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CD C

ity esign ollective

Strategic Urban Design Sprawl Repair + Retrofit District Revitalization Corridor Restructuring Community Visioning Public Realm Design

Positioning Cities for Success in the New Era


CDityesign C ollective Sprawl Repair District Revitalization Corridor Restructuring Community Visioning Streetscape Design Public Realm Design

specific plans form based codes web based codes streetscape design public realm design site masterplans revitalization strategies design guidelines design review sustainability planning two-day dialogues charrettes

From:  Re:

Mr. Ian Ross Principal, City Design Collective Introduction to the City Design Collective

Hello from City Design Collective, I am pleased to present to you an introduction to City Design Collective (CDC), and a brief orientation to our approach to urban design and district revitalization. The CDC is a multi-disciplinary firm of awardwinning professionals in the fields of urban design, land use planning, and public realm design, who have extensive experience assisting California cities to restructure patterns of development in support of long term social, economic, and environmental health. The CDC takes a comprehensive approach to revitalizing downtowns, mixed-use neighborhoods, commercial and workplace centers, waterfronts, and other unique districts. We work closely with stakeholders, city staff and community members to prepare a feasible long term vision that has broad community support. Once the community’s vision is in place, we prepare customized urban design, land use, and economic revitalization strategies to set the stage for desired new investment. CDC formbased regulations attract and guide new investment in support of revitalization while reducing investor risk by providing a vision that investors can rely upon, contribute to, and derive value from. CDC capital improvement strategies are designed to coordinate public and private investment by creating complete streets and sustainable public open spaces that support desired investment. As a small local business, our team is able to respond quickly to our client’s needs, and to provide unparalleled quality at surprisingly affordable rates. We maintain long standing alliances with members of the development community as well as top professionals in the fields of economics, transportation, and environmental analysis, and bring them in at key junctures to inform and ensure project feasibility. Unlike larger traditional firms, our clients deal directly with City Design Collective Principals who bring extensive expertise, and the ability to move from challenge to solution in short order. Thank you for taking the time to review the enclosed materials. Please contact me directly with any questions you may have, and to discuss how City Design Collective can assist you to envision, enable, and realize desired growth and change.

Best regards,

Ian Ross Principal City Design Collective

363 17th Street, Suite 301 Oakland, CA 94612 (p) 415-378-2181 (e) Ian@citydesigncollective.com (w) www.citydesigncollective.com


Contents Overview Strategic Planning Toolkit Methods & Approach Selected Project Examples Project References and Letters of Endorsement


Overview Urban Design Project Types

City Design Collective is an urban design firm focused on assisting cities to envision, enable, and realize revitalization of city districts in support of long-term social, environmental, and economic health. We are award-winning urban design professionals who share a passion for the value of meaningful and successful places, and their impact on the life and vitality of a community. We take a comprehensive approach to city design, combining dynamic public participation with innovative urban design to craft strategies, policies, form-based codes, and design solutions to catalyze and sustain envisioned transformation.

Sprawl Repair and Retrofit

In order to reverse trends of physical sprawl and patterns of development that have led to economic disinvestment, we work to restructure land use policies and regulations so as to streamline the development of walkable, transit-supportive neighborhood districts that use their valuable land with greater efficiency.

Riverside Dr.

High St.

District Revitalization

Fifth St.

Fourth St.

Third St.

Second St. Topeka St.

Stanislaus St.

Sierra St.

Patterson Rd.

Seventh St.

Santa Fe St.

Sixth St.

First St.

Atchison St.

Land use strategies and form-based codes are customized to attract and guide new investment towards the revitalization of downtowns, mixed-use neighborhoods, transit-oriented districts, mixed-use corridors, and workplace districts. Policies and development regulations are prepared to streamline the development process in order to catalyze beneficial growth and change.

Corridor Restructuring

Our corridor projects employ land use and site development regulations in combination with innovative streetscape design, to create attractive and vital city districts along a city’s primary arterials. Our projects are designed to enhance walkability and livability in support of long-term growth, transit access, and connectivity.

Community Visioning

We employ dynamic planning processes to educate, inspire, and empower community members, stakeholders, and key decision makers. We customize each planning process to suit the unique needs and preferred style of each community we work with. Our planning processes result in visions, goals, and strategies, which form the foundation for policies and regulations designed to catalyze desired new investment.

Public Realm Design

We are award-winning designers of streets, plazas, and public open spaces. Our designs create safe, attractive, and vibrant public destinations in support of city-wide vitality. We have extensive experience with streetscape elements, including lighting, street trees, and roadway materials.

Architectural Guidelines and Design Review

In support of guiding new development in accordance with the City’s preferred character, our team prepares architectural standards and guidelines and performs architectural design review for new buildings, renovations, and rehabilitation of existing buildings.

envision

enable

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


Strategic Planning Toolkit Solutions for the Post-Redevelopment Era

Since 1999, members of City Design Collective have been assisting California cities to realize desired new investment. In the post-redevelopment era, it is essential that cities take steps to ensure that they remain competitive in the regional marketplace for new investment. We are proud to announce the launch of a comprehensive toolkit which addresses the challenges cities face today. Strategies are selected and customized for each client in accordance with their needs.

Public Sector

Urban Design

ity C D esign Collective

Private Sector

Partnerships

The City Design Collective Toolkit combines Public Sector Urban Design Strategies with Private Sector Partnering Strategies.

Urban Design Services

Private Sector Partnering

• Two-Day Dialogue • Opportunity Site Analysis • Evaluation of City Policies and Regulations to Streamline New Investment • Site Master Planning • Economic Assessment/Market Analysis • Form-Based Codes • Community Visioning • Urban Design Revitalization Strategies • Capital Improvement Strategies

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• Outreach to Development Community • Facilitation of Developer Roundtables • Project Design and Development Pro Formas • Design Review • Outreach to Build Community Support for Desired Benefits and Amenities • Liaison between Public and Private Sectors

enable

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


Methods & Approach How We Work

The City Design Collective is an urban design firm focused on assisting cities to ENVISION, ENABLE, and REALIZE revitalization of city districts in support of long term social, environmental, and economic health. Our team builds collaborative relationships with decision-makers, city staff, stakeholders, and citizens to help create a community vision that reflects “public ownership”. We are keenly aware of the complex issues involved in planning for future growth and change, and make it our goal to lead communities towards progressive and feasible goals and objectives. The complex nature of urban design requires strong collaboration among the design team and the community, and we are committed to an open and inclusive process that aims at a higher public good. We are experienced public facilitators who craft our approach to community participation in a manner consistent with the character and needs of the project. We view the communities we serve as critical partners in all of our work. We understand that growth requires community support to be successful. We listen carefully, raise expectations, and work together to achieve excellence.

Revitalization of ‘auto row’, Alameda, CA.

Objectives

Our efforts are intended to implement a community’s vision for revitalization. To this end, our team works to identify and illustrate the trade-offs inherent to planning for growth and change. The resulting community vision will have the broad support necessary to ensure a smooth implementation, and will serve as the foundation for subsequent strategies, policies and implementing actions.

• Partner with the Public and Private Sectors

Infill redevelopment concept, Alameda, CA.

We create an open and positive dialogue between members of the project team, city staff, stakeholders, decision makers, and the community.

• Prepare Implementing Measures

Our team prepares urban design concepts, form-based development regulations, capital improvement strategies, and other measures to catalyze and support desired transformation.

• Support Economic and Environmental Health

Our urban design solutions are calibrated in accordance with contemporary investor and consumer preferences. Implementing measures are designed to streamline the approval process and maximize flexibility in support of long-term economic and environmental health. CDC presentation of build-out scenario concepts.

envision

enable

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


Methods & Approach What We Do

Our comprehensive approach to district and corridor revitalization is customized according to each client’s unique set of physical, social, and economic conditions. Our Dynamic Planning Process prepares a feasible long term Vision and associated Goals. Urban Design and economic Revitalization Strategies are produced to direct future public and private efforts in support of the community’s vision. Form-based site development regulations provide flexibility to attract a wide-range of new investment types while ensuring that new development protects and enhances the community’s preferences for overall physical character. Implementation measures including capital improvements and financing strategies are designed to stimulate new development, restructure the public realm in support of desired investment, and to create an attractive, walkable, and sustainable pedestrian environment. SeCtion 1 - Community viSion

Vision and Goals with Community Support

We partner with our clients to put in place an achievable vision and goals that form the foundation upon which revitalization strategies and subsequent policies and regulation are based. A clearly defined vision is necessary to attract and guide new development and to reduce investor risk, as true revitalization is likely to occur incrementally, and over time. Getting community buy-in is crucial to accelerating the planning process.

Revitalization Strategies

Revitalization Strategy

Establish mutually beneficial downtown sub-districts t range of complementary new investment.

Urban Design

Our urban design strategies are customized to catalyze the types of Waterfront District Neighborhood Concept redevelopment and restructuring necessary to achieve the community’s vision. We prepare site specific urban design and economic strategies for key areas within the Plan Area to attract and guide desired investment. Supportive economic policies are developed individually for each client to make revitalization a reality. 1:1

City of Rio Vista -

Waterfront Specific Plan

November 2007

Land Use Policies

Downtown Our land use policies are specifically customized to provide flexibility to the Gateway investor community by establishing a range of complementary land uses that are permitted throughout the Plan Area. Policies ensure the formation of a vibrant and active mixed-use environment that uses its valuable land with greater efficiency. A thorough review of existing zoning regulations is used to identify changes that are necessary to enhance a city’s ability to compete for new investment and residents.

Downtown Core Civic Core

Form-based Development Regulations

Form-based standards and guidelines for site development streamline the approval process by providing user-friendly regulations that support the community’s desire for an attractive, walkable, and high-quality built environment, Regulations that govern form are customized to build on the preferred qualities of craft and character, and dovetail with existing policies where applicable.

Implementing Strategies

Our strategies for Implementation are designed to coordinate public and private investment, and to create the momentum necessary to sustain long-term revitalization. Our team has extensive experience crafting Action Plans, Financing Strategies, and Capital Improvement designs for streetscapes, plazas and public open spaces that both catalyze and support the community’s goals.

envision

enable

Riv Neigh

Riverfront District

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181

Downto


Methods & Approach Public Process

The City Design Collective’s innovative approach to community visioning and public participation creates an enjoyable, educational, and highly-participatory planning process. We employ a range of customized workshop processes including Two-day Dialogues, Charrettes, and Public Workshops to maximize input and maintain support. We view the communities we serve as critical partners in all of our work, and work closely with staff, key decision makers, stakeholders, and residents. We understand that opinions differ about the conditions that contribute to quality of life, and will provide a forum for positive and open dialogue.

Two-Day Dialogues

Two-day meetings with our team, city staff, community members, stakeholders, and key decision makers, typically focused on a range of key issues. The ‘dialogue’ is a very effective way to get our team ‘up to speed’ on specific issues, and for community members to express their thoughts in a conversational setting.

Charrette

A highly-participatory day of educational presentations, roundtable working sessions, and individual and group presentations to develop new ideas and create a long term vision. Multi-day charrettes may include site visits and other unique activities to help build a knowledge base and inspire creative thinking.

Open Studios & Gallery

Our team creates a temporary design studio ‘on-site’ to allow community members to participate in the development of goals, strategies, and design concepts. Scheduled meetings and ‘drop-in’ hours allow all members to engage in the planning process. Ideas are presented in a subsequent evening ‘gallery’.

Public Workshops

2010 Community Vision - Land Use Plan Areas Plan aRea

a

Question 1 - Select the land uses you think should be included in Plan Area A.

Workshops are opportunities to check-in with our client/ communities and to advance new ideas. We review findings, present and discuss alternative approaches, and record the community’s input. Question and answer sessions are always part of a workshop, allowing participants to express their opinions.

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REFERENCE 2006 PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT CONCEPT HISTORIC DISTRICT

Workbooks

2010 MEASURE B HISTORIC DISTRICT

Strengths

Strengths

What is good about this plan?

What is good about this plan?

Land Use Plan Areas 1.

2.

Our team designs Community Workbooks to assist with gathering public input throughout a planning effort. Working alongside city staff, CDC summarizes and reviews key details from past years of previous planning efforts to educate residents and stakeholders about the trade-offs inherent in planning for growth.

HISTORIC DISTRICT

54

ALAMEDA POINT PRELIMINARY

Decide the mix of land uses that are appropriate for each preliminary land use plan area. Check multiple land uses for each district to support the creation of mixed-use neighborhoods.

S outh

FIGURE 25

Key Components Note: refer to the 2010 Historic District Update Map for building numbers. Administrative Core Proposed for Removal: Bachelor Officers’ Quarters (BOQ) (17), Officers’ Bathhouse (75), RecreDISTRICT D E V E L HISTORIC O PMEN T CONC EPT ation Storage (137), Community Facilities (135), Ambulance Garage (115), Low Pressure Chamber (130), and Rehab Center (116).

Weaknesses What could improve this plan?

Key Components Administrative Core Proposed for Removal: Officers’ Bathhouse (75), Recreation Storage (137), Community Facilities (135), Ambulance Garage (115), Low Pressure Chamber (130), and Rehab Center (116).

Hangars Area West (land plane hangars) All contributors retained.

Hangars Area West (land plane hangars) Proposed for Removal: two land plane hangars (22, 23).

ALAMEDA POINT PRELIMINARY DEVELOPMENT CONCEPT

Shops Area Proposed for Removal: Public Works Office Maintenance Shop (114), General Storehouse (8), Aircraft Storehouse (9), Packing - Shipping Storehouse (91) and Department (92), ATS Engineering Facility (42), Weapons Shop (43), and Ordnance Office (102)., Building 5. Residential Area Retained: 29 one-story Chief Petty Officers’ Housing. Proposed for Removal: 18 two-story Officer’s Housing (Big Whites).

B

C

D E

Weaknesses

F

What could improve this plan?

Shops Area Same as Preliminary Development Concept plan.

G

Residential Area Retained: 18 two-story Officer’s Housing (Big Whites). Proposed for Removal: 29 one-story Chief Petty Officers’ Housing. Hangars Area South (seaplane hangars) Proposed for Removal: two seaplane hangars (40,41), and Air Terminal Building (77).

Hangars Area South (seaplane hangars) All contributors retained.

HCP & AR : 2

Alameda Point 2010 Community Planning Workbook: Going Forward

�� Adjacent to the Estuary and the planned regional open space. �� Views of the Port of Oakland. �� ������������������������������������������� of the Historic District. �� ��������������������������������� (Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Bachelor ������������������� �� Contains a theater, the O’Club, a bowling alley, a church and administrative buildings. �� Contains the grand “mall” and central open space parade grounds.

Single Family Residential

Single Family Residential

Multi-Family Residential

Multi-Family Residential

Live Work

Live Work

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Lodging ���������������������������)

Mixed Use ����������������������������������

Mixed Use ����������������������������������

Retail and Services

Retail and Services

Civic Uses and Schools

Civic Uses and Schools

Cultural and Entertainment (museums, music)

Cultural and Entertainment (museums, music)

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Maritime Uses (boat repair, boat storage, etc.)

Maritime Uses (boat repair, boat storage, etc.)

Renewable Energy Facilities (e.g. solar farms)

Renewable Energy Facilities (e.g. solar farms)

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Urban Agriculture and������������������

Parks and Recreation

Parks and Recreation

2010 Community Vision - Land Use Plan Areas

Surveys

a

Question 1 - Select the land uses you think should be included in Plan Area A.

We use collaborative online interactive surveys to build community support for desired public amenities. Empowering the community to communicate their desire for specific benefits to the developers helps create buy-in and certainty for developers. Land Use: 14 Alameda Point Community Forums - Survey Results

CDityesign C ollective

Summary �� Adjacent to the endangered Least Tern Habitat. �� New construction in this area severely limited to protect endangered Least Tern. �� ������������������������������������������� Flight Tower Building. �� Superb views of San Francisco. �� Current home of Hanger 1 Vodka, Rock Wall Winery and Antiques by the Bay. �� Transition to Wildlife Refuge.

Alameda Point 2010 Community Planning Workbook: Going Forward

Land Use : 3

Plan aRea

Plan Area B

Summary

A

Note: refer to the 2010 Historic District Update Map for building numbers.

FIGURE 25

54

Plan Area A

See below for Northwest �����������������������

Directions

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Selected Project Examples


CD C

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Circle~S Development Code San Pablo, California

community vision + regulating code + implementation The City of San Pablo wishes to transform the 16 acre city-owned “Circle~S” site into a vibrant, active, mixed-use destination as part of the revitalization effort for San Pablo Avenue. City Design Collective performed public outreach, and prepared a concept masterplan and form-based development code to permit a healthy mix of retail, residential, civic and cultural uses organized within a network of walkable streets and open spaces, and anchored by a central public green.

PRIMARY CLIENT City of San Pablo

Project features • Form-based development regulations calibrated to streamline incremental investment. • Developer ‘Roundtable’ to refine project elements in accordance with investor preferences. • Mixed-use buildings with residential, office, and cultural uses above ground-floor retail • Central public green presided over by civic and cultural institutions. • Anchor retail/entertainment tenant. • Residential development adjacent to public parks and within walking distance of shops & cafes. • Bus depot links to regional transportation system. • Public parks, multipurpose trail, and promenade along Wildcat Creek.

Responsibilities Master Planning, Land Use Framework, Form-Based Coding, Developer Outreach, Public Process

Status Adopted 2010 Role Prime Urban Design Consultant

Reference Matt Rodriguez, City Manager mattr@sanpabloca.gov (510) 215-3012 DRAFT 10/11/11

2.2 Block and Frontage Reg

F DRAFT 10/11/11

A

DRAFT 10/11/11

B

C

E D

3.1. Street Network

CL

Circle~S Development Code Code - Administrative Draft The Avenue Development - Public Draft

September 2011

P 6’

6’

side plant walk strip

18’ – 22’

travel-way

N

Reserved for civic/cultural anchor.

bos

bos

Illustration 2.1 Map of Blocks and Frontages

P 6’

min. median

18’ – 22’

travel-way

6’

6’

Views from above Sa

plant side strip walk

Church Lane

66’ min.

BOS

BOS

San Pablo Avenue

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■ Street trees located in

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Illustration 1.2.2 Envisioned Redevelopment www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland Masterplan CA 94612 | 415 378-2181 P

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Alameda Point Going Forwards Alameda, California

CD C

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Community visioning + public outreach The Alameda Point 2010 Community Forum established opportunities for the Alameda community to actively participate in planning for the redevelopment of the 900 acre former Naval Air Station (Alameda Point). City Design Collective analyzed 16 years of prior planning efforts, facilitated public workshop, and produced a take home workbook and on-line survey to empower residents to provide meaningful input towards defining future land use districts, building types, open space types, and adaptive reuse of existing buildings. Results of the planning process set the stage for future environmental analysis and development regulations. Project features • Production of educational materials and survey materials to solicit public input. Community Benefits • ankinG Design and facilitation of public workshops and community forums. R BeneFits

Production of take-home workbook and on-line survey for residents and stakeholders to

Survey results used as framework for project description for future environmental analysis.

3. QUESTION necessary, would increase the number of housing units in units Alameda Point to pay for the Question -2:IfIfnecessary, wouldyou you increase thethe number of housing Alameda Point to pay inform2City decision makers and staff about “lessons learned” from in past planning efforts. following benefits?benefits? for the following

Yes

Directions 1.

2.

Branch Library

30.3% (53)

See below for Northwest �����������������������

Affordable Housing

Decide the mix of land uses that are appropriate Active Openland Space for each preliminary use plan area. Check multiple land uses for each district to support the creation of mixed-use neighborhoods.

(ball fields, etc.)

B

Passive Open Space (trails, etc.) New Ferry Terminal Historic Preservation New Marina Sports Complex

37.7% (66)

A

35.6% (62)

C 39.3% (70)D 26.8% (45)

E

21.7% (38)

F

14.7% (25) 25.6% (44)

G

62.3% (109) �� Adjacent to the endangered Least Tern

175

64.4% (112)

174

60.7% (108)

178

73.2% (123)Single Family Residential

168

Habitat. �� New construction in this area severely limited to protect endangered Least Tern. �� ������������������������������������������� Flight Tower Building. �� Superb views of San Francisco. �� Current home of Hanger 1 Vodka, Rock Wall Winery and Antiques by the Bay. �� Transition to Wildlife Refuge.

Single Family Residential Multi-Family Residential

Responsibilities Workshop Facilitation, Community Visioning, Planning Workbook Reference Andrew Thomas, Planning Svcs Manager athomas@ci.alameda.ca.us (510) 747-6881

175

Plan Area B Summary

�� Adjacent to the Estuary and the planned regional open space. �� Views of the Port of Oakland. �� ������������������������������������������� of the Historic District. �� ��������������������������������� (Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and Bachelor ������������������� �� Contains a theater, the O’Club, a bowling alley, a church and administrative buildings. �� Contains the grand “mall” and central open space parade grounds.

Role Prime Urban Design Consultant

Count

(122) Plan Area 69.7% A Summary

Status Completed 2011

Response

No

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Land Use Plan Areas

PRIMARY CLIENT City of Alameda

Multi-Family Residential Live Work

Live Work

175

78.3% (137)Lodging ���������������������������)

Lodging ���������������������������)

Mixed Use ����������������������������������

Mixed Use ����������������������������������

Retail and Services

Retail and Services

Civic Uses and Schools

170

85.3% (145)Civic Uses and Schools

Cultural and Entertainment (museums, music)

Cultural and Entertainment (museums, music)

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172

74.4% (128)����������������

Maritime Uses (boat repair, boat storage, etc.)

Maritime Uses (boat repair, boat storage, etc.)

Renewable Energy Facilities (e.g. solar farms)

Renewable Energy Facilities (e.g. solar farms)

answered Urbanquestion Agriculture and������������������

��������������������������������������� Parks and Recreation

190

Parks and Recreation

skipped question

33

Alameda Point 2010 Community Planning Workbook: Going Forward

Land Use : 3

4. QUESTION 1: New Ideas or Additional Thoughts? Response Count 97 answered question

97

skipped question

126

1. To proceed, please enter your zip code: Response Text 1

09090

Nov 24, 2010 2:42 AM

2

92782

Nov 24, 2010 7:44ity PM

3

Benefits: 87 94501

4

94501

5

94501

CD esign Alameda Point Community Forums - Survey Results ollective Nov 26, 2010 4:08 C PM

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e n a Nov b 27,l 2010 e 8:36rPMe a l i z e

Nov 29, 2010 7:18 PM94612 | 415 378-2181 www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 2 of 17


CDityesign C ollective

Heart of the City Plan Redondo Beach, California

waterfront revitalization

The Specific Plan puts forth strategies to create a Town Center along the City’s waterfront and guides redevelopment of the AES industrial complex and adjacent lands east of the Waterfront. Masterplans illustrate a new marina, retail center, and public market at the water’s edge. The code enables mixed-use development to be organized along a walkable network of streets, blocks, and open spaces leading to a grand civic plaza. Comprehensive growth strategies include standards and guidelines for new development as well as land use policies to reduce investor risk. Project features • Community workshops, stakeholder meetings, and advisory board meetings to discuss analyze ULI recommendations. • Masterplan concepts depicting future build-out scenarios for waterfront redevelopment. • Growth strategies for new infill development and redevelopment of AES industrial complex. • Policies and regulations to promote development of under-utilized parcels throughout the

PRIMARY CLIENT City of Redondo Beach Status Adopted by City Council, 2001 Role Urban Design Consultant in association with Korve Engineering, FTS, CHS Consulting Responsibilities Community Visioning, Revitalization Planning, Masterplans and Develoment Code.

Plan Area.

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www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


CDityesign C ollective

NewPark Mall Masterplan Newark, California

Sprawl repair and retrofit The purpose of the Greater NewPark Master Plan is to put in place a communitysupported development vision for an economically feasible transformation of the 125 acre project area that will catalyze and guide new investment, and serve as the framework for future implementing measures. Arguably one of the city’s most valuable and most underutilized sites, the mall presents a once-in-a-generation opportunity to envision and enable a new district comprised of significant residential, office, lodging, retail, and entertainment uses within a walkable and transit supportive neighborhood anchored by the existing enclosed mall. Project features • Masterplan illustrates approximiately 2000 new residential units, 500,000 square feet of office, and 700 room hotel located on underutilized lands throughout the project area. • Mixed-use lifestyle center extending from primary automobile entrance to mall entrance. • Town square adjacent to mall entrance serves as central focal point of lifestyle center and establishes a formal setting for civic and cultural events. • Restructuring of ‘loop road’ into attractive and walkable ‘boulevard’. • Phasing strategies allow for incremental new investment.

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PRIMARY CLIENT City of Newark Status Draft Plan Under Review, 2012 Role Prime Urban Design Consultant Responsibilities Master Planning, Project Coordination, Developer Outreach, Community Visioning, Building Typologies Reference Terrence Grindall terrence.grindall@newark.org (510) 578-4208

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


CDityesign C ollective

Design Review Manual Alameda, California standards and guidelines for new development

Finial Standing seam metal roof

Standing seam metal roof

Half round gutter

Half round gutter

Pre cast ston concrete or smooth stucc trim

Recessed lint

Doors recesse one brick length Tower projects from primary facade

Cornice +/- 4’-0”

Wood doors

TOWER DETAIL

Decorative building butto Windows divided into two with either true divided lites or simulated divided lites. For simulated divided lites spacers shall be used between panes. Muntins or grids shall project at least 3/8” from the glass surface and shall be used on the exterior and interior of the glass.

Brick used as decorative element Control joints Variegated thin red brick primary cladding Brick window sills

Standing seam metal roof

Recessed cler windows

Cornice Pre cast stone, concrete or smooth stucco trim

Canvas awnin Wood doors with transom windows at balcony tower

Lintel +/- 10”

Metal railing Decorative building buttons

Signage locat shown in sub

Canvas awning

Shallow arched clerestory windows Increased storefront window width Sconce lighting

Variegated th brick primary

Balcony door Pilasters with pre cast trim

PILASTER/ STOREFRONT DETAIL

1700 PARK ST. RECOMMENDATION- NORTHWEST ELEVATION Scale: 1/8”=1’-0”

ROOF/ CORNICE PROFILE AT TOWER Scale: 1’-1/2”=1’-0”

The Design Review Manual was created specifically for the City of Alameda to serve as a centralized document for applicants and city staff to ensure that new projects are designed in accordance with the community’s vision for architectural style, craft, and character. The document employs form-based site development regulations and style guidelines to serve applicants, design review staff, and decision-makers. The Design Manual will streamline the application process for new projects and reduce investor risk, enhancing the City’s ability to attract new residential and commercial investment. Project features • Form-based development regulations for Building Types, Frontage Types, Architecture, Landscape and Open Space, and site specific design requirements. • Architectural style guidelines for historic and contemporary styles. • Assists in the preparation, evaluation, and approval of design plans. • Applicable to new buildings and modifications to existing buildings.

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PRIMARY CLIENT City of Alameda Status On-going Role Prime Urban Design Consultant Responsibilities Architectural Style Guidelines, Design Review, Development Standards, Zoning Code Integration Reference Andrew Thomas, Planning Svcs Manager athomas@ci.alameda.ca.us (510) 747-6881

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


CDityesign C ollective

Downtown Specific Plan Riverbank, California

Community visioning and outreach The Downtown Specific Plan contains growth strategies, land use plans, and form-based development regulations to attract and focus new investment in Riverbank’s historic downtown and adjacent corridors. City Design Collective custoimzed revitalization strategies, prepared capital imprvement strategies and established form-based development regulations to focus new investment in the downtown core. Masterplans for the adjacent 18 acre industrial facility were prepared to guide new investment in support of mutually beneficial city districts and to reduce unnecessary competition for tenants and customers.

PRIMARY CLIENT City of Riverbank Status Unanimously Approved, 2008 Role Prime Urban Design Consultant Responsibilities Economic and Urban Design Revitalization, Community Visioning

Project features • Community visioning and urban design recommendations. • Development regulations to attract and guide new investment. • Capital improvements customized to coordinate public and private investment in support of desired revitalization. • Attract a wide range of complementary commercial, residential, live-work, workplace, civic

Reference Tim Ogden, Director of Economic Development and Housing togden@riverbank.org (209) 863-7129

and cultural uses to the downtown district. 

Riverside Dr.

High St.

Fifth St.

Fourth St.

Third St.

Second St.

First St.

Atchison St.

Topeka St.

Stanislaus St.

Sierra St.

Patterson Rd.

envision

enable

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181

Seventh St.

Sixth St.

Santa Fe St.


Bel Mateo Village Specific Plan San Mateo, California

CD C

ity esign ollective

sprawl repair + strip mall redevelopment

Incorporating collected community visions and goals, the specific plan establishes policies and regulations to catalyze the transformation of a fifteen-acre autooriented strip center into a mixed-use transit village. The plan contains an economic revitalization strategy, land use regulations, and form-based standards and guidelines for site development and architecture to guide new investment in support of the community’s goals.

PRIMARY CLIENT City of San Mateo Status Adopted Role Urban Design Consultant in association with Sedway Group FTS

Project features

Responsibilities Economic and Urban Design

• •

Enable comprehensive or incremental redevelopment of underutilized parcels. Encourage a range of new residential and commercial reinvestment.

• • •

Establish a retail ‘frontage road’ along El Camino Real to put new retail uses on display. Locate residential and workplace uses where they have access to public transportation. Focus new retail uses adjacent to the primary retail anchor to support a ‘park-once’ shopping

Revitalization, Community Visioning

experience.

envision

enable

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


CDityesign C ollective

Waterfront Specific Plan SeCtion 1 - Community viSion

Rio Vista, California

urban design strategies + waterfront revitalization + Community VIsioning Earned Solano County Transportation Authority Project of the Year Honors: “Planning for Livable Communities�

3.4

Des Two Hig bac

Waterfront District Neighborhood Concept 1:1

City of Rio Vista -

Waterfront Specific Plan

Stan 1. 2. 3.

November 2007

4. 5. Note: The width of the Promenade will be determined as a part of the site and architectural review process.    

The Rio Vista community had a vision for a comprehensive redevelopment of their under-utilized waterfront. City Design Collective partnered with staff, residents, and local business owners to prepare a feasible masterplan calling for a wide range of new residential, live-work, workplace, and commercial development. Form-based regulations require the development of a walkable network of streets and blocks anchored by a ‘waterfront green’ and ‘public promenade’ along the Sacramento River.

PRIMARY CLIENT City of Rio Vista Status Adopted by City Council, 2008

Gui 1. 2. 3.

Est The to b bec con and

Role Urban Design Consultant, Form-Based Code, Masterplans, Community Vision

Responsibilities Project features Zoning Code Review, Community • Stakeholder meetings and public workshops to build the community’s vision. Visioning Process, Economic and Urban • Form-based standards and guidelines for site development. Enhanced land use flexibility to Design Development Strategies attract uses complementary to existing Downtown businesses.          • Revitalization strategies and financing strategies for capital improvement. Reference Emi Theriault, Planning Manager City of Rio Vista, CA

envision

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www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181



November 200


Cinema Streetscapes Project Theatre Way, Redwood City, California

CDityesign C ollective

public realm design + downtown Revitalization

Memers of City Design Collective worked to completely redesign and transform Middlefield Road in downtown Redwood City to createa an eye-catching public space between the historic Fox Theater and the Century Theater entertainment and retail complex. The streetscape design was integral to an overall plan to reposition Downtown as the community’s destination for arts, culture, shopping and entertainment. Project features • Streetscape concept alternatives, design development, construction documentation and construction administration. • Unique pedestrian realm with wall-to-wall decorative paving and 22 foot dining terrace to support new restaurants and cafe’s. • Street can be closed with decorative bollards to a create pedestrian plaza. • Custom planters, street furnishings, and decorative lighting contribute to a special aesthetic throughout the pedestrian environment.

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PRIMARY CLIENT City of Redwood City Status Completed 2009 Role Lead designer, Project Manager in association with FTS Cities Responsibilities Streetscape and Urban Design, Project Coordination and Management, Construction Documentation Reference Pat Webb Economic Development Coordinator (650) 780-7293

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


Cinema Streetscapes Project Broadway, Redwood City, California

CDityesign C ollective

public realm design + downtown Revitalization City Design Collective members were responsible for a wholesale transformation of Broadway between Hamilton and Jefferson Avenue in downtown Redwood City. Working in tandem with the Theatreway project, the new streetscape and plaza design on Broadway creates a dramatic and pedestrian-friendly public realm adjacent to the Courthouse Plaza and historic Fox Theater. Project features • Streetscape concept, design development concepts, construction documentation and construction administration. • Custom furnishings, decorative trees, custom lighting, and unique paving materials create a vibrant setting to attract residents and visitors to the heart of Redwood City. • Protected pedestrian drop-off zone supports retail tenants and theater patron.

PRIMARY CLIENT City of Redwood City Status Completed 2009 Role Lead designer, Project Manager in association with FTS Cities Responsibilities Streetscape and Urban Design, Project Coordination and Management, Construction Documentation Reference Pat Webb Economic Development Coordinator (650) 780-7293

envision

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www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


Downtown Revitalization Plan Colusa, California

CDityesign C ollective

Economic development + Urban Design + Downtown Revitalization

Urban Design

Economics Outreach

Revitalization Strategy Urban Design

Downtown Gateway

Establish mutually beneficial downtown sub-districts to attract a range of complementary new investment.

Riverfront Neighborhood

Riverfront District Downtown Core

Downtown General

Civic Core Funded through a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), the Downtown Development Plan provides a framework for future policies and regulations that will attract and guide new investment in support of the community’s vision for a vibrant, active, and economically healthy Downtown. Key elements of the Plan include capitalizing on the riverfront, state highway thoroughfares, and the Colusa State Recreation Area to attract a wide range of complementary new development. The planning process included a Two-Day Dialogue, public workshops, and presentations to Planning Commission and City Council. The Plan combines urban design, economic, and outreach strategies to maximize the city’s ability to attract desired investment. Project features • District formation to enhance and focus new investment. • Two-day dialogue with residents, stakeholders, elected officials. • Land use strategies to increase property values and enhance investor flexibility. • Building design strategies to preserve and enhance local character. • City-wide and Downtown economic revitalization strategies.

envision

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PRIMARY CLIENT City of Colusa Status Public Review Draft Role Prime Urban Design Consultant Responsibilities Community Visioning Process, Economic Development Strategies, Downtown Revitalization Strategies, Outreach and Branding Strategies Reference Jan McClintock, Former City Manager jan.mcclintock@gmail.com

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


ity C Gateway District Strategic Plan esign D N C ollective Alameda, California EIGHBORHOOD CONCEPT PLANS

economic and urban design strategies + corridor restructuring

N

EIGHBORHOOD CONCEPT PLANS

LOCATION: PARK STREET BETWEEN CLEMENT AVENUE AND EAGLE AVENUE Concept: Infill development and redevelopment of primary opportunity site. dIstrIct-Zone regulatIons

20’ - minimum

estuary

Promenade

commercial ground floor use

Pedestrian activity-generating use such as outdoor dining or display of goods

Pa

20’ - minimum open space

Promenade

Promenade concept - open space frontage

District Zone : 42

20’ - minimum

estuary Parking

nu ve Cl

The Park Street Gateway District

e

Promenade concept - commercial frontage

tA

Promenade concept - residential frontage

estuary

Promenade

en

Front setback

em

20’ - minimum residential

rk

St

re

et

estuary

Promenade

Parking setback

Promenade concept - Parking frontage

Park Street Gateway District Strategic Plan, November 2008 C

Park Street Districts Regulating Code - PSBA Review Draft - February, 2010

DCesign ollective ity

Vision 10

Concept Plan

PRIMARY City Design Collective prepared a district-wide masterplan and an envisioned build-out • Two story mixed-use building at corner ofCLIENT Clement Avenue and Park Street could support City of Alameda workplace, commercial, or residential uses above ground-floor retail. scenario to depict the community’s long-term vision for revitalization of the disinvested • Two-story or ‘grand’ single-story building at corner of Eagle Avenue and Park Street could auto-row. Four elements highlighted this comprehensive process: Urban Design incorporate commercial usesStatus such as office, retail or a destination restaurant. Strategies, Economic Strategies, Land Use Strategies, and Public •Realm Design. The centrally-located plaza creates opportunities for Approved, outdoor diningJune and display Plan Unanimously 2008of goods, and connects Park Street sidewalks to parking lots located to the rear of buildings. Architectural style guidelines embraced the city’s historic character, while creating Role flexibility for investors. Streetscape designs enhance safety and walkability while serving Prime Urban Design Consultant to ‘set the stage’ for new investment. Vision 11

Project features • Analysis of the City’s existing zoning and recommended changes for successful project implementation. • Opportunity site masterplans depicting infill redevelopment of underutilized properties • Form-based site development recommendations including building types, architectural styles, and frontage conditions. • Public realm design.

envision

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Park Street Gateway District Strategic Plan, November 2008 Responsibilities Community Visioning Process, Economic and Urban Design Development

Strategies, Public Realm Design Reference Jennifer Ott, Deputy City Manager City of Alameda, CA (510) 747-4747

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www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


East Palo Alto Revitalization Plan East Palo Alto, California

CDityesign C ollective

revitalization planning + Community visioning

During the height of development pressure in Silicon Valley, the citizens of East Palo Alto created the Revitalization Specific Plan to establish strategies for growth, and to instigate the development of significant opportunity sites throughout the City. With significant input from community workshops and stakeholder meetings, members of City Design Collective produced masterplans, streetscape designs, land use and revitalization strategies, and implementation strategies to attract and guide new investment throughout the plan area. Project features • Attract significant new investment to the district; coordinate public and private investment to catalyze revitalization efforts and sustain necessary momentum. • Prepare economic and urban design revitalization strategies. • Establish the framework for future City districts including the ‘Town Center’, ‘Ravenswood

PRIMARY CLIENT City of East Palo Alto Status Adopted Role Urban design in association with FTS and Mundie and Associates Responsibilities Economic and Urban Design Revitalization, Community Visioning

Business District’, and ‘University Corridor’. Promote the development of under-utilized lands throughout the Plan Area.

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realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


CDityesign C ollective

North Shattuck Parklets Berkeley, California

tactical intervention + public realm design An emerging trend in cities throughout the united states and abroad, parklets re-purpose on-street parking spaces to create attractive pedestrian areas that enhance district character, and add value to nearby shops and services. City Design Collective is partnering with the North Shattuck Business Association in Berkeley’s “gourmet ghetto” to facilitate public input and develop parklet design concepts to be located nearby two highly popular destinations. CDC designs incorporate opportunities for pedestrian seating, bicycle parking, and gathering spaces while ensuring a safe and attractive outdoor environment.

PRIMARY CLIENT North Shattuck Business Association

Project features • Parklet designs for two locations in Berkeley’s ‘gormet ghetto’. • Conceptual sketches and 3-D renderings. • Preliminary construction methodology and analysis.

Reference Heather Hensley 510-219-5524

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Status Design Review Role Prime Urban Design Consultant Responsibilities Parklet Design, Community Outreach

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


Downtown Open Space Plan Morgan Hill, California

CDityesign C ollective

open space planning + Community visioning

As a key component to an overall Downtown Revitalization Plan, Morgan Hill residents participated in a series of public meetings, interactive workshops, and walking tours of opportunity sites with the explicit goal of envisioning future public parks and open spaces in the downtown district. The community engaged in workshops to discuss the tradeoffs associated with planning open spaces in developed areas. Long term goals aim to attract residents and visitors of all ages and abilities while supporting local businesses throughout the downtown core. Project features • Community visioning, including workshops, meetings, and walking tours of possible project sites highlighting natural features and the relationship to surrounding streets and properties. • Preparation of conceptual design plans illustrating potential public open spaces in accordance with the community’s vision. • Recommend design and planning of attractive outdoor spaces for downtown residents as part of new residential and mixed-use development within Downtown.

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PRIMARY CLIENT City of Morgan Hill Status Adopted 2012 Role Prime Urban Design Consultant Responsibilities Community Visioning, Open Space Integration, Downtown Revitalization Reference Nick Calubaquib nick.calubaquib@morganhill.ca.gov (408) 310-4241

realize

www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


San Fernando Corridors Plan San Fernando, California

CDityesign C ollective

open space planning + Community visioning Winner of the 2005 Award for planning implementation, small jurisdiction, L.A. chapter of the American Planning Association

The San Fernando Corridors Specific Plan contains growth strategies, streetscape design concepts, land use plans, and form-based development regulations to attract and focus new investment along three of the city’s primary mixed-use corridors. Well-attended public workshops lead to a long term vision and visual preferences for architecture and landscape character to guide future investment. Project features • Three public workshops focused on land use, district character, and streetscape design. • Attract significant new investment to the three gateway corridors. • Coordinate public and private investment to catalyze revitalization. • Focus new retail uses in the Downtown and encourage new mixed-use and residential development along Maclay and San Fernando Corridors. • Attract a range of complementary commercial, live-work, and workplace uses to Truman Street.

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PRIMARY CLIENT City of San Fernando Status Adopted 2005 Role Urban Design in association with FTB Conley Consulting Group Responsibilities Community Visioning, Downtown Revitalization, Land Use Strategies, Form-based Site Development Strategies

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www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


CDityesign C ollective

Oakdale Shopping Center Oakdale, California

Shopping center renewal + Sprawl repair + site masterplanning

City Design Collective prepared two different concepts to encourage retrofit of the Oakdale Shopping Center. Infill and retrofit strategies include new mixed-use buildings with office and/or residential land uses above ground floor retail to create a walkable street network within the existing mall layout. A mixed-use building having restaurants and office space is located on the banks of the Stanislaus River. The more ambitious concept is a complete site redevelopment which lays the groundwork for a mid-rise mixed-use town center in which residents can live, work, and shop within walking distance of the River.

PRIMARY CLIENT City of Oakdale Role Prime Urban Design Consultant Responsibilities Infill Strategies, Strip Mall Retrofit,

Project features • Design concepts maximize the site’s valuable land and utilize its strategic location. • Mixed-use development entitlements add value to existing stakeholders. • Dedicated area for small boat ‘put-in’ and ‘take-out’ to accommodate river-oriented retail and services.

envision

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www.citydesigncollective.com | 363 17th Street, Oakland CA 94612 | 415 378-2181


Project References and Letters of Endorsement


Project References The City Design Collective is strongly committed to the success of its clients and the people and places they represent. We approach each project as a unique opportunity, and consistently strive to produce the highest caliber of work possible. The references we have provided can testify to our deep knowledge of design and planning issues, collaborative approach, and strong work ethic.

Circle~S Redevelopment Plan and Form-Based Development Code

The City Design Collective project team worked closely with City Staff to prepare a masterplan and corresponding form-based development code for 16 acres of city-owned land along one of the city’s primary mixed-use corridors Project Contact: Tina Gallegos, City Planner (510) 215-3002

Gateway District Strategic Plan

The City Design Collective project team worked closely with City Staff to prepare strategies for the revitalization of Alameda’s former auto row. Stakeholder meetings and a public charrette led to a statement of visions and goals as well as economic, urban design, and capital improvement strategies designed in support of desired new investment. Project Contact: Jennifer Ott, Deputy City Manager (510) 747-4747 dIstrIct-Zone regulatIons

Park Street Districts Regulating Code, Architectural Guidelines and Project Design Review

2.1 diStriCt zoneS north of lincoln ~ regulating Plan

District Zones Park Street general as a gateway to the city of alameda, Park Street general is composed of attractive buildings located near to the back of the sidewalk having a mix of commercial, workplace, and residential uses in a pedestrian-friendly environment. Parking is located onstreet and in shared parking lots to the rear and side of buildings. workplace neighborhood the Workplace neighborhood contains a variety of building types having a mix of workplace, commercial, and residential uses. Building types, land uses, and site design principles create an environment that supports a range of commercial and residential activities.

p

clement avenue

p

residential neighborhood the residential neighborhood is home to many historic homes and has a distinctive residential character. regulations for sitedevelopment, building types, and architecture are designed to preserve and enhance residential character. Workplace uses are conditionally permitted in residential building types, and must be compatible with adjacent residences.

eagle avenue

p

waterfront Between Blanding avenue and the estuary, the Waterfront District contains a mix of land uses, building types, and development patterns to enhance pedestrian activity. the code allows for a flexible approach to infill and redevelopment in support of overall district growth and revitalization.

Buena Vista avenue

Foley Street

p

Pacific avenue

p

regulating plan symbols

tild

Corner treatment required [see Section 2.3 for details]

p

City Design Collective prepared the Park Street Districts Regulating Code, the first formbased code developed for the City of Alameda. Land use, site development, and architecture regulations are designed to incentivize and streamline new development.

Broadway

mixed-use neighborhood The Mixed-Use Neighborhood is comprised primarily of residential and compatible workplace uses. Workplace uses are permitted in residentially-compatible building types. new live-work and residential building types are similarly encouraged.

everett Street

oak Street

Park Street

Blanding avenue

Parking all new development conditional. applicant to review development scenarios incorporating additional public parking supply

lincoln

aven

en

Project Contact: Andrew Thomas, Planning Services Manager (510) 747-6881

ay W

ue

Riverside Dr.

District Zone : 1

CDityesign C ollective

Park Street Districts Regulating Code - PSBA Review Draft - February, 2010 High St.

Downtown Specific Plan

Fifth St.

Fourth St.

Third St.

Second St. Topeka St.

Stanislaus St.

Sierra St.

Patterson Rd.

Seventh St.

Santa Fe St.

Sixth St.

First St.

Atchison St.

City Design Collective led a public planning process and created urban design and economic revitalization strategies for Riverbank’s historic downtown. The resulting Specific Plan includes land use policies, streetscape designs, and a form-based development code. Project Contact: Tim Ogden, City Manager, City of Waterford, CA. (209) 874-2328 x103

Cinema Streetscape Improvements Project

Ian Ross served as project manager and lead designer for the urban design team. The restructuring of Middlefield Road and Broadway Avenue, and design of new plazas created a vibrant, pedestrian-friendly public realm the heart of Downtown Redwood City. Project Contact: Pat Webb, Economic Development Coordinator (650) 780-7293


letter of reference

tim ogden, director of economic development

& housing, riverbank, ca

CD C

ity esign ollective


letter of reference

jennifer ott, deputy city manager, alameda, ca

CDityesign C ollective


letters of reference

andrew thomas, planning services manager, city of alameda, ca

CDityesign C ollective


City Design Collective in the news: gateway district strategic plan

CDityesign C ollective


City Design Collective Contact Information

www.citydesigncollective.com ian@citydesigncollective.com

363 17th Street Suite 301

Oakland, California 94612 (415) 378-2181

“Cities must see themselves as partners who work hand-in-hand with the private sector. Our tools are designed to strengthen relationships between cities and prospective investors, to streamline the approval process, and to enhance a city’s overall competitiveness in the regional marketplace for new investment.” Ian Ross, Founding Principal San Jose State Symposium for Public Private Partnerships September 2012

“The CDC did a fantastic job creating urban design strategies for the City of Alameda that the community could use to articulate their priorities and preferences regarding the redevelopment and reuse of our former Naval Air Station. They are exceptionally good at articulating difficult land use and urban design concepts in non-threatening, easy to understand terms so that the community can have productive discussions and arrive at consensus.” Andrew Thomas, Planning Services Manager City of Alameda, California


City Design Collective - Strategic Urban Design