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domestically and internationally are upending food systems that feed millions of people. Entire cities are disappearing into the ocean—sea level rise, erosion from human development, and intensified tropical storms. The Great Barrier Reef has all but died while polar bears starve on shockingly green hills. It makes me think of their newlytemperate home when my own can’t seem to remember how to make it winter until the Polar Vortex deforms into my backyard. And just as quickly, my faith that we have any chance to fix this evaporates like seawater into Maria. Yes, we are replacing coal-fired power plants at unprecedented rates. Yes, solar and wind are some of the cheapest forms of electricity. But I open my door to see a street lined with cars, which cause a quarter of carbon emissions. I bite into an apple and remember that the food I eat causes another quarter of those emissions. (Oh, plus the methane it creates when decomposing in a landfill if I don’t throw it in a compost bin.) (Which reminds me, did I mention how all that CO2 is making plants significantly less healthy, too?) I exhale and remember that I’m a standalone CO2 factory, too, converting our atmospheric oxygen into global warming with every breath. I can almost start to accept climate disaster as humanity’s inevitability: we were born to emit carbon. We would always get to this point, and perhaps we would also fail to get past it. We struggle to recognize how our past has limited our future. We are Walter Benjamin’s Angel of History:

Questions & Lies  

Questions & Lies is about the emotional toll of the politics of grievance and fear: immigration, climate change, transphobia, wealth hoardin...

Questions & Lies  

Questions & Lies is about the emotional toll of the politics of grievance and fear: immigration, climate change, transphobia, wealth hoardin...

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