Page 1

Police Department 2 018 A N N UA L R E P O R T


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Contents Core Values����������������������������� 3 Mission������������������������������������� 3 Vision��������������������������������������� 3 Message from the Chief of Police������������������ 4 2018 Organizational Chart���������������������������������������� 6 Concord Quick Facts���������������7 2018 Highlights����������������������� 8 2018 Goals��������������������������������11 Operating Expenditures�������������������������� 12 Three Year Comparison���������������������������� 13 Ten Year Comparison����������� 13 Statistical Data����������������������� 14 Patrol Bureau������������������������� 16 Operations Bureau���������������� 19 Administration Bureau����������������������������������� 22 Commendations�������������������� 24 On the Move���������������������������27

Annual Report Project Manager: Major Robert Ledwell Project Coordinator: Sergeant Curtis Anderson Front/back cover photos: Michael A. Anderson Photography

2017 Officer of the Year - Angel Gonzalez and family PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 3

Mission In partnership with the community, we will reduce the levels of crime, fear, and disorder through evidence-based community policing strategies. We embrace transparency and accountability, provide exceptional service, and are committed to a culture of excellence.

Vision A community where citizens and police work together, in harmony, to achieve the highest standards of public safety.

Core Values COMPETENCE

We are prudent stewards of the public’s grant of authority and resources. We are accountable for the quality of our performance and the standards of our conduct. COURAGE

We place the safety of others before our own and accept our moral responsibility to take action against injustice and wrongdoing. Coworkers are expected to take prudent risks on behalf of the public. INTEGRITY

We recognize the complexity of police work and exercise discretion in ways that are beyond reproach and worthy of public trust. Honesty and truthfulness are fundamental elements of integrity. It is our duty to earn public trust through consistent words and actions. We are honest in word and deed. LEADERSHIP

We seek to influence human behavior to achieve organizational goals that serve the public while developing individuals, teams and the organization for future service. We accept our responsibility to be leaders, both within the community and among our peers, and for the actions of our colleagues and ourselves. We are all responsible for the performance, reputation and morale of the department. RESPECT

We hold life in the highest regard. We treat all citizens and colleagues with dignity and respect, and are fair and impartial as we perform our duties. We openly and effectively communicate with the public and each other by sharing information and soliciting feedback to accomplish the department’s vision and mission. RESTRAINT

We use the minimum force and authority necessary to accomplish a proper police purpose. We demonstrate self-discipline, even when no one is listening or watching.


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Message from the Chief of Police

I present to you the 2018 Concord Police Department Annual Report. Another year has come and gone and there is much to report in the following pages. If there was a central theme to my focus in 2018 (aside from the standard public safety concerns of crime, traffic safety, community engagement, etc.), it was the health and wellbeing of those who dedicate their lives to serving and protecting Concord. Employee health and wellbeing is always of top concern to me, and in 2018 I took deliberate steps to focus on those areas. The department had a Police Chaplain program for several years, however the program was not as active or engaging as officers would like. Coworkers participated in a survey where they overwhelmingly supported a new approach and demonstrated a desire for a “ministry of presence�, where chaplains would spend time developing relationships with employees in advance of a personal or professional crisis. Chaplain Lonnie Clouse, of First Responders 1st (FR1), began his chaplaincy in February and has dedicated many hours attending roll calls, ride-alongs, and various special events. He is truly active in the lives of coworkers and has even presided over a couple wedding ceremonies. In October, Chaplain Mike Cowan joined FR1 in support of CPD and has also been actively involved in our program. Master Police Officer Joshua Shaver serves as a volunteer program coordinator where he connects coworkers with chaplain services and regularly reports to me on the number of hours our chaplains spend interacting with staff. Coworkers also completed a survey to gauge their satisfaction with our existing annual physical fitness assessment and to also provide input on new ideas and ways we can enhance physical fitness programming within the department. Efforts are underway to implement changes in 2019 and beyond. City Council and city management supported facility improvements to our headquarters building in 2018. We took unused office space and converted it to a cardio fitness facility. The creation of a dedicated cardio facility provided much needed space in our original strength training room, which allowed for an upgrade to that equipment as well. With these facility enhancements department coworkers have 24/7 access to state of the art equipment. Moving forward, I plan to provide coworkers with literature and training that focuses on their health and wellbeing. Policing is a difficult profession that can wear down even the strongest of personalities over a 25-30 year career. In order for our law enforcement professionals to be at their best to serve the public, we must ensure that their physical, mental, and spiritual needs are met now and into the future.

Marine Week, Concord-Padgett Regional Airport


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 5

Staffing was mentioned as a critical concern last year not only for CPD but the profession in general. In 2018 we experienced a 21% reduction in attrition, but we were only able to hire two additional officers than the number that separated from service. As of the writing of this message, 2019’s attrition rate is significantly lower than prior years and our hiring rate is trending in the right direction. I am optimistic in our ability to be fully staffed by the middle of 2019 so that we may begin to focus on strategic growth. The State of North Carolina mandated that law enforcement agencies report crime statistics using the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) method in 2019 as opposed to Incident Based Reporting (IBR). The Concord Police Department became NIBRS compliant in fall of 2018 in preparation for the state mandate. While there are several changes between the IBR and NIBRS methods of crime reporting, the public might only take notice that Part 1 and Part 2 crimes (IBR) will be referred to as Group A and Group B offenses (NIBRS).

Gary J Gacek PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

In fall we launched our Horse Mounted Patrol Unit. Sergeants Cydney McGhee and Lance Brooks submitted a proposal to use their personally owned horses for special events such as the Tree Lighting Ceremony, Christmas Parade, and Law Day Ceremony. The sergeants and their horses, “Ace” and “Sarg”, were specially trained and certified for mounted patrol duties. Their proposal represents a very cost-effective way for the department to deploy a mounted patrol, and so far the public’s response has been very positive. Effective December 31, 2018, Deputy Chief Betty Stocks retired after a lengthy and successful career serving the City of Concord. On behalf of the department, I wish her and her family the best as she enters upon the next chapter of her life. Also on December 31, 2018, Major Jimmy Hughes was promoted to Deputy Chief and currently serves as the commanding officer of the Patrol Bureau and second in command of the entire police department. I have the utmost faith and confidence in his ability to assist me in leading this department into the future. Finally – and in keeping with the foundation of the department’s Mission of reducing crime, fear, and disorder in the City – I am very pleased to report that Concord’s crime rate reached its lowest level in over 20 years. Despite an increase in land mass, an increase in residential and commercial development, and an increase in population, overall Part 1 crime was reduced in 2018. Violent crime remained relatively stable, while property crime was reduced by 7% compared to 2017. Most noteworthy, burglary was reduced by 101 offenses. While we often discuss crime in terms of numbers or statistics, we should not lose sight of the fact that last year 101 fewer families (and businesses) were impacted by this very invasive type of crime. I hope you enjoy reviewing our 2018 annual report and I hope you find it informative. A lot of work has been performed on the public’s behalf this past year, and I am very proud of the men and women who comprise this great department for their contributions to public safety.

Gary J. Gacek Chief of Police Concord, NC


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2018 Organizational Chart Gary J. Gacek Chief of Police Executive Assistants

Major Keith Eury

Deputy Chief Betty Stocks

Patrol Bureau

Operations Bureau

Administration Bureau

Captain Jeremy Baggarly

Captain Patrick Tierney

Adam Patrol District

Special Operations

Major Jimmy Hughes

Information Technology

Airport Unit Captain Todd McGhee Baker Patrol District

Captain Robert Ledwell Office of Management, Analysis & Planning

Community Outreach & Education

Crime & Strategic Analysis

Public Safety Unit

Planning & Logistics

Robert Watson

Captain Alan Lee

Code Enforcement

Charlie Patrol District

Captain John Tierney

Captain Deckster Barlowe

Criminal Investigations

David Patrol District

Forensics & Property Control Major Crimes Vice & Narcotics SWAT

Captain Vashon Clark Support Services

Customer Service Recruiting & Training


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 7

Quick Facts About Concord OVERVIEW

CONCORD TOURISM

Concord is a great place to live, with a thriving economy and excellent quality of life. Easy airport access and adequate lodging support healthy tourism, fueled by the local race industry. We also offer world-class shopping and dining experiences. DEMOGRAPHICS

Visitors

By population, Concord is the

11th largest

municipality in the State.

33,835

90,827

Current population

35.7

Total housing units

Median age

1.5 million

63.356

745,000+ Hotel Usage

7.9% Increase Hotel Rooms Utilized

Square miles

84%

CITY GROWTH 2015-18

Concord’s share of Lodging in Cabarrus County

Annexations:

2.4 square miles

PROVIDED BY CABARRUS COUNTY CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

CONCORD-PADGETT REGIONAL AIRPORT

9.5% Increase Overall Airport Operations

21%

Allegiant Enplanements

PROVIDED BY CITY OF CONCORD GIS

PROVIDED BY CONCORD REGIONAL AIRPORT


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Department Highlights From 2018 CRIME & SAFETY BRIEFINGS

In January and July of 2018 the department held meetings with the community to review up to date crime statistics and trends. Guest speakers to the events also spoke about fire safety in the home and updates to ongoing traffic and roadway projects in progress throughout the city of Concord. PUBLIC SAFETY ACADEMY

The department participated in the 2018 Public Safety Academy where sixteen citizens of Concord attended meetings and presentations regarding the operations and ideology of the police department. COFFEE WITH A COP

On October 3, 2018 officers sat down for a cup of coffee and conversation with citizens throughout the city at locations hosted by several Concord businesses. PIZZA WITH THE POLICE

Grin Kids: Captain Todd McGhee, McGruff the Crime Dog, and Major Jimmy Hughes

Hosted by Concord Middle School, officers met with students over lunch in an effort to build a positive relationship between city youth and the police department. YOUTH POLICE ACADEMY

The department held two YPA sessions in 2018; over 80 students participated. COPS AND KIDS

On December 15, 2018 Concord police officers participated in the annual Christmas Cops and Kids program to ensure underprivileged children had a Merry Christmas.

First Responders 1st (FR1) Dinner


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 9

UNITED POLICE WORK DOG ASSOCIATION

The department hosted a training seminar for the UPWDA which is a nationally recognized police K9 certification organization. MOUNTED PATROL UNIT

In November 2018 Concord Police formed the Mounted Patrol Unit. The unit will allow officers on horseback to patrol special events throughout the city.

Cops and Kids

Coffee with a Cop

2018 Candy Crawl PHOTO: MICHAEL A. ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY


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Police Chaplain Program In 2018 the department revitalized the Police Chaplain Program. The program is designed to provide a source of emotional and spiritual support to department coworkers, their immediate family members, and the community. The police chaplains participate in the workplace of department coworkers and actively listen with empathy and experience, advising calmly in the midst of turmoil and danger, and offering assistance when appropriate or requested. This support is offered to all coworkers regardless of one’s religion, race, gender, or sexual orientation and without cost or proselytizing. For the program to be a success, each chaplain will build individual and group coworker relationships by attending roll calls, participating on ride-alongs, and being involved in other types of department activities. The police chaplains are available to meet with coworkers away from city facilities if requested to do so. At this time the department has two active Chaplains, Lonnie Clouse and Michael Cowen. Chaplain Clouse created the First Responders 1st organization that provides emotional and spiritual support to first responders and their families.

Chaplain Lonnie Clouse

Chaplain Michael Cowen

2018 Law Day

SWAT Tryouts


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 11

2019 Department Goals

Achieve 100% staffing and reduce attrition rate.

Lower police fleet vehicle crashes.

Re-Institute the rank of Lieutenant and develop a Watch Commander role.

Develop and implement a Police Cadet program.

Continue to enhance community engagement through social media.

Provide officers with further training in de-escalation, along with supervisor and leadership development training.

Race Day


1 2 | C O N C O R D P O L I C E D E PA R T M E N T

Operating Expenditures Budget to Actual Spending Debt Service Cost Allocations Capital

4%

Debt Service

15%

3%

4%

Cost Allocations

72%

100% 92% 109%

Operations

90%

Personnel

98%

Personnel

Capital

Operations

$20,079,425 Total 2018 Expenditures

Part I Crimes Ten Years Comparison Murder

down 31.8%

Rape

down 18%

Robbery

down 24%

Aggravated Assault

down 24.5%

Burglary

down 52.4%

Larceny

down 34.6%

Motor Vehicle Theft

down 49.4%

Arson

down 90.7%

Total Violent Crimes

down 23.9%

Total Property Crimes

down 38.2%

Total Part I Crimes

down 37.6%


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 13

Three Year Comparison Three Year Average Compared to 2017 Crime

2015

2016

Murder

2017

5

Average

5

1

2018

% Change

4.0

3

-25.0%

Rape

11

13

7

10.3

10

-3.2%

Robbery

55

46

31

44.0

39

-11.4%

Aggravated Assault

55

54

54

54.3

40

-26.4%

294

345

295

311.3

194

-37.7%

1,982

1,781

1,456

1,739.7

1430

-17.8%

95

104

64

87.7

70

-20.2%

7

8

4

6.3

1

-84.2%

2,378

2,238

1,819

2,145

1,695

-21.0%

Burglary Larceny Theft Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Total Property Crimes Total Violent Crimes

126

118

93

113

92

-18.3%

Total Part I Crimes

2,504

2,356

1,912

2,258

1,787

-20.8%

Activity

2015

2016

2017

Average

2018

% Change

Dispatched

41,032

43,602

42,838

42,491

42,873

0.9%

Self Initiated

58,199

73,832

93,145

75,059

84,349

12.4%

99,231

117,434

135,983

117,549

127,222

8.2%

Total

Ten Year Comparison Part I Crimes Ten Years Comparison Crime

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Average

2018

7

7

4

2

3

7

2

5

5

1

4.3

3

-30.2%

Rape

19

16

11

11

10

11

13

11

13

7

12.2

10

-18.0%

Robbery

84

70

57

36

40

51

43

55

46

31

51.3

39

-24.0%

Aggravated Assault

48

81

59

46

38

55

40

55

54

54

53.0

40

-24.5%

531

536

354

461

473

435

351

294

345

295

407.5

194

-52.4%

2,417

2,575

2,378

2,584

2,498

2,174

2,005

1,982

1,781

1,456

2,185.0

1,430

-34.6%

242

232

167

132

137

105

106

95

104

64

138.4

70

-49.4%

16

6

23

10

20

6

8

7

8

4

10.8

1

-90.7%

3,206

3,349

2,922

3,187

3,128

2,720

2,470

2,378

2,238

1,819

2,935.6

1,695

-38.2%

158

174

131

95

91

124

98

126

118

93

2,862.6

92

-23.9%

2,863 1,787

-37.6%

Murder

Burglary Larceny Motor Vehicle Theft Arson Total Property Crimes Total Violent Crimes

Total Part I Crimes

Activity

3,364 3,523 3,053 3,282 3,219 2,844 2,568 2,504 2,356 1,912

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Average

% Change

2018

% Change

Dispatched

40,447

38,701

38,935

38,775

39,729

39,558

41,032

43,602

42,838

40,402

42,873

6.1%

Self Initiated

52,058

55,877

50,470

39,990

38,085

39,992

58,199

73,832

93,145

55,739

84,349

51.3%

92,505 94,578 89,405 78,765 77,814 79,550 99,231 117,434 135,983 96,141 127,222

32.3%

Total

Incidents determined to be unfounded have been excluded from statistical data.


14 | C O N C O R D P O L I C E D E PA R T M E N T

Statistical Data CHARLOTTE MOTOR SPEEDWAY EVENTS ATTENDANCE

3,238

Reports Taken

3,989

4,670

Accident Reports

Arrest Reports

NHRA

75,129 spectators 45,393

Traffic Stops 10-61

10,960

34,040

Citations Issued

Warnings Issued

NASCAR

3,297

Field Contacts

45,166

84,121

Property Checks

Officer Initiated Calls

PARKING CITATIONS

120,567

Total Calls for Service

SWAT Tryouts

173,137 spectators

2,559 Issued 250 Voided

1,648 Paid 661 Unpaid

World Finals

41,570 spectators SOURCE CHARLOTTE MOTOR SPEEDWAY


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 15

2018 Bank of America ROVAL 400


1 6 | C O N C O R D P O L I C E D E PA R T M E N T

Patrol Bureau The Patrol Bureau is the first line of response provided by the Concord Police Department. Under the command of Major Jimmy Hughes, the Patrol Bureau is responsible and accountable for leadership, performance, efficiency, and general good conduct of the department. Major Hughes delegates responsibilities of patrol as prescribed by the Chief of Police.

ADAM DISTRICT

Adam District comprises an area of approximately 8.6 square miles and has a residential population of over 16,000. Within the district, there are nine educational institutions and seven recreational parks and facilities. With 29 officers assigned to the patrol district, Adam District has community partnerships with eight established neighborhoods. Major employment and economic facilities within the district include ACN, Carolinas HealthCare

Captain Jeremy Baggarly

System NorthEast and the Carolina Mall.

Adam Patrol District

Compared to the 3-Year average, overall crime was down 21% in 2018. Officer self- initiation in 2018 increased 6% and total calls for service rose by 4%.

Violent crimes continued to decrease, however Adam District did see increases in Motor Vehicle Thefts in 2018 (15 in 2017 compared to 19 in 2018) and a 23% increase in Larceny from Motor Vehicles. Adam District officers conducted over 800 hours of foot patrols in 2018.

Adam District has set a goal for 2019 to decrease the number of burglaries and larcenies from vehicles by at least 10% compared to 2018. Major Jimmy Hughes

31%

8.6

28

Officers

16,000

Square Miles

800

Residential Population

Decrease In Violent Crime

Hours Of Foot Patrols

27%

19%

48%

21%

Decrease In Larceny

Decrease In Burglary

3 -Year Average Decrease In Violent Crime

3-Year Average Decrease In Overall Crime


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 17

BAKER DISTRICT

Baker District encompasses an area of approximately 17.5 square miles and has a residential population of over 23,800 residents. There are seven educational institutions within the district as well as six recreational parks and facilities. Baker District has 10 active neighborhood partnerships. Baker District is also home to the Hartsell Ballfield complex that has on several occasions been the host of numerous AAU baseball tournaments and championships.

Captain Todd McGhee

Baker District completed 2018 with a 14% decrease in property crimes as compared to 2017. Overall crime compared to 2017, Baker District saw a decrease of 13%.

Baker Patrol District

Compared to the 3-Year average, overall crime was down 35%. These decreases are highlighted by a 59% decrease in burglaries in 2018 compared to 2017. The only significant increase that Baker District experienced in 2018 compared to 2017 was a 17% rise in Larceny from Motor Vehicles (60 in 2017 compared to 70 in 2018), but when compared to the 3-Year Average, Larceny from Motor Vehicles continued its downward trend by 21%. Baker District officers conducted over 1400 hours of foot patrols in 2018.

2019 goals for Baker District include averaging one hour of foot patrol per officer per shift to continue to strengthen community relations; and, to decrease the number of officer vehicle accidents by 25%.

17.5

28

Officers

23,800

Square Miles

Residential Population

Race Day

59%

1,400

Decrease In Burglary

Hours Of Foot Patrols

13%

14%

29%

35%

Decrease In Overall Crime

Decrease In Property Crime

3 -Year Average Decrease In Violent Crime

3-Year Average Decrease In Overall Crime


1 8 | C O N C O R D P O L I C E D E PA R T M E N T

CHARLIE DISTRICT

Charlie District covers approximately 20.7 square miles and

27,400

21

Residential Population

Officers

has a residential population of over 27,000. Within the district, there are three private schools, four public educational institutions, and another opening in 2020. With 21 officers assigned to the patrol district, Charlie District has community partnerships with 26 established neighborhoods and has two

15%

recreational facilities. As the district grows, it continues to have a mix of commercial and residential construction. Charlie District ended 2018 with an 11% increase in violent

20.7

Square Miles

3-Year Average Decrease In Overall Crime

crime and a 16% decrease in property crime. Overall crime decreased 15% in 2018 as compared to 2017 and the

Captain Alan Lee Charlie Patrol District

3-year average. The moderate increase in violent crime in 2018 was contributed to an increase in robberies within the district (two in 2017 as compared to eight in 2018).

16%

700

Officer self-initiated activity continued to rise with a 12% increase, and overall calls for service rose again in 2018 by 9%.

Hours Of Foot Patrols

Decrease In Property Crime

34%

15%

Decrease In Burglary

Decrease In Overall Crime

Charlie District officers accounted for over 700 hours of combined foot and bike patrols during 2018.

Charlie District will work to decrease the number of robberies in 2019 and will also look to increase officer visibility in areas of new construction within the district via regular patrols, along with additional foot and bike patrols. DAVID DISTRICT

David District has an area of approximately 13.6 square

24

950

Officers

Hours Of Foot And Bike Patrols

14,000

miles and a residential population of over 13,000. The district contains one high school and one middle school. With 24 officers assigned there, David District has community partnerships with five established neighborhoods and contains popular attractions such as Great Wolf Lodge, Charlotte Motor Speedway and Concord Mills Mall. David District experienced a 20% increase in violent crime

Residential Population

in 2018 as compared to 2017 (15 in 2017 compared to 18 in 2018). Property crimes continued to trend downward and finished 2018 with a 6% decrease. Overall crime in David

4%

6%

Decrease In Larceny

Decrease In Property Crime

Captain Deckster Barlowe David Patrol District

District was down 5% in 2018 as compared to 2017, and was down 14% compared to the 3-Year average. Overall calls for service decreased by 2% in 2018, but were 6% above the 3-Year average. David District officers conducted over 950 hours of combined foot and bike

5%

14%

Decrease In Overall Crime

3-Year Average Decrease In Overall Crime

patrols in 2018.

David District officers will work to improve their overall visibility in 2019 in a effort to deter crime and decrease the number of citizen vehicle accidents.


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 19

Operations Bureau The Operations Bureau is responsible for providing operational support to the Patrol Bureau via a variety of specialized teams, intervention strategies, and tactics. Commanded by Major Keith Eury, this bureau partners with patrol, schools, and the community and works collaboratively to reduce the levels of crime, fear, and disorder in neighborhoods; improve the quality of life for Concord’s citizens, visitors, and businesses; and have a positive and lasting impression on the lives of student aged youth.

CODE ENFORCEMENT DIVISION

The Code Enforcement Division consists of one manager, a senior code enforcement officer and 7 enforcement officers. The Code Enforcement Division is responsible for planning, developing, coordinating, and executing the enforcement of the city code and ordinances as set forth by City Council. Other duties of the division include: conduct field inspections of properties and public facilities for violations of minimum housing, zoning, and historic preservation standards, receive and investigate complaints regarding substandard housing conditions, hazardous conditions, improper use of dwellings and commercial structures, nuisance conditions, and other code related issues on public and private property within the city. COMMUNITY OUTREACH & EDUCATION

The Community Outreach and Education Unit is comprised of a two sergeants and 18 school resource officers. The unit’s ultimate responsibility is to ensure a safe and secure environment for students, faculty and others who work and visit our schools, while providing educational programs to the students. Community Outreach officers also provide operational support to the patrol bureau during periods when school is not in session. CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DIVISION

The Criminal Investigations Division is comprised of a captain, three sergeants and 10 investigators. The division is responsible for providing the patrol bureau with operational support through the investigation, relentless follow-up, and case management of felony crimes that are complex and severe in nature; providing forensic and other crime scene services; assisting in the collection and storage of evidence and other property coming into the department’s possession; managing property control and identification processes and records; conducting vice and narcotics related investigations; and investigating any other crimes as directed by the chief of police. In 2018 the division was assigned over 500 cases, which included incidents of homicide, serious assaults and crimes against women and children. Major Keith Eury

Code Enforcement Stats

2017 Major Crimes Case Type

% Cleared

Homicide

100.0%

Case Type

2017

2018

% change

Property Nuisance

2209

1673

-24%

Investigations (not counted until end of Q4 2015)

1234

1625

32%

BB Goals / Obstructions

31

5

-83%

Garbage & Waste (bulk piles, leaves & etc)

94

70

-25%

Minimum Housing Standards

68

73

7%

9

5

-44%

98

36

-63%

Rape

20.0%

Robbery

43.6%

Aggravated Assault

65.0%

Burglary

12.9%

Parking Violations (tickets, commercial vehicles, etc.)

293

118

-60%

Larceny Theft

38.0%

Vehicle - Front Yard Parking

350

181

-48%

MV Theft

17.1%

Vehicle Violations (junk & abandoned)

892

912

2%

Total

35.2%

Zoning Violations (signs, permits, COCs, etc.)

124

67

-46%

Stagnant Water Miscellaneous (livestock, stormwater, etc.)


2 0 | C O N C O R D P O L I C E D E PA R T M E N T

FORENSICS & PROPERTY CONTROL

Forensics & Property Control is comprised of a sergeant, two forensic investigators and two civilian property control custodians. The section is responsible for the operation of all identification systems, the maintenance of criminal, fingerprint, and photographic records, forensic examination of friction ridge skin impressions, documents and surveillance video as well as crime scene and other evidentiary support to the department. The section continues to conduct complex forensic crime scene investigations, while providing training and equipment to crime scene technicians assigned to the patrol bureaus. A crucial responsibility of Forensics & Property Control is maintaining secure custody of property and evidence that comes into the possession of the department. Both civilian custodians maintain certification from the Association of Property and Evidence. In 2018 over 11,000 individual pieces of property were submitted to the department’s property control section. MAJOR CRIMES

The section is responsible for investigating major criminal cases such as homicide, sexual assault, serious assaults, crimes against children and the elderly, and any crime deemed to be exigent in nature. SPECIAL OPERATIONS DIVISION

The Special Operations Division is responsible for providing operational support by utilizing a variety of special teams, intervention strategies, and tactics. In 2018, Special Operations continued to partner with the Patrol Bureau to achieve the overall goal of reducing the levels of crime, fear of crime, and disorder while improving the quality of life for the citizens and businesses of Concord, as well as its visitors. The division is comprised of four units: Airport Unit, Public Safety Unit, Street Crimes Unit and Vice & Narcotics. AIRPORT UNIT

The department’s airport unit is comprised of a sergeant and four officers that are responsible for enhancing the safety for visitors and employees of the ConcordPadgett Regional Airport. In addition to responding to emergency and nonemergency calls for service, the unit protects the airport from security breaches by using a combination of foot, bicycle and motor vehicle patrols while conducting frequent inspections of secure and non-secure areas. PUBLIC SAFETY UNIT

The Public Safety Unit consists of one sergeant, three traffic officers, a center city officer, a city hall officer, one park patrol officer, a parking enforcement officer along with nine crossing guards.


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 21

STREET CRIMES UNIT

The Street Crimes Unit presently consists of two sergeants and two officers. The unit is utilized throughout the city in areas that are susceptible to crime and disorder. During the execution of their duties, the unit provides highly visible and proactive policing aimed at stopping and preventing street-level crime and disorder, while assisting patrol resources in reducing crime and disorder through evidencebased community policing strategies. The unit will be deployed in areas dictated by the needs of district captain’s utilizing tangible crime and data analysis. The ultimate goal of the unit is to facilitate safe, sustainable neighborhoods and public spaces within the City of Concord. VICE & NARCOTICS

The Vice & Narcotics Section is responsible for the proactive investigation of crime such as the sale and manufacturing of illegal narcotics, gambling, prostitution and the gathering of gang intelligence. The investigator officer responsible for ABC investigations is responsible for ensuring that local establishments selling alcoholic beverages are compliant to the state regulations and have updated and proper permits. SWAT

The SWAT team consists of two commanders, three team leaders, and 16 operators. The team is responsible for evaluating search warrants and assessing the risk associated with executing the warrants as codified by department policy and procedure. The team also executes search warrants deemed “high risk” and any other warrants as directed by the chief of police. Finally, the SWAT Team provides the department with a highly motivated, technically and tactically proficient special operations team capable of responding to a variety of critical incidents and resolving them with minimum risk to officers, suspects, and innocent parties.

Criminal Investigations Case Assignments Case Type Assaults w/ weapon

7

Aggravated Assault

3

Arson

1

Burglary Cyber Bullying / Stalking Fraud Homicide

22 4 198 3

Missing Persons / Runaways

35

Rape

11

Robbery

30

Shoot Into Occupied Property

SWAT Tryouts

Assigned

6


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Administration Bureau Commanded by Deputy Chief of Police Betty Stocks and support staff, the Administration Bureau is responsible for numerous aspects of the department outside of normal patrol and investigative functions. The bureau reviews policies and procedures to ensure they are up to date with current laws and court rulings. Budget oversight remains a major component of the Administration Bureau, as it continues to be responsible for budget management and preparation. Other responsibilities of the Administration Bureau include: staffing, grants, facilities management, information and vehicle technology, strategic planning, career development program, secondary employment and the administering and planning of promotional processes.

Crime Briefing

SUPPORT SERVICES DIVISION

The Support Services Division is responsible for recruiting new officers, conducting the hiring process, managing training for all officers to include state mandated in-service, and coordinating the career development program. The division also includes the records management section and customer service. Goals for the Support Services Division in 2018 include utilizing newly implemented “Policeone”, an online training resource to reduce expenses and increase officer efficiency, increasing retention of newly hired officers and veteran officers through training and programs geared to improve quality of life concepts, implementing the Army “PAYS” Partnership for Youth Success program, which allows the department to partner with the US Army to hire qualified veterans once they have completed their military obligations, and implementing a new system for tracking training hours of officers in the department. OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT, ANALYSIS AND PLANNING

The Office of Management, Analysis and Planning (O.M.A.P.) is responsible for research, analysis, project management, tactical and strategic planning, fleet management, and creating and maintaining partnerships with community organizations and other government agencies. O.M.A.P. manages two aspects for the department:

Planning And Logistics

Hiring Report Prior Experience

Male

Female

HS

AA

BA

MBA

Prior LE

Military

Total

Education

Hispanic

2018

Sex

Black

Race White

Deputy Chief Betty Stocks

This aspect of O.M.A.P. includes a sergeant that is responsible for planning, scheduling, and coordinating department personnel and resources for secondary employment, special events, and any other gatherings or events as directed by the chief of police. The sergeant is also responsible for planning, coordinating, preparing, and publishing department orders, directives, surveys, and other information intended for department-wide dissemination.

17

8

0

17

8

8

2

14

1

12

2

25


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 23

Race Day

Additionally, the Planning and Logistics sergeant is responsible for researching and applying for alternate sources of funding. The grant management process includes but is not limited to monitoring grant awards, expenditures, compliance, and periodic reporting as required by a grantor.

Crime Analyst The crime analyst is responsible for collecting, collating, analyzing, disseminating, and evaluating crime data to identify emerging trends, patterns, and changes in criminal activity using mapping and analytical software. The analyst prepares crime data that is used to make recommendations for deployment and resource allocation, measures and forecasts long-term public safety activities related to problem solving, intervention, and crime reduction efforts.

Separation Report

Black

Hispanic

Male

Female

Total

2018

Sex

White

Race

15

7

1

18

5

23

MPO Joel Patterson and K9 Wolf


2 4 | C O N C O R D P O L I C E D E PA R T M E N T

2018 Commendations Department for 2018. Sergeant Sabanija was selected for this award based on his heroism and lifesaving skills he utilized as he rendered aid to an individual experiencing a life threatening loss of blood.

2018 COWORKER OF THE YEAR

Sgt. Denan Sabanija Sergeant Sabanija was awarded the distinction of being Coworker of the Year for the Concord Police

Sergeant Sabanija was the first law enforcement officer to arrive on scene for the report of an attempted suicide and he immediately proceeded into the residence. Sabanija was quickly escorted to a bathroom in the back of the residence by anxious family members, where an adult male patient was found lying flat on his back in the bathtub. The male had selfinflicted lacerations. Sergeant Sabanija immediately removed his departmental issued tourniquet from his duty belt and applied it to the patient’s right

arm. He simultaneously asked for an additional tourniquet from coworkers standing by to be applied to the patient’s left arm. After applying the first tourniquet, the Concord Fire Department arrived and took over patient care. Sergeant Sabanija provided the fire department with the second tourniquet which was also applied to the patient. A week after this incident took place our department received communication from Cabarrus County EMS regarding Sergeant Sabanija’s actions which were determined to have been lifesaving. Sgt. Sabanija was also awarded the Concord Police Department Lifesaving Award for this event.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

Sgt. Brian Hathcock

Officer Miranda Brady

Detective Bobby Nicely

Detective Patrick Merritt

Each officer was awarded the Distinguished Service Award for their efforts during the investigation of an incident where a female was abducted at a local business by an offender unknown to her and then sexually assaulted.

Detective Chris Gorman

Detective Ashley Hulse


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 25

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD

MPO Angel Gonzalez / MPO Garron Lawing

Detective Ashley Hulse

Both officers were awarded the Distinguished Service Award following their investigation that resulted in the arrest of individuals responsible for the burglary of a local gun store.

Detective Hulse received the Distinguished Service Award in April 2018 due to her tireless work conducting latent print comparisons and providing information that led to the arrest of many offenders for various charges including burglary and serious assaults.

Officer Steven Williams / Officer Bradley Cook Both officers were awarded the Distinguished Service Award as a result of their investigation into a spike of residential burglaries in a specific housing subdivision. As a result of the investigation those responsible were charged with six felony offenses.

Detective Bobby Nicely Detective Nicely received the Distinguished Service Award following his investigation into the thefts of large construction equipment from construction sites. In addition to his charges, Nicely was able to link the suspect to an additional 18 incidents in other jurisdictions.

Detective Larissa Beaver / Officer Tyler Luby Both officers were awarded the Distinguished Service Award following their investigation into a trend of vehicle break-ins that culminated in the responsible party being charged with over 40 felony offenses.


2 6 | C O N C O R D P O L I C E D E PA R T M E N T

COWORKERS OF THE MONTH

January 2018 – Officer Matthew Willet

February 2018 – Sgt. Kevin Berg

March 2018 – Officer Miranda Brady

April 2018 – Sgt. Brian Kennerly

May 2018 – Sgt. Kelly Seagraves

June 2018 – MPO Tracy Law

EXCELLENCE IN POLICE SERVICE AWARD

MPO Lindsie Youngo

Captain Alan Lee

MPO Lindsie Youngo received the Excellence in Police Service Award for her investigative efforts following a traffic stop that culminated in both occupants of the vehicle being charged for several residential burglaries that involved numerous stolen firearms.

Captain Lee was awarded the Community Service Award for his efforts in organizing a trip to the May race events at Charlotte Motor Speedway for a young female fan that unselfishly donated her bone marrow to her brother that was battling a life threatening disease.

July 2018 – Officer Miranda Brady / Detective Bobby Nicely

August 2018 – Officer Steven Williams

September 2018 – Sgt. Cydney McGhee / MPO Tracy Blalock

October 2018 – Officer Zach Brown / Officer Caleb Shue

COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD

Bike To School Event

November 2018 – MPO Angie Linker

December 2018 – Officer Chris Gorman

Sergeants Promotional Ceremony


2018 A N N UA L R E P ORT | 27

On the Move 2018 PROMOTIONS

Promoted to the rank of Master Police Officer

Promoted to the rank of Sergeant

Michael Antonides

Jason Collins

Bradley Cook Vance McGee

Eugene Ramos

2018 RETIREMENT

Eric Cox

Tammy Drye

Angel Gonzalez

Stafford Hamilton

Joseph Hawkins

Corey Hynson

Nicole Johnson

Jeremy Julian

Greg King

Garron Lawing

Michael Lopez

Josh Shaver

Julia Soares

Jzanese Weekes

Lindsie Youngo

Deputy Chief Betty Stocks

MPO Ron Ferrell

MPO Roger Landers

Sergeant Tim Hartsell


CONCORDNC.GOV/POLICE

41 Cabarrus Ave. W Concord, NC 28025

Profile for City of Concord NC

Concord NC Police Annual Report 2018  

City of Concord NC - Police Department Annual Report

Concord NC Police Annual Report 2018  

City of Concord NC - Police Department Annual Report