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Get involved in a campaign. If you didn’t caucus, now is a great time to volunteer on a campaign by calling your precinct delegates. Knock on doors and make phone calls. Donate money. (Minnesotans can get a full rebate on the first $50 they donate during a cycle, so you can support someone you believe in without having to fork over your own money.) Talk to your friends, neighbors, and family about voting. Get involved in the process. We have public meeting laws for a reason—so that everyday people can give their input on policy that impacts them. Call your elected officials, attend hearings at city hall and the capitol, and suggest improvements to the bills they’re promoting. Attend their forums and events, and ask questions. Make your voice heard by writing letters to the editor and using the platforms you have to speak up. Build community. Invest in your immediate surroundings by attending your neighborhood organization’s meetings. Build relationships with your neighbors so you can manage conflicts without police intervention. Buy from local businesses as much as you can. Volunteer at nonprofits—as little as one hour every other week can be more helpful than you know. (The online companion to this booklet has a few ideas to get you started.) ●

www.citycounselor.org/agency

Questions & Lies  

Questions & Lies is about the emotional toll of the politics of grievance and fear: immigration, climate change, transphobia, wealth hoardin...

Questions & Lies  

Questions & Lies is about the emotional toll of the politics of grievance and fear: immigration, climate change, transphobia, wealth hoardin...

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