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purchasing their current lot, the couple just couldn’t get the numbers to work out. The solution: expand their options by opting for a manufactured home. “I went to the showroom grimacing since some of them did feel like trailers. But as I walked through the Silvercrest model, I thought, ‘Hey, that’s not too bad!’” Four months later, a huge truck was pulling up to the driveway with the first section. The remaining two pieces arrived the next day, offering curious neighbors a second round of free entertainment. Because of the need to keep costs down, the McIntyres had their home built by Hallmark, which ended up being less expensive. Construction quality was another consideration. Says McIntyre, “At the time, Silvercrest was doing 2 by 4 construction throughout, but Hallmark offered 2 by 6 exterior walls. This makes the place a little stouter.” Additionally, the McIntyres wanted a nearby manufacturer, not only to make delivery easier (and less costly), but also to ease the burden of meeting the special code requirements 28

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in her area. For all its natural wonders, the seaside community of Carpinteria, just 13 miles south of Santa Barbara, happens to be located in an earthquake and fire zone. Sited just on the edge of the chaparral-covered foothills, less than a mile from the Pacific Ocean, the bright and airy three-bedroom structure features a huge master bedroom and oversized bathroom as well as high ceilings with plenty of built in shelves and nooks—perfect for displaying McIntyre’s many sculptures and objets d’art. Outside, a king-sized wooden gazebo, complete with ceiling fans, offers a cool shady spot with—if you look hard enough—views of the ocean through Queen Palms swaying in the breeze. The 20 by 25 foot garage wasn’t always filled with canvases, paints and works-in-progress. It once housed her son’s muscle car, a 1962 Mercury Comet. “I told him, y’ know what? You don’t even live here. I need a studio.” Soon after, the car was removed, allowing McIntyre to expand beyond her tiny 10 by 12 studio. Over two

months, McIntyre and her husband transformed the space, first replacing the garage door with sliding glass doors, followed by insulation and wall paneling along with epoxy paint for the concrete floor. As for those porcelain heads, excavated near some Cologne factories destroyed during World War II, they ultimately found a proud owner. “I’m not sure what I’m going to do with them, but I had to have them,” McIntyre says laughing. She immediately points to a twofoot-tall torso made almost entirely out of buttons. “Well, I do things and sometimes I just need a head.” McIntyre’s art career started early, thanks in part to her artist mother who encouraged her to draw and experiment with watercolors. After getting a degree in fine arts from the University of California, Santa Barbara, she helped out with the advertising and marketing in the family business (“They made air filters, the quintessential widget”), which included designing booths for trade shows. Then. after becoming a stay-atw w w .umhm ag .c om

Upwardly Mobile Magazine  

The Magazine of Mobile, Manufactured and Modular Home Living

Upwardly Mobile Magazine  

The Magazine of Mobile, Manufactured and Modular Home Living

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