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AMENDMENTS

We worship the constitution as though it is a deity—an infallible arrangement of principles unaffected by technological, moral, or philosophical evolution. We assume its eternal presence the same way we accept the constant motion of time: something to count on precisely because it is so unchanging. The constitution’s inertia must be why no one seems to know that we are on the verge of the first constitutional convention since our current document was written in 1787. So far, all 27 amendments have taken the same path—twothirds of both houses of Congress proposed it, and threequarters of the states ratified its addition to our constitution. That’s how we ended legal slavery, outlawed and re-legalized alcohol, began directly electing senators, and expanded access to voting (which, by the way, is still not a constitutional right). But Article V of the constitution spells out another method —two-thirds of the state legislatures can call for a constitutional convention, allowing for debate and revision everything in the document. This includes not only the 27 amendments, but the constitution itself.

Questions & Lies  

Questions & Lies is about the emotional toll of the politics of grievance and fear: immigration, climate change, transphobia, wealth hoardin...

Questions & Lies  

Questions & Lies is about the emotional toll of the politics of grievance and fear: immigration, climate change, transphobia, wealth hoardin...

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