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Shellbrook Chronicle The voice of the Parkland for over 100 years Shellbrook, Saskatchewan Friday, August 24, 2012

VOL. 101 NO. 34 | PMR #40007604

www.shellbrookchronicle.com

Man dies following collision on Highway 3 One man is dead following an early evening collision between a minivan and a loaded semi truck on Highway 3 at the edge of Shellbrook. Just before 7 p.m. Tuesday night, a van pulled off of Fifth Street East onto Highway 3 and was struck on the driver’s side by an eastbound tractor trailer unit, causing both vehicles to go into the north ditch. According to Shellbrook RCMP Sergeant Carl Dinsdale, the driver of the semi used emergency braking and swerved to avoid a collision but to no avail. Emergency crews were on the scene a short time later and tried to help the driver of the van but he was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of the semi truck was uninjured. Dinsdale said that there was some speculation that sun glare may have played a part in the collision as the setting sun may have blinded the driver of the van as he was entering the intersection. RCMP redirected traffic on the busy highway hours after the crash to first clear the scene and later allow the investigation to be conducted. An RCMP traffic analyst had also been called to assist with the investigation. The collision is still under investigation by the RCMP. At press time, names had not been released pending next of kin notification.

Fire and Rescue crews and witnesses at the scene of a fatal accident on Highway 3 and Fifth Street East in Shellbrook Tuesday evening.

Tour exposes med students to rural practice A group of 55 new medical students from the University of Saskatchewan got a snapshot of what the Shellbrook area has to offer during a bus tour of the region last weekend. The annual bus tour, organized by the Student Medical Society of Saskatchewan and the host community, and funded by the Saskatchewan Medical Association gives first year students an opportunity to see rural and

remote practices. Ashley Miller, Medical Affairs Coordinator with the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region, saw the opportunity for the Region to make an impression on these young students and made a proposal to the SMA to host this year’s tour which was ultimately accepted. “It’s just a great way to show (medical students) that this is another opportunity for once they finish school

and decide on an area of practice,” said Miller, noting that some of these future doctors will enter general practice while some may find other specialties. The region hopes, by hosting the tour, that students will develop a familiarity with the community and the region itself and will fill physician vacancies here once they finish their education. Continued on page 10

Doctor recruits face immigration hurdles Shellbrook could have as many as four more doctors hang up their shingle in the coming months if all goes according to plan. Four international medical graduates (IMGs) have accepted offers of employment to work in Shellbrook but are now in the process of getting their immigration in order. Each of the four physicians who have taken part in site visits to Shellbrook over the past year have accepted employment offers and are now in varying stages of the immigration process according the Parkland Physician Recruitment and Reten-

tion Committee Chair Amund Otterson. To begin the immigration process, each of the physicians had to accept offers of employment. Now, the ball is in their hands as they have to fill out the paperwork and meet the requirements to receive a Canadian work visa. However, the committee’s optimism is tempered with the understanding that there are no guarantees that all or any of these physicians will ever come to Canada to practise but it is a step in the right direction. Continued on page 2

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Shellbrook Chronicle

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August 24, 2012

WWHS horticultural show draws 26 entrants A total of 26 exhibitors displayed 340 exhibits at this year’s Wallter Willoughby Horticultural Show at the Leask Lions Hall August 16. Joanne Beam was the Grand Aggregate winner with a whopping 165 points while Melodie Beam captured the Teen Aggregate award with 58 points. Beginner Aggregate honours went to newcomer Blythe Cobb, with 26 points. The following are the major award winners: Best Photograph in Show (In Memory of Phyllis Joanette, donated by Peggy Grenier) Beryl Peake; Best Houseplant in Show (In Memory of Gerda Hansen, donated by the Hansen Family) Mary Giesbrecht;

Best Dhalia in Show (Donated by Lil Sorenson) Margie Monus; Best Gladioli in Show (In Memory of Myrtle Robertson) Barb Valuck; Crafts and Concoctions Aggregate (Donated by Shellbrook Flowers n More) Fern Millar; Baking Aggregate (Donated by Canwood Coop) Lil Sorenson; Beginner Aggregate (Alan Daku) Blythe Cobb with 26 points; Fruit Aggregate (Tait Insurance Group) Louise Person with 15 points; Vegetable Aggregate (Parkside General Store) Joanne

Beam with 59 points; Potted Plant Aggregate (Dobson Family) Mary Giesbrecht with 20points each; Cut Flower Aggregate (K-5 Greenhouse) Joanne Beam with 36 points; Floral Art/Arrangement Aggregate (Beau “Lac” Funeral Home) Joanne Beam with 25 points; Reserve Aggregate (Shellbrook Funeral Home) Beryl Peake with 81 points; Grand Aggregate (Honeywood Dr. A.J. Porter Heritage Nursery) Joanne Beam with 165 points. New exhibitors prizes went to Blythe Cobb (20 points) and Celeste Adair (7 points).

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Back row, Margie Monus, Barb Valuck, Celeste Adair, Beryl Peake, Fern Miller, and Louise Person. Front Row, Lil Sorenson, Melodie Beam, Joanne Beam and Mary Giesbrecht. Missing is Blythe Cobb.

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August 24, 2012

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Saskatchewan air quality report released on the adverse effects of five common air pollutants: sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone and particulate matter. “As our province continues to experience growth and with more vehicles on the road, you would expect the level of pollution would increase as well,” Environment Minister Ken Cheveldayoff said. “This does not appear to be happening. The majority of results show an actual decrease in average levels of pollutants, which is good news for Saskatchewan. We

are committed to maintaining this trend of air quality, while at the same time encouraging business growth and expansion.” The ministry operates a network of permanent monitoring stations across Saskatchewan that measures ambient air quality in the communities of Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert, North Battleford, Swift Current and La Loche (moved to Buffalo Narrows in 2011) on a continuous basis. Data was also collected using the Saskatchewan Air Monitoring Lab (SAML), a

mobile air monitoring vehicle, at Buffalo Narrows, Beauval, Ile-a-la-Cross and Loon Lake during 2007 and 2009. The convenience of a mobile lab allows the ministry to monitor air quality anywhere in the province that is accessible by road. Under the new national Air Quality Management System, Saskatchewan is poised to develop airshed associations throughout the province in joint partnership monitoring with industry, public and nongovernment organizations. There are two associations currently in place - the

Mont Nebo woman shares business tips at national conference Lindsay Taylor, of Mont Nebo, was one of the guest lecturers at the Silpada Designs Canada annual conference in Toronto August 9-12. Taylor started with the company when it first came to Canada five years ago. At the time she was a mother of two small children working full time as a bank teller in Canwood and wondering where her money was going. “I was looking for something more. I thought there has to be something better than this and there’s not a lot of options out here in terms of a regular job,” said Taylor. She began looking at direct sales and stumbled upon Silpada and fell in love with the product. Despite living in a remote setting, Taylor is one of the top leaders in the Canadian division of the company and recently achieved 9th place in sales nationally. These achievements, along with her wealth of tips and tricks, were why Taylor was chosen to speak to the Toronto crowd. Her workshop topic was “A representative’s guide to success” in which she shared stories of her experiences in the industry. She admits that she has made mistakes along the way but has learned a lot from them. “I shared a lot of personal stories about how I did it wrong and how to do it right,” said Taylor, who had no direct sales experience before joining Silpada. One thing that took many people in the Toronto crowd aback was that her average drive time to a party is two hours one way. Efficiency is key when living that distance from her target market and she works to make efficient use of her time. Getting into the business at the beginning, she didn’t have to deal with market saturation but it wasn’t always an easy sell as the product didn’t have name recognition yet. “The challenge with that is that you are trying to go out and sell a product that nobody’s heard of,” said Taylor.

Silpada Designs is the world’s largest and fastest-growing jewelry home party company. More than 33,000 independent representatives throughout Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom sell Silpada’s handcrafted sterling silver jewellery.

Southeast Saskatchewan Airshed Association and the Western Yellowhead Airshed Management Zone in the west central portion of the province “It is an exciting time as we move forward to deliver collaborative and consensus-based air monitoring,

critical to protecting the environment and ensuring an improved quality life for our citizens,” Cheveldayoff said. The report is available on the ministry’s website at http://www.environment. gov.sk.ca/programs-services.

Desnethé-Missinippi-Churchill MP Rob Clarke Ottawa House of Commons 502 Justice Bldg. K1A 0A6 Phone: 613-995-8321 Fax: 613-995-7697

La Ronge 711 La Ronge Ave Box 612 S0J 1L0 Phone: 306-425-2643 Fax: 306-425-2677

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Saskatchewan residents should breathe easy knowing that we enjoy good quality air in the province. Over the past ten years, the urban air quality measured in six Saskatchewan communities is rated as “good” to “excellent”, according the Air Quality Index (AQI). These findings are summarized in the Saskatchewan Air Quality Report for 2000-2009, which has been posted on the Ministry of Environment’s website. It is the first report of its kind completed in Saskatchewan. The AQI is an indicator that provides information

“Check out my website at www.RobClarkeMP.ca for important information.” - MP Rob Clarke

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Shellbrook Chronicle

Community gets in on doctor recruitment

OPINION www.shellbrookchronicle.com

August 24, 2012

YESTERYEAR ~

T

he community of Shellbrook and the Prince Albert Parkland Health Region got the opportunity to make a first impression on 55 first and second year medical students over the weekend. Prince Albert Parkland was chosen to host the annual student rural site tour sponsored by the Saskatchewan Medical Association and Student Medical Society of Saskatchewan. Students, most of which just completed their first year orientation, got to try their hand at suturing, casting “broken” arms and taking blood pressures at the Shellbrook Hospital and the Shellbrook Primary Care Clinic before heading off to MemoBRAD rial Lake Regional Park for an DUPUIS afternoon of watersports and a barbecue. ~ This is an event that the comNews munity could have idly stayed on the sidelines for but instead embraced the opportunity and got involved. Volunteers from the community donated their time and the use of their boats Saturday afternoon to ensure that these students had a good time at the lake. In all likelihood, not all 55 students will finish their degree to become a physician but those that do will remember that time in Shellbrook in their first year where they got to suture a pig's foot in the hot, muggy basement of that old hospital right before trying out a stand up paddle board for the first time. They are going to be aware that a brand new, state of the art hospital is in the process of being constructed. They are going to have some memory of the hospitality of the community members. They are going to know where Shellbrook is. These are all very good things. As they near the end of their schooling, these men and women are going to be flooded with employment offers from across the country. If they are looking for life in a rural setting, their fond memories of their visit to Shellbrook may be the deal clincher. Having been to the community and having that little snapshot of what the area has to offer may give this region a shot where others don't really have one. One may look at this as physician recruitment efforts wasted on people who may not be doctors for seven years or more but the new reality in rural Saskatchewan is that recruitment can never stop and the earlier you start, the more successful you are likely to be. Efforts must be continuous in attracting current doctors and the general practitioners of tomorrow. With the competition for doctors now being on a global scale its difficult for communities like Big River, Shellbrook and Spiritwood to even be on the radar. Efforts like these help greatly in that regard. Though the event was organized by the Health Region, members of the community helped make it the success that it was and hopefully in a few years time it will start to pay dividends.

Editor

The new reality in rural Saskatchewan is that recruitment can never stop and the earlier you start, the more successful you are likely to be.

A harvest scene from years gone by.

Submit your old photo. Please no personal photos. Send to Box 10, Shellbrook, Sk. S0J 2E0.

Momentum continues in Sask manufacturing Saskatchewan has one of the hottest manufacturing mar- and to thank the local business community, the company kets in the country. opened its doors last week with tours and a lunch for other An update on the status of the nation’s manufacbusiness people. It was also an opportunity to inturing sector issued by StatsCan shows factories troduce the next generation of the Malinowski’s in this province recorded the country’s biggest in the business who now hold a raft of executive monthly gain in June, up 8 per cent from May. It positions and those who don’t work in the busiwas a huge difference from other provinces such nesses full time fill out the company’s board of as Ontario which saw only a half point improvedirectors. ment and Quebec which declined. While the family used the opportunity to thank Obviously the Western Canadian dollar is not the local business community for its support over hurting our manufacturers as much as the Eastthe past four decades, it was also a celebration of ern Canadian buck. success….something that seems be getting a bit PAUL And when you step back a bit, looking at these easier to do in this province. numbers on an annual basis, we continue to rise *** MARTIN to the top. This province’s annual ritual is underway…and ~ Compared to a year earlier, sales from our manit’s a bit early. ufacturers rose by more than 14 per cent. Only A few weeks ago the first Saskatoon berry pickNewfoundland was higher when it produced a 150 per cent ing got underway. As usual, harvest started in the south and improvement. gradually worked their way north with early reports pointBut it is another sign that momentum is building in this ing to a spectacular crop for some producers. province’s economy as more than half the year’s increase And swathers have become fairly common in many parts came in the last month contained in this report as produc- of the province in the last week or so and now combines are tion of non-durable goods was particularly strong in the tail starting to roll. end of the second quarter of this year. For years there has been a saying that once the exhibition *** is over in Regina, summer is over and while that may be a bit It is the classic family business. of stretch it is hard to avoid thoughts like that when harvest Saskatchewan has a long tradition of family enterprises equipment starts rolling into the fields. moving from one generation to the next. The family farm is Forecasts on this year’s quality and volume are still probably the most visible example. sketchy but anyone driving around the province can only Another of the family business success stories is Yorkton’s be impressed by the condition of this year’s crops with one Malinowski clan. They founded RAM Industries as well as observer suggesting it may be the best one the province has Leon’s Manufacturing, two companies with roots in man- seen. ufacturing products for the farm sector but later branchGiven the drought in the US which has pushed prices ing out to service oil and gas and clients throughout north upward, a bumper crop coupled with strong prices means America. another of Saskatchewan’s key industries finds itself in top RAM was named Yorkton’s business of the year for 2012 form.


VIEWPOINT

August 24, 2012

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YOUR TWO CENTS ~ Conservatives turn their back on science Dear Editor, This month scientists from all across Canada held a funeral march on Parliament Hill for the “death of evidence.” They were protesting how MP Randy Hoback and his Conservative government are ignoring evidence in policy-making, cutting off funding to vital research and preventing government scientists from presenting evidence to the public. This normally reserved group was moved to noisy protest by a set of decisions of the Conservative government that shows disregard for the hard work that our scientists do to generate knowledge for the benefit of Canadians. The Conservatives are eliminating the Experimental Lakes Area, which we have used for 40 years to protect us from poisons in our water. They killed the mandatory long form census, depriving us of a clear picture and understanding of the circumstances that Canadians face in their daily lives. Scores of federal scientists will no longer be monitoring and reporting to us about the environment that our children and grandchildren will have to live in. I believe that to make good decisions you need good data. Yet Mr. Hoback and the Conservatives are eroding that data, bit by bit. It leaves our government flying blind—and dangerously ill-equipped to protect the health and safety of Canadians. Ted Hsu, MP Science and Technology Critic for the Liberal Party of Canada

Death of evidence Dear Editor, Action taken in the Omnibus Budget Bill cutting back funding for research resulted in scientists protesting 'death of evidence' on Parliament Hill. Unfortunately this is only one example of the Harper Government's actions related to evidence. "Why save the prison farms?" provided reasons, evidence ignored, in the closing of prison farms on the no-evidence basis they were too costly. Recent changes in the collection of statistics through the Census were proceeded with, despite contrary evidence of its value. Belief in removal of government and its replacement by corporate interests is suggested as motivation for proceeding without regard to evidence as in the plan of 2012 layoffs of 2 300 Statistics Canada employees that "may result in data collection and processing services being contracted out " and meetings of the vice president of The GEO Group, Inc., operator of private prisons, with Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), Public Safety Canada (PS), Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), Public-Private Partnerships Canada, Solicitor General Canada (SGC). Continued on page 6

Shellbrook Chronicle Serving the Communities of Shellbrook, Canwood, Debden, Big River, Parkside, Leask, Marcelin, Blaine Lake, Holbein, Mont Nebo, Mayview A Division of Pepperfram Limited Publications Mail Registration #07621

Published Every Friday Morning P.O. Box 10, Shellbrook, Sask. S0J 2E0 Phone 747-2442 or Fax 747-3000 Editorial: chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com Advertising chads@shellbrookchronicle.com

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Shellbrook Chronicle Polling Question 100

LAST WEEK’S QUESTION: In this age of professional sports are the Olympic Games still relevant?.

75 50 25 0

RESULTS: 75% Yes ~ 25% No THIS WEEK’S QUESTION: Does Saskatchewan need more provincial constituencies? To vote, go to www.shellbrookchronicle.com

The subtle art of political change It appears Premier Brad Wall's Saskatchewan Par- been an entrepreneurial spirit that appreciates the ty government has tapped into the formula for politi- need for wealth creation. That said, the recognition cal success in the province. that Saskatchewan people might not have survived Or at least, the Sask. Party leader and his party this harsh climate without a highly co-operative aphave tapped into the formula of saying what people proach plays into the notion that we should all benlike to hear from their government and efit a fair share from the benefits of growth. then massaging public opinion so that From these two contrasting ideals has voters can more easily see things the emerged the tug-o-war that has been Sasgovernment’s way. katchewan political debate between the right Prior to embarking last week for the and left ... although what's often missed is government caucus's annual summer how willingly both sides pay homage to other retreat at the lovely Elk Ridge Resort, party's philosophical viewpoint to appease the Wall explained that his MLAs recently majority. For example, even Wall admits that asked their constituents the followthe NDP government's substantial income ing three questions: "How do we keep and corporate tax reductions and generous growth going?" "How do we make sure royalty holidays for potash mine expansions MURRAY people are benefiting from the growth?" and oil well drilling have been critical to SasMANDRYK "How do we deal with the challenges rekatchewan’s economic growth these past eight ~ lated to growth?" years. And among the Wall government's first Perhaps to no one's surprise, infraorder of business was to raise the income structure -- specifically, the state of Sastax exemption (most benefiting the working katchewan roads -- was at the top of that list. "There poor) and raise allowances for seniors and disabled. are more potholes than pavement right now and we Meanwhile, one can't even begin to discuss with Wall have to deal with infrastructure concerns," said Wall, and the Sask. Party the notion of selling money-loswhose strength may be his ability to come across as ing STC or even public liquor stores and other major relatable and humble. He added that the two other Crowns. While there is little subtlety when it comes re-occuring themes that emerged from the MLAs' to how the left-right political divide in Saskatchewan questionnaire were health care and debt reduction. is played out in the legislature or on coffee row, talk On the surface, this would seem neither surpris- radio or the internet, there is a actually lot of subtlety ing nor a particularly great use of government time when it comes to massaging people's views so that it and energy when it comes to policy development. To is more in line with government thinking. This, too, have such obvious generalities like "highways", "debt seems like a big part of the meeting in Elk Ridge as reduction" and "health care" emerge, as the most Wall talked about dealing with the "infrastructure pressing issues would hardly seem enlightening. But deficit" that may need to be addressed "in more inif it isn't great policy development, it is subtle, smart novative ways" like partnerships with municipalities politics all about massaging voter opinion so it’s and private sector that have the expertise "so that we more aligned with your own philosophy. After all, it’s can get more work done." Gone are the days of the always good to ask people's opinion in this province, clumsy. bull-in-the-china-shop approach of Grant but it's an especially good idea to frame the ques- Devine's highways minister Jim Garner who sold off tions in such a way that it cross-sects the great left- government highway equipment and explained fired right dichotomy that is Saskatchewan politics. Since highways workers were being "transferred to the prithe early days of this province when people risked vate sector." Wall seems significantly more skilled at it all for the chance of prosperity, there has always the more subtle nuances of the political game.

C. J. Pepper, Publisher Brad Dupuis, Editor chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com Madeleine Wrigley, Advertising Sales chroniclesales@sasktel.net Kathleen Nording, Composition/Pagination chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com Patt Ganton, Composition/Pagination chads@shellbrookchronicle.com Cheryl Mason, Bookkeeping/Reception Office Hours: Monday.-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. & 1 to 4 p.m.; Advertising Deadline: Mondays at 5:00 p.m. website:www.shellrookchronicle.com

The contents of the Shellbrook Chronicle are protected by Copyright. Reproduction of any material must be done so with expressed permission of the publisher.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: In the interest of readers of this newspaper, we will publish opinions of our readers. Letters To The Editor are most welcome; however, they must be signed. and include writer’s contact information and will only be published with the writer’s name on it. Letters should be limited in length and be typed or clearly written. We reserve the right to edit letters depending on available space. Member of


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Shellbrook Chronicle

www.shellbrookchronicle.com

August 24, 2012

Report from the Legislature then the principles for our first term in government. It’s time to revisit that plan and create a new one that reflects Saskatchewan in 2012. It should focus NADINE SCOTT MOE on maintainWILSON ~ ing growth and ~ Rosthern Saskatchewan using our relaShellbrook Rivers tive economic Toll Free: Toll Free: strength to im1-855-793-3422 1-888-763-0615 prove people’s www.scott-moe.com www.nadinewilson.ca lives. When the Wh th SaskatchS k t h We W have h been blessed ewan Party was in op- with amazing growth. position, we released an Since the Saskatchewan economic paper called Party took office in 2007, the Promise of Saskatch- our population has grown ewan. That document by 76,000 people to a formed the basis for our record-high of 1,072,282. election platform and There are now 34,000

more people working than there were five years ago. We have the strongest economy in Canada, which means more opportunities for young people, the lowest taxes for families, a significant reduction in the size of the provincial debt and more support for those that are most vulnerable. This historic growth has allowed us to make record investments in highways, healthcare and education, while most of the world has been struggling through a recession and debt crisis. So back to the need for a new plan. At the end of the spring session of the Legislature, the Pre-

mier charged MLAs with spending the summer talking to constituents, councils and community groups within the context of three important questions: • What should the government’s long-term goals be? • How do we achieve those goals? • What should we do about the immediate challenges of growth? What we heard was that Saskatchewan people are overall pretty happy with the direction our government has taken, but there are still challenges. We heard about the need to continue to invest in the infrastructure a growing economy

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those who need it most. There will be a day in the future when we have paid off the provincial debt. When that day comes, we need a plan for what to do next. You have laid the foundation for this work through the feedback you gave to your MLA over the summer. Thank you for that. So enjoy the rest of your summer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget that this year, school doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start until after Labour Day!

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YOUR TWO CENTS ~ Death of evidence

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needs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; highways, healthcare and education. You told us about the ongoing labour shortage that is a byproduct of Saskatchewanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic growth. We heard about using post-secondary education as a way to let more people benefit from the economy. But we also heard that this new plan needs to be about more than just dollars and cents. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to have goals for improving healthcare, education and support for

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Continued from page 5 The corporatist directions evident in internal policy do not explain international reactions made without waiting for evidence. John Bairdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reaction to events in Treimsa , â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;?The use by Syrian security forces of artillery, tanks and helicopters, confirmed by the supervision mission of the UN in Syria, demonstrates the barbarity of the regime,â&#x20AC;? were not based on evidence that has since come forward but on following the directions of our closest allies. The incidence of Death of Evidence practices of the Harper Government internally have negative effects. None as negative, however, as this: having the United States and Israel opening hostilities against Syria and then Iran through receiving Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unquestioning support rather than words of caution . Yours truly Joe Hueglin Niagara Falls, Ontario

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Farm diversification can be a hit and miss venture Agricultural diversification has long been an interest of mine, as regular readers will recognize. The idea of creating more options in terms of generating a positive cash flow has always seemed like a very common sense approach for a sector where traditional core production products; wheat, barley, cattle and hogs are given to some pretty large and relatively long-lasting price dips. The farming founders of Canada had diversification at the heart of their operations, with mixed farms the norm. It was a built-in insurance plan of sorts. If a barley crop came off in bad condition it could be fed through hopefully higher valued hogs. If bad prices hit the cattle sector, they were still a fertilizer source for cereal crop land. And intertwined within the mixed farm philosophy was a full larder with your own meat in the freezer, veggies in the cellar, and eggs and milk in the cooler. The concept of mixed farming has all but disappeared today, at least in terms of major farms. Specialization has taken over, and one can argue that is good in terms of management expertise in terms of production.

Making the farm profitable is not necessarily made easier in terms of being so specialized. We have seen the effect of extended low prices basically gutting the hog sector in Western Canada, yet it was not so many years ago the region was considered nearly perfect in terms of producing pigs. The combination of seemingly long CALVIN term low grain prices, abundant room in terms of isolating barn units, and DANIELS the need for local job creation all ~ seemed to make Saskatchewan ideal for pig barns. But the big barns struggled as grain prices climbed, as did wages, and pork prices stayed low. Of course diversification, even as it was basically sanctioned by the province's agricultural departments proved to be hit or miss -- actually more miss than hit. The list of failures is long, ostrich, emu, fallow deer, sea-

Province consulting with pasture patrons The Government of Saskatchewan will be further consulting with federal pasture patrons on the transition of federal community pastures to patron-controlled ownership and operation. “We have said all along that the patrons of these pastures are the priority for our government throughout this transition,” Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart said. “Our goal is to ensure patrons are able to continue using these lands and we want to give them every opportunity to have input about the transition of their pastures.” While these consultations continue, the Governments of Canada and Saskatchewan are working to ensure patrons are able to utilize these pastures for grazing in 2013. Both governments are negotiating a memorandum of understanding that will see federal staff continue to manage these pastures for the 2013 grazing season. Following the federal government’s decision to discontinue the Community Pasture Program, Saskatchewan established an advisory committee made up of industry leaders and cattle producers. The advisory committee recommend-

ed the following principles form the framework for this transition: * Pasture patron groups will have the opportunity to own and operate each pasture; * Each pasture will be maintained as a complete block; * Sales will be based on market values; and * Any sale of native prairie land will be subject to no-break and no-drain conservation easements. Representatives from each federal community pasture patron group were invited to participate in a conference call in July, and each patron advisory committee chairman has been sent an information package on the transition process. “We have had numerous inquiries by patron groups who are interested in owning and operating these pastures,” Stewart said. “I encourage all pasture patron groups to look into forming legal entities or grazing co-operatives in order to transition these pastures into their hands.” Discussions are ongoing with the federal government and Farm Credit Canada on options for financing plans for patron groups to purchase their pastures.

Agriculture continues to be the key driver of the Saskatchewan economy “There is good news for both consumers and farmers in an annual survey comparing the cost of an average basket of groceries to the farmers’ share of the food dollar”, APAS President Norm Hall said today. The 2012 annual survey was completed in May of 2012 and is the fifth annual survey undertaken by the Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan (APAS), the Keystone Agricultural Producers (KAP), and the Wild Rose Agricultural Producers (WRAP). “The real good news for consumers is that the consumers’ price for a basket of food remained relatively stable with some sharp declines in high value items such as beef,” Hall said. “The accompanying good news for farmers is that the farmers’ share of the food dollar remained stable at 33.8%.” “This year, Saskatchewan farmers are preparing to enjoy a harvest in which largely optimal weather conditions, the potential of good to excellent yields and higher than expected commodity prices have come together”, Hall said. “Saskatchewan farmers are known worldwide as consistent and reliable suppliers of safe and high quality grains, oilseeds, pulses, and livestock.”

“Agriculture continues to a key driver of the Saskatchewan economy accounting for over one-third of the province’s total exports”, the APAS President said. “In 2011, the total value of agricultural exports from Saskatchewan was over $10 billion. These exports are more than any other province in Canada. Saskatchewan farm and ranch families play an important role in our communities, economies and on the world stage.” The Farmers’ Share 2012 Update is available at the APAS website at www.apas.ca For More Information, please call Norm Hall at 306-7897774 ext 151 APAS is Saskatchewan’s general farm organization formed to provide farmers and ranchers with a democratically elected, grassroots, non-partisan, producer organization based on rural municipal boundaries. As the united voice of thousands of agricultural producers in Saskatchewan, we strive to represent the views of a wide variety of agricultural stakeholders in order to form comprehensive policies that can benefit all sectors of society.

buckthorn, and to lesser extents borage and fibre hemp and the list goes on. The problems are largely a lack of processing facilities, which never got off the ground because production levels, or market potential never made a facility viable. One shining example of a new sector which arrived, and has managed to grow albeit a slow growth curve over many years, is the bison sector. The big animals have found a niche in a world where consumers want lean, low fat meat, and bison provides just that. Bison also do well on fringe land, that which is not suited for regular cultivation, and crop production, meaning the animals fit with the idea of sustainable farming without impacting land use in terms of producing grain for human consumption. That will be increasingly important to consumers as well. While not a major agricultural commodity compared to beef or pork, bison are an example of diversification which has worked, and that sets the sector apart from most.

TOP PRICES PAID For Feed Barley, Wheat, Oats,

Rye, Triticale & Heated Oil Seeds

Priced At Your Bin

PEARMAN GRAIN LTD. Saskatoon (306) 374-1968

SCOTT MOE

MLA - Rosthern - Shellbrook Constituency Office #34 Main, Box 115 Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0 Telephone: (306) 747-3422 Facsimile: (306) 747-3472 Toll Free: 1-855-793-3422 Email: scottmoe.mla@sasktel.net Website: www.scott-moe.com

AUCTION SALE SUN., AUGUST 26/12 1:00 p.m.

Blaine Lake Community Hall

BUILDING SUPPLIES - Plywood, Oak, Birch, Spruce, Panelling, Soffit, Fascia, Over 1,000’ Oak & primed trim boards 2 - 4”, Vinyl Lattice, Toilet, Sinks, Vanities, All kinds doors, MDF, Windows, Roof Vents, Joist hangers, Palight trim, Shelving, Shower kits, Tub surround, Aluminum, Deck Railing, Carpet, Lino, Vanee Air-To-Air Heat Exchanger. New barbecues, Bikes, Wheel Barrows, Yard lights, Mitre Saw, Air nails, Caulking, Paint, Skil Saws, Air Nailer, Beaver table saw, 2 Lathes, General band saw, Dewalt planer, Craftsman Jointer planer; 4 Boats - 2 new Pelican 10’ & 12’, used 12’ Alum c/w 9.9 Johnson 4 stroke, 15’ Open bow alum, 75 hp Merc, Okanagan truck camper, Dodge camper van, Trailers, Chev 3 ton w/18’ insulated box & power lift, ‘64 Ford ½ ton, 86 - C 7000 needs work, Washer & dryer set, 3 piece couch set, Deep freeze, Garden cultivator, 3 lawn mowers, Clear out of blow-up beach toys, Skiis, 2 home gyms, Treadmill, Many more items.

Gateway Cafe Brunch Special: 11 am to Sale Time

Blaine Lake Auction

Phone: Tom (306) 466-4650; (306) 221-7929

Auctioneer Bob Burletoff

PL#0801-5943


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Shellbrook Chronicle

www.shellbrookchronicle.com

August 24, 2012

Night golf tourney in Canwood

On Saturday, August 18th at 9:30 pm Canwood Golf Course was the scene of a Night Golf Tourney which brought out 38 brave souls. A very dark night of golf and fun was enjoyed by everyone. Mary Benson and Melissa Stieb were the lucky winners of the prizes. All the golfers enjoyed pizza after their round of golf!

L-R. Linda Young and Kerri Charbonneau participated in the tournament.

Rhythm Works Dance Studio

Buying?

Registration Night

Selling?

Thurs., September 6

Classifieds

7:00 p.m. ~ Shellbrook Legion Hall Bring Used Dance Wear for Resale! Tentative dance schedule is on Town of Shellbrook website www.shellbrook.net

Work!

747-2442

Thank You The Centennial organizing Committee of the Blaine Lake Centennial Celebration, held on August 3-5, 2012 would like to say thank you to all of the volunteers and individuals who put the time and effort in to make the celebration weekend a success. Without your hard work and dedication throughout the planning of the celebrations, this would not have been possible. Thank you as well to all of the businesses that helped to make the weekend a wonderful success. Your contributions, monetary or in-kind, helped all to celebrate in this historic event for Blaine Lake, Saskatchewan. We appreciate your efforts and all that you have done for us. Thank you to the following: • Affinity Credit Union • Dutchak Family of Companies • Associated Engineering • Flamans/Blair Industrial Ltd. • Blaine Lake Ambulance Care • Gateway Grill • Blaine Lake Community Association • Hawryluk Funeral Home • Blaine Lake ESSO • Heavenly Hills Orchard • Blaine Lake General Store • Leask Grocery Mart • Blaine Lake Senior Citizens’ Centre • Loraas Disposal • BLEDCO • Prairies North Magazine • Blair Industrial • Prince Albert Co-op • Building Communities through Arts & • Riverlands Heritage Preservation Heritage/Legacy Fund • R.M. of Blaine Lake • Canada Post • Saskatchewan Tourism • CIBC • SaskEnergy • Class of 1970 • SaskTel • Community Initiatives Fund • SGI • Community Vitality Program-Community • Supreme Basics Pride Projects and Events • Town of Blaine Lake • Cree River Developments • Wendland Ag Services • CS Skrupski • 12-40 Small Business Loan Association • Doreen Kalmakoff • 12-40 & Beyond Self-Guided Tour

(L-R ) Mary Benson and Melissa Stieb were the winners of the Canwood Night Golf Tourney prizes!!

Nominations open for medal Saskatchewan residents have until October 18 to nominate individuals for the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal. The Volunteer Medal recognizes individuals who have provided outstanding volunteer service or exceptional community involvement. “Saskatchewan’s greatest strength is our capable and generous volunteers,” Lieutenant Governor Vaughn Solomon Schofield said. “I encourage everyone to consider nominating a deserving individual to receive our highest volunteer award, the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal, so that we can publicly thank our most outstanding volunteers.”

The ! y r T s OS ified s T s a U Cl A

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.

C MIS

ES s RV HOM

747-2442 Call Today Shellbrook Chronicle

Any Canadian citizen who is a current or former long-term resident of Saskatchewan is eligible. Nominations cannot be accepted for sitting members of Parliament, the Legislature or judiciary. Groups or organizations cannot be nominated. Posthumous nominations are not accepted. Since its inception in 1995, 148 recipients have received the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal. Additional information, nomination forms and a list of previous recipients can be found online at www.ops.gov.sk.ca/svm or call toll-free 1-877-427-5505.

The Prince Albert Parkland Health Region thanks all of the volunteers and Fresh Air Experience who assisted with the Rural Bus Tour of Medical Students sponsored by the Saskatchewan Medical Association in Shellbrook and Memorial Lake on August 18th. You helped make it a very special day.


August 24, 2012

www.shellbrookchronicle.com

Shellbrook Chronicle

9

Water wreaking havoc in RM of Leask A high water table combined with periods of relentless rains have been the cause of serious trouble in the the Rural Municipality of Leask. According to Adminstrator Sherri McHanson Budd, an engineer from the Provincial Disaster Assistance Program (PDAP) was set to visit the area this week to check on 38 individual sites to determine whether or not they meet the program’s conditions. Last year, the RM was approved for 56 trouble spots of varying size, under the program.

“There are spots we built up last year that are now underwater again,” said McHanson Budd. Because of the extensive work load, the RM was granted an extension to complete work from last year under the PDAP program. RM crews have had their work cut out for them again this year as they try to complete the last of last year’s projects while trying to stay ahead of this year’s problem areas. Priority has been given to roads that are the only access

while areas with multiple access roads are pushed further down the list. According to McHanson Budd, many of the trouble spots are located in basins where there is nowhere for the water to go. As more precipitation falls, the water accumulates until it runs over the road. In other areas, water can be “let go” but the RM has to determine where the runoff can go with the least amount of impact.

Frustrated? No room in the garage for your car? Placing a classified ad is easy and affordable! Clean out the clutter by advertising your unwanted items for hundreds of potential buyers.

What are you waiting for? Call us today and start turning the stuff you don’t want into CASH!

Get Things Moving! Shellbrook Chronicle Heavy rains combined with saturated soil has caused serious damage to roads throughout the RM of Leask over the past two years.

747-2442 ~ chads@shellbrookchronicle.com

SHELLBROOK & AREA LISTINGS NEW LISTING Leask Bungalow

Canbrook Developments

NEW PRICES!

- 2 Bedroom bungalow - Large porch w/Dual entry - Updated kitchen cabinets - Close to schools - Large double lot - Single detached garage $65,000 MLS #2-410

Unit #5, 703 Mesa Way $237,500 + GST MLS Adv # 1-413 Unit #6, 703 Mesa Way $231,500 + GST MLS Adv # 1-414 Unit #7, 703 Mesa Way $228,500 + GST MLS Adv # 1-415 Unit #8, 703 Mesa Way $234,500 + GST MLS Adv # 1-416

- 1,166 Square Foot Condos - 2 Large Bedrooms - Maple Cabinets and Hardwood Floors - Single Attached Garage - Early Purchasers Can Pick Colors - Unit #2 for Immediate Possession!!! Shellbrook

Area Acreage - Stunning NEW Updates - 14.87 Acres with trees PRICE! Completed - 1120 sq ft House - Eloquent Bathroom D - Well maintained home - Corrals for horses OL S Finishings - 3 Bdrms/2 Baths - Lrg Double Lot - 3 Bedrooms/ 2 baths - Very Quiet Location - Seller will look at offers!! $249,900 MLS #2-118 $277,500 MLS # 2-253 NEW PRICE!

Great Shellbrook Family Home!

- 75x170 feet - Quiet Pratt Lake - Great Fishing & Watersports - Build Your Dream Cabin - Only 1½ hrs from Saskatoon $89,900 MLS #1-497

- 2+2 Bdrm bi-level - Very functional floor plan - Oversized double corner lot - Dble attach. garage - Beautifully landscaped yard - Excellent Shellbrook location $269,900 MLS #1-430

Waterfront Lake Lot

- 4.69 acres building site - Just off Hwy 55N - ¼ mile to Shellbrook - Power & gas nearby - Ready to build on

$39,500 MLS

Private Shellbrook Subdivision - Private Subdivision - Town Amenities - Back onto Sports Grounds - Close to Golf Course - Large Lots (104x133’) - Pick Yours Now!!!

#2-040

$37,500 + GST

- Large Double Fenced Lot $269,900 MLS

New Listing

Shellbrook

New Listing Shellbrook Acreage Lot

- 4 Bedroom Spacious Home - Fully Renovated Kitchen & Bathrms - Beautiful H’Wd Floors& Finishings - Move In Ready!!! #2-399

Shellbrook Commercial Lots

Family Bungalow

Pratt Lake Vacant Lot

NEW LISTING Extensively Renovated Character Home!!!

#0-525

- 50m x 50m - Just North of S.brook Storage - Great Location for Any Business - Total of 3 Lots Available!

shaped lot - On quiet crescent

$334,900 MLS

#2-328

Canwood Starter Home - 2 Bedrooms - Large Living Room - Updated Bathroom - Fully Fenced Backyard - Great Starter Or Retirement Home Detached Garage #2-306 $269,900 MLS

- 2 Bedroom Raised Bungalow - Bamboo Hardwood Floors - Open Concept Living Area - Large Manicured Yard - Double - Main Floor Laundry

$31,900 + GST MLS

- Well Maintained Home $94,900 MLS

- Highway Access

Excellent Family Bungalow - 3 + 2 Bedroom bungalow - Beautiful maple kitchen - Great family floor plan - Fully finished b’ment - Lrg private pie

#2-156

Leask Family Home - 2 + 2 Bdrms - Main Flr Laundry - Fully Finished Basement - Lrg Living Rm - Very Clean Home! $97,500 MLS #2-153

Restored Character!!!

- Great character home! - Fully updated features - 4 lrg bdrms - Formal dining/ living room - Beautiful double lot! - Great family home $319,900 MLS #2-176

Great Sh’brook Bungalow

SOLD

#2 - 347

Shellbrook Starter Home!! NEW - One ! Block from PRICE Downtown Shellbrook - 2 Bedrooms - Many Updates Completed - Quick Possession - Very Clean Home - Additional Lot Also Available $119,900 MLS #1-538

Great Character Home!

Let me show you how I can help you sell your home!! • FREE Market Evaluation based on current rising market trends • Reach out of town buyers through the Multiple Listing Service and www.realtor.ca • Exposure of your home through RE/MAX offices & Websites • Courtesy moving trailer available.

Call Quinn Tait RE/MAX P.A. Realty for more information or for your free market evaluation

747-2227 or 747-7507

- Well Maintained Home - Beautiful Hrdwd Floors - Fantastic Character Finishings - Lrg 90x130 Lot - Appliances Included

$114,000 MLS NEW PRICE!

- 3 Bedrooms/ 2bathrooms - Low maintenance $169,900 MLS

#2-175

Cowan Lake All Seasons Cabin

- Modern cabin/house - Cowan Lake subdivision - Large private yard - Relax year round #1-342


10

Shellbrook Chronicle

www.shellbrookchronicle.com

August 24, 2012

Ready or Ripe? Is it time to harvest? By Erl Svendsen and Jackie Bantle The challenge for many gardeners is that some crops are difficult to judge when they are ready for harvest. This is particularly true for crops where ‘ripe’ doesn’t apply: potatoes and carrots are good examples. Or for crops that we pick when they are unripe, like green peppers or green beans. There are also those vegetables that are best picked after a frost. To sort things out, the following is a list of commonly grown vegetables with their ideal harvest characteristics. Bean, fresh: harvest pods while they are still crisp and fleshy throughout, and can be easily snapped. Beets: Dig the roots when they are large enough to suit (I prefer 5cm in diameter or larger). Very large beets harvested late in the season tend to be woody – depending on the cultivar. Brussels sprouts: Harvest when sprouts are firm to touch and after they have received at least one good frost to improve their flavour; immediately before Thanksgiving dinner is usually a good time. Cabbage: three days before they split. Cut head at the base (next to the soil) when the head is very firm to touch. Some cultivars split quickly, so check heads daily. Carrot: can be harvested when they are large enough to suit (e.g. baby carrots). Danvers type carrots should be harvested when they

reach 3-4cm in diameter as they tend to become woody. For maximum yield and storability, wait until they reach full size, which varies by cultivar. Sweetness will improve after a good frost. Cucumber: Pick when green; if yellow too late. Corn: cobs are ready when the tip of the cob comes to a blunt end, kernels are filled out (plump) and juice is clear (not milky) when kernel is pierced by fingernail. Garlic: Dig bulbs when tops are 50-75% dead (usually the end of July). Bulbs with dry tops will tend to rot in the soil. Muskmelon/cantaloupe: ripe when the melon simply ‘slips’ off the vine. Once off the vine, will not sweeten further. Onion: lift when tops have started to yellow, die down. Dry out in shade in a warm well-ventilated area until the necks have closed before storing. If the tops have not started to die down late in the season, gently push the them over to help the necks close off. Parsnip: harvest after a good frost for the best flavour. Pea, fresh: ready when pods are still green, filled out; peas are tender and sweet Pepper: depends on cultivar.Can be picked green (ready) if the fruit feels firm or wait until the skin changes colour (ripe) for a sweeter pepper. Potato: flowering is not a good indicator of when po-

tatoes are ready to dig. Can be harvested when potatoes are small with thin papery skins (baby potatoes) – fresh eating. For storage, skins need to be ‘set’. Aboveground plant parts should be dead or removed at least one week before harvest. Tubers in the soil can withstand a short -2˚C frost overnight. Winter Squash: harvest late in the fall. Fully mature winter squash will survive -2˚C temperatures. Immature squash will have a water-soaked or ‘soft’ area on the skin after a -2˚C frost.

Tomato: can be picked as soon as you see a slight blush and allowed to fully ripen inside on your counter. Or wait until they are fully coloured (yellow or red, depending on cultivar) for maximum flavour and sweetness. Of course when killing frosts threaten, pick them all to ripen inside. Those that don’t turn colour after a few weeks can be cooked up in a recipe or tossed on your compost pile. Watermelon: check for a dry tendril on the stem next to where the fruit is

attached to the stem; the watermelon should sound hollow when tapped lightly; and sweet and fruity smell. Zucchini: should have been picked last week. Best (most tender) when picked under 8 inches long – no peeling required. If left until the size of a baseball bat, will need to peel and scoop out seeds to enjoy. Upcoming events August 26. Open House and Walking Tour. Superintendent’s Residence at the Saskatoon Forestry Farm Park and Zoo Open house at 1:30 and 3:30 pm; his-

torical walking tour of the grounds at 2 pm. Refreshments available for $2 or a small donation; otherwise free and open to the public. Peggy: 652-9801. Call Gardenline with all your yard and garden questions. Only 1 more week before they close for the season: 966-5865; gardenline@usask.ca; http://agbio.usask. ca/gardenline This column is courtesy of the Saskatchewan Perennial Society (www14.brinkster.com/saskperrennial; hortscene@yahoo.com).

First signs of harvest

A combine dumps a load of barley into a grain cart as it harvests a field just north of Shellbrook Tuesday afternoon.

Crop Production Services donates to project

With support from fundraisers, donations and grants the Canwood Community Pride Committee is working on the final stages to complete a picnic/ park area. In June Crop Production Services donated sod, along with employees to assist in placing it. Above are Merv Bobryk and Les Porter assisting in laying the sod. Left is the finished product.

Pruning ban ends Aug 31 The annual restriction on pruning all types of elm trees is over at the end of August. Homeowners are encouraged to prune their elms, beginning September 1. Each year, pruning of elm trees is prohibited from April 1 to August 31 to reduce the risk of Dutch elm disease (DED). The elm bark beetles that spread the deadly disease are most active during this period and fresh cuts attract them. Regular pruning, outside the ban period, helps keep trees healthy and better able to resist all types of diseases, including Dutch elm disease. Removing dead wood also makes trees less attractive to elm bark beetles. The late summer and early fall can be a good time for tree maintenance, with generally more pleasant and predictable weather than in the early spring. The leaves on the trees also making it easier to spot and remove dead or unhealthy branches. Provincial regulations require commercial pruners of elm trees to complete a recognized training program or be under the supervision of someone who has. Improper pruning techniques can contribute to the spread of many tree diseases, including Dutch elm disease. Due to the risk of spreading DED, transporting or storing elm firewood is illegal. Any elm wood should be disposed of promptly by burning or burying it in a location approved by the municipality. If you require additional information regarding designated disposal areas and methods in your area, contact your local municipal authority. For more information about Dutch elm disease or to report a suspicious tree, call 1-800-SASK ELM or your local municipal office.


August 24, 2012

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Shellbrook Chronicle

11

Tour exposes med students to rural practice Continued from page 1 “Lots of students that I have talked to in the past say that they tend to go to places that they have been to before. So this will give Shellbrook and our region exposure, said Miller.” The bulk of the students are just entering their first year of medicine, fresh off of their orientation Thursday while a few are entering their second year. The day featured some time at the Shellbrook Hospital where the students took part in casting and suturing practice while also learning how to take blood pressure at the Shellbrook Primary Care clinic under the supervision of nurses, a nurse practitioner, and physicians from Shellbrook and Prince Albert. After lunch, the 55 students were bussed to Memorial Lake Regional Park for an afternoon of water sports.

Brendon Kushneriuk, of Prince Albert, was one of the few second year students on the trip. He decided to jump aboard the bus to be of help to the first years students and to get a closer look at rural practice. He felt he benefited from the clinical aspects of the trip with the exposure to suturing and casting clinics. Though he hasn’t determined what specialty he plans to pursue, he hasn’t ruled out general practice in a rural setting. First year student Erin Hadin, of Saskatoon, signed up for the tour as a way to get to know the people she will be spending the next few years with. “I thought it was a good opportunity to meet my classmates and it sounded like a lot of fun,” said Hadin. Hadin, whose parents both grew up in rural areas, said the tour could be an eye opener for students who

First year medical student Erin Hadin has her arm casted by a classmate.

Rotavirus vaccine coming to Saskatchewan Saskatchewan is expanding its infant immunization program by adding a rotavirus vaccine (ROTARIXTM) to its routine childhood immunization schedule this fall. ROTARIXTM is a two-dose oral vaccine series that will be given to infants between six weeks and eight months of age. "Immunizations play an important role in protecting the population against disease and we are pleased to offer this new vaccine to some of our youngest residents," Health Minister Dustin Duncan said. The vaccine will be offered starting November 1, 2012, at the regular two and four month immunization appointments, in addition to the current publicly-funded vaccines for infants that are routinely offered by public health nurses. "Rotavirus is a highly communicable, common diarrheal illness that affects all ages but is most prevalent in infants and young children," Chief Medical Health Officer Dr. Saqib Shahab said. "Children under two years face the most severe complications, and the vaccine is a safe and effective way to protect them against rotavirus infection." In Saskatchewan, it is estimated that Rotavirus results in 9,000 episodes of illness in infants on a yearly basis, with 1,400 phy-

sician visits, 800 Emergency Room visits and 200 hospitalizations. Rotavirus causes inflammation of the stomach and intestines and is sometimes called gastroenteritis. Symptoms of rotavirus illness generally include several days of vomiting, diarrhea and fever. Loss of body fluids often results in dehydration that may require hospitalization. Rotavirus is spread easily from children who are infected to other children, often through contaminated hands and objects such as toys. "Because there is a narrow time window in which the vaccine can be administered, we wanted to inform parents in advance so that they can book an appointment for their children with their public health office," Shahab said. The two dose vaccine series needs to be completed by eight months, with the first dose given by 15 weeks of age. Children receiving their two month routine immunizations starting in November will be eligible for the first Rotavirus vaccine dose. For more information on the Rotavirus vaccine program visit the Ministry of Health website at www.health.gov.sk.ca. Additional information on Rotavirus and symptoms of the disease is available at Healthline Online www.healthlineonline.ca.

have no experience with rural communities. “Some people decide what it (rural Saskatchewan) is like and don’t actually experience it,” said Hadin, adding that the hospitality shown to them on the tour could possibly change the minds of those who had previously ruled out practice in a rural area. In all, 100 students are accepted into the University of Saskatchewan’s Medicine program each year. Many of the students taking part in the tour may have little or no experience with rural communities and rural medical practice. This tour gave them a small taste of what it would be like to work and play in the PA Parkland Health Region. “This is just trying to give them exposure to rural communities and will give them an idea of what its like living and working in rural Saskatchewan,” said Miller.

Students practice suturing wounds on pigs feet under the tutelage of area physicians and medical personnel.

You are Invited to “A Taste of Northern Saskatchewan” with your Host MP Rob Clarke and the Desnethé-Missinippi-Churchill River Electoral District Association to an Evening Gala with Special Guest Speaker Member of Parliament Peter MacKay

“A Taste of Northern Saskatchewan” This evening will include a chance for you To meet with MP Clarke, MP MacKay & other Conservative colleagues, Dine on delectable food from Northern Saskatchewan and Experience DMC’s hospitality. This event will be held at the Big River Community Center 606 1st Street North in Big River, Saskatchewan

Friday, September 14, 2012 Cocktails - 6 pm ~ Supper - 7pm Guest Speaker - 8pm ~ Auction to follow ~ Cash Bar Tickets can be purchased in advance only by contacting: Trischa Doucette at (306) 469-4845 or email trischa@bigriverrealestate.ca or Sharlene Beaulieu at (306) 236-5577 or email beaufarm@sasktel.net. Tickets are $50.00 each or purchase a table of 8 for $400.00 Please RSVP by purchasing your tickets by August 31, 2012. You will have a chance to win some great door prizes and to bid on some great items.


12

Shellbrook Chronicle

www.shellbrookchronicle.com

August 24, 2012

U of S and Blue Cross announce investment The University of Saskatchewan has announced an exciting partnership with Saskatchewan Blue Cross to curb childhood obesity in the province. Enabled by the generous $1-million investment of Saskatchewan Blue Cross, the College of Kinesiology will launch the Mind, Exercise, Nutrition, Do It (MEND) program in Saskatchewan this September. “The corporate social responsibility vision of Saskatchewan Blue Cross is the improved health and wellness of Saskatchewan residents. We care about Saskatchewan people and feel a strong responsibility to address the pressing health issue of childhood obesity, as our children’s health will determine the future health of our province,” stated Arnie Arnott, president and CEO of Saskatchewan Blue Cross. “We are very pleased to be the lead partner of MEND in Saskatchewan, creating a breakthrough pathway for young people to connect with a new obesity prevention program,” Arnott continued. “We are tackling the issue of childhood obesity by committing $1-million in start-up funding for a MEND program

to be delivered at the University of Saskatchewan, the first of its kind in our province.” MEND inspires children and families to lead and sustain fitter, healthier and happier lives by changing behaviours that cause obesity. Presently in Canada, more than a quarter of children ages two to17 are overweight or obese. In Saskatchewan the problem is even more pronounced with a rate of over 29 per cent. “The College of Kinesiology is particularly committed to this program. Promoting a healthy lifestyle and highlighting the importance of increased levels of physical activity are key components in reversing this trend,” said Carol Rodgers, dean of the College of Kinesiology. “It is also a wonderful opportunity for students and faculty across the Colleges of Kinesiology, Nursing, Medicine and Pharmacy and Nutrition to work together in an inter-professional model of wellness program delivery,” she added. MEND is a program that has evolved into one of the most successful and internationally recognized obesity prevention initiatives in the past decade with programs in the Unit-

ed Kingdom, Canada, United States, Australia, New Zealand and Denmark. In Saskatchewan, the program will begin as a three-year project, starting with Saskatoon in the first year and expanding to Prince Albert and northern communities in year two. In its third year, it will expand throughout the province to include Regina and southern regions. The programs are provided free of charge through the support of donors like lead partner Saskatchewan Blue Cross, and will offer three streams, focusing on children aged two to four, five to seven and seven to 13. Together with their parents, children learn about topics that range from nutrition and portion size to motivation and goal setting. Additionally, children participate in group physical activity while parents discuss ways to improve the overall health of their families. The leadership Saskatchewan Blue Cross exemplifies in supporting the MEND program is in line with its vision of improving the health and wellness of Saskatchewan residents.

Changing labor laws could save your money By the Canadian Taxpayers Federation Imagine if every time you got a pay cheque your employer had skimmed a bit off and sent it to either the Sask Party or the NDP? Wouldn’t you be outraged (especially if you disagreed with their views) that your hard earned money was used to fund them? Unfortunately for some unionized employees in Saskatchewan, that troubling scenario is actually a reality. However, the good news is the Saskatchewan government is currently reviewing the laws that allow this to happen - Saskatchewan’s current labour legislation. If they truly care about the plight of hard-working Saskatchewan citizens, here’s a few places they can start to make changes: First, every pay period in Saskatchewan, unionized workers across the province are forced to pay union dues. Many unions in turn take some of those funds and use them for politics and other non-bargaining activities. For example, last year the NDP received $325,552 in union donations and the Sask Party received $10,752. Thus, you could detest politics entirely, but if you’re unionized by one of the unions that donated to those parties, you’d still be forced to sacrifice some of your pay cheque.

Alternatively, a union might use some of your pay cheque to run political advertisements you don’t agree with or donate funds to a charity that is not on your priority list. Your preference might be to instead send those funds to your local church or perhaps spend them on a pack of beer. Whatever the case may be, workers shouldn’t be forced to fund activities they don’t support. The government should change existing labour legislation to restrict union dues to bargaining activities. That way unionized worker’ money is spent in their workplace and the extra – well, workers would get to decide how it is spent. Second, the provincial government should stop using public funds and resources to collect union dues. You see every pay period government employees have to figure out the union dues for unionized government employees and ensure the funds are sent to the respective union. Thus, taxpayers end up footing the bill for all the collection work behind the scenes. Meanwhile, local hockey beer leagues, the red hat society and other groups to which government employees belong have to collect their own membership dues and other fees. Unions should have to do the same. And while the

government is at it, they should free businesses from being forced to collect the dues of unions as well. Finally, some have argued the minimum wage should increase automatically with inflation. While the recommendation is likely well intentioned (to help low income people), it actually doesn’t work. If a business is forced by the government to raise the minimum wage tomorrow, many businesses will just raise prices to pay for it. Thus, the minimum wage earner may see a small rise in pay, but they’ll pay more for goods and services. Meanwhile, low-income earners just above the minimum wage level will only see a rise in prices. A better solution is to hike the basic personal amount – the amount of money one can earn before paying taxes. Saskatchewan’s threshold is $14,942, but it still lags Alberta’s threshold of $17,282. As you can see, changing labour legislation can save taxpayers money. Thankfully, having your say isn’t a labour intensive process – simply call or email your local MLA.

TOWN OF BIG RIVER PUBLIC NOTICE

12084PS00

Public Notice is hereby given that the Council of the Town of Big River, pursuant to Section 207 of The Planning and Development Act, 1983 intends to pass a bylaw to amend Zoning Bylaw No. 15/81 as hereinafter provided: It is proposed to amend the said Zoning bylaw as follows: 1) To change the Zoning of 1, Block M, Town of Big River, Plan 74B12304 outlined in bold on the map which forms part of this notice, from UR- Urban Reserve District to R1Residential District 2) To include Dwelling Unit Groups Explanation: Council wishes to provide for Dwelling Unit Groups. Bylaw Inspection: The Bylaw may be inspected by any interested person at the Town Office in Big River on any judicial day from Monday to Friday between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Copies are available to persons at a cost of $1.00 each. Public Hearing: Representations respecting the amendments will be considered by Council at 1:15 p.m. September 17, 2012 at Big River Community Centre, 606 1st Street North, in Big River, Saskatchewan. Council shall hear any person or group of persons or person acting on their behalf who wish to make a presentation. Notice of a person’s intent to make representation must be received by 9 a.m., September 17th, 2012. Written representations received by the Administrator prior to 9:00 a.m. September 17th, 2012 will be considered by Council. Issued at Big River this 17th day of August 2012. Gail Gear, Administrator


August 24, 2012

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RM of Leask meeting highlights The Regular Meeting of the Council of the Rural Municipality of Leask No. 464 was held in the Leask Municipal Office on Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The following are the highlights of that meeting. Present were Reeve Len Cantin, Administrator Sheri McHanson Budd and the following Council members: Real Diehl (Div 2), Marcie Kreese (Div3), Myles Robin (Div 4), Robert Girod (Div 5) and Victor Unyi (Div 6). That the minutes of the Regular Council meeting of June 27, 2012 be adopted as circulated with the amendment to change resolution #268/12 replacing Ordale Road with Kilwinning Road. That Council amend resolution 199/12 approving accounts for payment to include other payments numbered 71 to 78 inclusive, instead of payments 71-79. Councillor Kreese left Council Chambers 11:35 a.m. That the statement of Financial Activities for the period ending June 30, 2012 be approved as presented. Councillor Kreese returned to Council Chambers 11:41 a.m. That Council approve payments to Shellbrook Crushing $6,709.50 for Shellbrook crushing and loading gravel hauled by the RM and other contractors. That Council accept the following reports presented and that they be filed accordingly: Administrator’s Report and Bylaw Enforcement Report. That the RM contact the Saskatchewan Labour Relations Board with a request to amend Labour Order dated October

4, 2001 LRB No 187-01 to allow for an out of scope foreman position. That the RM advise Lac La Peche Resort and the Martin’s Lake Regional Park Board that effective July 20, 2012 that they will be required to use the Highway 12 Landfill during the regular operating hours and pay the standard tipping fees. Councillor Unyi left Council Chambers 3:24 p.m. That Council appoint Marcie Kreese to the Leask Recreation Board as a second appointee. Councillor Unyi returned to Council Chambers 3:26 p.m. That Council accept the elected Emerald Lake Leaseholders Association ELLA President Barb Cross and appoint her to the Emerald Lake Regional Park Board. That council send a correspondence to Dave Marit of SARM and Scott Moe, MLA that the RM proposes to take over the PFRA lands within our RM to manage land use and maintain the lands as public lands. And that the RM wishes to pursue discussions with the producers regarding the management of the said lands. That Bylaw 3/2012 be amended to reduce the lake front yard setback from 45 meters to 35 meters and increase the front yard setback from 10 meters to 20 meters. That Bylaw 3/2012 to read a second time as amended. That Council table the requests for development permits as listed while council works on creating a policy for dock and boat lift management: a) Lot 15 Block 5 Pelican Cove – Dock, b) Lot 10 Block 3 Pelican Cove – Dock, c) Lot 5 Block

3 Pelican Cove – Dock + 2 Boat Lifts, d) Lot 11 Block 2 Martins Lake Joanette Subdivision – Dock, e) Lot 6 Block 3 Pelican Cove – Dock That Council approve the request for a development permit to develop thepublic reserve to create a pathway and sitting area across from Lot 12 Block 2 Martin’s Lake Joanette Subdivision or any combination of development. That we approve the request for a development permit to clear trees 5 feet wide by 10 feet long from the property line extending from Lot 1 Block 1 Plan 10273913 on the Environmental Reserve (ER) 1 Plan 10273913 Ext. 0 Iroquois Lake to build a walkway and stairs for dock access. Motion Lost. That Council accept the following correspondence as presented and that it be filed accordingly: 1. Martins Lake Regional Park – Minutes of June 11, 2012, 2. Leask Recreation Board – Minutes of the meeting of June 20, 2012, 3. Agricultural Producers Association of Saskatchewan - Information. That Council invoice Burton Aggregates Ltd. $187.65 the cost to repair the Lac La Peche driveway for damages he created to the road hauling while road bans were on. Delegations: 9:12 – 10:30 a.m. Scott Moe MLA; 10:52 11:22 a.m. Jesse Welsh regarding Flooding concerns; 1 : 0 2 – 1:25 p.m. Bill Nemish Grid 783 Flooding; Teleconference 1:53 – 2:08 p.m. RM of Redberry Council – Grid 783 Flooding; and Teleconference 2:35 – 2:52 p.m. Al Keller and Brent Eberle SWA Grid 783 Flooding.

Hi-tech combo-alarms for smoke and gas leaks While your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms silently go about their business day-in and day-out – unless there is danger – the company that sells the most of these life-saving devices in Canada is busy finding ways to make them better and last longer. Market leader Kidde says it has recently introduced two advanced combination smoke and CO alarms that are Canadian firsts. These new “intelligent” combo alarms react more

quickly to real fires while at the same time are better able to differentiate between false alarms and the real thing. One unit is battery powered, while the other is hardwired with a battery back up in case of a power outage. They take direct aim at a major consumer complaint of all alarms – that they go off too easily if you burn the toast or the turkey. For carbon monoxide alarms, consumers often find it

From the desk of the Recreation Director By: Cassie Bendig Lots going on this final week of August! Ranging from the Shellbrook Street Fair to the closing of summer facilities. If you’re curious on exactly what is going on when, visit me on my Facebook page www.facebook. com/shellbrookrecreation. Saturday, August 25th is the 2nd annual Shellbrook Street Fair. End your summer with a bang by participating in multiple activities, touring the large amount of vendors, shopping at the trade show, enjoying a drink at the beer gardens, watching fireworks or dancing at the Street Dance. The list of what will be available is never ending – so be sure to take a walk down Main Street starting at 10am to see what is all in store. Friday August 31st will be the last day of the playground program and the pool. There will be a Fun Day for the kids all day that day. If your child is between the ages of 5 and 12 years, drop them off at the Scout Hall at 8:30am to start with the Playground Program. At 1pm the kids will move on over to the pool to enjoy an afternoon of fun, games and prizes. There will also be a BBQ sale that day to help support the future renovations of the Shellbrook Swimming Pool. JumpStart basketball with Sandra and Lauren will be back this year as well! Starting September 9th and costs $40.00 per

child for kids ages 5-13 years. Keep posted for more details. Our annual Registration Night will be coming soon as well. Thursday September 6, 2012 from 6-8pm at our Community Hall will be Shellbrook Minor Hockey, Shellbrook Skate Club, Fitness with Leeta and Shellbrook Before and After School program with tables for registration. If you would like to reserve a table for anything, please let me know; tables are free! Fitness with Leeta will not be starting until October this year. You will have a chance to get the kidlets back in school and organized – then you can start your prepare-forDecember-meals workout plan so you can intake those extra calories on an amazing Christmas supper. At the Registration Night on September 6th, you may pre-purchase passes for the upcoming work-out season. Weekly Health Tip: Christmas will be here before you know it – and that can be a stressful time with all of the visiting and money spent. Start a saving jar for Christmas presents/expenses now and help save your body a little bit of stress by not worrying about funds this 2012 season. Have a great week! office – 747-4949 ~ cell – 747-9098 email – shellbrookrecdirector@sasktel. net

Shellbrook Chronicle

confusing that they need to be replaced every seven years while smoke alarms need replacing every 10 years. So in both these new Kidde combination alarms, the smoke and carbon monoxide sensors feature the same 10-year lifespan and 10-year warranty. More information and fire safety tips are available online at www.kiddecanada.com and www.safeathome.ca.


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OBITUARIES ~ James ‘Jim’ Henry HENRY- Mr. James Alexander ‘Jim’ Henry, age 87, late of Shellbrook, passed away in a Saskatoon hospital on Tuesday, July 31, 2012. Jim was the third son of Alexander and Minerva Henry, and was born on May 19, 1925 in Guernsey, Saskatchewan. His family moved to Aberdeen, then came to Wild Rose in 1932. He became interested in sports and the 4-H, helped with farm work, then took an agriculture course at the University of Saskatchewan. In the 50’s he established an International Harvester dealership and British American Service Station, along with his brothers. He was active in the community, serving on several local boards. In 1957 he married Edith Earby, and took up farming in the Foxdale area. Jim and his brothers also had a sawmill. His family was very important to him, and he always flooded a winter skating rink near the house for the kids, coached their teams, kept them active in 4-H, and was proud of everything they did. Jim had an old blue truck on the farm that most of the grandchildren used to learn to drive. Many winter afternoons were spent riding the toboggan behind the tractor. He lived a full life, was a very social person, and could carry a conversation with anyone.

PRAISE & WORSHIP ~

Regular services, Sunday school and special events will be listed at no charge.

Jim leaves to cherish his memory, his loving wife, Edith of Shellbrook; his children, Harley (Linda) Henry of Foxdale, Bev (Richard) Roberts of Martensville, Wendy (Jim) Watt of Shellbrook, Wayne (Lynne) Henry of Foxdale, Kevin (Glenda) Henry of Foxdale; his grandchildren, Darren (Lisa) Henry of Gillam MB and their children Triston, Gavin, Michael (Nicole) Henry of Saskatoon and their children Lilli-Anne, Tavis and Emmett, Blaine (Lee) Henry of Foxdale and their children Harlin, Myla, Jennifer (Travis) Friedley of Calgary and their son Carter, Jason (Erin) Roberts of Maidstone, Michelle (Todd) Steil of Camrose, and their daughter Sierra, Marcus Watt of Yellowknife, Amanda Watt of Shellbrook, Colton Henry of Regina, Justin Henry of lloydminster, Branden, Courtney, Alex, Hailey, Dane and Jaxen Henry, all of Foxdale; his brother-in-law Edwin Earby of Holbein, his sister-in-law, Isabel Henry of Shellbrook; numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. He was predeceased by his parents, Alexander and Minerva Henry, his in-laws, Cliff and Dorothy Earby; his brothers, Bob, Bill, Bruce; his sisters-in-law Olga Henry and Evelyn Henry. The funeral service was held at Knox United Church in Shellbrook on Tuesday, August 7 at 2:00 pm with Rev. Tony Thompson as officiant. The eulogy was given by Darren Henry and Jennifer Friedley and the readers were Alex Henry and Amanda Watt and Blaine Henry. The granddaughters read a special poem entitled ‘Close the Gate’. The urn bearers were Michael Henry and Jason Roberts. The honorary pallbearers were Harley Henry, Wayne Henry, Kevin Henry, Richard Roberts, Jim Watt, John Earby, Arthur Voyer. Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Society. Condolences e-mailed to www.beaulacfuneralhome.com will be forwarded to the family. Beau “Lac” Funeral Home is entrusted with the funeral arrangements.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR ~ BLAINE LAKE: Wapiti Library: Books, DVDs, Internet, Study/Meeting Space,

Proctor Service. *New Hours*: Tuesday 1-5, Wednesday & Friday 1-5, Thursday 5-8. Weekly Programming: After School Club (Crafts, Stories, Homework Help) Thursday 2:15-5:15, Craft n’ Chat for Adults Thursday 6-8, Drop In Computer Help Friday 2-4. 306-497-3130. CANWOOD: Branch of Wapiti Regional Library Hours: Tues. and Fri., 1 - 5 p.m. Internet services available at the library. DEBDEN: Wapiti Library hours: Monday 3 pm - 7 pm. Afterschool Program 3:30 - 5:00. Wednesday 11 am - 4 pm. Librarian: Aline Hannon LEASK: Wapiti Library Hours: Tues. & Fri.: 1 - 5:30 pm & Sat., 1:00 - 5:00 pm. MARCELIN: Wapiti Library is open Tues. 11 - 4 pm; Thur. 3 - 8 pm. For information on all your library needs, please contact 306-226-2110. SHELLBROOK: Shellbrook Branch of the Wapiti Library located at 105 Railway Ave., West (Provincial building). Library Hours: Mon., 2 - 6:00 pm; Tues., 2 - 8 pm; Wed. 2 - 8 pm; Thur., 2 - 6:00 pm; Fri., 10 - 4 pm. Children’s Story Time: Fri. 10:30 am (Oct. - May). Ph. 747-3419. PARKSIDE: Parkside Pentecostal Church 90th Anniversary on Sat., Sept. 1st - 7 pm Potluck Fellowship, Reminiscing & Music, Sun., Sept. 2nd - 10 am. Worship Service followed by Luncheon. Please call ahead if you plan to attend the luncheon 747-3572. CANWOOD: Lorne Lovberg 2nd annual Memorial Golf Tournament, Sat., Sept. 1, Sun., Sept. 2, Registration, Sat. 9 a.m. $50/person ~ Enter as two person team. 2 rounds each day; Ryder Cup format, 2-$10,000 Hole-in-One prizes; Putting contest, Cash Prizes. SHELLBROOK: Rhythm Works Dance Studio Registration Night, Thurs., September 6. 7:00 p.m. ~ Shellbrook Legion Hall. Bring Used Dance Wear for resale! Tentative dance schedule is on Town of Shellbrook website www.shellbrook.net

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St. Henry’s - Leask LUTHERAN CHURCH Mass Sunday 9 a.m. Zion - Canwood St. Joseph’s - Marcelin Sunday School, Mass Sunday, 11 a.m. Worship Sunday, 11 a.m. Fr. Tru Le St. John’s - Shellbrook -----------------------Sunday School, PRESBYTERIAN Worship Sunday, 9 a.m. Mistawasis Pastor Doug Schmirler Sunday worship Parkside, Immanuel 11 a.m. 10 a.m. - Worship Rev. Bev Shepansky Pastor Chris Dean ----------------------------------------------SEVENTH DAY PENTECOSTAL ADVENTIST CHURCH 407-2nd Ave E, Parkside Shellbrook 10:00 a.m. Time of Sat., 9:45 a.m. - Sabbath prayer School. 10:30 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sunday School Sat., 11:00 am Worship Broadcast on Pastor David Baldock VOAR 92.1 FM Shellbrook Sun., 10:30 a.m. - Wor- Pastor Stanislav Kondrat 306-764-6853 ship -----------------------Pastor David Bodvarson SOVEREIGN GRACE 747-7235 BAPTIST CHURCH Canwood Currently meeting in 10:30 a.m. - Worship homes on Sunday morn. Pastor Glenn Blazosek and Wednesday eveLeask Gospel nings. Tabernacle Parkside 747-2309, Sunday 6:30 p.m. Leask 466-4498 Pastor L. Trafford Marcelin 226-4615 306-466-2296 ----------------------------------------------ANGLICAN CHURCH EVANGELICAL FREE Leask - All Saint’s Big River 8 a.m. - Morning prayer 11:00 a.m. - Worship Service. Bible Classes 9:45 A.M. Summer: 10:30 a.m. - 12 9 a.m. Holy Communion Canwood - Christ Church 469-2258 2 p.m. 1st & 3rd Sundays Youth Nite: Fridays Evening Prayer Mont Nebo 2nd & 4th Sundays Holy Wed., 7:30 p.m. - Bible Communion Study and Prayer. Mont Nebo - St. Luke’s Sun., 10:30 a.m. - Wor2 p.m. - 1st and 3rd ship Sundays Holy CommuPastor Bill nion Klumpenhower 2nd and 4th Sundays -----------------------Evening Prayer CATHOLIC CHURCH St. Andrew’s Debden Sun., 9:30 a.m. - Mass. Shellbrook Fr. Sebastian Kunnath Sunday, 11 a.m. Big River - Sacred Heart Holy Communion Sun., 11:30 a.m. - Mass Father Harnish Whitefish 468-2264 Sun., 2:30 p.m. - Mass. -----------------------Victoire UNITED CHURCH Sat., 7:30 p.m. - Mass. Big River Fr. Sebastin Kunnath 1st & 2nd Sundays Eucharist Celebrations 1 p.m. - Worship Muskeg at Anglican Church Sat., 7:30 p.m. - Mass All Other Sundays -10 Mistawasis a.m. Sunday, 3 p.m. Shellbrook - Knox St. Agatha’s - Shellbrook Sun., 10 am - Worship Mass Saturday, 7 p.m.. Pastor Dave Whalley

In Memoriams In memoriams may be put in the Chronicle for $19.00 (30 words) plus 20¢ per additional word

Shellbrook Chronicle Phone 306-747-2442 Fax 306-747-3000


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August 24, 2012

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Roughrider's problems hard to pinpoint

ROD PEDERSEN ~ Voice of The Riders

It is now a legitimate question: "What's wrong with the Saskatchewan Roughriders?" We've heard it, at times, over the course of the summer of 2012 but it never seemed like there was too much wrong with the Green & White. Their perfect play during a 3-0 start seemed too good to be true and it was unreasonable to expect it would continue for the rest of the season. However as we close in on the halfway mark of this CFL campaign, even the most optimistic of Rider Priders has to be concerned over the state of this team as they seemed to have collapsed into a tailspin. Sunday's 24-5 loss in BC was

the club's fourth consecutive defeat and the team appears to be reeling. How couldn't they be? The club's last win was in Week 3, a 23-20 triumph over the Lions in Regina. Yet, remarkably, had the Riders won in B.C. on Sunday, they would have held top spot in the West with the season series advantage over the Lions. Instead they are 3-4, tied with Calgary for third, and are technically in fourth in the division as the Stamps hold the tiebreaker. So, all is not lost and head coach Corey Chamblin continues to be positive despite the slide. "I looked at it as we came out aggressive and stayed aggres-

sive with play-calling," Chamblin said after the match. "They (B.C.) are a veteran group and they just came out stronger. We'll grow into that role. "Once again this team fought to the end. The biggest thing is there are couple of units who played better than they have in the past. We need all three phases playing together and I know we'll get there." As is usually the case, a handful of plays dictated the outcome and some seriously questionable calls took the Riders out at the knees at critical times. We can safely say the Lions are the CFL's best team and the Riders went toe-to-toe with

them for most of the contest until a 55-yard touchdown by Arland Bruce broke their back in the last minute of the third quarter. "The game was in reach near the end but a few plays late broke it open," Chamblin explained. "It was close for a long time at 7-3." So what ails this team right now? That's tough to say. The offence certainly didn't seem to be a problem as they averaged close to 30 points per game in the first six games but their one measly field goal in Vancouver easily stood out as their worst offensive showing of the season.

Defensively, they relentlessly pounded Lions quarterback Travis Lulay but the reigning league MVP kept getting back up for more. He's just that good, and that tough. In the final analysis all that matters is that there are 11 games left to play and there's still plenty of time to turn things around. They have held the lead in every one of their first seven games and it's clear this team is as good as any in the league. However now is the time to find answers to the questions because they can't afford to squander divisional games any longer.

Signing Josh Hamilton could be a risky move Based on statistics alone, Josh Hamilton should be one of the most sought-after free agents this winter in the history of Major League Baseball. But any general manager offering what a player of Hamilton’s calibre should normally command — something in the Albert Pujols/ Prince Fielder stratosphere . . . $200 million or so for nine or 10 years — would either have to be partly off his rocker to do so, or have extraordinary faith. Hamilton, you see, is an enigma. A team signing the Texas Rangers star won’t really be sure what it is getting. Will it get the ‘good Hamilton’, the 35-home-run slugger who bats .350, as he did in 2010 when he was the runaway winner of the American League MVP voting? Or will it possibly get the ‘bad Hamilton’, the drugand alcohol-addicted loser whose life spun so miserably out of control that his career stats have a three-year void (2003-2005), when the booze and drugs caused him to hit rock bottom. His fall was dramatic; his comeback has been wonderfully heartwarming. Two hundred million dollars, however, is a big investment, no matter how much money some of the big players (Yankees, Dodgers, Angels) might have to throw around. Since getting his life under control, and his terrorization of American League pitchers has been the norm, Hamilton has had a couple of alcoholic ‘slips.’ And you

know what they say about alcoholics, of which Hamilton is admittedly one: “One drink is always too many; and 100 is never enough.” Baseball MVPs in their prime (Hamilton is 31) who are free agents are usually followed around by general managers driving Brinks’ trucks until they agree to take hundreds of millions of dollars from one of them. But a strange thing happened to Hamilton this summer. After living up to his new image by batting .395 and .344 in April and May, he slumped horribly – hitting only .202 during June and July. At one point, perplexed Rangers’ manager Ron Washington even benched his slugging outfielder. In all probability, Hamilton will need a number of suitcases to carry all the cash some hopeful team will offer him this winter. But it will be all that other Hamilton baggage that the ‘winning’ team should be worried about. • Comedy writer Jerry Perisho, Tweeting about Felix Hernandez’s perfect game against the Rays: “Can a game really be ‘perfect’ when there are no cheerleaders?” • Scott Ostler of the San Francisco Chronicle: “Congrats to Britain on its first victory in men’s basketball since 1948! The opponent? I believe it was Kantdunkistan.” • R.J. Currie of sportsdeke. com: “Warren Sapp is getting rid of 215 pairs of Nikes on eBay. Makes sense. In his playing days he was never fond of runners.”

BRUCE PENTON ~ • Comedy writer Gary Bachman, via Facebook, on Alex Rodriguez putting his Miami mansion up for sale for $38 million: “The home boasts nine bedrooms, 11 bathrooms and 426 mirrors.” • Comedy writer Alex Kaseberg, after swim star Ryan Lochte fessed up to urinating in the pool: “Now we know why Lochte went last

in the relays. And we thought he was standing in the water smiling because he won a medal.” • Dwight Perry of the Seattle Times: “Naturally there's talk of Olympic swim star Michael Phelps taking his talents to ‘Dancing With The Stars.’ As for the perfect dance partner, how about Daryl Hannah in her mermaid outfit?” • Cam Hutchinson of the Saskatoon Express, after the Blue Jays called up Adeiny Hechavarria from the minors: "Finally, they have a big-name player." • Blogger Bill Littlejohn, after all nine Giants defenders somehow took part in a rundown play against the Rockies: "Waiting at home plate was the Stanford band." • Headline at the Onion. com: “Subway Releases PoolWater-Soaked Sandwiches

To Honour Michael Phelps' Retirement.” • Greg Cote of the Miami Herald: “I remember Jimmy Johnson, way back in the Dallas Cowboys days, telling me once that if a seventhround, fourth-string rookie guard fell asleep in a team meeting you would kick his butt out the door, but if Troy Aikman was caught dozing you would gently nudge him awake and offer to fluff his pillow.” • Another one from Kaseberg: “It might sound like sour grapes, but a lot of people accuse Chinese Olympic gold medal swimmer, Ye Sciwen, of using performance enhancing drugs. They may be right. They tried to test her, but every time she peed into a cup, the cup melted.” • Kaseberg again: “You know what Olympic sport I miss? The Equestrian events.

Like that one time when that really rich white guy beat that filthy rich white guy. That was exciting.” • Another one from Perry: “Yet another competition — this time Scrabble — has been hit with a cheating scandal after a player at a tournament in Orlando, Fla., was caught with a couple extra tiles up his sleeve. As for a possible motive, investigators say they're still drawing a blank.” • B.C. comic Torben Rolfsen, after The Economist named Vancouver the world's third-most livable city: “Another bronze for Canada.” Care to comment? Email brucepenton2003@yahoo. ca

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AUTOBODY REPAIR

922-2040

 COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL WIRING  TRENCHING  SKIDSTEER & BACKHOE SERVICES

CURTIS BLOOM JOURNEYMAN ELECTRICIAN

(P) 306.747.8282 (F) 306.747.4445 (E) livewireelectric@sasktel.net

BRONZE CASTER

ELECTRICIAN

NISSE FOUNDRY

J &H Electric

Wayne Timoffee Kelsey Bremner Andrea Langlois

email nisse@sasktel.net web: www.nissefoundry.com

(306) 747-5592 Box 381, Shellbrook S0J 2E0 Serving Shellbrook & Surrounding area

A division of FYI Doctors 3 - 2685 - 2nd Avenue West

Call Today:

HEARING CLINIC

OPTOMETRIST

VACUUM SALES

Carlton Trail Hearing Clinic Doreen Chyz, BC - HIS

Dr. Wayne Diakow Dr. Stephen Malec Dr. Carolyn Haugen Dr. Nicole Lacey

2995 2nd Ave. West South Hill Mall, Prince Albert, SK

OPTOMETRISTS

Phone 764-2288

Central Optometric Group

P.A. VACUUM Service - Parts

(all makes of vacuums welcome

FREE ESTIMATES

SALES

763-3202

306-922-0003 TF 1-877-477-6863

3 - 210 - 15th Street East, Prince Albert S6V 1G2

www.carltontrailhearing.com

PHONE 764-6311

INSURANCE

PLUMBING

PLUMBING/HEATING

Shelltown Plumbing & Heating

D & S Mechanical Services Inc. Commercial Refrigeration Res. & Com. Air Conditioning Plumbing • Heating Gas Fitting

Courteous, professional, reliable, plumbing, heating, gas fitting services

#2-150-32nd St. W. Prince Albert, SK (behind Pizza Hut)

Phone 747-4332 Shellbrook, Sask.

Shellbrook & Area Tel: 306-747-3170 Cell: 306-981-6869 Cell: 306-747-9317

FUNERAL SERVICES

PLUMBING

WELDING/REPAIR

BEAU “LAC” FUNERAL HOME LTD.

BMW Plumbing & Heating

PARKSIDE WELDING & REPAIR

1-877-898-8248 (TAIT) General Insurance Health Insurance Motor Licence Issuer

101 RAILWAY AVE. SHELLBROOK, SK

747-2828 (24 hrs.) www.beaulacfuneralhome.com

• Pre-arrangements Available • Monument Sales Dave Hjertaas

Tammy Smart

John Couture Greg Spencer Fred Pomrenk Donna Lovberg Marjorie Brossart

FUNERAL SERVICES

LAWYER

Kimble Bradley

306-747-9073

P.A. Vision Centre OPTOMETRISTS

Keep Your Business In The Public Eye And A Quick Reference At Your Customer’s Finger Tips.

website: www.pavision.ca

Harry Groenen

Phone: 468-2853 Fax: 468-2252

Drs. Degelman, Miller, MacDonald & Fink

Madeleine 747-2442

Jake Verbonac

Residential, Commercial & Agricultural Wiring & Trenching

This Space Is Waiting For You

Prince Albert

WilcoxZuk-Chovin Law Office

Bronze cemetery plaques made at Mont Nebo, Sask.

Build our community: Buy locally manufactured

Don Moriarty Colette Kadziolka Louise Robert

LEASK 466-4811

E L E C T R I C

• Complete Autobody Repair • Lifetime Warranty • Auto Glass Repair • Paintless Dent Repair 492 South Industrial Dr. Prince Albert

Pre-Arrangements Available

CANWOOD 468-2227

747-7905 747-7905

ELECTRICIAN

For all your Grain Hauling needs.

WAITING FOR YOU

SHELLBROOK 747-2896

Sheldon Moe Contact: Sheldon Moe

Fax: 763-0410

phone (306) 764-6856 fax (306) 763-9540

OPTOMETRIST

email: office@taitinsurance.ca www.taitinsurance.ca

• Electrical Contracting • Residential • Commercial • Farm • Telephone & Data • Commercial Contracting Trench • Maintenance • Trenching •Services Contact

100A - 10th St. East Prince Albert, SK S6V 0Y7

FUNERAL SERVICES

Au.D., BCC - HIS

ELECTRICIAN

Debden, SK

469-4944

Dr. Jodi Haberstock,

PARTS Larry Adamko, Joe Clyke After Hours 960-1921 SERVICE Chris Lucyshyn After Hours 960-4916 SALES Brent Karr 232-7810

Rocky Road Trucking Ltd.

Contact Rocky Couture Cell (306)468-7872 or (306)724-2176

306-764-2727 1-888-858-2727

tmkasner@sasktel.net

Allan Autet

DELBERT M. DYNNA Law Office

Preferred areas of practice: Wills, Estates, Real Estate

Prince Albert, SK

Tyson Kasner

TRUCKING

Big River

RIVER PARK FUNERAL HOME

EAVESTROUGHING

LAWYER

747-2641 Shellbrook

Licensed Gas Fitter/ Journeyman Plumber New Construction & Renovations Furnace/Boiler/ Airconditioning Free Quotes 1-306-883-2350 Cell: 1-306-883-7467

MOBILE & SHOP

Spiritwood, SK. S0J 2M0

Greg Olson Ph: 747-2990 Cell: 747-8148 Parkside g-welding@hotmail.com

REAL ESTATE

YARD CARE

Barry West, Owner/Operator

Your Best Move! 922-1420

www.tbmason.com

Total Lot Care

• Snow Removal • Roto Tilling • Levelling • Material Hauling • Finish & Rough Cut Mowing

Trac Skid Steer Dump Trailer ~ Tractor Call Cal at

1-306-714-7222


THE CLASSIFIEDS Email your ad: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com

August 24, 2012

Phone 306-747-2442 Fax 306-747-3000 Email

chads@shellbrookchronicle.com P.O. Box 10, Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0 Advertising Deadline - Monday: 5:00 p.m.

Subscriptions $57.00 + $2.85 (GST) = $59.85/year

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Estate of Gertrude Gunn, late of Shellbrook in the province of Saskatchewan, retired, deceased. All claims against the above estate duly verified by statutory declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before August 31, 2012. Glenna Stene and Vernon Gunn, Executors PO Box 256 Spruce Home, SK S0J 2N0 2-34C NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Estate of Leo Joseph Beaulac, late of Canwood, in the Province of Saskatchewan, deceased. All claims against the above Estate duly verified by statutory declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before 31st day of August, 2012. Wilcox-Zuk-Chovin Law Office Barristers & SolicitorsBox 820 (52 Main Street) Shellbrook, Saskatchewan S0J 2E0 Solicitors for the Estate. 2-35C

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE FOR SALE - One used wood furnace. CSA approved. Taking offers. Phone 306-883-2962. 3-34CH FOR SALE - Rough lumber and timber in all dimensions and lengths, up to 20’ long. Log siding, tongue and grove; panelling and Birch fire wood. Check out our website at www. christiansenlumber. ca. Call 469-2490, Big River TFCH

TENDERS FOR TENDER The Morin Lake Regional Park Authority is inviting Sealed Tenders from interested parties for the purchase of playground equipment. Sealed tenders will be received by mail or at the Park Kiosk up to September 1, 2012. Purchaser will be responsible for the removal of equipment before the indicated completion date. Equipment may be viewed in person on online at Kijiji Prince Albert. Please indicate your purchase price and date of removal. STARTING DATE: September 6, 2012. COMPLETION DATE: September 15, 2012. The Authority reserves the right to reject any or all tenders. Morin Lake Regional Park, Box 503 Debden, SK S0J 0S0 Ph: (306) 724-4955 2-35C

AUTOS FOR SALE FOR SALE – 2001 Dodge Ram 1500, reasonably priced. Ph: 747-3555 2-35CH

REC. VEHICLES FOR SALE FOR SALE - 14' aluminum boat, no trailer. $600 7473343 2-35CH

MACHINERY FOR SALE FOR SALE - Stainless steel conveyor, 3 phase motor, 34' long; 38" JD tractor rims $100 each; 3 phase aeration fan. 883-3113 2-34CH

Advertising Deadline is Monday 5:00 p.m.

Shellbrook Chronicle

SWNA Blanket Classifieds

Reaching over 6 million people weekly.

Reaching over 10,000 people weekly. Cost for 25 words: Personal Classifieds: Saskatchewan market .........$209.00 One Zone ............................$86.00 $13.25 for 20 words + 20¢ additional Two Zone ..........................$123.00 words for the 1st week. Alberta market .......................$259.00 Additional weeks: $7.75/week + GST. Manitoba market ...................$179.00 Classified Display: BC market .............................$395.00 $17.50/column inch. Minimum 2 Ontario market ......................$429.00 column inches - $35.00 + GST. Central Ontario ..................$139.00 Eastern Ontario ..................$143.00 For All Other Advertising Northern Ontario ..................$82.00 Please Contact Our Office at: Quebec market Ph: 747-2442 or Fax: 747-3000 English ...............................$160.00 Email: news: French ................................$709.00 chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com Atlantic market ......................$159.00 advertising: Across Canada ..................$1,770.00 (excluding French) chads@shellbrookchronicle.com FOR SALE - NH 1090 Swather 21', new guard, knife, canvass in the last year; 21' U2 pickup reel. $3,500. 8832543 3-35CH FOR SALE - JD 1070 acreage tractor. 35 hp diesel, standard trans, turf tires, c/w 72” midmount mower, 6 ft 3pth blade and 7ft 3pth cultivator. $8,500. JD 7721 parts combine. $500. 468-2807 3-36CH FOR SALE – 7700 JD; 1460 Case IH; 860 MF running condition; 2 - 751 MF for parts 9842300 2-35CH

BINS FOR SALE FOR SALE - 1 Westeel #145 bin on steel hopper, single skid, capacity approx 1900 bu. $4,600 bu.; 3 - Westeel #146 bins on steel hopper, double skid, capacity approx. 2200 bu. each $5,200 each. Don Moe 747-7874 2-34CH

LIVESTOCK FOR SALE POPLAR RIDGE ANGUS OFFERING- Registered Purebred Black Angus yearling bulls. Quiet disposition - Easy calving – Semen tested & pasture ready. SHELLBROOK SK 306-747-3038 TFCH

Classifieds Work!

747-2442

WANTED WANTED - All kinds of feed grain, including heated canola. Now distributors of feed pellets with up to 36% protein. Marcel Seeds, Debden Ph: 306-724-4461 TFCH WANTED - Standing hay to cut and bale in Shellbrook/ Prince Albert area. Phone Glenn at 7473038/981-3653 TFCH

HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE – Farm house, Canwood RM (to be dismantled & salvaged) 34’x36’, 2x4 walls, includes newer 12’x34’ addition, 2x6 walls. Brown tin roof, white vinyl siding, 9 windows (various sizes) all in good condition. For more info 4682757 4-34CH FOR SALE - 3 bedroom mobile home and lot in Spiritwood. Fridge, stove, washer, dryer, fenced yard. $40,000 obo. 608 Memorial Drive East. Ph: 306-8837092 4-36CH HOUSE FOR SALE – 205 5th Ave. W, Shellbrook, 4 bedroom 2 full baths, finished basement, appliances included. Available Sept. 1/12. Ph: 747-3287 3-36CH FOR SALE – 2013 Park Model quality built 2x6 construction, w/housewrap for all season living,

2 bedroom, full size stainless steel appliances, dishwasher, washer, dryer, fully furnished, central heat/air, plus lots of options. 14'x45’ delivered to your lot for only $62,000 plus tax. Or order from over 40 floor plans of Homes, Cabins, Offices or Man Camps. For an appointment call Joyce 306-4682224 or cell 425348-8948. www. smartcottagelife.com Worth the drive! 2-35CH FOR SALE – 2 smaller renovated 2 bedroom houses for sale in Spiritwood. Ph: 1-306-883-2208 TFCH FOR SALE – 2012 Park Model Home, 1 bedroom w/optional den room divider. 13’x44’ fully furnished, central heat/ air. Bay Window, fireplace, full size appliances. $54,000 plus tax, delivered to your lot. For an appointment call Joyce 306-468-2224 4-37CH

FOR RENT HOUSE FOR RENT – in Shellbrook, 2 + bedrooms, 1 block to downtown, brand new stainless dishwasher, fridge, stove, newer w/d, unfinished basement. Large yard, garage, etc. Very clean. $650/month + utilities & deposit. Call Joyce 306-4682224 2-35CH Try the Classifieds

747-2442

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Shellbrook Motel now looking for Maintenance person/Grounds keeper. Ph: 7472631 TFC HELP WANTED - on grain/cattle farm, experience with farm machinery required; Class 1A and asset. Drivers abstract required, full and part time available. Ph: Mike 306-469-7741 6-35CH HELP WANTED – Spiritwood Stockyards is now accepting applications for the 2012/2013 season for cattle sorters & cattle penners. Experience with livestock preferred. These are part-time positions. Please contact: Brian Jacobsen @ 306-883-2168 4-34CH FULL TIME Ag Mechanic required. Experience necessary, benefits, Mon. - Fri., some overtime. Competitive wages, Contact tfisher@ martodammotors.com or phone 1-306-883-2045 2-34CH

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - WORK FROM YOUR CASTLE! Do you have 10 hrs a week? Teach over the internet. Free online training. Flexible hours. Great retire-

Shellbrook Chronicle

17

Career Ads

Reaching Over 600,000 People Weekly

Rates: $7.79 per agate line Size: 2 col. x 2” ...................$424.00 Deadline for Booking/Material Tuesdays at 12 Noon Contact the Shellbrook Chronicle 306-747-2442 or Email:

chads@shellbrookchronicle.com All prices plus applicable taxes.

NOTICE This newspaper accepts advertisements in good faith. We advise that it is in your interest to investigate offers personally. Publications by this paper should not be taken as an endorsement of the product or services offered.

ment income. www. key2wellness4all. com

SERVI CES OFFERING PIANO LESSONS in Shellbrook, starting Sept. 2012. For more info call Joy 466-2068 4-34C SERVICES – Bookkeeper with 10 years experience has openings for new clients. Reasonable rates. Ph: 468-3228 4-37CH

AUCTIONS AUCTIONS - ANTIQUE & COLLECTION AUCTION SALE August 25, 2012 @ 10:00AM 1410 Faulkner Cres. Saskatoon, SK. For information Contact 1-877-494-2437, 306-227-9505 www.bodnarusauctioneering.com

Buying? Selling? Classifieds Work!

747-2442

Great Family Home For Sale

3+1 bedroom 1,175 sq. ft. bungalow in Shellbrook. Open concept with vaulted ceiling in kitchen and living room. Close to schools in a great neighbourhood. Ask about garage incentive. $

239,000

Call 747-7545 for viewing

The Town of Shellbrook currently has an exciting opportunity for a permanent full-time Bookkeeper. If you are enthusiastic, enjoy a challenge and working with the public in a fast paced environment then we want you on our team. In this role, you will need to have the ability to multi-task & pay close attention to detail. Experience in processing A/P, A/R, payroll and bank reconciliations is required. A strong background in Microsoft Excel would be preferred. If you are the person we are looking for please submit your resume to the Town Office in person at 71 Main Street, or by mail: Box 40, Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0 email: shellbrook@sasktel.net fax: (306) 747-3111 Competition closes Friday, August 31st, 2012 @ 4pm


THE CLASSIFIEDS Email your ad: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com

August 24, 2012

Phone 306-747-2442 Fax 306-747-3000 Email

chads@shellbrookchronicle.com P.O. Box 10, Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0 Advertising Deadline - Monday: 5:00 p.m.

Subscriptions $57.00 + $2.85 (GST) = $59.85/year

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Estate of Gertrude Gunn, late of Shellbrook in the province of Saskatchewan, retired, deceased. All claims against the above estate duly verified by statutory declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before August 31, 2012. Glenna Stene and Vernon Gunn, Executors PO Box 256 Spruce Home, SK S0J 2N0 2-34C NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Estate of Leo Joseph Beaulac, late of Canwood, in the Province of Saskatchewan, deceased. All claims against the above Estate duly verified by statutory declaration and with particulars and valuation of security held, if any, must be sent to the undersigned before 31st day of August, 2012. Wilcox-Zuk-Chovin Law Office Barristers & SolicitorsBox 820 (52 Main Street) Shellbrook, Saskatchewan S0J 2E0 Solicitors for the Estate. 2-35C

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE FOR SALE - One used wood furnace. CSA approved. Taking offers. Phone 306-883-2962. 3-34CH FOR SALE - Rough lumber and timber in all dimensions and lengths, up to 20’ long. Log siding, tongue and grove; panelling and Birch fire wood. Check out our website at www. christiansenlumber. ca. Call 469-2490, Big River TFCH

TENDERS FOR TENDER The Morin Lake Regional Park Authority is inviting Sealed Tenders from interested parties for the purchase of playground equipment. Sealed tenders will be received by mail or at the Park Kiosk up to September 1, 2012. Purchaser will be responsible for the removal of equipment before the indicated completion date. Equipment may be viewed in person on online at Kijiji Prince Albert. Please indicate your purchase price and date of removal. STARTING DATE: September 6, 2012. COMPLETION DATE: September 15, 2012. The Authority reserves the right to reject any or all tenders. Morin Lake Regional Park, Box 503 Debden, SK S0J 0S0 Ph: (306) 724-4955 2-35C

AUTOS FOR SALE FOR SALE – 2001 Dodge Ram 1500, reasonably priced. Ph: 747-3555 2-35CH

REC. VEHICLES FOR SALE FOR SALE - 14' aluminum boat, no trailer. $600 7473343 2-35CH

MACHINERY FOR SALE FOR SALE - Stainless steel conveyor, 3 phase motor, 34' long; 38" JD tractor rims $100 each; 3 phase aeration fan. 883-3113 2-34CH

Advertising Deadline is Monday 5:00 p.m.

Shellbrook Chronicle

SWNA Blanket Classifieds

Reaching over 6 million people weekly.

Reaching over 10,000 people weekly. Cost for 25 words: Personal Classifieds: Saskatchewan market .........$209.00 One Zone ............................$86.00 $13.25 for 20 words + 20¢ additional Two Zone ..........................$123.00 words for the 1st week. Alberta market .......................$259.00 Additional weeks: $7.75/week + GST. Manitoba market ...................$179.00 Classified Display: BC market .............................$395.00 $17.50/column inch. Minimum 2 Ontario market ......................$429.00 column inches - $35.00 + GST. Central Ontario ..................$139.00 Eastern Ontario ..................$143.00 For All Other Advertising Northern Ontario ..................$82.00 Please Contact Our Office at: Quebec market Ph: 747-2442 or Fax: 747-3000 English ...............................$160.00 Email: news: French ................................$709.00 chnews@shellbrookchronicle.com Atlantic market ......................$159.00 advertising: Across Canada ..................$1,770.00 (excluding French) chads@shellbrookchronicle.com FOR SALE - NH 1090 Swather 21', new guard, knife, canvass in the last year; 21' U2 pickup reel. $3,500. 8832543 3-35CH FOR SALE - JD 1070 acreage tractor. 35 hp diesel, standard trans, turf tires, c/w 72” midmount mower, 6 ft 3pth blade and 7ft 3pth cultivator. $8,500. JD 7721 parts combine. $500. 468-2807 3-36CH FOR SALE – 7700 JD; 1460 Case IH; 860 MF running condition; 2 - 751 MF for parts 9842300 2-35CH

BINS FOR SALE FOR SALE - 1 Westeel #145 bin on steel hopper, single skid, capacity approx 1900 bu. $4,600 bu.; 3 - Westeel #146 bins on steel hopper, double skid, capacity approx. 2200 bu. each $5,200 each. Don Moe 747-7874 2-34CH

LIVESTOCK FOR SALE POPLAR RIDGE ANGUS OFFERING- Registered Purebred Black Angus yearling bulls. Quiet disposition - Easy calving – Semen tested & pasture ready. SHELLBROOK SK 306-747-3038 TFCH

Classifieds Work!

747-2442

WANTED WANTED - All kinds of feed grain, including heated canola. Now distributors of feed pellets with up to 36% protein. Marcel Seeds, Debden Ph: 306-724-4461 TFCH WANTED - Standing hay to cut and bale in Shellbrook/ Prince Albert area. Phone Glenn at 7473038/981-3653 TFCH

HOMES FOR SALE FOR SALE – Farm house, Canwood RM (to be dismantled & salvaged) 34’x36’, 2x4 walls, includes newer 12’x34’ addition, 2x6 walls. Brown tin roof, white vinyl siding, 9 windows (various sizes) all in good condition. For more info 4682757 4-34CH FOR SALE - 3 bedroom mobile home and lot in Spiritwood. Fridge, stove, washer, dryer, fenced yard. $40,000 obo. 608 Memorial Drive East. Ph: 306-8837092 4-36CH HOUSE FOR SALE – 205 5th Ave. W, Shellbrook, 4 bedroom 2 full baths, finished basement, appliances included. Available Sept. 1/12. Ph: 747-3287 3-36CH FOR SALE – 2013 Park Model quality built 2x6 construction, w/housewrap for all season living,

2 bedroom, full size stainless steel appliances, dishwasher, washer, dryer, fully furnished, central heat/air, plus lots of options. 14'x45’ delivered to your lot for only $62,000 plus tax. Or order from over 40 floor plans of Homes, Cabins, Offices or Man Camps. For an appointment call Joyce 306-4682224 or cell 425348-8948. www. smartcottagelife.com Worth the drive! 2-35CH FOR SALE – 2 smaller renovated 2 bedroom houses for sale in Spiritwood. Ph: 1-306-883-2208 TFCH FOR SALE – 2012 Park Model Home, 1 bedroom w/optional den room divider. 13’x44’ fully furnished, central heat/ air. Bay Window, fireplace, full size appliances. $54,000 plus tax, delivered to your lot. For an appointment call Joyce 306-468-2224 4-37CH

FOR RENT HOUSE FOR RENT – in Shellbrook, 2 + bedrooms, 1 block to downtown, brand new stainless dishwasher, fridge, stove, newer w/d, unfinished basement. Large yard, garage, etc. Very clean. $650/month + utilities & deposit. Call Joyce 306-4682224 2-35CH Try the Classifieds

747-2442

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED Shellbrook Motel now looking for Maintenance person/Grounds keeper. Ph: 7472631 TFC HELP WANTED - on grain/cattle farm, experience with farm machinery required; Class 1A and asset. Drivers abstract required, full and part time available. Ph: Mike 306-469-7741 6-35CH HELP WANTED – Spiritwood Stockyards is now accepting applications for the 2012/2013 season for cattle sorters & cattle penners. Experience with livestock preferred. These are part-time positions. Please contact: Brian Jacobsen @ 306-883-2168 4-34CH FULL TIME Ag Mechanic required. Experience necessary, benefits, Mon. - Fri., some overtime. Competitive wages, Contact tfisher@ martodammotors.com or phone 1-306-883-2045 2-34CH

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - WORK FROM YOUR CASTLE! Do you have 10 hrs a week? Teach over the internet. Free online training. Flexible hours. Great retire-

Shellbrook Chronicle

17

Career Ads

Reaching Over 600,000 People Weekly

Rates: $7.79 per agate line Size: 2 col. x 2” ...................$424.00 Deadline for Booking/Material Tuesdays at 12 Noon Contact the Shellbrook Chronicle 306-747-2442 or Email:

chads@shellbrookchronicle.com All prices plus applicable taxes.

NOTICE This newspaper accepts advertisements in good faith. We advise that it is in your interest to investigate offers personally. Publications by this paper should not be taken as an endorsement of the product or services offered.

ment income. www. key2wellness4all. com

SERVI CES OFFERING PIANO LESSONS in Shellbrook, starting Sept. 2012. For more info call Joy 466-2068 4-34C SERVICES – Bookkeeper with 10 years experience has openings for new clients. Reasonable rates. Ph: 468-3228 4-37CH

AUCTIONS AUCTIONS - ANTIQUE & COLLECTION AUCTION SALE August 25, 2012 @ 10:00AM 1410 Faulkner Cres. Saskatoon, SK. For information Contact 1-877-494-2437, 306-227-9505 www.bodnarusauctioneering.com

Buying? Selling? Classifieds Work!

747-2442

Great Family Home For Sale

3+1 bedroom 1,175 sq. ft. bungalow in Shellbrook. Open concept with vaulted ceiling in kitchen and living room. Close to schools in a great neighbourhood. Ask about garage incentive. $

239,000

Call 747-7545 for viewing

The Town of Shellbrook currently has an exciting opportunity for a permanent full-time Bookkeeper. If you are enthusiastic, enjoy a challenge and working with the public in a fast paced environment then we want you on our team. In this role, you will need to have the ability to multi-task & pay close attention to detail. Experience in processing A/P, A/R, payroll and bank reconciliations is required. A strong background in Microsoft Excel would be preferred. If you are the person we are looking for please submit your resume to the Town Office in person at 71 Main Street, or by mail: Box 40, Shellbrook, SK S0J 2E0 email: shellbrook@sasktel.net fax: (306) 747-3111 Competition closes Friday, August 31st, 2012 @ 4pm


18

Shellbrook Chronicle CARD OF THANKS

Walter Willoughby Horticultural Society wishes to thank all exhibitors, sponsors, judges and visitors for helping make our 51st annual show held on Thurs., August 16th in Leask such a success. ! We wish to say a sincere thank you to everyone who came to the farm to take part in the celebration of our Sixtieth Wedding Anniversary on August 11th; for all the good wishes, the many beautiful cards, flowers, gifts and food; and to the musicians whose music always livens things up and adds a special touch. Thanks too, to our family who worked so hard to get it all

THE CLASSIFIEDS

organized. What a wonderful time of renewing friendships and catching up on relationships. We will have happy memories of the day for a very long time. Thank you all for your presence. - Earl & Ellen Weber. Card of Thanks from the Dicus Family We would like to express our deepest appreciation to everyone who showed their kindness, caring, and thoughtfulness through Dad’s (Bud’s) hospital stay and recent passing. All the visits and phone calls, all the food, flowers, cards, emails and hugs were a blessing. The care Dad received in the St. Paul’s Hospital was above and beyond the call of duty and

Email your ad: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com

Dad was very grateful for the many visits from family and friends. Dad’s Celebration of Life was very special and we would like to thank the many people who helped make it that way: good friend and Pastor, David Jensen, for the beautiful service, the Happy Wanderers for the wonderful music and singing, the Partners in Worship Women for the lovely lunch, the Royal Canadian Legion for their service and the Beau ‘Lac’ Funeral Home for all the arrangements. We would also like to thank granddaughters, Jennifer Dumais and Michelle Compagna for the readings and Estelle Dicus and Paul Watier for the eulogy. Dad (Bud) had a

long and happy life; thanks to everyone who was a part of it. - Gratefully, Flo, Merl, Penny, Trudy, Lorne, Scott and families.

MEMORIAMS EARBY - Cliff, 1895 - 1983; Dorothy, 1911 - 2011. Though your smile is gone forever And your hand we cannot touch Still we have so many memories Of the ones we loved so much Your memory is our keepsake With which we'll never part We have you in our hearts. We can still hear your laughter and see your smiles. - Edith, Henry, Edwin Earby and families.

August 24, 2012

Looking For Employees? Try swna blanket classifieds and advertise across Saskatchewan?

83% of people surveyed read the last issue of their community newspaper. blanket classifieds delivers an exclusive audience! For More Information Call 747-2442

Frustrated? No room in the garage for your car? Placing a classified ad is easy and affordable! Clean out the clutter by advertising your unwanted items for hundreds of potential buyers.

What are you waiting for? Call us today and start turning the stuff you don’t want into CASH!

Get Things Moving! Shellbrook Chronicle 747-2442 ~ chads@shellbrookchronicle.com

Limited Access for Shellbrook Hospital Emergency Department Due to the difficulty in recruiting doctors, there is a temporary reduction in services at the Shellbrook Hospital. The next closest hospital with 24-hour Emergency Care is the Victoria Hospital in Prince Albert. Emergency services at the out-patient department are only available in Shellbrook on weekends [Friday from 6 p.m. until the following Monday morning at 8 a.m.] Ambulance services are available 24 hours a day. On weekdays, the ambulance will go to the Victoria Hospital in Prince Albert from Sunday at midnight to Friday at 6 p.m. The Ambulance will not stop in Shellbrook at these times. Care for new patients who need to be admitted to the hospital for acute illnesses are not available NON-EMERGENCY SERVICES Two medical clinics in Shellbrook, across the street from the Shellbrook Hospital, provide primary health care for NON-EMERGENCY MEDICAL CONDITIONS. You can call one of the medical clinics at 306-747-2171 or 306-747-2552 for an appointment. Hours of operation for the clinic and the hospital laboratory are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays excluding statutory holidays. Walk-in clinics are also available in Prince Albert, with no appointment necessary: Prince Albert Walk-In Medical Clinic, 800 15th Street East, Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Saturday. 9 a.m.- 9 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.- 9 p.m. South Hill Minor Emergency Clinic, 2685 2nd Ave. West, Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Friday 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.- 10 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.- 8 p.m. Super Med Walk-In Clinic, 591 15th Street East, Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Friday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sunday and Statutory Holiday 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Victoria Square Medical Centre, 2345 10th Ave. West Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Friday 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. West Hill Medical Clinic , South Hill Mall, 2nd Avenue West, Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Friday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. – 10 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. WHEN YOU ARE UNCERTAIN You may call Saskatchewan HealthLine for medical advice 24-hours a day, 7 days a week. The HealthLine number is 1-877-800-0002. They can provide you with immediate, professional health advice or information, and direct you to the most appropriate source of care. HealthLine will help you decide whether you should treat your own symptoms, go to a clinic, wait to see your doctor, or go to a hospital emergency room. HealthLine is also available online at www.health.gov.sk.ca/healthline


18

Shellbrook Chronicle CARD OF THANKS

Walter Willoughby Horticultural Society wishes to thank all exhibitors, sponsors, judges and visitors for helping make our 51st annual show held on Thurs., August 16th in Leask such a success. ! We wish to say a sincere thank you to everyone who came to the farm to take part in the celebration of our Sixtieth Wedding Anniversary on August 11th; for all the good wishes, the many beautiful cards, flowers, gifts and food; and to the musicians whose music always livens things up and adds a special touch. Thanks too, to our family who worked so hard to get it all

THE CLASSIFIEDS

organized. What a wonderful time of renewing friendships and catching up on relationships. We will have happy memories of the day for a very long time. Thank you all for your presence. - Earl & Ellen Weber. Card of Thanks from the Dicus Family We would like to express our deepest appreciation to everyone who showed their kindness, caring, and thoughtfulness through Dad’s (Bud’s) hospital stay and recent passing. All the visits and phone calls, all the food, flowers, cards, emails and hugs were a blessing. The care Dad received in the St. Paul’s Hospital was above and beyond the call of duty and

Email your ad: chads@shellbrookchronicle.com

Dad was very grateful for the many visits from family and friends. Dad’s Celebration of Life was very special and we would like to thank the many people who helped make it that way: good friend and Pastor, David Jensen, for the beautiful service, the Happy Wanderers for the wonderful music and singing, the Partners in Worship Women for the lovely lunch, the Royal Canadian Legion for their service and the Beau ‘Lac’ Funeral Home for all the arrangements. We would also like to thank granddaughters, Jennifer Dumais and Michelle Compagna for the readings and Estelle Dicus and Paul Watier for the eulogy. Dad (Bud) had a

long and happy life; thanks to everyone who was a part of it. - Gratefully, Flo, Merl, Penny, Trudy, Lorne, Scott and families.

MEMORIAMS EARBY - Cliff, 1895 - 1983; Dorothy, 1911 - 2011. Though your smile is gone forever And your hand we cannot touch Still we have so many memories Of the ones we loved so much Your memory is our keepsake With which we'll never part We have you in our hearts. We can still hear your laughter and see your smiles. - Edith, Henry, Edwin Earby and families.

August 24, 2012

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Limited Access for Shellbrook Hospital Emergency Department Due to the difficulty in recruiting doctors, there is a temporary reduction in services at the Shellbrook Hospital. The next closest hospital with 24-hour Emergency Care is the Victoria Hospital in Prince Albert. Emergency services at the out-patient department are only available in Shellbrook on weekends [Friday from 6 p.m. until the following Monday morning at 8 a.m.] Ambulance services are available 24 hours a day. On weekdays, the ambulance will go to the Victoria Hospital in Prince Albert from Sunday at midnight to Friday at 6 p.m. The Ambulance will not stop in Shellbrook at these times. Care for new patients who need to be admitted to the hospital for acute illnesses are not available NON-EMERGENCY SERVICES Two medical clinics in Shellbrook, across the street from the Shellbrook Hospital, provide primary health care for NON-EMERGENCY MEDICAL CONDITIONS. You can call one of the medical clinics at 306-747-2171 or 306-747-2552 for an appointment. Hours of operation for the clinic and the hospital laboratory are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays excluding statutory holidays. Walk-in clinics are also available in Prince Albert, with no appointment necessary: Prince Albert Walk-In Medical Clinic, 800 15th Street East, Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Saturday. 9 a.m.- 9 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.- 9 p.m. South Hill Minor Emergency Clinic, 2685 2nd Ave. West, Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Friday 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m.- 10 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.- 8 p.m. Super Med Walk-In Clinic, 591 15th Street East, Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Friday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sunday and Statutory Holiday 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Victoria Square Medical Centre, 2345 10th Ave. West Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Friday 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. West Hill Medical Clinic , South Hill Mall, 2nd Avenue West, Prince Albert Hours: Monday to Friday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. – 10 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. WHEN YOU ARE UNCERTAIN You may call Saskatchewan HealthLine for medical advice 24-hours a day, 7 days a week. The HealthLine number is 1-877-800-0002. They can provide you with immediate, professional health advice or information, and direct you to the most appropriate source of care. HealthLine will help you decide whether you should treat your own symptoms, go to a clinic, wait to see your doctor, or go to a hospital emergency room. HealthLine is also available online at www.health.gov.sk.ca/healthline


August 24, 2012

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY A&B Pipeliners is immediately recruiting for a large pipeline construction project in the Bengough, SK area: Foremen, Lead Hands, Labourers, HE Operators, Journeymen Welders and Pipefitters. Visit http://www.abpipelin ers.com for more information. Send resumes to: Fax 780.384.2402 email hr@abpipeliners.com.

ALBERTA BASED COMPANY looking for qualified & experienced: Equipment Operators, Mulcher, Feller Buncher & Processor Operators. Out of town & camp work. Safety tickets & drivers abstract required. Email resume: jobs@commandequip ment.com. Fax 780488-3002.

Now Hiring: Skilled Tradespersons with industrial construction experience for an industrial site near Vanscoy, SK. • Journeymen & Apprentice Concrete Finishers • Journeymen & Apprentice Scaffolders • Skilled Labourers All wages depend on experience. We offer a $2.00/hour retention bonus & $2.00/hour completion bonus (Total $4.00/hour). Living out allowance is provided to those that qualify. We are also looking to fill night shift positions with an extra premium of $3.00 hour. Monad has excellent benefits, pension plan & RRSPs. The successful candidate must have current safety certifications including CSTS 09, H2S Alive & complete a pre-access D&A test. Apply with resume In person: 9744 - 45th Ave Edmonton AB T6E 5C5 or by fax: 1-888-398-0725 or email: jobs@monad.ca Attn: Monad Recruitment Team.

www.shellbrookchronicle.com

BUSY WELDING SHOP located in Brooks, Alberta looking for fulltime Welders. Call 403-362-7311; 403362-1870 cell or fax resume to 403-3627611. Dave’s Electric Ltd. Meadow Lake, Sk. Full time journeyman or 4th year apprentice. We do residential, commerial, industrial. Apply by: Email daves.elec@ sasktel.net or Fax 1-306-236-2390 TH Vac Services, Kindersley SK is now hiring Vac Truck drivers and HydroVac/Combo Vac Truck Drivers. Class 3A or 1A drivers license required. Competitive wages, benefits package, scheduled days off. Tickets an asset. Email resume to thvacs@ sasktel.net or fax 306463-3219. Call Don or Tim @ 306-463-7720. The Town of Rosetown is seeking an experienced business professional to fill the newly-created position of Community and Business Development Manager. Reporting to the Town Administrator, the Community and Business Development Manager plans, organizes, directs, controls and evaluates the business plan and operating resources necessary to implement and evaluate the multi-year strategic plan, as it relates to Community and Business Development, approved by Town Council. A complete job description is available upon request. Salary will be commensurate with education and experience. A comprehensive benefit plan and pension plan is available. Candidates should submit a cover letter, resume, salary expectations and three (3) references to: Steven Piermantier, B.Comm, RMA, Town Administrator, Box 398, Rosetown, SK S0L 2V0. E-mail: adminis trator.rosetown@sask tel.net Application deadline: Friday, August 31, 2012.

TITAN TRANSPORT LTD. We are a Premiere International specialized deck Carrier that urgently requires additional FLAT DECK OWNER/OPERATORS (minimun 2 years experience)

as well as COMPANY DRIVERS to handle our major growth. If you are a career minded professional seeking a secure future with above average earnings contact Robert at 1-800-667-7080 or fax your resume and abstract to 1-306-374-1751.

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AUTOMOTIVE Guaranteed approval drive away today! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1-877-796-0514. www.yourapproved online.com.

CAREER TRAINING

COMING EVENTS FOR INTEREST or career opportunities, take an online eight-week Renewable Energy and Conservation course from Lakeland College. September 4 - Basic Energy Principles; Energy and the Environment. October 29 - Introduction to Wind Power; Energy Audits and Conservation Practices; www.lakelandcollege.ca. 1-800-661-6490.

FEED AND SEED Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @ www.westerncommodities.ca

& provide us with your e-mail address to receive our weekly e-mail, with pricing indications and market trends. HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252 GRAIN BAG ZIPPER™ USED WITH POLYFASTENER™ NEW SOLUTION FOR GRAIN BAGGERS - PERFECT WAY TO SEAL YOUR GRAIN BAGS - 100% WATERTIGHT - ONE PERSON, ONE PASS - EASY TO OPEN AND RE-USE - ALL WEATHER, ALL TERRAIN 1-800-538-0008 www.grainbagzipper.com

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FOR SALE PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS. Reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call this newspaper NOW or 306649.1405 for details.

Shellbrook Chronicle

LABOUR DAY CLASSIC SIDELINE TICKETS Sunday, September 2nd Includes a post game BBQ on Willow Island on Wascana Lake Hotel packages also avaiable These tickets are held for Rider fans in Rural Saskatchewan only Go to www.dashtours.com or call Dash Tours and Tickets at 1-800-265-0000 One Call & You’re There.

LOST & FOUND LOST 4KM South of Kindersley. “Bear” Bernese Mountain Dog. 7 Months Old, Weighs Approx 60 lbs. Missing Since August 7th, 2012. $2,000 Reward 306-463-8532 306463-3118.

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My wife and I recently made the decision to sell our 5 quarters of farmland between Semans and Nokomis, Saskatchewan and we were very pleased with the service that was given to us by Doug Rue. His agricultural background and his business acumen made him the perfect fit for us in terms of completing a “worry-free” transaction. The process was swift and easy and we were more than pleased with the price we received for the land. I particularly enjoyed my conversations with Doug and his attention to detail with respect to following up with us.

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GET PAID TO LOSE WEIGHT. $5,000 For Your Success Story. Personal Image TV Show. Call to Qualify: 1.888.771.7607 AVA@mertontv.ca. www.mertontv.ca. Go to www.angus campbellcentre.ca for information on Saskatchewan’s premier fee for service alcohol & drug treatment and detox centre. Choose 7 to 42 days to start your recovery. Call now!

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Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Saskatchewan Weekly Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’ s Blanket Advertising Conditions on our website at www.swna.com.

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19

STEEL BUILDING HUGE CLEARANCE SALE! 20X24 $4,658. 25X28 $5,295. 30X40 $7,790. 32X54 $10,600. 40X58 $14,895. 47X78 $19,838. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca.

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INSIDE EACH ISSUE Place Yours!


20

Shellbrook Chronicle

www.shellbrookchronicle.com

12084MC00

August 24, 2012


AUGUST, 2012

A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO

Shellbrook Chronicle Spiritwood Herald

Back to School, back to AVINGS

Technology As a Learning Tool

$

The many reasons to support technology in the classroom

Financing Your Future

on e v a s o t w o H l back-to-schoo supplies

Financial considerations for adults mulling a return to school

Buying a used car After Care options for families

Go Online to view this section!

www.shellbrookchronicle.com


2

school year

ALLEVIATING FIRST-DAY-OFSCHOOL JITTERS A childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first day of school is a momentous occasion, one that parents and children alike will never forget. For parents, the day might stir memories of their own first day of school all those years ago. For youngsters, the excitement of the first day of school might be accompanied by a little anxiety, as kids donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to expect. Anxiety may decrease as kids grow more acclimated to their school and their classmates, but that first day can be difficult for some youngsters. Here are a few steps parents can take to prepare their children for school.

Discuss the schedule with your child. Having a schedule can be a difficult adjustment for youngsters, especially those who have never attended preschool or another structured program. To help kids handle this adjustment, discuss the schedule with your children ahead of time, explaining when school begins and ends each day and how activities are likely to be scheduled during the school day. In the weeks leading up to the first day of school, help kids get in the swing of things by waking them up earlier and scheduling some activities so kids can get used to a more structured environment.

There are many ways parents can help nervous youngsters get over the first day of school jitters.


school year

HOW TO RECOGNIZE IF YOUR CHILD HAS A VISION PROBLEM

Parents want their kids to be as healthy as possible. Whether tailoring kids’ diets to include healthier foods or encouraging their youngsters to be physically active, parents often go the extra mile with regards to the health of their children. But as hard as parents may try, some health-related issues are difficult to avoid or prevent. For example, even the most conscientious parents might have little influence over their children’s vision. Many children have a form of myopia, commonly known as nearsightedness, which progressively worsens as

kids get older but eventually stabilizes when their eyes have stopped growing, typically in a young adult’s early 20s. Myopia is common and treatable, but parents should still educate themselves about it so they can better respond should they suspect their child is suffering from nearsightedness. What causes myopia? When a person has myopia, light entering his or her eye is focused incorrectly. Nearsighted people usually have an eyeball that is slightly longer than normal from front to back, and the light rays that make up the

images a nearsighted person sees focus in front of the retina instead of directly on it. The result is that objects that are far away appear blurry. Are there indicators that a child is nearsighted? Kids likely won’t tell their parents that they are struggling to see distant objects clearly, so it’s important for parents to look for indicators that a child might be struggling with myopia. Kids who are nearsighted might squint to see objects that are far away, including the television. One of the telltale indicators is how a child behaves in the classroom. Children who tell their teacher they need to move closer to the chalkboard should be taken to the eye doctor. Parents who suspect their child might be nearsighted can talk to their child’s teacher and ask if the teacher feels the child might be struggling with his or her vision. Such struggles can affect how a child performs in school. Children who get frequent headaches might also be suffering from nearsightedness. Doctors recommend that kids have their eyes examined at six months, three years of age and prior to entering the first grade. But even if kids have passed previous eye examinations at each of those benchmarks, it’s best to take them for another exam the moment a vision problem is suspected. Is myopia preventable? Since it is often inherited, myopia is not preventable. However, treatment can significantly minimize its effects. Children who appear to be struggling to see distant objects clearly should be taken for an eye exam. That

exam may include an eye pressure measurement; a refraction test, which is used to determine a correct prescription for eyeglasses; a retinal examination and a visual acuity test, which measures sharpness of vision at close and far distances. When a child is diagnosed as being nearsighted, the doctor will likely prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses. LASIK surgery can correct vision, but many surgeons are reticent to recommend such surgery until a patient’s eye has fully developed, which does not occur until after childhood. Are there other symptoms of childhood vision problems? There are additional symptoms of childhood vision problems that might not indicate nearsightedness, but might indicate another problem that should result in a trip to the eye doctor. For example, a child might close one eye when watching television or reading. This could be indicative that vision in one eye is poorer than the other. Young children who struggle to color within the lines might have an issue with their hand-eye coordination. Poor hand-

eye coordination could be the result of a vision impairment. Children who tilt their head to one side to improve vision might be suffering from a vision problem that makes it difficult for them to look directly down.

3

Vision problems can negatively affect how a child performs in school as well as in social situations. Though such vision problems are not always preventable, parents who can identify them can greatly minimize their effects.


4

school year

HOMEWORK HELP MAY FORCE PARENTS

TO REFRESH SCHOOL SKILLS

In a 2010 Encyclopedia Britannica survey, researchers tested 500 British parents who had children under the age of 16 at the time. The parents took a quiz based on lessons studied for General Certificate of Secondary Education, or GCSE, exams. The survey found that mothers struggled, answering 12.3 percent of questions correctly, while fathers (27.8 percent) did not fare much better. Many North American parents struggle to help their students with homework as well. Immigrant parents have the most difficulty, likely due to language barriers. In addition, immigrant parents were

likely schooled in different education systems in another part of the world, making homework assignments seem foreign even for those parents who speak English well. Parents who understand the homework may be confusing their children by assisting them in a manner that is inconsistent with the way the students are now being taught. So what is a parent to do? Some school districts are aware of the problem and provide solutions. Jill I., a parent in New York, says that her son’s school sends home a parental instruction book that explains the basics behind subject matter and illustrates how to explain it to children. Other

parents are left floundering to figure out the best way to be of assistance to their kids. These are some of the steps they can take. Contact the teacher and find out if you can purchase or borrow a copy of the teacher’s edition of the textbook. This way you can keep abreast of the lessons and instruct in the same way that the lessons are being taught in school. If a book is not available, find out if instructional materials can be assembled to assist you in mastering the concepts. Log online to search for the subject matter and refresh your memory. Many teachers or experts volunteer information

Homework time often becomes a family affair. Many parents are finding they need to brush up on basic skills to offer adequate assistance. online to help educate students (and parents) about math, science, reading, and other subjects. Parents looking to double-check their math and science work can use a Web site like Wolfram Alpha, which is a computational knowledge engine. Hire a tutor if you find you’re doing more harm than good when assisting with homework. If lack of personal knowledge about the homework or simple frustration over your child’s inability to grasp the lessons is making homework time unbearable, and ending in a shouting match, consider the use of a tutor. Students a few years older than your child might be able to help with homework because it is more fresh in their minds. Plus, your child may feel less pressure when learning from a peer or older sibling. The “MetLife Survey of the American Teacher: The Homework Experience,” a 2007 survey which polled teachers, students and parents, found that almost everyone believed in the value of homework. Homework was viewed

as an essential part of student learning. Because it is an integral part of a child’s learning experience,

it behooves parents to find ways to assist with homework questions, no matter the method.


school year

ADULTS

RETURNING TO SCHOOL TO ADVANCE CAREERS What do you do if the economy has stalled your career prospects or left you looking for a new job? Many adults are choosing to go back to school. Thousands of laid-off workers or those who are stuck in careers that may not have been their first choice find that the path to new opportunities runs through a classroom. Many adults have traded in their time cards for textbooks. Or they’re spending evenings and weekends taking courses after-hours. Community colleges and some vocational schools are finding the recession has been good for enrollment. Schools are expanding or just developing online degree options, which enable adults to take classes on their own time. Online schooling is an attractive alternative because of flexible schedules and no commute times. Decide on what you want to study. Some adults are going back to school to further develop their skills in a particular career field. Others are returning to learn entirely new things in preparation for a new job. Have your major clearly defined so you can immediately get started with schooling. Choose the college or university. There are schools all over the country and the world. Community colleges are less expensive than private schools, and some offer comparable educations. When going back to school, the prestige of the learning institution may not be as important the second time around. Many adults look for schools with online courses so they can continue to

work. These will be factors in deciding where to go. Apply for financial aid. Adults returning to school are just as entitled to apply for financial aid as new students right out of high school. Federal funding and grants, as well as private scholarships, may be available to help pay for your education — especially if you’re experiencing financial hardship at the time. Start out slowly. Do not take too many classes at once if you already have a busy schedule. You want to ensure you’ll have time to study and do your homework. Once you can gauge how much time the average class requires of you, you can increase the number of courses accordingly. Be patient. Although many adults are returning to school, it may be expected that you will be outnumbered in the classroom by younger students. Some adults feel awkward in these situations, while others embrace the opportunity for new experiences and chances to impart their own knowledge on younger classmates. It may take time to find your groove once more. There are several reasons adults are returning to school. The process has become easier now that the economy has made furthering your education almost a necessity.

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school year

6

FINDING THE PERFECT USED CAR FOR STUDENTS

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For All Your Ford Authorized Repair & Maintenance

The new school year means new classes, new friends and, for many students, a new commute. Most students have to hit the road before they can hit the books, so finding a reliable car on a student budget is the semester’s first lesson. Whether you’re a student heading to your first new home-away-from-home, or looking for a cool but reliable way to get to class, there’s still time to find the perfect used vehicle. Here are some practical, simple tips to help you find the perfect car on a budget, as well as a list of the most reliable used cars under $10,000: • Always ask the seller for the Used Vehicle Information Package (UVIP) and request a copy of the vehicle’s CarProof Vehicle History Report. • Have a professional inspection done by a licensed technician. This can help avoid unanticipated problems and expenses later on. • Arrange the test drive when the engine is completely cold to get a better idea of how the car starts, regardless of how long it’s been parked. • Count the miles and the time. Vehicles today are built to last longer than vehicles built decades ago. You may need to consider some maintenance when a vehicle has accumulated over 100,000 kilometres. Kijiji Canada’s Top Five Back to School Cars for Under $10,000: • 2005 or 2006 Honda Civic: Sporty, fun, and reliable, this has been a top seller in Canada for over the past 10 years, so there are lots to choose from. • 2005 or 2006 Mazda3: A great alternative to the Civic, but a bit more stylish. • 2007 or 2008 Hyundai Elantra: A few years newer than most of the other models on the list, the Elantra is a reliable, comfortable, and predictable car. • 2004 Ford Mustang (V6): More attitude and character than most cars at this price point. • 2007 or 2008 Pontiac Vibe: While GM retired the Pontiac brand, the Vibe is a still a versatile hatchback with lots of space.

Scott Neil is the head of vertical business at Kijiji Canada. He is responsible for the strategy, operations and development of vertical

businesses at the company, including Canada’s most visited car site, Kijiji Autos, www.newscanada.com

DID YOU KNOW?

Those who take out loans as a means to pay their way may want to consider college majors that may better prepare them to find jobs in well-paying fields and offset the cost of those loans. According to salary data site PayScale, engineering majors are the majors to consider if salary is a priority. • Petroleum engineering: Starting pay, $91,000; median pay, $155,000 • Chemical engineering: $64,500; $109,000. • Electrical engineering: $61,300; $103,000 • Aerospace engineering: $60,700; $102,000 • Computer engineering: $61,800; $101,000 • Physics: $49,000; $101,000 • Applied mathematics: $52,600; $98,600 • Computer science: $56,600; $97,900 • Nuclear engineering: $65,000; $97,800

Wishing all Students & Parents a Safe & Enjoyable School Year!


school year

BUY SCHOOL SUPPLIES IN BULK AND SAVE

It’s the time of year to stock up on pencils, scissors and other school supplies. Purchase in bulk could save you money.

The back-to-school season is fast approaching. This is a time of school bus traffic on the roads, anxious parents snapping first-day-of-school photos, and children will meeting their new classmates and forging new friendships. This time of the year is also one when parents and students must shop for school supplies. Tradition dictates that families will flock to stores after dismissal and shop for folders, binders, pens and protractors. Caught up in the moment, many shoppers choose convenience over low prices on school supplies. Parents could end up at the check-out line with a considerable bill to pay, particularly if they are shopping for multiple students. Buying items in bulk — and sharing the cost — may be a more affordable option. Although it can be easy to procrastinate and wait until school starts to buy supplies, it might be prudent to shop before the new school year begins. Many teachers, in an attempt to help parents save money, publish school-supply lists online in advance of the

school year. Most teachers do not vary their requirements from year to year, so if your son or daughter has been assigned a teacher, ask around among last year’s students to see what that teacher requires. This way you can head to the store or comparison shop online at your convenience. Some supplies are standard regardless of class assignment. These include pens and/ or pencils, folders, spiral notebooks, copy paper, looseleaf paper, erasers, crayons, markers, and highlighters. Purchased individually, the per-unit cost of each item may be higher than purchasing these items in bulk. This is when the advantage of buying in bulk shines through. Here are some helpful hints for parents about to shop for school supplies. • Shop for frequently used items in bulk, whether from online wholesalers or through a warehouse store for which you are a member. • Collaborate with a few different school parents to chip in for school supplies. Then one parent does the shopping and splits the

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supplies with the others. • Keep a stockpile of supplies at home. They do not expire, and next year you may not have to shop at all. • Having extra supplies on hand enables duplicate sets for at home and in school for consistency. • Some parents like to buy many supplies and then donate some for underprivileged children. This time of year manufacturers or retailers could actually donate a portion of school-supply proceeds to some educational organizations. • Buying larger quantities of supplies could enable you to build up rewards points at certain retailers. This may entitle you to future coupons or dollar awards that can be put toward more expensive items, including tablets or graphing calculators. • Contact the teacher and see if you can volunteer to buy all of the supplies in bulk for the entire class, with each student then paying the required amount. This will save many families time and effort.


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NSERC funds new U of S training program A new University of Sas-

katchewan training program that will produce future leaders in food safety, infectious disease control and public policy has been awarded $1.65 million over six years through the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council’s Collaborative Research and Training Experience (CREATE) program. “This unique, forwardthinking program is the ideal fit for the U of S. We can link our infrastructure with our intellectual resources in one of our signature areas and put them to work directly for the benefit of people and animals around the world,” ” said U of S Vice-President of Research Karen Chad. The signature research area of “One Health” targets health solutions at the human-animalenvironment interface. The U of S will top up the NSERC contribution with $2.76 million in matching funds to create the integrated training program in infectious disease, food safety and public policy. Over the next six years, it will prepare more than 55 graduates for diverse careers in government, industry and academia. The initiative specifically targets the private and public sectors’ urgent need for highly qualified professionals to manage complex public health threats such as emerging zoonotic diseases

(transmissible between animals and humans) and food-borne illnesses. “When we consulted members of industry and government, they identified the need for people who are trained in infectious disease, microbiology or immunology but also have a clear understanding of food safety and public policy,” said Baljit Singh, project leader and associate dean of research at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) at the U of S. The program will be aimed at undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from Canada and abroad. The program’s development team includes experts in epidemiology, infectious disease, vaccine development, immunology, microbiology, public health and public policy. Many will also serve as mentors for the program’s students. “Through this program, we will use integrated, experiential learning to train students in multiple disciplines so they can use their diverse knowledge to be creative in solving public health and food safety issues,” Singh said. “We’ll also develop a new set of courses that encourage students to think more globally when they tackle their own research projects.” Besides the WCVM, the program involves representatives from the U of S College of Medicine, School of

Public Health, the JohnsonShoyama School of Public Policy, the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s National Centre for Foreign Animal Disease. Other public sector agencies and industrial partners will contribute to the program through work experiences and research collaborations. The U of S is also collaborating with the Free University of Berlin in Germany and the Guru Angad Dev Veterinary and Animal Sciences University (GADVAS) in Punjab, India, to provide graduates of the program exposure to international research environments. The program’s first students will begin training in September 2012. Qualified applicants can enter the program as undergraduate students, or they can enrol in existing, thesis-based MSc, PhD or postdoctoral programs at the U of S and at partnering universities in Germany and India. The federal CREATE program is designed to improve the mentoring and training environment for Canada’s future researchers by improving communication, collaboration and professional skills, as well as experience in academic and non-academic environments.

Baljit Singh (left) and colleague Vikram Misra (right) meet with students at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine

school year

JOB TIPS FOR NEW COLLEGE GRADS

Though many college students dream of

the day they will walk across the stage and receive their bachelor’s degree, the reality that awaits many after the last note of “Pomp and Circumstance” has been played may not be what is expected because job availability remains bleak. According to analysis of government data conducted for the Associated Press, nearly 54 percent of bachelor’s degree holders under the age of 25 were jobless or underemployed in 2011. That’s the lowest such level in more than a decade. Some analysts have begun to question the value of a college degree for recent college graduates who have student loans to pay off. But the concern should be less about the value of a degree and more about how recent graduates can find jobs in an economy where a lack of professional experience might make them more affordable, but ultimately less valuable to prospective employers. The following are a few tips recent college grads can employ to increase their chances at finding a job. Use the resources at your disposal. Even if it may seem you’re on your own the moment you put away that cap and gown, there are resources at your disposal. Your university’s alumni career center, for example, has helped graduates find jobs in what has proven to be a historically bad economy over the last several years. Alumni career centers often sponsor networking events and will help recent graduates craft their resumes. Graduates who went to school away from home can still

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tap this potentially valuable resource even if they’re no longer nearby campus. Chat online with an alumni center representatives and access online video workshops that offer anything from interviewing advice to how to write a better cover letter. Other resources may include your parents, their friends, your own friends who have already found work or anyone else who might share their experience and advice. Look for jobs in fields that are expanding. Though it might seem as though no job fields are fertile in the current economy, that’s not true. Green jobs and jobs in the field of health, for instance, are growing and projections indicate that growth is expected to continue in the years to come. Such fields are likely to have more entry-level positions available, and entry-level positions do not typically target experienced professionals. Consider moving. One of the biggest advantages to being a recent college graduate is freedom to move around. Few have spouses or children to consider, and even fewer have a mortgage to pay. Having so few strings attached to you can work to your advantage — allowing you to relocate to a stronger job market even if you don’t already have a job offer in hand. As the economy has struggled, many companies have been forced to cut back, and one of the cutbacks many companies have made is reducing their relocation budgets. A 2009 poll from the Society of Human Resource Management found that 58 percent of companies had reduced their relocation programs, while 17 percent had eliminated such programs entirely. Simply put, companies have begun to limit their hiring to local candidates. If a particular company has caught your eye, consider moving to where that company is located. Being local might just make you a more attractive applicant.

DON’T MISS NEXT YEAR’S BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL SECTION Contact Madeleine Wrigley at 747-2442 747-7151 (cell) for all your advertising needs


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school year

THE MANY REASONS TO SUPPORT TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM

Technology has become an integral part of life, affecting how we communicate, how we view our homes, how we conduct business and nearly every other aspect of our daily lives. That includes how we learn, especially for today’s youngsters. The classrooms of yesteryear are quickly becoming a thing of the past, as teachers are increasingly turning to

technology to help students learn. Whereas technology in the classroom once meant teaching basic computer software and fundamental computer skills, nowadays technology is being integrated in ways that supplement lesson plans regardless of the subject matter. Students are utilizing technology to

tackle projects, which helps them get a more realistic grasp on how to handle projects outside of the classroom and in the professional arena. Utilizing programs that professionals use better prepares students for life after they have earned their diplomas or degrees, making them more attractive to prospective employers and more capable once they are hired. Another way technology in the classroom is benefitting today’s students is the wealth of resources that technology can provide. Classes connected to the Internet, for instance, give students access to the latest information about topics they’re studying. This can include up-to-date studies and theories from experts in the field or, for current events students, instant access to what is going on in their community and beyond. Such accessibility was unimaginable as recently as 15 years ago,

but is quickly becoming commonplace, and benefiting students along the way. Technology in the classroom can also help teachers. Students learn in their own ways, but teachers faced with growing class sizes and fewer resources often find it hard to connect with students who might not respond to the same teaching methods as their classmates. Technology can provide teachers with another avenue by which to reach their students, helping to engage those students who might otherwise have been turned off or lacked the necessary initiative to excel in school. Teachers may also find that technology in the classroom makes it easier to reach students. That’s because kids tend to find technology fun, even if it’s part of the learning process. In a study that reported on the experiences of teachers and students in classrooms where technology was incorporated, teachers responded that, in many instances, students chose to work on technology-based projects during recess or lunch. As classrooms continue to change, the role of technology figures to expand. That expanded role can benefit students and teachers alike in a variety of ways.

Technology in the classroom is changing the ways students of all ages are learning.


PARENTS CONNECTING WITH

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AFTER-CARE OPTIONS FOR DUAL-INCOME FAMILIES

SOCIAL MEDIA

Parents are increasingly relying on social media sites to communicate with others and learn about school happenings. There is a power outage, and your child’s school is dismissing students early, requiring you to arrive quickly for pickup. Your kid will not be left waiting for you because you got this information immediately after a quick log-in to the social media site you use to connect with other parents. Some other parents may be delayed in receiving this important information because they rely on phone alerts. Social media has changed the way people communicate. Whether through tweets or status updates, information shared through social media avenues is often instantaneous and can reach a large number of people, which is why many parents have turned to social media to learn about events at school. According to a study by Nielsen McKinsey Company, parents are more likely than adults without children to play games, engage in creative pursuits, and look for entertainment on Facebook, blogs and other social sites. The data collected from 2,000 adults (both parents and nonparents) who frequently

use social media found 88 percent of users rely on social networking sites for communicating with family and friends. The next most popular activity is connecting with new friends, followed by accessing product reviews and online entertainment. Reports show that adults devote a quarter of their time spent online to social media sites. Parents, in particular, are finding new ways to put these sites to use. Social media is helping parents in a variety of ways, even enabling them to keep an eye on their children when they go online. According to a survey from Laptop magazine, 55 percent of parents are using social media to watch their kids’ online activities. Of that 55 percent, one-fifth indicated they only use social media to monitor their child’s online activity. However, social media has other handy purposes. Many parents use it as they would a bulletin board — posting all types of information. Some parents use social media to stay abreast of school happenings, asking questions about when fundraiser money is due or if

anyone got the spelling words for the week. Others find it is a good way to meet parents or speak with the parents of their child’s classmates. Some moms and dads use it to set up parents’ nights out, advertise things for sale or ask for recommendations on contractors. Parents also use social media to invite people to special events, including birthday parties. Others can see who was invited and decide if they’re going to come, too. More parents are turning to social media sites for advice and information, to stay in touch or simply to share a good laugh.

Dual-income families are relying on after-care programs and more.

In a perfect world, school and work hours would run concurrently. But the average school day begins at 9:00 a.m. and continues until 3:00 p.m., while the average work day lasts from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. As a result, parents must arrange for child care during those hours when school is out, but Mom and Dad are still at work. The two-income family is more common than ever before. Up until the 20th century, a dual-income family was rare. Today, however, roughly 80 percent of families in North America have both parents working, and many find it is impossible to live on one income. Dual-income families often have to make difficult choices about child care. If a mother returned to work shortly after giving birth, day care was probably arranged early on. Statistics indicate that in 2010, 48 percent of children ages 0 to 4 with employed mothers were primarily cared for by a relative. Twenty-four percent spent the majority of their time in a center-based arrangement. As children grow and attend elementary school, traditional day care is usually not an option and parents have to make other arrangements. School-based care Many schools offer programs both before and after school, many of which are reasonably priced. This helps dual-income families, but may not be practical during early-release days, during teacher planning days or holiday breaks. Programs that help parents before school typically allow working parents to drop off their children before the parents head to work. The students are kept in the school’s gym or cafeteria until the regular school day begins. The same scenario applies to after school programs. At dismissal, after-care students will return to the designated location to work on homework or engage in some activities with other after-care participants until their parents arrive to take them home. Family and friends Parents who prefer a different situation than school-based care frequently turn to friends or family members to bridge the gap between school and work. Students who carpool may be dropped off early at the driver’s home and stay there after school until their parents get home.

In addition, many families have welcomed older relatives back into their homes in light of the struggling economy. In such instances, grandparents or aunts and uncles can look after the kids once school has ended for the day. After-school programs Some children are enrolled in care centers that watch children before school, bus them to school and then return in the afternoon to pick up the children again. This is one of the more costly options in child care. However, it may be more educationally structured than the care programs provided at school. Students who participate in sports or academic clubs may have an arrangement to stay with a teacher, coach or club administrator until their parents are home from work. These programs vary depending on the region of the country and the particular school district. Personal finances also play a role in the type of care families can afford. When the decision is made, there are some questions parents should ask before enrollment. • What is the ratio of caregivers to students? • What is the cost of the program? • How are delayed opening days and early dismissal days handled? Holidays and breaks? • What happens if I arrive late? • What activities will take place? • Is there ample time for homework? • Are caregivers teachers or volunteers? • Are background checks conducted? • Is financial assistance available? • What is the turn-over rate of staff? • Is there a nurse available? • Who oversees the program? • Is busing available? • How are emergencies handled? • How is poor behavior handled? • May I visit the program for a check-in? • With whom do I speak if I have a problem? • If my child is absent, do I receive a refund for that day? • How long is the waiting list? These are just some of the questions to ask, and parents are encouraged to come up with their own to find the best program for their children.


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Shellbrook Chronicle August 24th