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City & Guilds Vocational Rich List 2011 Published by City & Guilds to celebrate WorldSkills London 2011, the world’s greatest skills Competition.

I AM... AT THE TOP OF MY GAME


City & Guilds Vocational Rich List 2011 The City & Guilds Vocational Rich List ranks wealth among those who have built their fortunes following an Apprenticeship or other practical qualification. And defying the downturn, the seventh edition of the List shows Britain’s self-made, vocational elite are worth a collective £17.6 billion – a billion pound increase since 2008.


Contents 05

Foreword by Chris Jones & Aidan Jones

06

Philip Beresford – Introduction to the City & Guilds Vocational Rich List

08

City & Guilds Vocational Rich List

08

01–05

10

06–10

12

11–15

14

16–20

16

21–45

18

46–70

20

70–100

22

About City & Guilds


Foreword

The City & Guilds Vocational Rich List showcases the wealthiest people in the UK who come from a vocational background, having undertaken an Apprenticeship or other practical qualification. Since 2008, when the last edition of the City & Guilds Vocational Rich List was published, much in Britain has changed. There is a new economic climate, a new government and a new horizon for young people leaving school. But in amongst all this change, the value and importance of vocational skills and qualifications has not only remained but in many cases increased. And, WorldSkills London 2011 – which takes place at ExCeL London from 5–8 October – will be a vivid reminder that now, just as throughout history, skills shape our world. In fact, for many of Britain’s most wealthy individuals, vocational qualifications and skills have laid the foundations for them to realise their ambitions, carve out a successful career and reach the peaks of their industries.

That’s why the 2011 edition of the City & Guilds Vocational Rich List has been published to celebrate WorldSkills London 2011 – the world’s greatest international skills Competition, careers and jobs event – which will bring together over 1,000 young people from across the globe, competing to be world champions in their chosen skill. While members of the biggest ever Team UK can be proud of their place at WorldSkills London 2011, and may well be candidates for future editions of the City & Guilds Vocational Rich List, it is also a real honour for those that feature on this roll call. We hope the seventh City & Guilds Vocational Rich List will not only celebrate their success, but also serve as an inspiration to others to discover their talent, unlock their potential and achieve their career aspirations through vocational education and skills training.

Chris Jones

Aidan Jones

CEO and Director General, City & Guilds

Chief Executive, WorldSkills London 2011

04 05


Philip Beresford, compiler of the City & Guilds Vocational Rich List and the Sunday Times Rich List, reflects on the 2011 rankings

Taking an Apprenticeship or vocational qualification – such as those offered by leading vocational education organisation City & Guilds – is certainly no impediment to entrepreneurial activity and wealth creation. The City & Guilds Vocational Rich List 2011, the seventh edition of the list which identifies the wealthiest people in the UK from a vocational background, clearly shows the dynamism of the much-maligned British economy – a place where talent can indeed flourish, whatever the background of the individual. This year the 100 millionaires who began their careers with vocational qualifications are collectively worth £17.6 billion, against £16.6 billion when we last did the survey in 2008, just as the economic downturn began.

Indeed, in direct contradiction to Lord Sugar, who recently told his BBC ‘Apprentices’ that he is yet to meet an engineer ‘who can turn his hands to business’, the 2011 City & Guilds Vocational Rich List reveals many trained engineers who have not only turned their hand to business but also made a huge success of it (some - dare I say it – even more successfully than Lord Sugar himself). Twenty-four of the top 100 started out as engineering apprentices including Sir Anthony Bamford, whose family fortune has shot up this year to £2.15 billion on the back of strong profits at the famous JCB construction equipment firm. This year Bamford heads a list of five billionaires in the top 100. He is closely followed by “King of Diamonds” Laurence Graff who started out as a Hatton Garden apprentice and is now worth £2 billion. At number three is former engineering apprentice John Caudwell who went on to make a £1.5 billion fortune from mobile phones. Our fourth billionaire is Sir James Dyson, worth £1.45 billion from a strong showing at his Dyson Appliances operation. None of these four went to university, instead serving their time as apprentices in different fields. Clearly then, Oxbridge degrees and prestige business qualifications are not obligatory for entry into the ranks of the self-made billionaire club.

I AM... REAPIN THE REW


As in previous years, this is a list that is overwhelmingly self-made. All but six of the top 100 have made their own way in the world and did not inherit any wealth. The six who inherited – Sir Anthony Bamford, Jack Tordoff, Peter Dawson, Graham Baker, Andrew Thorpe and Deborah Meaden of Dragon’s Den fame – took over family operations after gaining their vocational qualifications and used their nous to turn them into much larger or more successful concerns. This year Meaden helps the female representation to a record of seven with well-known names from the world of fashion such as Linda Bennett, Stella McCartney and Karen Millen well represented. The List also features TV cook and prolific food writer Delia Smith. Celebrities, too, have found an Apprenticeship put them on the road to success. Sir Alex Ferguson, the Manchester United manager, worth at least £20m, served his time as a Govan shipbuilding apprentice. Billy Connolly, the comedian, also worked in the Clyde shipyards. Other prominent people with vocational qualifications include Sir Jackie Stewart and Nigel Mansell, former world champion racing drivers, and Ron Dennis, Chairman of McLaren Automotive. TV chefs Jamie Oliver, Rick Stein and Gary Rhodes all entered their careers after completing vocational catering qualifications.

Indeed, of the 100 wealthiest individuals from a practical or vocational background, some 14 may be described as celebrity money with a difference, having all done some training at the outset. In terms of geography, the usual distribution of millionaire wealth is heavily weighted to the South East, with over half of the Sunday Times Rich List, for example, coming from London and its environs. Encouragingly, the City & Guilds Vocational Rich List is heavily weighted in favour of the regions. Only 24 of 100 come from the South East. Scotland is second with 20. The North West comes in third with 11, while Yorkshire and the Midlands tie for fourth place with nine apiece. This is a very positive step, as the better spread of millionaire money across the UK helps deliver the message that local entrepreneurs who start with nothing other than their practical training can do extraordinarily well. Their prosperity is our prosperity – through the taxes they pay, their spending power and the jobs they create. Entrepreneurs from industry, including high-tech sectors, lead the way in the 2011 City & Guilds Vocational Rich List, making up 30 of the 100, an increase of nine since 2008. They are followed by property and construction, with 25 millionaires, and the leisure sector, with ten.

The typical vocational millionaire is still a late middle-aged male aged around 61, living outside London with an engineering or construction qualification. He works in industry and has made his own way in the world. On a lighter note, it helps to be born as a Gemini – 20 of the top 100 are born under that star sign – far ahead of any other. Capricorn and Cancer follow this with twelve apiece. Just one of the top 100 was born in the 1980s while two are from the 1970s. Another three were at the other end of the age spectrum being born in the 1920s. The youngest millionaire to make it onto this year’s Vocational Rich List is internet entrepreneur and former commis chef to Gordon Ramsay, Mark Pearson. The oldest is 83-year-old Glasgow-born car dealer Sir Arnold Clark. Two thirds of the top 100 were born in the 1940s and 1950s, so they are anything from nearly 50 to comfortably in their sixties, reflecting the time it can take to build a fortune. So who qualifies for the City & Guilds Vocational Rich List? All millionaires listed have completed some form of vocational or practical training, such as an Apprenticeship. Wealth is identified as stakes in companies, or via sales of companies. The List takes into account brand names, book sales and the like in valuations. All valuations were completed in mid-2011 using Companies House and stock exchange prices in June 2011. To find out who makes the top 100 read on...

NG WARDS

06 07


01

Sir Anthony Bamford & Family

02

Laurence Graff

John Caudwell

23/10/1945

13/06/1938

07/10/1952

Industry

Diamonds

Mobile Phones

£2.15bn

£2bn

£1.5bn

JCB, the yellow digger maker and a bellwether for UK industry, more than doubled its profits in 2010 to £235 million on much higher sales of £2 billion on the back of a record year in India, and profits are expected to recover strongly. Staffordshire-based JCB was founded by Sir Anthony Bamford’s late father in 1945. Bamford’s career began with a two-year Apprenticeship at Massey Ferguson in France before he started work at JCB’s Rochester headquarters in 1964. He stepped down as MD in 2004 but remains as chairman of what is the world’s third largest supplier of earth-moving equipment. We value the business at around £2,000 million today. There are substantial private assets in the Bamford family such as a 4,500-acre Staffordshire estate, another 1,500 acres in Gloucestershire, plus holiday homes in Barbados and the South of France. The Bamford family has also had dividends of £69 million in recent years. We add £150 million for other assets taking the Bamford family to around £2.15 billion.

A pink diamond became the most expensive piece of jewellery to be sold at auction, fetching £28.8 million at a Sotheby’s sale in Geneva in November. The buyer was of course Graff, known as “The King of Diamonds.” He followed this up a week later by spending £14 million on two rough diamonds in Antwerp. Graff, who held the previous £15.3 million sale record set in 2008, has renamed his pink diamond the Graff Pink. The prices being paid shows that the diamond trade is now bouncing back from recession. Aside from his diamond purchases, Graff also had time late last year to open a new luxury hotel called Delaire’s in South Africa. Graff Diamonds International, his company, has bounced back from the downturn, making £62.5 million profit on £275 million sales in 2010. With his roots in London’s East End, Graff left school at 14 determined to make his fortune. He took a Hatton Garden Apprenticeship in diamonds and began buying and selling stones in 1957. It was a long haul, but by the mid-sixties, his workshop was regarded as a haunt for the mega-rich. There are nearly 40 Graff stores worldwide today. With recovery in the market, we raise our valuation of the business to £1.7 billion. That sort of a price would not deter the many luxury goods companies that have expressed an interest in acquiring the Graff name and operation. Graff splits his time between homes in Gstaad, London, Cap Ferrat, New York City and his 150-foot yacht. He also owns a vineyard and winery in Stellenbosch, the Napa Valley of South Africa, and a modern and contemporary art collection valued at £125 million. These assets take Graff to a cool £2 billion.

John Caudwell’s move into property is bearing fruit. His six separate Caudwell Properties operations made a total of close to £6.7 million profit on nearly £11 million sales in 2009-10. He has spent £80 million on properties in London and elsewhere. He can easily afford to take such a gamble, having sold most of Caudwell Group in 2006 for £1.46 billion. His remaining stake netted him another £100 million when the company, trading as Phones4U, was sold again in March. It was in 1970 that Caudwell took his first job as an engineering apprentice at the Michelin Tyre Company locally. He later became a successful car dealer but his path to serious money came through an early move into the fledgling mobile phone industry in 1987. When he sold up, Caudwell was the biggest independent player in the European mobile phone industry. His 85% stake in the business was worth around £1.24 billion at the sale price. Two years previously he had sold off his Singlepoint customer billing operation to Vodafone for £405 million. With his proceeds and other assets we value Caudwell at £1.5 billion this year with the final sale of Phones4U. He does hefty charitable work for Caudwell Children, which grants holidays, provides equipment and support to youngsters with life-limiting illnesses and their families.

Sir Anthony was awarded a Fellowship to the City and Guilds of London Institute in 1992

01

03


04

Sir James Dyson & Family

Sir Terry Matthews

02/05/1947

06/06/1943

Industry

Telecoms

£1.45bn

£1.4bn

Dyson’s expansion plans are well under way and the Malmesbury-based operation aims to double its development team from 350 to 700. In 2009, Dyson launched nine new machines, including the popular Air Multiplier fan, and doubled its profits to £163.8 million on record sales of £770 million. It is all a long way from Dyson’s early days. Having studied industrial design at the Royal College of Art, he put his skills to good use. His first foray into inventing was the Ballbarrow thirty years ago and he spent 15 years plugging away to get the Dyson cleaner on the market. In the five years from 1979 to 1984, Dyson made 5,127 prototypes of the dual-cyclone cleaner before he perfected the design. It nearly bankrupted him. But it was worth it. On the latest profits, we value the business at around £1.3 billion in the current climate. Since 1999, Dyson and his family have had over £278 million in salaries and dividends. Property assets, such as his £15 million Gloucestershire mansion, his London home and a £3 million French chateau, take the Dyson family to perhaps £1.45 billion after-tax.

05

Dyson’s expansion plans are well under way and the Malmesbury-based operation aims to double its development team from 350 to 700.

Rain may have blighted the 2010 Ryder Cup at Celtic Manor but the thrilling climax and European victory will have pleased Sir Terry Matthews. It was the high point of Matthews’ life, which actually started 67 years ago in the resort when it was the site of a maternity hospital. He spent over £150 million and 20 years of hard labour to develop a resort fit for golf’s equivalent of the World Cup. But ironically golf is not Matthews’ first passion. Since taking an Apprenticeship at the Post Office research department at 15, Matthews has been immersed in technology. After university in his beloved Wales, Matthews went to Canada and made his fortune, first with a telecom company called Mitel, later sold to British Telecom, and then more significantly with Newbridge Networks. The company floated in 1989, and Matthews sold it to the French telecom giant Alcatel in 2000 for £4.4 billion. Matthews collected over £1 billion in Alcatel shares at the time. Today Matthews moves easily between Canada and Wales. He is the founder and main investor in Celtic House International, the venture capital group with £200 million of funding for start-up tech companies. He also invests in other companies through his Wesley Clover Corporation, which owns Celtic Manor and the Brookstreet resort in Canada. The Canadian Business Rich List valued Matthews at £1.043 billion in late 2010.

05

08 09


06

Jim McColl

Trevor Hemmings

22/12/1951

11/06/1935

Industry

Property and leisure

£570m

£550m

McColl aims to open a new school in a former Glasgow pumps factory where he started work as a 16-year old engineering apprentice. Today he runs Clyde Blowers, one of Scotland’s largest privately owned engineering groups. The Glasgow-based company was taken over in 1992 by McColl, who after his Apprenticeship, took an MBA and made his first serious money as a company doctor. He owns 60% of Clyde Blowers which employs 5,500 staff worldwide, only 1,500 of whom are in the UK. In 2009 group profits worldwide came in at £125 million on £1.35 billion sales. The company should be worth £900 million on these figures. Other assets and properties take McColl to around £570 million.

07

McColl aims to open a new school in a former Glasgow pumps factory where he started work as a 16-year old engineering apprentice. Today he runs Clyde Blowers, one of Scotland’s largest privately owned engineering groups.

Previously Jim was highly commended for the City & Guilds Prince Philip Medal

06

Leisure tycoon Trevor Hemmings came to his beloved Preston North End’s aid in July 2010 by paying the club’s latest tax bill. Hemmings, who holds an 88.5% stake in North End, loaned the struggling football club £200,000 through his Guild Ventures investment group. Hemmings’ loans to the club are now just shy of £15 million. Hemmings has the cash, having sold the famous Blackpool Tower to the local council for around £40 million recently. He started out as a bricklayer’s apprentice locally in Leyland, later building his own housebuilding firm, selling it for £1.5 million in the early 1970s to the late Sir Fred Pontin. Hemmings became his right hand man in the Pontins leisure operation. He later took over the business and sold it in 1989 for a hefty profit. In 2000, he bought Littlewoods’ pools operation from the Moores family for £161 million. His main holdings company, the Northern Trust Group, has £122 million net assets in 2009-10. His pub company Trust Inns has £84.3 million net assets while we can see £47 million of stakes in quoted companies. Hemmings is now easily worth £550 million.


08

Sir David McMurtry

09

10

Sir Arnold Clark & Family

Steve Morgan

15/03/1940

27/11/1927

25/11/1952

Industry

Car sales

Property and construction

£450m

£430m

£400m

The Wotton-under-Edge-based Renishaw is a recognised world leader in the fields of metrology and spectroscopy, along with precision engineering. As a result, it has opened two offices in China to cope with a flood of orders and spent £7.5 million on a new factory in Gloucestershire. Renishaw’s founder and chairman Sir David McMurtry, an ex-Rolls-Royce apprentice and later engineer, left his native Dublin at 18. While at Rolls, he was responsible for many inventions with the engine maker. He set up Renishaw in 1973 and floated the operation on the stock market ten years later. Renishaw’s share price has soared in recent weeks and the company is now worth £1.24 billion. McMurtry’s stake is now worth £430 million. Past dividends etc. will take him to perhaps £450 million after-tax.

Profits more than doubled at Glasgowbased Arnold Clark Automobiles to £73.8 million on £2.1 billion sales in 2009. The company benefited from the government scrappage scheme, selling 75,390 new cars. Born in Glasgow’s Townhead, the son of a steelworker, founder Sir Arnold Clark left school at 14 and to his mother’s pleasure swiftly found a job as an apprentice shoe designer with the Co-op. “I designed the tops of the shoes. It was a good start in those days but I never really liked it,” says Clark. At just 17, with £160 savings, he joined the RAF which he says taught him a great deal. But it was his family that taught him to be thrifty, a quality that has underpinned the astonishing growth of his car empire. When he left the RAF, his £160 savings intact, he decided to set up in business for himself. But he needed more cash before getting into the car trade and grafted for several years in the catering and pub business. He began his own car dealership in Glasgow’s Kelvinside in 1955. Today it has 145 outlets and is Scotland’s biggest car dealer. The company, owned by Clark and his family, is easily worth its £413 million net assets. We add £17 million for other assets.

Steve Morgan is the proud owner of Wolverhampton Wanderers, which just survived its second season in the Premier League in May. Morgan paid just £10 to Sir Jack Hayward to take over at Molineux in August 2007, but he promised to invest £30 million in the club. Morgan can afford it. He started labouring for his father’s small civil engineering company after a move to a new school in Liverpool proved a disaster: After an OND in civil engineering at Liverpool Polytechnic, Morgan worked with a local civil engineering contractor for two years. Then came the big break. In the recession of 1974, his employer decided to pull out of civil engineering, but was stuck with an unwanted £25,000 contract in Penley, North Wales. “I told them I was happy to leave and do the work for them as subcontractor. I borrowed £5,000 from my father to set up, and made £5,000 profit on the job after paying my father back. That’s 100% return on capital in three months.” Twenty years later, as one of the biggest housebuilders in Britain, Redrow was floated on the stock market. Morgan sold £240 million worth of shares in the float and afterwards when he left the Redrow board in 2000. He also had a £100 million stake in the De Vere leisure group, which was the subject of a bidding battle in the summer of 2006. Morgan also recently shared £75 million sale proceeds on a Spanish development. In March 2009 Morgan returned to Redrow as chairman and has seen the share price revive in recent months. He has a £108 million stake. Allowing for reinvestment of his share sale proceeds, Morgan is worth perhaps £400 million after-tax.

10 11


11

John Bloor

12

13

David Wilson & Family

Ray O’ Rourke & Family

16/06/1943

05/12/1941

23/01/1947

Industry

Construction

Construction

£385m

£360m

£315m

Triumph, the British motorbike manufacturer, has had an extraordinary renaissance under John Bloor, the Midlands building tycoon. In 2009, it captured 13% of the British market and displaced Kawasaki, one of the big four Japanese bike makers. Its global market share is up from 3.3% to 4.4% and it is taking on Harley-Davidson with its Thunderbird and Rocket 111 models. The Triumph success has helped its parent company, Bloor Holdings, survive the downturn in reasonable shape. In 2009-10 it returned a £19.6 million profit on £631.4 million sales. It was in 1983 that Triumph’s revival started. Bloor, was looking for property to develop for housing when a real estate agent showed him the shuttered Triumph factory in the Midlands. Bloor ended up buying a lot more, paying about £150,000 for the Triumph name and various assets. He built a new factory about 15 miles away in Leicestershire and in 1991 introduced the first new-era models. A good portion of the factory burned down in March 2002, pushing the company to the brink of collapse again. Bloor pressed the insurance companies for fast action in settling claims; within six months, production was restored. A miner’s son from Derbyshire, Bloor overcame debilitating illness as a child, and went to work as an apprentice plasterer at age 17. That job introduced him to the housing industry. Before long he had launched Bloor Holdings, which he gradually built up into one of England’s most successful housing developers. Since 1983, he has also spent upward of £80m reviving the Triumph marque. Bloor Holdings still has nearly £365m net assets and a solid balance sheet. In the current climate it should be worth £360m. Bloor owns it all and we add £25m for past salaries/dividends and other assets.

David Wilson’s new housebuilding operation, Davidsons Developments, made a £1.7 million profit on £62.8 million sales in 2009-10. It is worth its £78 million net assets. Wilson joined his dad’s small Ibstock building business in 1961 after graduating from the Leicester Polytechnic School of Building. Leicestershire-based Wilson Bowden prospered and was floated on the stock market in 1987. Twenty years, later Wilson sold the company to rival Barratt Developments in a £2.2 billion deal. It netted £727 million for Wilson and his family trusts in a mix of £304 million in cash and the rest in Barratt shares. His remaining Barratt stake is now worth £16 million, as the shares have drifted downwards recently. The cash element of the deal, £98 million of share sales and dividends over the years at Wilson Bowden and the £78 million for Davidsons take the Wilson family to £360 million after-tax. He will go higher if Davidsons proves as successful as Wilson Bowden.

County Mayo-born O’Rourke left Ireland to work in Britain after training as a civil engineer in Dublin. He founded the O’Rourke operation in 1977 with his brother. It was re-named Laing O’Rourke in 2001 when it acquired the construction division of John Laing. Known as the ‘tough guy’ in Britain’s toughest industry, O’Rourke claimed the deal by which he bought Laing Construction for £1 in 2001 ‘brings forward the O’Rourke Group’s plans by eight years.’ In 2009-10 Laing O’Rourke made £34.3 million profit on nearly £2.2 billion sales. It has £145 million net assets and is easily worth £285 million. We assume the O’Rourke family is the ultimate owner and add £30 million for other assets and past salaries etc.


Known as the ‘tough guy’ in Britain’s toughest industry, O’Rourke claimed the deal by which he bought Laing Construction for £1 in 2001 ‘brings forward the O’Rourke Group’s plans by eight years.’

14

15

Jack Tordoff & Family

David Hood

05/05/1935

25/03/1948

Car sales

Electronics

£290m

£250m

Having moved into a new £3 million headquarters outside Leeds, Tordoff’s JCT 600 motor trader now has 48 dealerships. In 2010, it made £12.3 million profit on £615 million sales and with £92 million net assets should be worth £270 million. Tordoff himself started working for his father’s garage business as an apprentice mechanic. He now runs and owns the business with his family trusts, having bought out his late father’s two partners. JCT 600 is now regarded as the dealer for luxury brands in the Yorkshire region. Tordoff’s other assets take the family to £290 million.

Set-top box maker Pace Micro Technology has seen its shares fall sharply recently, after it warned that profits would be well below market expectations because of component supply problems related to the Japanese tsunami in March. This will disappoint David Hood, its biggest individual shareholder. A former apprentice at a hi-fi manufacturer, Hood went into the television industry at the height of its development in the early 1970s. He later moved into TV rentals before teaming up with his friend Barry Rubery to launch Pace Micro Technology in 1982. Pace floated on the stock market in 1996. Hood sold £109 million worth of shares in the float and another £92.4 million in 2000. In the first half of 2010 profits soared 46.4% to £45.4 million at the Bradford-based operation. Hood, no longer on the board, retains a stake that has fallen recently to £17 million, even after another £12.5 million share sale in 2009. Hood runs two businesses out of Leeds-Bradford Airport: the Multiflight air charter operation and online search group Infoserve, in which he has a £350,000 stake. With his sale proceeds, Hood is easily worth £250 million after tax.

15

12 13


16

Michael Clare

John Deer

08/02/1955

13/01/1938

Property and retailing

Industry

£237m

£210m

Mike Clare, the colourful founder of beds retailer Dreams, has invested £85m in property in the last 18 months, which is now worth around £120 million. He has also put £5 million into his charity called The Clare Foundation, which aims to help other charities become more efficient and entrepreneurial. In March 2008 he sold his Dreams bed business for a reported £230 million, some 23 years after he started it. After taking an HND in business studies Clare first went into the furniture trade in High Wycombe, working his way up to area manager. In 1987, he took a lease on a shop in Uxbridge and opened as the Sofa Bed Centre, since renamed Dreams. Clare and his family owned it all. He reinvested £20 million in the firm under its new owner, private equity firm Exponent. His investments and other assets should take him to perhaps £237million after-tax.

16

17

Mike Clare, the colourful founder of beds retailer Dreams, has invested £85m in property in the last 18 months, which is now worth around £120m. He has also put £5m into his charity called The Clare Foundation, which aims to help other charities become more efficient and entrepreneurial.

Engineering firm Renishaw has seen its shares rise on the back of a strong order book from China. This is good news for John Deer, a co-founder of the group. He trained as mechanical engineer at Richard Thomas and Baldwin before moving to the power plant aerodynamics department of Rolls Royce in 1960. At Rolls he teamed up with Sir David McMurtry in 1973 to form Renishaw. Ten years later the pair floated Renishaw on the stock market. Deer’s stake (including shares in trust) had increased in value to £199 million. Past dividends and other assets, including the 200-acre Oakgrove Stud, opposite Chepstow racecourse, take him to £200 million easily.


18

Michael Oglesby & Family

19

20

Peter Dawson & Family

Ron Dennis

05/06/1939

19/08/1938

01/06/1947

Property

Truck rentals

Industry and motor sports

£200m

£187m

£177m

Michael Oglesby was made a CBE in the New Year’s honours list for services to business and charity. After leaving school at 16, he became an apprentice plumber to his father, before both realised it wasn’t working and he went to college to do a degree in building. Today, as founder and chairman of Manchester’s Bruntwood Property Group, he is one of the most high profile construction tycoons in the North West. Bruntwood is easily the busiest developer in Manchester. Altogether, Bruntwood owns over 80 office buildings in Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds and Birmingham. In 2008, it bought one site in each of the four cities as the market softened. The company is keen to foster links with local communities and donates 10% of profits to charity and local communities. Each of its 400 staff takes two days off a year to work with local communities. It was in 1970 that Oglesby moved from Scunthorpe to Manchester, forming Bruntwood five years later. The share structure of the various Bruntwood operations is complex but the main family operation, Bruntwood Ltd, saw its profits fall slightly to £11 million on £100.2 million sales in 2010. It is worth its £147 million net assets. Other assets take the Oglesby family to £200 million.

In 2010, profits at Peter Dawson’s company, Dawsongroup, came in at £19.2 million on sales of £145.2 million. Dawson joined what was his father’s haulage group in 1956, after serving an engineering Apprenticeship. He turned the Milton Keynes-based operation, which dates back to 1935, into one of the largest truck rental businesses in Europe. It was quoted on the stock market in 1988 and went private again in 2000. Dawson and family trusts own all the company, which is worth its £167.3 million net assets. Other assets add £20 million.

McLaren Automotive chairman Ron Dennis launched the company’s new MP4-12C supercar. McLaren has spent £780 million on the car, which will be a rival to Ferrari. Full production has just started and it is now on sale in Europe. After 42 years in motorsport, during which he chaperoned some of F1’s greatest drivers to ten championships and the McLaren team to over 138 grands prix triumphs, Dennis stepped down in 2009 as team principal. He left on a high, with driver Lewis Hamilton crowned world champion at the end of the 2008 season. In his new capacity, Dennis is building the McLaren Group, which includes divisions devoted to luxury car manufacturing, electronics and applied technology. Early in 2007, Bahrain’s Mumtalakat Holding Company bought a 30% stake in McLaren. Dennis, who was brought up in Woking and left school at 16 to become an apprentice mechanic, has a 21% stake in the business. The recent £200 million plus flotation of much smaller and less successful rival Williams on the Frankfurt stock exchange allows us to revalue McLaren to around £750 million on the back of £68 million profit on £292 million sales in 2009. That values Dennis’s stake at around £157 million. Other assets add £20 million.

20

14 15


21

26

31=

Frank Boyd & Family

Sir Tom Farmer

Rod Aldridge

08/06/1954

10/07/1940

07/11/1947

Property

Property and tyres

Business services

£165m

£136m

£110m

22=

27

31=

Rodger Dudding

Eric Clapton

Tommy Dreelan & Family

21/12/1937

30/03/1945

04/10/1956

Property

Music

Industry

£150m

£125m

£110m

22=

28=

33

John Frieda

Andrew Creighton

Jamie Oliver

05/07/1951

09/06/1961

27/05/1975

Hair care

Property

Media

£150m

£120m

£106m City & Guilds Qualified and Fellow

22=

28=

34=

William Haughey & Family

Kevin McCabe & Family

Ross Brawn

02/07/1956

25/04/1948

23/11/1954

Business services

Property

Motor racing

£150m

£120m

£100m

25

30

34=

Stewart Milne & Family

Kenneth Townsley

Mark Constantine & Family

23/07/1950

03/06/1945

21/07/1952

Construction

Leisure

Retailing

£140m

£118m

£100m

21


I am a passionate supporter of providing opportunities for young people to learn practical skills, and this experience is key to getting the best possible grounding in any trade. In our environment, working at the very top of global motorsport, we need our people to have very good practical experience, whether they are engineers, mechanics or technicians. Initiatives such as F1 in Schools, Formula Student and the SKIDZ Motor Projects charity which I am a Patron of, provide fantastic opportunities for young people to become involved in, and develop the skills to feed their passion for, motorsport. The enthusiasm and commitment that I have seen at such events fills me with optimism for the future of science and engineering in this country. Ross Brawn, Team Principal, MERCEDES GP PETRONAS Formula One Team

36

41=

Larry Kinch

Linda Bennett

29/05/1953

08/09/1962

Industry

Retailing

£96m

£70m

37

41=

George Moore & Family

Emma Harrison

22/07/1928

13/08/1963

Industry

Business services

£95m

£70m

38

43

John Muir & Family

Peter Darwell

31/05/1936

24/06/1949

Construction

Industry

£82m

£69m

39

44

David Russell

Vidal Sassoon

15/09/1956

17/01/1928

Property

Hair care

£78m

£68m

40

45

Allan McKeown & Family

Kevin McDonald

21/05/1946

20/10/1933

Media

Industry

£75m

£64m

45

16 17


46=

49=

55=

James Milne & Family

Colin Halpern & Family

Nigel Mansell

26/12/1940

19/01/1937

08/08/1953

Industry

Pizzas

Motor racing

£60m

£55m

£50m

46=

49=

55=

Mark Pearson

Mustafa Kiamil & Family

Richard Teatum & Family

18/04/1980

29/05/1956

14/03/1957

Internet

Food services

Car sales

£60m

£55m

£50m

46=

49=

58

Michael Slade

Charlie Mullins

David Carr & Family

13/08/1946

28/10/1952

16/06/1937

Property

Plumbing

Car sales

£60m

£55m

£48m

49=

54

59=

Graham Baker

Andrew Tinkler & Family

Ben Brodie

03/04/1952

14/07/1963

24/04/1952

Dog food

Transport

Property

£55m

£54m

£45m

49=

55=

59=

Keith Ford & Family

Jerry Knight & Family

Patrick Head

06/01/1944

27/05/1956

05/06/1946

Industry

Property

Industry

£55m

£50m

£45m

46


63=

61 Andrew Thorpe & Family 14/07/1949 Industry

£44m 62 Sir Jackie Stewart 11/06/1939 Motor racing

£41m 63= Christopher Adey & Family 14/02/1966 Industry

£40m 63= Peter Bull 06/08/1951

As someone who set up their own business at a young age, I know only too well how important it is to have the right skills and the right attitude to become successful. I think it’s wonderful that industrious, talented young people are being celebrated through WorldSkills London 2011. Skills really do mean business and I hope that the Competition inspires people to think about different ways to achieve their goals.

Deborah Meaden & Family

Entrepreneur and Dragon’s Den star Deborah Meaden

69

11/02/1959 Leisure

£40m 63= Karen Millen 29/09/1961 Fashion

£40m City & Guilds qualified

63= Bill Robertson & Family 25/04/1945 Construction

£40m Graham Leslie 05/08/1946

Leisure

Pharmaceuticals

£40m

£38m

63=

70=

Brendan Kerr & Family

Alfie Cheyne & Family

24/08/1965

21/04/1964

Construction

Industry

£40m

£32m

70

18 19


70=

73=

79=

Martin Morgan & Family

Chris Thompson

David Mitchell

15/09/1962

25/09/1956

05/11/1959

Property

Industry

Media

£32m

£30m

£25m

70=

77=

79=

Alan Richardson & Family

Sir Alex Ferguson

Rick Stein & Family

05/07/1942

31/12/1941

04/01/1947

Construction

Football

Restaurants

£32m

£27m

£25m

73=

77=

83

John Elliott & Family

Gavin Oldham

Christopher Kelly

28/12/1943

05/05/1949

11/02/1949

Industry

Finance

Truck sales

£30m

£27m

£22m

73=

79=

84=

Jim Kerr

Bill Haslam

Billy Connolly

09/07/1959

07/12/1959

24/11/1942

Music

Property

Media

£30m

£25m

£20m

73=

79=

84=

John Lancaster & Family

Graham Knight

Robbie Cowling & Family

14/10/1942

25/05/1951

26/11/1960

Industry

Car sales

Internet

£30m

£25m

£20m

70


84=

89=

95=

Terry Crawley

Rick Nevinson & Family

Sir Moir Lockhead

01/01/1963

19/04/1963

25/04/1945

Finance

Business services

Transport

£20m

£15m

£12m

84=

89=

95=

Ken Shaw

Matt Roseberry

Paul Rowley

08/01/1950

07/06/1944

17/03/1966

Industry

Property

Construction

£20m

£15m

£12m

88

89=

98=

Martin McCloskey & Family

Delia Smith & Family

Neil Gatt

14/07/1954

18/06/1941

21/11/1962

Construction

Media

Restaurants

£17m

£15m

£10m

89=

94

98=

Billy Lowe

Charan Gill & Family

Robyn Jones & Family

29/08/1959

08/12/1954

20/08/1961

Leisure

Leisure

Catering services

£15m

£14m

£10m

89=

95=

98=

Stella McCartney

Frank Carter & Family

Gary Rhodes

13/09/1971

12/05/1938

20/04/1960

Fashion

Transport

Chef

£15m

£12m

£10m

City & Guilds Qualified

100 City & Guilds Qualified and Fellow

20 21


I AM... LOOKING TO THE FUTURE Looking for a good job you enjoy, a big house, a nice car and money in the bank? We can help you get there. Who are we? As the UK’s leading vocational education organisation, City & Guilds is pioneering a talent revolution by inspiring people to unlock their potential, develop their skills and achieve their goals. Working with over 8500 centres and training providers, we offer more than 500 qualifications across 28 industries and currently award around two million certificates every year. With 170 job roles across 26 industries, City & Guilds also offers the widest range of Apprenticeships in the UK, through 1000 approved training centres. What do we believe? City & Guilds is dedicated to creating a more proficient and sustainable economy through vocational education. We believe learning has no limits and by working with learners, centres and employers, we can help to drive future economic growth. To achieve this, we want to: – Inspire young people to discover their potential and unlock their talent – Give our training providers the very best in learning support – Provide employers with the talented employees they need to boost their long-term growth.

Why City & Guilds? 99% of employers recognise a City & Guilds qualification as a sign of exceptional training. City & Guilds works with a variety of employers to deliver their training needs, including: – Lloyds TSB – London Underground – Tesco – B&Q – Honda – Rolls Royce Aero Engines As a charity, City & Guilds continually reinvests to improve the quality of vocational education and develop the tools to help learners make informed choices about their futures. Why are we sponsoring WorldSkills London 2011? City & Guilds has a long association with skills competitions and the UK team, having actively supported the past four WorldSkills competitions through UK Skills. WorldSkills London 2011 is an excellent way to celebrate the exceptional talents and ambitions of young people in the UK and inspire more young people to discover their career aspirations. As a Premier Sponsor of WorldSkills London 2011, we are extremely proud that over half of the UK Squad are City & Guilds qualified.


The greatest skills Competition, careers and jobs event on the planet. WorldSkills London 2011 Be part of it! 5– 8 October 2011 ExCeL London Register online now for complimentary tickets worldskillslondon2011.com/visit

Find out about the wealth of inspiring career and job opportunities Meet 100s of top employers such as BT, Cisco, Honda, L’Oréal and others Have a Go and try your hand at 100s of skills Watch 1,000 young people from across the globe compete to be the best in their chosen skill Have you signed up yet?

I AM... ON THE ROAD TO SUCCESS


WorldSkills London 2011 Be part of it! worldskillslondon2011.com/visit

City & Guilds Vocational Rich List 2011 Published by City & Guilds to celebrate WorldSkills London 2011, the world’s greatest skills Competition.

Profile for City & Guilds

City and Guilds Vocational Rich List 2011  

City and Guilds Vocational Rich List 2011

City and Guilds Vocational Rich List 2011  

City and Guilds Vocational Rich List 2011

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