, we are setting the standards of excellence; guided by our values of integrity, professionalism, trustworthiness, dedication and ethical behavior. We will demonstrate continuous improvement in all duties and responsibilities, as well as by enhancing the services that our community trusts us to provide. Through enhanced communications initiatives, our community will be served with the best, expeditious response. We will do this by maintaining a high level of readiness and by focusing on the professional development and training of all our personnel. We recognize the importance of and will foster improvement in our external systems relationships to further support our delivery to the community. With a comprehensive workforce planning initiative, we will invest in our greatest organizational assets and ensure that our workforce is appropriately staffed and professionally developed to best accomplish our mission. Our strengthened systems of internal and external communication will prove our unified intent to meet or exceed the expectations of our community and to hold one another accountable for carrying out our mission, living our values and ensuring that this vision becomes reality.

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Values The Edmond Fire Department is dedicated to a unified set of values that define who we are and how we operate. We value... integrit y By upholding a compassionate, ethical service to our community. professionalism Through continuous improvement in our level of service by pursuing excellence in emergency response, education, prevention, preparedness and training. trustworthiness By providing trustworthy service and responsible stewardship of our organization and resources. dedication Through faithful servants providing an excellent level of service to our community and organization. ethics Through unbiased care, service, leadership, and support while ensuring high moral standards.

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professionalism “If you only do what you’ve always done, you’ll only be as good as you’ve ever been.” robert “bob” murgallis

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organizational chart

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list of personnel | As of June 2013

administration Fire Chief | Jake Rhoades Deputy Fire Chief | Ryan Lenz Administrative Assistant | Nancy Lazzaro Technology Coordinator | Mark Voyles Administrative Specialist I | Diane Davis Service Technician | Vacancy Administrative Specialist II | Vacancy training Chief Training Officer | Jon Neely Major | Joe Elam Major | Mike Fitzgerald Major | Vacancy prevention Fire Prevention Chief | Mike Barnes Major | Gary Dill Major | Kelly Lewis Major | Vacancy Major | Vacancy Fire Protection Specialist | Chad Nash Fire Protection Specialist | Zach Siegrist firefighter recruits Dustin Bowman Jason Dillon Johnny Gibson

Izea Lovejoy Taylor Mick Cody Sanders

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Tyler Smith Jacob Stangl Craig Williamson


blue shift green shift red shift

Station #1 Battalion Chief | Doug Hall Captain | Barry Garrett Lieutenant | Chad Weaver Lieutenant | Ben Young Lieutenant | Jason Hazzard Driver | Jeff Fountain Driver | Courtney Powell Driver | John Block Firefighter/Relief Driver | Justin Mann Firefighter | Brandon Thornbrue Firefighter | Justin Ross Firefighter | Jimmy Weathers Firefighter | Lindall Wood Firefighter | Kyle Begley Firefighter | Tim Vernon

Station #1 Battalion Chief | Shawn Horn Captain | Mike Smith Lieutenant | Chris Denton Lieutenant | Jeff Ryan Lieutenant | Todd Gabbert Driver | Joe Voss Driver | Ed Lahr Driver | Luke Gregory Firefighter/Relief Driver | Lindy Simpson Firefighter/Relief Driver | Jeff Thompson Firefighter/Relief Driver | Travis Haddock Firefighter | Mitch Rainwater Firefighter | Brian Hale Firefighter | Lance Morrison Firefighter | Patrick Olson

Station #1 Battalion Chief | Keith Randolph Captain | Kent Shomber Lieutenant | Ryan Dubord Lieutenant | Jeremy Sanders Lieutenant | Wes Skelly Driver | Brian Gerken Driver | John Walker Driver | Mark Sanders Firefighter/Relief Driver | Lance Breeden Firefighter/Relief Driver | Bill Brown Firefighter/Relief Driver | Juan Lopez Firefighter | Brian Olea Firefighter | Jarred McAlvain Firefighter | Micah Miles Firefighter | Steven Rakett

Station #2 Captain | Russ Locke Driver | Ryan Barrett Firefighter | Tim Thurman Firefighter | Brian Nipper

Station #2 Captain | Jeff Zelnicek Driver | Luke Martin Firefighter | Jeremy Martin Firefighter | Daniel Lasater

Station #2 Captain | Brian Rowell Driver | PT McMurtrey Firefighter | Marcus Ferguson Firefighter | Joe Weeks

Station #3 Captain | Jeremy Harwell Driver | Lance Ford Firefighter/Relief Driver | Brian Pever Firefighter | John Basgall

Station #3 Captain | Terry Hill Driver | Todd Curtis Firefighter | Richard Munsey Firefighter | Chase Olson

Station #3 Captain | Vince Pfeiffer Driver | Jeromy Hudson Firefighter | Chad George Firefighter | Jason McKinney

Station #4 Captain | Greg Westermier Driver | Brock Terrell Firefighter | Lance Bloyd Firefighter | Cory Charmasson

Station #4 Captain | Charlie Michael Driver | Les Leach Firefighter | Paul Kress Firefighter | Ryan Godbehere

Station #4 Captain | Euel Davis Driver | Jeremy Gary Firefighter | Ryan Gleghorn Firefighter | Casey Stewart

Station #5 Captain | Richard Ragland Driver | Ollie Hicks Driver | Stephen Raney Firefighter/Relief Driver | Nick Hamar Firefighter | Brent Armer Firefighter | Mace Shatwell

Station #5 Captain | Doug Benne Driver | Anthony Wilson Driver | Jason Egelston Firefighter | Billy Meeks Firefighter | Josh Hillis Firefighter | Chris Channel

Station #5 Captain | Kevin Woodard Driver | Matt Schwettmann Driver | Bud Vandewalker Firefighter | Brad Powell Firefighter | Kyle Shelton Firefighter | Jesse Benne

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dedication

“The hero is commonly the simplest and obscurest of men.� henry david thoreau

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training division

The Training Division is led by Chief of Training Jon Neely. The Training Division is responsible for the development, implementation and delivery of a variety of training that meets national, state and local regulations,as well as ensures that the department is meeting best industry practices. The Training Division is responsible for ensuring members of the Operations Division are prepared for the mitigation of emergency incidents not only within the city of Edmond but the state of Oklahoma. Every day, the Training Division prepares members of the department to respond to incidents within the city of Edmond. As an all hazards response agency, the Edmond Fire Department must be prepared to face a variety of emergencies at a moment’s notice. In addition to fire response, the Training Division must prepare members to respond to emergencies in EMS, hazardous materials and technical rescue as well as any other emergency that may occur within the city. The Training Division has a multitude of other responsibilities for the department that include the administration of the hiring process, planning, coordinating and participating in interagency drills and training, as well as response to emergency scenes for operational and technical support. The expertise provided during emergency response ensures firefighters are operating safely during the performance of their assigned functions. In 2012, the Training Division implemented changes to modernize the hiring process for new employees. The concept of a user-friendly electronic process for the applicant resulted in a more streamlined and efficient process for city employees as well. Through a cooperative effort with the Human Resources and Marketing Department this process proved very beneficial to all stakeholders; internal and external. All applications processed in 2012 were processed electronically. Notifications to applicants of how well they scored throughout the testing process was also processed electronically as opposed to sending letters to hundreds of applicants, numerous times, resulting in savings in time, as well as money and resources for the department as well as the city. By using the City of Edmond website all applicants were easily kept up to date of their status in the process. The Edmond Fire Department is blessed to have the facilities and staff to serve the department. In addition to the Chief of Training, two (2) majors provide innovative instruction methods and the introduction of curriculum and simulations based on real world incidents and events. The Training Division also utilizes nine (9) in-field instructors to assist in the delivery of training curriculum to other members of the department. Utiliz-ing the in-field instructor’s expertise provides a tremendous asset to the Training Division, as well as the Operations Division. The Training facilities for the Edmond Fire Department are second to none in Oklahoma. In addition to a multitude of classrooms, the department boasts a five story drill tower, a two story search and rescue building, a two story class A burn building, a flashover simulator, (5) interior propane props, (10) exterior propane props, hazmat trailer trainer and a SCBA/technical rescue trailer/trainer. In summary, the training grounds are equipped with a variety of props to simulate any emergency.

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The department is fortunate to have an emergency vehicle driving pad and SkidTruck skid avoidance trainer; the only one in the nation on a custom cab fire apparatus. At this time we are also the only department in the state who has personnel trained to certify drivers of fire apparatus in emergency driving through an accrediting agency, the Department of Transportation. This program and recertification is provided on an annual basis to all operators of department fire apparatus. In 2013, the department will utilize these resources along with a combination of efforts with Oklahoma Fire Service Training to offer certification training in apparatus operations. This endeavor has been in the process for several months and will reach fruition in 2013. Training Division personnel have been heavily involved with OSU FST in the development of this program. Department trainers, facility and OSU FST will be the cornerstone of this one of a kind program. Over the next year our personnel will be heavily involved in the accreditation process to provide this statewide program through OSU FST as the accreditation agency. The department is making an exerted effort to ensure other departments and agencies utilize the training facilities as it is an opportunity to not only showcase the Edmond Fire Department but also the city of Edmond. The department currently allows for training to be conducted by and for other departments in emergency vehicle operations, emergency medical services training, and flashover as well as other opportunities such as the OG&E Technical Rescue Rodeo. The year was a busy one for the Training Division with numerous classes taught for a total of 23,230 hours of training. These hours were accumulated through a variety of means to include those classes delivered by the Training Division, as well as those impromptu training hours conducted among individual companies. This total also includes events where department personnel traveled and received training and instruction outside the city of Edmond and the state of Oklahoma. Several members have been sent to these events, usually Train the Trainer events, so they can bring back newer techniques and technology ideas to keep our personnel on the cutting edge of their profession. Operations personnel complete training in topics such as self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), equipment care and maintenance, fire ground safety, a variety of EMS continuing education, leadership and management and water rescue. Today’s firefighters are jack of all trades and must be capable of delivering the level of service that the city of Edmond expects and deserves. The list of training courses completed by department members is never ending and will become even more comprehensive in the future as the Training Division ensures that members are prepared to face the challenges of tomorrow. In addition, department personnel completed 3,414 hours of physical fitness training in 2012. This training is critical due to the physical and mental demands placed on the members of the department in today’s fire service. Long term health and wellness of each department member is critical, not only to avoid injuries but also to ensure a long term service career with the organization.

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The new year presents a variety of challenges for the department and the Training Division. Facing the transition of the department and new leadership, the demands of training in the future are more pronounced than ever. Preparing for today, as well as the future is a simple but daunting goal for a division to turn the organization into a training centric department. The Training Division must prepare for a recruit academy in 2013. This twenty-one (21) week academy prepares new employees to become members of the Operations Division. In addition to firefighter training, new recruits will be trained to utilize a dynamic and balanced approach ensuring they are prepared to meet the hazards and risks faced during both emergency and non-emergency response. This period is critical as it will prepare nine (9) new employees for their lives in fire service, while establishing a foundation for their career. The foundation we strive to establish focuses more on character and servitude than solely on the knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform their job duties. In addition, the division must maintain constant awareness of individual and company training and proficiency through a variety of training reports that will be distributed within the organization and evaluated to ensure that the training program is meeting the needs of every individual within the department. Monthly training reports and documentation are analyzed by department leadership to ensure established training goals are met by all department personnel in a planned and systematic manner. The Training Division will be developing a comprehensive annual training plan for release in 2014 which will include all disciplines and ensures the members of the department are offered and receive training throughout the course of the year. This plan will provide a road map for a training centric department for years to come and establish a foundation for the Edmond Fire Department that will increase the effectiveness and efficiency of department operations in all aspects. In addition, to the annual training plan, minimum company standards and other training programs will be introduced within the department. Leadership and officer training is also on the horizon and will incorporate a number of requirements and opportunities for all department personnel as we prepare for future development and succession of department members and prepare them for future advancement and leadership roles. The goals of the Training Division include a variety of challenges that come with the constant challenges and changes in the fire service. The changes require constant awareness as well as up to date training to ensure that all members of the department are prepared to meet the challenges of today’s fire service as well as the threats they will face tomorrow.

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integrity “I can think of no more stirring symbol of man’s humanity to man than a fire engine.� kurt vonnegut

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prevention division

The Prevention Division is led by Chief of Prevention Mike Barnes. Chief Barnes was promoted to this position in December 2012 and inherits the responsibility of leading the prevention efforts for the city of Edmond well into the future. The Fire Prevention Division is responsible for the prevention and mitigation of fires before they occur. The Edmond Fire Department works to prevent injuries and deaths by applying the principles of education, engineering and enforcement. In 2012, the office staff consisted of five (5) Majors that conduct public education, fire investigations and fire code assistance. The fire code Major is assigned as a working liaison with the building department and works with two (2) Building Department Fire Protection Specialists. Fire Suppression personnel played a critical role in public education. Fire suppression and the Fire Prevention Division working together are creating a FireSafe Edmond for our citizens. The Fire Prevention Division is founded on its prevention efforts and is dedicated to providing continued services to our increasing population, as well as the new and existing businesses. These challenges are being met with new priorities, processes and the development of new programs to enhance the services provided by the Edmond Fire Department. The year 2012 marked the second consecutive year that ended with zero fire fatalities and a reduction of structure fires, from 81 in 2011 to 54 in 2012. Research has shown that this is well under the national average for a city the size of Edmond. In addition, the University of Central Oklahoma’s student population and demographics add increased risk to the city of Edmond, however the numbers indicate that the city of Edmond remains safer than most cities its size due to the aggressive prevention efforts of the fire department. In 2012, the Fire Prevention Division accomplished a number of objectives for the department, as well as the city. These could not be accomplished without the dedication and efforts of the members of this division, but could not be completed without the support it receives from the city of Edmond. Two fire inspection team members were nominated and selected to the State of Oklahoma International Code Council (ICC) building code, residential code and property maintenance code technical review teams. These two team members and the groups they were assigned to reviewed the entire code and worked within their group of professional committee members to develop Oklahoma’s first minimum building code, residential code and property maintenance code standards for the state. These codes were officially adopted by State legislatures in November 2012. The Fire Code Division updated the City of Edmond Title 17. This document makes amendment changes to the adopted ICC fire code in an effort to help provide better fire protection services to our citizens and business owners.

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fire code assistance The Edmond Fire Department reviews building codes and plans for all new and existing structures to reduce the number of injuries, deaths and loss of property due to fires. The Fire Prevention Division provides proactive code assistance services to our business owners, builders, architect, developers and engineers. A comprehensive plan review is provided on all construction projects within the city to ensure that all elements of the adopted International Code Council Fire Codes and the City of Edmond Title 17 are met. This process allows for potential issues to be identified early in the reviews and corrected with little expense for the developer and/or owner. The Fire Prevention Division also works closely with other city departments on the site review team to ensure that projects move smoothly through the permit, review and inspection process. In 2012, there were 408 plan reviews that included building, fire protection, special hazard protection and fire alarm. The total square footage of buildings reviewed was 963,993 at an estimated permitted building cost of $133,391,461.00. These new projects and fire protection systems received 1674 construction site inspections to assure compliance to all fire codes in our city. There were also 69 site and plat plans reviewed for future project considerations or construction. fire inspections Another important element of Fire Prevention is code assistance through existing building and occupancy inspections, which focus on assuring buildings are FireSafe. In 2012, a total of 278 existing building inspections were conducted. These inspections included educational facilities, nursing and assist living facilities, childcare facilities, complaints, businesses and other commercial facilities. New and existing inspections are provided to identify and correct hazardous conditions before they cause an incident. This effort contributes greatly to the city’s very low incidence of fire. The Prevention Division has been challenged with the development of a comprehensive inspection program that will net all commercial occupancies within the city of Edmond on an annual basis. This is a tremendous undertaking that will begin progressive steps in 2013. As a result of this foresight, prevention and suppression personnel will combine to conduct inspections and pre-planning activities to better protect the city of Edmond and be more effective in daily operations. public education Public education is a primary focus of the division. The emphasis of the education program is children. The department utilizes the Children Safety Village (CSV) to educate children of all ages in home fire safety, bicycle safety, electrical safety, poisoning and other programs inherent with this unique risk group. The Edmond Fire Department is fortunate to have a facility such as the CSV. Less than a dozen departments across the nation have such a unique resource. As a result, many more programs are being developed to fully utilize this resource and further the educational efforts to children throughout the city. These efforts will be enhanced with a planned and systematic effort with Edmond Public Schools and partnerships with the University of Central Oklahoma to ensure that the target groups are identified and being taught in effective, fun formats that ensure lifelong education.

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The future of public education is critical for the safety and health of the city of Edmond. Establishing additional programs for identified risk groups will allow for a more comprehensive approach to preventing deaths, injuries and loss of property due to fire. In addition, public education programs will also focus on national, as well as local causes of fires which include cooking equipment, smoking materials, candles and heating equipment. Public education reached an amazing 27,806 citizens through fire station tours, safety presentations, apparatus demonstrations, Children’s Safety Village and fire drills. These amazing numbers of citizens were reached in a team effort by the Fire Suppression Division and the Fire Prevention Division working together. The division also devoted resources towards ensuring residences have working smoke alarms. In 2012, 54 smoke alarms and four carbon monoxide alarms were installed. The fire departments also installed 15 batteries in smoke alarms requested by citizens. One of the challenges with the smoke alarm program is funding. However, the Wal-Mart Corporation has awarded the Edmond Fire Department a $1000.00 grant towards the program. The money will be used to provide smoke alarms and batteries in 2013. Another program that has also had a tremendous impact within the city of Edmond is car seat installations and checks in partnership with Safekids Coalition. This program allows department personnel to conduct annual events, as well as provide citizens the opportunity to come to a fire station that has a car seat technician for this community service. In 2012, the department installed 288 car seats and educated 358 parents, grandparents and other family members in the proper installation and use of the child car seats. This program has been fully adopted by the department and has been integrated into the curriculum of the new recruit firefighter training academy. Every new fighter will have this skill set to further enhance the capabilities of the department. fire investigation Although the city of Edmond does not experience a high incidence of fires, it is critical that investigators determine the origin and cause to ensure that future fires do not occur. If a pattern or careless behavior is found, the information is forwarded to the public education officers where the information is developed into a public education message for lectures, media releases or web site information. During 2012, Fire Investigators from the Fire Prevention Office were called to determine the origin and cause of sixty-three (63) fire related incidents. After detailed fire scene examinations of these incidents, Juvenile fire play was involved in six (6) incidents and seven (7) incidents were found to be of incendiary nature. Incendiary fires caused approximately $10,450 in damages. Approximately 85% of the fire scenes examined, the areas of origin were determined and the causes were cleared at the scenes. During the year, there were two arson charges that were filed against one suspect. Because of the fire investigation team effort the arsonist was caught, charged and was found guilty of two felonies.

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fire prevention activities SUBJECT

NUMBER ATTENDA NCE

Station Tours* Fire Safety House Calls for Service/Information Safety Presentations* Apparatus Demos* Children’s Safety Challenge Children’s Safety Village Fire Drills Juveniles Smoke Alarms Smoke Alarm Batteries Hearing Impaired Smoke Alarms Carbon Monoxide Alarms Car Seat Installation*

73 1323 - 1 3000 47 5,645 76 12,545 15 334 25 1194 19 3303 14 23 54 55 15 22 - 3 4 288 358

TOTAL CITIZENS CONTACTED 630

27,806

* Fire Suppression personnel performed and/or assisted in these activities. In the year 2012, there were ten (10) civilians treated for fire related injuries.

2012

t ypes of investigations Commercial Business Properties: 7

26: Single-Family Residents Grass /Leaves Brush /Rubbish: 16

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operations division

The Operations Division of the Edmond Fire Department is led by Battalion Chief Shawn Horn, Battalion Chief Doug Hall and Battalion Chief Keith Randolph. Each Battalion Chief is responsible for the delivery of emergency medical services, fire suppression, hazardous materials response, technical rescue response, as well as any other services required for the city of Edmond on any given day. The Operations Division provides support through mutual aid to surrounding areas when requested. The Operations Division of the Edmond Fire Department provides a safe community through the response to emergency and non-emergency incidents in order to minimize the loss of life and property resulting from fires, medical emergencies and other disasters. Every day, the Operations Division responds to serve the citizens while remaining engaged in a variety of other fire protection activities to ensure they are prepared for any event within the city of Edmond. In order to accomplish this mission, the Operations Division is divided into three (3) platoons based on 24 hour work schedules; Red Shift, Green Shift and Blue Shift. Each shift is managed by one of the Battalion Chiefs. The Battalion Chief is responsible for ensuring that all fire companies are staffed to a minimum staffing level of four (4) to ensure the level of service is met for the city and that firefighters remain safe during operations. In addition, personnel certified in specialty disciplines such as paramedic, technical rescue and hazardous materials are assigned throughout the city to ensure consistent services to the city. significant events As an all hazards response agency, the Edmond Fire Department responds to a variety of emergencies. In addition to fire response, the Operations Division provides EMS with paramedic (ALS) Engines, hazardous materials, technical rescue capabilities, as well as dive rescue in order to address any emergency that may occur within the city. During the average day, Edmond Fire Department personnel respond to an average of 16.38 responses across the city. In addition, personnel welcome members of the community into fire stations to conduct tours, educational presentations and car seat installations. In 2012, Edmond Fire Department responded to 54 structure fires. There were several significant structure fires within the city including a large motel fire on south Broadway. Due to the magnitude of this fire, nearly all on-duty firefighters and equipment were required in order to protect various exposures and structures nearby. All of the exposures were protected and the majority of contents within the motel were saved due to efforts of firefighters on scene. In 2012, the Edmond Fire Department experienced grass fires that had a tremendous impact on our community due to the hot and dry conditions associated with an Oklahoma summer. The department responded to 81 grass fires both within the city limits, as well as providing mutual aid to neighboring cities and departments in efforts to assist them in the extinguishment of their grass fires. Edmond Fire Department participates in the Oklahoma Wildland Task Force which pulls resources from departments from all over

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Oklahoma County to make a large firefighting force that can respond throughout the state to fight large grass fires. Recognizing the need for dependable apparatus to use in fighting grass fires, the Edmond Fire Department was approved to build a new Brush Pumper to replace an aging unit. This Brush Pumper was designed by Department personnel to fit the needs of our city and will be put into service in 2013. The unit being replaced will be put into reserve so that it can be utilized in case of emergency as well as provide mutual aid support. The department has established a variety of goals for improvement including the revision and implementation of current Standard Operating Guidelines (SOG), as well as other processes that will enhance the response capability and availability of the Operations Division. Additional equipment such as thermal imaging cameras and roadway incident signs not only provide additional capabilities but also additional safety for all personnel. In addition, the department has established accreditation through the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) which reflects a comprehensive self-assessment and evaluation model that will allow the Edmond Fire Department to examine service levels and performance in a way to compare to industry best practices. This allows the department to improve service delivery by: • Determining community risk and safety needs. • Evaluating the performance of the department. • Establishing a method for achieving continuous organizational improvement. Another way in which the city of Edmond will see improvement is through the potential lowering of the current Insurance Services Office (ISO) rating for the city of Edmond. Currently rated a three (3) for the majority of Edmond, the department realizes this number can be improved which means enhanced service to the community, as well as savings to the individual in the form of lower insurance premiums through the Public Protection Classification (PPC) program. The PPC provides a valuable benchmark for fire departments as statistical data on fire loss distinguishes the relationship between excellent fire protection and low fire losses. The goals for operations of the Edmond Fire Department are clear for 2013; provide even better service to the citizens of Edmond. This comes through a variety of measures but begins with consistency. Minimum staffing has been established for a consistent level of service in the delivery of emergency and non-emergency services in all disciplines. Building depth in the organization through training, certification and credentialing will allow for succession planning in the future but also has an immediate impact on the department as well. Regardless of the event, the citizens of Edmond can be assured that members of the Operations Division will be there to provide professional and compassionate service at a moments notice.

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hazardous materials The Edmond Fire Department’s Hazardous Materials Response Team, operating out of Fire Station 5, responds to a variety of incidents and emergencies which involve hazardous materials and other dangerous substances. The Team provides the technical expertise and equipment needed to safely mitigate hazardous materials emergencies. The Hazardous Materials Response Team is part of the Oklahoma Regional Response System which was developed by the Oklahoma Office of Homeland Security (OKOHS) which currently consists of 113 specialized resources located throughout the state of Oklahoma. The system is comprised of different levels of specialized units capable of responding to chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear and explosive (CBRNE) incidents, agriculture emergencies, technical rescue incidents and natural disasters. All Edmond Fire Department personnel are certified to a minimum of hazardous materials operations and many personnel are certified to the technician level in order to provide a greater level of service to the community. In 2012, the Hazardous Materials Response team responded to nine (9) incidents ranging from gas leaks to full hazardous materials responses. technical rescue The Edmond Fire Department’s Technical Rescue Team, operating from Fire Station 4, responds to a variety of incidents and emergencies which involve technical rescue. These emergencies range from high angle rescue to structure or building collapse and also includes water and dive rescue. The team responds with the technical expertise and equipment necessary to safely mitigate any technical rescue emergencies. Similar to the Hazardous Materials Team, the Technical Rescue Team is part of the Oklahoma Regional Response System which is managed by the Oklahoma Office of Homeland Security (OKOHS). This is a tiered response system that culminates with Oklahoma Task Force 1 (OK TF1). There are numerous members of the Edmond Fire Department who are also members of OK TF1. These personnel participate and receive additional training and expertise while being available to respond as part of the Urban Search and Rescue efforts of the Task Force. All Technical Rescue Team members are certified to the requirements of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1670, as well as receiving other specific training required by the department. The department has capabilities for open water rescue, swift water rescue and currently has personnel certified in dive rescue to further enhance the capabilities of the organization. In 2012, the Technical Rescue Team responded to a variety of technical rescue incidents. The future ensures that the service of technical rescue will continue and department capabilities will be increased through additional training opportunities. Additional personnel will be certified in technical rescue disciplines and additional equipment will be provided to enhance operations and safety during these types of incidents.

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emergency medical services

Major Brian Davis leads the Emergency Medical Services Unit for the Edmond Fire Department. Major Davis serves as the medical coordinator for the department and plays a critical role in the department, as well as a liaison with the Office of the Medical Director to ensure that the department is achieving its objectives and delivering the most up to date life saving practices available. Like many other fire departments across the country, Emergency Response has evolved from its original purpose of solely fighting fires to a much broader level of service delivery. In 2012, over 70% of the Edmond Fire Department’s emergency responses were related to emergency medical calls. The Edmond Fire Department is very proud to be able to provide Advanced Life Support engines (ALS) within our city. The department employs a variety of certified emergency medical personnel to provide basic and advanced level of care. The department’s goal is to be able to give our citizens the very best care possible in their worst time of need. By providing ALS first response units we are able to accomplish that mission. The Edmond Fire Department continues to work closely with the Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA) to provide prompt emergency medical service and patient care. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) is a leading cause of death among adults over the age of 40 in the United States and other countries. In the U.S. alone, approximately 359,400 people of all ages experience EMS-assessed out-of-hospital non-traumatic SCA each year and nine out of 10 victims die. The primary benchmark of any EMS system is the survival rate from SCA, nationwide the survival rate is 2% while our system reports a survival rate of 38% for SCA within the city of Edmond. This alone stands as a testament to the level of EMS that the department provides, but the challenge has been accepted that these numbers can and will improve for the citizens of Edmond. The Edmond Fire Department strives to provide the best possible care through training and quality assurance to maintain and improve their skill level. We will continue to look at the needs of our citizens and how we can adjust our level of service to meet those needs. In 2012, there were numerous advancements in treatment protocols, as well as accomplishments for the department. Cardiac arrest continues to be a primary focus in EMS across the country and this is no different in the city of Edmond. There have been multiple specific cardiac dysrhythmia protocols developed and/or reformatted to include the latest science in lifesaving practices that include: increasing chest compression rates from 100 per minute to 120 per minute and guided per metronome, based upon improved return of spontaneous circulation rates, promoting continuity of chest compressions, using proper chest compression mechanics developing an enhanced “pit crew” model of resuscitation team dynamics, derived from best practices in EMS systems across the United States.

24


The department also promotes frequent cooling therapy known as Therapeutic Hypothermia for post-cardiac arrest patients with the goal of better neurologic recovery. The department is constantly updating therapeutic intervention instructions for critical interventions in life-threatening hemorrhage with provisions such as tourniquets, which significantly improves abilities to control high-pressure arterial bleeding in extremity wounds. The department also implemented an expansion of EMT-Basic scope of practice to include ECG acquisition and transmission and the use of waveform capnography. In addition, specific treatments were adopted for seizures utilizing dosing of midazolam based upon reported findings in a multi-center, national study evaluating optimal EMS care for active, persistent seizures. Protocols were updated by the Office of the Medical Director and adopted to highlight treatment priorities and differential assessment for overdoses of opiates, antidepressants, stimulants, street drugs and cardio toxic drugs. The department also included further treatment directives for childbirth care of infant and mother, including management of potential childbirth-related complications. Finally, the department implemented up-date protocols, techniques and equipment being used by EMT-Intermediate and EMT-Paramedics in the EMS system for IV access and airway control. These include Introsseus access and the use of Combitube™ airway which favors better cerebral circulation when a rescue airway is warranted. Continuous improvement is on the horizon for the Edmond Fire Department. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) has established numerous goals in order to improve the quality of services to the city of Edmond. A few of EMS goals for 2013 include ECG acquisition and transmission of 12 lead with use of waveform capnography to the receiving hospital, as well as things as simple as providing patient gowns to patients suspected of a STEMI or in need of a 12 lead ECG in order to maintain the privacy and discretion of the patient. Improvement in the process of continuous clinical quality reporting between the Edmond Fire Department and the Office of the Medical Director has been identified as an ongoing need and will receive special attention in the upcoming year. In addition, continuing education with the Office of the Medical Director will provide constant medical services from patient contact through transport. Training is a high priority for the Edmond Fire Department and 2013 will provide opportunities for training additional personnel in cardiopulmonary circulation, advanced cardiac life support and pediatric life support. Finally, the consistent level of advanced life support has been identified as a critical area of improvement for the department. Currently, the department maintains three (3) advanced life support apparatus for first line response. Additional units are utilized at this level as staffing allows. However, all front line apparatus have been equipped with the necessary equipment for advanced life support. Additional personnel will begin paramedic training in the fall of 2013. This will increase the capability of the department and ensure that the citizens of Edmond receive the highest level of service every time that an Edmond Fire Department unit arrives on scene regardless of the emergency.

25


goals and visions

The Edmond Fire Department has approached its desire to develop and implement a Strategic Plan by asking for and receiving input from the community and members of the agency during the development stage of the Strategic Planning Process. The department utilized professional guidance and the Community-Driven Strategic Planning Process to compile a plan that will be used as a guide for the next five (5) years and will have an impact for many more years thereafter. The success of the Strategic Plan will not depend upon implementation of the goals and their related objectives, but from support received from the authority having jurisdiction, membership of the agency and the community at-large. Provided the community-driven strategic planning process is kept dynamic and supported by effective leadership and active participation, it will be a considerable opportunity to unify internal and external stakeholders through a jointly developed understanding of organizational direction; how all vested parties will work to achieve the mission, goals, and vision; and how the organization will measure and be accountable for its progress and successes. Leadership of the Edmond Fire Department will establish work groups to meet periodically to review progress toward these goals and objectives and adjust timelines as needs and the environment change. Goals and objectives and management tools will be updated on an on-going basis to identify what has been accomplished and to note changes within the organization and the community. The attainment of a performance target will be recognized and celebrated to provide a sense of organizational accomplishment. The goals and objectives have now become the focus of the efforts of the agency. By following these carefully, the Edmond Fire Department can be directed into its desired future while having reduced the obstacles and distractions along the way. • •

To ensure the quality and consistency of standardized training within the agency and as applicable to external agencies.

To improve our emergency communications to better serve the community.

To expand and enhance communications systems with both internal and external stakeholders.

To identify and enhance the external systems and relationships in order to better meet the departments’ mission.

Manage highly qualified personnel to effectively maximize and maintain productivity, strengths and overall services to our community.

To enhance and standardize departmental operations to ensure efficiency, direction, safety, and welfare of the Edmond Fire Department personnel.

To improve technolog y in order to meet the demands of the department and community.

Prepare for, pursue, achieve and maintain international accreditation.

26


commitment “The only limit to your impact is your imagination and commitment.” tony robbins

The strategic planning session involved community stakeholders providing input and establishing priorities for community service, as well as their expectations for the level of service provided for the citizens of Edmond. Some of the established goals may be as simple as a “To Do List,” or as complicated as a plan of action with milestones and performance measures. Implied within the planning process is the ability to measure effectiveness of the actions taken in the conduct of the organization’s business. It is our pleasure to have an established strategic plan that has been developed by the City of Edmond and for the city of Edmond to ensure that the department it meeting its needs and the established level of service now as well as into the future.

27


budget |

FY 2012–13

The Edmond Fire Department FY2012-13 budget was $17,508,368. The department is dedicated to the efficient and effective use of these funds and is constantly pursuing other means of offsetting allocated funds such as local and federal grant opportunities and other funding opportunities that may arise throughout the course of the year such as those available though Homeland Security as well as local industry. The Public Safety Sales Tax has continued to provide an essential foundation for financial stability. Specifically, the Fire Department receives a dedicated 1/4 cent tax for the purpose of providing additional firefighting personnel and equipment, competitive compensation and benefits for existing and retired personnel. In addition, the Fire Department receives 30% of the City’s General Fund. Since the inception of the tax, thirty-eight additional full time positions have been budgeted to ensure adequate response to the city of Edmond. The Department continues annual funding of the $1,200,000 Reserve for Committed Reserves. Included in this allocation is $1,000,000 for Contingency/Disaster Relief and $200,000 for Technology. The annual budget for the Edmond Fire Department is divided into five sections: Personal Services $13,185,881 Transfers $2,542,487 Materials & Supplies $772,750 Other Services & Charges $600,250 Capital Outlay $407,000 Maintaining 122 positions, Personal Services compromised 75.31% of the total budget. This category includes salaries, allowances and incentive pay. Payroll expenses were lower than last year and included twenty-seven pay periods instead of the normal twenty-six. This phenomenon occurs once every eleven years. The second largest component of the budget is Transfers. These are allocations to internal support departments such as Human Resources, Payroll, Purchasing, Risk Management and Facility Maintenance. Insurance assessment and funds for the repair and replacement of apparatus are also included in this category. Uniforms/safety clothing, medical supplies, fire equipment, lifesaving supplies, radios, public education and building materials are examples of the composition of direct costs included in the Materials & Supplies section of the budget. This section of the budget is critical for providing the employees of the Edmond Fire Department with the equipment and supplies necessary to perform their duties on a daily basis.

28


Other Services & Charges encompasses a wide and vital aspect of the fire department operations that include the expenses for continued education and training, which is necessary based upon the amount of duties and responsibilities of today’s firefighters. Additional training needs from this account include sending personnel to paramedic school. In addition, this section of the budget accounts for business services necessary for operation that include utilities to operate and services to maintain our apparatus and facilities. Hazardous waste disposal, license renewal and medical services are other examples of these services and charges. The Edmond Fire Department was fortunate to plan for and purchase capital outlay items in 2012. Two Lifepak 15 defibrillators are state of the art pieces of equipment that work by automatically detecting any abnormal arrhythmia or other life-threatening heart conditions on a person. Once this is detected, an Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) delivers an electrical energ y current when and if it detects that a person needs this current in order to remain alive. In an emergency situation, an AED can make the difference in saving a life. Precisely because AEDs are so easy to use by the Paramedics of the Edmond Fire Department. Two Scott Thermal Imaging Cameras (TIC) provide critical pieces of technolog y for use in search and rescue, overhaul operations and hot spot identification. The TIC that are utilized by the department allow personnel to perform their duties more efficiently and effeciently while providing a critical safety element during emergency incident. Portable Lecture Capture System allows personnel to create a learning resource library by the recording of lecture material and presenter for on-demand, scheduled or live playback across all shifts and stations. Technical Rescue Team materials/equipment 30’ trailer. The department was reimbursed 50% of this purchase through a 2009 UASI grant program. This equipment and trailer provides a critical element in the response to emergencies such as tornados, swiftwater rescue, confined space, trench and other specialized rescue events. Brush Pumper 5 (BP5) received a new bed which allows for extended life of the vehicle for combating grass fires. The Edmond Fire Department battles grass and wild land fires within the city limits of Edmond, as well as providing mutual aid to surrounding communities. The department also made provisions in 2013 to purchase replacement apparatus for its fleet. This includes the replacement of the current Battalion Chief Vehicle, as well as the replacement of a staff vehicle for the Fire Chief. These vehicles are Chevrolet Tahoe’s as the department looks to standardize its fleet for more consistency in order to reduce maintenance and repair costs. In addition, a new BrushPumper will be delivered in 2013 allowing the department to utilize a current BrushPumper in reserve status. Budgeted expenditures that were deferred to FY 2013-14 include the replacement of Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA), emergency generator replacement, dive rescue watercraft, retention wall reconstruction and land improvements to the fire training grounds perimeter. These items provide the department with the necessary resources to accomplish its mission and could not be possible without the support of city of Edmond leadership as well as the citizens that it serves on a daily basis.

29


2012 of edmond

cit y cit y council

Charles Lamb Mayor May 2015 charles.lamb@edmondok.com

Victoria Caldwell Council Member Ward 1 May 2011–15 victoria.caldwell@edmondok.com

Darrell Davis Council Member Ward 3 May 2013–17 darrell.davis@edmondok.com

Elizabeth Waner Council Member Ward 2 May 2011–15 elizabeth.waner@edmondok.com

Nick Masey Council Member Ward 4 May 2013–17 nick.massey@edmondok.com

30


2012 of edmond

cit y ward map

Choctaw

31

Henney

Memorial

Hiwassee

15th

Anderson

WARD 1

Westminister

ion

Edmond

Post

x tens

Coffee Creek

Douglas

way E

I-35

Midwest

Bro ad

Danforth

Air Depot

Sooner

Coltrane

Bryant

Boulevard

Kelly

WARD 3 33rd

Santa Fe

Sorghum Mill

WARD 2 WARD 4 Covell

Western

Pennsylvania

Waterloo


1

fire station #1 925 E. Second St. Edmond, OK 73034 (405) 216-7310

2

2012 of edmond

cit y fire stations

32

station #2 1315 S. Broadway Edmond, OK 73034 (405) 216-7320


3

fire station #3 1540 W. Danforth Rd. Edmond, OK 73003 (405) 216-7330

4 5 fire station #4 1701 W. I-35 Frontage Rd. Edmond, OK 73013

fire station #5 5300 E. Covell Rd. Edmond, OK 73034

(405) 216-7340

(405) 216-7350

33


response performance measurements

The department implemented response performance measurements in 2012 to reflect best industry practices based upon the guidelines established by the Commission on Public Safety Excellence, as well as the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1710, Standard for the Organization and Deployment of Fire Suppression Operations, Emergency Medical Operations and Special Operations to the Public by Career Fire Departments. The department is investing significant time, energ y and resources into ensuring response times are properly analyzed. A critical step in the analysis process is ensuring the information is communicated to personnel for areas of improvement as well as analyzed to ensure resources are properly distributed and concentrated throughout the city in order to provide a timely and effective response. Ensuring response times are meeting the expectations of the city of Edmond is a combined effort throughout the city and numerous processes have been identified for improvement as well, as the addition of technological advances that simply allow the Fire Suppression Division to be notified sooner and respond faster and more effectively than ever before. The future also holds improvements in response capabilities by utilizing auto-vehicle locator (AVL) dispatching to ensure the nearest available unit responds to an emergency. Improvements in station alerting, Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) and Records Management Systems (RMS) all provide for enhanced response capabilities for the city of Edmond. Individual efforts provided with improvements in technology will combine to show immediate improvements in response times. In 2013, the department will implement silent status changes in which units will be tasked with manually changing unit status to accurately reflect their en-route and arrival times which in turn provide a more accurate reflection of the department’s performance. Throughout the past, response times have been measured as an “average” which does not necessarily provide the necessary details or specific for decision making. Although “average” response information is provided within this report, the future of the Edmond Fire Department is the response performance objectives recognized as industry standard or best practices. The department will develop a Standard of Cover (SOC) document with the following benchmark goals for its response performance: dispatch time This time segment is defined as the time between when the call is received at the Edmond Communications Center and time units are dispatched. The time segments to calculate this metric are both found in the Computer Aided Dispatch System (CAD) and imported into the Edmond Fire Department’s records management system. The benchmark for this response time segment is ninety (90) seconds, ninety (90) percent of the time.

34


turnout time This time segment is defined as the time between when a unit/company is dispatched and the time they signal they are responding using the radio or mobile data computer. The time segments to calculate this metric are both found in CAD and imported into the Edmond Fire Department’s records management system. The responding signal will be controlled by firefighters using their Mobile Data Computers (MDC). The benchmark for this response time segment is sixty (60) seconds, ninety (90) percent of the time. travel time | 1st arrival This time segment is defined as the time between the first arriving unit signaling they are responding and when they signal they have arrived at the incident scene. Both of the time segments used to calculate this time are recorded in CAD and signaled by firefighters using their MDC. The benchmark for this response time segment is four (4) minutes, ninety (90) percent of the time. travel time | effective response force The Effective Response Force (ERF) varies depending on the incident type. For a firstalarm fire, the ERF includes three engines, one ladder, one Rescue and the Battalion Chief. The time segment for measuring ERF arrival includes the time of first unit responding to the time of the last unit’s arrival. These time metrics are recorded in CAD by firefighters using their MDC. The benchmark for this response time segment is eight (8) minutes, ninety (90) percent of the time.  The improvement of the response capabilities provided by the Edmond Fire Department begins with the analysis of data provided during response to both emergency and nonemergency incidents. These times will be evaluated for all disciples, fire, technical rescue, hazardous materials and EMS, to ensure that the department is arriving with an effective response force in sufficient time to adequately handle any emergency. This process will ensure that the Edmond Fire Department is meeting the expectations of city leadership, as well as each of the citizens of Edmond.

35


retirements

gilbert h a rry m a n

1978 Firefighter 1979 Lieutenant 1982 Captain 1989 Battalion Chief

| fire chief | 1977-2012

1993 Assistant Fire Chief 2001 Fire Chief

Chief Harryman’s accomplishments during his career are numerous. During his 35 year career, Gil came up through the ranks until 2001 when he became the Chief of the department. During his time as Fire Chief, Chief Harryman made numerous improvements for the city of Edmond that include the development of Fire Station #5/Fire Training Center/Fire Administration Complex, construction of the Children’s Safety Village and implementation of the ALS program. A big impact that Chief Harryman made on the citizens of Edmond during his tenure as Fire Chief was the improvement to the ISO rating for the City of Edmond. Chief Harryman received the Steve Begley award in 2004. a rnie postier

1986 1991 1997 2001

| deput y fire chief | 1982-2012

Fire Prevention Officer Assistant Training Officer Chief Training Officer Deputy Fire Chief

Chief Postier was hired in 1982 and first entered the administration of the department in 1986 as a member of the Fire Prevention Office. He later went to serve the department in the Training Division where he was instrumental in the training and development of numerous firefighter recruits. In 2001, he was promoted to Deputy Fire Chief under Chief Harryman where he served until retirement.

36


| battalion chief | 1974-2012

johnn y gibbon

1976 Driver 1978 Lieutenant 1980 Captain 1987 Battalion Chief

Battalion Chief Johnny Gibbon served the Edmond Fire Department in a variety of ways but will be long remembered as a Battalion Chief. He held this position for 25 years of his 36 year career. Chief Gibbon was instrumental in the development of numerous programs for the department as well as the state in special operation; technical rescue, hazardous materials and dive rescue. His influence, drive and direction permeated all facets of the department and will have a long lasting impact on the organization. m a rk lit tle

| captain | 1986-2012

1994 Driver 2005 Lieutenant 2007 Captain

Captain Little started his career in 1986. He spent over 10 years as a Driver and was respected for his mechanical abilities and knowledge of our apparatus. Captain Little helped train recruits and the department in electrical safety. Captain Little spent the last years of his career as an Officer. He was well liked by the crews that he supervised. a da m smith

| driver | 1983-2012

1989 Driver 2008 Interim Lieutenant 2009 Driver

Driver Smith spent the majority of his career as an Apparatus Driver. He did however step up, when asked by the Chief, to work for one year as a Lieutenant, Driver Smith did a good job in the situation. Driver Smith was always known as the department artist. He designed the Edmond Fire Department workout t-shirts and the Hazmat t-shirts.

37


dedication “When a man becomes a fireman his greatest act of bravery has been accomplished. What he does after that is all in the line of work.� edward f . croker

2012

promotions Bud Vandewalker Jeff Thompson Kevin Woodard Wes Skelly Mark Sanders Justin Mann Keith Randolph Russ Locke Brian Rowell Jeremy Sanders Jason Hazzard Courtney Powell PT McMurtrey Nick Hamar Juan Lopez Jake Rhoades Ryan Lenz Mike Barnes

Driver FF/Relief Driver Captain Lieutenant Driver FF/Relief Driver Battalion Chief Captain Captain Lieutenant Lieutenant Driver Driver FF/Relief Driver FF/Relief Driver Fire Chief Deputy Fire Chief Fire Prevention Chief

38

2/18/2012 2/18/2012 3/3/2012 6/9/2012 6/9/2012 6/9/2012 6/16/2012 6/16/2012 6/16/2012 6/16/2012 6/16/2012 6/16/2012 6/16/2012 6/16/2012 6/16/2012 10/22/2012 10/27/2012 12/22/2012


2012

service awards

1982

1992

2002

2007

30 years

20 years

10 years

5 years

Marcus Ferguson Terry Hill

Brent Armer Jeff Fountain Ed Lahr Charles Michael Greg Westermier

Kelly Lewis Ryan Barrett Jeromy Hudson Les Leach Jeremy Sanders Matt Schwettmann Wes Skelly Brian Davis

Micah Miles Ryan Godbehere Nick Hamar Josh Hillis Justin Mann Kyle Shelton Jimmy Weathers Joe Weeks Lindall Wood

steven begley award Captain Kevin Woodard The Steven Begley award is given to individuals who are recognized by their peers as having demonstrated outstanding service, unselfish dedication and personal sacrifice in the performance of their duties. kiwanis firefighter of the year Captain John Werhun The Firefighter of the year is awarded by the Edmond Kiwanis to the Steven Begley award winner from the previous year. As such, Captain John Werhun was the 2011 Steven Begley Award recipient. meritorious award Firefighter/Relief Driver Jeff Thompson The Meritorious award is awarded for conduct involving courage, risk and danger to personal safety. It is awarded for meritorious service in a duty of great responsibility: such duty reflecting excellence in such performance that distinguishes both himself/herself and the Department.

39

2012


services provided

The Edmond Fire Department currently operates out of five (5) fire stations throughout the city. Every day, the Edmond Fire Department has up to thirty five (35) personnel assigned to the Suppression Division. Under the direction of the Fire Chief, the Edmond Fire Department has an authorized strength of 124 personnel as shown below. Deputy Fire Chief 1 Chief of Training 1 Chief of Prevention 1 Fire Battalion Chief 3 Prevention Division Majors 5 Training Division Majors 2 ESM Coordinator 1 Fire Captain 15 Fire Lieutenant 9 Fire Apparatus Driver 24 Firefighter / Relief Driver 9 Firefighter 42 Fire Protection Specialist 2 Administrative Support 5 These personnel are responsible for responding to both emergency and non-emergency incidents throughout the city of Edmond. Primarily, the Suppression Division maintains readiness and response capabilities in a variety of front line apparatus to meet the needs of the community: Three (3) Engines Two (2) Quints One (1) Aerial One (1) Rescue Three (3) Brush Trucks Three (3) Tankers In addition to these apparatus, the department maintains additional resources to ensure it has adequate resources to not only deliver exceptional services, but also ensure the safety of its personnel and the citizens of Edmond. These resources include: Hazardous Materials Regional Response Unit Technical Rescue Regional Response Unit Mass Casualty Unit Open Water Rescue Craft Swift Water Rescue Craft

40


selfless service “Fireman never know what they will encounter on each call but proceed with the same level of commitment and service.� byron pulsifer

In 2012, the Edmond Fire Department responded to 5,984 calls for service. Like many other departments across the United States, emergency medical calls account for the largest percentage of calls requested. This statistic held true to fashion in 2012 as 70.62 of total calls for service were emergency medical services; 4,226 total. Despite a transition in the leadership, the Edmond Fire Department worked on a number of projects to increase the level of service to the city of Edmond. The establishment of daily staffing requirements for special services such as hazardous materials and technical rescue, including dive rescue, as well as maintaining Advanced Life Support capabilities in order to provide consistent levels of service to the community. In addition, the department began the hiring process for new recruits for a recruit academy to begin in the spring of 2013. Finally, analysis of run data and dispatch information was established in order to revise and implement processes for better overall response time. These processes are coming to realization through technology improvements in station alerting, dispatch processes and the implementation of silent status changes by department personnel during emergency responses. These changes will continue into the future in the department’s effort to provide continuous improvement in the delivery of emergency services to the city of Edmond.

41


ethics “Let no man’s ghost return to say his training let him down.” unknown

42


citizens fire academy

The Edmond Fire Department conducted two (2) Citizens Fire Academy in 2012. The academy featured 16 community members in the spring and 13 members in the fall. These 29 members received a behind the scenes look at the department and its operations. The classes were held in Fire Administration classrooms, as well as the training grounds and various fire stations. The Prevention Division, as well as members of the Suppression Division partnered to provide participants with the familiarity of firefighting equipment and tactics, as well as an in depth look at the history of the department, its personnel and its divisions. The Citizens Fire Academy is a 12-week program that allows participants the opportunity to work side by side with current firefighters as they learn the basics with hands-on demonstrations of firefighting operations. The program enhances participant’s knowledge of the Edmond Fire Department’s capabilities, as well as builds relationships between the Edmond Fire Department and the citizens we strive to protect. Participants in the academy have the opportunity to participate in hands-on activities and are equipped with appropriate protective equipment during activities so they are not only protected, but gain the true experience as they complete skills and activities just as fire department personnel experience it. Topics for the academy include: • • • • • • • • • • •

History of the fire service and Edmond Fire Department Fire behavior, water supplies and fire hose Fire investigations/Apparatus Public education/fire/building codes First aid and CPR Forcible entry, extrication and ventilation Hazardous materials Personal protective clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus Search and rescue, thermal image cameras and fire extinguishers Live Burn Props Technical rescue

This successful program will continue in 2013 and in the future, due to the impact that it has on the participants, as well as the community. Members of the Citizens Fire Academy have formed an alumni program in which graduates may join to support the Edmond Fire Department and participate in future academies, as well as other department events. On behalf of the Edmond Fire Department, congratulations to those community members that attended and graduated from the Citizens Fire Academy in 2012, we look forward to working with you in the future!

43


commission on fire accreditation international

In 2012, the Edmond Fire Department initiated the process to obtain international accreditation through the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI). This organization assists emergency responders around the world in achieving organizational and professional excellence through its strategic self-assessment model and accreditation process. The accreditation process reflects a comprehensive self-assessment and evaluation model that enables fire and emergency service organizations to examine their service levels and performance in a way that allows them to compare to industry best practices. The process promotes continuous improvement of quality service delivered to the local community and the world at large. The goal of the accreditation process for the Edmond Fire Department is that this process will make us a more professional, efficient and effective organization that demonstrates we are meeting the expectations of the city of Edmond. This process will validate continuous improvement and ensure that we are constantly evaluating ourselves and maintaining best industry practices based on national standards and regulations. Using objective and subjective analysis, the department will possess the tools to justify actions and measure outcomes. The CFAI is a process that requires departments that attain accredited status to re-certify every five years. Simply defined; accredited members are continuously improving on the areas identified in the Self-Assessment and Standard of Cover documents. Once departments reach the goals outlined in these documents, new goals are established to continually move departments forward in efficiency, professionalism and service delivery. The Edmond Fire Department is currently in the registrant phase of the accreditation process. In 2013, the department completed a five (5) year Strategic Plan facilitated by the Center for Public Safety Excellence (CPSE) in which external stakeholders, including city leaders and citizens representing business, education, public safety and neighborhoods, attended a meeting in which they established their expectations and provided input on the future direction and operations of the department. The next phase of the development of the strategic plan involved 36 internal stakeholders providing input on organizational direction and identifying strengths, weaknesses and opportunities. The final product is a working document in the form of a five (5) year 2013-2018 Strategic Plan that the department can utilize as a road map to improvement combined with the Self-Assessment portion of the accreditation process. The Self-Assessment involves a comprehensive department evaluation and data analysis to contribute to the development of a Standard of Cover document which equips department personnel to rationally plan for and justify various levels of service. In 2014, the Edmond Fire Department will move from Registered to Applicant status and host a site visit from a CPSE Accreditation Team and defend our Self Assessment and Standard of Cover documents. Upon completion and approval by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International, the Edmond Fire Department will be the only accredited fire department in the state of Oklahoma. In short, the Edmond Fire Department will validate its status as a top notch fire department worthy of the city of Edmond.

44


honor guard

The fire service is full of tradition and pride, the Edmond Fire Department continues these traditions through the activities of the Honor Guard. The goal of the Honor Guard is to represent the Edmond Fire Department and its members of the fire service in a positive manner during ceremonies and activities. The Edmond Fire Department Honor Guard is staffed by department members on a voluntary basis. Although not required, several members have prior military experience which aids with proper etiquette and knowledge of drill and ceremonies such as presentation of colors, opening ceremonies and funeral processions. Currently the team is comprised of eight members of the Edmond Fire Department. Those members are: Chief Doug Hall Captain Michael Smith Captain Jeff Zelnicek

Lieutenant Ryan Dubord Driver Courtney Powell Driver Stephen Raney

Firefighter Lance Bloyd Firefighter Ryan Gleghorn

In 2012, the Edmond Fire Department Honor Guard participated in numerous ceremonies and represented the department professionally every time they donned their Class A uniforms. The members of the Honor Guard strive to provide a distinguished service to those being honoring during these events and it showed in their performance. The Edmond Fire Department will increase its membership in the future in an effort to provide even better service to the Edmond Fire Department, the city of Edmond, and the state of Oklahoma.

45


mission “Leadership is a verb, not a noun” john maxwell

46


data and graphs

Effectively managing a fire department requires an understanding of and an ability to demonstrate how changes to resources and performance will affect community outcomes. Performance and risks are easily based on qualitative assumptions rather that fact based, quantitative analysis. It is imperative that the Edmond Fire Department, as well as city leadership, know how fire department resource deployment affects community outcomes in important areas: firefighter injury and death; civilian injury and death; and economic loss. To facilitate this, fire department leaders must have reliable statistical data useful for optimization of response both prior to and during an incident. The Edmond Fire Department has undertaken technological advances and substantial efforts in data collection, in order to provide quantitative data necessary for decision making and planning purposes. Many decisions do not require analysis, such as decisions on personnel, promotions and even decisions on how to handle a fire. It is certainly true that fire departments can continue to operate in the same way they always have without doing a lot of analysis. On the other hand, there are three good reasons for looking closely at the data: (1) to gain insights into fire problems, (2) to improve resource allocation for combating fires and (3) to identify training needs. Probably the most compelling is that analysis gives insight into fire problems, which in turn can affect operations in the department. The analysis of data will provide insight into the current performance of the department and its membership, which allows for decisions into such things as station location, provisions for Advanced Life Support and training program development. It makes sense to see how training matches characteristics of fires in a particular jurisdiction. This is not to say that other training is not important, since an exception can always occur. However, knowing more about the fires in an area can improve the training. Additionally, an analysis of firefighter injuries may indicate a need for certain types of training. In summary, the Edmond Fire Department realizes the importance of the collection and analysis of data in the decision making process for the organization. This analysis will occur as part of an ongoing basis and provided to all department members, as well as city leadership on a monthly basis. By using these techniques of analysis and decision making, the Edmond Fire Department will provide a foundation for improvement in the current level of service through collecting data, analyzing data and presenting the results.

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total number of calls 8000

2012

total number of calls

5,984

6793

7000 6000

5707

5745

5890

2008

2009

2010

5984

5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 2011

2012

structure fire census 120

2012

number of structure fires

73

101 100

95 81

77

80

73

60

40

20

0 2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

fires per 1,000 population 4.0

3.77 3.52

2012

fires per 1,000 popul ation

2.65 83,035 Residents

3.5

3.23 2.84

3.0

2.65

2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0 2008

48

2009

2010

2011

2012


1

2012

total number of calls by station

1,793 Station #1

2

3

1,734

1,468

4

5

565

421

Station #2

Station #3

Station #4

Station #5

49


2012

total calls per unit

Quint #2

1,800

Engine #1

1,725

Quint #3

1,533

Rescue #1

Engine #4

627

Engine #5

470

Brush #3

382

Battalion Chief #1

Brush #4

262

Brush #5

210

Truck #1

74

Tanker #5

Tanker #4

Tanker #3

Hazmat

Boat #4

18

11

9

50

631

346 44 3


2012 of incidents

number by category

Rupture/Explosion: 6 Hazardous Condition: 146 Fire: 223

3: Severe Weather 1: Other

False Call: 305 Service Call: 456

Good Intent: 618 4,226: EMS/Rescue

51


In 2012 the Edmond Fire Department

$30.4m saved a total of in structur al damage Initial total value of structures: $33.2 Million

versus In 2008 the Edmond Fire Department

$26.3m saved a total of in structur al damage Initial total value of structures: $34.1 Million

52


2012

department aid summary

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Mutual Aid Received

8

8

4

13

5

Automatic Aid Received

3

3

-

4

3

Mutual Aid Given

83

90

47

67

61

Automatic Aid Given

21

21

22

16

12

Other Aid Given

5

-

-

-

-

2012

concurrent calls

1,547 53


total number of calls by month 600

2012

l argest number of monthly calls

565 August

515

513

500

449

446

538

565

546 550

533 501

433

395

400

300

200

100

0 J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

N

O

total number of calls by day 1000

2012

l argest number of daily calls

966 Monday

966 870

825

901 822

842

800

758

600

400

200

0 S

M

T

W

T

F

S

total number of calls by hour 1200

2012

l argest number of hourly calls

1,063 12 – 2 PM

1063 1000

1000

953

898 800 686 611

600

400

401

369

200

0 0−2

54

3−5

6−8 AM

9−11

12−2

3−5

6−8 PM

9−11

D


2012

aver age response time

5:28 2012

2012

aver age response time by district

district 1: district 2: district 3: district 4: district 5:

aver age response time by station

5:03 5:39 5:39 5:48 7:27

station 1: station 2: station 3: station 4: station 5:

55

4:59 5:11 5:37 6:01 7:29


2012

fr actile response time by unit

BC1

BP3

BP4

BP5

E1

E4

E5

HZMT5

0–1 min.

2

-

-

1

13

-

5

-

1–2 min.

5

2

1

1

20

4

1

-

2–3 min.

4

9

7

-

83

23

5

-

3–4 min.

14

40

14

3

236

42

8

-

4–5 min.

32

51

23

7

422

100

24

1

5–6 min.

31

62

34

15

305

104

40

-

6–7 min.

22

71

31

22

176

76

49

1

7–8 min.

27

29

15

23

67

36

60

-

8–9 min.

21

12

14

24

32

27

49

-

9–10 min.

7

9

5

11

12

15

39

-

10–15 min.

31

13

18

15

18

39

34

-

15–20 min.

9

3

7

5

3

8

6

2

20+ min.

3

-

6

7

5

4

6

1

Q2

Q3

R1

T1

TNK3

TNK4

TNK5

0–1 min.

7

3

1–2 min.

7

8

3

-

-

-

-

4

2

-

-

-

2–3 min.

67

49

9

1

-

-

-

3–4 min.

211

176

27

1

-

-

-

4–5 min.

461

290

55

4

1

-

-

5–6 min.

388

267

63

5

1

2

1

6–7 min.

225

233

54

8

-

-

1

7–8 min.

75

123

28

1

-

-

1

8–9 min.

31

56

18

1

-

2

4

9–10 min.

21

36

13

1

-

-

2

10–15 min.

13

32

25

6

2

-

2

15–20 min.

5

4

5

1

-

1

2

20+ min.

4

2

5

1

-

2

7

56


2012

fr actile response times 0–1 min.

29

1–2 min.

49

2–3 min.

239

3–4 min.

707

4–5 min.

1362

5–6 min.

1176

6–7 min.

843

7–8 min.

414

8–9 min.

244

9–10 min.

141

10–15 min.

183

15–20 min.

49

20+ min.

90

2012

fr actile response time by station

ST1

ST2

ST3

ST4

ST5

0–1 min.

14

6

3

-

6

1–2 min.

25

8

9

5

2

2–3 min.

92

68

49

24

6

3–4 min.

258

212

180

44

13

4–5 min.

462

473

300

101

26

5–6 min.

340

401

276

113

46

6–7 min.

205

241

255

85

57

7–8 min.

82

88

131

48

65

8–9 min.

45

38

60

45

56

9–10 min.

21

19

41

21

39

10–15 min.

25

22

39

51

46

15–20 min.

9

10

7

11

12

20+ min.

19

19

16

18

18

57


1

2012

percentage of avail abilit y

90.8% Station #1

2

3

91.6%

91.9%

4

5

94.0%

94.9%

Station #2

Station #3

Station #4

Station #5

58


2012

ems incidents by t ype

Abdominal pain

56

2.99%

Airway obstruction

2

0.11

Allergic reaction, excludes stings & venomous bit

8

0.43

Altered level of consciousness

116

6.20

Behavioral - mental status, psychiatric disorder

31

1.66

Burns

1

0.05

Cardiac arrest

47

2.51

Cardiac dysrhythmia

32

1.71

Chest pain

156

8.34

Diabetic symptom

65

3.48

Do not resuscitate

3

0.16

General illness

236

12.62

Hemorrhaging/bleeding

32

1.71

Hyperthermia

8

0.43

Hypothermia

1

0.05

Hypovolemia

4

0.21

None/no patient or refused treatment

13

0.70

Obvious death

11

0.59

Other impression/assessment

196

10.48

Overdose/poisoning

48

2.57

Pregnancy/OB

6

0.32

Respiratory arrest

4

0.21

Respiratory distress

181

9.68

Seizure

86

4.60

Sexual assault

1

0.05

Sting/bite

3

0.16

Stroke/CVA

40

2.14

Syncope, fainting

84

4.49

Trauma

399

21.34

(Blank)

2384

-

Number of Patients

4254

-

Count excluding blanks used for % of Total

1870

-

59


2012 number of ems incidents by gender

705 male

rel ated incidents

984 female

rel ated incidents

60


2012

total tr aining hours

23,230 61


2012

tr aining hours by category Accident Prevention

15

Basic Hydraulics

-

Adult CPR and Airway Obstructions

27

Basic Life Support - Adult

2

Advance a Hose Bundle from a Standpipe

4

Behavioral Emerg. & Special Situations

2

Advance a Hoseline Up a Ladder

1

Bleeding & Shock

4

Advance a Hoseline Up/Down a Stairway

9

Building Collapse

1

Advanced Airway Management

12

Building Construction

1

Advanced Airway Techniques

-

Building Construction Types & Features

2

Advanced First Aid

10

Burns

2

Advanced Life Support Assist & AED

3

Cardiology

38

Aerial Apparatus - Maintenance

38

Cardio-Pulmonary Resc.

60

Aerial Apparatus - Operations

12

CDC Communicable Diseases HIV/HBV

2

Aerial Apparatus - Positioning

2

Childhood Illnesses, Pediatric Emergencies

1

Aerial Apparatus - Stabilization

-

Communicable Disease - HIV/HBV

1

Aerial Ladder Company Operations

2

Computer Training

80

Aerial ladder Operations

-

Confined Space Rescue

9

Aerial Operator

51

Confined Space Rescue - Awareness

-

Aid/Medic Unit Operator

-

Critical Incident Stress Debriefing

0

Aid/Medic Unit Orientation

19

Critical Incident Stress Management

3

Airway Management

4

Customer Service

27

Airway Management and Chest Trauma

1

Daily Quick Drills

80

Alarms Systems

-

Deck Gun

6

Altered Level of Conciousness

-

Decontamination Procedures

21

Altered Level of Consciousness

4

Defensive Driving (EVAP)

15

Anatomy & Physiology - Review

4

Defensive Driving Techniques

7

Anatomy and Physiology - Review

1

Disaster Preparedness

-

Apparatus Inspections & Maintenance

599

Donning/Wearing/Using SCBA

63

Auto-Defib

6

DOT Guidebook Review

-

Automatic Sprinkler Systems

-

Drill Ground Safety

1

Basic First Aid

21

Driveway Supply Evolution

-

62


Dry Forward Hydrant (driveway lay)

-

Firefighting Tactics

Elevated Master Stream

-

First Responder

Emergency Medical Technician - Airway

-

First Responder Operations

46

129

Flammable Liquids Firefighting

2

Emergency Medical Technician - I.V.

4

Foam Fire Fighting Procedures

-

Emergency Response Safety

5

Forcible Entry

0

Emergency Vehicle & Incident Command

0

Forward Hydrant

-

Engine Company Attack Evolutions

4

General Pharmacology

7

Environmental Emergencies

1

Geriatrics

-

Environmental Injuries

3

Ground Ladders Operations

1

Ground Ladders, Raises/Lowers

-

Emergency Medical Technician - Basic

Equipment Care & Maintenance

155

43 -

EVAP Driving Rodeo

-

Hazardous Materials

-

Extinguishing Agents (Foam,etc.)

1

Hazardous Materials Chemistry

13

Extrication & Patient Handling

3

Hazardous Materials Identification

47

FDC Reverse Evolution

-

Hazardous Materials Technician

4

Field Decon Procedures

15

Haz-Mat Incident Procedures

40

Fire Apparatus Safety Procedure

1

Haz-Mat Incident Scene Safety

13

Fire Behavior

15

Haz-Mat On-Scene Incident Commander

4

Fire Cause Determination

8

Head Truama and Neuro Assessment

46

Fire Control

3

Heat Exhaustion

Fire Ground Management

39

High/Low Angle Rescue

52

Fire Ground Operations

13

Hose Care and Maintenance

36

Fire Ground Safety

97

Hose handling Fundamentals

15

Fire Prevention Fundamentals

2

Hose Testing

36

Fire Protection Systems

9

Hose Training

2

Fire Service Tools & Equipment

30

Hose/Appliance Fundamentals

-

Fire Streams

16

Hydraulics, Theory & Principles

-

Firefighter Safety

4

Incident Management System

Firefighter Tactics

6

Infection Control

63

-

28 -


2012

tr aining hours by category Infectious Disease Control Inspecting/Care/Maintaining SCBA

1

Other SCBA Training

12

312

Overhaul Procedures

3

IV Therapy

6

Oxygen Therapy

13

Ladder Operations

-

Passport Accountability System

1

Ladder Raise Fundamentals

3

Patient Assessment

21

Ladders, Care & Maintenance

1

Pediatric CPR & Airway Obstruction

-

Live Fire Training

18

Pediatric/Multi-System Trauma

-

Low Angle Rescue Procedures

-

Personal Protective Equipment

150

LPG/LNG Firefighting

31

Pharmacology

25

Management Principles

67

Pharyngeal Tracheal Lumen Device

3

Manipulative Driving Skills

574

Physical Fitness Training

Maps & Addressing

122

Portable Equipment Evolutions

-

Maps and Addressing

224

Portable Fire Extinguishers

6

762

Marine Operations

-

Portable Pumping Equipment

1

Masterstream Forward

8

Post Incident Critiques

38

Mechanism of injury and topics in trauma

1

Preconnect Attack

-

Medical Emerg. - Infants & Children

4

Preconnect Attack Evolution

2

Medical Emerg.,Acute Abdomen

2

Pre-Fire Orientation

38

Medical Emergencies - Adult

1

Pre-Incident Target Hazard Planning

68

Medical Legal Issues, Crime Scenes

5

Principles of Leadership/Supervision

228

Motor Vehicle Accident Scene Safety

1

Product Recognition & Identification

50

Multi Company IMS Drill

4

Proper Lifting Techniques

OB/GYN Emergencies

12

Protocal Review

Operating Small Equipment

142

Psychological Emergencies

3

Other Building Construction

4

Public Education Program

127

Other Driver/Operator Trianing

24

Pump Maintenance

11

Other Equipment Training

9

Pump Operator Hydraulics

1

Other Hose Training

-

Pumper Operations

12

Other Rescue Training

7

Pumper Operator

119

64

194


Pumper Tender Operations

1

Spinal, Abdomen, Extremity Trauma

3

Pumper/Tender Operations

5

Sprinkler Standpipe Reverse

-

Pumps & Components

12

Sprinkler Systems

4

Radio Communication & Report Writing

1

Standard Hydrant Hook-up Evolution

-

Radio Communication, Report Writing

3

Stress Management

-

Radio Procedures

10

Tender Operator

15

Records & Reports

464

Trauma - Chest/Abdomen/Genitalia

-

Rehab Procedures

-

Trauma care, burn/Soft-tissue Emerg.

-

Relay Pumping

-

Trauma Care, Head/Spine/Extremities

1

Rescue Company Evolutions

8

Trauma Care, Infants & Children

-

Rescue Equipment Orientation

9

Trench Rescue

66

Respiratory Emergencies

5

Utility Hazards

-

Reverse Hydrant

-

Vehicle Extrication

46

Reverse Lay

-

Vehicle Extrication - Tools & Techniques

56

Vehicle operations & multi-casualty incidents

2

Ventilation

3

Ventilation - Advanced

17

Ventilation - Fundamentals

-

Ropes & Knots

24

Safety Program Orientation

1

Salvage & Overhaul Operations

1

Salvage Procedures

2

SCBA Cascade System Operation

-

SCBA Certification

16

SCBA Compressor, Use and Maintenance

3

SCBA Confidence Course

20

SCBA Emergency Procedures

25

SCBA Skills Maintenance

13

Search & Rescue

1

Search & Rescue (SCBA)

60

Soft Tissue Injuries

1

Special Rescue Situations

27

Spinal Immobilization

6

Water Rescue

65

209

Water Supplies

4

Water Supply Systems

11

Water System Maintenance & Testing

106

Wet Forward Hydrant Evolution

-

Wildland Fire Fighting Safety

2

Wildland Firefighting

15

Wildland Firefighting Fundamentals

16

Wildland Firefighting Safety

0

Worker Right to Know Program

4


values “Courage isn’t that you can see what lies ahead; courage means you will advance not knowing but doing at all costs.” byron pulsifer

66


2012

densit y of calls map

67


2012

station location map

68


2012

incident location map

69


2012

target hazard location map

70


2012

tr avel time map

2:40

71


notes


city of edmond Âť fire department

2012 annual report edmondfd.com | 5300 E. Covell, Edmond, OK 73034 Ph: (405) 216-7300 | Fx: (405) 216-7301

2012 Edmond Fire Department Annual Report  

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