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mount an effective legal defense. Here in the Twin Cities, ICE hopes to pay county or private jails for space to house 600 additional detainees—directly linking ICE to the tradition of for-profit incarceration in our country. The average length of an immigration legal matter takes over 600 days to be resolved in our local immigration court. Most detainees spend that time in federal custody because directives from ICE leadership eliminated the use of prosecutorial discretion. Our very own Hennepin County Sheriff Rich Stanek works hand-in-hand with ICE, turning over individuals who haven’t been found guilty of a crime but are swept into the deportation dragnet through minor interactions like a light rail ticket check, a broken tail light, or just being Black, Asian or Brown in law enforcement’s presence. Even though Minneapolis is a so-called Sanctuary City (meaning Minneapolis police officers do not ask anyone about their immigration status nor do they honor ICE’s requests to turn over people in their custody), our city ordinances on the subject are moot because we contract all jail services to Sheriff Stanek. Once our city police turn someone over to the sheriff, they are immediately asked about their country of origin, and are then put on the phone with ICE without explanation that it speaking with them isn’t required. Stanek is not required to do this, and in fact, most police and sheriff departments choose not to aid ICE so because it renders them liable for errors ICE makes, like mistaken identity, unjust detention, and more. Stanek gets around the legal liability by not directly turning individuals over to ICE, but

Questions & Lies  

Questions & Lies is about the emotional toll of the politics of grievance and fear: immigration, climate change, transphobia, wealth hoardin...

Questions & Lies  

Questions & Lies is about the emotional toll of the politics of grievance and fear: immigration, climate change, transphobia, wealth hoardin...

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